Science.gov

Sample records for air residence time

  1. Air Parcel Residence Times within Tropical Forest Canopies and Implications for Reactive Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon rainforest is the world's largest natural emitter of reactive trace gases. Due to its dense vegetation (leaf area index > 4), turbulence fluctuations are highly attenuated deep inside the canopy. However, strong coherent eddies that penetrate the upper portion of the canopy can be very effective in transporting gases. Sweeps and ejections act in the order of seconds and transport air parcels into or out of the canopy. The effects of coherent structures on the air parcel residence times and associated chemical processing of reactive gases remain largely unquantified in tropical forests. We combine canopy resolving Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and field observations in the Brazilian Amazon to study residence times of air parcels in the rainforest as a function of canopy structure and height (h). Good agreement is obtained between simulated and observed turbulence statistics within and above the forest. Coherent structure properties obtained from quadrant analysis are also well reproduced. A Lagrangian particle tracking algorithm is used to quantify the distribution of residence times of air parcels "released" at different heights. Canopy residence times were determined from the particle trajectories. The resulting probability density function (PDF) strongly depended on the particle release height (z). For particles released in the upper canopy (at z/h=0.75) the most frequent residence times were in the order of 30s, with 50% of all particles ejected from the canopy after ~2 minutes. The mean residence time was close to 5 minutes, indicating a very skewed PDF. At z/h=0.25 the PDF was more evenly distributed with its median and mean in the order of ~10 minutes. Due to sweeps, both simulations had a non- negligible fraction of particles transported deep into the canopy, thus increasing greatly their residence times. As the reaction timescales of many biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are in the order of seconds to minutes, significant chemical

  2. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  3. Decomposing the profile of PM in two low polluted German cities--mapping of air mass residence time, focusing on potential long range transport impacts.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to decompose the profile of particulates in Karlsruhe and Potsdam (Germany), focusing on the localization of PM potential transboundary sources. An air mass cluster analysis was implemented, followed by a study of air mass residence time on a grid of a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution. Particulate/gaseous daily air pollution and meteorological data were used to indicate PM local sources. Four Principal Component Analysis (PCA) components were produced: traffic, photochemical, industrial/domestic and particulate. PM2.5/PM10 ratio seasonal trends, indicated production of PMCOARSE (PM10-PM2.5) from secondary sources in Potsdam during warm period (WP). The residing areas of incoming slow moving air masses are potential transboundary PM sources. For Karlsruhe those areas were mainly around the city. An air mass residence time secondary peak was observed over Stuttgart. For Potsdam, areas with increased dwelling time of the arriving air parcels were detected particularly above E/SE Germany.

  4. Microbial community changes during different empty bed residence times and operational fluctuations in an air diffusion reactor for odor abatement.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisa; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl; Lebrero, Raquel

    2017-03-08

    The succession of bacterial and fungal populations was assessed in an activated sludge (AS) diffusion bioreactor treating a synthetic malodorous emission containing H2S, toluene, butanone and alpha-pinene. Microbial community characteristics (bacterial and fungal diversity, richness, evenness and composition) and bioreactor function relationships were evaluated at different empty bed residence times (EBRTs) and after process fluctuations and operational failures (robustness test). For H2S, butanone and toluene, the bioreactor showed a stable and efficient abatement performance regardless of the EBRT and fluctuations applied, while low alpha-pinene removals were observed. While no clear positive or negative relationship between community characteristics and bioreactor functions was observed, ecological parameters such as evenness and community dynamics seemed to be of importance for maintaining reactor stability. The optimal degree of evenness of the inoculum likely contributed to the high robustness of the system towards the fluctuations imposed. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Fungi (Hypocreales, Chaeatothyriales) were the most abundant groups retrieved from the AS system with a putative key role in the degradation of butanone and toluene. Typical H2S and alpha-pinene degraders were not retrieved from the system. The inoculation of P. fluorescens, a known alpha-pinene degrader, to the system did not result in the enhancement of the degradation of this compound. This strain was likely outcompeted by the microorganisms already adapted to the AS environment.

  5. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  6. Singlet delta oxygen production in a 2D micro-discharge array in air: effect of gas residence time and discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gaurav; Santos Sousa, João; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    The production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) is of growing interest for many applications. We report on the measurement of O2(a 1Δg) and ozone (O3) in a room temperature atmospheric pressure discharge in dry air. The plasma source is a 2D array of micro-discharges generated by an alternating current voltage at 20 kHz. The study focuses on the effect of gas flow through the discharge. The maximum investigated flow rate allows reducing the gas residence time in the discharge zone to half the discharge period. Results indicate that the residence time and discharge power have a major effect on the O2(a 1Δg) production. Different O2(a 1Δg) density dependencies on power are observed for different flow rates. Effects of collisional quenching on the as-produced and measured O2(a 1Δg) densities are discussed. The flow rate also allows for control of the O2(a 1Δg) to O3 density ratio in the effluent from 0.7 to conditions of pure O3.

  7. Residence times of branching diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.

    2016-07-01

    The residence time of a branching Brownian process is the amount of time that the mother particle and all its descendants spend inside a domain. Using the Feynman-Kac formalism, we derive the residence-time equation as well as the equations for its moments for a branching diffusion process with an arbitrary number of descendants. This general approach is illustrated with simple examples in free space and in confined geometries where explicit formulas for the moments are obtained within the long time limit. In particular, we study in detail the influence of the branching mechanism on those moments. The present approach can also be applied to investigate other additive functionals of branching Brownian process.

  8. The United States Air force optometry residency program.

    PubMed

    Kent, J F

    1995-04-01

    The USAF Optometry Residency Program promotes an educational climate that facilitates the education and development of the resident doctor not only as an optometrist but also as a military officer. Development of self-directed education and decision making within the training period is emphasized. Residents are encouraged to examine and challenge existing ideas and to develop physiological concepts and principles so the practical application of these skills is reflected in active clinical practice and effective professional relationships. The Air Force Optometry Residency Program will train career-oriented Air Force optometrists in advanced clinical and diagnostic techniques, aerospace optometry, and clinic management including the latest continuous quality improvement concepts. Recent changes have enlarged the scope of practice for Air Force optometrists. This expanded scope of practice has created a need for a nucleus of residency-trained optometrists, skilled in the latest techniques of eye care, who return to the field and train their associates in these advanced techniques. Over 40 percent of Air Force optometry clinics are manned by one doctor of optometry. Residency-trained optometrists are able to provide a high level of comprehensive optometric care at these facilities. Through this program the Air Force can keep pace with the evolution of optometry and meet the challenge of providing the highest quality care to our patients.

  9. Comparison of residence time models for cascading rotary dryers

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.F.; Langrish, T.A.G.

    1999-04-01

    The predictions of the models of Matchett and Baker (1988), Saeman and Mitchell (1954) and Friedman and Marshall (1949) for the solids residence time in rotary dryers have been compared with both pilot-scale and industrial-scale data. A countercurrent pilot-scale dryer of 0.2m diameter and 2m long has been used with air velocities up to 1.5 m to measure the residence times of sorghum grain. The average discrepancy for the solids residence time between the predictions and the experiments that were carried out in the pilot-scale rotary dryer is {minus}10.4%. Compared with the models of Friedman and Marshall (1949) and Saeman and Mitchell (1954) for the pilot-scale data obtained here, the Matchett and Baker model is more satisfactory for predicting the solids residence time in this pilot-scale dryer. It has also been found that the model of Matchett and Baker describes the industrial data of Saeman and Mitchell (1954) than the correlation of Friedman and Marshall (1949).

  10. Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-04

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

  11. Mean sediment residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Yang, X.; Rozier, O.; Narteau, C.

    2014-03-01

    When a barchan dune migrates, the sediment trapped on its lee side is later mobilized when exposed on the stoss side. Then sand grains may undergo many dune turnover cycles before their ejection along the horns, but the amount of time a sand grain contributes to the dune morphodynamics remains unknown. To estimate such a residence time, we analyze sediment particle motions in steady state barchans by tracking individual cells of a 3-D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than the convergent sediment fluxes associated with avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchans. Then, for different flow strengths and dune sizes, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchans is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in the presence of bed forms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  12. Mean residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Yang, X.; Rozier, O.; Narteau, C.

    2013-12-01

    A barchan dune migrates when the sediment trapped on its lee side is remobilized by the flow. Then, sand grains may undergo many dune turnover cycles before their ejection along the horns, but the amount of time a sand grain contributes to the dune morphodynamics remains unknown. To estimate such a residence time, we analyze sediment particle motions in steady-state barchan dunes by tracking individual cells of a 3D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan dune shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchan dunes. Then, for different flow strengths and dune sizes, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchan dunes is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan dune morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in presence of bed forms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  13. A revised picture of the atmospheric moisture residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läderach, Alexander; Sodemann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric branch of the hydrological cycle is a key component of variability in the global water and energy budget. We study the transport of moisture by weather systems using a refined Lagrangian moisture source diagnostics on a global air mass transport climatology calculated with the FLEXPART model for the period 1979-2013. The diagnostics determine source-sink relationships for all precipitation events in the ERA-Interim data set, which provides a new estimate of the atmospheric moisture residence time (defined as the time moisture spends in the atmosphere between evaporation and precipitation). The global mean residence time of 4 to 5 days obtained from our diagnostics is about half the value assumed so far. This is mainly because previous estimates neglect moisture transport, and assume that depletion time constants can be considered as a proxy for the time moisture spends in the atmosphere. We show from different arguments that these assumptions are generally not fulfilled. The revised spatial and temporal picture of the atmospheric moisture residence time reveals patterns that are consistent with the footprints of precipitation producing weather systems in different regions of the earth. This will be exemplified with examples from tropical and extratropical regions.

  14. RESIDENCE TIME DISTRIBUTION OF FLUIDS IN STIRRED ANNULAR PHOTOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When gases flow through an annular photoreactor at constant rate, some of the gas spends more or less than the average residence time in the reactor. This spread of residence time can have an important effect on the performance of the reactor. this study tested how the residence...

  15. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J. Michael; McFarland, Jesse M.; Paavilainen, Ville O.; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T.; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G.; Nunn, Philip A.; Karr, Dane E.; Gerritsen, Mary E.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D.; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A.; Hill, Ronald J.; Goldstein, David M.; Taunton, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Drugs with prolonged, on-target residence time often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here, we demonstrate progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Utilizing an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrate biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 days. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK more than 18 hours after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further utilized to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating generalizability of the approach. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates “residence time by design”, the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo. PMID:26006010

  16. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  17. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process.

  18. The residence time of water in the atmosphere revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ent, Ruud J.; Tuinenburg, Obbe A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper revisits the knowledge on the residence time of water in the atmosphere. Based on state-of-the-art data of the hydrological cycle we derive a global average residence time of 8.9 ± 0.4 days (uncertainty given as 1 standard deviation). We use two different atmospheric moisture tracking models (WAM-2layers and 3D-T) to obtain atmospheric residence time characteristics in time and space. The tracking models estimate the global average residence time to be around 8.5 days based on ERA-Interim data. We conclude that the statement of a recent study that the global average residence time of water in the atmosphere is 4-5 days, is not correct. We derive spatial maps of residence time, attributed to evaporation and precipitation, and age of atmospheric water, showing that there are different ways of looking at temporal characteristics of atmospheric water. Longer evaporation residence times often indicate larger distances towards areas of high precipitation. From our analysis we find that the residence time over the ocean is about 2 days less than over land. It can be seen that in winter, the age of atmospheric moisture tends to be much lower than in summer. In the Northern Hemisphere, due to the contrast in ocean-to-land temperature and associated evaporation rates, the age of atmospheric moisture increases following atmospheric moisture flow inland in winter, and decreases in summer. Looking at the probability density functions of atmospheric residence time for precipitation and evaporation, we find long-tailed distributions with the median around 5 days. Overall, our research confirms the 8-10-day traditional estimate for the global mean residence time of atmospheric water, and our research contributes to a more complete view of the characteristics of the turnover of water in the atmosphere in time and space.

  19. Experimental determination of residence time distribution in continuous dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Haress; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2017-03-31

    With increasing importance of continuous manufacturing, the interest in integrating dry granulation into a continuous manufacturing line is growing. Residence time distribution measurements are of importance as they provide information about duration of materials within the process. These data enable traceability and are highly beneficial for developing control strategies. A digital image analysis system was used to determine the residence time distribution of two materials with different deformation behavior (brittle, plastic) in the milling unit of dry granulation systems. A colorant was added to the material (20%w/w iron oxide), which did not affect the material properties excessively, so the milling process could be mimicked well. Experimental designs were conducted to figure out which parameters effect the mean residence time strongly. Moreover, two types of dry granulation systems were contrasted. Longer mean residence times were obtained for the oscillating mill (OM) compared to the conical mill (CM). For co-processed microcrystalline cellulose residence times of 19.8-44.4s (OM) and 11.6-29.1s (CM) were measured, mainly influenced by the specific compaction force, the mill speed and roll speed. For dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrate residence times from 17.7-46.4 (OM) and 5.4-10.2s (CM) were measured, while here the specific compaction force, the mill speed and their interactions with the roll speed had an influence on the mean residence time.

  20. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

    2010-05-10

    Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

  1. A METHOD TO INCORPORATE ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME OF CHEMICALS IN EMBAYMENTS: LOCAL EFFECT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residence times are classically defined by the physical and chemical aspects of water bodies rather than by their ecological implications. Therefore, a more clear and direct connection between the residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these ...

  2. Prolonged patient emergence time among clinical anesthesia resident trainees

    PubMed Central

    House, L. McLean; Calloway, Nathan H.; Sandberg, Warren S.; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Emergence time, or the duration between incision closure and extubation, is costly nonoperative time. Efforts to improve operating room efficiency and identify trainee progress make such time intervals of interest. We sought to calculate the incidence of prolonged emergence (i.e., >15 min) for patients under the care of clinical anesthesia (CA) residents. We also sought to identify factors from resident training, medical history, anesthetic use, and anesthesia staffing, which affect emergence. Material and Methods: In this single-center, historical cohort study, perioperative information management systems provided data for surgical cases under resident care at a tertiary care center in the United States from 2006 to 2008. Using multiple logistic regression, the effects of variables on emergence was analyzed. Results: Of 7687 cases under the care of 27 residents, the incidence of prolonged emergence was 13.9%. Emergence prolongation decreased by month in training for 1st-year (CA-1) residents (r2 = 0.7, P < 0.001), but not for CA-2 and CA-3 residents. Mean patient emergence time differed among 27 residents (P < 0.01 for 58.4% or 205/351 paired comparisons). In a model restricted to 1st-year residents, patient male gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status >II, emergency surgical case, operative duration ≥2 h, and paralytic agent use were associated with higher frequency of prolonged emergence, while sevoflurane or desflurane use was associated with lower frequency. Attending anesthesiologist handoff was not associated with longer emergence. Conclusion: Incidence of prolonged emergence from general anesthesia differed significantly among trainees, by resident training duration, and for patients with ASA >II. PMID:28096573

  3. Impacts of air cleaners on indoor air quality in residences impacted by wood smoke.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Amanda J; Gibson, Mark D; MacNeill, Morgan; Ward, Tony J; Wallace, Lance A; Kuchta, James; Seaboyer, Matt; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Guernsey, Judith Read; Stieb, David M

    2014-10-21

    Residential wood combustion is an important source of ambient air pollution, accounting for over 25% of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions in Canada. In addition to these ambient contributions, wood smoke pollutants can enter the indoor environment directly when loading or stoking stoves, resulting in a high potential for human exposure. A study of the effectiveness of air cleaners at reducing wood smoke-associated PM2.5 of indoor and outdoor origin was conducted in 31 homes during winter 2009-10. Day 1, the residents' wood burning appliance operated as usual with no air cleaner. Days 2 and 3, the wood burning appliance was not operational and the air cleaner was randomly chosen to operate in "filtration" or "placebo filtration" mode. When the air cleaner was operating, total indoor PM2.5 levels were significantly lower than on placebo filtration days (p = 0.0001) resulting in a median reduction of 52%. There was also a reduction in the median PM2.5 infiltration factor from 0.56 to 0.26 between these 2 days, suggesting the air cleaner was responsible for increased PM2.5 deposition on filtration days. Our findings suggest that the use of an air cleaner reduces exposure to indoor PM2.5 resulting from both indoor and ambient wood smoke sources.

