Science.gov

Sample records for air pressure-aided deposition

  1. Watershed Deposition Tool for air quality impacts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The WDT is a software tool for mapping deposition estimates from the CMAQ model to watersheds. It provides users with the linkage of air and water needed for the total maximum daily load (TMDL) and related nonpoint-source watershed analyses.

  2. Atmospheric transport and deposition of acidic air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Although general principles which govern atmospheric chemistry of sulfur are understood, a purely theoretical estimation of the magnitude of the processes is not likely to be useful. Furthermore, the data base necessary to make empirical estimates does not yet exist. The sulfur budget of the atmosphere appears to be dominated by man-associated sulfur. The important processes in deposition of man-associated sulfur are wet deposition of sulfate and dry deposition of SO/sub 2/. The relative importance of sulfate and SO/sub 2/ to sulfur deposition (input to watersheds) depends on the air concentrations, and either compound may be the greater contributor depending on conditions. (PSB)

  3. Dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, H.L.; Lee, W.J.; Su, C.C.; Chao, H.R.; Fan, Y.C.

    1996-12-01

    Dry deposition and air sampling were undertaken, simultaneously, in the ambient air of an urban site and a petrochemical-industry (PCI) plant by using several dry deposition plates and PS-1 samplers from January to May 1994 in southern Taiwan. The dry deposition plate with a smooth surface was always pointed into the wind. Twenty-one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MSD). The dry deposition flux of total-PAHs in urban and PCI sites averaged 166 and 211 {micro}g/m{sup 2}{center_dot}d, respectively. In general, the PAH dry deposition flux increased with increases in the PAH concentration in the ambient air. The PAH pattern of dry deposition flux in both urban and PCI sites were similar to the pattern measured by the filter of the PS-1 sampler and completely different from the PAH pattern in the gas phase. The higher molecular weight PAHs have higher dry deposition velocities. This is due to the fact that higher molecular weight PAHs primarily associated with the particle phase are deposited mostly by gravitational settling, while the gas phase PAHs were between 0.001 and 0.010 cm/s, only the lower molecular-weight PAHs--Nap and AcPy--had a significant fraction of dry deposition flux contributed by the gas phase. All the remaining higher molecular-weight PAHs had more than 94.5% of their dry deposition flux resulting from the particle phase. This is due to the fact that higher molecular weight PAHs have a greater fraction in the particle phase and the dry deposition velocities of particulates are much higher than those of the gas phase.

  4. Bioaerosol deposition on an air-conditioning cooling coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Ailu; Luhung, Irvan; Gall, Elliott T.; Cao, Qingliang; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-11-01

    This study is concerned with the role of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger in modifying microbial indoor air quality. Specifically, depositional losses of ambient bioaerosols and particles onto dry (not cooled) and wet (cool) coil surfaces were measured for different airspeeds passing through the test coil. Total, bacterial and fungal DNA concentrations in condensate water produced by a wet coil were also quantified by means of fluorescent dsDNA-binding dye and qPCR assays. Results revealed that the deposition of bioaerosols and total particles is substantial on coil surfaces, especially when wet and cool. The average deposition fraction was 0.14 for total DNA, 0.18 for bacterial DNA and 0.22 for fungal DNA on the dry coil, increasing to 0.51 for total DNA, 0.50 for bacterial DNA and 0.68 for fungal DNA on the wet coil. Overall, as expected, deposition fractions increased with increasing particle size and increasing airspeed. Deposited DNA was removed from the cooling coil surfaces through the flow of condensing water at a rate comparable to the rate of direct deposition from air. A downward trend of bacterial and fungal DNA measured in condensate water over time provides suggestive evidence of biological growth on heat exchangers during nonoperational times of a ventilation system. This investigation provides new information about bioaerosol deposition onto a conventional fin-and-tube cooling coil, a potentially important factor influencing indoor exposure to microbial aerosols in air-conditioned buildings.

  5. Aerosol deposition and losses in two alpha air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1985-11-27

    We assessed particle deposition and loss occurring in two alpha-air monitors: an Eberline Alpha-3 Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) and a working-area transuranic aerosol monitor (WOTAMS). We investigated the dependence of particle size on losses in the sampling inlets and the real-time alpha detector areas for both instruments. We determined the uniformity of particle deposition on the filter to ascertain the effectiveness of the detector and collection-filter configuration. Results indicate that particle losses are a strong function of particle size in the CAM unit, with a 44% loss occurring for 6-..mu..m-diameter aerosols and a 0.3% loss for 0.6-..mu..m-diameter aerosols. Losses in the WOTAMS were less than 1% for particle diameters in the 0.6-to-7 ..mu..m range.

  6. Fabrication of Au nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, Rumen G.; Dikovska, Anna Og.; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N.; Atanasov, Petar A.

    2016-01-01

    Results on fabrication of Au nanostructures by laser ablation in open air are presented. The ablation of the Au target is performed in air environment by nanosecond laser pulses delivered by Nd:YAG laser system operated at λ = 355 nm. Due to the high density of the ambient atmosphere, the intensive collisions of the plume spices result in formation of nanoparticles and aggregates by condensation close to the target. The produced nanoagregates are deposited on a quartz substrate where grow in a specific nanostructure. Diagnostics of the laser-generated plasma for the laser fluences used in this study is performed. Study based on change of ambient conditions shows that the increase of the air pressure from 10 Torr to atmospheric one leads to transition from thin film to porous structures. It is found that the surface morphology of the structures produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in open air strongly depends on the substrate-target distance. The electrical properties of the obtained structures are studied by measurement of their electrical resistance. It is found that the conductivity of the structures strongly depends on their morphology. The fabricated structures have potential for application in the field of electronics and sensors.

  7. Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John Timothy; Hollenbeck, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of

  8. PRECISION OF ATMOSPHERIC DRY DEPOSITION DATA FROM THE CLEAN AIR STATUS AND TRENDS NETWORK (CASTNET)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A collocated, dry deposition sampling program was begun in January 1987 by the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide ongoing estimates of the overall precision of dry deposition and supporting data entering the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) archives Duplic...

  9. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - I: Air pollution and deposition in a desert environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations and atmospheric dry deposition were monitored seasonally at the Salton Sea, southern California. Measurements of ozone (O 3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) were performed using passive samplers. Deposition rates of NO 3-, NH4+, Cl-, SO 42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ to creosote bush branches and nylon filters as surrogate surfaces were determined for one-week long exposure periods. Maximum O3 values were recorded in spring with 24-h average values of 108.8 ??g m-3. Concentrations of NO and NO2 were low and within ranges of the non-urban areas in California (0.4-5.6 and 3.3-16.2 ??g m-3 ranges, respectively). Concentrations of HNO3 (2.0-6.7 ??g m-3) and NH 3 (6.4-15.7 ??g m-3) were elevated and above the levels typical for remote locations in California. Deposition rates of Cl-, SO42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ were related to the influence of sea spray or to suspended soil particles, and no strong enrichments caused by ions originated by human activities were detected. Dry deposition rates of NO3- and NH4+ were similar to values registered in areas where symptoms of nitrogen saturation and changes in species composition have been described. Deposition of nitrogenous compounds might be contributing to eutrophication processes at the Salton Sea. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High Mercury Wet Deposition at a "Clean Air" Site in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Shanley, James B; Engle, Mark A; Scholl, Martha; Krabbenhoft, David P; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L; Conroy, Mary E

    2015-10-20

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m(-2) yr(-1) wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr(-1). The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L(-1), and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m(-3)). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this "clean air" site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  11. Report: EPA Relying on Existing Clean Air Act Regulations to Reduce Atmospheric Deposition to the Chesapeake Bay and its Watershed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2007-P-00009, February 28, 2007. EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office is relying on anticipated nitrogen deposition reductions from Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations already issued by EPA, combined with other non-air sources' anticipated reductions.

  12. Air-stable ink for scalable, high-throughput layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Benjamin D; Connor, Stephen T; Cui, Yi

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing and depositing air-stable, easily decomposable, vulcanized ink on any of a wide range of substrates is disclosed. The ink enables high-volume production of optoelectronic and/or electronic devices using scalable production methods, such as roll-to-roll transfer, fast rolling processes, and the like.

  13. 5 CFR 842.811 - Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10, 2004. 842.811 Section 842.811 Administrative... Regulations Pertaining to Noncodified Statutes § 842.811 Deposits for second-level supervisory air...

  14. 5 CFR 842.811 - Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10, 2004. 842.811 Section 842.811 Administrative... Regulations Pertaining to Noncodified Statutes § 842.811 Deposits for second-level supervisory air...

  15. 5 CFR 842.811 - Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10, 2004. 842.811 Section 842.811 Administrative... Regulations Pertaining to Noncodified Statutes § 842.811 Deposits for second-level supervisory air...

  16. 5 CFR 842.811 - Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10, 2004. 842.811 Section 842.811 Administrative... Regulations Pertaining to Noncodified Statutes § 842.811 Deposits for second-level supervisory air...

  17. 5 CFR 842.811 - Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposits for second-level supervisory air traffic controller service performed before February 10, 2004. 842.811 Section 842.811 Administrative... Regulations Pertaining to Noncodified Statutes § 842.811 Deposits for second-level supervisory air...

  18. Dry deposition and soil-air gas exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-12-01

    Ambient air and dry deposition, and soil samples were collected at the Aliaga industrial site in Izmir, Turkey. Atmospheric total (particle+gas) Sigma(41)-PCB concentrations were higher in summer (3370+/-1617 pg m(-3), average+SD) than in winter (1164+/-618 pg m(-3)), probably due to increased volatilization with temperature. Average particulate Sigma(41)-PCBs dry deposition fluxes were 349+/-183 and 469+/-328 ng m(-2) day(-1) in summer and winter, respectively. Overall average particulate deposition velocity was 5.5+/-3.5 cm s(-1). The spatial distribution of Sigma(41)-PCB soil concentrations (n=48) showed that the iron-steel plants, ship dismantling facilities, refinery and petrochemicals complex are the major sources in the area. Calculated air-soil exchange fluxes indicated that the contaminated soil is a secondary source to the atmosphere for lighter PCBs and as a sink for heavier ones. Comparable magnitude of gas exchange and dry particle deposition fluxes indicated that both mechanisms are equally important for PCB movement between air and soil in Aliaga.

  19. Air pollutant deposition at declining forest sites of the Tanzawa Mountains, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igawa, Manabu; Kojima, Kyosuke; Yoshimoto, Osamu; Nanzai, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Fir and beech trees have been dying in the Tanzawa Mountains, which are located southwest of the Kanto Plain. We have observed fog characteristics since 1988 in Mt. Oyama, which is isolated from others, located southeast of the Mountains. Acid fog has been frequently observed there. The annual mean pH of the fog has remained roughly constant, but the pH distribution of fog has shifted to higher pH recently, which corresponds closely with the improvement of air pollution at the base of Mt. Oyama. Acid fog is still formed, and it may have affected tree species such as fir and beech, which are sensitive to air pollution. We observed rainy periods and foggy periods using a visibility meter at the mountain top. The canopies at the high altitude are confirmed to be wetted for a long period, which might enhance the air pollutant deposition. We also observed air pollution and wet deposition at Mt. Nabewari, located southwest of the Tanzawa Mountains. The acid gas concentrations are about the same level in the two mountains and are in the order of SO2 > HNO3 > HCl. Comparison of wet deposition at the summit of Mt. Nabewari to that of Mt. Oyama also revealed that they were of similar levels. In the Tanzawa Mountains, fir trees and beech trees are declining by the damage of acid fog, although the high concentration ozone and the other factors may have also affected them.

  20. Contribution of ship emissions to the concentration and deposition of air pollutants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoyoglu, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-11-01

    Emissions from the marine transport sector are one of the least regulated anthropogenic emission sources and contribute significantly to air pollution. Although strict limits were introduced recently for the maximum sulfur content in marine fuels in the SECAs (sulfur emission control areas) and in the EU ports, sulfur emissions outside the SECAs and emissions of other components in all European maritime areas have continued to increase in the last two decades. We have used the air quality model CAMx with and without ship emissions for the year 2006 to determine the effects of international shipping on the annual as well as seasonal concentrations of ozone, primary and secondary components of PM2.5 and the dry and wet deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in Europe. Our results suggest that emissions from international shipping affect the air quality in northern and southern Europe differently and their contributions to the air concentrations vary seasonally. The largest changes in pollutant concentrations due to ship emissions were predicted for summer. Increased concentrations of the primary particle mass were found only along the shipping routes whereas concentrations of the secondary pollutants were affected over a larger area. Concentrations of particulate sulfate increased due to ship emissions in the Mediterranean (up to 60 %), in the English Channel and the North Sea (30-35 %) while increases in particulate nitrate levels were found especially in the north, around the Benelux area (20 %) where there were high NH3 land-based emissions. Our model results showed that not only the atmospheric concentrations of pollutants are affected by ship emissions, but also depositions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds increase significantly along the shipping routes. NOx emissions from the ships especially in the English Channel and the North Sea, cause a decrease in the dry deposition of reduced nitrogen at source regions by moving it from the gas-phase to the

  1. Low Selection Pressure Aids the Evolution of Cooperative Ribozyme Mutations in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Zhaleh N.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of functional RNA molecules is important for our molecular understanding of biology. Here we tested experimentally how two evolutionary parameters, selection pressure and recombination, influenced the evolution of an evolving RNA population. This was done using four parallel evolution experiments that employed low or gradually increasing selection pressure, and recombination events either at the end or dispersed throughout the evolution. As model system, a trans-splicing group I intron ribozyme was evolved in Escherichia coli cells over 12 rounds of selection and amplification, including mutagenesis and recombination. The low selection pressure resulted in higher efficiency of the evolved ribozyme populations, whereas differences in recombination did not have a strong effect. Five mutations were responsible for the highest efficiency. The first mutation swept quickly through all four evolving populations, whereas the remaining four mutations accumulated later and more efficiently under low selection pressure. To determine why low selection pressure aided this evolution, all evolutionary intermediates between the wild type and the 5-mutation variant were constructed, and their activities at three different selection pressures were determined. The resulting fitness profiles showed a high cooperativity among the four late mutations, which can explain why high selection pressure led to inefficient evolution. These results show experimentally how low selection pressure can benefit the evolution of cooperative mutations in functional RNAs. PMID:24089519

  2. Contribution of ship emissions to the concentration and deposition of air pollutants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-02-01

    Emissions from the marine transport sector are one of the least-regulated anthropogenic emission sources and contribute significantly to air pollution. Although strict limits were introduced recently for the maximum sulfur content in marine fuels in the SECAs (sulfur emission control areas) and in EU ports, sulfur emissions outside the SECAs and emissions of other components in all European maritime areas have continued to increase in the last two decades. We have used the air quality model CAMx (Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions) with and without ship emissions for the year 2006 to determine the effects of international shipping on the annual as well as seasonal concentrations of ozone, primary and secondary components of PM2.5, and the dry and wet deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in Europe. The largest changes in pollutant concentrations due to ship emissions were predicted for summer. Concentrations of particulate sulfate increased due to ship emissions in the Mediterranean (up to 60 %), the English Channel and the North Sea (30-35 %), while increases in particulate nitrate levels were found especially in the north, around the Benelux area (20 %), where there were high NH3 land-based emissions. Our model results showed that not only are the atmospheric concentrations of pollutants affected by ship emissions, but also depositions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds increase significantly along the shipping routes. NOx emissions from the ships, especially in the English Channel and the North Sea, cause a decrease in the dry deposition of reduced nitrogen at source regions by moving it from the gas phase to the particle phase which then contributes to an increase in the wet deposition at coastal areas with higher precipitation. In the western Mediterranean region, on the other hand, model results show an increase in the deposition of oxidized nitrogen (mostly HNO3) due to the ship traffic. Dry deposition of SO2 seems to be significant along

  3. Fractal titanium oxide under inverse 10-ns laser deposition in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Aifei; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Lin, Qijing; Cui, Jianlei; Wang, Kedian; Zhai, Zhaoyang

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the preparation of different kinds of titanium oxide fractal structures on the surface of titanium by inverse pulsed laser deposition (IPLD) in air and water. In air, two-dimensional fractal structures are obtained with a low pulse energy. However, their branches units are aggregated and nanoscale branches disappear due to the high substrate temperature, causing the low fractal dimension of structure. When a higher laser energy is applied, the preformed deposited material forms a porous film, which reduces heat transfer from substrate. Therefore, three-dimensional and one-dimensional fractal structures with nanoscale branches on the topside of the film can be obtained. Then the desired two-dimensional fractal structures with nano-branches are obtained in water due to the water-induced rapid cooling of substrate temperature and plasma shock wave-induced particle's expansion along the surface of substrate. Meanwhile, the asymmetry of fractal structure units analyzed by diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model is caused by the difference of the distance between the initial deposited particles. In addition, when the pulse energy goes up to 111 mJ, the branches of two-dimensional fractal structure units are also aggregated and form isolated particles. The idea about modification of substrate temperature and water can guide the preparation of the desired titanium oxide fractal structures in pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is also applicable to other materials.

  4. Robust deposition of lambda DNA on mica for imaging by AFM in air.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Nancy Anabel Gerling; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    Long DNA molecules remain difficult to image by atomic force microscopy (AFM) because of their tendency to entanglement and spontaneous formation of networks. We present a comparison of two different DNA deposition methods operating at room temperature and humidity conditions, aimed at reproducible imaging of isolated and relaxed λ DNA conformations by AFM in air. We first demonstrate that a standard deposition procedure, consisting in adsorption of DNA in the presence of divalent cations followed by washing and air-drying steps, yields a coexistence of different types of λ DNA networks with a only a few isolated DNA chains. In contrast, deposition using a spin-coating-based technique results in reproducible coverage of a significant fraction of the substrate area by isolated and relaxed λ DNA molecules, with the added benefit of a reduction in the effect of a residual layer that normally embeds DNA strands and leads to an apparent DNA height closer to the expected value. Furthermore, we show that deposition by spin-coating is also well-suited to visualize DNA-protein complexes. These results indicate that spin-coating is a simple, powerful alternative for reproducible sample preparation for AFM imaging.

  5. Nonuniform air flow in inlets: the effect on filter deposits in the fiber sampling cassette.

    PubMed

    Baron, P A; Chen, C C; Hemenway, D R; O'Shaughnessy, P

    1994-08-01

    Smoke stream studies were combined with a new technique for visualizing a filter deposit from samples used to monitor asbestos or other fibers. Results clearly show the effect of secondary flow vortices within the sampler under anisoaxial sampling conditions. The vortices observed at low wind velocities occur when the inlet axis is situated at angles between 45 degrees and 180 degrees to the motion of the surrounding air. It is demonstrated that the vortices can create a complex nonuniform pattern in the filter deposit, especially when combined with particle settling or electrostatic interactions between the particles and the sampler. Inertial effects also may play a role in the deposit nonuniformity, as well as causing deposition on the cowl surfaces. Changes in the sampler, such as its placement, may reduce these biases. The effects noted are not likely to occur in all sampling situations, but may explain some reports of high variability on asbestos fiber filter samples. The flow patterns observed in this study are applicable to straight, thin-walled inlets. Although only compact particles were used, the air flow patterns and forces involved will have similar effects on fibers of the same aerodynamic diameter.

  6. Estimates of the atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species: Clean Air Status and Trends Network 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Ralph E; Lavery, Thomas F; Rogers, Christopher M; Isil, Selma S

    2002-06-15

    The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) was established by the U.S. EPA in response to the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. To satisfy these requirements CASTNet was designed to assess and report on geographic patterns and long-term, temporal trends in ambient air pollution and acid deposition in order to gauge the effectiveness of current and future mandated emission reductions. This paper presents an analysis of the spatial patterns of deposition of sulfur and nitrogen pollutants for the period 1990-2000. Estimates of deposition are provided for two 4-yr periods: 1990-1993 and 1997-2000. These two periods were selected to contrast deposition before and after the large decrease in SO2 emissions that occurred in 1995. Estimates of dry deposition were obtained from measurements at CASTNet sites combined with deposition velocities that were modeled using the multilayer model, a 20-layer model that simulates the various atmospheric processes that contribute to dry deposition. Estimates of wet deposition were obtained from measurements at sites operated bythe National Atmospheric Deposition Program. The estimates of dry and wet deposition were combined to calculate total deposition of atmospheric sulfur (dry SO2, dry and wet SO4(2-)) and nitrogen (dry HNO3, dry and wet NO3-, dry and wet NH4+). An analysis of the deposition estimates showed a significant decline in sulfur deposition and no change in nitrogen deposition. The highest rates of sulfur deposition were observed in the Ohio River Valley and downwind states. This region also observed the largest decline in sulfur deposition. The highest rates of nitrogen deposition were observed in the Midwest from Illinois to southern New York State. Sulfur and nitrogen deposition fluxes were significantly higher in the eastern United States as compared to the western sites. Dry deposition contributed approximately 38% of total sulfur deposition and 30% of total nitrogen deposition in the eastern

  7. Paleo-channel deposits of natural uranium at a Former Air Force Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Weismann, PGJ.; Nelson, CHPK.

    2007-07-01

    The US Air Force has sought to understand the provenance of radionuclides that were detected in monitor wells surrounding a closed solid-waste landfill at the former Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado. Groundwater concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, and total uranium were thought to exceed regulatory standards. Down-gradient concentrations of these parameters exceeded up-gradient concentrations, suggesting that the landfill is leaching uranium to groundwater. Alternate hypotheses for the occurrence of the uranium included that either equipment containing refined uranium had been discarded or that uranium ore may have been disposed in the landfill, or that the uranium is naturally-occurring. Our study has concluded that the elevated radionuclide concentrations stem from naturally-occurring uranium in the regional watershed which has been preferentially deposited in paleo-channel sediments beneath the site. This study shows that a simple comparison of up-gradient versus down-gradient groundwater samples can be an inadequate method for determining whether heterogeneous geo-systems have been contaminated. It is important to understand the geologic depositional system, plus local geochemistry and how these factors impact contaminant transport. (authors)

  8. Development of open air silicon deposition technology by silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical transport under local ambient gas control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Teruki; Konno, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa

    2016-07-01

    Open air silicon deposition was performed by combining silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical transport and a newly developed local ambient gas control technology. The effect of air contamination on silicon deposition was investigated using a vacuum chamber, and the allowable air contamination level was confirmed to be 3 ppm. The capability of the local ambient gas control head was investigated numerically and experimentally. A safe and clean process environment with air contamination less than 1 ppm was achieved. Combining these technologies, a microcrystalline silicon film was deposited in open air, the properties of which were comparable to those of silicon films deposited in a vacuum chamber.

  9. Trends in mercury wet deposition and mercury air concentrations across the U.S. and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss-Penzias, Peter S.; Gay, David A.; Brigham, Mark E.; Parsons, Matthew T.; Gustin, Mae S.; ter Shure, Arnout

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the spatial and temporal trends of mercury (Hg) in wet deposition and air concentrations in the United States (U.S.) and Canada between 1997 and 2013. Data were obtained from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and Environment Canada monitoring networks, and other sources. Of the 19 sites with data records from 1997–2013, 53% had significant negative trends in Hg concentration in wet deposition, while no sites had significant positive trends, which is in general agreement with earlier studies that considered NADP data up until about 2010. However, for the time period 2007–2013 (71 sites), 17% and 13% of the sites had significant positive and negative trends, respectively, and for the time period 2008–2013 (81 sites) 30% and 6% of the sites had significant positive and negative trends, respectively. Non-significant positive tendencies were also widespread. Regional trend analyses revealed significant positive trends in Hg concentration in the Rocky Mountains, Plains, and Upper Midwest regions for the recent time periods in addition to significant positive trends in Hg deposition for the continent as a whole. Sulfate concentration trends in wet deposition were negative in all regions, suggesting a lower importance of local Hg sources. The trend in gaseous elemental Hg from short-term datasets merged as one continuous record was broadly consistent with trends in Hg concentration in wet deposition, with the early time period (1998–2007) producing a significantly negative trend (− 1.5 ± 0.2% year− 1) and the recent time period (2008–2013) displaying a flat slope (− 0.3 ± 0.1% year− 1, not significant). The observed shift to more positive or less negative trends in Hg wet deposition primarily seen in the Central-Western regions is consistent with the effects of rising Hg emissions from regions outside the U.S. and Canada and the influence of long-range transport in the free troposphere.

  10. Impact of subjacent rocks at the water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, V. A.

    2009-04-01

    At the depleted peat deposits (after peat extraction), where the residual layer of peat with the thickness of about 0,5 meters is laid at the well water permeable rocks, vegetation typical for dry conditions is developed in case of good drainage conditions; birch trees, willow, alder-trees and buckthorn prevail in this vegetation. Water and air regime is characterized here by good aeration with prevailing of oxidative processes. If water regime is regulated, these depleted peat areas are suitable for agricultural and forest lands; however, necessity of transformation of these depleted lands into forest and agricultural lands must be ecologically and economically justified. If the residual layer of peat with the thickness of 0,05-0,3 m is based at the sapropel or peat sapropel, contrast amphibiotic water and air regime with strong fluctuation of oxidative and restoration process depending on the weather conditions is formed; this regime is formed without artificial increase of the ground waters level. This does not allow bog vegetation or vegetation typical for dry conditions to develop. Thus, within 20 and more years after completion of peat extraction, such areas are not covered by vegetation in spite of favorable agro-chemical qualities of peat layer and favorable for vegetation chemical composition of soil and ground waters. Depleted peat deposits, that are based at the sapropel, are not suitable for agricultural use, because agricultural vegetation requires stable water and air regime with good aeration and oxidative and restoration potential within 400-750 mV. Contrast amphibiotic water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits that are based at sapropel excludes possibility to use them as agricultural lands. Because of this reason, areas with residual peat layer that are based at sapropel are not suitable for forest planting. Due to periodic increase of ground waters level, rot systems of the plants can not penetrate into the required depth, and mechanical

  11. Air annealing effects on the optical properties of ZnO SnO2 thin films deposited by a filtered vacuum arc deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO-SnO2 transparent and conducting thin films were deposited on microscope glass substrates by a filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD) system. The cathode was prepared with 50%:50% atomic concentration of Zn:Sn. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for 1 h. Structural and compositional analyses were obtained using XRD and XPS diagnostics. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-deposited and air-annealed thin ZnO-SnO2 films were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Zn to Sn in the film obtained using the 50%:50% cathode as determined by XPS analysis was ~2.7:1 in the bulk film. The optical properties were determined from normal incidence transmission measurements. Film transmission in the visible was 70% to 90%, affected by interference effects. Annealed films did not show higher transmission in the VIS compared to as-deposited films. Assuming that the interband electron transition is direct, the optical band gap was found to be in the range 3.34-3.61 eV for both as-deposited and annealed films. However, the average Eg for annealed films was 3.6 eV, larger by 0.2 eV than that of as-deposited. The refractive index n increased while the extinction index k decreased significantly with annealing.

  12. Air-Stable flexible organic light-emitting diodes enabled by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Yi-Neng; Tseng, Ming-Hung; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) are an energy-efficient light source with many desirable attributes, besides being an important display of technology, but its practical application has been limited by its low air-stability. This study demonstrates air-stable flexible OLEDs by utilizing two atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) films: (1) a ZnO film as both a stable electron-injection layer (EIL) and as a gas barrier in plastics-based OLED devices, and (2) an Al2O3/ZnO (AZO) nano-laminated film for encapsulating the devices. Through analyses of the morphology and electrical/gas-permeation properties of the films, we determined that a low ALD temperature of 70 °C resulted in optimal EIL performance from the ZnO film and excellent gas-barrier properties [water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) <5 × 10-4 g m-2 day-1] from both the ZnO EIL and the AZO encapsulating film. The low-temperature ALD processes eliminated thermal damage to the OLED devices, which were severe when a 90 °C encapsulation process was used, while enabling them to achieve an air-storage lifetime of >10 000 h.

  13. Modelling deposition and air concentration of reduced nitrogen in Poland and sensitivity to variability in annual meteorology.

    PubMed

    Kryza, Maciej; Dore, Anthony J; Błaś, Marek; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2011-04-01

    The relative contribution of reduced nitrogen to acid and eutrophic deposition in Europe has increased recently as a result of European policies which have been successful in reducing SO(2) and NO(x) emissions but have had smaller impacts on ammonia (NH(3)) emissions. In this paper the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used to calculate the spatial patterns of annual average ammonia and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) air concentrations and reduced nitrogen (NH(x)) dry and wet deposition with a 5 km × 5 km grid for years 2002-2005. The modelled air concentrations of NH(3) and dry deposition of NH(x) show similar spatial patterns for all years considered. The largest year to year changes were found for wet deposition, which vary considerably with precipitation amount. The FRAME modelled air concentrations and wet deposition are in reasonable agreement with available measurements (Pearson's correlation coefficients above 0.6 for years 2002-2005), and with spatial patterns of concentrations and deposition of NH(x) reported with the EMEP results, but show larger spatial gradients. The error statistics show that the FRAME model results are in better agreement with measurements if compared with EMEP estimates. The differences in deposition budgets calculated with FRAME and EMEP do not exceed 17% for wet and 6% for dry deposition, with FRAME estimates higher than for EMEP wet deposition for modelled period and lower or equal for dry deposition. The FRAME estimates of wet deposition budget are lower than the measurement-based values reported by the Chief Inspectorate of Environmental Protection of Poland, with the differences by approximately 3%. Up to 93% of dry and 53% of wet deposition of NH(x) in Poland originates from national sources. Over the western part of Poland and mountainous areas in the south, transboundary transport can contribute over 80% of total (dry + wet) NH(x) deposition. The spatial pattern of the relative contribution of

  14. Particle-phase dry deposition and air-soil gas-exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Izmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Banu; Odabasi, Mustafa

    2007-07-15

    The particle-phase dry deposition and soil-air gas-exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in Izmir, Turkey. Relative contributions of different deposition mechanisms (dry particle, dry gas, and wet deposition) were also determined. BDE-209 was the dominating congener in all types of samples (air, deposition, and soil). Average dry deposition fluxes of total PBDEs (sigma7PBDE) for suburban and urban sites were 67.6 and 128.8 ng m(-2) day(-1), respectively. Particulate dry deposition velocities ranged from 11.5 (BDE-28) to 3.9 cm s(-1) (BDE-209) for suburban sites and 7.8 (BDE-28) to 2.8 cm s(-1) (BDE-154) for urban sites with an overall average of 5.8 +/- 3.7 cm s(-1). The highest sigma7PBDE concentration (2.84 x 10(6) ng kg(-1) dry wt) was found around an electronic factory among the 13 soil samples collected from different sites. The concentration in a bag filter dust from a steel plant was also high (2.05 x 10(5) ng kg(-1)), indicating that these industries are significant PBDE sources. Calculated net soil-air gas exchange flux of sigma7PBDE ranged from 11.8 (urban) to 23.4 (industrial) ng m(-2) day(-1) in summer, while in winter it ranged from 3.2 (urban) to 11.6 (suburban) ng m(-2) day(-1). All congeners were deposited at all three sites in winter and summer. It was estimated that the wet deposition also contributes significantly to the total PBDE deposition to soil. Dry particle, wet, and gas deposition contribute 60, 32, and 8%, respectively, to annual PBDE flux to the suburban soil.

  15. One century of air deposition of hydrocarbons recorded in travertine in North Tibetan Plateau, China: Sources and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guo-Li; Wu, Ming-Zhe; Sun, Yong; Li, Jun; Li, Jing-Chao; Wang, Gen-Hou

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic distribution patterns of hydrocarbons have been used for fingerprinting to identify their sources. The historical air depositions of hydrocarbons recorded in natural media help to understand the evolution of the air environment. Travertine is a natural acceptor of air deposition that settles on the ground layer by layer. To reconstruct the historical air environment of hydrocarbons in the North Tibetan Plateau (NTP), a unique background region, twenty-seven travertine samples were collected systematically from a travertine column according to its precipitated year. For each sample, the precipitated year was dated while n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. Based on source identification, the air environment of hydrocarbons in the past century was studied for the region of NTP. Before World War II, the anthropogenic sources of hydrocarbons showed little influence on the air environment. During World War II and China's War of Liberation, hydrocarbons increased significantly, mainly from the use of fossil fuels. Between 1954 and 1963, hydrocarbons in the air decreased significantly because the sources of petroleum combustion decreased. From the mid-1960s through the end of the 1990s, air hydrocarbons, which mainly originated from biomass burning, increased gradually because agriculture and animal husbandry were developing steadily in Tibet and China. From the late 1990s, hydrocarbons in the atmosphere increased rapidly due to the rapid increase of tourism activities, which might increase hydrocarbon emissions from traffic. The reconstruction of the historical air hydrocarbons in NTP clearly reflects the evolution of the region and global development.

  16. Transport, deposition, and liftoff in laboratory density currents composed of hot particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of transport, deposition, and air entrainment in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is required for accurate predictions of future current behaviors and interpretations of ancient deposits, but directly observing the interiors of natural PDCs is effectively impossible. We model PDCs with scaled, hot, particle-laden density currents generated in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. Comparison of relevant scaling between our experiments and natural PDCs indicates that we are accurately capturing much of the dynamics of dilute PDCs: * Reynolds numbers of our experiments are lower than natural currents, 10^3 compared to 10^6, but still fully turbulent; * Densimetric and Thermal Richardson numbers are of O(1) in both natural and modeled currents; * Stokes and settling numbers for particles in the experiments fall within the expected range for natural PDCs. Conditions within the tank are monitored with temperature and humidity probes. Experiments are illuminated with sheet lighting, and recorded with high-definition video cameras. In general, currents have average velocities of 10-20 cm/s, initial thicknesses of 10-20 cm (although thickness greatly increases as currents entrain and expand air), and run out or lift off distances of 3-5 m. Large Kelvin-Helmholtz type eddies usually form along the top of the current immediately behind the head; these vortices are similar in size to the total current thickness. In currents that lift off, the distal current end typically retreats with time. Preliminary results suggest that lift off distance decreases with increasing thermal Richardson number. Analysis of turbulent structures indicates that the current heads are dominated by large coherent structures with length scales, L, comparable to the current thickness. Within 5-10 L of the current fronts, sequences of similar large eddies often occur. At greater distances behind the current fronts, turbulent structures become smaller and less

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Kuwano, Hiroki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  18. Paleo-channel deposition of natural uranium at a US Air Force landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Carl; Weismann, Joseph; Caputo, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The US Air Force sought to identify the source of radionuclides that were detected in groundwater surrounding a closed solid waste landfill at the former Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado, USA. Gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium levels in groundwater were thought to exceed US drinking water standards and down-gradient concentrations exceeded up-gradient concentrations. Our study has concluded that the elevated radionuclide concentrations are due to naturally-occurring uranium in the regional watershed and that the uranium is being released from paleo-channel sediments beneath the site. Groundwater samples were collected from monitor wells, surface water and sediments over four consecutive quarters. A list of 23 radionuclides was developed for analysis based on historical landfill records. Concentrations of major ions and metals and standard geochemical parameters were analyzed. The only radionuclide found to be above regulatory standards was uranium. A search of regional records shows that uranium is abundant in the upstream drainage basin. Analysis of uranium isotopic ratios shows that the uranium has not been processed for enrichment nor is it depleted uranium. There is however slight enrichment in the U-234:U- 238 activity ratio, which is consistent with uranium that has undergone aqueous transport. Comparison of up-gradient versus down-gradient uranium concentrations in groundwater confirms that higher uranium concentrations are found in the down-gradient wells. The US drinking water standard of 30 {mu}g/L for uranium was exceeded in some of the up-gradient wells and in most of the down-gradient wells. Several lines of evidence indicate that natural uranium occurring in streams has been preferentially deposited in paleo-channel sediments beneath the site, and that the paleo-channel deposits are causing the increased uranium concentrations in down-gradient groundwater compared to up

  19. Local emission of primary air pollutants and its contribution to wet deposition and concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masahide; Hiraki, Takatoshi; Tomoyose, Nobutaka; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Izumi; Murano, Kentaro; Mukai, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    We studied wet deposition by precipitation and the concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in relation to the primary air pollutants discharged from domestic areas. The concentrations of aerosols and gases were influenced by nearby emissions except for non-sea-salt SO, which is transported long distances. The area facing the Sea of Japan showed much larger wet deposition than other areas, although the domestic emissions of the primary air pollutants there were small and showed a peak in wet deposition from October to March, as distinct from April to September in other areas. We performed the correlation analyses between wet deposition of each component and the product of the concentrations of corresponding aerosols and gases in ambient air and the two-thirds power of the precipitation. From the results, following scavenging processes were suggested. • Sulfate and ammonium were scavenged in precipitation as particulate matter such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4. • Nitrate was scavenged mainly in precipitation through gaseous HNO3. • Ammonium was complementarily scavenged in precipitation through aerosols such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4 and through gaseous NH3.

  20. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  1. MODELING ASSESSMENT OF TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION PATTERNS OF MERCURY AIR EMISSIONS FROM THE U.S. AND CANADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In December 1997, the U.S. EPA submitted the Mercury Study Report to Congress which included a regional-scale modeling assessment of the transport and deposition of U.S. air emissions of mercury. This modeling was performed with a modified version of the Regional Lagrangian Mode...

  2. Reduced European emissions of S and N--effects on air concentrations, deposition and soil water chemistry in Swedish forests.

    PubMed

    Pihl Karlsson, Gunilla; Akselsson, Cecilia; Hellsten, Sofie; Karlsson, Per Erik

    2011-12-01

    Changes in sulphur and nitrogen pollution in Swedish forests have been assessed in relation to European emission reductions, based on measurements in the Swedish Throughfall Monitoring Network. Measurements were analysed over 20 years with a focus on the 12-year period 1996 to 2008. Air concentrations of SO(2) and NO(2), have decreased. The SO(4)-deposition has decreased in parallel with the European emission reductions. Soil water SO(4)-concentrations have decreased at most sites but the pH, ANC and inorganic Al-concentrations indicated acidification recovery only at some of the sites. No changes in the bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen could be demonstrated. Elevated NO(3)-concentrations in the soil water occurred at irregular occasions at some southern sites. Despite considerable air pollution emission reductions in Europe, acidification recovery in Swedish forests soils is slow. Nitrogen deposition to Swedish forests continues at elevated levels that may lead to leaching of nitrate to surface waters.

  3. Insights into Pleistocene palaeoenvironments and biostratigraphy in southern Buenos Aires province (Argentina) from continental deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilinson, E.; Gasparini, G. M.; Soibelzon, L. H.; Soibelzon, E.

    2015-07-01

    The coastal cliffs of the Buenos Aires province (Argentina) have been the subject of intense paleontological studies since the XIX century. Therefore, many of the type localities in which is based the late Cenozoic Pampean biostratigraphic/chronostratigraphic scheme are located in this area. In this context, the sedimentites that crop out near the mouth of the Chocorí Creek contain a set of palaeontological sites that, because of their richness and well-preserved fossil content, hold high national and international importance. The aims of the present contribution are: 1) to make a stratigraphic and sedimentological characterization of the study area; 2) to list the fauna outcropped at these palaeontological sites and establish a biostratigraphic framework; 3) to elaborate a palaeoenvironmental model for the area. The study interval was informally subdivided into a lower, middle and upper interval. Interpretation was based on the presence of a number of key features such as architectural elements; channel:overbank ratio and palaeosol occurrence. The first two intervals were interpreted as continental deposits of a fluvio-alluvial nature and are the focus of this paper. The upper interval was related to foreshore marine deposits and will be studied in a future contribution. The lower interval is characterized mainly by overbank architectural elements in which calcisols and argillic protosols were identified. Channel-fill deposits are isolated and surrounded by fine-grained overbank successions and sedimentary structures are suggestive of mixed-load transport. The contact between the lower and middle intervals is an irregular, highly erosive surface characterized by a significant vertical change in the facies. This surface defines the base of multistorey sandbodies which's internal arrangement alongside with the low participation of overbank deposits suggests deposition by a braided fluvial system. Palaeosols and vertebrate fossils were used as palaeoclimatic

  4. Air-water exchange and dry deposition of polybrominated diphenyl ethers at a coastal site in Izmir Bay, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Banu; Odabasi, Mustafa

    2007-02-01

    The air-water exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), an emerging class of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), was investigated using paired air-water samples (n = 15) collected in July and December, 2005 from Guzelyali Port in Izmir Bay, Turkey. Total dissolved-phase water concentrations of PBDEs (sigma7PBDEs) were 212 +/- 65 and 87 +/- 57 pg L(-1) (average +/- SD) in summer and winter, respectively. BDE-209 was the most abundant congener in all samples, followed by BDE-99 and -47. Average ambient gas-phase sigma7PBDE concentrations were between 189 +/- 61 (summer) and 76 +/- 65 pg m(-3) (winter). Net air-water exchange fluxes ranged from -0.9 +/- 1.0 (BDE-28) (volatilization) to 11.1 +/- 5.4 (BDE-209) ng m(-2) day(-1) (deposition). The BDE-28 fluxes were mainly volatilization while the other congeners were deposited. Gas- and dissolved-phase concentrations were significantly correlated (P = 0.33-0.55, p < 0.05, except for BDE-209, r = 0.05, p > 0.05) indicating thatthe atmosphere controls the surface water PBDE levels in this coastal environment. Estimated particulate dry deposition fluxes ranged between 2.7 +/- 1.9 (BDE-154) and 116 +/- 84 ng m(-2) day(-1) (BDE-209) indicating that dry deposition is also a significant input to surface waters in the study area.