  4. Online residence time distribution measurement of thermochemical biomass pretreatment reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, David A.; Kuhn, Erik M.; Stickel, Jonathan J.; Tucker, Melvin P.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2015-11-03

    Residence time is a critical parameter that strongly affects the product profile and overall yield achieved from thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass during production of liquid transportation fuels. The residence time distribution (RTD) is one important measure of reactor performance and provides a metric to use when evaluating changes in reactor design and operating parameters. An inexpensive and rapid RTD measurement technique was developed to measure the residence time characteristics in biomass pretreatment reactors and similar equipment processing wet-granular slurries. Sodium chloride was pulsed into the feed entering a 600 kg/d pilot-scale reactor operated at various conditions, and aqueous salt concentration was measured in the discharge using specially fabricated electrical conductivity instrumentation. This online conductivity method was superior in both measurement accuracy and resource requirements compared to offline analysis. Experimentally measured mean residence time values were longer than estimated by simple calculation and screw speed and throughput rate were investigated as contributing factors. In conclusion, a semi-empirical model was developed to predict the mean residence time as a function of operating parameters and enabled improved agreement.

  5. Online residence time distribution measurement of thermochemical biomass pretreatment reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Sievers, David A.; Kuhn, Erik M.; Stickel, Jonathan J.; ...

    2015-11-03

    Residence time is a critical parameter that strongly affects the product profile and overall yield achieved from thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass during production of liquid transportation fuels. The residence time distribution (RTD) is one important measure of reactor performance and provides a metric to use when evaluating changes in reactor design and operating parameters. An inexpensive and rapid RTD measurement technique was developed to measure the residence time characteristics in biomass pretreatment reactors and similar equipment processing wet-granular slurries. Sodium chloride was pulsed into the feed entering a 600 kg/d pilot-scale reactor operated at various conditions, and aqueous saltmore » concentration was measured in the discharge using specially fabricated electrical conductivity instrumentation. This online conductivity method was superior in both measurement accuracy and resource requirements compared to offline analysis. Experimentally measured mean residence time values were longer than estimated by simple calculation and screw speed and throughput rate were investigated as contributing factors. In conclusion, a semi-empirical model was developed to predict the mean residence time as a function of operating parameters and enabled improved agreement.« less

  6. Indoor Residence Times of Semivolatile Organic Compounds: Model Estimation and Field Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor residence times of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major and mostly unavailable input for residential exposure assessment. We calculated residence times for a suite of SVOCs using a fugacity model applied to residential environments. Residence times depend on...

  7. Computational fluid dynamic prediction of the residence time of a vortex separator applied to disinfection.

    PubMed

    Egarr, D; Faram, M G; O'Doherty, T; Phipps, D; Syred, N

    2005-01-01

    A Hydrodynamic Vortex Separator (HDVS) has been modelled using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in order to predict the residence time of the fluid at the overflow and underflow outlets. A technique which was developed for use in Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) was used to determine the residence time and the results have been compared with those determined experimentally. It is shown that in using CFD, it is possible to predict the mean residence time of the fluid and to study the response to a pulse injection of tracer. It is also shown that it is possible to apply these techniques to predict the mean survival rate of bacteria in a combined separation and disinfection process.

  8. Stable, Ultra-Low Residence Time Partial Oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Hickman, Daniel A.

    1997-07-15

    A process for the catalytic partial oxidation of methane in gas phase at very short residence time (800,000 to 12,000,000 hr.sup.-1) by contacting a gas stream containing methane and oxygen with a metal supported catalyst, such as platinum deposited on a ceramic monolith.

  9. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics. PMID:17988402

  10. The Effect of Tidal Exchange on Residence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, P.; Reniers, A.; Van De Kreeke, J.; MacMahan, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the conduit between the ocean and an inland body of water such as a lagoon, estuary or harbor, tidal inlets serve an important role in the hydrodynamics of the nearshore environment. As the global population grows in a world where 13% of the coastline is composed of barrier islands, an understanding of the physical processes that influence the transport of inland waters offshore is increasingly paramount. Water renewal, or the replacement of old lagoon water with new seawater has been well studied and is controlled by the tides through the process of tidal exchange or 'tidal pumping'. The magnitude of tidal exchange is influenced by the inlet hydraulics and geometry of the inlet and various physical processes driven by the tide, wind, and waves. To examine the correlation between tidal exchange and the renewal of lagoon water with seawater, a new method to quantify lagoon residence time is explored. Modeling experiments in Delft3D of idealized inlet systems are used to quantify the effect that tidal exchange has on residence time. Tidal exchange is decomposed into two fractions, an ocean exchange fraction and a lagoon exchange fraction. A simple transport model that utilizes both these fractions is compared to both a tidal prism model that neglects the lagoon exchange fraction and Delft3D. The tidal prism model over predicts the seaward transport of lagoon water as compared to Delft3D for all inlet channel geometries studied. The transport model shows good agreement with Delft3D for narrower inlets that support high ocean exchange fractions, but less agreement for wider inlets that support low ocean exchange fractions. Residence time distributions for each geometry are calculated using a new virtual tracer method in Delft3D. The spatially averaged residence time in the lagoon is found to be inversely proportional to the product of the two exchange fractions of each inlet system. Funded by ONR and NDSEG

  11. Mean Residence Time and Emergency Drinking Water Supply.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin; Humer, Franko

    2013-04-01

    Immediately after securing an endangered population, the first priority of aid workers following a disaster is the distribution of drinking water. Such emergency situations are reported from many parts of the world following regional chemical or nuclear pollution accidents, floods, droughts, rain-induced landslides, tsunami, and other extreme events. It is often difficult to organise a replacement water supply when regular water systems with short residence times are polluted, infiltrated or even flooded by natural or man-made disasters. They are either unusable or their restoration may take months or even years. Groundwater resources, proven safe and protected by the geological environment, with long residence times and the necessary infrastructure for their exploitation, would provide populations with timeous replacement of vulnerable water supply systems and make rescue activities more rapid and effective. Such resources have to be identified and investigated, as a substitute for affected drinking water supplies thereby eliminating or reducing the impact of their failure following catastrophic events. Even in many areas such water resources with long residence times in years or decades are difficult to find it should be known which water supply facilities in the region are matching these requirements to allow in emergency situation the transport of water in tankers to the affected regions to prevent epidemics, importing large quantities of bottled water. One should know the residence time of the water supply to have sufficient time to plan and install new safe water supply facilities. Development of such policy and strategy for human security - both long term and short term - is therefore needed to decrease the vulnerability of populations threatened by extreme events and water supplies with short residence times. Generally: The longer the residence time of groundwater in the aquifer, the lower its vulnerability. The most common and economic methods to estimate

  12. Manganese in Air: Associations in Residents with Tremor and Motor Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: An environmental study examined air manganese (Mn) exposed residents of two towns in Ohio: Marietta (near a ferro-manganese smelter) and East Liverpool (EL)(adjacent to an open-storage ore packaging facility). Air Mn inhalation is associated with neuropsychological/neu...

  13. Monitored summer peak attic air temperatures in Florida residences

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.S.; Sherwin, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has analyzed measured summer attic air temperature data taken for some 21 houses (three with two different roof configurations) over the last several years. The analysis is in support of the calculation within ASHRAE Special Project 152P, which will be used to estimate duct system conductance gains that are exposed to the attic space. Knowledge of prevailing attic thermal conditions are critical to the duct heat transfer calculations for estimation of impacts on residential cooling system sizing. The field data were from a variety of residential monitoring projects that were classified according to intrinsic differences in roofing configurations and characteristics. The sites were occupied homes spread around the state of Florida. There were a variety of different roofing construction types, roof colors, and ventilation configurations. Data at each site were obtained from June 1 to September 30 according to the ASHRAE definition of summer. The attic air temperature and ambient air temperature were used for the data analysis. The attic air temperature was measured with a shielded type-T thermocouple at mid-attic height, halfway between the decking and insulation surface. The ambient air temperature was obtained at each site by thermocouples located inside a shielded exterior enclosure at a 3 to 4 m (10--12 ft) height. The summer 15-minute data from each site were sorted by the average ambient air temperature into the top 2.5% of the observations of the highest temperature. Within this limited group of observations, the average outside air temperature, attic air temperature, and coincident difference were reported.

  14. The residence time of intensively managed agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, Laura; Cherkauer, Keith; Chiu, Chun-mei; Rahman, Sanoar

    2015-04-01

    Much of the agricultural landscape across the Midwestern United States is intensively managed through numerous surface and subsurface drainage improvements, and the growing extraction of groundwater resources. The relatively recent glaciation of the North Central region means that the landscape is less dissected and hydrologically connected than older till areas. Low topographic gradients and underlying dense till which restricts vertical water movement, as well as kettle depressions, have led to poorly drained soils and extensive wetlands within the landscape. Large areas of this land could only be farmed once the excess water was removed through artificial surface and subsurface drainage. Conventional wisdom in the region maintains that subsurface tile drainage reduces the occurrence of peak flow events by increasing soil water storage capacity. At the watershed scale, this view does not take into account the coincident increase in surface drainage and reduction in residence time in surface depressions. This paper explores to what degree water management and irrigation has changed surface and subsurface water storage and residence time over the last century and how this has impacted flow duration throughout the Wabash River system in Indiana, USA. The effects of subsurface tile drains, wetlands and aquifer storage are explicitly represented within the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model. We maintain a focus on the entire Wabash River, a river system of historic importance that is also representative of many similar areas in the till plain region of the agricultural Midwest, which contribute to water quality and flood dynamics of the Mississippi river system. By lowering the water table, surface and subsurface drainage improvements have increased the subsurface storage capacity at the beginning of rain events, but this is overwhelmed by the decrease in surface storage capacity for intermediate to large events, decreasing the current

  15. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  16. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  17. Modelling travel and residence times in the eastern Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, T; Hartnett, M

    2008-01-01

    The Irish Sea, which lies between 51 degrees N-56 degrees N and 2 degrees 50'W-7 degrees W, provides a sheltered environment to exploit valuable fisheries resource. Anthropogenic activity is a real threat to its water quality. The majority of freshwater input down rivers flows into the eastern Irish Sea. The structure of the water circulation was not well understood during the planning of Sellafield nuclear plant outfall site in the eastern Irish Sea. A three-dimensional primitive equation numerical model was applied to the Irish Sea to simulate both barotropic and baroclinic circulation within the region. High accuracy was achieved with regard to the prediction of both tidal circulation and surface and nearbed water temperatures across the region. The model properly represented the Western Irish Sea Gyre, induced by thermal stratification and not known during planning Sellafield. Passive tracer simulations based on the developed hydrodynamic model were used to deliver residence times of the eastern Irish Sea region for various times of the year as well as travel times from the Sellafield outfall site to various locations within the Irish Sea. The results indicate a strong seasonal variability of travel times from Sellafield to the examined locations. Travel time to the Clyde Sea is the shortest for the autumnal tracer release (90 days); it takes almost a year for the tracer to arrive at the same location if it is released in January. Travel times from Sellafield to Dublin Bay fall within the range of 180-360 days. The average residence time of the entire eastern Irish Sea is around 7 months. The areas surrounding the Isle of Man are initially flushed due to a predominant northward flow; a backwater is formed in Liverpool Bay. Thus, elevated tracer concentrations are predicted in Liverpool Bay in the case of accidental spills at the Sellafield outfall site.

  18. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  19. Residence time estimates for asymmetric simple exclusion dynamics on strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Krehel, Oleh; Muntean, Adrian; van Santen, Rutger; Sengar, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    The target of our study is to approximate numerically and, in some particular physically relevant cases, also analytically, the residence time of particles undergoing an asymmetric simple exclusion dynamics on a two-dimensional vertical strip. The sources of asymmetry are twofold: (i) the choice of boundary conditions (different reservoir levels) and (ii) the strong anisotropy from a drift nonlinear in density with prescribed directionality. We focus on the effect of the choice of anisotropy on residence time. We analyze our results by means of two theoretical models, a Mean Field and a one-dimensional Birth and Death one. For positive drift we find a striking agreement between Monte Carlo and theoretical results. In the zero drift case we still find agreement as long as particles can freely escape the strip through the bottom boundary. Otherwise, the two models give different predictions and their ability to reproduce numerical results depends on the horizontal displacement probability. The topic is relevant for situations occurring in pedestrian flows or biological transport in crowded environments, where lateral displacements of the particles occur predominantly affecting therefore in an essentially way the efficiency of the overall transport mechanism.

  20. The determination of residence times in a pilot plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, F. Pablo; Cortés, M. Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that residence time distributions (RTD) are very important in many chemical processes such as separation, reforming, hydrocracking, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfuration, hydrogenation among others [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. In addition, tracers can be used to measure the velocity, distribution and residence time of any stream through any part of an industrial [Guidebook on Radioisotope Tracers in Industry, IAEA, Vienna, 1990] or experimental system. Perhaps the best quality of radiotracers is that they do not interfere with normal unit operations or production scheduling. In this paper are presented the RTDs obtained in a pilot plant for a hydrogenation process [IMP, Technical Report, Determinación del tiempo de residencia promedio en el reactor de la planta piloto de hidroagotamiento de crudo, 2002]. The RTDs show a random phenomenon, which is not typical of this type of chemical processes. Several RTDs were determined in order to confirm this random behavior. The data were obtained using as a tracer a radioactive form of sodium iodide containing iodine-131 [The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 10th Ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold, USA, 1981]. The process works with two phases in a countercurrent flow, inside a packed column. The liquid phase goes down by gravity. The gas phase goes up due to pressure difference [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. The tracer was selected such that it would follow the liquid phase.

  1. THE LOCAL EFFECT TIME (LET) AND HOW IT INCORPORATES ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A clear and direct connection between constituent/water residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these time scales to ecology. The concept of "local effect time" (LET) is proposed here as a time scale with adequate spatial resolution to relate ...

  2. Exposure times rather than residence times control redox transformation efficiencies in riparian wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Peiffer, S.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of Damköhler numbers have been extensively used in the discipline of chemical engineering and lately increasingly found its application into environmental science in order to describe the integrated behavior of hydrological systems with respect to their physical transport and biogeochemical transformation capabilities. Defining characteristic time scales of transport and reaction, as part of the Damköhler concept, however is not trivial especially for non-well mixed systems like catchments where physically controlled transport and biogeochemical moderated reactions can be highly variable among individual flow paths. Often, system specific residence times alone are not useful to describe the timescales of transport in the Damköhler concept, because it neglects that degradation of redox-sensitive compounds depend on dynamically changing and non-uniformly distributed hydro-biogeochemical boundary conditions that either facilitate or suppress biogeochemical reactions. In this study an approach is presented that highlights the importance to specifically distinguish between residence and exposure times if system specific transformation efficiencies are evaluated. We investigate the inter-relationship between residence and exposure time distributions for different biogeochemical processes in a virtual wetland environment that is exposed to different hydrological conditions. The relationship between exposure and residence times is mathematically described by a composition matrix that linearly relates the two identities to each other. Composition matrices for different hydrological conditions are analyzed by using the singular value decomposition technique. Results show that especially the type of couplings between the surface and subsurface flow domain control how exposure and residence times are related to each other in the wetland system and that timescales of residence and exposure typically differ by orders of magnitude. Finally, results also indicate

  3. Chicago Residents' Perceptions of Air Quality: Objective Pollution, the Built Environment, and Neighborhood Stigma Theory.

    PubMed

    King, Katherine E

    2015-09-01

    Substantial research documents higher pollution levels in minority neighborhoods, but little research evaluates how residents perceive their own communities' pollution risks. According to "Neighborhood stigma" theory, survey respondents share a cultural bias that minorities cause social dysfunction, leading to over-reports of dysfunction in minority communities. This study investigates perceptions of residential outdoor air quality by linking objective data on built and social environments with multiple measures of pollution and a representative survey of Chicago residents. Consistent with the scholarly narrative, results show air quality is rated worse where minorities and poverty are concentrated, even after extensive adjustment for objective pollution and built environment measures. Perceptions of air pollution may thus be driven by neighborhood socioeconomic position far more than by respondents' ability to perceive pollution. The finding that 63.5% of the sample reported excellent or good air quality helps to explain current challenging in promoting environmental action.

  4. Annoyance due to noise and air pollution to the residents of heavily frequented streets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanner, H. U.; Wehrli, B.; Nemecek, J.; Turrian, V.

    1980-01-01

    The residents of different streets with varying traffic density and building density were questioned about annoyance due to traffic noise and air pollution. Results show that annoyance felt is dependent not only on the measured noise levels and/or air pollution concentrations, but that there do exist interactions between the residential quarters and annoyance. These interactions should be considered when fixing the limits and standards.

  5. Air exchange rates and migration of VOCs in basements and residences

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liuliu; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Rowe, Zachary; Chin, Jo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Basements can influence indoor air quality by affecting air exchange rates (AERs) and by the presence of emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other pollutants. We characterized VOC levels, AERs and interzonal flows between basements and occupied spaces in 74 residences in Detroit, Michigan. Flows were measured using a steady-state multi-tracer system, and 7-day VOC measurements were collected using passive samplers in both living areas and basements. A walkthrough survey/inspection was conducted in each residence. AERs in residences and basements averaged 0.51 and 1.52 h−1, respectively, and had strong and opposite seasonal trends, e.g., AERs were highest in residences during the summer, and highest in basements during the winter. Air flows from basements to occupied spaces also varied seasonally. VOC concentration distributions were right-skewed, e.g., 90th percentile benzene, toluene, naphthalene and limonene concentrations were 4.0, 19.1, 20.3 and 51.0 μg m−3, respectively; maximum concentrations were 54, 888, 1117 and 134 μg m−3. Identified VOC sources in basements included solvents, household cleaners, air fresheners, smoking, and gasoline-powered equipment. The number and type of potential VOC sources found in basements are significant and problematic, and may warrant advisories regarding the storage and use of potentially strong VOCs sources in basements. PMID:25601281

  6. Sediment residence time and landscape evolution in arid Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H. K.; Dosseto, A.; Suresh, P. O.; Cohen, T. J.; Turner, S.

    2009-12-01

    Fractionation of Uranium isotopes (234U and 238U) in fine-grained sediment (< 50 µm) can be used to quantify timescales of sediment residence i.e. storage in soils and associated transport in fluvial or aeolian systems. This information is invaluable for understanding the relationships between climate, tectonics and landscape evolution. Previous work has shown it is possible to use this technique to quantify the links between climate change and sediment transport during the last glacial cycle in Australia (Dosseto et al. 2008). In the temperate, tectonically quiescent catchment area studied, Dosseto et al. showed that changes in climatic conditions strongly influence sediment provenance. However, can the same conclusions be drawn for a semi-arid catchment area? (234U/238U) ratios are presented on the fine fraction (2-50 µm) of palaeochannel sediments from the Katipiri Formation in the Strzelecki Desert. The data are combined with sediment deposition ages inferred from optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating in order to constrain the time elapsed since production by physical weathering of the source bedrock (comminution age). These results provide constraint on the evolution of what today is a semi-arid environment and, in particular, how sediment transport and the landscape have responded to climate change over the past 100,000 yrs. The results are compared and contrasted with sediment residence timescales obtained for temperate Australia. Dosseto, A., Turner, S.P., Hesse, P., Maher, K., and Fryirs, K., 2008, Vegetation over hydrologic control of sediment transport over the past 100,000 yr: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, v. 72, p. Suppl. 1.

  7. Air Force Research Laboratory Resident Associateship Program Continuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    dominating 45% of the final sequenced pool. 2 Developed equilibrium dialysis protocols for testing dissociation constants of aptamer/small molecule...2) Developed equilibrium dialysis protocols for testing dissociation constants of aptamer/small molecule target binding. Confirmed a low micromolar...frequency hopping mechanism which has been finished. The second one is to implement a time slot transmit protocol where each packet is transmitted at

  8. Computing the residence times in the Venice Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, G.; Cucco, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Venice Lagoon is a shallow water body with a total area of about 500 km2. Three inlets govern the water exchanges between the Adriatic Sea and the Venice Lagoon. Water, entering and exiting through these channels during an entire tidal cycle, changes its biogeochemical and physical properties. The aim of this work is to investigate the Venice Lagoon circulation and to quantify the turn over time of the lagoon which mainly influences the water quality of the basin. The study has been carried out with a numerical model. The model computes the main hydrodynamic unknowns on a spatial domain that represents the Venice Lagoon and the Adriatic Sea with a finite element grid. The model considers as open boundary the line of Otranto channel in the southern Adriatic Sea and elsewhere as closed boundary the whole perimeter of the Adriatic Sea and Venice Lagoon. The model has been calibrated using the sea level data measured by more than twelve tide gauges located along the Adriatic Sea and inside the lagoon. The results obtained by the calibrated model have been validated with experimental data such as discharge data collected by botton mounted ADCP probes located at each inlet. The simulations take into account the tidal forcing and the different wind regimes. The instantaneous circulation and the residual current fields have been analyzed and the impact of the most important wind regimes on the circulation has been studied. The turn over time of the lagoon has been computed under different forcing conditions. A passive tracer only subjected to transport mechanism, has been released inside the lagoon. Resolving the time decaying of the tracer concentration for the whole area, the model computes the spatial distribution of the residence time in the basin. The results show that the re-import of water that previously exited the lagoon through the three inlets, plays an important role on the estimation of the turn over time of the lagoon thus influencing the water quality of

  9. Water residence time in Chesapeake Bay for 1980-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Concerns have grown over the increase of nutrients and pollutants discharged into the estuaries and coastal seas. The retention and export of these materials inside a system depends on the residence time (RT). A long-term simulation of time-varying RT of the Chesapeake Bay was conducted over the period from 1980 to 2012. The 33-year simulation results show that the mean RT of the entire Chesapeake Bay system ranges from 110 to 264 days, with an average value of 180 days. The RT was larger in the bottom layers than in the surface layers due to the persistent stratification and estuarine circulation. A clear seasonal cycle of RT was found, with a much smaller RT in winter than in summer, indicating materials discharged in winter would be quickly transported out of the estuary due to the winter-spring high flow. Large interannual variability of the RT was highly correlated with the variability of river discharge (R2 = 0.92). The monthly variability of RT can be partially attributed to the variability of estuarine circulation. A strengthened estuarine circulation results in a larger bottom influx and thus reduces the RT. Wind exerts a significant impact on the RT. The upstream wind is more important in controlling the lateral pattern of RT in the mainstem.

  10. TEAM (Total Exposure Assessment Methodology) Study: personal exposures to toxic substances in air, drinking water, and breath of 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A.; Pellizzari, E.D.; Hartwell, T.D.; Sparacino, C.; Whitmore, R.; Sheldon, L.; Zelon, H.; Perritt, R.

    1987-08-01

    EPA's TEAM Study has measured exposures to 20 volatile organic compounds in personal air, outdoor air, drinking water, and breath of approximately 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota. All residents were selected by a probability sampling scheme to represent 128,000 inhabitants of Elizabeth and Bayonne, New Jersey, 131,000 residents of Greensboro, North Carolina, and 7000 residents of Devils Lake, North Dakota. Participants carried a personal monitor to collect two 12-hr air samples and gave a breath sample at the end of the day. Two consecutive 12-hr outdoor air samples were also collected on identical Tenax cartridges in the backyards of some of the participants. About 5000 samples were collected, of which 1500 were quality control samples. Ten compounds were often present in personal air and breath samples at all locations. Personal exposures were consistently higher than outdoor concentrations for these chemicals and were sometimes 10 times the outdoor concentrations. Indoor sources appeared to be responsible for much of the difference. Breath concentrations also often exceeded outdoor concentrations and correlated more strongly with personal exposures than with outdoor concentrations. Some activities (smoking, visiting dry cleaners or service stations) and occupations (chemical, paint, and plastics plants) were associated with significantly elevated exposures and breath levels for certain toxic chemicals. Homes with smokers had significantly increased benzene and styrene levels in indoor air. Residence near major point sources did not affect exposure.

  11. Effect of air pollution on olfactory function in residents of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robyn; Arriola, Aline; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Distel, Hans

    2006-01-01

    To our knowledge there has been no study of the effect of everyday air pollution on olfactory function. It was therefore the aim of this study to compare the olfactory performance of long-term residents of Mexico City, an environment with high air pollution, with the olfactory performance of residents of the Mexican state of Tlaxcala, a region geographically similar to Mexico City but with low air pollution. Healthy volunteers [82 Mexico City subjects (MEX), 86 Tlaxcala subjects (TLX)] 20-63 years of age and balanced for age and gender between the two localities were tested for the perception of the odors of everyday beverages presented in squeeze bottles. When tested with ascending concentrations of stimuli in a three-way oddball paradigm, residents of Tlaxcala detected the odors of instant coffee and of an orange drink at significantly lower concentrations than residents of Mexico City. They also performed significantly better in discriminating between the two similar-smelling Mexican beverages horchata and atole in an oddball test. Significant differences between the two populations in overall olfactory performance were apparent in three of the four age classes (20- to 29-, 30- to 39-, and 40- to 49-year-old subjects) but not in the 50-63 years age class. About 10% of MEX subjects compared to about 2% of TLX subjects were judged to have poor olfactory function; all were from the older age classes (mean age: 48.6 years). Thus, air pollution in Mexico City appears to have a substantial impact on olfactory function even in young and middle-aged residents.

  12. Particle tracking and mean residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Deguo; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We analyze sediment particles motions in steady-state barchan dunes by tracking individual cells of a 3-D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan dune shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchan dunes. Then, for different flow strength and dune size, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchan dunes is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan dune morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in presence of bedforms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  13. Pathology residency training: time for a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Domen, Ronald E; Baccon, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    The exponential growth of the field of pathology over the past several decades has created challenges for residency training programs. These challenges include the ability to train competent pathologists in 4 years, an increased demand for fellowship training, and the structuring and completion of maintenance of certification. The authors feel that pathology residency training has reached a critical point and that a new paradigm for training is required.

  14. Nonparametric estimation of groundwater residence time distributions: What can environmental tracer data tell us about groundwater residence time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, James L.; Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Cook, Peter. G.

    2014-03-01

    Residence time distributions (RTDs) have been used extensively for quantifying flow and transport in subsurface hydrology. In geochemical approaches, environmental tracer concentrations are used in conjunction with simple lumped parameter models (LPMs). Conversely, numerical simulation techniques require large amounts of parameterization and estimated RTDs are certainly limited by associated uncertainties. In this study, we apply a nonparametric deconvolution approach to estimate RTDs using environmental tracer concentrations. The model is based only on the assumption that flow is steady enough that the observed concentrations are well approximated by linear superposition of the input concentrations with the RTD; that is, the convolution integral holds. Even with large amounts of environmental tracer concentration data, the entire shape of an RTD remains highly nonunique. However, accurate estimates of mean ages and in some cases prediction of young portions of the RTD may be possible. The most useful type of data was found to be the use of a time series of tritium. This was due to the sharp variations in atmospheric concentrations and a short half-life. Conversely, the use of CFC compounds with smoothly varying atmospheric concentrations was more prone to nonuniqueness. This work highlights the benefits and limitations of using environmental tracer data to estimate whole RTDs with either LPMs or through numerical simulation. However, the ability of the nonparametric approach developed here to correct for mixing biases in mean ages appears promising.

  15. Controls on residence time and exchange in a system of shallow coastal bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, I.; Wiberg, P. L.; Richardson, D. L.; Kurum, M. O.

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of transport and residence time influence the morphology, ecology and biogeochemistry of shallow coastal bay systems in important ways. To better understand the factors controlling residence time and exchange in coastal bays, a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model was set up and validated with field observations of circulation in a system of 14 shallow coastal bays on the Atlantic coast of the USA (Virginia Coast Reserve). Residence times of neutrally buoyant particles as well as exchange among the bays in the system and between the bays and the ocean were examined with Lagrangian particle tracking. There was orders of magnitude variation in the calculated residence time within most of the bays, ranging from hours in the tidally refreshed (repletion) water near the inlets to days-weeks in the remaining (residual) water away from the inlets. Residence time in the repletion waters was most sensitive to the tidal phase (low vs. high) when particles were released whereas residence time in the residual waters was more sensitive to wind forcing. Wind forcing was found to act as a diffuser that shortens particle residence within the bays; its effect was higher away from the inlets and in relatively confined bays. Median residence time in the bays significantly decreased with an increase in the ratio between open water area and total area (open water plus marsh). Exchange among the bays and capture areas of inlets (i.e., exchange between the bays and the ocean) varied considerably but were insensitive to tidal phase of release, wind, and forcing conditions in different years, in contrast to the sensitivity of residence time to these factors. We defined a new quantity, termed shortest-path residence time, calculated as distance from the closest inlet divided by root-mean-square velocity at each point in model domain. A relationship between shortest-path residence time and particle-tracking residence time provides a means of estimating residence time

  16. Predictors of Indoor Air Concentrations in Smoking and Non-Smoking Residences

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Marie-Eve; Clark, Nina; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Gilbert, Nicolas L.; Harrison, Ian; Rispler, Kathleen; Wang, Daniel; Anastassopoulos, Angelos; Guay, Mireille; MacNeill, Morgan; Wheeler, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Indoor concentrations of air pollutants (benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, elemental carbon and ozone) were measured in residences in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Data were collected in 106 homes in winter and 111 homes in summer of 2007, with 71 homes participating in both seasons. In addition, data for relative humidity, temperature, air exchange rates, housing characteristics and occupants’ activities during sampling were collected. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to construct season-specific models for the air pollutants. Where smoking was a major contributor to indoor concentrations, separate models were constructed for all homes and for those homes with no cigarette smoke exposure. The housing characteristics and occupants’ activities investigated in this study explained between 11% and 53% of the variability in indoor air pollutant concentrations, with ventilation, age of home and attached garage being important predictors for many pollutants. PMID:20948949

  17. Watershed mean residence times and travel time distributions: how accurately can they be characterized?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    The average time that rainfall takes to reach the stream - the mean residence time - is a basic parameter used to characterize watersheds. Watersheds are also characterized by the distribution of travel times for individual parcels of precipitation that fall on different points across the catchment. This travel time distribution is an important control on catchment response to contamination events. Catchments with shorter residence times or narrower distributions will have a flashier response to contamination events, whereas catchments with longer residence times or longer-tailed distributions will have a more persistent response to those same contamination events. Catchments' travel time distributions are typically inferred from time series of passive tracers (such as water isotopes, chloride, or bromide) in rainfall and streamflow. Tracer fluctuations in streamflow are typically damped compared to those in preciptation, because precipitation inputs of different ages (and different tracer signatures) are mixed within the catchment. Mathematically, this mixing process is modeled by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation tracer inputs to generate the stream tracer outputs. The parameters describing the travel time distribution are typically estimated by maximizing the goodness of fit between the modeled and measured tracer outputs. This approach is potentially subject to at least two sources of uncertainty. First, both the input and output tracer concentrations are subject to measurement error. Second, although the catchment mixing process is continuous, the inputs and outputs are only sampled at discrete points in time. Here we test how these two sources of uncertainty may affect travel time distributions that are estimated from catchment monitoring data. We begin by generating synthetic tracer input time series, and convolve these with a specified travel-time distribution to generate a synthetic output time series. We then subsample

  18. Air Pollution and Deaths among Elderly Residents of São Paulo, Brazil: An Analysis of Mortality Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Amine Farias; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert; Ponce de Leon, Antônio C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of short-term mortality displacement is essential to accurately estimate the impact of short-term air pollution exposure on public health. Objectives: We quantified mortality displacement by estimating single-day lag effects and cumulative effects of air pollutants on mortality using distributed lag models. Methods: We performed a daily time series of nonaccidental and cause-specific mortality among elderly residents of São Paulo, Brazil, between 2000 and 2011. Effects of particulate matter smaller than 10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were estimated in Poisson generalized additive models. Single-day lag effects of air pollutant exposure were estimated for 0-, 1- and 2-day lags. Distributed lag models with lags of 0–10, 0–20 and 0–30 days were used to assess mortality displacement and potential cumulative exposure effects. Results: PM10, NO2 and CO were significantly associated with nonaccidental and cause-specific deaths in both single-day lag and cumulative lag models. Cumulative effect estimates for 0–10 days were larger than estimates for single-day lags. Cumulative effect estimates for 0–30 days were essentially zero for nonaccidental and circulatory deaths but remained elevated for respiratory and cancer deaths. Conclusions: We found evidence of mortality displacement within 30 days for nonaccidental and circulatory deaths in elderly residents of São Paulo. We did not find evidence of mortality displacement within 30 days for respiratory or cancer deaths. Citation: Costa AF, Hoek G, Brunekreef B, Ponce de Leon AC. 2017. Air pollution and deaths among elderly residents of São Paulo, Brazil: an analysis of mortality displacement. Environ Health Perspect 125:349–354; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP98 PMID:27713111

  19. My Time as a Professor in Residence: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Josephine Peyton

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is based on two of the lessons the author learned as the professor in residence at ASU Preparatory Academy-Phoenix (ASU Prep), a Title I school operated in partnership with the Phoenix Elementary School District. Her role as a university professor on special assignment as a literacy coach, staff developer, and co-researcher. The…

  20. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-4 - Residency time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... resident test (green card test), described in paragraph (b)(1) of § 301.7701(b)-1, is the first day during... test and the green card test will be the earlier of the first day the individual is physically present... termination date for an alien who meets the green card test is the first day during the calendar year that...