  5. Ozone deposition to an oat crop ( Avena sativa L.) grown in open-top chambers and in the ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleijel, H.; Wallin, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Skarby, L.; Sellden, G.

    Fluxes and deposition velocities for ozone were determined for open-top chambers with and without an oat crop, and for the adjacent field, using a resistance analogue model and the aerodynamic wind-profile method, respectively. During a period when the canopy was green and the ambient wind speeds modest, the fluxes and deposition velocities were higher in the chamber with plants than in the field crop. The deposition to chamber walls and soil in the chamber only accounted for part of that difference. The deposition velocity for ozone to the crop was light-dependent both in the chamber with plants and in the ambient air. With increasing plant senescence, the deposition velocity declined and the light dependence disappeared. Fluctuations in deposition velocity superimposed on the overall declining trend followed the same temporal pattern in the chambers with and without plants. These fluctuations in deposition velocity may partly be explained by variations in surface wetness. Differences in boundary layer conductance between chamber and ambient, which under certain conditions may significantly influence the validity of the chamber as a test system, were observed.

  6. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  7. Predictions of U.K. regulated power station contributions to regional air pollution and deposition: a model comparison exercise.

    PubMed

    Chemel, Charles; Sokhi, Ranjeet S; Dore, Anthony J; Sutton, Paul; Vincent, Keith J; Griffiths, Stephen J; Hayman, Garry D; Wright, Raymond D; Baggaley, Matthew; Hallsworth, Stephen; Prain, H Douglas; Fisher, Bernard E A

    2011-11-01

    Contributions of the emissions from a U.K. regulated fossil-fuel power station to regional air pollution and deposition are estimated using four air quality modeling systems for the year 2003. The modeling systems vary in complexity and emphasis in the way they treat atmospheric and chemical processes, and include the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system in its versions 4.6 and 4.7, a nested modeling system that combines long- and short-range impacts (referred to as TRACK-ADMS [Trajectory Model with Atmospheric Chemical Kinetics-Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System]), and the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model. An evaluation of the baseline calculations against U.K. monitoring network data is performed. The CMAQ modeling system version 4.6 data set is selected as the reference data set for the model footprint comparison. The annual mean air concentration and total deposition footprints are summarized for each modeling system. The footprints of the power station emissions can account for a significant fraction of the local impacts for some species (e.g., more than 50% for SO2 air concentration and non-sea-salt sulfur deposition close to the source) for 2003. The spatial correlation and the coefficient of variation of the root mean square error (CVRMSE) are calculated between each model footprint and that calculated by the CMAQ modeling system version 4.6. The correlation coefficient quantifies model agreement in terms of spatial patterns, and the CVRMSE measures the magnitude of the difference between model footprints. Possible reasons for the differences between model results are discussed. Finally, implications and recommendations for the regulatory assessment of the impact of major industrial sources using regional air quality modeling systems are discussed in the light of results from this case study.

  8. Numerical investigation of regional particle deposition in the upper airway of a standing male mannequin in calm air surroundings.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Arash; Abouali, Omid; Ghalati, Pejman Farhadi; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2014-09-01

    A 3-D realistic computational model of the airway system integrated into a standing male mannequin was developed. The computational domain includes the regions around the mannequin and the inside of the airway passages. The simulation was performed for low activity breathing rates with calm air around the mannequin. The flowfield of the inhaled air was first obtained from solving the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. Then the particles were released in the domain around the mannequin and their trajectories were evaluated by using the Lagrangian approach for solving the particle equation of motion. The regional aerosols deposition was evaluated for different parts of the human airway system and the results were compared with those obtained from the separate modeling of the airway system without the interaction of the airflow with the mannequin external face. The results showed when the upper airway is integrated into the mannequin, the regional deposition of inhaled particles mainly changes in the airway system.

  9. Flow structures and particle deposition patterns in double-bifurcation airway models. Part 1. Air flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, J. K.; Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2001-05-01

    The understanding and quantitative assessment of air flow fields and local micron-particle wall concentrations in tracheobronchial airways are very important for estimating the health risks of inhaled particulate pollutants, developing algebraic transfer functions of global lung deposition models used in dose-response analyses, and/or determining proper drug-aerosol delivery to target sites in the lung. In this paper (Part 1) the theory, model geometries, and air flow results are provided. In a companion paper (Part 2, Comer et al. 2001), the history of particle deposition patterns and comparisons with measured data sets are reported. Decoupling of the naturally dilute particle suspension makes it feasible to present the results in two parts.

  10. Enhancement of the deposition of ultrafine secondary organic aerosols by the negative air ion and the effect of relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Pin

    2012-11-01

    Deposition is an important process for the removal of aerosol particles. Negative air ion (NAI) generators can charge the ultrafine airborne particles and enhance their deposition rate. However, many NAI generators may also emit ozone and increase the concentration of particles in the presence of biogenic volatile organic compounds owing to the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. To validate the effectiveness of NAI generator the authors investigated the enhancement effect of an NAI generator on the deposition of the ultrafine SOAs generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene in a test chamber under controlled ventilation rate and relative humidity (RH). The experimental results demonstrated that compared with other effects, including the gravity, particle eddy diffusion, and the Brownian diffusion, the effect of NAIs is the most dominate one on the deposition of SOA particles onto the wall surface in the near-wall region (<1 cm away from the wall). According to these experiments, the tested NAI generator could efficiently enhance the deposition rate by an enhancement factor ranging from 8.17 +/- 0.38 to 25.3 +/- 1.1, with a low ozone production rate. This NAI generator had better performance on the deposition of the SOAs with smaller particle sizes and it performed even better under higher RH. The enhancement effect of the NAI generator was related to its high NAI production and electric field strength.

  11. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen emitted in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires to coastal waters of de la Plata River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Rojas, Andrea L.; Venegas, Laura E.

    The Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (MABA) is the third mega-city in Latin America. Atmospheric N emitted in the area deposits to coastal waters of de la Plata River. This study describes the parameterizations included in DAUMOD-RD (v.3) model to evaluate concentrations of nitrogen compounds (nitrogen dioxide, gaseous nitric acid and nitrate aerosol) and their total (dry and wet) deposition to a water surface. This model is applied to area sources and CALPUFF model to point sources of NO x in the MABA. The models are run for 3 years of hourly meteorological data, with a spatial resolution of 1 km 2. Mean annual deposition is 69, 728 kg-N year -1 over 2 339 km 2 of river. Dry deposition contributions of N-NO 2, N-HNO 3 and N-NO 3- to this value are 44%, 22% and 20%, respectively. Wet deposition of N-HNO 3 and N-NO 3- represents 3% and 11% of total annual value, respectively. This very low contribution results from the rare occurrence of rainy hours with wind blowing from the city to the river. Monthly dry deposition flux estimated for coastal waters of MABA varies between 7 and 13 kg-N km -2 month -1. These results are comparable to values reported for other coastal zones in the world.

  12. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  13. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, and nickel) in the southern Tucson metropolitan area. A Tucson company that uses beryllium oxide to manufacture thermally conductive ceramics has prompted strong citizen concern. This study found that the study area has good air quality with respect to PM10 and metals, with ambient concentrations meeting US Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization standards. Beryllium was detected only once (during a dust storm) and was ascribed to naturally-occurring beryllium in the suspended soil. The third paper (to be submitted to the Journal of Great Lakes Research) studies nitrogen dry deposition over Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. Numerous studies have shown that wet and dry deposition of nitrogen has contributed to the eutrophication of coastal waters and declining productivity of marine fisheries. Nitrogen dry deposition over the Great Lakes themselves, as opposed to the shorelines, has not been documented in the peer-reviewed literature. This paper calculates nitrogen dry deposition over Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, using aircraft measurements from the LADCO Aircraft Study, and finds that over-water, nitrogen dry deposition is a significant source of nitrogen to Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.

  14. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  15. Deposition and adsorption of the air pollutant HNO 3 vapor to soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Pamela E.; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej

    Deposition of nitric acid (HNO 3) vapor to soils has been evaluated in three experimental settings: (1) continuously stirred tank reactors with the pollutant added to clean air, (2) open-top chambers at high ambient levels of pollution with and without filtration reducing particulate nitrate levels, (3) two field sites with high or low pollution loads in the coastal sage plant community of southern California. The results from experiment (1) indicated that the amount of extractable NO 3- from isolated sand, silt and clay fractions increased with atmospheric concentration and duration of exposure. After 32 days, the highest absorption of HNO 3 was determined for clay, followed by silt and sand. While the sand and silt fractions showed a tendency to saturate, the clay samples did not after 32 days of exposure under highly polluted conditions. Absorption of HNO 3 occurred mainly in the top 1 mm layer of the soil samples and the presence of water increased HNO 3 absorption by about 2-fold. Experiment (2) indicated that the presence of coarse particulate NO 3- could effectively block absorption sites of soils for HNO 3 vapor. Experiment (3) showed that soil samples collected from open sites had about 2.5 more extractable NO 3- as compared to samples collected from beneath shrub canopies. The difference in NO 3- occurred only in the upper 1-2 cm as no significant differences in NO 3- concentrations were found in the 2-5 cm soil layers. Extractable NO 3- from surface soils collected from a low-pollution site ranged between 1 and 8 μg NO 3-N g -1, compared to a maximum of 42 μg NO 3-N g -1 for soils collected from a highly polluted site. Highly significant relationship between HNO 3 vapor doses and its accumulation in the upper layers of soils indicates that carefully prepared soil samples (especially clay fraction) may be useful as passive samplers for evaluation of ambient concentrations of HNO 3 vapor.

  16. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  17. Sulfate in air and snow at the South Pole: Implications for transport and deposition at sites with low snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Susan; Warren, Stephen G.; Charlson, Robert J.

    2000-09-01

    Air and surface snow were sampled at Amundsen-Scott Station at the South Pole from July through December of 1992. Four-day averages of non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4=) aerosol show a strong seasonal trend, increasing by a factor of about 30 from winter to summer as oceanic biogenic sources become more active and atmospheric transport pathways change. Three-dimensional sampling of small-scale surface topography (sastrugi) provides evidence supporting wind pumping and filtration of aerosol by snow as a significant mechanism for dry deposition at this site. The estimated monthly flux of nss-SO4= to the snow surface also increases from winter to spring, but by only a factor of 2, suggesting that the efficiency of deposition for this aerosol-borne species from the near-surface air to the snow is greater in winter. The strong surface-based temperature inversion in winter inhibits vertical motion and may limit the rate of delivery of aerosol to the boundary layer from the free troposphere. Because the snow surface is a sink for aerosol, near-surface measurements of aerosol in the stable inversion layer may not be representative of the free troposphere. Air and snow data in summer (when the inversion is weak) are used to estimate a tropospheric residence time of 4-20 days for nss SO4=.

  18. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub

  19. Acid deposition in Maryland. Summary of research and monitoring results compiled through 1991 and a discussion of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Report for 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Mountain, D.

    1992-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report submitted under Maryland legislative requirements. The report focuses on more than a decade of acid deposition research conducted in Maryland. In addition, the report discusses Title IV - Acid Deposition Control of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and its potential impacts on Maryland.

  20. Impact of Air Pollution on Mineral Aerosol Deposition, Soluble Fe Flux and Ocean Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, H.

    2006-12-01

    We find that a two-step mechanism (sulfate and nitrate coating followed by hematite dissolution) is necessary to reproduce observations of mineral aerosol iron solubility that range from less than 1% over desert source regions to frequently more than 10% in the remote Pacific and Atlantic. This mechanism was implemented in a global atmospheric model of dust entrainment, transport, dissolution, and deposition that simulates a realistic distribution of mineral aerosol. Model simulations with pre-industrial and present levels of pollution are presented. Analysis shows that, while atmospheric pollution results in a slight decrease in mineral aerosol lifetime and lower dust concentrations over the remote oceans, it also appreciably increases the rate of hematite dissolution in the dust that remains airborne and results in a significant increase in the percent solubility of deposited iron. The net result of anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx is increased oceanic deposition of soluble iron, particularly to the Northern Hemisphere oceans. These new soluble iron deposition fields are then used as input to an ocean biogeochemistry model. We first compare results from two complex ocean biogeochemistry model simulations using: 1. Fe fluxes based on previous global model approaches of constant solubility; 2. Fe fluxes of variable iron solubility from this study. We then examine the implications of the pollution driven increases in iron deposition to ocean ecosystems and to iron cycling in the surface ocean, particularly in the Subarctic and Equatorial Pacific where primary productivity is known to be stressed by low iron availability.

  1. Trace element and isotope deposition across the air-sea interface: progress and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.; Landing, W. M.; Bucciarelli, E.; Cheize, M.; Fietz, S.; Hayes, C. T.; Kadko, D.; Morton, P. L.; Rogan, N.; Sarthou, G.; Shelley, R. U.; Shi, Z.; Shiller, A.; van Hulten, M. M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The importance of the atmospheric deposition of biologically essential trace elements, especially iron, is widely recognized, as are the difficulties of accurately quantifying the rates of trace element wet and dry deposition and their fractional solubility. This paper summarizes some of the recent progress in this field, particularly that driven by the GEOTRACES, and other, international research programmes. The utility and limitations of models used to estimate atmospheric deposition flux, for example, from the surface ocean distribution of tracers such as dissolved aluminium, are discussed and a relatively new technique for quantifying atmospheric deposition using the short-lived radionuclide beryllium-7 is highlighted. It is proposed that this field will advance more rapidly by using a multi-tracer approach, and that aerosol deposition models should be ground-truthed against observed aerosol concentration data. It is also important to improve our understanding of the mechanisms and rates that control the fractional solubility of these tracers. Aerosol provenance and chemistry (humidity, acidity and organic ligand characteristics) play important roles in governing tracer solubility. Many of these factors are likely to be influenced by changes in atmospheric composition in the future. Intercalibration exercises for aerosol chemistry and fractional solubility are an essential component of the GEOTRACES programme. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  2. Urea-stabilized air-stable Pt nanoparticles for thin film deposition.

    PubMed

    Latour, Virginie; Maisonnat, André; Coppel, Yannick; Collière, Vincent; Fau, Pierre; Chaudret, Bruno

    2010-04-21

    The reduction of [Pt(COD)(CH3)2] with CO in the presence of hexadecylamine (HDA) and oleic acid (OlAc) leads to amine carbonylation and formation of an air-stable colloidal solution of N,N'-bis(hexadecyl)urea-stabilized Pt(0) nanoparticles. These air-stable colloidal solutions can be used to form thin films of Pt nanoparticles on a silicon substrate.

  3. Structural and Electrical Characterization of SiO2 Gate Dielectrics Deposited from Solutions at Moderate Temperatures in Air.

    PubMed

    Esro, Mazran; Kolosov, Oleg; Jones, Peter J; Milne, William I; Adamopoulos, George

    2017-01-11

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is the most widely used dielectric for electronic applications. It is usually produced by thermal oxidation of silicon or by using a wide range of vacuum-based techniques. By default, the growth of SiO2 by thermal oxidation of silicon requires the use of Si substrates whereas the other deposition techniques either produce low quality or poor interface material and mostly require high deposition or annealing temperatures. Recent investigations therefore have focused on the development of alternative deposition paradigms based on solutions. Here, we report the deposition of SiO2 thin film dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis in air at moderate temperatures of ≈350 °C from pentane-2,4-dione solutions of SiCl4. SiO2 dielectrics were investigated by means of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, XRD, UFM/AFM, admittance spectroscopy, and field-effect measurements. Data analysis reveals smooth (RRMS < 1 nm) amorphous films with a dielectric constant of about 3.8, an optical band gap of ≈8.1 eV, leakage current densities in the order of ≈10(-7) A/cm(2) at 1 MV/cm, and high dielectric strength in excess of 5 MV/cm. XPS measurements confirm the SiO2 stoichiometry and FTIR spectra reveal features related to SiO2 only. Thin film transistors implementing spray-coated SiO2 gate dielectrics and C60 and pentacene semiconducting channels exhibit excellent transport characteristics, i.e., negligible hysteresis, low leakage currents, high on/off current modulation ratio on the order of 10(6), and high carrier mobility.

  4. Connecting nitrogen deposition and Final Ecosystem Goods and Services for air quality standards review

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a great deal of effort to document changes in ecosystem structure and function in response to increasing or decreasing N deposition, yet less work connects the specific effects on the value to people of these changes in the ecosystem. Although there are studies ta...

  5. High-resolution modelling of air pollution and deposition over the Netherlands with plume, grid and hybrid modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Swaluw, Eric; de Vries, Wilco; Sauter, Ferd; Aben, Jan; Velders, Guus; van Pul, Addo

    2017-04-01

    We present high-resolution model results of air pollution and deposition over the Netherlands with three models, the Eulerian grid model LOTOS-EUROS, the Gaussian plume model OPS and the hybrid model LEO. The latter combines results from LOTOS-EUROS and OPS using source apportionment techniques. The hybrid modelling combines the efficiency of calculating at high-resolution around sources with the plume model, and the accuracy of taking into account long-range transport and chemistry with a Eulerian grid model. We compare calculations from all three models with measurements for the period 2009-2011 for ammonia, NOx, secondary inorganic aerosols, particulate matter (PM10) and wet deposition of acidifying and eutrophying components (ammonium, nitrate and sulfate). It is found that concentrations of ammonia, NOx and the wet deposition components are best represented by the Gaussian plume model OPS. Secondary inorganic aerosols are best modelled with the LOTOS-EUROS model, and PM10 is best described with the LEO model. Subsequently for the year 2011, PM10 concentration and reduced nitrogen dry deposition maps are presented with respectively the OPS and LEO model. Using the LEO calculations for the production of the PM10 map, yields an overall better result than using the OPS calculations for this application. This is mainly due to the fact that the spatial distribution of the secondary inorganic aerosols is better described in the LEO model than in OPS, and because more (natural induced) PM10 sources are included in LEO, i.e. the contribution to PM10 of sea-salt and wind-blown dust as calculated by the LOTOS-EUROS model. Finally, dry deposition maps of reduced nitrogen over the Netherlands are compared as calculated by respectively the OPS and LEO model. The differences between both models are overall small (±100 mol/ha) with respect to the peak values observed in the maps (>2000 mol/ha). This is due to the fact that the contribution of dry deposition of reduced

  6. Brooktrout Lake case study: biotic recovery from acid deposition 20 years after the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, James W; Acker, Frank W; Bloomfield, Jay A; Boylen, Charles W; Charles, Donald F; Daniels, Robert A; Eichler, Lawrence W; Farrell, Jeremy L; Feranec, Robert S; Hare, Matthew P; Kanfoush, Sharon L; Preall, Richard J; Quinn, Scott O; Rowell, H Chandler; Schoch, William F; Shaw, William H; Siegfried, Clifford A; Sullivan, Timothy J; Winkler, David A; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2015-03-03

    The Adirondack Mountain region is an extensive geographic area (26,305 km(2)) in upstate New York where acid deposition has negatively affected water resources for decades and caused the extirpation of local fish populations. The water quality decline and loss of an established brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis [Mitchill]) population in Brooktrout Lake were reconstructed from historical information dating back to the late 1880s. Water quality and biotic recovery were documented in Brooktrout Lake in response to reductions of S deposition during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s and provided a unique scientific opportunity to re-introduce fish in 2005 and examine their critical role in the recovery of food webs affected by acid deposition. Using C and N isotope analysis of fish collagen and state hatchery feed as well as Bayesian assignment tests of microsatellite genotypes, we document in situ brook trout reproduction, which is the initial phase in the restoration of a preacidification food web structure in Brooktrout Lake. Combined with sulfur dioxide emissions reductions promulgated by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, our results suggest that other acid-affected Adirondack waters could benefit from careful fish re-introduction protocols to initiate the ecosystem reconstruction of important components of food web dimensionality and functionality.

  7. Spray deposition inside tree canopies from a newly developed variable-rate air assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries are not target-oriented, resulting in significant waste of pesticides and contamination of the environment. To address this problem, a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer implementing laser scanning technology was developed to apply...

  8. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  9. Dry deposition of acidic air pollutants to tree leaves, determined by a modified leaf-washing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mirai; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami K.; Yamamura, Shigeki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    Dry deposition fluxes ( FL) of NO 3- and SO 42- to leaf surfaces were measured for Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora), Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa), and Japanese white oak ( Quercus myrsinaefolia), together with atmospheric concentrations ( CL) of NO x (NO + NO 2), T-NO 3 (gaseous HNO 3 + particulate NO 3-) and SO x (gaseous SO 2 + particulate SO 42-) around the leaves in a suburban area of Japan, using a modified leaf-washing technique. FL of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased as follows: pine >> cedar > cypress ≥ oak and pine >> cedar > oak ≥ cypress, respectively. FL of NO 3- for all tree species fluctuated synchronously with CL of T-NO 3. FL of SO 42- fluctuated with CL of SO x, but the dominant pollutant deposited (SO 2 or SO 42-) appeared to differ for different tree species. Dry deposition conductance ( KL) of T-NO 3 and SO x was derived as an FL/ CL ratio. Seasonal variations of KL likely reflect the gas/particle ratios of T-NO 3 and SO x, which were affected by meteorological conditions such as temperature. Dry deposition velocities ( Vd) of T-NO 3 and SO x were obtained as the mathematical product of annual mean KL and the total leaf surface areas in the forests. The comparison of Vd among tree species indicated that the loads of acidic air pollutants were higher to coniferous forests than broad-leaved forest because of the higher KL and/or larger leaf surface areas.

  10. Integrated evaluation of aerogenic pollution by air-transported heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu) in the analysis of the main deposit media.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Baltrėnas, Pranas; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Serevičienė, Vaida; Zuokaitė, Eglė

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the ambient air is constantly changing; therefore, the monitoring of ambient air quality to detect the changes caused by aerogenic pollutants makes the essential part of general environmental monitoring. To achieve more effective improvement of the ambient air quality, the Directive 2008/50/EC on 'Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe' was adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council. It informed the public and enterprises about a negative effect of pollution on humans, animals and plants, as well as about the need for monitoring aerogenic pollutants not only at the continuous monitoring stations but also by using indicator methods, i.e. by analysing natural deposit media. The problem of determining the relationship between the accumulation level of pollutants by a deposit medium and the level of air pollution and its risks is constantly growing in importance. The paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the response of the main four deposit media, i.e. snow cover, soil, pine bark and epigeic mosses, to the long-term pollution by aerogenic pollutants which can be observed in the area of oil refinery influence. Based on the quantitative expressions of the amounts of the accumulated pollutants in the deposit media, the territory of the oil refinery investigated in this paper has been referred to the areas of mild or moderate pollution.

  11. Granulometric and magnetic properties of deposited particles in the Beijing subway and the implications for air quality management.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guipeng; Zhou, Liping; Dearing, John

    2016-10-15

    The subway system is an important traffic facility in Beijing and its internal air quality is an environmental issue that could potentially affect millions of people every day. Due to the intrinsic nature of rail abrasion in subway tunnels, iron-containing particles can be generated and become suspended in the subway environment. While some studies (e.g. Li et al., 2006) have monitored the in-train levels of PM2.5 (particles<2.5μm), there is a lack of systematic assessment of the concentration and characteristics of iron-containing particles in the Beijing subway system. Here we report results of a study on the granulometric and magnetic properties of deposited particle samples collected at different localities of the Beijing subway system. Our results show that the subway samples are characterized by the presence of fine particles. Volume proportions of 6.1±1.3% for particles<2.5μm and 27.5±6.1% for particles<10μm are found in the bulk subway samples. These samples exhibit a strong magnetic signal, which is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that in naturally deposited particles collected in Beijing. Fine grained ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic minerals (e.g. iron and magnetite, respectively) are identified from mineral magnetic measurements and scanning electric microscopy. The samples collected from the Beijing stations with platform screen doors are found to be magnetically stronger and finer than those without them, suggesting that platform screen doors have failed to block the fine iron-containing particles released from the rail tunnel. Given the potential health consequences of fine suspended iron-containing particles, our results have important implications for air quality management in the Beijing subway system.

  12. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, C.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Muehlfeld, C.; Schmid, O.; Ferron, G.A.; Maier, K.L.; Gehr, P.; Lenz, A.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm{sup 2} and 561 ng Au/cm{sup 2} deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  13. Eddy covariance flux of sulfur dioxide to the sea surface: Air-side resistance to deposition of a highly soluble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Deposition to the sea surface represents a major atmospheric removal mechanism for sulfur dioxide and many other highly soluble products of tropospheric photochemistry. Such gases include nitric acid, ammonia, organic acids, sulfur dioxide, and highly soluble organic compounds such as methanol and acetone. The deposition of highly soluble gases is controlled by turbulent and diffusive transport on the air side of the air/sea interface. In this study, air/sea fluxes of the soluble gas sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), sensible and latent heat, and momentum were measured using eddy covariance. This was a pilot study carried out in April 2014 on Scripps pier in La Jolla, California, that was designed to assess the potential for measuring SO2 fluxes over the ocean. SO2 was detected using chemical ion mass spectrometry in negative ion mode with a sensitivity of roughly 100 Hz/ppt. The ionization scheme involved addition of ozone to a dried air stream and subsequent conversion of SO2 to the SO5 - ion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of seagoing SO2 flux measurements. Such measurements can be used to constrain the depositional velocities of soluble gases and test models for air-side resistance to air/sea gas transfer.

  14. Lessons from Popocatepetl Volcano (Mexico): Ancient Settlement Buried by Lavas, Mudflows, and Air-Fall Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, H.; Panfil, M.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Coyoacan, C. U.; Urangaela, G.; Plunket, P.; Gardner, T.; Abrams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is 5452 m in altitude and capped by glaciers with a long Late Pleistocene-Holocene history. Volcanic activity has been intense during the last 10 000 years. Therefore, the valleys at the NE foothills of the volcano, covered by air-fall ejecta and drained by the runoff of the glaciers, became very attractive to ancient inhabitants of the Xalizintla Valley (XV) west of Puebla City, because of fertility of soils. The XV was occupied by humans about 2000 years ago who witnessed five events related to volcanic activity related to Popo. These events, described in this paper, are being taken into account for volcanic risk evaluation since several towns with a population of more than 23 000 people reoccupied again the Xalizintla Valley.

  15. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  16. Changing trends in sulfur emissions in Asia: implications for acid deposition, air pollution, and climate.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Gregory R; Streets, David G; Calori, Giuseppe; Amann, Markus; Jacobson, Mark Z; Hansen, James; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2002-11-15

    In the early 1990s, it was projected that annual SO2 emissions in Asia might grow to 80-110 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. Based on new high-resolution estimates from 1975 to 2000, we calculate that SO2 emissions in Asia might grow only to 40-45 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. The main reason for this lower estimate is a decline of SO2 emissions from 1995 to 2000 in China, which emits about two-thirds of Asian SO2. The decline was due to a reduction in industrial coal use, a slowdown of the Chinese economy, and the closure of small and inefficient plants, among other reasons. One effect of the reduction in SO2 emissions in China has been a reduction in acid deposition not only in China but also in Japan. Reductions should also improve visibility and reduce health problems. SO2 emission reductions may increase global warming, but this warming effect could be partially offset by reductions in the emissions of black carbon. How SO2 emissions in the region change in the coming decades will depend on many competing factors (economic growth, pollution control laws, etc.). However a continuation of current trends would result in sulfur emissions lower than any IPCC forecasts.

  17. A Multi-Resolution Assessment of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model v4.7 Wet Deposition Estimates for 2002 - 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines the operational performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations for 2002 - 2006 using both 36-km and 12-km horizontal grid spacing, with a primary focus on the performance of the CMAQ model in predicting wet deposition of sulfate (...

  18. Trends in visibility, PM{sub 2.5}, and deposition expected from the Acid Rain Provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, J.D.; Hanson, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) are designed to reduce the deposition of SO{sub 2} and sulfate and, to a lesser extent, the deposition of NO{sub x} and nitrate through reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. However, other important benefits are anticipated from the emission control strategies, including improvement of regional visibility and reductions in concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5). In this study, the authors coupled utility emissions forecasts with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model and the Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) to calculate and compare the relative improvements by 2010 in visual impairment, PM2.5 concentrations, and sulfate wet deposition at selected sites in the eastern United States.

  19. Changes in future air quality, deposition, and aerosol-cloud interactions under future climate and emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotfelty, Timothy; Zhang, Yang; Karamchandani, Prakash; Streets, David G.

    2016-08-01

    The prospect of global climate change will have wide scale impacts, such as ecological stress and human health hazards. One aspect of concern is future changes in air quality that will result from changes in both meteorological forcing and air pollutant emissions. In this study, the GU-WRF/Chem model is employed to simulate the impact of changing climate and emissions following the IPCC AR4 SRES A1B scenario. An average of 4 future years (2020, 2030, 2040, and 2050) is compared against an average of 2 current years (2001 and 2010). Under this scenario, by the Mid-21st century global air quality is projected to degrade with a global average increase of 2.5 ppb in the maximum 8-hr O3 level and of 0.3 μg m-3 in 24-hr average PM2.5. However, PM2.5 changes are more regional due to regional variations in primary aerosol emissions and emissions of gaseous precursor for secondary PM2.5. Increasing NOx emissions in this scenario combines with a wetter climate elevating levels of OH, HO2, H2O2, and the nitrate radical and increasing the atmosphere's near surface oxidation state. This differs from findings under the RCP scenarios that experience declines in OH from reduced NOx emissions, stratospheric recovery of O3, and increases in CH4 and VOCs. Increasing NOx and O3 levels enhances the nitrogen and O3 deposition, indicating potentially enhanced crop damage and ecosystem stress under this scenario. The enhanced global aerosol level results in enhancements in aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud optical thickness. This leads to dimming at the Earth's surface with a global average reduction in shortwave radiation of 1.2 W m-2. This enhanced dimming leads to a more moderate warming trend and different trends in radiation than those found in NCAR's CCSM simulation, which does not include the advanced chemistry and aerosol treatment of GU-WRF/Chem and cannot simulate the impacts of changing climate and emissions with the same level of detailed

  20. Changes in future air quality, deposition, and aerosol-cloud interactions under future climate and emission scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelty, Timothy; Zhang, Yang; Karamchandani, Prakash; Streets, David G.

    2016-08-01

    The prospect of global climate change will have wide scale impacts, such as ecological stress and human health hazards. One aspect of concern is future changes in air quality that will result from changes in both meteorological forcing and air pollutant emissions. In this study, the GU-WRF/Chem model is employed to simulate the impact of changing climate and emissions following the IPCC AR4 SRES A1B scenario. An average of 4 future years (2020, 2030, 2040, and 2050) is compared against an average of 2 current years (2001 and 2010). Under this scenario, by the Mid-21st century global air quality is projected to degrade with a global average increase of 2.5 ppb in the maximum 8-hr O3 level and of 0.3 mg m3 in 24-hr average PM2.5. However, PM2.5 changes are more regional due to regional variations in primary aerosol emissions and emissions of gaseous precursor for secondary PM2.5. Increasing NOx emissions in this scenario combines with a wetter climate elevating levels of OH, HO2, H2O2, and the nitrate radical and increasing the atmosphere’s near surface oxidation state. This differs from findings under the RCP scenarios that experience declines in OH from reduced NOx emissions, stratospheric recovery of O3, and increases in CH4 and VOCs. Increasing NOx and O3 levels enhances the nitrogen and O3 deposition, indicating potentially enhanced crop damage and ecosystem stress under this scenario. The enhanced global aerosol level results in enhancements in aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud optical thickness. This leads to dimming at the Earth’s surface with a global average reduction in shortwave radiation of 1.2 W m2 . This enhanced dimming leads to a more moderate warming trend and different trends in radiation than those found in NCAR’s CCSM simulation, which does not include the advanced chemistry and aerosol

  1. Growth of CdS thin films on indium coated glass substrates via chemical bath deposition and subsequent air annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Biswajit; Kumar, Kamlesh; Singh, Balwant Kr; Banerjee, Pushan; Das, Subrata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work attempts were made to synthesize indium doped CdS films by fabricating In/CdS bilayers using CBD-CdS on vacuum evaporated In thin films and subsequent air annealing. 135 nm CdS films were grown onto 20 nm and 35 nm indium coated glass substrate employing chemical bath deposition technique. The In/CdS bilayers thus formed were subjected to heat treatment at the temperatures between 200 and 400 °C for 4 min in the muffle furnace to facilitate indium to diffuse into the CdS films. XRD pattern ascertained no noticeable shift in lattice constant implying grain boundary metal segregation, while secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the diffusion profile of indium into CdS matrices. Mass spectrometry results showed that substantial diffusion of indium had been taken place within CdS at 400 °C. Dark and photocurrent with different illumination time were measured to ascertain the photosensitivity of pure and composite CdS films.

  2. An accurate derivation of the air dose-rate and the deposition concentration distribution by aerial monitoring in a low level contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Sugita, Takeshi; Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) have been conducting aerial monitoring to investigate the distribution of radioactive cesium dispersed into the atmosphere after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), Tokyo Electric Power Company. Distribution maps of the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition concentration on the ground are prepared using spectrum obtained by aerial monitoring. The radioactive cesium deposition is derived from its dose rate, which is calculated by excluding the dose rate of the background radiation due to natural radionuclides from the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground. The first step of the current method of calculating the dose rate due to natural radionuclides is calculate the ratio of the total count rate of areas where no radioactive cesium is detected and the count rate of regions with energy levels of 1,400 keV or higher (BG-Index). Next, calculate the air dose rate of radioactive cesium by multiplying the BG-Index and the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher for the area where the radioactive cesium is distributed. In high dose-rate areas, however, the count rate of the 1,365-keV peak of Cs-134, though small, is included in the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher, which could cause an overestimation of the air dose rate of natural radionuclides. We developed a method for accurately evaluating the distribution maps of natural air dose-rate by excluding the effect of radioactive cesium, even in contaminated areas, and obtained the accurate air dose-rate map attributed the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground. Furthermore, the natural dose-rate distribution throughout Japan has been obtained by this method.

  3. Characterization of nanosecond, femtosecond and dual pulse laser energy deposition in air for flow control and diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, Christopher M.

    The non-resonant heating of gases by laser irradiation and plasma formation has been under investigation since the development of 100 megawatt peak power, Q-switched, nanosecond pulse duration lasers and the commensurate discovery of laser air sparks. More recently, advances in mode-locking and chirped pulse amplification have led to commercially available 100 gigawatt peak power, femtosecond pulse duration lasers with a rapidly increasing number of applications including remote sensing, laser spectroscopy, aerodynamic flow control, and molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry diagnostics. This work investigates local energy deposition and gas heating produced by focused, non-resonant, nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in the context of flow control and laser diagnostic applications. Three types of pulse configurations were examined: single nanosecond pulses, single femtosecond pulses and a dual pulse approach whereby a femtosecond pre-ionizing pulse is followed by a nanosecond pulse. For each pulse configuration, optical and laser diagnostic techniques were applied in order to qualitatively and quantitatively measure the plasmadynamic and hydrodynamic processes accompanying laser energy deposition. Time resolved imaging of optical emission from the plasma and excited species was used to qualitatively examine the morphology and decay of the excited gas. Additionally, Thomson scattering and Rayleigh scattering diagnostics were applied towards measurements of electron temperature, electron density, gas temperature and gas density. Gas heating by nanosecond and dual pulse laser plasmas was found to be considerably more intense than femtosecond plasmas, irrespective of pressure, while the dual pulse approach provided substantially more controllability than nanosecond pulses alone. In comparison, measurements of femtosecond laser heating showed a strong and nonlinearly dependence on focusing strength. With comparable pulse energy, measurements of maximum

  4. Evaluation of fluorine release from air deposited coal spoil piles: A case study at Yangquan city, northern China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xubo; Hu, Yandi; Li, Chengcheng; Dai, Chong; Li, Liang; Ou, Xiong; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-03-01

    The fluorine content of coal has been well documented, while such data of coal spoil are limited. In the present paper, fluorine in coal spoils and its releasing behavior were studied via leaching and combustion tests, as well as field investigation. Fluoride pollution in groundwater and soil occurred in the air depositing areas of coal spoils. The average content of fluorine in coal spoils was 525 mg/kg with the highest value of 1885 mg/kg. The only XRD detectable inorganic fluorine phase was fluorphlogopite. The absence of major fluorine bearing minerals in coal spoils suggested that bulk fluorine, rather than trace phases, resided in the mineral matrix. The major extracted species were water soluble fluorine and exchangeable fluorine in the coal spoils. Batch leaching tests illustrated that the leachable fluoride in coal spoils was widely distributed, ranging from 2.0 to 108.4 mg/kg. Column leaching tests showed a clear pH-dependent leaching behavior of fluorine: lower pH situation led to fluorine release from the mineral matrix; the loosely bound or easily exchangeable fluorine was also flushed out of the column. The higher ion strength or alkaline bicarbonate/carbonate rich leaching solution tended to free more fluorine into the acidic aqueous solution. The leachable fluorine in coal spoils was estimated as ca. 6%, based on the results of leaching tests. Also, our research found that over 90% of fluorine in coal spoils could be released into the atmosphere as a result of spontaneous combustion, accounting for over 40% of the total atmospheric fluorine emissions in northern China. Our investigation suggests that it is urgent to conduct comprehensive studies to assist the management and control of fluorine pollution at coal spoil banks.

  5. Using soil records with atmospheric dispersion modeling to investigate the effects of clean air regulations on 60 years of manganese deposition in Marietta, Ohio (USA).

    PubMed

    Carter, Megan R; Gaudet, Brian J; Stauffer, David R; White, Timothy S; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-15

    Atmospheric emissions of metals from anthropogenic activities have led to deposition and contamination of soils worldwide. We quantified addition of manganese (Mn) to soils around the largest emitter of Mn in the United States (U.S.) using chemical analyses and atmospheric dispersion modeling (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF)). Concentrations of soil-surface Mn were enriched by 9-fold relative to that of the parent material within 1 km of the facility. Elevated concentrations of Mn and chromium (Cr), another potentially toxic element that was emitted, document contamination only within 1 m of the soil surface. Total mass of Mn added per unit land area integrated over 1 m, mMn, equals ~80 mg Mn cm(-2) near the facility. Values of mMn remained above background up to tens of kilometers from the source. Air concentrations of Mn particles of 7.5-micron diameter simulated with SCIPUFF using available data for the emission rate and local meteorological conditions for 2006 were consistent with measured air concentrations. However, the Mn deposition calculated for 2006 with SCIPUFF yielded a cumulative value over the lifetime of the refinery (60 years) that is a factor of 15 lower than the Mn observed to have been added to the soils. This discrepancy can be easily explained if Mn deposition rates before 1988 were more than an order of magnitude greater than today. Such higher emissions are probable, given the changes in metal production with time and the installation of emission controls after the Clean Air Act (1970). This work shows that atmospheric dispersion models can be used with soil profiles to understand the changes in metal emissions over decadal timescales. In addition, the calculations are consistent with the Clean Air Act accounting for a 15-fold decrease in the Mn deposition to soils around the refinery per metric ton of Mn alloy produced.

  6. Reconstructing the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident 30 years after. A unique database of air concentration and deposition measurements over Europe.