  1. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-4 - Residency time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resident test (green card test), described in paragraph (b)(1) of § 301.7701(b)-1, is the first day during... test and the green card test will be the earlier of the first day the individual is physically present... termination date for an alien who meets the green card test is the first day during the calendar year that...

  2. Estimation of optimum requirements for indoor air quality and energy consumption in some residences in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elkilani, A; Bouhamra, W

    2001-12-01

    Contrasting effects of the dilution of indoor generated pollutants and the energy efficiency of heating and ventilating air conditioning systems (HVAC) for indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort were studied for 10 Kuwaiti residences. The levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the calculated cooling load of the HVAC systems were used as indicators for the IAQ and for the energy consumption, respectively. Air exchange rates and VOCs levels (both indoor and outdoor) were measured. It was found that the outdoor VOC concentrations were always less than the indoor values. Therefore reduction of indoor VOC levels can be accomplished either by increasing the ratio of the makeup air to the recirculation air of the HVAC system or by increasing the infiltration airflow rate through openings. A single compartment IAQ model, modified by the authors, was used to test for the variation in the above two dilution modes and to test the performance sensitivity. Hence, the optimum parameters in terms of IAQ and energy consumption were determined. The results indicated that it was necessary to increase the ratio of the makeup air to the recirculation air from its typical design value of 0.5 to a range of 0.7-1.3 in order to reduce indoor VOC to acceptable levels.

  3. Effects of zebra mussels on food webs: Interactions with juvenile bluegill and water residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.; Bartsch, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated how water residence time mediated the impact of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus on experimental food webs established in 1100-1 outdoor mesocosms. Water residence time was manipulated as a surrogate for seston resupply - a critical variable affecting growth and survival of suspension-feeding invertebrates. We used a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experimental design with eight treatment combinations (3 replicates/treatment) including the presence or absence of Dreissena (2000 per m2), juvenile bluegill (40 per mesocosm), and short (1100 1 per d) or long (220 1 per d) water residence time. Measures of seston concentration (chlorophyll a, turbidity and suspended solids) were greater in the short- compared to long water-residence mesocosms, but intermediate in short water-residence mesocosms containing Dreissena. Abundance of rotifers (Keratella and Polyarthra) was reduced in Dreissena mesocosms and elevated in short residence time mesocosms. Cladocera abundance, in general, was unaffected by the presence of Dreissena; densities were higher in short-residence time mesocosms, and reduced in the presence of Lepomis. The growth of juvenile Lepomis were unaffected by Dreissena because of abundant benthic food. The final total mass of Dreissena was significantly greater in short- than long-residence mesocosms. Impacts of Dreissena on planktonic food webs may not only depend on the density of zebra mussels but also on the residence time of the surrounding water and the resupply of seston. ?? 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  4. Joint space-time geostatistical model for air quality surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A.; Soares, A.; Pereira, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    Air pollution and peoples' generalized concern about air quality are, nowadays, considered to be a global problem. Although the introduction of rigid air pollution regulations has reduced pollution from industry and power stations, the growing number of cars on the road poses a new pollution problem. Considering the characteristics of the atmospheric circulation and also the residence times of certain pollutants in the atmosphere, a generalized and growing interest on air quality issues led to research intensification and publication of several articles with quite different levels of scientific depth. As most natural phenomena, air quality can be seen as a space-time process, where space-time relationships have usually quite different characteristics and levels of uncertainty. As a result, the simultaneous integration of space and time is not an easy task to perform. This problem is overcome by a variety of methodologies. The use of stochastic models and neural networks to characterize space-time dispersion of air quality is becoming a common practice. The main objective of this work is to produce an air quality model which allows forecasting critical concentration episodes of a certain pollutant by means of a hybrid approach, based on the combined use of neural network models and stochastic simulations. A stochastic simulation of the spatial component with a space-time trend model is proposed to characterize critical situations, taking into account data from the past and a space-time trend from the recent past. To identify near future critical episodes, predicted values from neural networks are used at each monitoring station. In this paper, we describe the design of a hybrid forecasting tool for ambient NO2 concentrations in Lisbon, Portugal.

  5. Methane: Interhemispheric concentration gradient and atmospheric residence time

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Edward W.; Blake, Donald R.; Tyler, Stanley C.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Montague, Derek C.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1982-01-01

    The ground level concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been measured to be in the range from 1.45 to 1.62 parts per million by volume (ppmv) of dry air in remote locations between 62°N and 54°S latitudes during the time period from November 1977 to July 1979. The average (±rms) concentration for the northern hemisphere was 1.57 ± 0.02 ppmv in January 1978 and 1.59 ± 0.02 in July 1979. The average concentration in the southern hemisphere was lower—1.47 ± 0.02 in January 1978 and 1.51 ± 0.01 in July 1979. The ratio of concentrations between the two hemispheres was 1.068 ± 0.016 in January 1978 and 1.055 ± 0.013 in July 1979, for an average of 1.06 ± 0.01. The higher concentrations in the northern hemisphere require either that the sources of methane lie preferentially in the northern hemisphere or that the removal processes operate more rapidly in the southern hemisphere or both. The primary removal process for CH4 is reaction with tropospheric OH radicals and its estimated atmospheric lifetime is 10.5 ± 1.8 yr. The observed interhemispheric gradient is consistent with this lifetime and preferential release of methane in the northern hemisphere. Measurements taken in the Amazon basin region indicate the presence of a substantial source of methane in that area. PMID:16593168

  6. Ross ice shelf cavity circulation, residence time, and melting: Results from a model of oceanic chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Tasha E.; Holland, David M.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2010-04-01

    Despite their harmful effects in the upper atmosphere, anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons dissolved in seawater are extremely useful for studying ocean circulation and ventilation, particularly in remote locations. Because they behave as a passive tracer in seawater, and their atmospheric concentrations are well-mixed, well-known, and have changed over time, they are ideal for gaining insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the isolated cavities found under Antarctic ice shelves, where direct observations are difficult to obtain. Here we present results from a modeling study of air-sea chlorofluorocarbon exchange and ocean circulation in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. We compare our model estimates of oceanic CFC-12 concentrations along an ice shelf edge transect to field data collected during three cruises spanning 16 yr. Our model produces chlorofluorocarbon concentrations that are quite similar to those measured in the field, both in magnitude and distribution, showing high values near the surface, decreasing with depth, and increasing over time. After validating modeled circulation and air-sea gas exchange through comparison of modeled temperature, salinity, and chlorofluorocarbons with field data, we estimate that the residence time of water in the Ross Ice Shelf cavity is approximately 2.2 yr and that basal melt rates for the ice shelf average 10 cm yr -1. The model predicts a seasonal signature to basal melting, with highest melt rates in the spring and also the fall.

  7. An approach to the residence time distribution for stochastic multi-compartment models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihnhee; Wehrly, Thomas E

    2004-10-01

    Stochastic compartmental models are widely used in modeling processes such as drug kinetics in biological systems. This paper considers the distribution of the residence times for stochastic multi-compartment models, especially systems with non-exponential lifetime distributions. The paper first derives the moment generating function of the bivariate residence time distribution for the two-compartment model with general lifetimes and approximates the density of the residence time using the saddlepoint approximation. Then, it extends the distributional approach to the residence time for multi-compartment semi-Markov models combining the cofactor rule for a single destination and the analytic approach to the two-compartment model. This approach provides a complete specification of the residence time distribution based on the moment generating function and thus facilitates an easier calculation of high-order moments than the approach using the coefficient matrix. Applications to drug kinetics demonstrate the simplicity and usefulness of this approach.

  8. Residence time control on hot moments of net nitrate production and uptake in the hyporheic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura K.; Hare, Danielle K.

    2014-01-01

    moments of net production and uptake, enhancing NO3- production as residence times approach the anaerobic threshold, and changing zones of net NO3- production to uptake as residence times increase past the net sink threshold. The anaerobic and net sink thresholds for beaver-influenced streambed morphology occur at much shorter residence times (1.3 h and 2.3 h, respectively) compared to other documented hyporheic systems, and the net sink threshold compares favorably to the lower boundary of the anaerobic threshold determined for this system with the new oxygen Damkohler number. The consistency of the residence time threshold values of NO3- cycling in this study, despite environmental variability and disparate morphology, indicates that NO3- hot moment dynamics are primarily driven by changes in physical hydrology and associated residence times.

  9. The role of topography on catchment-scale water residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, K.J.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Weiler, M.; Kendall, C.; McGlynn, B.L.; Welker, J.M.; Seibert, J.

    2005-01-01

    The age, or residence time, of water is a fundamental descriptor of catchment hydrology, revealing information about the storage, flow pathways, and source of water in a single integrated measure. While there has been tremendous recent interest in residence time estimation to characterize watersheds, there are relatively few studies that have quantified residence time at the watershed scale, and fewer still that have extended those results beyond single catchments to larger landscape scales. We examined-topographic controls on residence time for seven catchments (0.085-62.4 km2) that represent diverse geologic and geomorphic conditions in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Our primary objective was to determine the dominant physical controls on catchment-scale, water residence time and specifically test the hypothesis that residence time is related to the size of the basin. Residence times were estimated by simple convolution models that described the transfer of precipitation isotopic composition to the stream network. We found that base flow mean residence times for exponential distributions ranged from 0.8 to 3.3 years. Mean residence time showed no correlation to basin area (r2 < 0.01) but instead was correlated (r2 =-0:91) to catchment terrain indices representing the flow path distance and flow path gradient to the stream network. These results illustrate that landscape organization (i.e., topography) rather than basin area controls catchment-scale transport. Results from this study may provide a framework for describing scale-invariant transport across climatic and geologic conditions, whereby the internal form and structure of the basin defines the first-order control on base flow residence time. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Analysis of soil water residence times in a monolith lysimeter at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, B.F.; Eckstein, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Estimates of soil water residence times can be made using water budget records. A single average value, referred to as conventional residence time, can be obtained by dividing the mean storage volume by the mean output volume. Using concepts from queuing theory, estimates of residence times can be made by assuming first-in-first-out (FIFO) or last-in-first-out (LIFO) movement of the water. Using such assumption, estimates can be made on the length of time that water remains in the soil, depending on the time of year that water enters the soil. For residence time estimations, monthly water budget data was obtained for the period from 1947 through 1982 for a weighing monolith lysimeter located at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed near Coshocton, Ohio. The lysimeter encloses an undisturbed block of silt loam soil. The conventional residence time for the record period is 10.2 months. The mean maximum residence time, based on the assumption of all FIFO movement, is 11.1 months with a minimum value of 4 months and a maximum value of 18 months. The assumption of all LIFO movement gives a mean maximum residence time value of 3.8 months with a minimum value of less than one month and a maximum value of 102 months.

  11. Mixing and residence times of stormwater runoff in a detection system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Edward H.

    1989-01-01

    Five tracer runs were performed on a detention pond and wetlands system to determine mixing and residence times in the system. The data indicate that at low discharges and with large amounts of storage, the pond is moderately mixed with residence times not much less than the theoretical maximum possible under complete mixing. At higher discharges and with less storage in the pond, short-circuiting occurs, reducing the amount of mixing in the pond and appreciably reducing the residence times. The time between pond outlet peak concentrations and wetlands outlet peak concentrations indicate that in the wetlands, mixing increases with decreasing discharge and increasing storage.

  12. Children's Perspectives on Everyday Experiences of Shared Residence: Time, Emotions and Agency Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Gry Mette D.

    2010-01-01

    Shared residence is often presented as an arrangement that is in the best interests of the child following the divorce of its parents. Based on in-depth interviews with Norwegian children who have experienced shared residence, this article seeks to explore some dilemmas concerning time, agency and the children's emotions. Three characteristics of…

  13. Respiratory effects of secondhand smoke exposure among young adults residing in a "clean" indoor air state.

    PubMed

    Lee, David J; Dietz, Noella A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Wilkinson, James D; Clark, John D; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of self-reported secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures and its association with respiratory symptoms in a sample of young adults residing in a state with a partial clean indoor air law. A cross-sectional telephone survey of Florida households and a single state University was conducted in 2005. Enrolled participants between 18 and 24 years of age completed a 15-20 min interview assessing past and current SHS exposure and current respiratory symptoms (n = 1858). Approximately 60% of the sample were female; nearly 70% were non-Hispanic white, 10% were non-Hispanic Black, and 11% were Hispanic. Over two-thirds reported completing at least some college; 23% reported smoking in the past month. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported visiting a bar or nightclub which exposed them to SHS in the previous month; nearly half (46%) reported SHS exposure while riding in automobiles; 15% reported occupational SHS exposure; and nearly 9% reported living with at least one smoker. In multivariable models, personal smoking behavior, parental smoking history, and exposure to SHS in automobiles and in bars or nightclubs were significantly associated with increased reports of respiratory symptoms. Despite residing in a "clean" indoor air state, the majority of surveyed young adults continue to report exposure to SHS, especially in automobiles and in bars, and these exposures adversely impact respiratory health. All municipalities should pursue clean indoor air legislation which does not exempt bars and restaurants. Educational campaigns directed at reducing SHS exposure in motor vehicles also are needed.

  14. Multimedia level-III partitioning and residence times of xenobiotics in water-rich and water-poor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Breitkopf, C.; Kuehne, R.; Schueuermann, G.

    2000-05-01

    The environmental fate of 10 compounds covering a wide range of intrinsic persistence and volatility is studied with a multimedia level-III fugacity model at two system temperatures (293 and 282 K) using water-rich and water-poor model environments and standard emission scenarios to air and water, respectively. The resultant level-III partitionings depend significantly on the entry mode and on the relative compartment sizes, and the variation with system temperature is more pronounced for polar compounds and when air is the primary discharge compartment. For example, the steady-state portion in soil of airborne phenol varies from 21 to 89%, whereas waterborne phenol resides in water at a rate of 100% in both water-rich and water-poor environments. For some compounds, the residence time (considering both advection and degradation) is substantially affected by intermedia transport processes such as rainfall. With airborne atrazine, the regional residence time is comparable to that of DDT and significantly greater than the ones of hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated biphenyl 28, and lindane, although the latter have much longer media-specific half-lives and much greater hydrophobicity. The discussion includes detailed analyses of the compound properties and their impact on the level-III environmental fate.

  15. MODELING HOW A HURRICANE BARRIER IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS, AFFECTS THE HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport models were used to simulate tidal and subtidal circulation, residence times, and the longitudinal distributions of conservative constituents in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, before and after a hurricane barrier was constructed. The...

  16. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    PubMed

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  17. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  18. Role of Plasma Temperature and Residence Time in Stagnation Plasma Synthesis of c-BN Nanopowders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    downstream of the bubbler; (8) Set the RF plasma power to ~500-1400W; (9) Open MFCs simultaneously; (10) Once the flow reaches steady state, spark ...ROLE OF PLASMA TEMPERATURE AND RESIDENCE TIME IN STAGNATION PLASMA SYNTHESIS OF c-BN NANOPOWDERS by JONATHAN M DOYLE A Thesis submitted to the...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Plasma Temperature And Residence Time In Stagnation Plasma Synthesis

  19. The effect of tidal exchange on residence time in a coastal embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, Patrick; Reniers, Ad; van de Kreeke, Jacobus; MacMahan, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of an idealized lagoon that is connected to the ocean via a tidal inlet show that the mean residence time is inversely proportional to tidal exchange. In the Delft3D model the tidal exchange is controlled by varying the inlet length, width and depth. These changes in the inlet geometry affect the tidal prism and the ebb/flood flow structure, which are shown to control the exchange of lagoon water with seawater. To map residence time within the lagoon, a new method that implements dye tracer is developed and shows that the tidally averaged residence time exhibits significant spatial variability. For inlet systems in which, as a first approximation, the lagoon can be described by a uniformly fluctuating water level, a simple transport model is developed to elucidate the specific processes that control tidal exchange and their effect on residence time. In this transport model tidal exchange is decomposed into two fractions, an ocean exchange fraction and a lagoon exchange fraction. It is shown that both fractions need to be included to better describe tidal exchange. Specifically, inclusion of a lagoon exchange fraction improves previous tidal prism models that assume complete mixing in the lagoon. The assumption of complete mixing results in an under-prediction of residence time. Relating the spatially averaged residence time results to the exchange fractions for each inlet geometry show that the residence time is inversely proportional to the product of the tidal exchange fractions. For these single inlet systems, Keulegan's 0-D hydrodynamic model shows good agreement with Delft3D in predicting the tidal prism, maximum flow velocity, and exchange fractions. With these parameters, estimates of the mean residence time can be reached through a relationship derived from the simple transport model.