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Hamburger, Thomas; Talerko, Nikolai; Zibtsev, Sergey; Bondar, Yuri; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2016-09-01

    30 years after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident, its radioactive releases still remain of great interest mainly due to the long half-lives of many radionuclides emitted. Observations from the terrestrial environment, which hosts radionuclides for many years after initial deposition, are important for health and environmental assessments. Furthermore, such measurements are the basis for validation of atmospheric transport models and can be used for constraining the still not accurately known source terms. However, although the "Atlas of cesium deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl accident" (hereafter referred to as "Atlas") has been published since 1998, less than 1% of the direct observations of (137)Cs deposition has been made publicly available. The remaining ones are neither accessible nor traceable to specific data providers and a large fraction of these data might have been lost entirely. The present paper is an effort to rescue some of the data collected over the years following the CNPP accident and make them publicly available. The database includes surface air activity concentrations and deposition observations for (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs measured and provided by Former Soviet Union authorities the years that followed the accident. Using the same interpolation tool as the official authorities, we have reconstructed a deposition map of (137)Cs based on about 3% of the data used to create the Atlas map. The reconstructed deposition map is very similar to the official one, but it has the advantage that it is based exclusively on documented data sources, which are all made available within this publication. In contrast to the official map, our deposition map is therefore reproducible and all underlying data can be used also for other purposes. The efficacy of the database was proved using simulated activity concentrations and deposition of (137)Cs from a Langrangian and a Euleurian transport model.

  7. On Dry Deposition Modelling of Atmospheric Pollutants on Vegetation at the Microscale: Application to the Impact of Street Vegetation on Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Jose-Luis; Martilli, Alberto; Martin, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model is used to investigate the impact of urban canopy vegetation on air quality, with particular emphasis on the comparison between the positive effect induced by deposition versus the negative effect due to a reduction of ventilation. With this aim, a series of simulations over a simplified urban geometry with different vegetation designs are carried out. The problem is tackled at two scales. From the mesoscale point of view, the relevant variable is the total deposition flux of pollutant as a function of the pollutant concentration above the canopy (e.g. the "mesoscale" deposition velocity). This is assessed within the Monin-Obukov similarity theory framework, and a modification of the classical formulation is proposed based on the numerical results. At the microscale, the distribution of concentration within the urban canopy is investigated for the different configurations. The main conclusion is that the height of the vegetation and the magnitude of the microscale deposition velocity are key parameters that determine which of the two effects (deposition or reduction of ventilation) prevails.

  8. Fabrication of a multi-walled carbon nanotube-deposited glass fiber air filter for the enhancement of nano and submicron aerosol particle filtration and additional antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Na, Hyungjoo; Kim, Yang Seon; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Jongbaeg; Yoon, Young Hun

    2011-09-01

    We grew multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a glass fiber air filter using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) after the filter was catalytically activated with a spark discharge. After the CNT deposition, filtration and antibacterial tests were performed with the filters. Potassium chloride (KCl) particles (<1 μm) were used as the test aerosol particles, and their number concentration was measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Antibacterial tests were performed using the colony counting method, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used as the test bacteria. The results showed that the CNT deposition increased the filtration efficiency of nano and submicron-sized particles, but did not increase the pressure drop across the filter. When a pristine glass fiber filter that had no CNTs was used, the particle filtration efficiencies at particle sizes under 30 nm and near 500 nm were 48.5% and 46.8%, respectively. However, the efficiencies increased to 64.3% and 60.2%, respectively, when the CNT-deposited filter was used. The reduction in the number of viable cells was determined by counting the colony forming units (CFU) of each test filter after contact with the cells. The pristine glass fiber filter was used as a control, and 83.7% of the E. coli were inactivated on the CNT-deposited filter.

  9. On Dry Deposition Modelling of Atmospheric Pollutants on Vegetation at the Microscale: Application to the Impact of Street Vegetation on Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Jose-Luis; Martilli, Alberto; Martin, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model is used to investigate the impact of urban canopy vegetation on air quality, with particular emphasis on the comparison between the positive effect induced by deposition versus the negative effect due to a reduction of ventilation. With this aim, a series of simulations over a simplified urban geometry with different vegetation designs are carried out. The problem is tackled at two scales. From the mesoscale point of view, the relevant variable is the total deposition flux of pollutant as a function of the pollutant concentration above the canopy (e.g. the "mesoscale" deposition velocity). This is assessed within the Monin-Obukov similarity theory framework, and a modification of the classical formulation is proposed based on the numerical results. At the microscale, the distribution of concentration within the urban canopy is investigated for the different configurations. The main conclusion is that the height of the vegetation and the magnitude of the microscale deposition velocity are key parameters that determine which of the two effects (deposition or reduction of ventilation) prevails.

  10. Air pollution and changes in forest nitrogen status: Fog and rain deposition and nitrogen losses from forested watersheds in the San Bernardino Mountains. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to examine the effects of N deposition on mixed conifer forests in southern California. Studies were conducted at selected sites an air pollution gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The main tasks were: (1) to measure N deposition to the forest in fog and throughfall, (2) to determine spatial and temporal patterns of nitrate export in stream water, and (3) to quantify trace gas fluxes from soil at sites with high and low N deposition. Fog was found to be an important N source at the western end of the SMB due to his high frequency and presence at elevated concentrations. N deposition from throughfall was found to be similar to levels in forests where adverse effects have occurred. Annual fluxes of N from soil were 18-times higher at the western end of the SBM than at the eastern end. The data provide evidence of forest nitrogen saturation caused by the deposition of anthropogenic pollutants over a multi-decade period in the SBM.

  11. Landscapes, depositional environments and human occupation at Middle Paleolithic open-air sites in the southern Levant, with new insights from Nesher Ramla, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidner, Yossi; Frumkin, Amos; Friesem, David; Tsatskin, Alexander; Shahack-Gross, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Middle Paleolithic human occupation in the Levant (250-50 ka ago) has been recorded in roofed (cave and rockshelter) and open-air sites. Research at these different types of sites yielded different perspectives on the Middle Paleolithic human behavior and evolution. Until recently, open-air Middle Paleolithic sites in the Levant were found in three major sedimentary environments: fluvial, lake-margin and spring. Here we describe a unique depositional environment and formation processes at the recently discovered open-air site of Nesher Ramla (Israel) and discuss their contribution to understanding site formation processes in open-air sites in the Levant. The site is 8-m-thick Middle Paleolithic sequence (OSL dated to 170-80 ka) that is located in a karst sinkhole formed by gravitational deformation and sagging into underground voids. The sedimentary sequence was shaped by gravitational collapse, cyclic colluviation of soil and gravel into the depression, waterlogging, in situ pedogenesis and human occupation. Original bedding and combustion features are well-preserved in the Lower archaeological sequence, a rare occurrence in comparison to other open-air archaeological sites. This phenomenon coincides with episodes of fast sedimentation/burial, which also allowed better preservation of microscopic remains such as ash. The Upper archaeological sequence does not exhibit bedding or preservation of ash, despite presence of heat-affected lithic artifacts, which makes it similar to other open-air sites in the Levant. We suggest that rate of burial is the major factor that caused the difference between the Upper and Lower sequences. The differences in the burial rate may be connected to environmental and vegetation changes at the end of MIS 6. We also identified an interplay between sediment in-wash and density of human activity remains, i.e. during episodes of low natural sediment input the density of artifacts is higher relative to episodes with high rate of sediment in

  12. Characterization of Extreme Deposition of Air Pollutants in MT. Mitchell State Park: Potential for Forest Decline and Opportunity for Cloud Deacidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defelice, Thomas Peter

    The decline of forests has long been attributed to various natural (e.g. drought), man-made (e.g. logging), and perhaps, combinations of these (eg. fires caused by loggers) causes. A new type of forest decline (attributed to the deposition of air pollutants and other natural causes) has become apparent at high elevation sites in western Europe and North America; especially for above cloudbase forests like those in the Mt. Mitchell State Park. Investigations of air pollutant deposition are plentiful and laboratory studies have shown extreme deposition of these pollutants to be potentially harmful to forests. However, no field study has concentrated on these events. The primary objective of this study is to characterize (i.e., meterologically, microphysically, chemically) extreme episodes of air pollutant deposition. This study defines extreme aqueous events as having a pH < 3.1. pH's of this order are known to reduce laboratory tree growth depending on their age and species. On the average, one out of three aqueous events, sampled in the park during the 1986-1988 growing seasons (mid-May through mid-September), was extreme. Their occurrence over time may lead to the death of infant and 'old' trees, and to the reduced vigor of trees in their prime, as a result of triggering the decline mechanisms of these trees. These events usually last ~ 4.0 h, form during extended periods of high atmospheric pressure, have a liquid water content of ~ 0.10 gm^{-3}, and near typical cloud droplet sizes (~ 8.0 μm). Extreme aqueous events deposit most of their acid at their end. The deposition from the infrequent occurrences of very high ozone ( >=q100 ppb) and sulfur dioxide (>=q 5 ppb) concentrations in conjunction with these cloud events may be even more detrimental to the canopy, then that by extreme aqueous events alone. The physical characteristics of these combined events appear to include those of mature, precipitating clouds. Their occurrence may provide a clue as to how

  13. Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S. . Lab. de Energia Solar)

    1994-09-01

    The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. A multilayer of 0.3 [mu]m thick CuS film deposited over a thin film of ZnS upon annealing at 150 C shows atomic ratios of Zn to Cu of [approximately]0.15 and [approximately]0.48 at the surface layers of the samples annealed for 12 and 24 h, respectively. In the case of CuS on PbS film, the corresponding Pb to Cu atomic ratios at the surface layers are 0.43 and 0.83. The optical transmittance spectra and sheet resistance of these multilayer films indicate thermal stabilities superior to that of the CuS-only coatings. Application of the interfacial diffusion process in the production of thermally stable solar control coatings, solar absorber coating, or p-type films for solar cell structures is discussed.

  14. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  15. Engendering Long-Term Air and Light Stability of a TiO2-Supported Porphyrinic Dye via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hoffeditz, William L; Son, Ho-Jin; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-12-21

    Organic and porphyrin-based chromophores are prevalent in liquid-junction photovoltaic and photocatalytic solar-cell chemistry; however, their long-term air and light instability may limit their practicality in real world technologies. Here, we describe the protection of a zinc porphyrin dye, adsorbed on nanoparticulate TiO2, from air and light degradation by a protective coating of alumina grown with a previously developed post-treatment atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The protective Al2O3 ALD layer is deposited using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide as an Al source; in contrast to the ubiquitous ALD precursor trimethylaluminum, dimethylaluminum isopropoxide does not degrade the zinc porphyrin dye, as confirmed by UV-vis measurements. The growth of this protective ALD layer around the dye can be monitored by an in-reactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Furthermore, greater than 80% of porphyrin light absorption is retained over ∼1 month of exposure to air and light when the protective coating is present, whereas almost complete loss of porphyrin absorption is observed in less than 2 days in the absence of the ALD protective layer. Applying the Al2O3 post-treatment technique to the TiO2-adsorbed dye allows the dye to remain in electronic contact with both the semiconductor surface and a surrounding electrolyte solution, the combination of which makes this technique promising for numerous other electrochemical photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications, especially those involving the dye-sensitized evolution of oxygen.

  16. A multi-resolution assessment of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model v4.7 wet deposition estimates for 2002-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, K. W.; Foley, K. M.; Bash, J. O.; Pinder, R. W.; Dennis, R. L.; Allen, D. J.; Pickering, K.

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines the operational performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations for 2002-2006 using both 36-km and 12-km horizontal grid spacing, with a primary focus on the performance of the CMAQ model in predicting wet deposition of sulfate (SO4=), ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). Performance of the wet deposition estimates from the model is determined by comparing CMAQ predicted concentrations to concentrations measured by the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP), specifically the National Trends Network (NTN). For SO4= wet deposition, the CMAQ model estimates were generally comparable between the 36-km and 12-km simulations for the eastern US, with the 12-km simulation giving slightly higher estimates of SO4= wet deposition than the 36-km simulation on average. The result is a slightly larger normalized mean bias (NMB) for the 12-km simulation; however both simulations had annual biases that were less than ±15 % for each of the five years. The model estimated SO4= wet deposition values improved when they were adjusted to account for biases in the model estimated precipitation. The CMAQ model underestimates NH4+ wet deposition over the eastern US, with a slightly larger underestimation in the 36-km simulation. The largest underestimations occur in the winter and spring periods, while the summer and fall have slightly smaller underestimations of NH4+ wet deposition. The underestimation in NH4+ wet deposition is likely due in part to the poor temporal and spatial representation of ammonia (NH3) emissions, particularly those emissions associated with fertilizer applications and NH3 bi-directional exchange. The model performance for estimates of NO3- wet deposition are mixed throughout the year, with the model largely underestimating NO3- wet deposition in the spring and summer in the eastern US, while the model has a relatively small bias in the fall and winter. Model estimates of NO3- wet deposition tend to be slightly

  17. Transfer-printing of active layers to achieve high quality interfaces in sequentially deposited multilayer inverted polymer solar cells fabricated in air

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Varun; Anzai, Takuya; Inaba, Shusei; Porzio, William; Barba, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Polymer solar cells (PSCs) are greatly influenced by both the vertical concentration gradient in the active layer and the quality of the various interfaces. To achieve vertical concentration gradients in inverted PSCs, a sequential deposition approach is necessary. However, a direct approach to sequential deposition by spin-coating results in partial dissolution of the underlying layers which decreases the control over the process and results in not well-defined interfaces. Here, we demonstrate that by using a transfer-printing process based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps we can obtain increased control over the thickness of the various layers while at the same time increasing the quality of the interfaces and the overall concentration gradient within the active layer of PSCs prepared in air. To optimize the process and understand the influence of various interlayers, our approach is based on surface free energy, spreading parameters and work of adhesion calculations. The key parameter presented here is the insertion of high quality hole transporting and electron transporting layers, respectively above and underneath the active layer of the inverted structure PSC which not only facilitates the transfer process but also induces the adequate vertical concentration gradient in the device to facilitate charge extraction. The resulting non-encapsulated devices (active layer prepared in air) demonstrate over 40% increase in power conversion efficiency with respect to the reference spin-coated inverted PSCs. PMID:27877901

  18. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  19. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  20. Monitoring ambient air pollutants and apply Woods' model in the prediction seasonal dry deposition at Chang-Hua (urban) and Kao-Mei (wetland) county, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Ying

    2014-09-01

    The main purpose for this study was to monitor ambient air particles and metallic elements (Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu and Pb) in total suspended particulate (TSP) concentration and dry deposition. In addition, the calculated/measured dry deposition flux ratios of ambient air particles and metallic elements (Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu and Pb) were evaluated using Woods' model at urban and wetland areas for the 2009-2010 period. The results indicated that the mean highest concentrations of metallic elements Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu and Pb in TSP were found in Chang-Hua (urban) sampling site. And as for the two characteristic sampling sites, the Woods' model exhibits better dry deposition of particulates of 18 µm particle size than the rest of the other particle sizes at any sampling site in this study. The average calculated/measured flux ratios for two seasons (summer and fall) by using Woods model at 2.5, 10 and 18 µm particles sizes were also studied. The results indicated that the average calculated/measured flux ratios orders for two seasons of various particles sizes were all displayed as Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cr > Pb > particle. And these calculated/measured flux ratios orders were Fe > Mn > Cu > Zn > Cr > Pb > particle and were Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cr > particle > Pb, during spring and winter seasons, respectively. Finally, in the spring and summer seasons of Gao-Mei (wetland) sampling site, the average calculated/measured flux ratios using Woods' model was found to be 2.5, 10 and 18 µm, showing the order of the calculated/measured flux ratios to be Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Cr > Pb > particle. And the calculated/measured flux ratio orders were Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu > Cr > particle > Pb and were Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Cr > particle > Pb for fall and winter season, respectively.

  1. Impact of air exposure and annealing on the chemical and electronic properties of the surface of SnO2 nanolayers deposited by rheotaxial growth and vacuum oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Krzywiecki, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the SnO2 nanolayers were deposited by rheotaxial growth and vacuum oxidation (RGVO) and analyzed for the susceptibility to ambient-air exposure and the subsequent recovery under vacuum conditions. Particularly the surface chemistry of the layers, stoichiometry and level of carbon contamination, was scrutinized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The layers were tested i) pristine, ii) after air exposure and iii) after UHV annealing to validate perspective recovery procedures of the sensing layers. XPS results showed that the pristine RGVO SnO2 nanolayers are of high purity with a ratio [O]/[Sn] = 1.62 and almost no carbon contamination. After air exposure the relative [O]/[Sn] concentration increased to 1.80 while maintaining a relatively low level of carbon contaminants. Subsequent UHV annealing led to a relative [O]/[Sn] concentration comparable to the pristine samples. The oxidation resulted in a variation of the distance between the valence band edge and the Fermi level energy. This was attributed to oxygen diffusion through the porous SnO2 surface as measured by atomic force microscopy. PMID:28382240

  2. Room-Temperature, Hydrochloride-Assisted, One-Step Deposition for Highly Efficient and Air-Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinlong; Mu, Cheng; Li, Qi; Li, Weizhen; Ma, Ding; Xu, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Uniform perovskite films are achieved by HCl-assisted one-step spin-coating at room temperature. By this method, a highest power conversion efficiency of 17.9% is obtained for perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The devices retain ≈95% of their original efficiency after storage in air for two months. The highest efficiency obtained for large-area PSCs (0.86 cm(2) ) is 15.7%.

  3. Air concentrations and wet deposition of major inorganic ions at five non-urban sites in China, 2001-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aas, Wenche; Shao, Min; Jin, Lei; Larssen, Thorjørn; Zhao, Dawei; Xiang, Renjun; Zhang, Jinhong; Xiao, Jinsong; Duan, Lei

    Air and precipitation measurements at five sites were undertaken from 2001 to 2003 in four different provinces in China, as part of the acid rain monitoring program IMPACTS. The sites were located in Tie Shan Ping (TSP) in Chongqing, Cai Jia Tang (CJT) in Hunan, Lei Gong Shan (LGS) and Liu Chong Guan (LCG) in Guizhou and Li Xi He (LXH) in Guangdong. The site characteristics are quite varied with TSP and LCG located relatively near big cites while the three others are situated in more regionally representative areas. The distances to urban centres are reflected in the air pollution concentrations, with annual average concentrations of SO 2 ranging from 0.5 to above 40 μg S m -3. The main components in the airborne particles are (NH 4) 2SO 4 and CaSO 4. Reduced nitrogen has a considerably higher concentration level than oxidised nitrogen, reflecting the high ammonia emissions from agriculture. The gas/particle ratio for the nitrogen compounds is about 1:1 at all the three intensive measurement sites, while for sulphur it varies from 2.5 to 0.5 depending on the distance to the emission sources. As in air, the predominant ions in precipitation are sulphate, calcium and ammonium. The volume weighted annual concentration of sulphate ranges from about 70 μeq l -1 at the most rural site (LGS) to about 200 μeq l -1 at TSP and LCG. The calcium concentration ranges from 25 to 250 μeq l -1, while the total nitrogen concentration is between 30 and 150 μeq l -1; ammonium is generally twice as high as nitrate. China's acid rain research has traditionally been focused on urban sites, but these measurements show a significant influence of long range transported air pollutants to rural areas in China. The concentration levels are significantly higher than seen in most other parts of the world.

  4. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall

    PubMed Central

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-01-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005–2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination. PMID:24722630

  5. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-11-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005-2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination.

  6. (7)Be in soil, deposited dust and atmospheric air and its using to infer soil erosion along Alexandria region, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saleh, I H; Abdel-Halim, A A

    2017-03-14

    This study investigated the radioactivity behavior of (7)Be in surface soil, airborne and deposited dust along Alexandria region in Egypt. The results obtained were used to predict scavenging processes of (7)Be from surface soil to infer soil erosion and land vulnerable to accelerated sea-level rise. The areal activity concentrations of (7)Be in surface soil were investigated in 30 undisturbed sites and (7)Be inventories were determined via deposited dust in 10 locations. Results of the former were found to be ranged from 78 Bq/m(2) to 104 Bq/m(2). High levels were observed in western sites associated with high dust deposition rate. On the other hand, low levels were found in the eastern sites, those may be attributed to scavenging processes such as land erosion toward the direction to the sea. The effective removal rates of (7)Be were calculated using the box-model, showing a broad special trend of inventories generally decreasing eastwards. The scavenging rates were ranged between 3.13 yr(-1) in western sites to 5.34 yr(-1) in eastern ones which denote that the east of the city suffers from rapid soil erosion. The airborne (7)Be was monthly monitored along the period from October 2014 to September 2015 through one site located at the mid of the city. The results revealed lower values in winter and autumn than in summer and spring ranged between 6.2 mBq/m(3) and 10.5 mBq/m(3). These levels are comparable with that in other world regions and the seasonal variations are associated with the prevailing climatic conditions in Alexandria region.

  7. A chemical deposition method to prepare circular planar 147Pm sources for the measurement of particulate emission in air.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumar, J; Gandhi, Shyamala S; Kumar, Manoj; Dash, Ashutosh

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method for preparing a circular planar source of 17 mm diameter containing approximately 400 kBq of (147)Pm employing a wet chemical deposition technique to be used in dust monitors. This manuscript described the overall process concept and experimental procedure. The technical feasibility, efficiency of the process and product quality has been evaluated. The quality of the prepared source in terms of nonleachability, uniform distribution of activity and stability, which are necessary attributes of a radioactive source were evaluated and found to be satisfactory.

  8. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Alexander H.; Labelle, André J.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells.

  9. Stratigraphy of the fluvial deposits of the Salado river basin, Buenos Aires Province: Lithology, chronology and paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucks, E.; Pisano, M. F.; Huarte, R. A.; Di Lello, C. V.; Mari, F.; Carbonari, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    The regional landscape of the Salado depression is related to weathering, eolian and fluvial processes generated under different climatic conditions. Although during most of the Holocene the climatic conditions were warm and humid, previously, a vast plain dominated by deflation processes and enhanced by weathering processes was developed in an arid environment. Fluvial deposits produced afterwards are continuous and lithologically homogeneous, which allows differentiation and characterization of the entire stratigraphic sequence. The stratigraphic units of this area, closely related to the paleoclimatic conditions, are recognized and characterized. Three lithostratigraphic units of fluvial origin (Members) and two paleosols have been differentiated. The first ones were grouped in the Luján Formation. Some of the units are related to other ones previously recognized in this area (La Chumbiada Member and La Pelada Geosol), but others have no similarity or relationship with previously known units (Gorch and Puente Las Gaviotas Members, and Frigorífico Belgrano Geosol). Radiocarbon ages suggest that the fluvial sequences were deposited after the glacial maximum, corresponding to MIS 1, except for the basal levels of the lower member which is late Late Pleistocene. Although the general paleoclimatic conditions were related to warm and humid climate, events related to water deficits were also recognized, which could be related to the Younger Dryas, the middle Holocene and the late Holocene.

  10. Air-stable short-wave infrared PbS colloidal quantum dot photoconductors passivated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chen; Gassenq, Alban; Chen, Hongtao; Roelkens, Günther; Justo, Yolanda; Hens, Zeger; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Detavernier, Christophe

    2014-10-27

    A PbS colloidal quantum dot photoconductor with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition (ALD) passivation for air-stable operation is presented. Two different types of inorganic ligands for the quantum dots, S{sup 2−} and OH{sup −}, are investigated. PbS/S{sup 2−} photoconductors with a cut-off wavelength up to 2.4 μm are obtained, and a responsivity up to 50 A/W at 1550 nm is reported. The corresponding specific detectivity is ∼3.4 × 10{sup 8} Jones at 230 K. The 3-dB bandwidth of the PbS/S{sup 2−} and PbS/OH{sup −} photodetectors is 40 Hz and 11 Hz, respectively.

  11. Uniform, stable, and efficient planar-heterojunction perovskite solar cells by facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition under fully open-air conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Xia, Wei; Yuan, Chenchen; Cheng, Jigui; Lu, Yingwei

    2015-02-04

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attracted extensive attention due to their high efficiency and simple preparing process. Herein, a facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technology is first developed to fabricate PSCs, which can effectively reduce the over-rapid intercalating reaction rate and easily overcome this blocking issue during the solution process. As a result, the prepared uniform perovskite films exhibit good crystallization, strong absorption, and long carrier diffusion length. More strikingly, CH3NH3PbI3 absorbers by LPCVD demonstrate excellent moisture-resistant feature even under laser illumination and high-temperature conditions, which indicates that our proprietary method is very suitable for the future low-cost, nonvacuum production of the new generation photovoltaic devices. Finally, high efficiency of 12.73% is successfully achieved under fully open-air conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of efficient PSCs with such a high humidity above 60%.

  12. Analysis of forest environmental measurements to estimate parameters of microclimate and air-pollution deposition-velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jr, C E; Lorenz, R

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for estimating flux densities and deposition of gaseous pollutants for a period of a year or more, using data collected for a period of a few days. The estimates are based on models which characterize the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the vegetation as a series of resistances and then use linear statistical submodels based on experimental data to relate the resistances to the surrounding environment. The models are shown to fit the experimental data reasonably well. Annual values calculated for a young loblolly pine plantation were: evaporation 63.2 cm, carbon dioxide exchange 31.5 t/ha, and sulfur dioxide exchange 120 gm/ha. 17 references.

  13. A catalog of the types of Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera) deposited in the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, Buenos Aires (MACN).

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Axel O; Chani-Posse, Mariana; Guala, Mariel E; Newton, Alfred F

    2017-01-22

    The type specimens (all current categories) of Staphylinidae deposited in this Museum are listed; names are recorded, most of them represented by name-bearing types (primary types). The specific and subspecific names are alphabetically ordered in a single list, followed by the generic names (and subgeneric ones, if they were stated) spelled as they were published; later combinations and/ or current binomina are mentioned insofar these are known to the authors. Two lists are added: 2. Specimens labeled as types of names not found in the literature and probably never published, or published as nomina nuda; and 3. Specimens labeled as types, but not originally designated as such. An appendix provides a systematically arranged list of all names discussed, with indication of where they are discussed in the text.

  14. ZnO-based thin film transistors employing aluminum titanate gate dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Mazzocco, Riccardo; Vourlias, Georgios; Livesley, Peter J; Krier, Anthony; Milne, William I; Kolosov, Oleg; Adamopoulos, George

    2015-04-08

    The replacement of SiO2 gate dielectrics with metal oxides of higher dielectric constant has led to the investigation of a wide range of materials with superior properties compared with SiO2. Despite their attractive properties, these high-k dielectrics are usually manufactured using costly vacuum-based techniques. To overcome this bottleneck, research has focused on the development of alternative deposition methods based on solution-processable metal oxides. Here we report the application of spray pyrolysis for the deposition and investigation of Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics as a function of the [Ti(4+)]/[Ti(4+)+2·Al(3+)] ratio and their implementation in thin film transistors (TFTs) employing spray-coated ZnO as the active semiconducting channels. The films are studied by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, impedance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field-effect measurements. Analyses reveal amorphous Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics that exhibit a wide band gap (∼4.5 eV), low roughness (∼0.9 nm), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 13), Schottky pinning factor S of ∼0.44 and very low leakage currents (<5 nA/cm(2)). TFTs employing stoichiometric Al2O3·TiO2 gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with low operating voltages (∼10 V), negligible hysteresis, high on/off current modulation ratio of ∼10(6), subthreshold swing (SS) of ∼550 mV/dec and electron mobility of ∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  15. Short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in air and soil of subtropical terrestrial environment in the pearl river delta, South China: distribution, composition, atmospheric deposition fluxes, and environmental fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Zhineng; Li, Qilu; Pan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruijie; Liu, Di; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xiang; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Zhang, Gan

    2013-03-19

    Research on the environmental fate of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs) in highly industrialized subtropical areas is still scarce. Air, soil, and atmospheric deposition process in the Pearl River Delta of South China were investigated, and the average SCCP and MCCP concentrations were 5.2 μg/sampler (17.69 ng/m(3)) and 4.1 μg/sampler for passive air samples, 18.3 and 59.3 ng/g for soil samples, and 5.0 and 5.3 μg/(m(2)d) for deposition samples, respectively. Influenced by primary sources and the properties of chlorinated paraffins (CPs), a gradient trend of concentrations and a fractionation of composition from more to less industrialized areas were discovered. Intense seasonal variations with high levels in summer air and winter deposition samples indicated that the air and deposition CP levels were controlled mainly by the vapor and particle phase, respectively. Complex environmental processes like volatilization and fractionation resulted in different CP profiles in different environment matrixes and sampling locations, with C(10-11) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-7), C(10-12) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-8), and C(11-12) C(l6-8) and C(14) C(l7-8) dominating in air, soil, and atmospheric deposition, respectively. Shorter-chain and less chlorinated congeners were enriched in air in the less industrialized areas, while longer-chain and higher chlorinated congeners were concentrated in soil in the more industrialized areas. This is suggesting that the gaseous transport of CPs is the dominant mechanism responsible for the higher concentrations of lighter and likely more mobile CPs in the rural areas.

  16. In Vitro Exposures in Diesel Exhaust Atmospheres: Resuspension of PM from Filters Verses Direct Deposition of PM from Air

    PubMed Central

    Lichtveld, Kim M.; Ebersviller, Seth M.; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Vizuete, William; Jaspers, Ilona; Jeffries, Harvey E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most widely used in vitro particulate matter (PM) exposures methods is the collection of PM on filters, followed by resuspension in a liquid medium, with subsequent addition onto a cell culture. To avoid disruption of equilibria between gases and PM, we have developed a direct in vitro sampling and exposure method (DSEM) capable of PM-only exposures. We hypothesize that the separation of phases and post-treatment of filter-collected PM significantly modifies the toxicity of the PM compared to direct deposition, resulting in a distorted view of the potential PM health effects. Controlled test environments were created in a chamber that combined diesel exhaust with an urban-like mixture. The complex mixture was analyzed using both the DSEM and concurrently-collected filter samples. The DSEM showed that PM from test atmospheres produced significant inflammatory response, while the resuspension exposures at the same exposure concentration did not. Increasing the concentration of resuspended PM sixteen times was required to yield measurable IL-8 expression. Chemical analysis of the resuspended PM indicated a total absence of carbonyl compounds compared to the test atmosphere during the direct-exposures. Therefore, collection and resuspension of PM into liquid modifies its toxicity and likely leads to underestimating toxicity. PMID:22834915

  17. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Di; Yang, Lixia; Cai, Tao; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhiqi

    2016-09-28

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS) for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm) on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm); a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor's performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  18. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Di; Yang, Lixia; Cai, Tao; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS) for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm) on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm); a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature. PMID:27690037

  19. A comparison of air dispersion models for estimating PM2.5 and dry deposition to urban trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Game, Ibrahim Paguedame

    Many cities have public health issues linked to air pollution; various tools are used to assess pollutant distribution and removal by urban trees to help alleviate some of these issues. This research compares the predicted PM2.5 concentrations from the US EPA's AERMOD, the USDA Forest Service's i-Tree-Eco-D, the US EPA's Fused HBM data to short- and long-term monitors in New York City. AERMOD generally performs better than the US EPA's Fuse and i-Tree-Eco-D. On days with lower PM2.5 concentrations, Fuse appears to better capture the spatial distribution of PM2.5 than the other models, though on days with high PM2.5, Fuse had a larger negative bias. i-Tree-Eco-D was improved by raising the height of mobile emissions. Predictions from Fuse lead to higher estimates of PM2.5 removal and human health benefits, while AERMOD produced the lowest; and the removal varied across boroughs in NYC.

  20. Concentrations of particulates in ambient air, gaseous elementary mercury (GEM), and particulate-bound mercury (Hg(p)) at a traffic sampling site: a study of dry deposition in daytime and nighttime.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lin, Yen-Heng; Chang, Chia-Ying; Zheng, Yu-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    In this investigation, the concentrations of particles in ambient air, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), and particulate-bound mercury (Hg(p)) in total suspended particulates (TSP) as well as dry deposition at a (Traffic) sampling site at Hung-kuang were studied during the day and night in 2012. The results reveal that the mean concentrations of TSP in ambient air, GEM, and Hg(p) were 69.72 μg/m(3), 3.17, and 0.024 ng/m(3), respectively, at the Hung-kuang (Traffic) sampling site during daytime sampling periods. The results also reveal that the mean rates of dry deposition of particles from ambient air and Hg(p) were 145.20 μg/m(2) min and 0.022 ng/m(2) min, respectively, at the Hung-kuang (Traffic) sampling site during the daytime sampling period. The mean concentrations of TSP in ambient air, GEM, and Hg(p) were 60.56 μg/m(3), 2.74, and 0.018 ng/m(3), respectively, at the Hung-kuang (Traffic) sampling site during the nighttime sampling period. The mean rates of dry deposition of particles and Hg(p) from ambient air were 132.58 μg/m(2) min and 0.016 ng/m(2) min, respectively, at the Hung-kuang (Traffic) sampling site during the nighttime sampling period.

  1. Development of fireside performance indices, Task 7.33, Development of methods to predict agglomeration and deposition in FBCS, Task 7.36, Enhanced air toxics control, Task 7.45

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Laudal, D.L.; Miller, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been developing advanced indices that rank coals according to their fouling and slagging propensity in utility boilers. The indices are based on sophisticated analytical techniques for identifying and quantifying coal inorganics and are useful in predicting the effects of proposed operational changes on ash deposition in coal-fired boilers. These indices are intended to provide an economical way to reduce the amount of full-scale testing needed to determine the best means of minimizing ash-related problems. The successful design and operation of the fluidized-bed combustor requires the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The major ash-related problems in FBC are agglomeration of bed material, ash deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, ash deposition on refractory and uncooled surfaces, corrosion, and erosion. The focus of the Development of Methods to Predict Agglomeration and Deposition in FBCs is on the agglomeration and deposition problems in atmospheric bubbling and circulating beds. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require study of air toxic emissions from coal combustion systems. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine-particle control appears to be the best approach to achieving a high level of air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and are not typically collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, the goal of this project is to develop methods that capture the vapor-phase metals while simultaneously achieving ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxics.

  2. Ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) concentrations: dry deposition study over a Traffic, Airport, Park (T.A.P.) areas during years of 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lin, Yen-Heng; Zheng, Yu-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to monitor ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) in total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations and dry deposition at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling sites during the daytime and nighttime, from 2011 to 2012. In addition, the calculated/measured dry deposition flux ratios of ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) were also studied with Baklanov & Sorensen and the Williams models. For a particle size of 10 μm, the Baklanov & Sorensen model yielded better predictions of dry deposition of ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling site during the daytime and nighttime sampling periods. However, for particulates with sizes 20-23 μm, the results obtained in the study reveal that the Williams model provided better prediction results for ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at all sampling sites in this study.

  3. Comparison of precipitation chemistry measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network and National Atmospheric Deposition Program for the period 1995-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Rothert, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation chemistry and depth measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) and the US National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) were compared for the 10-year period 1995–2004. Colocated sets of CAPMoN and NADP instrumentation, consisting of precipitation collectors and rain gages, were operated simultaneously per standard protocols for each network at Sutton, Ontario and Frelighsburg, Ontario, Canada and at State College, PA, USA. CAPMoN samples were collected daily, and NADP samples were collected weekly, and samples were analyzed exclusively by each network’s laboratory for pH, H + , Ca2+  , Mg2+  , Na + , K + , NH+4 , Cl − , NO−3 , and SO2−4 . Weekly and annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations for each network were compared. This study is a follow-up to an earlier internetwork comparison for the period 1986–1993, published by Alain Sirois, Robert Vet, and Dennis Lamb in 2000. Median weekly internetwork differences for 1995–2004 data were the same to slightly lower than for data for the previous study period (1986–1993) for all analytes except NO−3 , SO2−4 , and sample depth. A 1994 NADP sampling protocol change and a 1998 change in the types of filters used to process NADP samples reversed the previously identified negative bias in NADP data for hydrogen-ion and sodium concentrations. Statistically significant biases (α = 0.10) for sodium and hydrogen-ion concentrations observed in the 1986–1993 data were not significant for 1995–2004. Weekly CAPMoN measurements generally are higher than weekly NADP measurements due to differences in sample filtration and field instrumentation, not sample evaporation, contamination, or analytical laboratory differences.

  4. Preliminary measurements of summer nitric acid and ammonia concentrations in the Lake Tahoe Basin air-shed: implications for dry deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Tarnay, L; Gertler, A W; Blank, R R; Taylor, G E

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, Lake Tahoe, an alpine lake located in the Sierra Nevada mountains on the border between California and Nevada, has seen a decline in water clarity. With significant urbanization within its borders and major urban areas 130 km upwind of the prevailing synoptic airflow, it is believed the Lake Tahoe Basin is receiving substantial nitrogen (N) input via atmospheric deposition during summer and fall. We present preliminary inferential flux estimates to both lake surface and forest canopy based on empirical measurements of ambient nitric acid (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) concentrations, in an effort to identify the major contributors to and ranges of atmospheric dry N deposition to the Lake Tahoe Basin. Total flux from dry deposition ranges from 1.2 to 8.6 kg N ha-1 for the summer and fall dry season and is significantly higher than wet deposition, which ranges from 1.7 to 2.9 kg N ha-1 year-1. These preliminary results suggest that dry deposition of HNO3 is the major source of atmospheric N deposition for the Lake Tahoe Basin, and that overall N deposition is similar in magnitude to deposition reported for sites exposed to moderate N pollution in the southern California mountains.

  5. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  6. Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 for a High-Efficiency Hole-Blocking Layer in Hole-Conductor-Free Perovskite Solar Cells Processed in Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang; Dong, Binghai; Hu, Huating; Chen, Fengxiang; Kong, Mengqin; Zhang, Qiuping; Luo, Tianyue; Zhao, Li; Guo, Zhiguang; Li, Jing; Xu, Zuxun; Wang, Shimin; Eder, Dominik; Wan, Li

    2016-07-20

    In this study we design and construct high-efficiency, low-cost, highly stable, hole-conductor-free, solid-state perovskite solar cells, with TiO2 as the electron transport layer (ETL) and carbon as the hole collection layer, in ambient air. First, uniform, pinhole-free TiO2 films of various thicknesses were deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrodes by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. Based on these TiO2 films, a series of hole-conductor-free perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with carbon as the counter electrode were fabricated in ambient air, and the effect of thickness of TiO2 compact film on the device performance was investigated in detail. It was found that the performance of PSCs depends on the thickness of the compact layer due to the difference in surface roughness, transmittance, charge transport resistance, electron-hole recombination rate, and the charge lifetime. The best-performance devices based on optimized TiO2 compact film (by 2000 cycles ALD) can achieve power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of as high as 7.82%. Furthermore, they can maintain over 96% of their initial PCE after 651 h (about 1 month) storage in ambient air, thus exhibiting excellent long-term stability.

  7. In situ STM investigation of the lithium underpotential deposition on Au(111) in the air- and water-stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, L H S; Borisenko, N; Bocchi, N; El Abedin, S Zein; Endres, F

    2009-12-21

    In the present paper the underpotential deposition (UPD) of lithium on Au(111) from 0.5 mol L(-1) LiTFSA in the air- and water stable ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, [Py(1,4)]TFSA, has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The pure [Py(1,4)]TFSA was found to be inert in the potential regime investigated. The results show that the lithium UPD on Au(111) in [Py(1,4)]TFSA begins at potentials considerably positive to the electrode potential of bulk deposition and follows a layer-by-layer mechanism with the formation of at least two monolayers. A large number of monoatomically deep pits appear when the potential reaches positive values, which is an indication that a Li-Au alloy was formed.

  8. Development of a state-of-the-art acid-deposition model for the South Coast Air Basin of California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1989-03-25

    Three different aqueous-phase modules have been developed to describe the physicochemical processes associated with the aqueous-phase in the atmosphere. These modules constitute the central core of an urban-scale acid deposition model and can be incorporated into an Eulerian three dimensional grid-based system. The fog model (Module 2) has been implemented in a trajectory framework and has been employed to predict the temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas and aqueous phase concentrations of pollutants, and wet deposition rates of main ionic species during the radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4-5, 1985.

  9. Modeling of air pollutant removal by dry deposition to urban trees using a WRF/CMAQ/i-Tree Eco coupled system.

    PubMed

    Cabaraban, Maria Theresa I; Kroll, Charles N; Hirabayashi, Satoshi; Nowak, David J

    2013-05-01

    A distributed adaptation of i-Tree Eco was used to simulate dry deposition in an urban area. This investigation focused on the effects of varying temperature, LAI, and NO2 concentration inputs on estimated NO2 dry deposition to trees in Baltimore, MD. A coupled modeling system is described, wherein WRF provided temperature and LAI fields, and CMAQ provided NO2 concentrations. A base case simulation was conducted using built-in distributed i-Tree Eco tools, and simulations using different inputs were compared against this base case. Differences in land cover classification and tree cover between the distributed i-Tree Eco and WRF resulted in changes in estimated LAI, which in turn resulted in variations in simulated NO2 dry deposition. Estimated NO2 removal decreased when CMAQ-derived concentration was applied to the distributed i-Tree Eco simulation. Discrepancies in temperature inputs did little to affect estimates of NO2 removal by dry deposition to trees in Baltimore.

  10. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such

  11. APPLICATION OF A NEW LAND-SURFACE, DRY DEPOSITION, AND PBL MODEL IN THE MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTI-SCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Like most air quality modeling systems, CMAQ divides the treatment of meteorological and chemical/transport processes into separate models run sequentially. A potential drawback to this approach is that it creates the illusion that these processes are minimally interdependent an...

  12. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  13. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  14. Simple fabrication of air-stable black phosphorus heterostructures with large-area hBN sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sapna; Takabayashi, Yuya; Shinohara, Hisanori; Kitaura, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a facile and general method to passivate thin black phosphorus (BP) flakes with large-area high-quality monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheets grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In spite of the one-atom-thick structure, the high-quality CVD-grown monolayer hBN has proven to be useful to prevent the degradation of thin BP flakes exfoliated on substrates. Mechanically exfoliated BP flakes prepared on a Si substrate are covered by the monolayer hBN sheet to preserve (otherwise unstable) atomic layered BP flakes from degradation. The present technique can generally be applied to fabricating BP-based electronic devices with much easiness.

  15. Air-stable conversion of separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors from p-type to n-type using atomic layer deposition of high-κ oxide and its application in CMOS logic circuits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Yue; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-04-26

    Due to extraordinary electrical properties, preseparated, high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes hold great potential for thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuit applications. One of the main challenges it still faces is the fabrication of air-stable n-type nanotube TFTs with industry-compatible techniques. Here in this paper, we report a novel and highly reliable method of converting the as-made p-type TFTs using preseparated semiconducting nanotubes into air-stable n-type transistors by adding a high-κ oxide passivation layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The n-type devices exhibit symmetric electrical performance compared with the p-type devices in terms of on-current, on/off ratio, and device mobility. Various factors affecting the conversion process, including ALD temperature, metal contact material, and channel length, have also been systematically studied by a series of designed experiments. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with rail-to-rail output, symmetric input/output behavior, and large noise margin has been further demonstrated. The excellent performance gives us the feasibility of cascading multiple stages of logic blocks and larger scale integration. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film macroelectronics.

  16. A novel simple one-step air jet spinning approach for deposition of poly(vinyl acetate)/hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers on Ti implants.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek; Lim, Ju Hyun

    2015-04-01

    A biocompatible coating consists of a poly(vinyl acetate)/hydroxyapatite (PVAc/HA) composite nanofiber mat was applied to NaOH-treated titanium metal by means of a novel, facile and efficient air jet spinning (AJS) approach. Results showed that HA nanoparticles (NPs) strongly embedded onto the AJS single fiber surface resulting in a strong chemical interfacial bonding between the two phases due to the difference in kinetic energies. It was proven that AJS membrane coatings can provide significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of titanium substrate. Interestingly, the biocompatibility using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast to the PVAc/HA fiber composite layer coated on Ti was significantly higher than pure titanium-substrates.

  17. Deposition of SOCs in forests

    SciTech Connect

    Horstmann, M.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The bulk deposition, wet-only deposition, dry-only deposition and ambient air concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PAHs were measured in an 80 year old spruce forest, an 80 year old mixed deciduous (beech and oak) forest, and in an adjacent clearing over a period of 1--2 years. The deposition of the less volatile compounds that are primarily particle bound in the atmosphere was similar at both sites. These compounds were deposited primarily through wet deposition, as shown by the measurements in the clearing. In contrast, the deposition of the more volatile compounds was much higher at the forest sites than in the clearing. For instance, the annual deposition of Cl{sub 4}DF was 5 times higher in the spruce forest and 8 times higher in the deciduous forest. The excess deposition in the deciduous forest was almost completely due to the leaf fall in October--December, while about half of the excess deposition in the spruce forest was the result of needle fall. A further, as yet unexplained deposition mechanism accounted for the remainder of the flux in the spruce forest. Other studies have shown that more volatile SOCs are deposited to vegetation primarily through dry gaseous deposition. Hence, while forests have little influence on the deposition of less volatile compounds like the higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs and the 5--6 ring PAHs, dry deposition to leaves/needles and their subsequent falling to the forest floor make forest soils an extremely important sink for more volatile SOC.

  18. A micro-scale hot wire anemometer based on low stress (Ni/W) multi-layers deposited on nano-crystalline diamond for air flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Gimeno, L.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Viard, R.; Soltani, A.; Mortet, V.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2015-12-01

    A linear array of microscale thermal anemometers has been designed, fabricated and characterized. The sensitive element consists of a self-compensated-stress multilayer (Ni/W) patterned to form a wire with length, width, and thickness close to 200 μm, 5 μm and 2 μm respectively. The wire is deposited and supported by prongs made of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) of about 2 μm in thickness. Due to its high Young’s modulus, NCD allows a very high mechanical toughness without the need for thicker support for the hot wire. Also, depending on grain size, the NCD is able to present thermal conductivity smaller than 10 W mK-1, providing good thermal insulation from the substrate and less conductive end losses to the prongs. The sensor was characterized experimentally. Its electrical and thermal properties were obtained first in the absence of fluid flow. The results confirm the effectiveness of thermal insulation and the mechanical robustness of the structure. The fluidic characterizations were performed and analysed in the case of an airflow with velocities of up to 30 m s-1.

  19. High-mobility and air-stable single-layer WS2 field-effect transistors sandwiched between chemical vapor deposition-grown hexagonal BN films

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, M Waqas; Iqbal, M Zahir; Khan, M Farooq; Shehzad, M Arslan; Seo, Yongho; Park, Jong Hyun; Hwang, Chanyong; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-01-01

    An emerging electronic material as one of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), tungsten disulfide (WS2) can be exfoliated as an atomically thin layer and can compensate for the drawback of graphene originating from a gapless band structure. A direct bandgap, which is obtainable in single-layer WS2, is an attractive characteristic for developing optoelectronic devices, as well as field-effect transistors. However, its relatively low mobility and electrical characteristics susceptible to environments remain obstacles for the use of device materials. Here, we demonstrate remarkable improvement in the electrical characteristics of single-layer WS2 field-effect transistor (SL-WS2 FET) using chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown hexagonal BN (h-BN). SL-WS2 FET sandwiched between CVD-grown h-BN films shows unprecedented high mobility of 214 cm2/Vs at room temperature. The mobility of a SL-WS2 FET has been found to be 486 cm2/Vs at 5 K. The ON/OFF ratio of output current is ~107 at room temperature. Apart from an ideal substrate for WS2 FET, CVD-grown h-BN film also provides a protection layer against unwanted influence by gas environments. The h-BN/SL-WS2/h-BN sandwich structure offers a way to develop high-quality durable single-layer TMDCs electronic devices. PMID:26030008

  20. Estimation of the caesium-137 source term from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant using a consistent joint assimilation of air concentration and deposition observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiarek, Victor; Bocquet, Marc; Duhanyan, Nora; Roustan, Yelva; Saunier, Olivier; Mathieu, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Inverse modelling techniques can be used to estimate the amount of radionuclides and the temporal profile of the source term released in the atmosphere during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. In Winiarek et al. (2012b), the lower bounds of the caesium-137 and iodine-131 source terms were estimated with such techniques, using activity concentration measurements. The importance of an objective assessment of prior errors (the observation errors and the background errors) was emphasised for a reliable inversion. In such critical context where the meteorological conditions can make the source term partly unobservable and where only a few observations are available, such prior estimation techniques are mandatory, the retrieved source term being very sensitive to this estimation. We propose to extend the use of these techniques to the estimation of prior errors when assimilating observations from several data sets. The aim is to compute an estimate of the caesium-137 source term jointly using all available data about this radionuclide, such as activity concentrations in the air, but also daily fallout measurements and total cumulated fallout measurements. It is crucial to properly and simultaneously estimate the background errors and the prior errors relative to each data set. A proper estimation of prior errors is also a necessary condition to reliably estimate the a posteriori uncertainty of the estimated source term. Using such techniques, we retrieve a total released quantity of caesium-137 in the interval 11.6-19.3 PBq with an estimated standard deviation range of 15-20% depending on the method and the data sets. The “blind” time intervals of the source term have also been strongly mitigated compared to the first estimations with only activity concentration data.

  1. The Sky is Falling: An air deposition/stormwater runoff model simulating the pathways of five heavy metals from their status as mobile and stack exhaust constituents to their delivery to the Elizabeth River

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett-McDaniels, J.; Barrett, M.

    1997-12-31

    Recent studies by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) indicate that air emissions contribute a major portion of the total loading of toxic metals to the waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. According to the Chesapeake Executive Council of the interstate Chesapeake Bay Program, five of these metals, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc, have been observed to have a negative impact on the waters of the Elizabeth River, which is within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In order to better define the sources and processes which contribute to concentrations of these metals in the Elizabeth River, this analysis simulates the pathway of these metals from their status as mobile and stack exhaust constituents to their delivery to the river. EPA`s ISCST3 model was used to predict deposition loading on the Elizabeth River water and watershed surfaces, using regional annual meteorological data. Air emissions input to the ISCST3 model were derived from stationary and mobile sources: stationary source emissions were estimated using Virginia Department of Environmental Quality inventories and EPA-approved emissions factors for major sources with the potential to impact the watershed, while mobile source emissions were estimated using traffic volumes provided by the Department of Transportation and EPA-approved emissions factors. EPA`s SWMM model was then used to predict maximum short term and average annual build up and wash off rates for these metals using recorded rainfall data and existing land use and impervious cover for the watershed. The results are compared to water quality monitoring data from the municipal NPDES stormwater wet weather monitoring permit program.

  2. The United States Total DEPosition (TDEP) Project for Sulfur and Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of total sulfur and nitrogen deposition are needed for use in critical loads and other ecosystem assessments. Measurements are available for some chemical species at individual locations for air concentration and wet deposition, but not dry deposition. Modeling provid...

  3. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark Raymond

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  4. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  5. Jet aircraft fuel system deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hazlett, R.N.; Hall, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    Deposits samples were from the valve cavity of a fuel nozzle of a CF6-50A engine, from the fuel manifold adjacent to the combustor nozzles of a TR-30 engine, fuel test devices, and heat exchange tubes, operated in the laboratories of the Naval Air Propulsion Center and the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory. Carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in the deposits were determined with a Perkin Elmer Elemental Analyzer. Sulfur was determined on a separate sample by modifying ASTM method D3120-75. The high amount of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur found in the deposits is noteworthy. The data reported generally corroborates the information from the literature. All of the deposits from the engines and the test devices point to the importance of compounds containing hereto atoms. The importance of oxidation in triggering solids formation has been reviewed. It would appear that the trace primary oxidation reactions occurring in a fuel system would be insufficient to give the high concentration of oxygen in the deposit. However, if the compounds undergoing oxidation were oxygen-containing compounds rather than hydrocarbons the high oxygen concentrations in the deposit would be more reasonable. The high enhancement factors observed, causes one to conclude that some nitrogen and sulfur compounds found in fuels are very susceptible to oxidation and subsequent deposit formation. The high concentrations of hereto atoms implies that the deposits have highly polar characteristics. Since such material would have little attraction for the non-polar fuel, the insolubility of deposits may be due primarily to polarity differences rather than high molecular weight.

  6. Estimating Total Deposition Using NADP & CASTNET Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than 40 years, efforts have been made to estimate total sulfur and nitrogen deposition in the United States using a combination of measured concentrations in precipitation and in the air, precipitation amounts for wet deposition, and various modeled or estimated depositi...

  7. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Preciado, Ignacio; Eddings, Eric G.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D; Lance, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  8. RESULTS FROM THE MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the. requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The main ob...

  9. OXIDIZED NITROGEN DEPOSITION IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Air quality and selected meteorological parameters have been monitored at rural sites in the United States (US) by EPA's Clean Air Status and Trends Network, (CASTNet) sites. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) monitors wet deposition of numerous ions in precip...

  10. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  11. Salt deposition at particle contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Evitts, Richard W.; Besant, Robert W.; Kennell, Glyn F.

    2015-09-01

    Caking may occur when granular potash fertilizer with a moisture content greater than 0.25 % (w/w) undergoes drying. Since cake strength is proportional to the mass of crystal deposited per unit volume near contact points (and other factors) the modelling of mass deposition near contact points is important. The Young-Laplace equation for the air-salt-solution interface is used to determine the geometry of a 2-D planar saline film between two cubic potash particles. A 2-D theoretical model is developed and applied for ion diffusion and deposition near the contact point during drying. The numerical predictions of ion diffusion in an initially saturated salt illustrate the transient spatial distribution of new KCl deposits along the solid surfaces near the contact line. These results indicate the average salt deposition commences at the air-liquid-solid intersection, where the liquid film is thinnest, and moves toward the particle contact point with increasing area averaged KCl deposits, causing the formation of crystal deposits and bridges near contact points. It is concluded that the average salt deposit height increases inversely with distance from the contact point and decreases with initial contact angle of the contact region, but the deposition is nearly independent of the evaporation or drying rate near each contact region. Caking strength depends on, among other parameters, the amount of salt deposition near contact points.

  12. A Novel Hybrid Approach for Estimating Total Deposition in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur causes many deleterious effects on ecosystems including acidification and excess eutrophication. Assessments to support development of strategies to mitigate these effects require spatially and temporally continuous values of nitrogen and sulfur deposition. In the U.S., national monitoring networks exist that provide values of wet and dry deposition at discrete locations. While wet deposition can be interpolated between the monitoring locations, dry deposition cannot. Additionally, monitoring networks do not measure the complete suite of chemicals that contribute to total sulfur and nitrogen deposition. Regional air quality models provide spatially continuous values of deposition of monitored species as well as important unmeasured species. However, air quality modeling values are not generally available for an extended continuous time period. Air quality modeling results may also be biased for some chemical species. We developed a novel approach for estimating dry deposition using data from monitoring networks such as the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET), the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Ammonia Monitoring Network (AMoN), and the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network and modeled data from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. These dry deposition values estimates are then combined with wet deposition values from the NADP National Trends Networ

  13. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  14. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  15. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  16. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  17. MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM (MADPRO): CLOUD DEPOSITION TO THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS, 1994 THROUGH 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The two ma...

  18. Wet deposition in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J; Mohnen, V; Kadlecek, J

    1980-12-01

    Attempts are made to examine concentration and wet deposition of pollutant material at selected stations within the northeastern United States and to characterize as many events as possible with respect to air mass origin. Further attempts are made to develop a regional pattern for the deposition of dominant ion species. MAP3S (US Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study) data for 1977 to 1979 are used to determine concentration and deposition on an event basis from which monthly, seasonal, annual, and cumulative averages are developed. The ARL-ATAD trajectory model is used to characterize individual events as to air mass origin. Case studies are examined to illustrate variability in the chemical composition of precipitation originating from distinctly different air mass trajectories. A difference in concentration of pollution-related ions in precipitation is noted between Midwest/Ohio Valley and Great Lakes/Canadian air mass origins for carefully selected cases. Total deposition of the major ions is examined in an effort to develop a regional pattern for deposition over a period of at least one year. For that purpose, total deposition is normalized to remove the variability in precipitation amounts for inter-station comparison. No marked gradient is noted in the normalized deposition totals within the northeast of the United States. The Adirondack region exhibited the lowest normalized ion deposition value, while the Illinois station showed the highest of the MAP3S network. The data analysis suggest that the acid rain phenomena covers the entire northeast. The concept of large scale mixing emerges to account for the lack of a significant gradient in the normalized deposition.

  19. Atmospheric deposition maps for the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, L.; Campbell, D.H.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Variability in atmospheric deposition across the Rocky Mountains is influenced by elevation, slope, aspect, and precipitation amount and by regional and local sources of air pollution. To improve estimates of deposition in mountainous regions, maps of average annual atmospheric deposition loadings of nitrate, sulfate, and acidity were developed for the Rocky Mountains by using spatial statistics. A parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) was incorporated to account for variations in precipitation amount over mountainous regions. Chemical data were obtained from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and from annual snowpack surveys conducted by the US Geological Survey and National Park Service, in cooperation with other Federal, State and local agencies. Surface concentration maps were created by ordinary kriging in a geographic information system, using a local trend and mathematical model to estimate the spatial variance. Atmospheric-deposition maps were constructed at 1-km resolution by multiplying surface concentrations from the kriged grid and estimates of precipitation amount from the PRISM model. Maps indicate an increasing spatial trend in concentration and deposition of the modeled constituents, particularly nitrate and sulfate, from north to south throughout the Rocky Mountains and identify hot-spots of atmospheric deposition that result from combined local and regional sources of air pollution. Highest nitrate (2.5-3.0kg/ha N) and sulfate (10.0-12.0kg/ha SO4) deposition is found in northern Colorado.

  20. The particles in town air

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, J. McK.

    1965-01-01

    Particles constitute an important part of air pollution, and their behaviour when suspended in air is very different from that of gas molecules: in particular, the mechanisms by which they become deposited on surfaces are different, and consequently the methods normally used for removing particles from the air, either for sampling or for cleaning it, rely mainly on mechanisms that do not enter into the behaviour of gas molecules. These mechanisms are described, and the ways in which they affect the problems of air pollution and its measurement are discussed. ImagesFIG. 8 PMID:14315713

  1. Self-Lubricating-Diamond Like Coatings Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    LABORATORY WRIGHT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-6533 1 ~ is NOTICE When...demand for diamond-like coatings of boron nitride (BN) in a large number of tribological applications including cryogenic bearings and adiabatic engines...neutralizer filaments; a new grid system for the ion source; and mounting jigs and hardware for rotating (planetary-type) depositions. All of these

  2. An automatic collector to monitor insoluble atmospheric deposition: application for mineral dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, B.; Losno, R.; Chevaillier, S.; Vincent, J.; Roullet, P.; Bon Nguyen, E.; Ouboulmane, N.; Triquet, S.; Fornier, M.; Raimbault, P.; Bergametti, G.

    2015-07-01

    Deposition is one of the key terms of the mineral dust cycle. However, dust deposition remains poorly constrained in transport models simulating the atmospheric dust cycle. This is mainly due to the limited number of relevant deposition measurements. This paper aims to present an automatic collector (CARAGA), specially developed to sample the total (dry and wet) atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust in remote areas. The autonomy of the CARAGA can range from 25 days to almost 1 year depending on the programmed sampling frequency (from 1 day to 2 weeks respectively). This collector is used to sample atmospheric deposition of Saharan dust on the Frioul islands in the Gulf of Lions in the Western Mediterranean. To quantify the mineral dust mass in deposition samples, a weighing and ignition protocol is applied. Almost 2 years of continuous deposition measurements performed on a weekly sampling basis on Frioul Island are presented and discussed with air mass trajectories and satellite observations of dust. Insoluble mineral deposition measured on Frioul Island was 2.45 g m-2 for February to December 2011 and 3.16 g m-2 for January to October 2012. Nine major mineral deposition events, measured during periods with significant MODIS aerosol optical depths, were associated with air masses coming from the southern Mediterranean Basin and North Africa.

  3. Comparison of Aerodynamic Resistance Parameterizations and Implications for Dry Deposition Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen deposition data used to support the secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards and critical loads research derives from both measurements and modeling. Data sets with spatial coverage sufficient for regional scale deposition assessments are currently generated fro...

  4. Regional Scale Photochemical Model Evaluation of Total Mercury Wet Deposition and Speciated Ambient Mercury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury is a known neurotoxin with deleterious health effects on humans and wildlife. Atmospheric deposition is the largest source of mercury loading to most terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Regional scale air quality models are needed to quantify mercury deposition resu...

  5. ACIDIC DEPOSITION IN THE NORTHEASTERN U.S.: SOURCES AND INPUTS, ECOSYSTEM EFFECTS, AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic deposition results from the emissions of air pollutants. Effects of acidic deposition in the northeastern US include the acidification of soil and water, causing stresses to terrestrial and aquatic biota.

  6. Combustion system processes leading to corrosive deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Rosner, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Degradation of turbine engine hot gas path components by high temperature corrosion can usually be associated with deposits even though other factors may also play a significant role. The origins of the corrosive deposits are traceable to chemical reactions which take place during the combustion process. In the case of hot corrosion/sulfidation, sodium sulfate was established as the deposited corrosive agent even when none of this salt enters the engine directly. The sodium sulfate is formed during the combustion and deposition processes from compounds of sulfur contained in the fuel as low level impurities and sodium compounds, such as sodium chloride, ingested with intake air. In other turbine and power generation situations, corrosive and/or fouling deposits can result from such metals as potassium, iron, calcium, vanadium, magnesium, anad silicon. Previously announced in STAR as N81-23243

  7. Combustion system processes leading to corrosive deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Rosner, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    Degradation of turbine engine hot gas path components by high temperature corrosion can usually be associated with deposits even though other factors may also play a significant role. The origins of the corrosive deposits are traceable to chemical reactions which take place during the combustion process. In the case of hot corrosion/sulfidation, sodium sulfate was established as the deposited corrosive agent even when none of this salt enters the engine directly. The sodium sulfate is formed during the combustion and deposition processes from compounds of sulfur contained in the fuel as low level impurities and sodium compounds, such as sodium chloride, ingested with intake air. In other turbine and power generation situations, corrosive and/or fouling deposits can result from such metals as potassium, iron, calcium, vanadium, magnesium, and silicon.

  8. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  9. Trends in atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur deposition in northern Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staelens, Jeroen; Wuyts, Karen; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Van Avermaet, Philip; Buysse, Hilde; Van den Bril, Bo; Roekens, Edward; Ottoy, Jean-Pierre; Verheyen, Kris; Thas, Olivier; Deschepper, Ellen

    2012-03-01

    Temporal trends (2002-2009) in air concentrations and wet and dry atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) were determined for nine stations in northern Belgium (Flanders). Wet deposition of NH4+, NO3- and SO42- was measured with wet-only precipitation collectors and air concentrations of NH3, NO2 and SO2 with passive samplers. Dry deposition was calculated from the air concentrations and literature-based deposition velocities. Generalized additive models were used to assess seasonal and long-term trends of biweekly measurements. Kendall tests on annual data were also applied but found to be less powerful. There was no trend in wet N deposition, while wet deposition of SO42- and air concentrations of NH3 and SO2 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) at seven of the nine stations. For NO2, no significant long-term trend was detected, but opposite to the other compounds, the NO2 concentration tended to increase at all stations. Overall, inorganic N deposition and potentially acidifying deposition (N + S) to grassland decreased significantly at seven stations. The N and N + S deposition to grassland in 2009 was generally below deposition targets for 2010, but the difference was not significant when accounting for data uncertainty using a bootstrap resampling procedure. For most stations, atmospheric deposition to heathland and deciduous forest insignificantly exceeded the targets, while deposition to coniferous forest was significantly too high. Consequently, additional policy measures are needed to reach deposition targets in order to prevent further eutrophication and acidification of (semi)natural ecosystems and to protect groundwater layers in Flanders.

  10. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  11. Automated semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility (totally automatic) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to the track, and sent on to the next operation. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  12. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  13. Technical note: Examining ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over sea-water and can be influenced by chemical interactions at the air-water interface. Here, we examine the effect of chemical interactions of iodide, dimethylsulfide, dissolved organic c...

  14. Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with neuroinflammation, an altered innate immune response, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, ultrafine particulate deposition, and accumulation of amyloid beta-42 and alpha-synuclein in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Solt, Anna C; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Nuse, Bryan; Herritt, Lou; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Stone, Ida; García, Raquel; Brooks, Diane M; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Reed, William

    2008-02-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. We investigated whether residency in cities with high air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation/neurodegeneration in healthy children and young adults who died suddenly. We measured mRNA cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in target brain regions from low (n = 12) or highly exposed residents (n = 35) aged 25.1 +/- 1.5 years. Upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, substantia nigrae and vagus nerves; disruption of the blood-brain barrier; endothelial activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell trafficking were seen in highly exposed subjects. Amyloid beta42 (Abeta42) immunoreactivity was observed in 58.8% of apolipoprotein E (APOE) 3/3 < 25 y, and 100% of the APOE 4 subjects, whereas alpha-synuclein was seen in 23.5% of < 25 y subjects. Particulate material (PM) was seen in olfactory bulb neurons, and PM < 100 nm were observed in intraluminal erythrocytes from lung, frontal, and trigeminal ganglia capillaries. Exposure to air pollution causes neuroinflammation, an altered brain innate immune response, and accumulation of Abeta42 and alpha-synuclein starting in childhood. Exposure to air pollution should be considered a risk factor for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and carriers of the APOE 4 allele could have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if they reside in a polluted environment.

  15. Novel interconnect deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckman, D. M.; Wendt, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    A new series of experiments was initiated to improve current interconnect deposition technology for integrated circuits. Preliminary aluminum deposition experiments were carried out using trimethylamine(alane) as the precursor, and some mildly reflective, uniform aluminum films were successfully deposited on glass slides, suggesting that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) will be a practicable deposition technique for advanced integrated circuit interconnect films. CVD studies of aluminum and zirconium- and hafnium-diboride thin films are continuing.

  16. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's tabulation of volcanogenic uranium deposits lists 100 deposits in 20 countries, with major deposits in Russia, Mongolia, and China. Collectively these deposits are estimated to contain uranium resources of approximately 500,000 tons of uranium, which amounts to 6 percent of the known global resources. Prior to the 1990s, these deposits were considered to be small (less than 10,000 tons of uranium) with relatively low to moderate grades (0.05 to 0.2 weight percent of uranium). Recent availability of information on volcanogenic uranium deposits in Asia highlighted the large resource potential of this deposit type. For example, the Streltsovskoye district in eastern Russia produced more than 100,000 tons of uranium as of 2005; with equivalent resources remaining. Known volcanogenic uranium deposits within the United States are located in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. These deposits produced an estimated total of 800 tons of uranium during mining from the 1950s through the 1970s and have known resources of 30,000 tons of uranium. The most recent estimate of speculative resources proposed an endowment of 200,000 tons of uranium.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  18. Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff, California: A novel pyroclastic depositional mechanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, C.J.N.; Hildreth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff show features common to both archetypal fall and surge deposits. Like normal-fall deposits, they have an overall plane-parallel bedding and flat-lying pumice clasts but also, like surge deposits, they show variable development of cross-bedding, some crystal and pumice sorting, and some rounding of pumice clasts. All variations exist from normal-fall deposits, through streaky material with incipient development of cross-bedding, to the hybrid fall deposits with well-developed cross-bedding. The streaky and hybrid deposits are interpreted as fall material contemporaneously redeposited by strong (up to 40 m/s) swirling winds, comparable to firestorm whirlwinds, generated by air currents associated with coeval emplacement of pyroclastic flows. Recognition of hybrid fall deposits is important in interpreting the dynamics of explosive eruptions and correctly assessing volcanic hazards. However, although such deposits may be commonly produced by explosive eruptions, especially where pyroclastic flows accompany fall activity, they are likely to be overlooked, or wrongly interpreted as surge deposits or secondary, reworked material.

  19. Ultrafine particle deposition in subjects with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, David C; Morrow, Paul E; Oberdörster, Günter; Utell, Mark J; Frampton, Mark W

    2004-06-01

    Ambient air particles in the ultrafine size range (diameter < 100 nm) may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter. However, there are few data on ultrafine particle deposition during spontaneous breathing, and none in people with asthma. Sixteen subjects with mild to moderate asthma were exposed for 2 hr, by mouthpiece, to ultrafine carbon particles with a count median diameter (CMD) of 23 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Deposition was measured during spontaneous breathing at rest (minute ventilation, 13.3 +/- 2.0 L/min) and exercise (minute ventilation, 41.9 +/- 9.0 L/min). The mean +/- SD fractional deposition was 0.76 +/- 0.05 by particle number and 0.69 +/- 0.07 by particle mass concentration. The number deposition fraction increased as particle size decreased, reaching 0.84 +/- 0.03 for the smallest particles (midpoint CMD = 8.7 nm). No differences between sexes were observed. The deposition fraction increased during exercise to 0.86 +/- 0.04 and 0.79 +/- 0.05 by particle number and mass concentration, respectively, and reached 0.93 +/- 0.02 for the smallest particles. Experimental deposition data exceeded model predictions during exercise. The deposition at rest was greater in these subjects with asthma than in previously studied healthy subjects (0.76 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.10, p < 0.001). The efficient respiratory deposition of ultrafine particles increases further in subjects with asthma. Key words: air pollution, asthma, deposition, dosimetry, inhalation, ultrafine particles.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber and sample pedestal heated by an external RF coil has been extensively modified by installation of mass flow controllers, automatic process sequence timers, and special bellows-sealed air-operated valves for overall improved performance. Various film characterization procedures, including classical metallography, SEM analyses, X ray diffraction analyses, surface profilometry, and electrical measurements (resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, spreading resistance profiles, and minority-carrier lifetime by the C-V-t method) area used to correlate Si sheet properties with CVD parameters and substrate properties. Evaluation procedures and measurements are given. Experimental solar cell structures were made both in epitaxial Si sheet (on sapphire substrates) and in polycrystalline material on alumina substrates, the former to provide an indication of what might be an upper limit on performance of the latter. Preliminary results are given, as obtained in cell structures not specially designed to allow for the unique properties of the sheet material, and fabricated in material known to be far from optimum for photovoltaic performance. Low power conversion efficiencies have been obtained in the epitaxial as well as the polycrystalline Si sheet.

  1. Atmospheric deposition fluxes to Monetary Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E.; Paytan, A.; Ryan, J.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances. Sources of these components include both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources, which may contribute to harmful health and environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. This study looks at the flux of aerosol deposition (TSP - total suspended particle load) to Monterey Bay, California. Samples are collected on a cascade impactor aerosol sampler (size fractions PM 2.5 and PM 10) every 48 hours continuously. Preliminary results indicate that the TSP for PM 10 ranged from 0.026 to 0.104 mg m-3 of air and for PM 2.5 from 0.014 to 0.046 mg m-3 of air. Using a deposition velocity of 2 cm s-1 for the large fraction (PM10 - PM 2.5) and a deposition velocity of 0.7 cm s-1 for the fine fraction (PM 2.5) deposition rates are 13 and 86 mg m-2 d-1 respectively.

  2. Estimating Total Deposition Using NADP & CASTNET Data (NADP 2016 poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than 40 years, efforts have been made to estimate total sulfur and nitrogen deposition in the United States using a combination of measured concentrations in precipitation and in the air, precipitation amounts for wet deposition, and various modeled or estimated depositi...

  3. 49 CFR 821.19 - Depositions and other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY BOARD RULES OF PRACTICE IN AIR SAFETY PROCEEDINGS General Rules Applicable to Petitions for Review, Appeals to the Board, and Appeals From Law Judges Initial Decisions and Appealable Orders § 821.19... deposition. A copy of any notice of deposition shall be served on the law judge to whom the proceeding...

  4. 49 CFR 821.19 - Depositions and other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY BOARD RULES OF PRACTICE IN AIR SAFETY PROCEEDINGS General Rules Applicable to Petitions for Review, Appeals to the Board, and Appeals From Law Judges Initial Decisions and Appealable Orders § 821.19... deposition. A copy of any notice of deposition shall be served on the law judge to whom the proceeding...

  5. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  6. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Climate Change on Children's Health: Session Two: Air Quality Impacts MODERATOR: Susan Anenberg, EPA Meredith McCormack, Johns ... University • Effects of Climate Change on Children’s Health: Air Quality Impacts Frederica Perera, Columbia University • Air quality Impacts ...

  7. Evaluation of Data Replacement Strategies for CASTNET Dry Deposition Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) and its predecessor, the National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN), as national air quality and meteorological monitoring networks. The purpose of CASTNET is to track the pr...

  8. United States Air Force Agency Financial Report 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Air Force General Fund The General Fund is the fund into which most receipts of the United States Government are deposited . Exceptions include...receipts from specific sources required by law to be deposited into other designated funds and receipts from appropriations made by Congress to carry...capital (revolving), trust, special, and deposit funds. The Air Force uses these appropriations and funds to execute its missions and subsequently report

  9. Nitrogen deposition in California forests: a review.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, A; Fenn, M E

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of the major nitrogenous (N) compounds and their biological effects in California forests are reviewed. Climatic characteristics of California are summarized in light of their effects on pollutant accumulation and transport. Over large areas of the state dry deposition is of greater magnitude than wet deposition due to the arid climate. However, fog deposition can also be significant in areas where seasonal fogs and N pollution sources coincide. The dominance of dry deposition is magnified in airsheds with frequent temperature inversions such as occur in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Most of the deposition in such areas occurs in summer as a result of surface deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO3) as well as particulate nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Internal uptake of gaseous N pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), and others provides additional N to forests. However, summer drought and subsequent lower stomatal conductance of plants tend to limit plant utilization of gaseous N. Nitrogen deposition is much greater than S deposition in California. In locations close to photochemical smog source areas, concentrations of oxidized forms of N (NO2, HNO3, PAN) dominate, while in areas near agricultural activities the importance of reduced N forms (NH3, NH4+) significantly increases. Little data from California forests are available for most of the gaseous N pollutants. Total inorganic N deposition in the most highly-exposed forests in the Los Angeles Air Basin may be as high as 25-45 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Nitrogen deposition in these highly-exposed areas has led to N saturation of chaparral and mixed conifer stands. In N saturated forests high concentrations of NO3- are found in streamwater, soil solution, and in foliage. Nitric oxide emissions from soil and foliar N:P ratios are also high in N saturated sites. Further research is needed to determine the

  10. An Intercomparison of the Deposition Models Used in the CASTNET and CAPMoN Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess long-term trends in atmospheric deposition, the U.S. operates the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) and Canada operates the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN). Both networks use modeled dry deposition velocities and measured atmospher...

  11. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Brian, Riley; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1989-01-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  12. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  13. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  14. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Air Policing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Iraq. To provide a background for understanding why Britain commenced the policy of air policing, this paper begins with a review of contemporary...7 Omissi, Air Power, XV. 8 policing actions or the pushing home of advantages gained by the air.” Within the context of this paper , the...control operations, and therefore within the context of this paper , the term coercive airpower refers to the threat of harming a population or the threat

  16. Some peat deposits in Penobscot County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cornelia Clermont; Anderson, Walter A.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty of the peat deposits in Penobscot County, Maine contain an estimated 29,282,000 short tons air-dried peat. The peat is chiefly sphagnum moss and reed-sedge of high quality according to ASTM standards for agricultural and horticultural use. Analyses show that this same volume has high fuel value, low sulfur and high hydrogen contents compared with lignite and sub-bituminous coal, which may indicate that it also has potential for fuel use. On the basis of the metallic trace element content, one area within the region containing the 20 deposits has been delineated for further bedrock studies.

  17. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  18. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment Summary: Title IV

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview of the 1990 amendments to Title IV of the Clean Air Act, which were enacted to curb acid rain, urban air pollution and toxic air emissions. The edits to this title deal with acid deposition control.

  19. Environmental Assessment for the Air Force Research Laboratory Security Fence Project, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    flanks of the hills are blanketed by Quaternary- aged alluvial fans consisting of water-laid sand and gravel deposits. The valley floor is composed...bedded clay and sand, interfingered with the encroaching alluvial fan deposits. Playa margins have shoreline sand deposits from the wetter middle and...AFRL and are detailed as follows (United States Air Force 2008a):  Alluvial fans in the AFRL and proposed fence project area primarily consist of

  20. 78 FR 56583 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Part 330 RIN 3064-AE00 Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit AGENCY: Federal...)(1), 12 U.S.C. 1821(f)(1). A. Definition of ``Deposit'' The term ``deposit'' is defined in section 3... between domestic and foreign deposits. The current statutory definition of ``deposit'' under section...

  1. An automatic collector to monitor insoluble atmospheric deposition: an application for mineral dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, B.; Losno, R.; Chevaillier, S.; Vincent, J.; Roullet, P.; Bon Nguyen, E.; Ouboulmane, N.; Triquet, S.; Fornier, M.; Raimbault, P.; Bergametti, G.

    2015-03-01

    Deposition is one of the key processes controlling the mass budget of the atmospheric mineral dust concentration. However, dust deposition remains poorly constrained in transport models simulating the atmospheric dust cycle. This is mainly due to the limited number of relevant deposition measurements. This paper aims at presenting an automatic collector (CARAGA), specially developed to sample the total (dry and wet) atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust in remote areas. The autonomy of the CARAGA can range from 25 days to almost 1 year depending on the programed sampling time step (1 day and 2 weeks sampling time steps, respectively). This collector is used to sample atmospheric deposition on Frioul Island which is located in the Gulf of Lions in the Western Mediterranean Basin over which Saharan dust can be transported and deposited. To quantify the mineral dust mass in deposition samples, a weighing and ignition protocol is applied. Two years of continuous deposition measurements performed on a weekly time step sampling on Frioul Island are presented and discussed with in-situ measurements, air mass trajectories and satellite observations of dust.

  2. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  3. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  4. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  5. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  6. ElectroSpark Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-25

    ElectroSpark Deposition Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Cadmium Alternatives Team Canadian Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Group on Pollution...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Processes, Inc. ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) Results of Materials Testing and Technology Insertion January 25, 2007 Advanced Surfaces And Processes, Inc. 3

  7. Deposition, retention, and clearance of inhaled particles.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, M; Yeates, D B; Albert, R E

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the concentrations and characteristics of air contaminants in the work place and the resultant toxic doses and potential hazards after their inhalation depends greatly on their patterns of deposition and the rates and pathways for their clearance from the deposition sites. The distribution of the deposition sites of inhaled particles is strongly dependent on their aerodynamic diameters. For normal man, inhaled non-hygroscopic particles greater than or equal to 2 micrometers that deposit in the conducting airways by impaction are concentrated on to a small fraction of the surface. Cigarette smoking and bronchitis produce a proximal shift in the deposition pattern. The major factor affecting the deposition of smaller particles is their transfer from tidal to reserve air. For particles soluble in respiratory tract fluid, systemic uptake may be relatively complete for all deposition patterns, and there may be local toxic or irritant effects or both. On the other hand, slowly soluble particles depositing in the conducting airways are carried on the surface to the glottis and are swallowed within one day. Mucociliary transport rates are highly variable, both along the ciliated airways of a given individual and between individuals. The changes in clearance rates produced by drugs, cigarette smoke, and other environmental pollutants can greatly increase or decrease these rates. Particles deposited in non-ciliated airways have large surface-to-volume ratios, and clearance by dissolution can occur for materials generally considered insoluble. They may also be cleared as free particles either by passive transport along surface liquids or, after phagocytosis, by transport within alveolar macrophages. If the particles penetrate the epithelium, either bare or within macrophages, they may be sequestered within cells or enter the lymphatic circulation and be carried to pleural, hilar, and more distant lymph nodes. Non-toxic insoluble particles are cleared from

  8. Deposit control in ground water remediation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, B.; Soeder, K.

    1995-12-31

    Remedial actions at all types of hazardous waste sites require the implementation of various water treatment technologies. Though the many groundwater treatment technologies are constantly developing, some age-old problems associated with handling any water remains. These operating problems include deposition of naturally occurring inorganic solutes such as iron, manganese, calcium and fouling by indigenous micro-organisms. Fouling of air stripping towers is a common example of this phenomenon. Virtually all groundwater treatment systems experience some degree of operating impediment from this cause. Some systems may take years for deposits to become problems, but many systems become inoperable within weeks or months. Recently released studies by the American Petroleum Institute show that deposit control is the most common operation problem causing remediation system failure. Such failures result in greatly increased operation & maintenance costs and non compliance with regulatory mandates.

  9. Air Apparent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbster, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the principle upon which a barometer operates. Describes how to construct two barometric devices for use in the classroom that show air's changing pressure. Cites some conditions for predicting weather. (RT)

  10. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... general dentist, who has been trained in restorative dentistry techniques, will perform any procedures that use air- ...