  20. The imprint of climate and geology on the residence times of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.; Kollet, Stefan J.; Maher, Kate; Haggerty, Roy; Forrester, Mary Michael

    2016-01-01

    Surface and subsurface flow dynamics govern residence time or water age until discharge, which is a key metric of storage and water availability for human use and ecosystem function. Although observations in small catchments have shown a fractal distribution of ages, residence times are difficult to directly quantify or measure in large basins. Here we use a simulation of major watersheds across North America to compute distributions of residence times. This simulation results in peak ages from 1.5 to 10.5 years, in agreement with isotopic observations from bomb-derived radioisotopes, and a wide range of residence times—from 0.1 to 10,000 years. This simulation suggests that peak residence times are controlled by the mean hydraulic conductivity, a function of the prevailing geology. The shape of the residence time distribution is dependent on aridity, which in turn determines water table depth and the frequency of shorter flow paths. These model results underscore the need for additional studies to characterize water ages in larger systems.

  1. Residence time and Posidonia oceanica in Cabrera Archipelago National Park, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfila, A.; Jordi, A.; Basterretxea, G.; Vizoso, G.; Marbà, N.; Duarte, C. M.; Werner, F. E.; Tintoré, J.

    2005-07-01

    Flushing time and residence time are studied in a small inlet in Cabrera National Park, Western Mediterranean Sea. Flushing time is studied using ADCP in situ data. Observed flushing time data are compared with the simulations from a three-dimensional coastal ocean numerical model. Residence time is assessed using virtual lagrangian particles and studying the number remaining within the analyzed domain. Results show a good agreement between observations and modeling estimations of the flushing time (i.e. 6 days from the ADCP data and 5.6 days from the numerical model). Residence time estimations yield a broad range of values, from 1 h in the Bay to over 30 days depending also on the horizontal and vertical position where particles were released. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model for the Port yields a value of 8.7 days. Results obtained for the residence time appear to have a determinant impact over the meadows of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, present inside the Port. Recirculation patterns and complex flows in coastal environments create a non-uniform distribution of the areas of accumulation of non-conservative properties that indicate that residence time concept is the correct approach when studying the impact of water transport over biological communities.

  2. Residence time of buoyant objects in drowning machines

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Gary, Stefan F.; Zamalloa, Carlo Zuñiga; Keane, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic jumps are a common feature of rivers and waterways, where they can be found close to spillways, weirs, rocky ledges, and boulders. People adrift upstream of a hydraulic jump are liable to become trapped in the turbulent roller of the hydraulic jump. For this reason, hydraulic jumps have been termed “drowning machines” and are recognized as a public hazard. We use experiments and theory to show that on average a buoyant object spends a time τ/p trapped in a jump, where τ is the period of a harmonic process inherent in the jump, and p is the probability that the object will escape in any time interval τ. The probability p is governed by the statistical theory of extreme values and depends primarily on the ratio between the density of the object and the density of the fluid. We use our results to draw conclusions that might prove to be useful to public-safety agencies intent on carrying out tests in drowning machines. Our results can also be used to predict the amount of flotsam that accumulates at the toe of a hydraulic jump.

  3. Simulation of Water Age and Residence Time in the New York Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. G.; Wilkin, J. L.; Schofield, O. M.

    2008-12-01

    Aiming at investigating the time scale of transporting biogeochemical tracers in the New York Bight (NYB), this work looks into the time scale associated with freshwater propagation in NYB. The Constituent-oriented Age and Residence-time Theory is applied in Regional Ocean Modeling System and then verified. Three-year mean age and two-year mean residence time simulations are carried out. Comparison between snapshots of modeled surface freshwater mean age and satellite measured channel ratio, an empirical proxy of age, shows agreement on the general patterns. Least square fit gives the first order estimation of the relationship between channel ratio and mean age. Time series show temporal and spatial variation in mean age, and seasonal averages demonstrate seasonality of surface mean age consistent with surface circulation. Correlation between surface mean age and wind shows major effects wind in different directions has on mean age. Time series of the mean residence time exhibits strong temporal fluctuation in the scale of days, and seasonal averages show seasonality in surface mean residence time, too. The surprising high value of mean residence time along the Long Island coast in spring and summer is caused by the reentry of previously exited water from the eastern boundary after wind changes direction. Correlation between mean residence time and wind shows major effects wind has on the time freshwater and tracers spend in the New York apex area. Results obtained here are very useful for coastal management and studies of local biogeochemical processes and larval dispersal given the ecological and economical importance of the New York Bay.

  4. Observations and modeling of exchange and residence time in tidal inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, Patrick Forde

    The exchange of water in a coastal embayment with seawater is forced by tidally driven and gravitational flows. Tidal flows oscillate temporally based on planetary motion, while gravitational flows like those found in rivers act in one direction from high to low altitude. These flows determine the residence time, or the time water will remain within an embayment. At the ocean boundary, many coasts contain barrier islands with inlets through which these flows propagate. The effect that inlets have on the exchange of inland water with the sea has been the subject of research for nearly a century. Residence time is a bulk parameter that can be used to indicate the efficiency of an inlet system to rid itself of contaminants and maintain good water quality. Because coastal embayments are often exposed to anthropogenic pollutants, understanding the processes that control residence time improves our ability to protect coastal ecosystems. Inlet systems, including lagoons and estuaries, are subject to processes of a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. As such, past efforts to identify which processes control the motion and transport of water often rely on assumptions that simplify the kinematics. Today, the rapid evolution of personal computing has enabled the creation of numerical models that resolve the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Equations (RANS) for complex flows found in inlet environments. This dissertation focuses on utilizing such a model to examine the flow in tidal inlet systems and to identify the dominant processes that control exchange and residence time. First, modeling experiments of idealized lagoons are conducted with the aim of quantifying how the shape of an inlet affects residence time. Seventeen different inlet configurations are examined. Methods of quantifying residence time based on previous analytical models are applied to a numerical model for the first time. To better understand the mechanism of exchange, a simple transport model is

  5. How Do Residents Spend Their Time in the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Weinger, Matthew B.; Brown, Roger; Cartmill, Randi; Slagle, Jason; Van Roy, Kara Schultz; Walker, James M.; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the work of residents and the distribution of their time in 6 ICUs of 2 medical centers. Methods We conducted a total of 242 hours of observation to capture data on tasks performed by residents in 6 ICUs, including adult, pediatric, medical and surgical units. For each observation period, the percentages of total time spent on each task and on the aggregated task categories were calculated. Results Overall, while in the ICUs, residents spent almost half of their time in clinical review and documentation (19%), conversation with team physicians (16%), conversation attendance (6%) and order management (6%). The two medical centers differed in the time that residents spent on administrative review and documentation (4% in one medical center and 15% in the other one). The pediatric ICUs were similar in the 2 medical centers, whereas the adult ICUs exhibited differences in the time spent on order management and administrative review and documentation. Conclusions While in the ICUs, residents spent most time performing direct patient care and care coordination activities. The distribution of activities varied across 2 medical centers and across ICUs, which highlights the need to consider the local context on residents’ work in ICUs. PMID:26171828

  6. Modeling exposure close to air pollution sources in naturally ventilated residences: association of turbulent diffusion coefficient with air change rate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Ott, Wayne R; Fringer, Oliver B; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-05-01

    For modeling exposure close to an indoor air pollution source, an isotropic turbulent diffusion coefficient is used to represent the average spread of emissions. However, its magnitude indoors has been difficult to assess experimentally due to limitations in the number of monitors available. We used 30-37 real-time monitors to simultaneously measure CO at different angles and distances from a continuous indoor point source. For 11 experiments involving two houses, with natural ventilation conditions ranging from <0.2 to >5 air changes per h, an eddy diffusion model was used to estimate the turbulent diffusion coefficients, which ranged from 0.001 to 0.013 m² s⁻¹. The model reproduced observed concentrations with reasonable accuracy over radial distances of 0.25-5.0 m. The air change rate, as measured using a SF₆ tracer gas release, showed a significant positive linear correlation with the air mixing rate, defined as the turbulent diffusion coefficient divided by a squared length scale representing the room size. The ability to estimate the indoor turbulent diffusion coefficient using two readily measurable parameters (air change rate and room dimensions) is useful for accurately modeling exposures in close proximity to an indoor pollution source.

  7. Particulate matter concentration in ambient air and its effects on lung functions among residents in the National Capital Region, India.

    PubMed

    Kesavachandran, C; Pangtey, B S; Bihari, V; Fareed, M; Pathak, M K; Srivastava, A K; Mathur, N

    2013-02-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that air pollution is responsible for 1.4 % of all deaths and 0.8 % of disability-adjusted life years. NOIDA, located at the National Capital Region, India, was declared as one of the critically air-polluted areas by the Central Pollution Control Board of the Government of India. Studies on the relationship of reduction in lung functions of residents living in areas with higher concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air were inconclusive since the subjects of most of the studies are hospital admission cases. Very few studies, including one from India, have shown the relationship of PM concentration and its effects of lung functions in the same location. Hence, a cross-sectional study was undertaken to study the effect of particulate matter concentration in ambient air on the lung functions of residents living in a critically air-polluted area in India. PM concentrations in ambient air (PM(1,) PM(2.5)) were monitored at residential locations and identified locations with higher (NOIDA) and lower concentrations (Gurgaon). Lung function tests (FEV(1), PEFR) were conducted using a spirometer in 757 residents. Both air monitoring and lung function tests were conducted on the same day. Significant negative linear relationship exists between higher concentrations of PM(1) with reduced FEV(1) and increased concentrations of PM(2.5) with reduced PEFR and FEV(1). The study shows that reductions in lung functions (PEFR and FEV(1)) can be attributed to higher particulate matter concentrations in ambient air. Decline in airflow obstruction in subjects exposed to high PM concentrations can be attributed to the fibrogenic response and associated airway wall remodeling. The study suggests the intervention of policy makers and stake holders to take necessary steps to reduce the emissions of PM concentrations, especially PM(1,) PM(2.5), which can lead to serious respiratory health concerns in residents.

  8. Residence time of pollutants discharged in the Gulf of Kachchh, northwestern Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Patgaonkar, Rupali S; Vethamony, P; Lokesh, K S; Babu, M T

    2012-08-01

    A 2D Hydrodynamic-Particle Analysis model was applied to the Gulf of Kachchh (GoK) to estimate the residence time of pollutants. The tidal currents in the Gulf have a strong E-W component, which prevents the material in the north being transported towards south. In the regions situated very close to the open boundary, where the GoK waters exchange freely with the northern Arabian Sea, dilution takes place rapidly with the incoming waters and hence, the residence time is on the order of 1 day. Influence of eddies and a dynamic barrier across the Sikka-Mundra section on the residence time is apparent. Eastern GoK shows a relatively large residence time, on the order of 2-4 days, warranting caution while releasing industrial wastes in the northeastern Gulf. The region around location-5 behaves like a bay; the dissolved matter gets trapped in this bay and the residence time increases by 3-4 days.

  9. Utilization of decadal tritium variation for assessing the residence time of base flow.

    PubMed

    Rose, S

    2007-01-01

    An iterative algorithm is presented that allows the user to model the subsurface residence time of shallow ground water comprising stream base flow based on decadal scale variation of tritium concentrations. The algorithm accounts for the effects of radioactive decay, the shallow subsurface mixing of ground water with precipitation, and ground water flux. The inverse of the best-fitting modeled flux through the saturated zone is equivalent to the residence time. The data required for this model include at least two measurements of tritium in base flow for a given stream location made at least a decade apart and the long-term tritium input in precipitation for the region of interest. The model is sensitive to relatively small changes in tritium concentrations and is limited by analytic uncertainties to an accuracy of approximately +/-5 years. The algorithm was applied to stream base flow for several basins in the Piedmont Province of Georgia in which tritium concentrations were measured during the early 1990s and again in the 2000s. The model results produced highly concordant residence times for three hydrogeologically similar basins in the Upper Ocmulgee Basin in North Central Georgia. The best estimate of the average residence time for ground water comprising base flow in this Piedmont basin using this new method is between approximately 14 and 18 years. These results are generally consistent with calculations made in previous studies, and these relatively long residence times can be attributed to the storage of water in the clay soils that dominate Piedmont Province watersheds.

  10. Concentrations of 20 volatile organic compounds in the air and drinking water of 350 residents of New Jersey compared with concentrations in their exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Pellizzari, E.; Hartwell, T.; Zelon, H.; Sparacino, C.; Perritt, R.; Whitmore, R.

    1986-08-01

    Twenty volatile organic compounds were measured in the personal air and drinking water of 350 New Jersey residents in the fall of 1981. Two consecutive 12-hour integrated personal air samples and two tap water samples were collected from each participant. At the end of the 24-hour monitoring period, each participant supplied a sample of exhaled breath. Simultaneous outdoor samples were collected in 100 residential locations in two cities. Eleven compounds were present much of the time in air, but only four (the trihalomethanes) in water; wide ranges of exposures (three to four orders of magnitude) were noted for most compounds. Ten of 11 compounds displayed significant correlations between air exposures and breath concentrations; the 11th (chloroform) was correlated with drinking water exposures. It was concluded that breath measurements are a feasible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive way to determine environmental and occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds.

  11. Concentrations of 20 volatile organic compounds in the air and drinking water of 350 residents of New Jersey compared with concentrations in their exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L; Pellizzari, E; Hartwell, T; Zelon, H; Sparacino, C; Perritt, R; Whitmore, R

    1986-08-01

    Twenty volatile organic compounds were measured in the personal air and drinking water of 350 New Jersey residents in the fall of 1981. Two consecutive 12-hour integrated personal air samples and two tap water samples were collected from each participant. At the end of the 24-hour monitoring period, each participant supplied a sample of exhaled breath. Simultaneous outdoor samples were collected in 100 residential locations in two cities. Eleven compounds were present much of the time in air, but only four (the trihalomethanes) in water; wide ranges of exposures (three to four orders of magnitude) were noted for most compounds. Ten of 11 compounds displayed significant correlations between air exposures and breath concentrations; the 11th (chloroform) was correlated with drinking water exposures. It was concluded that breath measurements are a feasible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive way to determine environmental and occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds.

  12. Background Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds in North American Residences (1990 – 2005): A Compilation of Statistics for Assessing Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical report presents a summary of indoor air studies that measured background concentrations of VOCs in the indoor air of thousands of North American residences and an evaluation and compilation of their reported statistical information.

  13. Effect of plateout, air motion and dust removal on radon decay product concentration in a simulated residence.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, S N; Hinds, W C; Maher, E F; First, M W

    1983-08-01

    The effectiveness of increased air motion and dust removal in reducing radon decay product concentration in residences subject to radon intrusion was evaluated in a 78-m3 room under steady-state conditions for air infiltration rates between 0.2 and 0.9 air changes per hour. Room-size, portable electrostatic precipitators and high-efficiency fibrous filters were tested as typical residential air cleaning devices; a portable box fan and a ceiling fan were employed as typical residential air movers. Reductions in working levels of 40-90% were found. The fate of radon decay products, with and without mixing fans, was determined by direct measurement. When mixing fans were used, most of the nonairborne potential alpha-energy was plated out on the room surfaces; less than 10% was deposited on the fan blades or housing. Results were compared to a mathematical model based on well-mixed room air, and good agreement was obtained.