  11. Air resources laboratory 1992 report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Laboratory provides scientific advice to elements of NOAA and other Government agencies on environmental problems, emergency assistance, and climate change. ARL research is oriented around three major themes, as follow: (1) Air Quality and Dispersion (air-surface exchange/micrometeorology; acid deposition; ozone and oxidants; aerosols and visibility; toxics); (2) Emergency Preparedness (nuclear; volcanoes; large fires; dense gases); (3) Climate Trends and Variability (solar radiation, including IR, UV; meteorological trends; desertification). Work on all of these themes is multi-organizational within ARL, and requires extensive interaction with other agencies. The issues addressed by these programs relate to environmental effects, human exposure, and societal impact.

  12. Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

    1994-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

  13. Technical note: Examining ozone deposition over seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Kang, Daiwen; Foley, Kristen; Schwede, Donna; Gantt, Brett; Mathur, Rohit

    2016-09-01

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over sea-water and can be influenced by chemical interactions at the air-water interface. Here, we examine the effect of chemical interactions of iodide, dimethylsulfide, dissolved organic carbon, and bromide in seawater on ozone deposition. We perform a series of simulations using the hemispheric Community Multiscale Air Quality model for summer months in the Northern Hemisphere. Our results suggest that each chemical interaction enhances the ozone deposition velocity and decreases the atmospheric ozone mixing ratio over seawater. Iodide enhances the median deposition velocity over seawater by 0.023 cm s-1, dissolved organic carbon by 0.021 cm s-1, dimethylsulfide by 0.002 cm s-1, and bromide by ∼0.0006 cm s-1. Consequently, iodide decreases the median atmospheric ozone mixing ratio over seawater by 0.7 ppb, dissolved organic carbon by 0.8 ppb, dimethylsulfide by 0.1 ppb, and bromide by 0.02 ppb. In a separate model simulation, we account for the effect of dissolved salts in seawater on the Henry's law constant for ozone and find that it reduces the median deposition velocity by 0.007 cm s-1 and increases surface ozone mixing ratio by 0.2 ppb. The combined effect of these processes increases the median ozone deposition velocity over seawater by 0.040 cm s-1, lowers the atmospheric ozone mixing ratio by 5%, and slightly improves model performance relative to observations.

  14. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  15. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  16. Plasma deposition of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, K.E.

    1986-12-01

    Tungsten films were plasma-deposited using an abnormal glow discharge through a mixture of tungsten hexafluoride, hydrogen, and argon. The films adhered well to silicon, silicon dioxide, gallium arsenide, and aluminum substrates placed directly on the discharge cathode. Typical deposition rates were on the order of 160 Angstroms/minute with as-deposited film resistivities of 40 to 70 microohm-cm. The tungsten was analyzed using a number of techniques including x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. Low-resistivity (<10 microohm-cm) films that adhered well to silicon dioxide were obtained with a two-step process utilizing plasma deposition and conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  17. Stratiform chromite deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2010-01-01

    Stratiform chromite deposits are of great economic importance, yet their origin and evolution remain highly debated. Layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld, Great Dyke, Kemi, and Stillwater Complexes, provide opportunities for studying magmatic differentiation processes and assimilation within the crust, as well as related ore-deposit formation. Chromite-rich seams within layered intrusions host the majority of the world's chromium reserves and may contain significant platinum-group-element (PGE) mineralization. This model of stratiform chromite deposits is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. The model focuses on features that may be common to all stratiform chromite deposits as a way to gain insight into the processes that gave rise to their emplacement and to the significant economic resources contained in them.

  18. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  19. Deposition of charged particles on lung airways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Xiong, J Q; Fang, C P; Li, W

    1998-05-01

    The effect of a single electric charge on the efficiency with which ultrafine particles deposit in human airways has been investigated. When inhaled short-lived radon progeny are attached to electrically neutral particles their deposition efficiency is controlled by diffusion. But most ambient particles carry one, or a few, charges. We measured and compared the deposition (DE) of singly charged, charge-neutralized, and zero-charge 20-nm and 125-nm particles in hollow-cast models of human airways. These particle sizes were selected because they are about where modal peaks occur for the activity of the short-lived radon progeny in indoor air. For singly charged 20-nm particles deposition (+/- standard error) in the casts was 3.4 +/- 0.3 times that for charge neutralized aerosols and 5.3 +/- 0.3 times the amount deposited for zero-charged particles. Corresponding ratios for the 125-nm particles were 2.3 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7. Since most ambient particles are charged this effect must be considered when models are used to predict dose from inhaled ultrafine particles.

  20. Development of multistage magnetic deposition microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Pulak; Strelnik, Joseph; Vasanji, Amit; Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej; Roy, Shuvo; Fleischman, Aaron J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic deposition microscropy (MDM) combines magnetic deposition and optical analysis of magnetically tagged cells into a single platform. Our multistage MDM uses enclosed microfabricated channels and a magnet assembly comprising four zones in series. The enclosed channels alleviate the problem plaguing previous versions of MDM: scouring of the cell deposition layer by the air-liquid interface as the channel is drained. The four-zone magnet assembly was designed to maximize capture efficiency, and experiments yielded total capture efficiencies of >99% of fluorescent- and magnetically-labeled Jurkat cells at reasonable throughputs (10(3) cells/min). A digital image processing protocol was developed to measure the average pixel intensities of the deposited cells in different zones, indicative of the marker expression. Preliminary findings indicate that the multistage MDM may be suitable for depositing cells and particles in successive zones according to their magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic susceptibilities or magnetophoretic mobilities). The overall goal is to allow the screening of multiple disease conditions in a single platform.

  1. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Air Toxics Website Rules and Implementation Related Information Air Quality Data and Tools Clean Air Act Criteria Air ... Resources Visibility and Haze Voluntary Programs for Improving Air Quality Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  2. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  3. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  4. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  5. World oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, C.O.; Russell, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The article estimates resources in-place and their oil equivalent. The major deposits are described in the U.S., Australia, USSR, Peoples Republic of China, Morocco, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Europe and South America. 2 refs.

  6. Solid deposit-induced high temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Keeyoung

    The present study is aimed at investigating the high temperature oxidation induced by ash deposition from use of alternative fuels. The alloys and coatings being studied are typical of those used in current power generating gas turbines, as well as those that may be used in advanced systems. To achieve this objective, the alloys Rene' N5, GTD 111, and IN 738 as well as these alloys coated with platinum aluminide and CoNiCrAlY were exposed to conditions relevant to corrosion induced by using alternative fuels. The test conditions representative of deposits from use of alternative fuels were selected based upon initial experiments that involved testing the alloy Rene' N5 with a platinum aluminide coating at 750°C, 950°C, and 1150°C in a variety of environments with deposits of CaO, CaSO4, and Na 2SO4. Based upon the results from such tests, a temperature (950°C) and a deposit (CaO) were selected for the further experiments to compare the corrosion characteristics of all of the alloys and coatings. At 950°C with deposits of CaO, which are the selected experimental conditions obtained from the preliminary tests, accelerated cyclic oxidation experiments were performed with all uncoated and coated superalloys in extra dry air and wet ( pH2O = 0.1 atm) air to compare corrosion characteristics of each with one another. Experimental details will be described followed by the presentation of experimental results and discussion. Additionally, uncoated GTD 111 specimens were exposed to different contaminants and moisture level environments to study the effect of contaminant level and water vapor pressure on CaO-induced degradation. Then, CaO deposits were coated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and specimens with TBCs were exposed to the cyclic oxidation environments. The effects of deposits other than CaO, such as Fe2O3 and SiO2, on the oxidation characteristics of the specimens were also investigated. Finally, a mechanism for high temperature oxidation induced by Ca

  7. Electrospark deposition coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheely, W. F.

    1986-11-01

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life.

  8. Electrospark deposition coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-11-19

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life. (DLC)

  9. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladinović, Zoran; Simić, Vladimir; Jelenković, Rade; Ilić, Miloje

    2016-06-01

    Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc.), jasper (picture, landscape, red etc.), common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc.), silica masses (undivided), and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.). Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine), garnet (almandine and pyrope), tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  10. /Air Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Samar; Sohn, Hong Yong; Kim, Hang Goo

    2014-08-01

    Molten magnesium oxidizes rapidly when exposed to air causing melt loss and handling difficulties. The use of certain additive gases such as SF6, SO2, and CO2 to form a protective MgO layer over a magnesium melt has been proposed. The oxidation behavior of molten magnesium in air containing various concentrations of SF6 was investigated. Measurements of the kinetics of the oxide layer growth at various SF6 concentrations in air and temperatures were made. Experiments were performed using a thermogravimetric analysis unit in the temperature range of 943 K to 1043 K (670 °C to 770 °C). Results showed that a thin, coherent, and protective MgF2 layer was formed under SF6/Air mixtures, with a thickness ranging from 300 nm to 3 μm depending on SF6 concentration, temperature, and exposure time. Rate parameters were calculated and a model for the process was developed. The morphology and composition of the surface films were studied using scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscope.

  11. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  12. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  13. Application of Watershed Deposition Tool to Estimate from CMAQ Simulations of the Atmospheric Deposition of Nitrogen to Tampa Bay and Its Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has developed Watershed Deposition Tool (WDT) to calculate from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model output the nitrogen, sulfur, and mercury deposition rates to watersheds and their sub-basins. The CMAQ model simulates from first principles the transport, ...

  14. Regional characteristics of dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds at EANET sites in Japan from 2003 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomomi; Yagoh, Hiroaki; Sato, Keiichi; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Hayashi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Izumi; Sawada, Kiyoshi

    2011-02-01

    The regional characteristics of estimated dry deposition and total atmospheric deposition, including dry and wet deposition, at 10 EANET sites in Japan from April 2003 to March 2008 are discussed. The components examined for dry deposition were sulfur compounds (SO 2 and particulate SO 42-) and nitrogen compounds (HNO 3, NH 3, particulate NO 3-, and NH 4+). Dry deposition was calculated by the product of the deposition velocity estimated by the inferential method for forest and grass surfaces and the air concentration of each compound. The 5-year mean annual dry deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were in the range of 5-37 and 7-50 mmol m -2 year -1, respectively. The regional characteristics of dry deposition amounts were similar between sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which showed higher deposition in the Sea of Japan side and in the Western Japan. The 5-year mean annual total deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were in the range of 28-77 and 22-130 mmol m -2 year -1, respectively. The contribution of dry deposition to the total deposition amounts was 10-55% and 13-56% for sulfur and nitrogen compounds, respectively. The regional characteristic of total deposition was different between sulfur and nitrogen compounds. Total deposition amounts in Japan were larger than those in CASTNET and EMEP because of high wet deposition, which implied that the increasing emissions of air pollutants in East Asia caused high atmospheric depositions.

  15. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  16. 78 FR 11604 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...; Definition of Insured Deposit AGENCY: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). SUMMARY: The FDIC is... FDI Act definition of the term ``deposit'' expressly excludes any obligation of a bank that is payable... purposes of national depositor preference. III. Statutory Framework A. Definition of ``Deposit'' The...

  17. Monitoring air pollution in the Bialowieza Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzahn, Elżbieta; Sondej, Izabela; Paluch, Rafał

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution, as sulfur dioxide(SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), affects forest health negatively and can initiate forest dieback. Long-term monitoring (since 1986) and analyses are conducted in the Bialowieza Forest due to the threat by abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. This forest has a special and unique natural value, as confirmed by the various forms of protection of national and international rank. The main aim of monitoring is to determine the level and trends of deposition of air pollutants and their effects on selected forest stands and forest communities in the Bialowieza Forest. Concentration measurements of gaseous pollutants and the chemical composition of the precipitation are performed at seven points within the forest area (62 219 ha). Measurement gauges are measuring gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NOx) by the passive method and collecting precipitation at each point at a height of three meters. The period of measuring by the instruments is 30 days. All analyses are conducted according to the methodology of the European forest monitoring program in the certified Laboratory of Natural Environment Chemistry of the Polish Forest Research Institute (IBL). The concentration of pollutant gases (dry deposition) in the years 2002-2015 accounted for only 6-13% of the limit in Poland, as defined by the Polish Ministry of Environment, and are of no threat to the forest environment. Wet deposition of pollutants, which dependents directly from the amount of precipitation and its concentration of pollutants, varied strongly between different months and years. Total deposition (dry and wet) of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) was calculated for seasonal and annual periods. On an annual basis, wet deposition represented approximately 80% of the total deposition of S and N. Total deposition of S did not exceed the average deposition values for forests in north-eastern Europe (5-10 kg ha-1 year-1) at any of the seven measuring points. Total deposition of N did not

  18. Oxide Deposition By PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbotson, Dale E.; Hsieh, Julian J.; Flamm, Daniel L.; Mucha, J. A.

    1989-03-01

    We have studied the chemical and physical properties of silicon oxide films plasma deposited from TEOS (tetraethoxysilane), to gain an understanding of the origins of (1) step coverage and (2) film stability. TEOS was diluted in helium/oxygen mixtures and deposited as a function of discharge frequency (150 kHz and 14 MHz) and 02 flow in a parallel plate reactor. The typical deposition conditions were 1 torr total pressure, 320°C substrate temperature, 1 -9% TEOS, 1 -80% 02, and -0.1 W/cm2 discharge power. Films deposited at high frequency with excess oxygen were generally oxygen-rich, chemically unstable and hygroscopic, while films deposited at low frequency were stable to moisture and slightly deficient in oxygen. However, coverage profiles of high frequency films showed an unusual degree of directionality, which could be used to advantage for the coating of high aspect ratio features. We suggest that a judicious combination of high and low frequency discharges may improve film properties while maintaining directional step coverage. Isotopic labeling experiments were performed using 1802 to gain insight into the origins of the oxygen that is contained in these PECVD films. Complete isotopic scrambling was not observed. Film composition data suggest that there is one tenacious Si-0 bond which remains with the silicon from the original TEOS molecule during the reaction to form Si02.

  19. Comparing Vesicularity in Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Kueppers, U.; Scheu, B.; Kramers, S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    The investigation of processes associated with explosive volcanism requires the knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of the rock material involved. Parameters such as the rock's density and vesicularity highly influence the rheological properties as well as the fragmentation behavior of magma. Because observations inside the volcanic conduit are not possible, information on the spatial and temporal variability of the ascending magma's vesicularity is more easily obtained by measuring a statistically reliable amount of representative erupted material. In order to correlate density/porosity distributions of eruptive products with specific volcanic settings and eruption characteristics, data from six field campaigns in the circum-Pacific area were analyzed and compared. Densities from ~3000 pyroclastic- deposit samples collected on St. Augustine (Alaska), Bezymianny (Kamchatka), Unzen (Japan), Colima (Mexico), and Merapi, Krakatau and Kelut (Indonesia) were mostly measured directly in the field. This field-based density measurement method is based on the Archimedean principle whereby a sample's mass is measured in air and under water (Kueppers et al., 2005). Previous results indicated that the density peaks of St. Augustine and Bezymianny were at 1.5 and 1.6 g/cm3, respectively, whereas the most abundant densities at Mt. Unzen and Merapi were significantly higher at 2.2 and 2.3 g/cm3. However, samples collected from the 1883 Krakatau pyroclastic deposits during our most recent campaign follow a lower density distribution with a density peak of ~0.6 g/cm3. This suggests that the erupted material had a higher gas content. Results will be supported by detailed laboratory-based density and porosity measurements, and investigations of their influence on rock fragmentation and viscosity. This comprehensive work is part of the BMBF project SUNDAARC, which aims to quantify the potential risk of selected highly-explosive volcanoes by combining field and laboratory

  20. Air pollution.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhu D; Sun, Li; Zidek, James V

    2010-01-01

    Toxic air pollutants are continuously released into the air supply. Various pollutants come from chemical facilities and small businesses, such as automobile service stations and dry cleaning establishments. Others, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and other volatile organic chemicals, arise primarily from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (coal and petroleum) and are emitted from sources that include car exhausts, home heating and industrial power plants. Pollutants in the atmosphere also result from photochemical transformations; for example, ozone is formed when molecular oxygen or nitrogen interacts with ultraviolet radiation. An association between air pollution exposure and lung cancer has been observed in several studies. The evidence for other cancers is far less conclusive. Estimates of the population attributable risk of cancer has varied substantially over the last 40 years, reflecting the limitations of studies; these include insufficient information on confounders, difficulties in characterizing associations due to a likely lengthy latency interval, and exposure misclassification. Although earlier estimates were less than one percent, recent cohort studies that have taken into account some confounding factors, such as smoking and education amongst others, suggest that approximately 3.6% of lung cancer in the European Union could be due to air pollution exposure, particularly to sulphate and fine particulates. A separate cohort study estimated 5-7% of lung cancers in European never smokers and ex-smokers could be due to air pollution exposure. Therefore, while cigarette smoking remains the predominant risk factor, the proportion of lung cancers attributable to air pollution may be higher than previously thought. Overall, major weaknesses in all air-pollution-and-cancer studies to date have been inadequate characterization of long-term air pollution exposure and imprecise or no measurements of covariates. It has only been in the last

  1. Evaluating sources of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Sparks, L.A.; White, J.B.; Jackson, M.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Evaluation of indoor air pollution problems requires an understanding of the relationship between sources, air movement, and outdoor air exchange. Research is underway to investigate these relationships. A three-phase program is being implemented: (1) Environmental chambers are used to provide source emission factors for specific indoor pollutants; (2) An IAQ (Indoor Air Quality) model has been developed to calculate indoor pollutant concentrations based on chamber emissions data and the air exchange and air movement within the indoor environment; and (3) An IAQ test house is used to conduct experiments to evaluate the model results. Examples are provided to show how this coordinated approach can be used to evaluate specific sources of indoor air pollution. Two sources are examined: (1) para-dichlorobenzene emissions from solid moth repellant; and (2) emissions from unvented kerosene heaters. The evaluation process for both sources followed the three-phase approach discussed above. Para-dichlorobenzene emission factors were determined by small chamber testing at EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory. Particle emission factors for the kerosene heaters were developed in large chambers at the J.B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory. Both sources were subsequently evaluated in EPA's IAQ test house. The IAQ model predictions showed good agreement with the test house measurements when appropriate values were provided for source emissions, outside air exchange, in-house air movement, and deposition on sink surfaces.

  2. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Objectives This manuscript aims to (1) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (2) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. Materials and methods An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1–100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. Results In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1–2 nm particles with approximately 1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans due to their larger minute volume. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles. PMID:26194036

  3. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY SIMULATION USING THE CMAQ MODEL: FORMULATION DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF WET DEPOSITION RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system has recently been adapted to simulate the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury in three distinct forms; elemental mercury gas, reactive gaseous mercury, and particulate mercury. Emis...

  4. Venus - Landslide Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft has observed remnant landslide deposits apparently resulting from the collapse of volcanic structures. This image, centered at 45.2 degrees south latitude, 201.4 degrees east longitude, shows a collapse deposit 70 kilometers (43 miles) across. The bright, highly textured deposit near the center of the image probably consists of huge blocks of fractured volcanic rock, many as large as several hundred meters across. A remnant of the volcano itself, about 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) across, is seen at the center of the image. The distorted radar appearance of the volcano is a result of extremely steep slopes on the 'scars' from which the landslide material originated. A field of numerous small volcanic domes can be seen in the northern half of the image. The bright irregular lineaments trending to the north-northwest are ridges caused by regional tectonic deformation of the upper layers of the Venusian crust.

  5. Turbine Airfoil Deposition Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Gas turbine failures associated with sea-salt ingestion and sulfur-containing fuel impurities have directed attention to alkali sulfate deposition and the associated hot corrosion of gas turbine (GT) blades under some GT operating conditions. These salt deposits form thin, molten films which undermine the protective metal oxide coating normally found on GT blades. The prediction of molten salt deposition, flow and oxide dissolution, and their effects on the lifetime of turbine blades are examined. Goals include rationalizing and helping to predict corrosion patterns on operational GT rotor blades and stators, and ultimately providing some of the tools required to design laboratory simulators and future corrosion-resistant high-performance engines. Necessary background developments are reviewed first, and then recent results and tentative conclusions are presented along with a brief account of the present research plans.

  6. Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S

    2002-04-20

    Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

  7. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Lograsso, T.A.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate. 7 figs.

  8. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Eshelman, Mark A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate.

  9. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  10. AEROSOL TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN SEQUENTIALLY BIFURCATING AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition patterns and efficiencies of a dilute suspension of inhaled particles in three-dimensional double bifurcating airway models for both in-plane and 90 deg out-of-plane configurations have been numerically simulated assuming steady, laminar, constant-property air flow wit...

  11. Dry Deposition Estimates in Texas during Drought Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Kimura, Y.; McDonald-Buller, E.; McGaughey, G.; Allen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Severe drought has been a recurring phenomenon in the southwestern United States. Most climate models suggest that droughts will become more frequent in the future as climate changes in response to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiative forcing species in the atmosphere. Drought-induced changes in natural and anthropogenically managed and cultivated land cover systems have the potential to affect air quality. Dry deposition refers to the process by which trace gases and particulates in the atmosphere are transferred to the Earth's surface, including to soil, vegetation, and water, in the absence of precipitation. It is a primary physical removal mechanism for ozone during the warm spring through early fall seasons in Texas. As the state endeavors to achieve and maintain attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone, it is important to understand the impacts of drought conditions on estimates of dry deposition. This research explores the interannual variations in predicted dry deposition velocities and component surface resistances of ozone in eastern Texas during 2006-2011, including years with severe to exceptional drought conditions (e.g. 2011) as well as years with average to above average precipitation patterns (e.g. 2007). Two widely used dry deposition algorithms that have been incorporated within the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx), the photochemical grid model used to support air quality planning efforts in Texas, are used in offline simulations.

  12. REGIONAL MODELING OF THE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been developed by the U.S. EPA that is capable of addressing the atmospheric fate, transport and deposition of some common trace toxics. An initial, 36-km rectangular grid-cell application for atrazine has been...

  13. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  14. Fog deposition to the Atacama desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbeld, A.; Klemm, O.; Griessbaum, F.; Sträter, E.; Larrain, H.; Osses, P.; Cereceda, P.

    2010-07-01

    of long, uninterrupted fog periods. On each of these days, turbulent upward fluxes occurred periodically. This leads to the assumption that there could have been a source of fog water near the surface. During the respective time periods, warm air was transported downward. The cold desert ground could have diminished the temperature of air layers at ground level, and therewith could have caused additional condensation. If there had been a source of droplets between the measuring height (5 m above ground) and the surface, deposition could have occurred while the instruments were measuring upward transport of fog droplets. Westbeld, A., Klemm, O., Griessbaum, F., Sträter, E., Larrain, H., Osses, P. & Cereceda, P. (2009) Fog deposition to a Tillandsia carpet in the Atacama Desert. Annales Geophysicae 27, 3571-3576.

  15. Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, M. S.; Vogel, J. R.; Capel, P. D.

    2006-05-01

    Concentrations of more than 80 pesticides and select transformation products were measured in atmospheric deposition during two growing seasons in five agricultural areas across the United States. Rainfall samples were collected at study areas in California, Indiana, Maryland, and Nebraska. In the arid Yakima Valley of Washington, dry deposition for the same compounds was estimated using air concentration measurements and depositional models. In the predominantly corn, soybean, and alfalfa growing region of Nebraska, Indiana, and Maryland, the herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor where the predominant pesticides detected, and the highest concentrations ranged from 0.64 microgram per liter (ug/L) for metolachlor in a small, predominantly dairy use dominated watershed in Maryland to 6.6 ug/L and 19 ug/L for atrazine in Indiana and Nebraska, respectively. California showed a different seasonal occurrence pattern and suite of detected pesticides because the rainy season occurs during the winter months and a wide variety of crops are grown throughout the year. With the exception of metolachlor (0.23 ug/L, max.), the corn and soybean herbicides were not used to any great extent in the California study area and were not detected. The insecticides diazinon (1.21 ug/L, max.) and chlorpyrifos (0.12 ug/L, max.) were detected in nearly every sample taken in California. The Washington study area was similar to California in terms of the variety of crops grown and the pesticides use, but it receives very little rainfall. Dry deposition was estimated at this site from air concentrations and particle settling velocities. The results of these studies show the importance of the atmosphere as an additional source of pesticide loading to agricultural watersheds.

  16. Air Quality System (AQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Air Quality System (AQS) database contains measurements of air pollutant concentrations from throughout the United States and its territories. The measurements include both criteria air pollutants and hazardous air pollutants.

  17. Air pollution modeling and its application III

    SciTech Connect

    De Wispelaere, C.

    1984-01-01

    This book focuses on the Lagrangian modeling of air pollution. Modeling cooling tower and power plant plumes, modeling the dispersion of heavy gases, remote sensing as a tool for air pollution modeling, dispersion modeling including photochemistry, and the evaluation of model performances in practical applications are discussed. Specific topics considered include dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the application of personal computers to Lagrangian modeling, the dynamic interaction of cooling tower and stack plumes, the diffusion of heavy gases, correlation spectrometry as a tool for mesoscale air pollution modeling, Doppler acoustic sounding, tetroon flights, photochemical air quality simulation modeling, acid deposition of photochemical oxidation products, atmospheric diffusion modeling, applications of an integral plume rise model, and the estimation of diffuse hydrocarbon leakages from petrochemical factories. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Thirteenth International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application held in France in 1982.

  18. Electrocatalysts for bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, V.; Iliev, P.; Petrov, K.; Vitanov, T.; Zhecheva, E.; Stoyanova, R.; Valov, I.; Stoychev, D.

    Oxygen reduction and evolution have been studied with respect to the development of bifunctional air/oxygen electrode (BFE). Three groups of catalysts have been prepared: (i) Cu xCo 3- xO 4 by thermal decomposition of mixed nitrate and carbonate precursors; (ii) thin films of Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of Co, Ni and TeO 2 and (iii) Co xO v/ZrO 2 films were obtained by electrochemical deposition. The electrochemical behavior of the chemically synthesized catalysts was studied on classical bilayered gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs), where the catalyst is in form of powder. The GDE catalyzed with vacuum deposited catalysts was prepared by direct deposition of the catalyst on gas-supplying layer, thus creating a ready-to-use gas diffusion electrode. Catalysts prepared electrochemically were first deposited on Ni foam and than pressed onto the gas-supplying layer. Different catalysts deposited on classical and originally designed GDEs were compared by their electrochemical performances. Cu 0.3Co 2.7O 4 deposited on a classical bilayered GDE with loading of 50 mg cm -2 exhibits stable current-voltage characteristics after 200 charge-discharge cycles in a real metal hydride-air battery. The electrochemically and vacuum deposited Co xO v/ZrO 2, Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O films exhibit much higher mass activity compared to Cu 0.2Co 2.8O 4 for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. The difference is that the loading of electrochemically and vacuum deposited films is 0.06 mg cm -2 only, which is a substantial advantage from a practical viewpoint.

  19. "Total Deposition (TDEP) Maps"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an update on the use of a hybrid methodology that relies on measured values from national monitoring networks and modeled values from CMAQ to produce of maps of total deposition for use in critical loads and other ecological assessments. Additionally, c...

  20. Shaping by Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    pasticprototypegreater design flexibility , rapid fabrication, and reduce cost.odels are built directly fronm liquid photopolymers by Shaping deposition processes build...ate on design models to help the designer create manufactura - ble designs on the basis of requirements and limitations of the This paper describes the

  1. Parameterizations of Dry Deposition for the Industrial Source Complex Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesely, M. L.; Doskey, P. V.; Touma, J. S.

    2002-05-01

    Improved algorithms have been developed to simulate the dry deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) with the Industrial Source Complex model system. The dry deposition velocities are described in conventional resistance schemes, for which micrometeorological formulas are applied to describe the aerodynamic resistances above the surface. Pathways to uptake of gases at the ground and in vegetative canopies are depicted with several resistances that are affected by variations in air temperature, humidity, solar irradiance, and soil moisture. Standardized land use types and seasonal categories provide sets of resistances to uptake by various components of the surface. To describe the dry deposition of the large number of gaseous organic HAPS, a new technique based on laboratory study results and theoretical considerations has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the role of lipid solubility on uptake by the waxy outer cuticle of vegetative plant leaves. The dry deposition velocities of particulate HAPs are simulated with a resistance scheme in which deposition velocity is described for two size modes: a fine mode with particles less than about 2.5 microns in diameter and a coarse mode with larger particles but excluding very coarse particles larger than about 10 microns in diameter. For the fine mode, the deposition velocity is calculated with a parameterization based on observations of sulfate dry deposition. For the coarse mode, a representative settling velocity is assumed. Then the total deposition velocity is estimated as the sum of the two deposition velocities weighted according to the amount of mass expected in the two modes.

  2. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  3. Pulmonary deposition of aerosols by different mechanical devices.

    PubMed

    Matthys, H; Köhler, D

    1985-01-01

    With a new method for easy labeling of beta 2-agonists we measured intra- and extrapulmonary aerosol deposition after the administration of a bolus from a metered-dose inhaler at residual volume (RV) inhaling after a pause of 2 s and after immediate administration into the inspiratory flow at functional residual capacity (FRC). Immediate administration during a slow inspiratory vital capacity maneuver gives the highest intrapulmonary deposition (30-40%). Compressed air and ultrasonic nebulizers with a particle distribution pattern of 2-5 micron aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) allow in normal subjects to achieve an intrapulmonary deposition of 30-60% during standardized tidal breathing at rest, the magnitude of the deposition depending mainly on each subject's larynx geometry. The outlet system leads to different deposition patterns in aerosol generators with the same AMMD. Many commercially available aerosol generators do not fulfill the criteria for any intrapulmonary aerosol deposition. For drug administration into the lungs, condensation aerosol generators ('steam boiler nebulizers') are useless as well as compressed-air, ultrasonic and steam driven nebulizers with a particle size of more than 10 micron AMMD.

  4. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Long term response of acid-sensitive Vermont Lakes to sulfate deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric deposition of sulfur can negatively affect the health of lakes and streams, particularly in poorly buffered catchments. In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments, wet deposition of sulfate decreased more than 35% in Vermont between 1990 and 2008. However, most of ...

  6. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING AND OTHER INDOOR SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential indoor particle concentrations are dependent on indoor sources, penetration of outdoor particles, air change with outdoors, and deposition of particles on indoor surfaces as well as other loss mechanisms. Of these factors, few data are available on deposition of pa...

  7. Impact of enhanced ozone deposition and halogen chemistry on tropospheric ozone over the Northern Hemisphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fate of ozone in marine environments has been receiving increased attention due to the tightening of ambient air quality standards. The role of deposition and halogen chemistry is examined through incorporation of an enhanced ozone deposition algorithm and inclusion of halogen ch...

  8. Atmospheric deposition flux estimates for chlorpyrifos and trifluralin in the chukchi sea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 1993 U.S.-Russian BERPAC expedition, residues of agricultural pesticides were detected in seawater, ice, surface microlayer, fog, and air of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. Gas exchange, wet deposition, and dry particle deposition fluxes of trifluralin and chlorpyrifos were estimated using m...

  9. Air cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Okiyoshi; Wakasa, Masayuki; Tamanoi, Yoshihito

    1991-04-01

    The present invention relates to an air cell. This air cell provides a compact light-weight power source for model aircraft permitting them to fly for an extended period so that they may be used for such practical purposes as crop dusting, surveying, and photographing. The cell is comprised of a current collector so disposed between a magnesium, zinc, or aluminum alloy cathode and a petroleum graphite anode that it is in contact with the anode. The anode is formed by adding polytetrafluoroethylene dispersion liquid in a mixture of active carbon and graphite powder, pouring the mixture into a mold and heating it to form the anode. It is fabricated by a plurality of anode sections and is formed with at least one hole so that it can provide a cell which is compact in size and light in weight yet is capable of generating a high output. The anode, the cathode, and a separator are wetted by an electrolytic liquid. The electrolyte is continuously supplied through the life of the cell.

  10. The Grainsize Characteristics of Coignimbrite Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwell, Samantha; Eychenne, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Due to their long atmospheric residence time, identifying the source and understanding the dispersion processes of fine-grained ash is of great importance when considering volcanic hazard and risk. An exceptionally efficient mechanism to supply large volumes of fine-grained ash to the stratosphere is the formation of co-ignimbrite plumes. Such plumes form as air is entrained at the top of propagating pyroclastic density currents, allowing a neutrally buoyant package of gas and ash to loft to high altitudes, consequently dispersing over large areas. The study of ash deposits on land and in deep sea cores has demonstrated that such events have played a major role during ignimbrite-forming eruptions, including the Tambora 1815, the Minoan (Santorini), the Campanian Ignimbrite, and the Younger Toba Tuff eruptions, as well as during more recent, pyroclastic flow-forming, intermediate sized eruptions (Vulcanian to Plinian in style), e.g. Mount St. Helens 1980, Fugen-dake (Unzen) 1991, Pinatubo 1991, Montserrat 1997 and Tungurahua 2006 eruptions. Published, as well as new results from the study of co-ignimbrite deposits, show that co-ignimbrite plumes can rise to high altitudes into the atmosphere (the co-ignimbrite plumes from the May 18, 1980 Mount St Helens blast and the Campanian Ignimbrite eruptions reached 30 - 35 km a.s.l,), potentially distribute enormous volumes of ash (the 75 ka Toba eruption and the Minoan eruption of Santorini settled >800 km3 and >25 km3 of co-ignimbrite ash, respectively), and contribute much of the ash to very large (60±6 vol% of the Campanian fallout deposit 130 to 900 km from vent), as well as intermediate size (up to 58 wt% and 52 wt% in the 2006 Tungurahua and May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens fallout deposits, respectively) explosive eruptions. Comparison of new data with those from the published record shows that co-ignimbrite deposits are strikingly similar, regardless of eruption conditions, and have distinct grain size characteristics

  11. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  12. Effect of fuel type and deposition surface temperature on the growth and structure of an ash deposit collected during co-firing of coal with sewage sludge and sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Kupka; Krzysztof Zajac; Roman Weber

    2009-07-15

    Blends of a South African bituminous 'Middleburg' coal, a municipal sewage sludge, and a sawdust have been fired in the slagging reactor to examine the effect of the added fuel on the slagging propensity of the mixtures. Uncooled ceramic probes and air-cooled metal probes were used to examine the influence of the deposition surface temperature on the growth and structureof the deposits. The initial stages of slagging were in a high-temperature range of 1100-1300{sup o}C and a low-temperature range of 550-700{sup o}C. Laboratory ash, ash sampled on the deposition probes, and ash collected in the cyclone have been analyzed using the X-ray fluorescence technique. The electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of the embedded resin deposit probes have been performed to determine the thickness, structure, porosity, and chemical composition in different layers of the deposit. Distinct differences in structures of the deposits collected using the uncooled ceramic probes and air-cooled steal probes were observed. Glassy, easily molten deposits collected on uncooled ceramic deposition probes are characteristic for co-firing of municipal sewage sludge with coal. Porous, sintered, but easily removable deposits of the same fuel blend have been collected on the air-cooled metal deposition probes. The addition of sawdust does not negatively influence the deposition behavior. Loose, easy removable deposits have been sampled on air-cooled metal deposition probes during co-firing of coal-sawdust blends. The mass of the deposit sampled at lower deposition surface temperatures (550-700{sup o}C) was always larger than the mass sampled at higher surface temperatures (1100-1300{sup o}C). 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Epitaxial growth of Si deposited on (100) Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, L. S.; Lau, S. S.; von Allmen, M.; Mayer, J. W.; Ullrich, B. M.; Baker, J. E.; Williams, P.; Tseng, W. F.

    1980-11-01

    Epitaxial growth of deposited amorphous Si on chemically cleaned (100) Si has been found and layer-by-layer growth occurred at rates comparable to those in self-ion-implanted-amorphous Si. There is no evidence for appreciable oxygen penetration into the deposited layer during storage in air. The critical factors in achieving epitaxial growth are fast (˜50 Å/sec) deposition of Si onto a surface cleaned with a HF dip as a last rinse before loading into the vacuum system. Channeling and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicated that the epitaxial layers are essentially defect free. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopic analysis showed about 1014 oxygen/cm2 at the amorphous/crystal interface. With either higher interfacial oxygen coverage or slow (˜2 Å/sec) deposition, epitaxial growth rates are significantly slower.

  14. Hydroxyapatite Deposition Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    calcific tendinitis or calcific periarthritis, is characterized by the deposition of calcium phosphate crystals (predominantly hydroxyapatite) in...site of HADD is the hip, where calcifications are usually found in the gluteus medius tendon or along the femur at various sites of tendinous ...posterolateral femoral diaphysis, as well as in various other tendinous attachments to the femur. Computed tomography is also helpful in the demonstration

  15. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.

  16. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  17. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  18. Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit welcomed the beginning of 2006 on Earth by taking this striking panorama of intricately rippled sand deposits in Gusev Crater on Mars. This is an approximate true-color rendering of the 'El Dorado' ripple field provided by Spirit over the New Year's holiday weekend. The view spans about 160 degrees in azimuth from left to right and consists of images acquired by Spirit's panoramic camera on Spirit's 708th and 710th Martian days, or sols, (Dec. 30, 2005 and Jan. 1, 2006). Spirit used the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters to capture the colors on Mars. Scientists have eliminated seams between individual frames in the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. Spirit spent several days acquiring images, spectral data, and compositional and mineralogical information about these large sand deposits before continuing downhill toward 'Home Plate.'

  19. Measurements of the deposition rates of radon daughters on indoor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.A.; Rundo, J.; Hengde, W.

    1983-01-01

    The deposition rates of radon daughters on indoor surfaces have been measured by exposing the window of a proportional counter to the air of a house with high concentrations of radon and its daughters. Deposition velocities for unattached RaA and RaB of approximately 4 mm sec/sup -1/ were obtained by dividing the deposition rates by the concentrations of unattached daughters in the air. These results agree with those obtained by other workers but are dependent on the assumptions made about the fractions of the daughters which are attached to the atmospheric aerosol.

  20. Committee on air pollution effects research: 40 years of UK air pollution.

    PubMed

    Fowler, David; Dise, Nancy; Sheppard, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The UK Committee on Air Pollution Effects Research (CAPER) was established 40 years ago. This special section was compiled to mark this anniversary. During this time there have been dramatic changes in the composition of the air over the UK. The four papers in this special section of Environmental Pollution represent the current air pollution effects research focus on ozone and nitrogen deposition, two related issues and are proving from a policy perspective to be quite intractable issues. The UK CAPER research community continues to advance the underpinning science and engages closely with the user community in government departments.

  1. Particle Deposition onto Enclosure Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-20

    Rate, P 16 4.3 Comparison of vd and fi 16 5. Methods for Measurement of Particle Deposition 19 5.1 Measuring Particle Deposition Rate, p 19...deposition. 18 5. Methods for Measurement of Particle Deposition Owing to its importance for numerous engineering systems, the processes of particle...particle counter, time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer, electrical aerosol mobility analyzer, as well as aerosol generation methods , can be found in

  2. A summary of the Lake Tahoe Atmospheric Deposition Study (LTADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolislager, Leon J.; VanCuren, Richard; Pederson, James R.; Lashgari, Ash; McCauley, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Tahoe Atmospheric Deposition Study (LTADS) was conducted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) primarily to generate refined estimates of the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and particulate matter (PM) directly to Lake Tahoe, which straddles the boundary between the states of California and Nevada in the United States of America. LTADS estimated that approximately 185, 3, and 755 metric tons respectively of N, P, and PM being directly deposited to the lake from the atmosphere. Various measurements of emissions, meteorology, and air quality were made within and west (typically upwind) of the Lake Tahoe Air Basin to better understand the pollutant sources contributing to the atmospheric deposition. The data indicate that ammonia (NH 3) contributes the bulk of the N loading. Aerosols with diameters greater than 2.5 μm contribute the bulk of the P and PM mass loadings. The emission sources of P and PM appear to be primarily local and associated with motor vehicles. However, construction, fires, and natural sources also contribute to the pollutant loadings. LTADS was part of a much larger research program to guide efforts to restore the remarkable water clarity of Lake Tahoe.

  3. Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Ian

    2001-09-01

    Many biologically active materials are transported as bioaerosols 1-10 {micro}m in diameter. These particles can deposit on cooling and heating coils and lead to serious indoor air quality problems. This paper investigates several of the mechanisms that lead to aerosol deposition on fin and tube heat exchangers. A model has been developed that incorporates the effects of several deposition mechanisms, including impaction, Brownian and turbulent diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The model is applied to a typical range of air velocities that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters from 1 - 8 {micro}m, and fin spacings from 3.2 - 7.9 fins/cm (8 - 16 fins/inch or FPI). The results from the model are compared to results from an experimental apparatus that directly measures deposition on a 4.7 fins/cm (12 FPI) coil. The model agrees reasonably well with this measured data and suggests that cooling coils are an important sink for biological aerosols and consequently a potential source of indoor air quality problems.

  4. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  5. Visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh, Zahra; Haghighi, Siavosh

    2015-01-01

    Visceral urate deposition (visceral gout) is a common finding during post-mortem examination of poultry. Rare cases of visceral gout may occur in wild birds. A rare case of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) is reported here. In May 2013, carcass of a little bittern was submitted for necropsy to the Clinic of Poultry Diseases (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University) by local authorities of Iran Department of Environment. At necropsy, white chalky deposits were observed on the heart and thoracic air sacs of the bird. To confirm the presence of urates, chalky deposits were collected from pericardium and tested by muerxide test. Heart and kidneys were sampled, preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution and submitted to laboratory for histopathology. Murexide test was positive for presence of uric acid in chalky deposits collected from pericardium. Light microscopy of affected organs confirmed the condition as visceral urate deposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern. PMID:26261716

  6. Deposition parameterizations for the Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, Marvin L.; Doskey, Paul V.; Shannon, J. D.

    2002-06-01

    Improved algorithms have been developed to simulate the dry and wet deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) with the Industrial Source Complex version 3 (ISC3) model system. The dry deposition velocities (concentrations divided by downward flux at a specified height) of the gaseous HAPs are modeled with algorithms adapted from existing dry deposition modules. The dry deposition velocities are described in a conventional resistance scheme, for which micrometeorological formulas are applied to describe the aerodynamic resistances above the surface. Pathways to uptake at the ground and in vegetative canopies are depicted with several resistances that are affected by variations in air temperature, humidity, solar irradiance, and soil moisture. The role of soil moisture variations in affecting the uptake of gases through vegetative plant leaf stomata is assessed with the relative available soil moisture, which is estimated with a rudimentary budget of soil moisture content. Some of the procedures and equations are simplified to be commensurate with the type and extent of information on atmospheric and surface conditions available to the ISC3 model system user. For example, standardized land use types and seasonal categories provide sets of resistances to uptake by various components of the surface. To describe the dry deposition of the large number of gaseous organic HAPS, a new technique based on laboratory study results and theoretical considerations has been developed providing a means of evaluating the role of lipid solubility in uptake by the waxy outer cuticle of vegetative plant leaves.

  7. Coalescence, evaporation and particle deposition of consecutively printed colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Yang, Xin; Shah, Jaymeen; Sun, Ying

    2012-11-01

    In applications such as inkjet printing and spray deposition, colloid drops are often used as building blocks for line and pattern printing where their interactions play important roles in determining the deposition morphology and properties. In this study, the particle deposition dynamics of two consecutively printed evaporating colloidal drops is examined using a fluorescence microscope and a synchronized side-view camera. The results show that the relaxation time of the water-air interface of the merged drop is shorter than that of a single drop impacting on a dry surface. It is also found that both morphology and particle distribution uniformity of the deposit change significantly with varying jetting delay and spatial spacing between two drops. As the drop spacing increases while keeping jetting delay constant, the circularity of the coalesced drop reduces. For the regime where the time scale for drop evaporation is comparable with the relaxation time scale for two drops to completely coalesce, the capillary flow induced by the local curvature variation of the air-water interface redistributes particles inside a merged drop, causing suppression of the coffee-ring effect for the case of a high jetting frequency while resulting in a region of particle accumulation in the middle of the merged drop at a low jetting frequency. By tuning the interplay of wetting, evaporation, capillary relaxation, and particle assembly, the deposition morphology of consecutively printed colloidal drops can be controlled.

  8. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  9. Coffee ring deposition in bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Wu, Ning; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2010-11-01

    Microscopic particles suspended in a liquid are transported and deposited at a contact line, as the contact line recedes due to evaporation. A particle layer of uniform thickness is deposited if the particle concentration is above a threshold; below this threshold the deposit forms periodic bands oriented parallel to the contact line. We present a model for the formation of these bands based on evaporation leading to the breakup of the thin liquid film near the contact line. The threshold results from a competition between evaporation speed and deposition speed. Using this model, we predict the thickness and length of the bands, making the control of patterned deposition possible.

  10. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  11. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  12. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  13. Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of cathodes of microbatteries is based on electrophoretic deposition. Heretofore, sputtering (for deposition) and the use of photoresist and liftoff (for patterning) have been the primary methods of fabricating components of microbatteries. The volume of active electrode material that can be deposited by sputtering is limited, and the discharge capacities of prior microbatteries have been limited accordingly. In addition, sputter deposition is slow. In contrast, electrophoretic deposition is much faster and has shown promise for increasing discharge capacities by a factor of 10, relative to those of microbatteries fabricated by prior methods.

  14. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Li, C.S.; Ramamurthi, M.

    1990-12-31

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the ``unattached`` fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  15. Air Storage System Energy Transfer (ASSET) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, Z. S.

    1983-09-01

    The design features and performance capabilities of Air Storage System Energy Transfer (ASSET) plants for transferring off-peak utility electricity to on-peak hours are described. The plant operations involve compressing ambient air with an axial flow compressor and depositing it in an underground reservoir at 70 bar pressure. Released during a peaking cycle, the pressure is reduced to 43 bar, the air is heated to 550 C, passed through an expander after a turbine, and passed through a low pressure combustion chamber to be heated to 850 C. A West German plant built in 1978 to supply over 300 MW continuous power for up to two hours is detailed, noting its availability factor of nearly 98 percent and power delivery cost of $230/kW installed. A plant being constructed in Illinois will use limestone caverns as the air storage tank.

  16. Linkages among global and regional air issues

    SciTech Connect

    Maarouf, A.R.

    1997-11-01

    Six air issues are currently on science and policy agendas in Canada and elsewhere. These are climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, acidic deposition, SMOG, suspended particulate matter, and hazardous air pollutants. It is now recognized that these issues are interrelated, and they may interact to cause negative as well as some beneficial effects. The linkages among these issues must therefore be better understood in order to develop effective policies to deal with this ensemble of related issues. This paper illustrates through several examples the linkages among the air issues. It also points to potentially conflicting policies arising from the single-issue approach, and it emphasizes the need for better integration of air issues. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  18. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  19. Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... can protect yourself and your family. Learn more Air Quality at Work Workers should breathe easy while on the job, but worksites with poor air quality put employees at risk. Healthy air is essential ...

  20. Air Sensor Toolbox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air Sensor Toolbox provides information to citizen scientists, researchers and developers interested in learning more about new lower-cost compact air sensor technologies and tools for measuring air quality.

  1. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  2. Needed: Clean Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Gerald

    1979-01-01

    Provides information on air pollution for young readers. Discusses damage to substances and sickness from air pollution, air quality, and what to do in a pollution alert. Includes questions with answers, illustrations, and activities for the learner. (MA)

  3. High efficiency air cycle air conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rannenberg, G. C.

    1985-11-19

    An air cycle air conditioning system is provided with regenerative heat exchangers upstream and downstream of an expansion turbine. A closedloop liquid circulatory system serially connects the two regenerative heat exchangers for regeneration without the bulk associated with air-to-air heat exchange. The liquid circulatory system may also provide heat transport to a remote sink heat exchanger and from a remote load as well as heat exchange within the sink heat exchanger and load for enhanced compactness and efficiency.

  4. Characterization of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, A.; Löffler, F.; Cheng, Yun-Chien; Torralba, G.; König, K.; Hausmann, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Stadler, V.; Bischoff, F. R.; Breitling, F.

    2010-04-01

    A device for the measurement of q/m-values and charge degradation of triboelectrically charged particles deposited on a surface was developed. The setup is based on the integration of currents, which are induced in a Faraday cage by insertion of a solid support covered with charged particles. The conductivity of different particle supports was taken into account. The 'blow-off' method, in which the particles are first deposited, and then blown off using an air stream, can be used for characterization of triboelectric properties of particles relative to different surfaces.

  5. Air Pollution Monitoring | Air Quality Planning & Standards ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-06-08

    The basic mission of the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards is to preserve and improve the quality of our nation's air. To accomplish this, OAQPS must be able to evaluate the status of the atmosphere as compared to clean air standards and historical information.

  6. Canyon Floor Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03598 Canyon Floor Deposits

    The layered and wind eroded deposits seen in this VIS image occur on the floor of Chandor Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 5.2S, Longitude 283.4E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Air Pollution Impacts on Global Crop Productivity and Nitrogen Depositio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, C. L.; Tai, A. P. K.; Val Martin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The biosphere is undeniably transformed by air pollution. Emissions, climate change, and land use change are all expected to substantially alter future air quality. In this presentation, we discuss near-term projections (2050) of air quality impacts on both crop productivity and nitrogen deposition. First, we contrast the relative impacts of ozone air pollution and a warming climate on global crop yields. To do so, we define statistical crop yield functions to a warming climate based on the historical record. We combine these relationships with ozone-damage estimates and apply these to future air quality and climate projections from a global coupled chemistry-climate model (CESM). We find substantial variability in the response, with certain regions or crops more sensitive to ozone pollution and others more sensitive to warming. This work demonstrates that air quality management is a key element to ensuring global food security. Second, we examine the relative impacts of anthropogenic emissions, climate change, and land use change on global nitrogen deposition. Nitrogen deposition has rapidly increased over the Anthropocene. Excess deposition of nitrogen to ecosystems can lead to eutrophication of waters, and a decrease in biodiversity. We use the CESM to investigate two scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP8.5) and focus our analysis on the impacts on diverse ecoregions in North America, Europe, and Asia.

  8. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  9. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, Edward N. G.

    1982-10-12

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  10. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  11. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yamada, Masahiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability. Methods and results Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light) were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition in the valleys and at the inclines of micro-roughened structures without affecting the existing micro-configuration. Micro-roughened titanium and apatite-deposited titanium surfaces had similar roughness values. The attachment, spreading, settling, proliferation, and alkaline phosphate activity of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were promoted on apatite-coated titanium with photofunctionalization. Conclusion UV-photofunctionalization of titanium enabled faster deposition of nanoscale biomimetic apatite, resulting in the improved biological capability compared to the similarly prepared apatite-deposited titanium without photofunctionalization. Photofunctionalization-assisted biomimetic apatite

  12. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  13. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  14. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  15. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  16. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees'...

  17. Atmospheric deposition of phthalate esters in a subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Feng; Lin, Yujun; Cui, Kunyan; Wen, Jiaxin; Ma, Yongqin; Chen, Hongli; Zhu, Fang; Ma, Zhiling; Zeng, Zunxiang

    2010-02-01

    In Chinese cities, air pollution has become a serious and aggravating environmental problem undermining the sustainability of urban ecosystems and the quality of urban life. Bulk atmospheric deposition samples were collected two-weekly, from February 2007 to January 2008, at three representative areas, one suburban and two urbanized, in the subtropical city, Guangzhou, China, to assess the deposition fluxes and seasonal variations of phthalate esters (PAEs). Sixteen PAE congeners in bulk deposition samples were measured and the depositional fluxes of ∑ 16PAEs ranged from 3.41 to 190 μg m -2 day -1, and were highly affected by local anthropogenic activities. The significant relationship between PAEs and particulate depositional fluxes (correlation coefficient R2 = 0.72, P < 0.001) showed PAEs are associated primarily with particles. Temporal flux variations of PAEs were influenced by seasonal changes in meteorological parameters, and the deposition fluxes of PAEs were obviously higher in wet season than in dry season. Diisobutyl phthalate (D iBP), Di- n-butyl phthalate (D nBP), and Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) dominated the PAE pattern in bulk depositions, which is consistent with a high consumption of the plasticizer market in China. PAE profiles in bulk deposition showed similarities exhibited in both time and space, and a weak increase of high molecular weight PAE (HMW PAE) contribution in the wet season compared to those in the dry season. Average atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAEs in the present study were significantly higher than those from other studies, reflecting strong anthropogenic inputs as a consequence of rapid industrial and urban development in the region.

  18. Linking Air Quality and Watershed Models for Environmental Assessments: Analysis of the Effects of Model-Specific Precipitation Estimates on Calculated Water Flux

    EPA Science Inventory

    Directly linking air quality and watershed models could provide an effective method for estimating spatially-explicit inputs of atmospheric contaminants to watershed biogeochemical models. However, to adequately link air and watershed models for wet deposition estimates, each mod...

  19. Acid deposition in Asia: Emissions, deposition, and ecosystem effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lei; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Pan, Yuepeng; Larssen, Thorjørn; Tang, Jie; Mulder, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We review and synthesize the current state of knowledge regarding acid deposition and its environmental effects across Asia. The extent and magnitude of acid deposition in Asia became apparent only about one decade after this issue was well described in Europe and North America. In addition to the temperate zone, much of eastern and southern Asia is situated in the tropics and subtropics, climate zones hitherto little studied with respect to the effects of high loads of acid deposition. Surface waters across Asia are generally not sensitive to the effects of acid deposition, whereas soils in some regions are sensitive to acidification due to low mineral weathering. However, soil acidification was largely neutralized by such processes as base cation deposition, nitrate (NO3-) denitrification, and sulfate (SO42-) adsorption. Accompanying the decrease in S deposition in recent years, N deposition is of increasing concern in Asia. The acidifying effect of N deposition may be more important than S deposition in well drained tropical/subtropical soils due to high SO42- adsorption. The risk of regional soil acidification is a major threat in Eastern Asia, indicated by critical load exceedance in large areas.

  20. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  1. Experimental reproduction of tsunami deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, T.; Matsuyama, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the process of sediment transport and deposition under a tsunami inundation is essential to provide the credible information about potential tsunamis from tsunami deposits. Detections of tsunami deposit has contributed to reveal centuries-old record of tsunami incursions. However, our knowledge is still not enough for evaluating the scale of past tsunamis using deposits. In this study, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between the hydraulic condition and sedimentological features of tsunami deposit. The large wave flume in CRIEPI, one of the largest wave flume in the world, which has 205 m length, 3.4 m width and 6 m depth was used. The sandy beach with uniform slope (1/50) were made in the flume. Sand dune of 0.2 high was placed near the shoreline. The tsunami was made by the wave generator which has 2.2 m stroke. The wave at the shore line has 0.6 m depth and the horizontal velocity reached up to 3.5 m/s. The incursion of the wave and its return flow completely washed out the dune and resulted in the deposition especially near the dune. The thickness of deposit shows landward thinning and fining, which has been widely confirmed by field observations. In addition, sedimentary structures of the deposit was investigated using the method similar to that used in geological survey such as core sampling and relief peel sampling. The obtained samples were investigated using a X-ray computed tomography. The obtained CT-images shows that most part of deposition consists two or more subsections divided by horizontal lamination although the deposition near the dune has drastic and complex change thickness and grain size. The subsections shows upward-fining and upward-coarsening which are been reported as common sedimentary structures of tsunami deposit from field surveys. Considering the similarity of sedimentary structures in the deposit reconstructed in this experiment and actual tsunami deposits, this experiment succeeded

  2. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  3. Volcanology and mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast, old volcanic regions, which host many of the world's major hydrothermal-vein, porphyry, and massive-sulfide ore deposits, have been studied mainly by economic geologists, regional stratigraphers, and structural geologists who have limited familiarity with the complexities of volcanic processes. Such "dead" volcanoes, ranging in age from a few million million years (tertiary) to a few billion years (Precambrian), are commonly incompletely and discontinuously preserved due to rapid erosion of originally high-standing volcanic edifices. They can be difficult to date reliably, especially in terms of the time scales of individual volcanic events, and are variably hydrothermally altered-impeding high-resolution petrologic and geochemical studies. Many volcanologists, geochemists, and geophysicists who work on active volcanoes accordingly have been reluctant to become involved in studies of such less tractable rocks. 

  4. An evaluation of ozone dry deposition simulations in East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R.; Hong, Seungkyu K.; Kwon, Hyoung-Ahn; Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex B.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Loughner, C. P.

    2014-08-11

    We used a 3-D regional atmospheric chemistry transport model (WRF-Chem) to examine processes that determine O3 in East Asia; in particular, we focused on O3 dry deposition, which is an uncertain research area due to insufficient observation and numerical studies in East Asia. Here, we compare two widely used dry deposition parameterization schemes, Wesely and M3DRY, which are used in the WRF-Chem and CMAQ models, respectively. The O3 dry deposition velocities simulated using the two aforementioned schemes under identical meteorological conditions show considerable differences (a factor of 2) due to surface resistance parameterization discrepancies. The O3 concentration differed by up to 10 ppbv for the monthly mean. The simulated and observed dry deposition velocities were compared, which showed that the Wesely scheme model is consistent with the observations and successfully reproduces the observed diurnal variation. We conduct several sensitivity simulations by changing the land use data, the surface resistance of the water and the model’s spatial resolution to examine the factors that affect O3 concentrations in East Asia. As shown, the model was considerably sensitive to the input parameters, which indicates a high uncertainty for such O3 dry deposition simulations. Observations are necessary to constrain the dry deposition parameterization and input data to improve the East Asia air quality models.

  5. Atmospheric deposition of fluoride in the lower Tamar Valley, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, P. S.; Bloom, H.

    Soluble fluoride (F -), measured using an ion-selective electrode, was monitored during 1982-1983 in monthly bulk (wet and dry) atmospheric deposition samples collected at 17 locations in the lower Tamar Valley, Tasmania, where an aluminium (Al) smelter is located. Glass samplers (funnel-bottle type) were used, with duplications by plastic samplers at five locations later. The spatial and temporal variations in F - deposition in relation to wind flow and rainfall are discussed, and its impact on the environment is highlighted. The mean deposition rates of F -, as measured from September 1982 to August 1983, ranged from about 90 μg m -2 day -1 at the intended 'background' location to 12,568 μg m -2day -1 at a location about 1 km east-southeast from the smelter. The depositional fluxes of F - and insoluble Al (another elemental tracer of the smelter) are significantly correlated ( P < 0.001). They were much higher within 3 km of the smelter, where vegetation damage by fluoride contamination was most evident. However, air emissions from the smelter could travel at least 10 km up the valley. Wet deposition was the predominant removal process for F - during autumn and winter, while dry deposition appeared to be more significant in summer. The plastic samplers collected about 8 and 17% more F - and Al, respectively, but with higher standard deviations. Thus the variations observed could be largely due to sampling fluctuations.

  6. Enhanced dry deposition of nitrogen pollution near coastlines: A case study covering the Chesapeake Bay estuary and Atlantic Ocean coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Shroder, Shulamit; Pickering, Kenneth E.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen pollution is one of the major sources of nitrogen to many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, worldwide. This modeling study suggests that coastlines frequently experience disproportionally high dry deposition of reactive nitrogen. High concentrations of air pollution from coastal cities often accumulate over adjacent estuaries and coastal waters due to low dry deposition rates over the water and a shallow marine boundary layer trapping marine emissions. As high concentrations of pollutants over the water are transported inland, enhanced dry deposition occurs onshore along the coastlines. Large spatial gradients in air pollutants and deposition totals are simulated along the coastline with decreasing concentrations/deposition as the distance from the water increases. As pollutants are transported onshore, air pollution mixing ratios near the surface decrease due to removal by dry deposition, vertical dilution due to deeper mixing layer heights, and decrease in friction velocity as a function of distance inland from the coastline. Ammonium nitrate formation near agricultural ammonia sources, sodium nitrate formation near coastal areas with atmospheric sea-salt loadings, and particulate growth via water uptake also contribute to large nitrate dry deposition totals at the coastline. Gradients in dry N deposition are evident over a monthly time scale and are enhanced during sea and bay breeze events. Current existing N-deposition monitoring networks do not capture the large spatial gradients of ammonium, nitrate, and nitric acid concentrations near coastlines predicted by the model due to the coarse spatial density distribution of monitoring sites.

  7. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  8. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  9. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  10. The Clean Air Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalone-King, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Clean Air game which teaches about air quality and its vital importance for life. Introduces students to air pollutants, health of people and environment, and possible actions individuals can take to prevent air pollution. Includes directions for the game. (YDS)

  11. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  12. Healthy Air Outdoors

    MedlinePlus

    ... families and can even shorten their lives. Outdoor Air Pollution and Health Outdoor air pollution continues to threaten the lives and health of ... sources such as fires and dust contribute to air pollution. Learn more Fighting for Healthy Air The American ...

  13. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  14. The investigation of atmospheric deposition distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cindoruk, S. Sıddık; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a significant pollution source leading to contamination of remote and clean sites, surface waters and soils. Since persistent organic pollutants (POPs) stay in atmosphere without any degradation, they can be transported and deposited to clean surfaces. Organochlorine pesticides are an important group of POPs which have toxic and harmful effects to living organisms and environment. Therefore, atmospheric deposition levels and characteristics are of importance to determine the pollution quantity of water and soil surfaces in terms of POPs. This study reports the distribution quantities of atmospheric deposition including bulk, dry, wet and air-water exchange of particle and gas phase OCPs as a result of 1-year sampling campaign. Atmospheric deposition distribution showed that the main mechanism for OCPs deposition is wet processes with percentage of 69 of total deposition. OCP compounds' deposition varied according to atmospheric concentration and deposition mechanism. HCH compounds were dominant pesticide species for all deposition mechanisms. HCH deposition constituted the 65% of Σ10OCPs.

  15. Spectrum of energy depositions in the Auger Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Humberto

    1999-08-01

    The measured spectrum of energy depositions in a Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) prototype for the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. A WCD (area 10 m2 )is located in the Puebla University campus at a depth of 800 g/cm2 (2200 m above sea level). Differential and integral spectra in a wide energy deposition range (0.5 - 150 of vertical equivalent muons) are presented. The problem of the WCD "self calibration" procedure (by rate of the muon events) is discussed. The characteristic change of the slopes of the differential spectrum at the transition from single muon signals to EAS signals is also discussed. The measured energy deposition spectrum at extreme signals is used to estimate the linearity of the response of the WCD PMTs. Key words: Auger array, water Cherenkov detector, extensive air showers

  16. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-04-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  17. Fiber inhalability and head deposition in rats and humans. ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to their dimensions and long durability, inhaled asbestos fibers clear slowly from lung airways. Retained fibers may injure the epithelium, interact with macrophages, or translocate to the interstitium to result in various respiratory diseases. Therefore, calculations of fiber inhalability, deposition, and retention in respiratory tract regions of both rats and humans are crucial, both to assess the health risk of fiber exposures and to facilitate inferences from rat inhalation studies. Rat inhalation experiments are underway at the EPA and NIEHS. A model of fiber inhalability and initial deposition in the human and rat nasal cavity was developed. Existing models for particles were extended to fibers by replacing particle diameter with an equivalent fiber diameter. Since fiber inhalability into the respiratory tract and deposition in the extra thoracic airways depended mainly on its inertia, equivalent impaction diameters were derived and substituted in expressions for spherical particle diameter to determine fiber inhalability and nasal losses. Fiber impaction diameter depended strongly on its orientation in the air. Highest inhalability was obtained when fibers were aligned perpendicular to the flow streamlines in the inhaled air. However, detailed calculations of fiber transport in slow moving air such as that in the atmosphere and in lung airways showed that fibers stayed primarily aligned (parallel) to the flow. Therefore, for inhalability calculations,

  18. Characteristics of contaminant deposition onto a cylindrical body surrounded by porous clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minki; Lee, Jinwon; Jung, Hyunsuk; Lee, Haewan; Pohang Univ of Sci; Tech Team; AgencyDefense Development Team

    2014-11-01

    In order to characterize the deposition pattern of air-borne contaminants on a human body protected by a garment, the air flow through the clothing and in the air gap between the clothing and the skin was numerically solved, and the deposition of the suspended contaminants on the skin was obtained over a wide variety of conditions-wind speed, human motion and clothing conditions. The penetrating air flow was sensitive to the pressure inside the air gap, for which a simple model was successfully formulated. Also the profile of the non-uniform deposition velocity or the Sherwood number could be well modeled based on the developing concentration boundary layer inside the air gap. The boundary layer thickness grew vary rapidly, nearly proportional to the square of the distance from the front stagnation point, which is much different from any other boundary layer studied in many engineering fields before. A rather universal function for the distribution of deposition speed over a cylindrical body was obtained, which remained valid for a very wide range of conditions. The characteristics for non-uniform and/or periodic external wind due to human motion were also analyzed. This study is supported by Agency for Defense Development.

  19. Electro-deposition of superconductor oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2001-01-01

    Methods for preparing high quality superconducting oxide precursors which are well suited for further oxidation and annealing to form superconducting oxide films. The method comprises forming a multilayered superconducting precursor on a substrate by providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a substrate electrode, and providing to the bath a plurality of precursor metal salts which are capable of exhibiting superconducting properties upon subsequent treatment. The superconducting precursor is then formed by electrodepositing a first electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the substrate electrode, followed by depositing a layer of silver onto the first electrodeposited (ED) layer, and then electrodepositing a second electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the Ag layer. The multilayered superconducting precursor is suitable for oxidation at a sufficient annealing temperature in air or an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form a crystalline superconducting oxide film.

  20. Ultrasound-Assisted Deposition Of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, C. K.; Jacobson, M. R.; Macleod, H. A.; Potoff, R. H.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of ultrasound-assisted deposition (UAD) of ZrOx , Ta0x , and MgFx films on their optical properties have been investigated. The direction of vibration is transverse to the direction of growing films on substrates that are glued to tubular piezoelectric transducers driven by a power amplifier. Results indicate that ultrasonic powers above 20 W/cm2 are required to induce detectable changes in UV absorption and vacuum-to-air shifts of spectral profiles. UAD is likely to induce oxygen and fluoride deficiencies in oxide and fluoride films and increase the packing density of films. No significant changes between UAD and conventional films were observed in x-ray diffraction analysis, humidity testing, and Nomarski microscopy.

  1. Pattern transition and sluggish cracking of colloidal droplet deposition with polymer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YongJian; Liu, ZhengTang; Zang, DuYang; Qian, YiMeng; Lin, KeJun

    2013-09-01

    Drying of colloidal droplets often develops versatile depositions. We study the drying deposition of both colloidal droplets containing silica nanoparticles and the silica colloidal droplets with polyethylene oxide (PEO) additives. We focus on the effect of polymer additives on the deposition formation and the cracking dynamics by using in-situ microscope observation. With PEO additives, a transition from ring-like deposition to uniform deposition is observed, and the cracking dynamics is greatly reduced. The PEO additives enhance the adsorption of particles at the air-water interface, thus forming the network structure at the interface which blocks the outward capillary flow. This contributes to the uniform deposition. Meanwhile, the multi-distribution of the aggregates size enhances the non-homogeneity of the drying film and consequently results in multi-nucleation of cracks. This reduces the stress accumulation that drives the crack propagation and may be responsible for the sluggish cracking dynamics.

  2. Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A.; De Rosa, H.; Cultrera, L.

    2010-11-10

    We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

  3. A Lightweight Particle Deposition System for Particle Resuspension Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degraw, Jason; Cimbala, John

    2007-11-01

    Experimental studies of particle resuspension often require that particles be deposited in a localized area in a repeatable manner. A system has been designed for this purpose that is lightweight in both mass and complexity -- attributes which are both highly desirable. The low mass of the system allows for accurate determination of the mass of particulate matter placed inside the system (via tare weighing), and the low complexity of the system makes it easy to use. The device is a piston-cylinder apparatus made of plastic, and is therefore inexpensive to build, easy to clean, and readily disposable. Rapid upward movement of the piston draws air into the cylinder through small ports placed around the perimeter of the cylinder. The injected air aerosolizes particulate matter placed in the ports, and then the particles are allowed to settle onto the substrate. The device enables the localized deposition of particles without much lost material, allowing for more frugal and careful use of allergen- containing particulate matter (some of which require a great deal of time and effort to produce). Our previous system would deposit about 15-20% of the particles in the desired location (typically a small region of a flooring sample), while the new system is able to deposit more than 25-30% of the particles in the desired location with considerably less waste.

  4. UNIVERSAL RELATIONSHIP OF TOTAL LUNG DEPOSITION OF PARTICLES IN NORMAL ADULTS WITH PARTICLE SIZE AND BREATHING PATTERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter in the air is known for causing adverse health effects and yet estimating lung deposition dose is difficult because exposure conditions vary widely. We measured total deposition fraction (TDF) of monodisperse aerosols in the size range of 0.04 - 5 micron in dia...

  5. The watershed depositon tool : a tool for incorporating atmospheric deposition in water-quality analyses {sup 1}.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwede, D. B.; Dennis, R. L.; Bitz, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; NOAA; EPA

    2009-08-01

    A tool for providing the linkage between air and water-quality modeling needed for determining the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and for analyzing related nonpoint-source impacts on watersheds has been developed. Using gridded output of atmospheric deposition from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, the Watershed Deposition Tool (WDT) calculates average per unit area and total deposition to selected watersheds and subwatersheds. CMAQ estimates the wet and dry deposition for all of its gaseous and particulate chemical species, including ozone, sulfur species, nitrogen species, secondary organic aerosols, and hazardous air pollutants at grid scale sizes ranging from 4 to 36 km. An overview of the CMAQ model is provided. The somewhat specialized format of the CMAQ files is not easily imported into standard spatial analysis tools. The WDT provides a graphical user interface that allows users to visualize CMAQ gridded data and perform further analyses on selected watersheds or simply convert CMAQ gridded data to a shapefile for use in other programs. Shapefiles for the 8-digit (cataloging unit) hydrologic unit code polygons for the United States are provided with the WDT; however, other user-supplied closed polygons may be used. An example application of the WDT for assessing the contributions of different source categories to deposition estimates, the contributions of wet and dry deposition to total deposition, and the potential reductions in total nitrogen deposition to the Albemarle-Pamlico basin stemming from future air emissions reductions is used to illustrate the WDT capabilities.

  6. Air pollutant intrusion into the Wieliczka Salt Mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salmon, L.G.; Cass, G.R.; Kozlowski, R.; Hejda, A.; Spiker, E. C.; Bates, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Wieliczka Salt Mine World Cultural Heritage Site contains many rock salt sculptures that are threatened by water vapor condensation from the mine ventilation air. Gaseous and particulate air pollutant concentrations have been measured both outdoors and within the Wieliczka Salt Mine, along with pollutant deposition fluxes to surfaces within the mine. One purpose of these measurements was to determine whether or not low deliquescence point ionic materials (e.g., NH4NO3) are accumulating on surfaces to an extent that would exacerbate the water vapor condensation problems in the mine. It was found that pollutant gases including SO2 and HNO3 present in outdoor air are removed rapidly and almost completely from the air within the mine by deposition to surfaces. Sulfur isotope analyses confirm the accumulation of air pollutant-derived sulfur in liquid dripping from surfaces within the mine. Particle deposition onto interior surfaces in the mine is apparent, with resulting soiling of some of those sculptures that have been carved from translucent rock salt. Water accumulation by salt sculpture surfaces was studied both experimentally and by approximate thermodynamic calculations. Both approaches suggest that the pollutant deposits on the sculpture surfaces lower the relative humidity (RH) at which a substantial amount of liquid water will accumulate by 1% to several percent. The extraordinarily low SO2 concentrations within the mine may explain the apparent success of a respiratory sanatorium located deep within the mine.

  7. Atmospheric deposition of toxic pollutants to the Great Lakes as measured by the integrated atmospheric deposition network

    SciTech Connect

    Hillery, B.R.; Simcik, M.F.; Basu, I.

    1998-08-01

    To determine atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic contaminants to the Great Lakes, the US and Canada established the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN), designed to collect regional data representative of the air over the lakes. In this paper, the authors present an update of atmospheric loadings to the Great Lakes for seven organochlorine pesticides, four polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and total-PCBs, four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and four trace metals. Calculations are based on gas, particle, and precipitation samples obtained in 1993 and 1994 at the five master IADN sampling stations. Air-water exchange is the dominant process for most organochlorines and lower molecular weight PAHs. Within the uncertainty in the data given here, current atmospheric loadings are indistinguishable from air-water equilibrium having been achieved over the lakes. In other words, the deposition of most organochlorine compounds into the Great Lakes is about balanced by the evaporation of these compounds from the lakes. Uncertainties in gas-transfer loadings are due to the inexact knowledge of physiochemical parameters, averaging of data over long time scales, and insufficient data for nonatmospheric sources.

  8. Geochemistry of sedimentary ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    A text providing a sedimentological treatment of a study on ore deposits, and especially as related to geochemistry. Excellently documented (about 5000 citations). Well indexed with the index of deposits and localities separated. Contents, Iron. Copper and silver. Aluminum and nickel. Manganese. Uranium. Lead and zinc. Volcanic-sedimentary ores. Appendix. Indexes.

  9. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  10. Particle Deposition in Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-01-01

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  11. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  12. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  13. Deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or large planar surfaces.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  15. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  16. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  17. Atmospheric trace elements at Enewetak Atoll: 2. Transport to the ocean by wet and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Duce, R. A.; Ray, B. J.; Unni, C. K.

    1985-02-01

    The concentrations of trace elements in precipitation and dry deposition are presented for samples collected at Enewetak Atoll (11°N, 162° E) during SEAREX experiments in 1979. The concentrations of Al, Sc, Mn, Fe, Co, and Th in rain are dominated by crustal material, and for these elements, wet deposition evidently exceeds dry deposition. For most of these elements the present rates of atmospheric deposition at Enewetak are similar to their mean rate of accumulation in sediments over the past 5-10,000 years, suggesting that the air-to-sea exchange of particles is closely tied to the sedimentary cycle of the mid-Pacific. Noncrustal sources govern the concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Se, and Cd in wet and dry deposition samples. Analyses of dry deposition collected from a flat plastic plate indicate that the amount of material recycled from the sea surface varies markedly between samples, and even though these estimates do not necessarily reflect the dry deposition to the ocean surface, the results suggest that recycled sea spray often amounts to more than 50% of the total dry deposition of the enriched elements. Recycled sea spray also makes up a significant fraction of the total wet deposition of the enriched elements. The net deposition rates of elements such as Cu and Zn are greater than or equal to their inputs from vertical mixing, but the net deposition of Pb clearly exceeds the input from upwelling. The current net deposition rates of the enriched elements are also similar to their rates of removal to sediments. These results indicate that air-sea exchange processes may significantly affect the chemistry of trace metals in the open ocean.

  18. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  19. Characterization of the acidic cold seep emplaced jarositic Golden Deposit, NWT, Canada, as an analogue for jarosite deposition on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battler, Melissa M.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; Davila, Alfonso F.; Michel, Frederick A.; Craig, Michael A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Leoni, Lisa; Slater, Gregory F.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Preston, Louisa J.; Banerjee, Neil R.

    2013-06-01

    Surficial deposits of the OH-bearing iron sulfate mineral jarosite have been observed in several places on Mars, such as Meridiani Planum and Mawrth Vallis. The specific depositional conditions and mechanisms are not known, but by comparing martian sites to analogous locations on Earth, the conditions of formation and, thus, the martian depositional paleoenvironments may be postulated. Located in a cold semi-arid desert ˜100 km east of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada, the Golden Deposit (GD) is visible from the air as a brilliant golden-yellow patch of unvegetated soil, approximately 140 m × 50 m. The GD is underlain by permafrost and consists of yellow sediment, which is precipitating from seeps of acidic, iron-bearing groundwater. On the surface, the GD appears as a patchwork of raised polygons, with acidic waters flowing from seeps in troughs between polygonal islands. Although UV-Vis-NIR spectral analysis detects only jarosite, mineralogy, as determined by X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry, is predominantly natrojarosite and jarosite, with hydronium jarosite, goethite, quartz, clays, and small amounts of hematite. Water pH varies significantly over short distances depending on proximity to acid seeps, from 2.3 directly above seeps, to 5.7 several m downstream from seeps within the deposit, and up to 6.5 in ponds proximal to the deposit. Visual observations of microbial filament communities and phospholipid fatty acid analyses confirm that the GD is capable of supporting life for at least part of the year. Jarosite-bearing sediments extend beneath vegetation up to 70 m out from the deposit and are mixed with plant debris and minerals presumably weathered from bedrock and glacial till. This site is of particular interest because mineralogy (natrojarosite, jarosite, hematite, and goethite) and environmental conditions (permafrost and arid conditions) at the time of deposition are conceivably analogous to jarosite

  20. Ni-Co laterite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Erin E.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are an important source of nickel (Ni). Currently, there is a decline in magmatic Ni-bearing sulfide lode deposit resources. New efforts to develop an alternative source of Ni, particularly with improved metallurgy processes, make the Ni-Co laterites an important exploration target in anticipation of the future demand for Ni. This deposit model provides a general description of the geology and mineralogy of Ni-Co laterite deposits, and contains discussion of the influences of climate, geomorphology (relief), drainage, tectonism, structure, and protolith on the development of favorable weathering profiles. This model of Ni-Co laterite deposits represents part of the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program's effort to update the existing models to be used for an upcoming national mineral resource assessment.

  1. Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes an improved zinc electrode for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed.

  2. Experimental Determination of ETS Particle Deposition in a Low Ventilation Room

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Nematollahi, M.; Sextro, R.G.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1993-05-01

    Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism for tobacco smoke particles. We report measurements of deposition rates of environmental tobacco smoke particles in a room-size chamber. The deposition rates were determined from the changes in measured concentrations by correcting for the effects of coagulation and ventilation. The air flow turbulent intensity parameter was determined independently by measuring the air velocities in the chamber. Particles with diameters smaller than 0.25 {micro}m coagulate to form larger particles of sizes between 0.25-0.5 {micro}m. The effect of coagulation on the particles larger than 0.5 {micro}m was found to be negligible. Comparison between our measurements and calculations using Crump and Seinfeld's theory showed smaller measured deposition rates for particles from 0.1 to 0.3 {micro}m in diameter and greater measured deposition rates for particles larger than 0.6 {micro}m at three mixing intensities. Comparison of Nazaroff and Cass model for natural convection flow showed good agreement with the measurements for particles larger than 0.1 {micro}m in diameter, however, measured deposition rates exceeded model prediction by a factor of approximately four for particles in size range 0.05-0.1 {micro}m diameter. These results were used to predict deposition of sidestream smoke particles on interior surfaces. Calculations predict that in 10 hours after smoking one cigarette, 22% of total sidestream particles by mass will deposit on interior surfaces at 0.03 air change per hour (ACH), 6% will deposit at 0.5 ACH, and 3% will deposit at 1 ACH.

  3. Isokinetic air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Sehmel, George A.

    1979-01-01

    An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

  4. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  5. The Effect of Ventilation, Age, and Asthmatic Condition on Ultrafine Particle Deposition in Children

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Perez, Daniel; Clague, Juan W.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Li, Wen-Whai; Amaya, Maria A.; Burchiel, Scott W.; Berwick, Marianne; Pingitore, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) contribute to health risks associated with air pollution, especially respiratory disease in children. Nonetheless, experimental data on UFP deposition in asthmatic children has been minimal. In this study, the effect of ventilation, developing respiratory physiology, and asthmatic condition on the deposition efficiency of ultrafine particles in children was explored. Deposited fractions of UFP (10–200 nm) were determined in 9 asthmatic children, 8 nonasthmatic children, and 5 nonasthmatic adults. Deposition efficiencies in adults served as reference of fully developed respiratory physiologies. A validated deposition model was employed as an auxiliary tool to assess the independent effect of varying ventilation on deposition. Asthmatic conditions were confirmed via pre-and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Subjects were exposed to a hygroscopic aerosol with number geometric mean diameter of 27–31 nm, geometric standard deviation of 1.8–2.0, and concentration of 1.2 × 106 particles cm−3. Exposure was through a silicone mouthpiece. Total deposited fraction (TDF) and normalized deposition rate were 50% and 32% higher in children than in adults. Accounting for tidal volume and age variation, TDF was 21% higher in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic children. The higher health risks of air pollution exposure observed in children and asthmatics might be augmented by their susceptibility to higher dosages of UFP. PMID:22848818

  6. Factors governing the atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to remote areas.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pilar; Carrera, Guillem; Grimalt, Joan O; Ventura, Marc; Camarero, Lluís; Catalan, Jordi; Nickus, Ulrike; Thies, Hansjörg; Psenner, Roland

    2003-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured in bulk atmospheric deposition collected in three remote areas of Europe during 1997-1998. Mean total PAH fluxes over a period of 18 months were 1560 +/- 750 and 1150 +/- 630 ng m(-2) mo(-1) in the Pyrenees and the Alps, respectively. In the Caledonian mountains (Scandinavia) the observed mean fluxes were 1900 +/- 940 ng m(-2) mo(-1) (6 month collection). Similar qualitative PAH compositions (p values <0.05) in the bulk atmospheric deposition have been observed between sites, which are dominated by the more volatile parent compounds. The main differences between lakes are related to the high molecular weight compounds. Atmospheric deposition of PAH to these remote sites appears to be independent of their concentrations in the atmosphere, which are similar between sites (in the range of 1.8-3.0 ng x m(-3)), being controlled mainly by particle deposition, followed by precipitation and air temperature. A multilevel regression model including these three variables accounted for 74% of the total variability in total PAH bulk deposition; however, the contribution of each variable in the model is compound and site-dependent. The deposition of high molecular weight PAH depends more on particle deposition and precipitation, whereas air temperature is the main factor controlling the deposition fluxes of the low molecular weight PAH.