  14. Residency Time as an Indicator of Reproductive Restraint in Male Burying Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashlee N.; Belk, Mark C.; Creighton, J. Curtis

    2014-01-01

    The cost of reproduction theory posits that there are trade-offs between current and future reproduction because resources that are allocated to current offspring cannot be used for future reproductive opportunities. Two adaptive reproductive strategies have been hypothesized to offset the costs of reproduction and maximize lifetime fitness. The terminal investment hypothesis predicts that as individuals age they will allocate more resources to current reproduction as a response to decreasing residual reproductive value. The reproductive restraint hypotheses predicts that as individuals age they will allocate fewer resources to current reproduction to increase the chance of surviving for an additional reproductive opportunity. In this study, we test for adaptive responses to advancing age in male burying beetles, Nicrophorus orbicollis. Burying beetles use facultative biparental care, but the male typically abandons the brood before the female. Previous work in male burying beetles has suggested several factors to explain variation in male residency time, but no study has observed male behavior throughout their entire reproductive lifetimes to determine whether males change residency time in an adaptive way with age. We compared residency time of males that reproduced biparentally, uniparentally, and on different-sized carcasses to determine if they used an adaptive reproductive strategy. Males did not increase residency time as they aged when reproducing biparentally, but decreased residency time with age when reproducing uniparentally. A decrease in parental care with age is consistent with a reproductive restraint strategy. When female age increased over time, males did not increase their residency time to compensate for deteriorating female condition. To our knowledge, this is the first test of adaptive reproductive allocation strategies in male burying beetles. PMID:25295755

  15. Residency time as an indicator of reproductive restraint in male burying beetles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ashlee N; Belk, Mark C; Creighton, J Curtis

    2014-01-01

    The cost of reproduction theory posits that there are trade-offs between current and future reproduction because resources that are allocated to current offspring cannot be used for future reproductive opportunities. Two adaptive reproductive strategies have been hypothesized to offset the costs of reproduction and maximize lifetime fitness. The terminal investment hypothesis predicts that as individuals age they will allocate more resources to current reproduction as a response to decreasing residual reproductive value. The reproductive restraint hypotheses predicts that as individuals age they will allocate fewer resources to current reproduction to increase the chance of surviving for an additional reproductive opportunity. In this study, we test for adaptive responses to advancing age in male burying beetles, Nicrophorus orbicollis. Burying beetles use facultative biparental care, but the male typically abandons the brood before the female. Previous work in male burying beetles has suggested several factors to explain variation in male residency time, but no study has observed male behavior throughout their entire reproductive lifetimes to determine whether males change residency time in an adaptive way with age. We compared residency time of males that reproduced biparentally, uniparentally, and on different-sized carcasses to determine if they used an adaptive reproductive strategy. Males did not increase residency time as they aged when reproducing biparentally, but decreased residency time with age when reproducing uniparentally. A decrease in parental care with age is consistent with a reproductive restraint strategy. When female age increased over time, males did not increase their residency time to compensate for deteriorating female condition. To our knowledge, this is the first test of adaptive reproductive allocation strategies in male burying beetles.

  16. Predictive Value of Performance Criteria for First-Time Sophomore Resident Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severance, Dana A.

    2015-01-01

    Housing professionals are increasingly compelled to consider hiring resident assistants (RAs) from a pool of applicants that includes students with less college experience than has traditionally been expected. The purpose of the study is to determine if the success of first-time sophomore RAs differs from that of first-time upper-class RAs…

  17. Does streambed heterogeneity matter for hyporheic residence time distribution in sand-bedded streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonina, Daniele; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Marzadri, Alessandra; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Stream water residence times within streambed sediments are key values to quantify hyporheic processes including sediment thermal regime, solute transient storage, dilution rates and biogeochemical transformations, such as those controlling degassing nitrous oxide. Heterogeneity of the streambed sediment hydraulic properties has been shown to be potentially an important factor to characterize hyporheic processes. Here, we quantify the importance of streambed heterogeneity on residence times of dune-like bedform induced hyporheic fluxes at the bedform and reach scales. We show that heterogeneity has a net effect of compression of the hyporheic zone (HZ) toward the streambed, changing HZ volume from the homogenous case and thus inducing remarkable differences in the flow field with respect to the homogeneous case. We unravel the physical conditions for which the commonly used homogenous field assumption is applicable for quantifying hyporheic processes thus explaining why predictive measures based on a characteristic residence time, like the Damköhler number, are robust in heterogeneous sand bedded streams.

  18. Strategic Application of Residence-Time Control in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    As a sustainable alternative for conventional batch-based synthetic techniques, the concept of continuous-flow processing has emerged in the synthesis of fine chemicals. Systematic tuning of the residence time, a key parameter of continuous-reaction technology, can govern the outcome of a chemical reaction by determining the reaction rate and the conversion and by influencing the product selectivity. This review furnishes a brief insight into flow reactions in which high chemo- and/or stereoselectivity can be attained by strategic residence-time control and illustrates the importance of the residence time as a crucial parameter in sustainable method development. Such a fine reaction control cannot be performed in conventional batch reaction set-ups. PMID:26246983

  19. Particulate matter concentrations in residences: an intervention study evaluating stand-alone filters and air conditioners

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, S.; Du, L.; Mentz, G.; Mukherjee, B.; Parker, E.; Godwin, C.; Chin, J.-Y.; O'Toole, A.; Robins, T.; Rowe, Z.; Lewis, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study, a randomized controlled trial, evaluated the effectiveness of free-standing air filters and window air conditioners (ACs) in 126 low-income households of children with asthma. Households were randomized into a control group, a group receiving a free-standing HEPA filter placed in the child's sleeping area, and a group receiving the filter and a window-mounted AC. Indoor air quality (IAQ) was monitored for week-long periods over three to four seasons. High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and carbon dioxide were frequently seen. When IAQ was monitored, filters reduced PM levels in the child's bedroom by an average of 50%. Filter use varied greatly among households and declined over time, for example, during weeks when pollutants were monitored, filter use was initially high, averaging 84 ± 27%, but dropped to 63 ± 33% in subsequent seasons. In months when households were not visited, use averaged only 34 ± 30%. Filter effectiveness did not vary in homes with central or room ACs. The study shows that measurements over multiple seasons are needed to characterize air quality and filter performance. The effectiveness of interventions using free-standing air filters depends on occupant behavior, and strategies to ensure filter use should be an integral part of interventions. PMID:22145709

  20. Protected block time for teaching and learning in a postgraduate family practice residency program

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Piera; Kennedy, Maggie; Winder, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the elements necessary for a high-quality educational experience in a family practice residency program with respect to scheduling, learning environment, and approaches to teaching and learning. Design An interpretative, qualitative study using a generative-inquiry approach. Setting The Nanaimo Site of the University of British Columbia Family Practice Residency Program. Participants Fifteen physician instructors and 16 first- and second-year residents. Methods Data were gathered from 2 qualitative focus group interviews with residents; 2 qualitative focus group interviews with physician instructors; and structured and semistructured observation of 2 in-class seminars, with a focus on residents’ engagement with the class. Results were analyzed and categorized into themes independently and collectively by the researchers. Main findings Protected block time for teaching and learning at the Nanaimo Site has been effective in fostering a learning environment that supports collegial relationships and in-depth instruction. Residents and physician instructors benefit from the week-long academic schedule and the opportunity to teach and learn collaboratively. Participants specifically value the connections among learning environment, collegiality, relationships, reflective learning, and the teaching and learning process. Conclusion These findings suggest that strategic planning and scheduling of teaching and learning sessions in residency programs are important to promoting a comprehensive educational experience. PMID:22700741

  1. Catchment travel and residence time distributions: a theoretical framework for solute transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, G.; Bertuzzo, E.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-12-01

    The probability density functions (pdf's) of travel and residence times are key descriptors of the mechanisms through which catchments retain and release old and event water, transporting solutes to receiving water bodies. In this contribution we derive a general stochastic framework applicable to arbitrary catchment control volumes, where time-variable precipitation, evapotranspiration and discharge are assumed to be the major hydrological drivers for water and solutes. A master equation for the residence time pdf is derived and solved analytically, providing expressions for travel and residence time pdf's as a function of input/output fluxes and of the relevant mixing processes occurring along streamflow production and plant upatke. Our solutions suggest intrinsically time variant travel and residence time pdf's through a direct dependence on the underlying hydrological forcings and soil vegetation dynamics. The proposed framework highlights the dependence of water/solute travel times on eco-hydrological processes (especially transpiration and uptake), and integrates age-dating and tracer hydrology techniques by providing a coherent framework for catchment transport models. An application to the release of pesticides from an agricultural watershead is also discussed.

  2. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    ¨hler number seemed to overestimate the actual transition as indicated by multiple secondary electron acceptors, illustrating the gradient nature of anaerobic transition. Temporal flux variability in low-flux morphologies generated a much greater range in hyporheic redox conditions compared to high-flux zones, and chemical responses to changing flux rates were consistent with those predicted from the empirical relationship between redox condition and residence time. The Raz tracer revealed that hyporheic flow paths have strong net aerobic respiration, particularly at higher residence time, but this reactive exchange did not affect the net stream signal at the reach scale.

  3. Residence time distribution and material flow studies in a rotary kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, P. S. T.; Surender, G. D.; Damodaran, A. D.; Suresh, V.; Philip, Z. G.; Sankaran, K.

    1990-12-01

    Experiments were conducted in a rotary kiln containing ilmenite particles to study the residence time distribution (RTD) of low-density particles, holdup, and bed depth profile. The variables include feed rate of solids, slope and rotational speed of the kiln, type and size of the tracer, and dam height. Correlations are presented for mean residence time, dispersion number, holdup, and steady-state throughput of solids in terms of the process variables. A simple method is proposed to estimate the dam height that gives rise to a flat profile of solids bed along the length of the kiln.

  4. The TEAM (Total Exposure Assessment Methodology) Study: personal exposures to toxic substances in air, drinking water, and breath of 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Pellizzari, E D; Hartwell, T D; Sparacino, C; Whitmore, R; Sheldon, L; Zelon, H; Perritt, R

    1987-08-01

    EPA's TEAM Study has measured exposures to 20 volatile organic compounds in personal air, outdoor air, drinking water, and breath of approximately 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota. All residents were selected by a probability sampling scheme to represent 128,000 inhabitants of Elizabeth and Bayonne, New Jersey, 131,000 residents of Greensboro, North Carolina, and 7000 residents of Devils Lake, North Dakota. Participants carried a personal monitor to collect two 12-hr air samples and gave a breath sample at the end of the day. Two consecutive 12-hr outdoor air samples were also collected on identical Tenax cartridges in the backyards of some of the participants. About 5000 samples were collected, of which 1500 were quality control samples. Ten compounds were often present in personal air and breath samples at all locations. Personal exposures were consistently higher than outdoor concentrations for these chemicals and were sometimes 10 times the outdoor concentrations. Indoor sources appeared to be responsible for much of the difference. Breath concentrations also often exceeded outdoor concentrations and correlated more strongly with personal exposures than with outdoor concentrations. Some activities (smoking, visiting dry cleaners or service stations) and occupations (chemical, paint, and plastics plants) were associated with significantly elevated exposures and breath levels for certain toxic chemicals. Homes with smokers had significantly increased benzene and styrene levels in indoor air. Residence near major point sources did not affect exposure.

  5. Radiogenic and Radioactive Isotopic Evidence for a Dynamic Residence Time of the Athabasca Glacier Subglacial Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, C. A.; Aciego, S.; Sims, K. W.; Aarons, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about the time it takes precipitation, input of water from reservoirs, surface melt, and basal melt to migrate to the base of a glacier and discharge. Previous work on the residence time of subglacial water has proven to be either inconclusive or inconsistent. Our research will address the primary subglacial water questions; the flux of subglacial water correlates directly to the mass balance of a glacier but what role does subglacial water storage play in that mass balance? Can we determine residence time of subglacial water? And, how variable is residence time seasonally and on longer time scales? The regional focus of our research is the Athabasca Glacier, part of the Columbia Icefield located in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. Uranium-series (U-series) dating methods based on the ingrowth of daughter isotopes from parents (234U, 230Th and 222Rn from the primary parent 238U) have been used to study the residence time of aquifer systems. Here we show the feasibility of applying these techniques to subglacial water. Samples were collected over two 25-day field periods to account for hydrological and chemical fluctuations between the onset of melt and peak melt. Daily physical observations, 222Rn concentrations (from a Durridge RAD7), conductivity, total alkalinity, pH, maximum velocity, and discharge measurements were taken. Fifty daily 10-40L subglacial water and filtered sediment samples were collected and filtered at our collection site in the main channel at the toe of the Athabasca Glacier. The 238U /234U and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compositions and U, Th, and Sr concentrations of the filtrate and captured sediments is pending. We will extrapolate the residence time of the water based on the accumulation of 234U and 230Th in our samples from alpha decay, which can be coupled to a radiometric timescale. Given that the 238U /234U and 234U/230Th isotopic composition of subglacial water is dependent on recoil and sediment dissolution processes

  6. Estimation of groundwater residence time using the 36Cl bomb pulse.

    PubMed

    Tosaki, Yuki; Tase, Norio; Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nagashima, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    We propose a methodology for estimating the residence time of groundwater based on bomb-produced (36)Cl. Water samples were collected from 28 springs and 2 flowing wells located around Mt. Fuji, Central Japan. (36)Cl/Cl ratios in the water samples, determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), were between 43 × 10(-15) and 412 × 10(-15). A reference time series of the above-background (i.e., bomb-derived) (36)Cl concentration was constructed by linearly scaling the background-corrected Dye-3 data according to the estimated total bomb-produced (36)Cl fallout in the Mt. Fuji area. Assuming piston flow transport, estimates of residence time were obtained by comparing the measured bomb-derived (36)Cl concentrations in spring water with the reference curve. The distribution of (36)Cl-based residence times is basically consistent with that of tritium-based estimates calculated from data presented in previous studies, although the estimated residence times differ between the two tracers. This discrepancy may reflect chlorine recycling via vegetation or the relatively small change in fallout rate, approximately since 1975, which would give rise to large uncertainties in (36)Cl-based estimates of recharge for the period, approximately since 1975. Given the estimated ages for groundwater from flowing wells, dating based on a (36)Cl bomb pulse may be more reliable and sensitive for groundwater recharged before 1975, back as far as the mid-1950s.

  7. Geospatially Analyzed Groundwater Residence Time as a Tool for Sustainable Groundwater Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Hillegonds, D.; Esser, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Managing groundwater during California's drought and satisfying the requirements of the 2014 Sustainable Groundwater Management Act will require multiple approaches to quantifying rates of change in groundwater storage in the heavily exploited basins around the state. Mean groundwater residence times are useful for developing sustainability goals in that the mean residence time is a measure of the aquifer turnover, or renewal time. The California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment program is unique among groundwater monitoring programs in that multiple analyses allow estimation of groundwater residence time. For example, over 4,000 tritium and noble gas analyses have been carried out in wells across California, allowing calculation of tritium-helium groundwater age, spatial analysis of groundwater residence times, and identification of the depth of the transition from modern to pre-modern groundwater. Areas of rapid turnover identified by young ages can be compared with areas that have been identified as being hydrogeologically vulnerable based on physical measures such as mapped permeability, confining conditions, or recharge/discharge rates. Application of groundwater residence time as a tool for sustainable groundwater management has advantages and potential pitfalls. The uncertainty associated with calculated ages and the complexity of broad age distributions in long-screened wells are some of the associated challenges. However, geospatial analysis of isotopic age data prove useful for highlighting areas where isotopic ages are not in agreement with other measures of groundwater renewal time, and where ages may therefore be helpful in setting sustainability goals. Initial comparisons suggest that isotopic ages delineate the extent of influence of artificial recharge more precisely than numerical models and that some areas in the Sierra foothills and Coast Range, identified as active recharge areas, host pre-modern groundwater, suggesting the need for

  8. Extra-regional residence time as a correlate of plant invasiveness: European archaeophytes in North America.

    PubMed

    La Sorte, Frank A; Pysek, Petr

    2009-09-01

    Human activities have degraded biogeographical barriers to dispersal resulting in the spread and naturalization of increasing numbers of nonnative invasive species. One correlate of invasiveness within a region is residence time or time since introduction. Plant species that were introduced into Europe prior to AD 1500 (European archaeophytes) that were subsequently introduced into North America provide a unique opportunity to examine the effect of extra-regional residence time (i.e., residence time that occurred in a nonnative region before a species was introduced into a new region). Here, we examine how nonnative species with extensive extra-regional residence times have affected beta diversity among states in the contiguous United States of America based on an analysis of occupancy and distance decay of similarity. State floras contained an average of 3106 +/- 922 species (mean +/- SD) with 2318 +/- 757 species classified as native, 180 +/- 43 species as European archaeophyte, and 608 -236 species as other exotic with no European archaeophyte association. For European archaeophytes, 42% were identified as noxious weeds in the United States with 8% identified as agricultural and 14% as natural-area weeds (20%, 2%, and 13% for other exotics, respectively). In strong contrast to natives and other exotics, European archaeophytes were more widespread and presented weaker distance-decay patterns. Thus, European archaeophytes were more likely to become noxious weeds, particularly within agricultural areas, and were associated with significant losses in beta diversity. We suggest that this outcome is a consequence of extra-regional residence time, which allowed for the selection of species or the evolution of traits that favored the colonization of arable habitats associated with early agricultural activities in Europe, habitats that are widespread, resource rich, and uniformly distributed in the United States. Our findings suggest that a long-term trajectory can be

  9. Residence times in river basins as determined by analysis of long-term tritium records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has maintained a network of stations to collect samples for the measurement of tritium concentrations in precipitation and streamflow since the early 1960s. Tritium data from outflow waters of river basins draining 4500-75000 km 2 are used to determine average residence times of water within the basins. The basins studied are the Colorado River above Cisco, Utah; the Kissimmee River above Lake Okeechobee, Florida; the Mississippi River above Anoka, Minnesota; the Neuse River above Streets Ferry Bridge near Vanceboro, North Carolina; the Potomac River above Point of Rocks, Maryland; the Sacramento River above Sacramento, California; the Susquehanna River above Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The basins are modeled with the assumption that the outflow in the river comes from two sources—prompt (within-year) runoff from precipitation, and flow from the long-term reservoirs of the basin. Tritium concentration in the outflow water of the basin is dependent on three factors: (1) tritium concentration in runoff from the long-term reservoir, which depends on the residence time for the reservoir and historical tritium concentrations in precipitation; (2) tritium concentrations in precipitation (the within-year runoff component); (3) relative contributions of flow from the long-term and within-year components. Predicted tritium concentrations for the outflow water in the river basins were calculated for different residence times and for different relative contributions from the two reservoirs. A box model was used to calculate tritium concentrations in the long-term reservoir. Calculated values of outflow tritium concentrations for the basin were regressed against the measured data to obtain a slope as close as possible to 1. These regressions assumed an intercept of zero and were carried out for different values of residence time and reservoir contribution to maximize the fit of modeled versus actual data for all the above rivers. The final slopes of

  10. Residence times in river basins as determined by analysis of long-term tritium records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has maintained a network of stations to collect samples for the measurement of tritium concentrations in precipitation and streamflow since the early 1960s. Tritium data from outflow waters of river basins draining 4500-75000 km2 are used to determine average residence times of water within the basins. The basins studied are the Colorado River above Cisco, Utah; the Kissimmee River above Lake Okeechobee, Florida; the Mississippi River above Anoka, Minnesota; the Neuse River above Streets Ferry Bridge near Vanceboro, North Carolina; the Potomac River above Point of Rocks, Maryland; the Sacramento River above Sacramento, California; the Susquehanna River above Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The basins are modeled with the assumption that the outflow in the river comes from two sources-prompt (within-year) runoff from precipitation, and flow from the long-term reservoirs of the basin. Tritium concentration in the outflow water of the basin is dependent on three factors: (1) tritium concentration in runoff from the long-term reservoir, which depends on the residence time for the reservoir and historical tritium concentrations in precipitation; (2) tritium concentrations in precipitation (the within-year runoff component); (3) relative contributions of flow from the long-term and within-year components. Predicted tritium concentrations for the outflow water in the river basins were calculated for different residence times and for different relative contributions from the two reservoirs. A box model was used to calculate tritium concentrations in the long-term reservoir. Calculated values of outflow tritium concentrations for the basin were regressed against the measured data to obtain a slope as close as possible to 1. These regressions assumed an intercept of zero and were carried out for different values of residence time and reservoir contribution to maximize the fit of modeled versus actual data for all the above rivers. The final slopes of the

  11. Recruitment, growth and residence time of fishes in a tropical Australian mangrove system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alistar I.; Duke, Norman C.

    1990-11-01

    Twenty fish species accounted for > 96% of the catch by numbers in mangrove habitats in Alligator Creek, in tropical Queensland, Australia. The timing of recruitment, residency status, the period of residence and growth of fish during the time they spent in the mangrove habitat was assessed by examining gonad maturity and following changes in size-frequency plots for each species over 13 months. Five species were permanent residents, completing their life-cycles in mangrove swamps; eight were 'long-term' temporary residents, being present for ˜ 1 year as juveniles before moving to other near-shore habitats; and seven were 'short-term' residents or sporadic users of the mangrove habitat. Amongst the latter group, four species lived in the mangrove habitat for between 1 and 4 consecutive months, while three engraulid species appeared to move rapidly, and often, between mangrove and other near-shore habitats. One of the resident species spawned and recruited throughout the year, but recruitment for most species was highly seasonal, being concentrated in the late dry season (October) to mid wet season (February) period. Temporary resident species dominated the fish community in the wet season (December-April), but resident species comprised more than 90% of total fish numbers in the mid dry season (August) after temporary residents left the mangroves in the early dry season. Several species had more than one peak of recruitment during the wet season. The cohort of 0 + aged Leiognathus equulus which recruited in December grew more rapidly and remained in the mangroves for a shorter period than the cohort which recruited later in the wet season (February). Only nine of the 20 species examined are strictly dependent on mangrove-lined estuaries, the remaining 11 are captured in significant numbers in other near-shore habitats. Only four of the 20 species are of direct commercial importance in Australia, but most are major prey for several valuable, commercial species

  12. LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RESIDENCE TIME DISTRIBUTION OF FLUIDS IN LAMINAR FLOW STIRRED ANNULAR PHOTOREACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and Numerical Investigations of Residence Time Distribution of Fluids in Laminar Flow Stirred Annular Photoreactor

    E. Sahle-Demessie1, Siefu Bekele2, U. R. Pillai1

    1U.S. EPA, National Risk Management Research Laboratory
    Sustainable Technology Division,...

  13. EFFECT OF RESIDENCE TIME ON ANNUAL EXPORT AND DENITRIFICATION OF NITROGEN IN ESTUARIES: A MODEL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple model of annual average response of an estuary to mean nitrogen loading rate and freshwater residence time was developed and tested. It uses nitrogen inputs from land, deposition from the atmosphere, and first-order calculations of internal loss rate and export to perfor...

  14. Temperature, plant species and residence time effects on nitrogen removal in model treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Allen, C R; Stein, O R; Hook, P B; Burr, M D; Parker, A E; Hafla, E C

    2013-01-01

    Total nitrogen (TN) removal in treatment wetlands (TWs) is challenging due to nitrogen cycle complexity and the variation of influent nitrogen species. Plant species, season, temperature and hydraulic loading most likely influence root zone oxygenation and appurtenant nitrogen removal, especially for ammonium-rich wastewater. Nitrogen data were collected from two experiments utilizing batch-loaded (3-, 6-, 9- and 20-day residence times), sub-surface TWs monitored for at least one year during which temperature was varied between 4 and 24 °C. Synthetic wastewater containing 17 mg/l N as NH4 and 27 mg/l amino-N, 450 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 13 mg/l SO4-S was applied to four replicates of Carex utriculata, Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha latifolia and unplanted controls. Plant presence and species had a greater effect on TN removal than temperature or residence time. Planted columns achieved approximately twice the nitrogen removal of unplanted controls (40-95% versus 20-50% removal) regardless of season and temperature. TWs planted with Carex outperformed both Typha and Schoenoplectus and demonstrated less temperature dependency. TN removal with Carex was excellent at all temperatures and residence times; Schoenoplectus and Typha TN removal improved at longer residence times. Reductions in TN were not accompanied by increases in NO3, which was consistently below 1 mg/l N.

  15. Bridging Home: Building Relationships between Immigrant and Long-Time Resident Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryden-Peterson, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is rising evidence that relationships that bridge between immigrants and long-time residents are critical to immigrant integration and to the overall heath of communities. The processes by which this bridging social capital is built are not well understood. Schools in new immigrant destinations, as spaces in which diverse youth…

  16. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  17. Untangling hyporheic residence time distributions and whole stream metabolisms using a hydrological process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenkirch, Nora; Mutz, Michael; Molkenthin, Frank; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Trauth, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of the water residence time in hyporheic sediments with the sediment metabolic rates is believed to be a key factor controlling whole stream metabolism. However, due to the methodological difficulties, there is little data that investigates this fundamental theory of aquatic ecology. Here, we report on progress made to combine numerical modeling with a series of manipulation to laboratory flumes overcoming methodological difficulties. In these flumes, hydraulic conditions were assessed using non-reactive tracer and heat pulse sensor. Metabolic activity was measured as the consumption and production of oxygen and the turnover of reactive tracers. Residence time and metabolic processes were modeled using a multicomponent reactive transport code called Min3P and calibrated with regard to the hydraulic conditions using the results obtained from the flume experiments. The metabolic activity was implemented in the model via Monod type expressions e.g. for aerobic respiration rates. A number of sediment structures differing in residence time distributions were introduced in both, the model and the flumes, specifically to model the biogeochemical performance and to validate the model results. Furthermore, the DOC supply and surface water flow velocity were altered to test the whole stream metabolic response. Using the results of the hydrological process model, a sensitivity analysis of the impact of residence time distributions on the metabolic activity could yield supporting proof of an existing link between the two.

  18. HOW TO MODEL HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES OF 27 ESTUARIES IN 4 MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrodynamics and residence times of 27 embayments were modeled during the first year of a project whose goal is to define the relation between nitrogen loadings and ecological responses of 44 systems that range from small to the size of Narragansett Bay and Buzzards Bay. The...

  19. Water Residence Times and Runoff Sources Across an Urbanizing Gradient (Croton Water Supply Area, New York)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D. A.; Duncan, J. M.; Hassett, J. M.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    Water residence times and nutrient budgets were measured in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY. The watersheds (less than 1km 2) have different levels of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on impervious surfaces and slow flow through the subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wet zones, hillslopes). Throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were sampled bi-weekly during a period of up to 2 years and analyzed for major chemical constituents, oxygen-18 content, and nitrogen species. Mean residence times of the stream water of about 30 weeks were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes for all 3 watersheds. There was no significant difference in mean residence times among the three study watersheds, despite their different levels of urbanization. However, residence times from a few weeks up to ca 2 years vary within the watersheds, depending on the local runoff sources and their geographical conditions (riparian and hillslope topography, aquifer type). The runoff sources were quantified for selected streamwater and groundwater sampling sites using the end member mixing analysis technique (EMMA). The mixing analysis shows the impact of the runoff sources on runoff generation in the selected watersheds, i.e. it shows how big is the impact of urbanization on the runoff generation and how big is the natural control. These results may be useful in watershed management and planning of further urbanization in the Croton water supply area.

  20. Water residence times and nutrient budgets across an urbanizing gradient (Croton water supply area, NY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D. A.; Duncan, J. M.; Hassett, J. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    Water residence times and nutrient budgets in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY, were examined. The watersheds (less than 1km 2) have different level of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on roads and slow flow through subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wet zones, hillslopes) . Measurements of the comprehensive chemical suite incl. components of nitrogen budget in the throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were performed bi-weekly over a period up to 2 years. Mean water residence times of the stream water were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes. There are significant differences in the chemical composition and decrease of nitrification intensity and of mean streamwater residence time along the increasing watershed development. Within each watershed, longer water residence times (up to over 2 years) were estimated in the wetland zones without direct communication with streams in comparison to hillslope areas (up to over 1 year). The results can be used in watershed management and planning of the further urbanization of this water supply area.

  1. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-04-25

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate on residence time. The study established that the kneading block in the screw configuration acts as a plug-flow zone inside the granulator. Furthermore, it was found that a balance between the throughput force and conveying rate is required to obtain a good axial mixing inside the twin-screw granulator. Although the granulation behaviour is different for other excipients, the experimental data collection and modelling methods applied in this study are generic and can be adapted to other excipients.

  2. Racing Against the Clock: Internal Medicine Residents' Time Spent On Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Guo, Uta; Illipparambil, Lijo C.; Netherton, Matt D.; Sheshadri, Bhairavi; Karu, Eric; Peterson, Stephen J.; Mehta, Parag H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the late 1980s, resident physicians have spent increasing amounts of time on electronic health record (EHR) data entry and retrieval. Objective longitudinal data measuring time spent on the EHR are lacking. Objective We sought to quantify the time actually spent using the EHR by all first-year internal medicine residents in a single program (N = 41). Methods Active EHR usage data were collected from the audit logs for May, July, and October 2014 and January 2015. Per recommendations from our EHR vendor (Cerner Corporation), active EHR usage time was defined as more than 15 keystrokes, or 3 mouse clicks, or 1700 “mouse miles” per minute. Active EHR usage time was tallied for each patient chart viewed each day and termed an electronic patient record encounter (EPRE). Results In 4 months, 41 interns accumulated 18 322 hours of active EHR usage in more than 33 733 EPREs. Each intern spent on average 112 hours per month on 206 EPREs. Interns spent more time in July compared to January (41 minutes versus 30 minutes per EPRE, P < .001). Time spent on the EHR in January echoed that of the previous May (30 minutes versus 29 minutes, P = .40). Conclusions First-year residents spent a significant amount of time actively using the EHR, achieving maximal proficiency on or before January of the academic year. Decreased time spent on the EHR may reflect greater familiarity with the EHR, growing EHR efficiencies, or other factors. PMID:26913101

  3. Assessing the effect of different river water level interpolation schemes on modeled groundwater residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Samuel; Renard, Philippe; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining a quantitative understanding of river-groundwater interactions is of high practical relevance, for instance within the context of riverbank filtration and river restoration. Modeling interactions between river and groundwater requires knowledge of the river's spatiotemporal water level distribution. The dynamic nature of riverbed morphology in restored river reaches might result in complex river water level distributions, including disconnected river branches, nonlinear longitudinal water level profiles and morphologically induced lateral water level gradients. Recently, two new methods were proposed to accurately and efficiently capture 2D water level distributions of dynamic rivers. In this study, we assessed the predictive capability of these methods with respect to simulated groundwater residence times. Both methods were used to generate surface water level distributions of a 1.2 km long partly restored river reach of the Thur River in northeastern Switzerland. We then assigned these water level distributions as boundary conditions to a 3D steady-state groundwater flow and transport model. When applying either of the new methods, the calibration-constrained groundwater flow field accurately predicted the spatial distribution of groundwater residence times; deviations were within a range of 30% when compared to residence times obtained using a reference method. We further tested the sensitivity of the simulated groundwater residence times to a simplified river water level distribution. The negligence of lateral river water level gradients of 20-30 cm on a length of 200 m caused errors of 40-80% in the calibration-constrained groundwater residence time distribution compared to results that included lateral water level gradients. The additional assumption of a linear water level distribution in longitudinal river direction led to deviations from the complete river water level distribution of up to 50 cm, which caused wide-spread errors in simulated

  4. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  5. Sustained increase in resident meal time hand hygiene through an interdisciplinary intervention engaging long-term care facility residents and staff.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Marguerite; Harris, Tony; Horn, Terancita; Midamba, Blondelle; Primes, Vickie; Sullivan, Nancy; Shuler, Rosalyn; Zabarsky, Trina F; Deshpande, Abhishek; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-02-01

    Hand hygiene by patients may prevent acquisition and dissemination of health care-associated pathogens, but limited efforts have been made to engage patients in hand hygiene interventions. In a long-term care facility, we found that residents were aware of the importance of hand hygiene, but barriers, such as inaccessible products or difficult to use products, limited compliance. A dramatic and sustained improvement in meal time hand hygiene was achieved through engagement of staff and residents.

  6. Influence of temperature on patch residence time in parasitoids: physiological and behavioural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Abram, Paul K; Louâpre, Philippe; Barrette, Maryse; Brodeur, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Patch time allocation has received much attention in the context of optimal foraging theory, including the effect of environmental variables. We investigated the direct role of temperature on patch time allocation by parasitoids through physiological and behavioural mechanisms and its indirect role via changes in sex allocation and behavioural defences of the hosts. We compared the influence of foraging temperature on patch residence time between an egg parasitoid, Trichogramma euproctidis, and an aphid parasitoid, Aphidius ervi. The latter attacks hosts that are able to actively defend themselves, and may thus indirectly influence patch time allocation of the parasitoid. Patch residence time decreased with an increase in temperature in both species. The increased activity levels with warming, as evidenced by the increase in walking speed, partially explained these variations, but other mechanisms were involved. In T. euproctidis, the ability to externally discriminate parasitised hosts decreased at low temperature, resulting in a longer patch residence time. Changes in sex allocation with temperature did not explain changes in patch time allocation in this species. For A. ervi, we observed that aphids frequently escaped at intermediate temperature and defended themselves aggressively at high temperature, but displayed few defence mechanisms at low temperature. These defensive behaviours resulted in a decreased patch residence time for the parasitoid and partly explained the fact that A. ervi remained for a shorter time at the intermediate and high temperatures than at the lowest temperature. Our results suggest that global warming may affect host-parasitoid interactions through complex mechanisms including both direct and indirect effects on parasitoid patch time allocation.