  7. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, John W.; Jones, Donald L.; Mu-tian, Bi

    1984-04-01

    Rising sulfur dioxide emissions from increased coal combustion present risks, not only of acid rain, but also to health by inhalation of the SO 2 and acid to the lung. We are investigating human inhalation of ppm SO 2 concentrations mixed with aerosol of submicrometer aqueous salt droplets to determine the effects on lung function and body chemistry. Unlike some investigators, we emphasize ammonium sulfate and trace element aerosol composition which simulates ambient air; aerosol pH, relative humidity, and temperature control to reveal gas-particle reaction mechanisms; and dose estimates from length of exposure, SO 2 concentration, and a direct measurement of respiratory deposition of aerosol as a function of particle size by cascade impactor sampling and elemental analysis by PIXE. Exposures, at rest or during exercise, are in a walk-in chamber at body temperature and high humidity to simulate Florida's summer climate. Lung function measurement by spirometry is carried out immediately after exposure. The results are significant in relating air quality to athletic performance and to public health in the southeastern United States.

  8. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two

  9. South Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 July 2003

    Similar to ice cores taken from Greenland and Antarctica, Mars also has fine-scale layered deposits in both the north and south polar regions. In this image from the south pole, alternating light and dark bands represent varying amounts of dust or sand mixed in with carbon dioxide ice. These layers are related in part to climate cycles caused by variations in the tilt of Mars' rotational axis, as well as other orbital variations that occur on geologic time scales (tens of thousands of years).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1, Longitude 260.4 East (99.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Deposition + Erosion = Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2003

    Toward the westernmost extent of the Medusae Fossae Formation, a 5000+ km long belt of eroding sediments, the interleaving of erosional surfaces produces dramatic textural variations. In the lower third of this image, the cross-hatched MFF layer is being stripped back from a surface that was already heavily eroded before the MFF layer was deposited. Also, note the sinuous and, in places, dendritic ridges that are either linear dunes or inverted channels.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -3.9, Longitude 154.1East (205.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  12. Canopy penetration and deposition of barrier sprays from electrostatic and conventional sprayers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W C; Farooq, M; Walker, T W; Fritz, B; Szumlas, D; Quinn, B; Bernier, U; Hogsette, J; Lan, Y; Huang, Y; Smith, V L; Robinson, C A

    2009-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the usefulness of electrostatic and conventional sprayers for barrier applications. Two conventional and three electrostatic sprayers were used in the study. Usefulness of the sprayers was rated based on penetration of spray into and deposition onto 2 sides of leaves on natural vegetation. Bifenthrin (Talstar adulticide) was applied at labeled rate, fluorescent dye was added to the tank mix as tracer, and all sprayers applied the dye and insecticide at the same rate. The results indicated that sprayers producing larger droplets produced significantly higher deposition on vegetation in barrier applications than the sprayers producing smaller droplets. Sprayers with higher air velocity at the nozzle discharge proved significantly better for barrier sprays than the sprayers with lower air velocity. Electrostatic sprayers did not show any improvement in deposition on vegetation or in penetration into vegetation over the conventional sprayers. There was no difference in deposition between truck-mounted and backpack sprayers.

  13. Stabilization of ambient sensitive atomic layer deposited lanthanum aluminates by annealing and in situ capping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swerts, J.; Gielis, S.; Vereecke, G.; Hardy, A.; Dewulf, D.; Adelmann, C.; Van Bael, M. K.; Van Elshocht, S.

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the effect of air exposure on lanthanum aluminates (LaAlOx) deposited by atomic layer deposition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy of as-deposited LaAlOx showed that H2O is absorbed during air exposure and that the amount of absorbed H2O increases with increasing La atomic percent. C was found to be incorporated already during deposition in the form of carbonates. H2O and CO2 are outgassed during postdeposition annealing in an inert atmosphere. After a 700 °C postdeposition anneal, the LaAlOx becomes resistant against H2O absorption due to film densification. Alternatively, in situ capping of the LaAlOx with a ˜2 nm thin Al2O3 film protects the LaAlOx against H2O absorption, but it also hinders the outgassing of the C contaminants during a postdeposition anneal.

  14. Determination of particle deposition in enclosed spaces by Detached Eddy Simulation with the Lagrangian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Miao; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-09-01

    Accurate prediction of particle deposition in airliner cabins is important for estimating the exposure risk of passengers to infectious diseases. This study developed a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) model with a modified Lagrangian method. The computer model was validated with experimental data for particle deposition in a cavity with natural convection and with air velocity, air temperature, and particle concentration data from a four-row, twin-aisle cabin mockup. The validation showed that the model performed well for the two cases. Then the model was further used to study particle deposition in the cabin mockup with seven sizes of particles. The particles were assumed to be released from an index passenger due to breathing or talking at zero velocity and due to coughing at a suitable jet velocity. This study can provide quantitative particle deposition distributions for different surfaces and particles removed by cabin ventilation.

  15. Isotonic and hypertonic saline droplet deposition in a human upper airway model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Kim, Chong S

    2006-01-01

    The evaporative and hygroscopic effects and deposition of isotonic and hypertonic saline droplets have been simulated from the mouth to the first four generations of the tracheobronchial tree under laminar-transitional-turbulent inspiratory flow conditions. Specifically, the local water vapor transport, droplet evaporation rate, and deposition fractions are analyzed. The effects of inhalation flow rates, thermodynamic air properties and NaCl-droplet concentrations of interest are discussed as well. The validated computer simulation results indicate that the increase of NaCl-solute concentration, increase of inlet relative humidity, or decrease of inlet air temperature may reduce water evaporation and increase water condensation at saline droplet surfaces, resulting in higher droplet depositions due to the increasing particle diameter and density. However, solute concentrations below 10% may not have a very pronounced effect on droplet deposition in the human upper airways.

  16. Ecological effects of nitrogen and sulfur air pollution in the US: what do we know?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, Tara L.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Barber, Mary C.; Baron, Jill S.; Cosby, Bernard J.; Deerhake, Marion E.; Dennis, Robin L.; Dubois, Jean-Jacque B.; Goodale, Christine L.; Herlihy, Alan T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Novak, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  17. Atmospheric gas-particle partitioning versus gaseous/particle-bound deposition of SVOCs: Why they are not equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüge, Juliane; Bogdal, Christian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-08-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be particle-bound or in the gas phase in the atmosphere, depending on the (temperature dependent) gas-particle partitioning of the chemicals and the fraction of particles in air. Several studies linked gas-particle partitioning of SVOCs in the atmosphere directly to the gaseous/particle-bound deposition of these chemicals, i.e. in cases of compounds occurring mainly in the gas phase, the deposition was also assumed to be mainly in gaseous form. In this study, we apply a multi-media fate model to point out that gas-particle partitioning of SVOCs in air and gaseous/particle-bound deposition of SVOCs are driven by different mechanism and, thus, cannot be deduced from each other. We apply our calculations to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as model SVOCs. We show that the fraction of particle-bound deposition to deciduous forest is 1.5-190 times higher in winter and between 5 and 1000 times higher in summer than the particle-bound fraction of these chemicals in air. The fraction of particle-bound deposition to coniferous forest is 1.5-172 times higher in winter and between 5 and 1000 times higher in summer than the particle-bound fraction of PCBs in air. In addition to the fractions of particle-bound SVOCs in air and particle-bound deposition, we recalculated particle-bound and gaseous deposition velocities to coniferous and deciduous forest for PCBs. The deposition velocities obtained for dry gaseous deposition (<1 m/h) are much lower than the existing values in the literature (10-200 m/h) because earlier studies assumed that for PCBs occurring predominantly in the gas phase, interception was also completely due to dry gaseous deposition.

  18. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  19. Mechanisms of fat, oil and grease (FOG) deposit formation in sewer lines.

    PubMed

    He, Xia; de los Reyes, Francis L; Leming, Michael L; Dean, Lisa O; Lappi, Simon E; Ducoste, Joel J

    2013-09-01

    FOG deposits in sewer systems have recently been shown to be metallic salts of fatty acids. However, the fate and transport of FOG deposit reactant constituents and the complex interactions during the FOG deposit formation process are still largely unknown. In this study, batch tests were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of FOG deposit formation that lead to sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). We report the first formation of FOG deposits on a concrete surface under laboratory conditions that mimic the formation of deposits in sewer systems. Results showed that calcium, the dominant metal in FOG deposits, can be released from concrete surfaces under low pH conditions and contribute to the formation process. Small amounts of additional oil to grease interceptor effluent substantially facilitated the air/water or pipe surface/water interfacial reaction between free fatty acids and calcium to produce surface FOG deposits. Tests of different fatty acids revealed that more viscous FOG deposit solids were formed on concrete surfaces, and concrete corrosion was accelerated, in the presence of unsaturated FFAs versus saturated FFAs. Based on all the data, a comprehensive model was proposed for the mechanisms of FOG deposit formation in sewer systems.

  20. Coke Deposition and Smoke Formation in Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, R. R.; Wear, J. D.

    1956-01-01

    In the early development of jet engines, it was occasionally found that excessive amounts of coke or other carbonaceous deposits were formed in the combustion chamber. Sometimes a considerable amount of smoke was noted in the-exhaust gases. Excessive coke deposits may adversely affect jet-engine performance in several ways. The formation of excessive amounts of coke on or just downstream of a fuel nozzle (figs. 116(a) and (b)) changes the fuel-spray pattern and possibly affects combustor life and performance. Similar effects on performance can result from the deposition of coke on primary-air entry ports (fig. 116(c)). Sea-level or altitude starting may be impaired by the deposition of coke on spark-plug electrodes (fig. 116(b)), deposits either grounding the electrodes completely or causing the spark to occur at positions other than the intended gap. For some time it was thought that large deposits of coke in turbojet combustion chambers (fig. 116(a)) might break away and damage turbine blades; however, experience has indicated that for metal blades this problem is insignificant. (Cermet turbine blades may be damaged by loose coke deposits.) Finally, the deposition of coke may cause high-temperature areas, which promote liner warping and cracking (fig. 116(d)) from excessive temperature gradients and variations in thermal-expansion rates. Smoke in the exhaust gases does not generally impair engine performance but may be undesirable from a tactical or a nuisance standpoint. Appendix B of reference 1 and references 2 to 4 present data obtained from full-scale engines operated on test stands and from flight tests that indicate some effects on performance caused by coke deposits and smoke. Some information about the mechanism of coke formation is given in reference 5 and chapter IX. The data indicate that (1) high-boiling fuel residuals and partly polymerized products may be mixed with a large amount of smoke formed in the gas phase to account for the consistency

  1. Debris avalanche deposits: emplacement dynamics, morphology and hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.; Dufresne, A.

    2013-12-01

    Debris avalanches from volcanoes form some of the largest subaerial and submarine landslide deposits on Earth, covering vast areas (10s to 100s km2) and displaying typically hummocky surface topography. Numerical models have been developed that can identify the area threatened by an event of known volume from a known volcano, if the runout mechanics can be understood. Better understanding the hazards from these enormous events requires realistic parameterization of models, which must be able to explain debris avalanche deposit geometries under water, in air, on Mars and in vacuo on the Moon. We have shown that the complex deposit geometry of the 25 km3 Socompa deposit in Chile can be explained by the effects of basal debris fragmenting during runout. The hummocky surface morphology of many debris avalanche deposits again indicates that the emplacement process involved a very mobile basal layer, above which the travelling mass passively extends, leading to lateral and longitudinal disaggregation of the mass into discrete blocks whose dimension reflects the mass depth. Submarine debris avalanches can also be modelled on this basis, because the presence of ambient water does not fundamentally alter the fragmentation process; to assess the additional hazards of debris avalanches entering into water, models are available to simulate the tsunami generated by such events.

  2. Deposition and removal of sodium contamination on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, I.; Tardif, F.; Derrien, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper investigations are performed in order to understand the source of sodium contamination in clean-room environments and to find different cleaning processes able to limit or suppress sodium deposition. In a clean-room environment, the human being has been identified as one of the major sources of sodium. The airborne sodium contamination is essentially transmitted in particle form. In order to limit sodium deposition from the air, the wafers awaiting subsequent processing need to be stored in a protective box or placed far from the human environment and should not be left for much more than 1 week in a class 1 clean room. Also, wet chemistries could cause sodium contamination on wafers particularly during the deionized water rinse. In order to limit the possible contamination, the sodium deposition mechanisms have been studied: they show the typical characteristics of Langmuir adsorption. Temperature and ionic concentration are both parameters which influence the deposition. In water, sodium deposition can be avoided by introducing acid or alkaline solutions or increasing the temperature: it can be drastically reduced by adding traces of HCl (0.01%). Finally, other cleaning chemistries such as SC1 (NH4 OH-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 0.25:1:5 proportion, SC2 (HCl-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 1:1:5 proportion, 0.1% HF and SPM (H2 SO4 -H2 O2 ) in 3:1 proportion reduce the contamination as well.

  3. Sources of mercury wet deposition in Eastern Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Gerald J; Landis, Matthew S; Norris, Gary A; Christianson, Emily M; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2006-10-01

    In the fall of 2002, an enhanced air monitoring site was established in Steubenville, Ohio as part of a multi-year comprehensive mercury monitoring and source apportionment study to investigate the impact of local and regional coal combustion sources on atmospheric mercury deposition in the Ohio River Valley. This study deployed advanced monitoring instrumentation, utilized innovative analytical techniques, and applied state-of-the-art statistical receptor models. This paper presents wet deposition data and source apportionment modeling results from daily event precipitation samples collected during the calendar years 2003-2004. The volume-weighted mean mercury concentrations for 2003 and 2004 were 14.0 and 13.5 ng L(-1), respectively, and total annual mercury wet deposition was 13.5 and 19.7 microg m(-2), respectively. Two new EPA-implemented multivariate statistical models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and Unmix, were applied to the data set and six sources were identified. The dominant contributor to the mercury wet deposition was found by both models to be coal combustion (approximately 70%). Meteorological analysis also indicated that a majority of the mercury deposition found at the Steubenville site was due to local and regional sources.

  4. Global scale deposition of radioactivity from a large scale exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.

    1983-10-01

    The global impact of radioactivity pertains to the continental scale and planetary scale deposition of the radioactivity in a delayed mode; it affects all peoples. Global deposition is distinct and separate from close-in fallout. Close-in fallout is delivered in a matter of a few days or less and is much studied in the literature of civilian defense. But much less studied is the matter of global deposition. The global deposition of radioactivity from the reference strategic exchange (5300 MT) leads to an estimated average whole body, total integrated dose of 20 rem for the latitudes of 30 to 50/sup 0/ in the Northern Hemisphere. Hotspots of deposited radioactivity can occur with doses of about 70 rem (winter) to 40 to 110 rem (summer) in regions like Europe, western Asia, western North Pacific, southeastern US, northeastern US, and Canada. The neighboring countries within a few hundred kilometers of areas under strategic nuclear attack can be impacted by the normal (termal close-in) fallout due to gravitational sedimentation with lethal radiation doses to unsheltered populations. In regard to the strategic scenario about 40% of the megatonage is assumed to be in a surface burst mode and the rest in the free air burst mode.

  5. Secondary acidification: Changes in gas-aerosol partitioning of semivolatile nitric acid and enhancement of its deposition due to increased emission and concentration of SOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Mizuo; Ueda, Hiromasa; Nakayama, Shinji

    2008-02-01

    Secondary acidification, or the indirect enhancement of semivolatile air pollutant deposition associated with increased SO42- concentrations, is shown to occur in general air pollution using data collected from six stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) in Japan. This effect was first detected as a result of volcanic SO2 plumes in our previous studies. Results indicate that as SO42- concentration increases, gas-aerosol partitioning of nitric acid shifts to the gas phase, increasing the HNO3 gas concentration. Since the dry and wet deposition rates of HNO3 gas are very high, deposition can be enhanced even when the emission of NOx remains unchanged. In western Japan, the indirect effect for wet deposition is most apparent from spring to autumn, when the Asian continental outflow carries sulfate-rich contaminated air masses. However, it is not pronounced in air masses containing abundant sea-salt particles and related cation components in aerosols. In areas such as forests or farmlands with low surface resistance, dry deposition of nitric acid is more pronounced than wet deposition as the dry deposition velocity of HNO3 gas is high. Increased dry deposition of t-NO3 due to the indirect effect and consequent vegetation damage is thus of considerable concern in such regions. The deposition of other semivolatile components, such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, can be altered and can also induce secondary acidification.

  6. Impacts of air cleaners on indoor air quality in residences impacted by wood smoke.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Amanda J; Gibson, Mark D; MacNeill, Morgan; Ward, Tony J; Wallace, Lance A; Kuchta, James; Seaboyer, Matt; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Guernsey, Judith Read; Stieb, David M

    2014-10-21

    Residential wood combustion is an important source of ambient air pollution, accounting for over 25% of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions in Canada. In addition to these ambient contributions, wood smoke pollutants can enter the indoor environment directly when loading or stoking stoves, resulting in a high potential for human exposure. A study of the effectiveness of air cleaners at reducing wood smoke-associated PM2.5 of indoor and outdoor origin was conducted in 31 homes during winter 2009-10. Day 1, the residents' wood burning appliance operated as usual with no air cleaner. Days 2 and 3, the wood burning appliance was not operational and the air cleaner was randomly chosen to operate in "filtration" or "placebo filtration" mode. When the air cleaner was operating, total indoor PM2.5 levels were significantly lower than on placebo filtration days (p = 0.0001) resulting in a median reduction of 52%. There was also a reduction in the median PM2.5 infiltration factor from 0.56 to 0.26 between these 2 days, suggesting the air cleaner was responsible for increased PM2.5 deposition on filtration days. Our findings suggest that the use of an air cleaner reduces exposure to indoor PM2.5 resulting from both indoor and ambient wood smoke sources.

  7. Indoor Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... is known as sick building syndrome. Usually indoor air quality problems only cause discomfort. Most people feel better ... and getting rid of pollutants can improve the quality of your indoor air. Environmental Protection Agency

  8. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 2014. In 2008, EPA significantly strengthened the air quality standards for lead to provide health protection for ... time? Setting and Reviewing Standards What are lead air quality standards? How are they developed and reviewed? What ...

  9. Transforming air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Janet McCabe

    2005-04-01

    Earlier this year, the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee submitted to EPA 38 recommendations intended to improve air quality management in the United States. This article summarizes the evaluation process leading up to the Committee's recommendations. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  10. National Air Toxics Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NATA is an ongoing comprehensive evaluation of air toxics in the U.S. As a screening tool, it helps air agencies prioritize pollutants, emission sources and locations of interest for further study to gain a better understanding of risks.

  11. Airing It Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how proper maintenance can help schools eliminate sources contributing to poor air quality. Maintaining heating and air conditioning units, investigating bacterial breeding grounds, fixing leaking boilers, and adhering to ventilation codes and standards are discussed. (GR)

  12. Air Quality Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information for air quality data analysts inside and outside EPA. Much of the information is in the form of documented analyses that support the review of the national air qualiyt standards.

  13. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  14. Air Data - Concentration Map

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Make a map of daily concentrations over several days. The daily air quality can be displayed in terms of the Air Quality Index or in concentration ranges for certain PM species like organic carbon, nitrates, and sulfates.

  15. Size distribution and dry deposition of road dust PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.H.; Chiang, C.F.; Lee, W.J.; Hwang, K.P.; Wu, E.M.Y.

    1999-07-01

    The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for road dust and for the engine exhaust of both gasoline-powered cars and motorcycles was investigated. In addition, by using the measured size distribution data, monitoring and modeling the PAH dry deposition, the contribution fraction of road dust on the dry deposition materials was also studied. Twenty-one PAHs were analyzed primarily by using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The mass median diameters (MMDs) of 21 individual PAHs for resuspendable road dust (cut size < 100 {micro}m) ranged between 63.4 {micro}m and 65.5 {micro}m. However, the MMDs of total-PAH size distributions for the engine exhaust of both gasoline-powered cars and four-stroke motorcycles averaged 0.45 {micro}m and 0.35 {micro}m, respectively, which were near the MMDs of PAHs (average 0.50 {micro}m) in the ambient air of traffic intersections. Suspended particle-phase total PAHs in the ambient air of traffic intersections were found to be more than 90% of the result of the automobile exhaust; that is, less than 10% of the amount was contributed by the road dust. However, the modeled MMDs of 21 individual PAHs on the dry deposition material were between 22.1 {micro}m and 44.6 {micro}m, and the contribution fraction of road dust on the PAH dry deposition was found to be more than 95%, even though the suspendable ambient-air PAHs were mainly from the mobile exhaust.

  16. Enhanced Deposition by Electrostatic Field-Assistance Aggravating Diesel Exhaust Aerosol Toxicity for Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Linda C; Madl, Pierre; Boyles, Matthew S P; Zauner, Roland; Wimmer, Monika; Wiegand, Harald; Andosch, Ancuela; Kasper, Gerhard; Pesch, Markus; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Himly, Martin; Duschl, Albert

    2015-07-21

    Air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, but conventional air quality monitoring gives no information about biological consequences. Exposing human lung cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI) to ambient aerosol could help identify acute biological responses. This study investigated electrode-assisted deposition of diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) on human lung epithelial cells (A549) in a prototype exposure chamber. A549 cells were exposed to DEA at the ALI and under submerged conditions in different electrostatic fields (EFs) and were assessed for cell viability, membrane integrity, and IL-8 secretion. Qualitative differences of the DEA and its deposition under different EFs were characterized using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Upon exposure to DEA only, cell viability decreased and membrane impairment increased for cells at the ALI; submerged cells were unaffected. These responses were enhanced upon application of an EF, as was DEA deposition. No adverse effects were observed for filtered DEA or air only, confirming particle-induced responses. The prototype exposure chamber proved suitable for testing DEA-induced biological responses of cells at the ALI using electrode-assisted deposition and may be useful for analysis of other air pollutants.

  17. Development and Implementation of Critical Loads for Atmospheric Deposition: Federal Land Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Critical loads for atmospheric deposition have been widely developed and used in Europe, Canada, and other countries. Critical loads are used to influence air pollution emissions reductions, thereby protecting and restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the United States, federal land management agencies are adopting the critical load concept as a potentially valuable resource management tool. Certain parks and wilderness areas are currently being affected by anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition. Effects of excess deposition include acidification, nitrogen enrichment, toxicity, and changes in biotic communities. Streams in both Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks are experiencing chronic and episodic acidification and brook trout fisheries in Shenandoah have been affected. High elevation ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park are undergoing subtle changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems attributable to atmospheric deposition. Natural resources in many other federal areas have been affected or are at risk from deposition. Federal land managers are refining strategies for critical loads that include working with scientists to identify resources sensitive to deposition, defining resource protection criteria that will meet management objectives, and estimating and implementing critical loads. Critical loads will be used in resource management decisions and federal land management planning. They will be used to evaluate management actions and assess progress towards meeting management goals. Federal land managers will also communicate critical loads information to air pollution regulatory agencies to inform emissions management strategies for clean air.

  18. Oceanic Emissions and Atmospheric Depositions of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B.; Beale, R.; Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) affect the tropospheric oxidative capacity due to their ubiquitous abundance and relatively high reactivity towards the hydroxyal radical. Over the ocean and away from terrestrial emission sources, oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) make up a large fraction of VOCs as airmasses age and become more oxidized. In addition to being produced or destroyed in the marine atmosphere, OVOCs can also be emitted from or deposited to the surface ocean. Here we first present direct air-sea flux measurements of three of the most abundant OVOCs - methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde, by the eddy covariance technique from two cruises in the Atlantic: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The OVOC mixing ratios were quantified by a high resolution proton-reaction-transfer mass spectrometer with isotopically labeled standards and their air-sea (net) fluxes were derived from the eddy covariance technique. Net methanol flux was consistently from the atmosphere to the surface ocean, while acetone varied from supersaturation (emission) in the subtropics to undersaturation (deposition) in the higher latitudes of the North Atlantic. The net air-sea flux of acetaldehyde is near zero through out the Atlantic despite the apparent supersaturation of this compound in the surface ocean. Knowing the dissolved concentrations and in situ production rates of these compounds in seawater, we then estimate their bulk atmospheric depositions and oceanic emissions. Lastly, we summarize the state of knowledge on the air-sea transport of a number of organic gasses, and postulate the magnitude and environmental impact of total organic carbon transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere.

  19. Into Thin Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Shows how schools are working to avoid the types of equipment, supplies, and maintenance practices that harm indoor air quality. Simple steps to maintaining a cleaner indoor air environment are highlighted as are steps to reducing the problem air quality and the occurrence of asthma. (GR)

  20. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  1. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  2. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  3. Air Pollution Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This catalog lists the universities, both supported and not supported by the Division of Air Pollution, which offer graduate programs in the field of air pollution. The catalog briefly describes the programs and their entrance requirements, the requirements, qualifications and terms of special fellowships offered by the Division of Air Pollution.…

  4. Clean Air Act Text

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act is the law that defines EPA's responsibilities for protecting and improving the nation's air quality and the stratospheric ozone layer. The last major change in the law, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, enacted in 1990 by Congress.

  5. Environmental Assessment for New Veterinary Clinic, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    USGS, 2002). Ellsworth AFB is located in an area consisting of terrace gravel and alluvial fan deposits of the Pleistocene age and Pierre Shale of...is negligible to low, and permeability is moderately slow to slow. Nunn soils are on terraces or alluvial fans and in drainage ways (NRCS, 2012...the base’s Production Well Number 1 (U.S. Air Force, 2010). Unconsolidated materials including colluvial deposits, alluvial deposits, and residual

  6. Forest decline from air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scientists in West Germany and the USA are involved in intensive efforts to ascertain the cause or causes of the declines in their forests. Ongoing research was discussed at an October 1983 symposium on air pollution and forest productivity, held in Washington, D.C., and sponsored by the Izaak Walton League of America and Pennsylvania State University. The dieback of spruce in the Northeast is relatively well-known. It was revealed at the symposium, however, that forests in other areas of the U.S. may be showing signs of stress and damage and that species other than spruce are affected. Samuel B. McLaughlin of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) pointed out that red spruce, shortleaf pine, hickory, yellow birch, pitch pine, hemlock, and Fraser fir are declining in East Tennessee. He noted that these decline together with those in New England suggest that decreased productivity in several tree species has been occurring over a broad scale during the past two decades. One commonly held view is that acid deposition is causing the decline of forests in both Europe and the U.S. At the symposium, a number of different opinions about possible causes were expressed, ranging from drought to ozone to combinations of pollutants, including acid deposition, ozone and trace metals. Possible causes that were not subjects of active inquiry were disease and insects. Most researchers in the field believe there is little evidence that one of these is the primary damaging agent.

  7. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  8. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  9. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  10. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  11. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests: refinement of estimation of dry deposition for unmeasured nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunova, Iva; Stoklasova, Petra; Kurfurst, Pavel; Vlcek, Ondrej; Schovankova, Jana

    2014-05-01

    The accurate quantification of atmospheric deposition is very important for assessment of ambient air pollution impacts on ecosystems. Our contribution presents an advanced approach to improved quantification of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests, merging available measured data and model results. The ambient air quality monitoring in the Czech Republic is paid an appreciable attention (Hůnová, 2001) due to the fact, that in the recent past its territory belonged to the most polluted parts of Europe (Moldan and Schnoor, 1992). The time trends and spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition were published (Hůnová et al. 2004, Hůnová et al. 2014). Nevertheless, it appears that the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, particularly the dry deposition, is likely to be underestimated due to unavailability of data of certain nitrogen species as HNO3(g) and NH3. It is known that HNO3(g) may contribute significantly to the dry deposition of nitrogen even in regions with relatively low concentrations (Flechard et al., 2011). We attempted to substitute unmeasured nitrogen species using an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Preliminary results for 2008 indicate that dry deposition of nitrogen, so far based on detailed monitoring of ambient NOx levels, is underestimated substantially. The dry deposition of N/NOx in 2008 reported by Ostatnická (2009) was about 0.5 g.m-2.year-1 over 99.5 % of the nation-wide area, while the contribution of unmeasured nitrogen species estimated by CAMx model were much higher. To be specific, the dry deposition of N/HNO3(g) accounted for 1.0 g.m-2.year-1, and N/NH3 for 1.6 g.m-2.year-1. In contrast, the deposition of N/HONO (g) with 0.001 g.m-2.year-1, N/PAN with 0.007 g.m-2.year-1, particulate N/NO3- with 0.002 g.m-2.year-1, and particulate N/NH4

  13. Selective molybdenum deposition by LPCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Lifshitz, N.; Williams, D.S.; Capio, C.D.; Brown, J.M.

    1987-08-01

    Molybdenum films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) on silicon substrates by the reduction of molybdenum hexafluoride in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. The deposition is extremely selective, with no Mo observed on silicon dioxide surfaces over the temperature range of 200/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C. Reduction by both hydrogen and silicon contribute to the deposition, with approximately equal, extremely high deposition rates; no self-limiting thickness was observed. Extensive TEM and SEM studies were conducted in order to characterize the microstructure of the deposited films. The main feature of the films is their extreme porosity - about 30%, which can explain many unusual properties of the process and the films. On the basis of experiments the authors propose a model to explain the origin of the porosity in the films. Comparative studies of tungsten and molybdenum LPCVD reveal that the difference between the two processes lie in the self-limiting mechanism occurring during the silicon reduction of tungsten hexafluoride.

  14. Air pollution and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Azzarelli, Biagio; Acuna, Hilda; Garcia, Raquel; Gambling, Todd M; Osnaya, Norma; Monroy, Sylvia; DEL Tizapantzi, Maria Rosario; Carson, Johnny L; Villarreal-Calderon, Anna; Rewcastle, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of air pollutants produces inflammation in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Because the nasal cavity is a common portal of entry, respiratory and olfactory epithelia are vulnerable targets for toxicological damage. This study has evaluated, by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosae, olfactory bulb, and cortical and subcortical structures from 32 healthy mongrel canine residents in Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), a highly polluted urban region. Findings were compared to those in 8 dogs from Tlaxcala, a less polluted, control city. In SWMMC dogs, expression of nuclear neuronal NF-kappaB and iNOS in cortical endothelial cells occurred at ages 2 and 4 weeks; subsequent damage included alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), degenerating cortical neurons, apoptotic glial white matter cells, deposition of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-positive lipid droplets in smooth muscle cells and pericytes, nonneuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Persistent pulmonary inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the neuropathology observed in the brains of these highly exposed canines. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's may begin early in life with air pollutants playing a crucial role.

  15. Correlation of gravestone decay and air quality 1960-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, H. D.; Carlson, M. J.; Harrison, R. M.; Inkpen, R. J.; Loeffler, S.

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of spatial and temporal variability in surface recession of lead-lettered Carrara marble gravestones provides a quantitative measure of acid flux to the stone surfaces and is closely related to local land use and air quality. Correlation of stone decay, land use, and air quality for the period after 1960 when reliable estimates of atmospheric pollution are available is evaluated. Gravestone decay and SO2 measurements are interpolated spatially using deterministic and geostatistical techniques. A general lack of spatial correlation was identified and therefore a land-use-based technique for correlation of stone decay and air quality is employed. Decadally averaged stone decay is highly correlated with land use averaged spatially over an optimum radius of ≈7 km even though air quality, determined by records from the UK monitoring network, is not highly correlated with gravestone decay. The relationships among stone decay, air-quality, and land use is complicated by the relatively low spatial density of both gravestone decay and air quality data and the fact that air quality data is available only as annual averages and therefore seasonal dependence cannot be evaluated. However, acid deposition calculated from gravestone decay suggests that the deposition efficiency of SO2 has increased appreciably since 1980 indicating an increase in the SO2 oxidation process possibly related to reactions with ammonia.

  16. Plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their tribological properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on the properties of diamondlike carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H ) films exhibiting more diamondlike behavior to more graphitic behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H can be effectively used as hard, wear-resistant, and protective lubricating films on ceramic materials such as Si(sub 3)N(sub 4) under a variety of environmental conditions such as moist air, dry nitrogrn, and vacuum.

  17. Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Prepared For: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Lab(WRDC/MLBT), Wright-Patterson AFB,OH 45433 Descriptors, Keywords: ion beam film deposition MoS2 solid...NUMBERS Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films PE - 63224C, 61153N WU -2855, 3409 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert N. Bolster 7... MoS2 ) are effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam-assisted deposition, which employs ion beam sputtering with an assist beam impinging on the growing

  18. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  19. Air Parity: Re-Discovering Contested Air Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AIR PARITY: RE-DISCOVERING CONTESTED AIR OPERATIONS BY CHRISTOPHER LAZIDIS A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF...THE SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES FOR COMPLETION OF GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES AIR ...UNIVERSITY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA JUNE 2016 DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited ii APPROVAL The

  20. Path Forward for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article lays out the objectives for Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The inhalation of air pollutants such as ozone and fine particles has been linked to adverse impacts on human health, and the atmospheric deposition of pollutan...

  1. “Exchanges of Aggregate Air Nitrogen Emissions and Watershed Nitrogen Loads”

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach has been developed to define transfer coefficients that can be used to convert changes in air emissions to changes in air deposition and subsequently to changes in loads delivered to the Bay. This approach uses a special CMAQ version that quantitatively attributes wa...

  2. Thermal behavior of spiral fin-and-tube heat exchanger having fly ash deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Nuntaphan, Atipoang; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat

    2007-08-15

    This research investigates the effect of fly-ash deposit on thermal performance of a cross-flow heat exchanger having a set of spiral finned-tubes as a heat transfer surface. A stream of warm air having high content of fly-ash is exchanging heat with a cool water stream in the tubes. In this study, the temperature of the heat exchanger surface is lower than the dew point temperature of air, thus there is condensation of moisture in the air stream on the heat exchanger surface. The affecting parameters such as the fin spacing, the air mass flow rate, the fly-ash mass flow rate and the inlet temperature of warm air are varied while the volume flow rate and the inlet temperature of the cold water stream are kept constant at 10 l/min and 5 C, respectively. From the experiment, it is found that as the testing period is shorter than 8 h the thermal resistance due to the fouling increases with time. Moreover, the deposit of fly-ash on the heat transfer surface is directly proportional to the dust-air ratio and the amount of condensate on heat exchange surface. However, the deposit of fly-ash is inversely proportional to the fin spacing. The empirical model for evaluating the thermal resistance is also developed in this work and the simulated results agree well with those of the measured data. (author)

  3. Air Conditioner/Dehumidifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An ordinary air conditioner in a very humid environment must overcool the room air, then reheat it. Mr. Dinh, a former STAC associate, devised a heat pipe based humidifier under a NASA Contract. The system used heat pipes to precool the air; the air conditioner's cooling coil removes heat and humidity, then the heat pipes restore the overcooled air to a comfortable temperature. The heat pipes use no energy, and typical savings are from 15-20%. The Dinh Company also manufactures a "Z" coil, a retrofit cooling coil which may be installed on an existing heater/air conditioner. It will also provide free hot water. The company has also developed a photovoltaic air conditioner and solar powered water pump.

  4. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health effects of air pollution Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that is not clean can hurt ... important to know about the health effects that air pollution can have on you and others. Once you ...

  5. Deposition of Na2SO4 from salt-seeded combustion gases of a high velocity burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of deposition of Na2SO4 was studied under controlled laboratory conditions and the results have been compared to a recently developed comprehensive theory of vapor deposition. Thus Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3 and simulated sea salt solutions were injected into the combustor of a nominal Mach 0.3 burner rig burning jet fuel at constant fuel/air ratios. The deposits formed on inert collectors, rotation in the cross flow of the combustion gases, were weighed and analyzed. Collector temperature was uniform and could be varied over a large range by internal air cooling. Deposition rates and dew point temperatures were determined. Supplemental testing included droplet size measurements of the atomized salt solutions. These tests along with thermodynamic and transport calculations were utilized in the interpretation of the deposition results.

  6. World Meteorological Organization's model simulations of the radionuclide dispersion and deposition from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Draxler, Roland; Arnold, Dèlia; Chino, Masamichi; Galmarini, Stefano; Hort, Matthew; Jones, Andrew; Leadbetter, Susan; Malo, Alain; Maurer, Christian; Rolph, Glenn; Saito, Kazuo; Servranckx, René; Shimbori, Toshiki; Solazzo, Efisio; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Five different atmospheric transport and dispersion model's (ATDM) deposition and air concentration results for atmospheric releases from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident were evaluated over Japan using regional (137)Cs deposition measurements and (137)Cs and (131)I air concentration time series at one location about 110 km from the plant. Some of the ATDMs used the same and others different meteorological data consistent with their normal operating practices. There were four global meteorological analyses data sets available and two regional high-resolution analyses. Not all of the ATDMs were able to use all of the meteorological data combinations. The ATDMs were configured identically as much as possible with respect to the release duration, release height, concentration grid size, and averaging time. However, each ATDM retained its unique treatment of the vertical velocity field and the wet and dry deposition, one of the largest uncertainties in these calculations. There were 18 ATDM-meteorology combinations available for evaluation. The deposition results showed that even when using the same meteorological analysis, each ATDM can produce quite different deposition patterns. The better calculations in terms of both deposition and air concentration were associated with the smoother ATDM deposition patterns. The best model with respect to the deposition was not always the best model with respect to air concentrations. The use of high-resolution mesoscale analyses improved ATDM performance; however, high-resolution precipitation analyses did not improve ATDM predictions. Although some ATDMs could be identified as better performers for either deposition or air concentration calculations, overall, the ensemble mean of a subset of better performing members provided more consistent results for both types of calculations.

  7. Impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on phytoplankton productivity in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Lee, Kitack; Duce, Robert; Liss, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition on the marine N cycle are only now being revealed, but the magnitudes of those impacts are largely unknown in time and space. The South China Sea (SCS) is particularly subject to high anthropogenic N deposition, because the adjacent countries are highly populated and have rapidly growing economies. Analysis of data sets for atmospheric N deposition, satellite chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and air mass back trajectories reveals that the transport of N originating from the populated east coasts of China and Indonesia, and its deposition to the ocean, has been responsible for the enhancements of Chl-a in the SCS. We found that atmospheric N deposition contributed approximately 20% of the annual biological new production in the SCS. The airborne contribution of N to new production in the SCS is expected to grow considerably in the coming decades.

  8. Does urban vegetation mitigate air pollution in northern conditions?

    PubMed

    Setälä, Heikki; Viippola, Viljami; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Pennanen, Arto; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa

    2013-12-01

    It is generally accepted that urban vegetation improves air quality and thereby enhances the well-being of citizens. However, empirical evidence on the potential of urban trees to mitigate air pollution is meager, particularly in northern climates with a short growing season. We studied the ability of urban park/forest vegetation to remove air pollutants (NO2, anthropogenic VOCs and particle deposition) using passive samplers in two Finnish cities. Concentrations of each pollutant in August (summer; leaf-period) and March (winter, leaf-free period) were slightly but often insignificantly lower under tree canopies than in adjacent open areas, suggesting that the role of foliage in removing air pollutants is insignificant. Furthermore, vegetation-related environmental variables (canopy closure, number and size of trees, density of understorey vegetation) did not explain the variation in pollution concentrations. Our results suggest that the ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor in northern climates.