  7. Influence of temperature on patch residence time in parasitoids: physiological and behavioural mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Abram, Paul K.; Louâpre, Philippe; Barrette, Maryse; Brodeur, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Patch time allocation has received much attention in the context of optimal foraging theory, including the effect of environmental variables. We investigated the direct role of temperature on patch time allocation by parasitoids through physiological and behavioural mechanisms and its indirect role via changes in sex allocation and behavioural defences of the hosts. We compared the influence of foraging temperature on patch residence time between an egg parasitoid, Trichogramma euproctidis, and an aphid parasitoid, Aphidius ervi. The latter attacks hosts that are able to actively defend themselves, and may thus indirectly influence patch time allocation of the parasitoid. Patch residence time decreased with an increase in temperature in both species. The increased activity levels with warming, as evidenced by the increase in walking speed, partially explained these variations, but other mechanisms were involved. In T. euproctidis, the ability to externally discriminate parasitised hosts decreased at low temperature, resulting in a longer patch residence time. Changes in sex allocation with temperature did not explain changes in patch time allocation in this species. For A. ervi, we observed that aphids frequently escaped at intermediate temperature and defended themselves aggressively at high temperature, but displayed few defence mechanisms at low temperature. These defensive behaviours resulted in a decreased patch residence time for the parasitoid and partly explained the fact that A. ervi remained for a shorter time at the intermediate and high temperatures than at the lowest temperature. Our results suggest that global warming may affect host-parasitoid interactions through complex mechanisms including both direct and indirect effects on parasitoid patch time allocation.

  8. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population.

  9. Spring time photochemical air pollution in Osaka

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Shinji; Uno, Itsushi; Ohara, Toshimasa

    1996-12-31

    High concentrations of nitrogen dioxide are frequently observed in Osaka area in spring season. To clarify this, a series of three dimensional field observation was conducted in April 1993 covering Osaka and surrounding area. Vertical and horizontal distributions of ozone, NO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, aerosol species, hydrocarbon species and meteorological parameter such as temperature, uv radiation, wind speed, wind direction are measured on the ground and aloft. Covering the observational period yellow sand transportation from the continent and stratospheric ozone intrusion were also observed under the meteorological condition of moving high pressure system. During the aircraft observation of 19 to 21 April 1993 high concentration of photochemical air pollution was observed aloft over Osaka area. Maximum ozone concentration was me than 150 ppb. Vertical distribution of ozone showed uniform profile up to 2500m in day time. At Mt. Ikoma (600 m) ozone concentration had been almost constant ranging 80-100 ppb throughout the observational period. To clarify this phenomena three dimensional photochemical air pollution simulation model was applied based on the real meteorological and emission conditions. Simulated result showed photochemical reaction play an important role to form the spring time high concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in Osaka.

  10. [Correlation between results of the residency admission test and of pediatric certification test in Buenos Aires, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juan Pablo; Hamui, Magali; Paganini, Agustina; Torres, Fernando A; Ossorio, María Fabiana; Eiguchi, Kumiko; Ferrero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In the city of Buenos Aires (CABA), pediatric residents enter the residency program after taking a unified admission test. After completion of the program and passing a final test, the Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) provides a professional certification. The objective of this study is to determine if the results obtained in the residency admission test (RAT) and those of the professional certification test (PCT) correlated. This is a cross-sectional study, that included all subjects who passed the pediatrics RAT in CABA in 2004-2009, and that attended the pediatric PCT of the UBA. The score for each subject in both tests was obtained and the corresponding correlation was calculated. Results were divided in quintiles, and the proportion of subjects who improved their position in the PCT with respect to the RAT was calculated. Data from 303 subjects was obtained. The RAT showed a median of 45.0 (over 60 maximum) (IC-range: 43.0-48.7), and the PCT showed a median of 6 points (over 10 max.)(IC-range: 6-8). A significative correlation between results in RAT and PCT was observed (r = 0.37, p < 0.001). Based on their position in the RAT, 43.8% of subjects improved their position in the PCT, without differences between residents attending pediatric and general hospitals (45.6 vs. 31.5%; p = 0.1). In the case of pediatric residents, results of the residency admission test correlate with those obtained in the professional certification test.

  11. Measurement of Ligand–Target Residence Times by 1H Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A ligand-observed 1H NMR relaxation experiment is introduced for measuring the binding kinetics of low-molecular-weight compounds to their biomolecular targets. We show that this approach, which does not require any isotope labeling, is applicable to ligand–target systems involving proteins and nucleic acids of variable molecular size. The experiment is particularly useful for the systematic investigation of low affinity molecules with residence times in the micro- to millisecond time regime. PMID:27933946

  12. Residence time distribution (RTD) of particulate foods in a continuous flow pilot-scale ohmic heater.

    PubMed

    Sarang, Sanjay; Heskitt, Brian; Tulsiyan, Priyank; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2009-08-01

    The residence time distribution (RTD) of a model particulate-fluid mixture (potato in starch solution) in the ohmic heater in a continuous sterilization process was measured using a radio frequency identification (RFID) methodology. The effect of solid concentration and the rotational speed of the agitators on the RTD were studied. The velocity of the fastest particle was 1.62 times the mean product velocity. In general, particle velocity was found to be greater than the product bulk average velocity. Mean particle residence time (MPRT) increased with an increase in the rotational speed of the agitators (P < 0.05), and no particular trend was observed between the MPRT and the solid concentration. The distribution curves E (theta) were skewed to the right suggesting slow moving zones in the system.

  13. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria rhyolites Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya: Residence times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    U-series disequilibrium analyses have been conducted on samples from Olkaria rhyolite centers with ages being available for all but one center using both internal and whole rock isochrons. 67 percent of the rhyolites analyzed show U-Th disequilibrium, ranging from 27 percent excess thorium to 36 percent excess uranium. Internal and whole rock isochrons give crystallization/formation ages between 65 ka and 9 ka, in every case these are substantially older than the eruptive dates. The residence times of the rhyolites (U-Th age minus the eruption date) have decreased almost linearly with time, from 45 ka to 7 Ka suggesting a possible increase of activity within the system related to increased basaltic input. The long residence times are mirrored by large Rn-222 fluxes from the centers which cannot be explained by larger U contents.

  14. Estimating Regional Water Residence Time Changes in the Colonial Northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. B.; Arrigo, J.; Duncan, J.; Parolari, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Northeast United States experienced a fundamental change following colonization by Europeans. During the period from 1600 to 1800 forests were cleared, agricultural lands were expanded, beavers were hunted to near-extinction, wetlands were drained or filled, and cities were built. Such activities had important implications for the stocks of water on and the fluxes of water through that landscape. We have made an early attempt to quantify the changed water stocks and fluxes in the Northeast during this time period using historical information and simple analyses. Simple calculations and estimates of stock and flux uncertainty were used to compute the distribution of land surface water residence times at the beginning and ending of the Colonial Era. Our estimates show that humans shifted water residence towards shorter times, which would have important implications for geomorphology, biogeochemistry, and how humans responded to their alteration of the hydrologic cycle.

  15. The Pools, Fluxes and Residence Time of Water Across the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, G. R.; Fisher, J. B.; McDonnell, J.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    What can ecology tell us about the hydrology of the Amazon? And what can hydrology tell us about the ecology? From a hydrological perspective, plant water storage and use contributes to determining the rate and time scales at which water is recycled from soil to the atmosphere. From an ecological perspective, plant water storage and use contributes to determining the rate and time scales at which water plants can support function. Conceptualized as residence time, the relationship between plant water storage and use can provide fundamental insights into ecohydrology. We explore the spatial variation in the aboveground storage, use, and residence time of water across the Amazon. To do so, we pair estimates of aboveground woody biomass from 413 1-ha old growth forest census plots situated across the Amazon Basin with high resolution estimates of intra- and inter- annual evapotranspiration derived from remote sensing. Aboveground water storage capacity (17.4 ± 6.3 mm) and evapotranspiration (3.7 ± 0.4 mm day-1) result in a residence time of 4.7 ± 1.5 days, equivalent to the use of ca. 24% of stored water day-1. The results indicate that residence time varies due to a predictable relationship between evapotranspiration and biomass at local, regional and landscape scales. The ecohydrology of the Amazon plays a critical role in water and carbon cycling on a global scale. We discuss how our results can help inform our understanding of both the hydrology and ecology of the Amazon Basin in the context of anthropogenic change.

  16. Characterization and source profiling of volatile organic compounds in indoor air of private residences in Selangor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Shuta; Matsui, Yasuto; Khan, Md Firoz; Latif, Mohd Talib; Ali Mohd, Mustafa; Yoneda, Minoru

    2017-05-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in indoor air were investigated at 39 private residences in Selangor State, Malaysia to characterize the indoor air quality and to identify pollution sources. Twenty-two VOCs including isomers (14 aldehydes, 5 aromatic hydrocarbons, acetone, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) were collected by 2 passive samplers for 24h and quantitated using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Source profiling based on benzene/toluene ratio as well as statistical analysis (cluster analysis, bivariate correlation analysis and principal component analysis) was performed to identify pollution sources of the detected VOCs. The VOCs concentrations were compared with regulatory limits of air quality guidelines in WHO/EU, the US, Canada and Japan to clarify the potential health risks to the residents. The 39 residences were classified into 2 groups and 2 ungrouped residences based on the dendrogram in the cluster analysis. Group 1 (n=30) had mainly toluene (6.87±2.19μg/m(3)), formaldehyde (16.0±10.1μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (5.35±4.57μg/m(3)) and acetone (11.1±5.95μg/m(3)) at background levels. Group 2 (n=7) had significantly high values of formaldehyde (99.3±10.7μg/m(3)) and acetone (35.8±12.6μg/m(3)), and a tendency to have higher values of acetaldehyde (23.7±13.5μg/m(3)), butyraldehyde (3.35±0.41μg/m(3)) and isovaleraldehyde (2.30±0.39μg/m(3)). The 2 ungrouped residences showed particularly high concentrations of BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene: 235μg/m(3) in total) or acetone (133μg/m(3)). The geometric mean value of formaldehyde (19.2μg/m(3)) exceeded an 8-hour regulatory limit in Canada (9μg/m(3)), while those in other compounds did not exceed any regulatory limits, although a few residences exceeded at least one regulatory limit of benzene or acetaldehyde. Thus, the VOCs in the private residences were effectively characterized from the limited number of monitoring, and the

  17. In-line real time air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Marcus B.; Thompson, Cyril V.

    1998-01-01

    An in-line gas monitor capable of accurate gas composition analysis in a continuous real time manner even under strong applied vacuum conditions operates by mixing an air sample with helium forming a sample gas in two complementary sample loops embedded in a manifold which includes two pairs of 3-way solenoid valves. The sample gas is then analyzed in an ion trap mass spectrometer on a continuous basis. Two valve drivers actuate the two pairs of 3-way valves in a reciprocating fashion, so that there is always flow through the in-line gas monitor via one or the other of the sample loops. The duty cycle for the two pairs of 3-way valves is varied by tuning the two valve drivers to a duty cycle typically between 0.2 to 0.7 seconds.

  18. In-line real time air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Wise, M.B.; Thompson, C.V.

    1998-07-14

    An in-line gas monitor capable of accurate gas composition analysis in a continuous real time manner even under strong applied vacuum conditions operates by mixing an air sample with helium forming a sample gas in two complementary sample loops embedded in a manifold which includes two pairs of 3-way solenoid valves. The sample gas is then analyzed in an ion trap mass spectrometer on a continuous basis. Two valve drivers actuate the two pairs of 3-way valves in a reciprocating fashion, so that there is always flow through the in-line gas monitor via one or the other of the sample loops. The duty cycle for the two pairs of 3-way valves is varied by tuning the two valve drivers to a duty cycle typically between 0.2 to 0.7 seconds. 3 figs.

  19. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  20. Method for Making Measurements of the Post-Combustion Residence Time in a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey H (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method of measuring a residence time in a gas-turbine engine is provided, whereby the method includes placing pressure sensors at a combustor entrance and at a turbine exit of the gas-turbine engine and measuring a combustor pressure at the combustor entrance and a turbine exit pressure at the turbine exit. The method further includes computing cross-spectrum functions between a combustor pressure sensor signal from the measured combustor pressure and a turbine exit pressure sensor signal from the measured turbine exit pressure, applying a linear curve fit to the cross-spectrum functions, and computing a post-combustion residence time from the linear curve fit.

  1. An overview of oil palm biomass torrefaction: Effects of temperature and residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaacob, N.; Rahman, N. A.; Matali, S.; Idris, S. S.; Alias, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass is characterized as high moisture content, low bulk and energy density, possesses hygroscopic behaviour and poor grindability material as compared to the superior coal. A thermal treatment called torrefaction is a heating of biomass in a temperature range between 200°C to 300°C under inert atmosphere in order to upgrade biomass properties. Torrefied biomass has many similar characteristics to coal such as low moisture content, high bulk and energy density, hydrophobic and good grindability. This paper reviews the effects of oil palm biomass torrefaction in terms of temperature and residence time. This is because comprehensive studies on torrefaction parameters need to be carried out since different parameters might affect the chemical and physical characteristic of the torrefied product. Hence, this paper aims to discuss the effects of different torrefaction temperature and residence time towards physicochemical characteristic, mass and energy yield as well as calorific value of torrefied oil palm biomass.

  2. Estimation of coastal residence time of submarine groundwater discharge using radium progenies.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, G; Tsabaris, C; Patiris, D L; Androulakaki, E G; Vlastou, R

    2017-03-01

    A methodology based on γ-spectrometry measurements of untreated coastal water samples is proposed for the direct estimation of coastal residence time of submarine discharged groundwater. The method was applied to a submarine spring at Stoupa Bay covering all seasons. The estimated residence time exhibited an annual mean of 4.6±1.7 d. An additional measurement using the in situ underwater γ-spectrometry technique was performed, in the same site. The in situ method yielded a value of 2.8±0.2 d that was found consistent with the corresponding value derived using the developed lab-based method (3.4±2.0 d) for the same period.

  3. New residence times of the Holocene reworked shells on the west coast of Bohai Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhiwen; Wang, Fu; Li, Jianfen; Marshall, William A.; Chen, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xingyu; Tian, Lizhu; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Shelly cheniers and shell-rich beds found intercalated in near-shore marine muds and sandy sediments can be used to indicate the location of ancient shorelines, and help to estimate the height of sea level. However, dating the deposition of material within cheniers and shell-rich beds is not straightforward because much of this material is transported and re-worked, creating an unknown temporal off-set, i.e., the residence time, between the death of a shell and its subsequent entombment. To quantify the residence time during the Holocene on a section of the northern Chinese coastline a total 47 shelly subsamples were taken from 17 discrete layers identified on the west coast of Bohai Bay. This material was AMS 14C dated and the calibrated ages were systematically compared. The subsamples were categorized by type as articulated and disarticulated bivalves, gastropod shells, and undifferentiated shell-hash. It was found that within most individual layers the calibrated ages of the subsamples got younger relative to the amount of apparent post-mortem re-working the material had been subject to. For examples, the 14C ages of the bivalve samples trended younger in this order: shell-hash → split shells → articulated shells. We propose that the younger subsample age determined within an individual layer will be the closest to the actual depositional age of the material dated. Using this approach at four Holocene sites we find residence times which range from 100 to 1260 cal yrs, with two average values of 600 cal yrs for the original 14C dates older than 1 ka cal BP and 100 cal yrs for the original 14C dates younger than 1 ka cal BP, respectively. Using this semi-empirical estimation of the shell residence times we have refined the existing chronology of the Holocene chenier ridges on the west coast of Bohai Bay.

  4. Optimisation of polymer foam bubble expansion in extruder by resident time distribution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochette, Mathieu; Graebling, Didier; Léonardi, Frédéric

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we used the Residence Time Distribution (RTD) to study the