  9. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2008-10-01

    Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

  10. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Accumulates in Watersheds of the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Grant, C.; Grimm, J.; Drohan, P. J.; Bennett, J.; Lawler, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and other sources such as waste incineration can be deposited to landscapes in precipitation and in dry fallout. Some mercury reaches watersheds and streams, where it can accumulate in sediments and biota. Human exposure to mercury occurs primarily through fish consumption, and currently mercury fish eating advisories are in place for many of the streams and lakes in the state. Here, we explored mercury in air, soils, water, and biota. To quantify atmospheric mercury deposition, we measured both wet and dry mercury deposition at over 10 locations in Pennsylvania, from which we present variation in mercury deposition and initial assessments of factors affecting the patterns. Further, we simulated mercury deposition at unmonitored locations in Pennsylvania and the northeastern United States over space and time with a high-resolution modeling technique that reflects storm tracks and air flow patterns. To consider mercury accumulation in watersheds, we collected data on soil mercury concentrations in a set of soil samples, and collected baseline data on mercury in streams draining 35 forested watersheds across Pennsylvania, spanning gradients of atmospheric deposition, climate and geology. Mercury concentrations were measured in stream water under base-flow conditions, in streambed sediments, aquatic mosses, and in fish tissues from brook trout. Results indicate that wet and dry atmospheric deposition is a primary source of mercury that is accumulating in watersheds of Pennsylvania and the northeastern United States.

  11. Impact of nitrogen deposition at the species level

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Richard J.; Dise, Nancy B.; Stevens, Carly J.; Gowing, David J.; Duprè, Cecilia; Dorland, Edu; Gaudnik, Cassandre; Bleeker, Albert; Diekmann, Martin; Alard, Didier; Bobbink, Roland; Fowler, David; Corcket, Emmanuel; Mountford, J. Owen; Vandvik, Vigdis; Aarrestad, Per Arild; Muller, Serge

    2013-01-01

    In Europe and, increasingly, the rest of the world, the key policy tool for the control of air pollution is the critical load, a level of pollution below which there are no known significant harmful effects on the environment. Critical loads are used to map sensitive regions and habitats, permit individual polluting activities, and frame international negotiations on transboundary air pollution. Despite their fundamental importance in environmental science and policy, there has been no systematic attempt to verify a critical load with field survey data. Here, we use a large dataset of European grasslands along a gradient of nitrogen (N) deposition to show statistically significant declines in the abundance of species from the lowest level of N deposition at which it is possible to identify a change. Approximately 60% of species change points occur at or below the range of the currently established critical load. If this result is found more widely, the underlying principle of no harm in pollution policy may need to be modified to one of informed decisions on how much harm is acceptable. Our results highlight the importance of protecting currently unpolluted areas from new pollution sources, because we cannot rule out ecological impacts from even relatively small increases in reactive N deposition. PMID:23271811

  12. Atmospheric deposition exposes Qinling pandas to toxic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zheng, Ying-Juan; Liu, Qiang; Song, Yi; An, Zhi-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Yi; Ellison, Aaron M

    2016-12-31

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals in the world, and it is recognized worldwide as a symbol for conservation. A previous study showed that wild and captive pandas, especially those of the Qinling subspecies, were exposed to toxicants in their diet of bamboo; the ultimate origin of these toxicants is unknown. Here we show that atmospheric deposition is the most likely origin of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the diets of captive and wild Qinling pandas. Average atmospheric deposition was 199, 115 and 49 g∙m(-2) ∙yr(-1) in the center of Xi'an city, at China's Shaanxi Wild Animal Research Center (SWARC), and at Foping National Nature Reserve (FNNR), respectively. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Co, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni) and POPs was highest at Xi'an city, intermediate at SWARC, and lowest at FNNR. Soil concentrations of the aforementioned heavy metals other than As and Zn also were significantly higher at SWARC than at FNNR. Efforts to conserve Qinling pandas may be compromised by air pollution attendant to China's economic development. Improvement of air quality and reductions of toxic emissions are urgently required to protect China's iconic species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of nitrogen deposition at the species level.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard J; Dise, Nancy B; Stevens, Carly J; Gowing, David J

    2013-01-15

    In Europe and, increasingly, the rest of the world, the key policy tool for the control of air pollution is the critical load, a level of pollution below which there are no known significant harmful effects on the environment. Critical loads are used to map sensitive regions and habitats, permit individual polluting activities, and frame international negotiations on transboundary air pollution. Despite their fundamental importance in environmental science and policy, there has been no systematic attempt to verify a critical load with field survey data. Here, we use a large dataset of European grasslands along a gradient of nitrogen (N) deposition to show statistically significant declines in the abundance of species from the lowest level of N deposition at which it is possible to identify a change. Approximately 60% of species change points occur at or below the range of the currently established critical load. If this result is found more widely, the underlying principle of no harm in pollution policy may need to be modified to one of informed decisions on how much harm is acceptable. Our results highlight the importance of protecting currently unpolluted areas from new pollution sources, because we cannot rule out ecological impacts from even relatively small increases in reactive N deposition.

  14. USING THE AIR QUALITY MODEL TO ANALYZE THE CONCENTRATIONS OF AIR TOXICS OVER THE CONTINENTAL U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is examining the concentrations and deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), which include a large number of chemicals, ranging from non reactive (i.e. carbon tetrachloride) to reactive (i.e. formaldehyde), exist in gas, aqueous, and...

  15. The impact of drought on ozone dry deposition over eastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ling; McDonald-Buller, Elena C.; McGaughey, Gary; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David T.

    2016-02-01

    Dry deposition represents a critical pathway through which ground-level ozone is removed from the atmosphere. Understanding the effects of drought on ozone dry deposition is essential for air quality modeling and management in regions of the world with recurring droughts. This work applied the widely used Zhang dry deposition algorithm to examine seasonal and interannual changes in estimated ozone dry deposition velocities and component resistances/conductances over eastern Texas during years with drought (2006 and 2011) as well as a year with slightly cooler temperatures and above average rainfall (2007). Simulated area-averaged daytime ozone dry deposition velocities ranged between 0.26 and 0.47 cm/s. Seasonal patterns reflected the combined seasonal variations in non-stomatal and stomatal deposition pathways. Daytime ozone dry deposition velocities during the growing season were consistently larger during 2007 compared to 2006 and 2011. These differences were associated with differences in stomatal conductances and were most pronounced in forested areas. Reductions in stomatal conductances under drought conditions were highly sensitive to increases in vapor pressure deficit and warmer temperatures in Zhang's algorithm. Reductions in daytime ozone deposition velocities and deposition mass during drought years were associated with estimates of higher surface ozone concentrations.

  16. Controls on mercury and methylmercury deposition for two watersheds in Acadia National Park, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.B.; Haines, T.A.; Kahl, J.S.; Norton, S.A.; Amirbahman, A.; Sheehan, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    Throughfall and bulk precipitation samples were collected for two watersheds at Acadia National Park, Maine, from 3 May to 16 November 2000, to determine which landscape factors affected mercury (Hg) deposition. One of these watersheds, Cadillac Brook, burned in 1947, providing a natural experimental design to study the effects of forest type on deposition to forested watersheds. Sites that face southwest received the highest Hg deposition, which may be due to the interception of cross-continental movement of contaminated air masses. Sites covered with softwood vegetation also received higher Hg deposition than other vegetation types because of the higher scavenging efficiency of the canopy structure. Methyl mercury (MeHg) deposition was not affected by these factors. Hg deposition, as bulk precipitation and throughfall was lower in Cadillac Brook watershed (burned) than in Hadlock Brook watershed (unburned) because of vegetation type and watershed aspect. Hg and MeHg inputs were weighted by season and vegetation type because these two factors had the most influence on deposition. Hg volatilization was not determined. The total Hg deposition via throughfall and bulk precipitation was 9.4 ??g/m2/year in Cadillac Brook watershed and 10.2 ??g/m2/year in Hadlock Brook watershed. The total MeHg deposition via throughfall and bulk precipitation was 0.05 ??g/m2/year in Cadillac Brook watershed and 0.10 ??g/m2/year in Hadlock Brook watershed. ?? Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2006.

  17. Source apportionment of wet-deposited atmospheric mercury in Tampa, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Ryan; Stuart, Amy L.; Trotz, Maya A.; Akiwumi, Fenda

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, sources of mercury deposition to the Tampa area (Florida, USA) are investigated by analysis of one year (March 2000-March 2001) of daily wet deposition data. HYSPLIT back-trajectory modeling was performed to assess potential source locations for high versus low concentration events in data stratified by precipitation level. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was also applied to apportion the elemental compositions from each event and to identify sources. Increased total mercury deposition was observed during summer months, corresponding to increased precipitation. However, mercury concentration in deposited samples was not strongly correlated with precipitation amount. Back-trajectories show air masses passing over Florida land in the short (12 h) and medium (24 h) term prior to deposition for high mercury concentration events. PMF results indicate that eleven factors contribute to the deposited elements in the event data. Diagnosed elemental profiles suggest the sources that contribute to mercury wet deposition at the study site are coal combustion (52% of the deposited mercury mass), municipal waste incineration (23%), medical waste incineration (19%), and crustal dust (6%). Overall, results suggest that sources local to the county and in Florida likely contributed substantially to mercury deposition at the study site, but distant sources may also contribute.

  18. Dust deposition and ambient PM10 concentration in northwest China: spatial and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Sharratt, Brenton; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zi-Fa; Liu, Lian-You; Guo, Yu-Hong; Li, Jie; Chen, Huan-Sheng; Yang, Wen-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Eolian dust transport and deposition are important geophysical processes which influence global bio-geochemical cycles. Currently, reliable deposition data are scarce in central and east Asia. Located at the boundary of central and east Asia, Xinjiang Province of northwestern China has long played a strategic role in cultural and economic trade between Asia and Europe. In this paper, we investigated the spatial distribution and temporal variation in dust deposition and ambient PM10 (particulate matter in aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm) concentration from 2000 to 2013 in Xinjiang Province. This variation was assessed using environmental monitoring records from 14 stations in the province. Over the 14 years, annual average dust deposition across stations in the province ranged from 255.7 to 421.4 t km-2. Annual dust deposition was greater in southern Xinjiang (663.6 t km-2) than northern (147.8 t km-2) and eastern Xinjiang (194.9 t km-2). Annual average PM10 concentration across stations in the province varied from 100 to 196 µg m-3 and was 70, 115 and 239 µg m-3 in northern, eastern and southern Xinjiang, respectively. The highest annual dust deposition (1394.1 t km-2) and ambient PM10 concentration (352 µg m-3) were observed in Hotan, which is located in southern Xinjiang and at the southern boundary of the Taklamakan Desert. Dust deposition was more intense during the spring and summer than other seasons. PM10 was the main air pollutant that significantly influenced regional air quality. Annual average dust deposition increased logarithmically with ambient PM10 concentration (R2 ≥ 0.81). While the annual average dust storm frequency remained unchanged from 2000 to 2013, there was a positive relationship between dust storm days and dust deposition and PM10 concentration across stations. This study suggests that sand storms are a major factor affecting the temporal variability and spatial distribution of dust deposition in northwest China.

  19. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  20. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  1. Investigation of ammonia air-surface exchange processes in a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent assessments of atmospheric deposition in North America note the increasing importance of reduced (NHx = NH3 + NH4+) forms of nitrogen (N) relative to oxidized forms. This shift in in the composition of inorganic nitrogen deposition has both ecological and policy implications. Deposition budgets developed from inferential models applied at the landscape scale, as well as regional and global chemical transport models, indicate that NH3 dry deposition contributes a significant portion of inorganic N deposition in many areas. However, the bidirectional NH3 flux algorithms employed in these models have not been extensively evaluated for North American conditions (e.g, atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, biogeochemistry). Further understanding of the processes controlling NH3 air-surface exchange in natural systems is critically needed. Based on preliminary results from the Southern Appalachian Nitrogen Deposition Study (SANDS), this presentation examines processes of NH3 air-surface exchange in a deciduous montane forest at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. A combination of measurements and modeling are used to investigate net fluxes of NH3 above the forest and sources and sinks of NH3 within the canopy and forest floor. Measurements of biogeochemical NH4+ pools are used to characterize emission potential and NH3 compensation points of canopy foliage (i.e., green vegetation), leaf litter, and soil and their relation to NH3 fluxes

  2. Comparison of observed and predicted Kr-85 air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiran, M.; Miller, C.W.

    1984-04-25

    A computer code, ANEMOS has been written to estimate concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operation Sources. This code uses a modified Gaussian plum equation. Output from ANEMOS includes annual-average air concentrations and ground deposition rates of dispersed radionuclides and daughters. To use the environmental transport model properly, some estimate of the models predictive accuracy must be obtained. To validate the ANEMOS model, one year of weekly average Kr-85 concentrations observed at 13 stations located 28 to 144 km distant from continuous point source at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), Aiken, South Carolina, have been used. There was a general tendency for the model to underpredict the observed air concentrations slightly. Pearsons's correlation between pairs of logarithms of observed and predicted annual-average values was r = 0.84. The monthly results tend to show more scatter than do either the seasonal or the annual comparisons. 18 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, D.J.; Fan, S.M.; Wofsy, S.C.; Spiro, P.A.; Bakwin, P.S.; Ritter, J.A.; Browell, E.V.; Gregory, G.L.; Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA New York State Univ., Albany )

    1992-10-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O[sub 3] deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O[sub 3] deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O[sub 3] at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O[sub 3] deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O[sub 3] concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere. 34 refs.

  4. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, D. J.; Fan, S.-M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Spiro, P. A.; Bakwin, P. S.; Ritter, J. A.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Moore, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O3 deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O3 deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O3 at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O3 deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O3 concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin.

    PubMed

    Isukapalli, Sastry S; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    PubMed Central

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin’s lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides. PMID:25642134

  8. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  9. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall...

  10. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall...

  11. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  12. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  13. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  14. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  15. Draft air deflecting device

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, J.E.

    1982-05-18

    A draft air deflecting device is mountable proximate to a window contained in a firebox and serves as a conduit which directs draft air across the inner surface of the window prior to its supporting combustion of the fuel in the firebox. In this respect , the draft air deflecting device is formed as a box which communicates with draft air holes located in the firebox and which includes a forwardly extending lip serving to define a nozzle for both increasing the velocity and directing the incoming draft air across the firebox window. The incoming draft air is thus utilized to cool and to prevent soot, creosote and other particulates from accumulating on the window.

  16. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  17. CdSe nanowires grown by using chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubur, H. Metin; Septekin, F.; Alpdogan, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Cadmium-selenide (CdSe) nanowire thin films were prepared on glass substrates by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) at 70 °C. Cadmium sulfate and sodium selenosulphate were used as Cd2+ and Se2- ion sources, respectively. The CdSe nanowire film was annealed in an air atmosphere at 573 K for 1 hour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the nanowire films as-deposited and annealed had mixed cubic and hexagonal phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the CdSe nanowires had lengths ranging from 642 nm to 2.5 μm and diameters ranging from 46 nm to 211 nm. The optical properties of the as-deposited and the annealed nanowire films, an investigated by recording the transmission spectra by using an UV-visible spectrophotometer revealed that the energy band gap decreased (from 1.78 eV to 1.50 eV) upon annealing. The conductivity measurements made by using four-probe methods for both the annealed and the as-deposited films showed that the resistivity, conductivity and activation energy changed upon annealing.

  18. Tree height growth indicating drought and nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Berki, Imre

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have been reported the increasing trends of forest growth in Europe in the last decades. Sites, where the water is not limiting factor, the increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and high nitrogen deposition influenced accelerated tree height growth. However few researches show that the drying climate conditions and water deficit cause slow/not definite trend of tree height growth in forests. The aim of our study presents the effects of drying climate and surplus nitrogen on height growth of sessile oak (Quercus petraea). Almost 50 sessile oak stands (with zonal site condition) have been measured along a humid-arid climatic transect in Hungary. Top heights of the trees are the best dendrometric parameter for indicating the changing site conditions. Observed top heights dates were compared with 50-years climate condition along the humid-arid climatic transect. Tree height growth in the dry and mesic section of climatic gradient slowed at the last 4 decades, because of the increasing frequency of dry periods. Accelerated height growth were measured in the mesic and humid section of transect, where the nitrogen deposition due to local air pollution were higher than the background deposition. These results draw attention to the importance of the drying climate and surplus nitrogen in the global changes. Keywords: climate change impacts, drought periods, surplus deposition, tree height growth Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU-national joint funded research project.

  19. Modelling airborne concentration and deposition rate of maize pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, Nathalie; Loubet, Benjamin; Huber, Laurent

    2004-10-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has reinforced the need to quantify gene flow from crop to crop. This requires predictive tools which take into account meteorological conditions, canopy structure as well as pollen aerodynamic characteristics. A Lagrangian Stochastic (LS) model, called SMOP-2D (Stochastic Mechanistic model for Pollen dispersion and deposition in 2 Dimensions), is presented. It simulates wind dispersion of pollen by calculating individual pollen trajectories from their emission to their deposition. SMOP-2D was validated using two field experiments where airborne concentration and deposition rate of pollen were measured within and downwind from different sized maize (Zea mays) plots together with micrometeorological measurements. SMOP-2D correctly simulated the shapes of the concentration profiles but generally underestimated the deposition rates in the first 10 m downwind from the source. Potential explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. Incorrect parameterisation of turbulence in the transition from the crop to the surroundings is probably the most likely reason. This demonstrates that LS models for particle transfer need to be coupled with air-flow models under complex terrain conditions.

  20. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  1. 76 FR 41392 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... marginal rates of return. Increased deposits might also mean added pressure for depository institutions to... institutions with heightened risk due to repeal of the statutory prohibition; (c) stress tests should be... the meaning of the relevant sections of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Act of 1996...

  2. Air Power and Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    American air ace.- New York: Putnam , 1958. (UG!3 290 G98) Guild, Richard E. The double attack system: a formalization. Yokota Air Base, Japan, 1968...1962) Sa..dby;•Robert H.M.S. Air bombardment: the story of it- development New York: Harper, 1961. (UGK 207 S25) Saunders, Hilary A.S. .Per ardua; the...1961. Letchworth, Herts: Harleyford Publications, 1961. (UGH 3215 .F5 887) Bruce, John N. British ,aeroplance 1914-1918. London: Putnam ; 1957. (Ref

  3. Contact air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Porth, R

    1999-05-01

    The advantages of contact air abrasion techniques are readily apparent. The first, of course, is the greatly increased ease of use. Working with contact also tends to speed the learning curve by giving the process a more natural dental feel. In addition, as one becomes familiar with working with a dust stream, the potential for misdirecting the air flow is decreased. The future use of air abrasion for deep decay removal will make this the treatment of choice for the next millennium.

  4. Mars W cloud: Evidence of nighttime ice depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, Y.; Forbes, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    Water clouds on Mars, their current and past connections with other forms of water, along with surface features that suggest the early existence of flowing water, continue to be intriguing aspects of the red planet. Discrete afternoon mountain clouds were one of the earliest atmospheric features to be observed on Mars. Their exclusive formation near the high mountains led to the common belief that air lifting associated with local circulation induced by the mountains underlies their formation. We demonstrate that an additional local source of water vapor is needed for the formation of opaque discrete afternoon clouds on the mountains of Mars, including the so-called W-formation. We suggest that the possible deposition of ice from the thick aphelion cloud belt during the night is capable of providing this additional source. This direct cloud water deposition on mountains on Mars bears many similarities with the well-known interception of water by mountains frequently immersed in fogs on Earth.

  5. Atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Weathers, K.C.; Lindberg, S.E. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    Three important phenomena characterize atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests: (1) multiple deposition mechanisms (wet, dry, and cloud deposition), (2) high rates of deposition, and (3) high spatial variability. The high rates of deposition are caused by changes in meteorological conditions with elevation, especially increasing wind speed and cloud immersion frequency. The high spatial variability of deposition is a result of the regulation of cloud and dry deposition rates by microclimatic and canopy structure conditions, which can be extremely heterogeneous in mountain landscapes. Spruce-fir forests are often [open quotes]hot spots[close quotes] of deposition when viewed in a landscape or regional context because of their elevation, exposure, and evergreen canopy. In this talk we will consider atmospheric depositions to high-elevation forests in both the northeastern and southeastern U.S., using field data and geographic information systems to illustrate deposition patterns.

  6. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  7. Deposition of diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A diamondlike carbon film is deposited in the surface of a substrate by exposing the surface to an argon ion beam containing a hydrocarbon. The current density in the ion beam is low during initial deposition of the film. Subsequent to this initial low current condition, the ion beam is increased to full power. At the same time, a second argon ion beam is directed toward the surface of the substrate. The second ion beam has an energy level much greater than that of the ion beam containing the hydrocarbon. This addition of energy to the system increases mobility of the condensing atoms and serves to remove lesser bound atoms.

  8. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  9. Metalliferous lode deposits of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, Henry C.; Cobb, Edward Huntington

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes from repoAs of Federal and State agencies published before August 31, 1965, the geology of Alaska's metal-bearing lodes, including their structural or stratigraphic control, host rock, mode of origin, kinds of .Q minerals, grade, past production, and extent of exploration. In addition, the lists of mineral occurrences that accompany the 35 mineral-deposit location maps constitute an inventory of the State's known lodes. A total of 692 localities where m&alliferous deposits have been found are shown on the maps. The localities include 1,739 mines, prospects, and reported occurrences, of which 821 are described individually or otherwise cited in the text.

  10. Investigation of Effects of Varying Model Inputs on Mercury Deposition Estimates in the Southwest US

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 4.7.1 was used to simulate mercury wet and dry deposition for a domain covering the continental United States (US). The simulations used MM5-derived meteorological input fields and the US Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  11. Declining atmospheric sulfate deposition in a small agricultural watershed in central Pennsylvania, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur emissions in the northeastern USA are only 20% of what they once were due the enactment of the Clean Air Act. While there are numerous reports of aquatic and forested ecosystems recovering as a result of the decline in sulfur deposition, there is little information describing such effects in ...

  12. Summer deposition of sulfate and reactive nitrogen to two alpine valleys in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiuta, Vivian; Lafrenière, Melissa J.; Norman, Ann-Lise; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2015-01-01

    Summer deposition of sulfate and reactive nitrogen (mainly nitrate, and ammonium) to two alpine valleys in the Southern Canadian Rocky Mountains was investigated to constrain their major sources and evaluate physiographic influences on deposition. The effects of elevation, aspect, and air mass trajectory were evaluated using stable isotope composition (δ15N-NO3-, δ18O-NO3-, and δ34S-SO42-) and major ion concentrations for bulk precipitation. Deposition in the two valleys was related to synoptic scale weather conditions and the route the air mass followed, the location of major emission sources relative to the study site, and atmospheric residence time. Distinct differences in deposition at a relatively small scale between two opposing alpine valleys was mainly related to the orientation of the two valleys relative to the physiography of the Western Canadian Cordillera and the dominant pathways of air mass transport. Sulfate was found to be dominantly from distant sources, while NO3- was strongly enhanced by emissions from local to regional combustion. Local to regional pollutants were preferentially transported to the NNW facing Robertson Valley during NW-upslope synoptic conditions while precipitation in the SE facing Haig Valley was from relatively clean air with minimal influence from local and regional pollutants particularly at the highest elevation site.

  13. New Approach to Depositing Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Buffer Layers for Coated Conductors (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    distribution unlimited. See additional restrictions described on inside pages STINFO COPY © 2003 Materials Research Society AIR... additional layer in the buffer layer stack—a transient nickel layer deposited directly on the substrate. Regardless of the substrate and protective layers...Ridge Na- tional Laboratory ( ORNL ), Oak Ridge, TN, were precleaned in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol, chloro- form) using ultrasonic agitation

  14. Modeling of Ammonia Dry Deposition to a Pocosin Landscape Downwind of a Large Poultry Facility

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-empirical bi-directional flux modeling approach is used to estimate NH3 air concentrations and dry deposition fluxes to a portion of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (PLNWR) downwind of a large poultry facility. Meteorological patterns at PLNWR are such that som...

  15. Deposition of thin mesoporous silica films on glass substrates from basic solution.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Naoki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2006-11-01

    Transparent thin (ca. 100 nm) films of silica-surfactant mesostructured materials were deposited on borosilicate glass plates and soda-lime glass tubes from aqueous solutions containing tetraethoxysilane, alkyltrimethylammonium chloride, ammonia, and methanol. By calcination in air, the films became mesoporous (BET surface area of 700-900 m2 g-1) with pore diameter 2.0-2.8 nm.

  16. Response of DOC in acid-sensitive Maine lakes to decreasing sulfur deposition (1993 - 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, th...

  17. Impact of enhanced ozone deposition and halogen chemistry on model performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, an enhanced ozone deposition scheme due to the interaction of iodide in sea-water and atmospheric ozone and the detailed chemical reactions of organic and inorganic halogen species are incorporated into the hemispheric Community Multiscale Air Quality model. Prelim...

  18. Seasonal and annual variations and regional characteristics of wet and dry deposition amounts in East Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Tsuyoshi, O.; Endo, T.; Yagoh, H.; Matsuda, K.

    2011-12-01

    Emission of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Asian region has been remarkably increased with recent rapid economical growth (Ohara et al., 2007). To appropriately assess the influence of air pollutants on the ecosystem, it is important to quantitatively determine the atmospheric deposition of air pollutants. Here, Seasonal and annual variations and regional characteristics of estimated wet and dry deposition amounts at 27 monitoring sites of Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) from 2003 to 2009 are discussed. Wet deposition sample was collected every 24 hours or 1 week by a wet only sampler. Wet deposition amounts were calculated by the product of the volume-weighted concentrations of ionic species (SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+) in the precipitation and precipitation amount measured by a standard rain gauge at each site. Dry deposition amount was estimated by the inferential method which was originated the model developed by Wesely and Hicks (1977) and modified by Matsuda (2008). The components examined for dry deposition were sulfur compounds (gaseous SO2 and particulate SO42-) and nitrogen compounds (gaseous HNO3 and NH3, particulate NO3- and NH4+). Dry deposition was calculated by the product of the deposition velocity estimated by the inferential method for forest and grass surfaces and the monitored air concentration of each compound. The mean annual dry deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Japanese sites were in the range of 5-37 and 7-50 mmol m-2 year-1, respectively. The regional characteristics of dry deposition amounts in Japan were similar between sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which showed higher deposition in the Sea of Japan side and the western Japan. The mean annual total (wet + dry) deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Japanese sites were in the range of 28-77 and 22-130 mmol m-2 year-1, respectively. The contributions of dry deposition to the total deposition amounts were 10-55% and 13-56% for

  19. Applications Using AIRS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Olsen, E. T.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. For vector-borne disease, research is underway using AIRS near surface retrievals to assess outbreak risk, mosquito incubation periods and epidemic potential for dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. For drought applications, AIRS temperature and humidity data are being used in the development of new drought indicators and improvement in the understanding of drought development. For volcanic hazards, new algorithms using AIRS data are in development to improve the reporting of sulfur dioxide concentration, the burden and height of volcanic ash and dust, all of which pose a safety threat to aircraft. In addition, anomaly maps of many of AIRS standard products are being produced to help highlight "hot spots" and illustrate trends. To distribute it's applications imagery, AIRS is leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving, distribution and participation in the BEDI. This poster will communicate the status of the applications effort for the AIRS Project and provide examples of new maps designed to best communicate the AIRS data.

  20. Air modulation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, D. T.; Corsmeier, R. J.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An air modulation apparatus, such as for use in modulating cooling air to the turbine section of a gas turbine engine is described. The apparatus includes valve means disposed around an annular conduit, such as a nozzle, in the engine cooling air circuit. The valve means, when in a closed position, blocks a portion of the conduit, and thus reduces the amount and increases the velocity of cooling air flowing through the nozzle. The apparatus also includes actuation means, which can operate in response to predetermined engine conditions, for enabling opening and closing of the valve means.

  1. Clean Air Excellence Awards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These non-monetary awards honor sustainable efforts toward pollutant emissions reduction from innovators in clean air technology, community action and outreach, policy development, and transportation efficiency.

  2. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Ronald G.; Salazar, Samuel A.

    2000-01-01

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  3. An Oligocene subaqueous PDC deposit: inferences on its depositional mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, A.; Groppelli, G.

    2014-12-01

    We studied and discussed the depositional mechanisms of a PDC deposit recognized in the Oligocene turbite system of the Val d'Aveto Formation (Northern Italian Apennines). The deposit is characterized by a sandy-sized base (4 m-thick), overlain by a massive conglomerate (46 m-thick), whose gravel-sized detritus is overall represented by substrate-derived clasts (~80%), rather than volcaniclastic ones. Optical, diffractometric (XRD) and minero-chemical (SEM-EDS) analyses on matrix samples reveal a welded volcanic felty texture, rich in plagioclase and horneblende, with accidental metamorphic rock fragments and loose crystals that tend to upward increase along the deposit. Lithological association and roundness of gravel-sized detritus, together with the accidental lithics and loose crystals in the matrix fraction, suggest that this PDC ran channelized in a continental (mountain?) drainage before entering the basin. Channelization in this type of setting 1) enhanced the PDC erosion capacity during the motion and 2) partially cooled it. Flow reached the water at temperatures which triggered the formation of a trapped gas carapace, able to inhibit the water-flow mixing (Sparks et al. (1980-Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). This preserved the current from a shocking water mix and favored its welding. Thus, we suggest that this model can be generally applied when PDC temperatures trigger a stable heat transfer between the flow and the water, which allows the generation of trapped gas carapace and preservation from phreatomagmatic explosions. In contrast, depositional mechanisms inferred by Whitman (1989-Marine Geology) and the ones proposed through the direct observation and sampling of a hot PDC at Montserrat Volcano (Trofimovs et al., 2006-Geology) are developed when fundamental role is played by phreatomagmatic explosions and violent water-flow mix.

  4. Wet deposition monitoring and modelling in New Brunswick — An area dominated by wet deposition due to long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Claude S.

    Two wet deposition monitoring networks, the Coleson Cove Precipitation Monitoring Network (CCPMN) (12 stations) located in the Coleson Cove-Saint John area of south New Brunswick, and the Expanded New Brunswick Precipitation Monitoring Network (ENBPMN) (6 stations) covering the remainder of the province, were established in May 1988. The monitoring networks and a complementary modelling study were implemented to assess the relative contributions of local and distant sources to wet deposition in New Brunswick. Quality assurance/quality control activities for the networks included independent external audits, collocated samplers at one site and comparisons of weekly measurements at the ENBPMN sampler and the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) sampler which makes daily measurements. The intercomparisons provided reassurance that the networks provided high quality data. Analysis of 2 years (June 1988-May 1990) data from the networks included routine statistical analyses for acid rain chemistry as well as analysis of 1 year of daily back trajectory data from Harcourt, New Brunswick. Three-day back trajectories determined at 12-h intervals from Harcourt on days with precipitatio showed that air masses originate mainly from regions in Quebec, Ontario and northeast U.S.A. which are known to have high sulphur oxide emissions. Some 18 trajectories were associated with 50% of the wet sulphate deposition and over 200 trajectories with 75% of the deposition in the 1-year period ending 31 May 1989. The MESOPUFF model, applied to an 800 km by 800 km domain that included the entire province of New Brunswick, was used to make predictions of wet sulphate and nitrate deposition at each of the wet deposition monitoring stations for a 2-year period, 1 June 1988-31 May 1990. Model predictions averaged over all receptors due to all sources in the model domain accounted for 7-25% of the measured seasonal average wet sulphate deposition and less than 3% of the

  5. Physical properties of chemically deposited Bi2S3 thin films using two post-deposition treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, H.; Messina, S.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; Martínez, H.

    2014-08-01

    As-deposited bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3) thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition technique were treated with thermal annealed in air atmosphere and argon AC plasma. The as-deposited, thermally annealing and plasma treatment Bi2S3 thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM), transmission, specular reflectance and electrical measurements. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the films are compared. The XRD analysis showed that both post-deposition treatments, transform the thin films from amorphous to a crystalline phase. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement showed a reduction of roughness for the films treated in plasma. The energy band gap value of the as-prepared film was Eg = 1.61 eV, while for the film thermally annealed was Eg = 1.60 eV and Eg = 1.56 eV for film treated with Plasma. The electrical conductivity under illumination of the as-prepared films was 3.6 × 10-5 (Ω cm)-1, whereas the conductivity value for the thermally annealed films was 2.0 × 10-3 (Ω cm)-1 and for the plasma treated films the electrical conductivity increases up to 7.7 × 10-2 (Ω cm)-1.

  6. Arctic air pollution: origins and impacts.

    PubMed

    Law, Kathy S; Stohl, Andreas

    2007-03-16

    Notable warming trends have been observed in the Arctic. Although increased human-induced emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases are certainly the main driving factor, air pollutants, such as aerosols and ozone, are also important. Air pollutants are transported to the Arctic, primarily from Eurasia, leading to high concentrations in winter and spring (Arctic haze). Local ship emissions and summertime boreal forest fires may also be important pollution sources. Aerosols and ozone could be perturbing the radiative budget of the Arctic through processes specific to the region: Absorption of solar radiation by aerosols is enhanced by highly reflective snow and ice surfaces; deposition of light-absorbing aerosols on snow or ice can decrease surface albedo; and tropospheric ozone forcing may also be contributing to warming in this region. Future increases in pollutant emissions locally or in mid-latitudes could further accelerate global warming in the Arctic.

  7. Pesticides in western Canadian mountain air and soil.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gillian L; Lei, Ying D; Teixeira, Camilla; Muir, Derek C G; Wania, Frank

    2007-09-01

    The distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCP; in past and current use) in the mountains of western Canada was determined by sampling air, soil, and lichen along three elevational transects in 2003-2004. Two transects west of the Continental Divide were located in Mount Revelstoke and Yoho National Park, while the Observation Peak transect in Banff National Park is east of the divide. XAD-based passive air samplers, yielding annually averaged air concentrations, were deployed, and soils were collected at all 22 sampling sites, whereas lichen were only sampled in Revelstoke. Back trajectory analysis showed limited air mass transport from the Prairies to the east, but a high frequency of air arriving from the southwest, which includes agricultural regions in British Columbia and Washington State. Endosulfan, dieldrin, and a-hexachlorocyclohexane were the most prevalent OCPs in air and soil; hexachlorobenzene was only abundant in air; chlorothalonil, dacthal, and pentachloronitrobenzene were also consistently present. OCP air concentrations were similar across the three transects, suggesting efficient atmospheric mixing on a local and regional scale. Soil concentrations and soil/air concentration ratios of many OCPs were significantly higher west of the Continental Divide. The soil and lichen concentrations of most OCPs increased with altitude in Revelstoke, and displayed maxima at intermediate elevations at Yoho and Observation Peak. These distribution patterns can be understood as being determined by the balance between atmospheric deposition to, and retention within, the soils. Higher deposition, due to more precipitation falling at lower temperatures, likely occurs west of the divide and at higher elevations. Higher retention, due to higher soil organic matter content, is believed to occur in soils below the tree line. Highest pesticide concentrations are thus found intemperate mountain soils that are rich in organic matter and receive large amounts of cold

  8. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  9. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  10. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  11. Grow Your Own Copper Deposit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Timothy John

    2009-01-01

    Crystals are beautiful structures--yet they occur naturally in dirty and remote places. In the inquiry-based activity described here, students will enjoy the process of creating their own crystals and using microscopes to examine them. It demonstrates the process of mineral concentration and deposition. Upon completing this activity, students…

  12. Modeling of heavy organic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Organic deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. This problem is manifested by current activities in gas flooding and heavy oil production. The need for understanding the nature of asphaltenes and asphaltics and developing solutions to the deposition problem is well recognized. Prediction technique is crucial to solution development. In the past 5 years, some progress in modeling organic deposition has been made. A state-of-the-art review of methods for modeling organic deposition is presented in this report. Two new models were developed in this work; one based on a thermodynamic equilibrium principle and the other on the colloidal stability theory. These two models are more general and realistic than others previously reported. Because experimental results on the characteristics of asphaltene are inconclusive, it is still not well known whether the asphaltenes is crude oil exist as a true solution or as a colloidal suspension. Further laboratory work which is designed to study the solubility properties of asphaltenes and to provide additional information for model development is proposed. Some experimental tests have been conducted to study the mechanisms of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation. Coreflooding experiments show that asphaltene precipitation occurs after gas breakthrough. The mechanism of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation is believed to occur by hydrocarbon extraction which causes change in oil composition. Oil swelling due to CO{sub 2} solubilization does not induce asphaltene precipitation.

  13. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  14. Subconjunctival and episcleral lipid deposits.

    PubMed Central

    Fraunfelder, F. T.; Garner, A.; Barras, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    Biomicroscopical examination of the bulbar conjunctiva and anterior episclera of 1000 randomly selected outpatients showed the presence of multiple discrete lipid globules in 30 per cent. The lipid deposits were asymptomatic. Their prevalence was age-related, while their distribution and composition were consistent with origin from the conjunctival blood vessels. Images PMID:952830

  15. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

  16. Pathology of glomerular deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Joh, Kensuke

    2007-09-01

    In routine diagnosis on renal biopsy, one of the confusing fields for pathological diagnoses is the glomerulopathies with fibrillary structure. The primary glomerulopathies with a deposit of ultrastructural fibrillary structure, which are negative for Congo-red stain but positive for immunoglobulins, include fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Several paraproteinemias including cryoglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy, and light chain deposition disease as well as hematopoietic disorders including plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and B cell lymphoproliferative disorders involve glomerulopathy with an ultrastructural fibrillary structure. A rare glomerulopathy with fibrillary structure that stains negative for Congo-red as well as for immunoglobulins has been also reported. The pathological diagnoses of these glomerulopathies can include either glomerular diseases, or paraproteinemic diseases, or hematopoietic diseases. The terminology is still confusing when glomerular diseases can be combined with paraproteinemic diseases and/or hematopoietic diseases. Therefore, the generic term, 'glomerular deposition disease' (GDD), has been proposed by pathologists with a requirement for clinicians to detect autoantibodies, paraproteins as well as to carry out a bone marrow check. An attempt has been made to rearrange the diseases with related disorders of fibrillary deposits, based on detailed clinical and pathological finding and to elucidate the correlation between GDD, paraproteinemia, and hematopoietic disorder.

  17. Titania Deposition on PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary B.; Sutter, James K.; Pizem, Hillel; Gershevitz, Olga; Goffer, Yossi; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Milhet, Xavier; McIlwain, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The formation, degree of crystallinity and adherence of dense titania (TiO2) thin film coatings on a high-temperature polyimide resin (PMR-15) can be influenced by the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Furthermore, solution deposition conditions can be adjusted to provide additional control over the morphology and crystallinity of the titania films. Recipes for solution-based titania deposition that used a slowly-hydrolyzing titanium fluoride salt in the presence of boric acid as a fluoride scavenger allowed growth of films up to 750 nm thick in 22 h. By adjusting solution pH and temperature, either amorphous titania or oriented crystalline anatase films could be formed. Surface sulfonate groups enhance the adhesion of solution-deposited oxide thin film coatings. While most sulfonation procedures severely damaged the PMR-15 surface, the use of chlorosulfonic acid followed by hydrolysis of the installed chlorosulfonyl groups provided effective surface sulfonation without significant surface damage. In some cases, the oxide deposition solution caused partial hydrolysis of the polymer surface, which itself was sufficient to allow adhesion of the titania film through chelation of titanium ions by exposed benzoic acid groups on the polymer surface.

  18. Electro-spark deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  19. Oxalate deposition on asbestos bodies.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Roggli, Victor L; Richards, Judy H; Crissman, Kay M; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline D; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a deposition of oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos demonstrated in 3 patients. We investigated the mechanism and possible significance of this deposition by testing the hypothesis that oxalate generated through nonenzymatic oxidation of ascorbate by asbestos-associated iron accounts for the deposition of the crystal on a ferruginous body. Crocidolite asbestos (1000 microg/mL) was incubated with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C. The dependence of oxalate generation on iron-catalyzed oxidant production was tested with the both the metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylthiourea. Incubation of crocidolite, H(2)O(2), and ascorbate in vitro generated approximately 42 nmol of oxalate in 24 hours. Oxalate generation was diminished significantly by the inclusion of either deferoxamine or dimethylthiourea in the reaction mixture. Incubation of asbestos bodies and uncoated fibers isolated from human lung with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C resulted in the generation of numerous oxalate crystals. We conclude that iron-catalyzed production of oxalate from ascorbate can account for the deposition of this crystal on ferruginous bodies.

  20. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint.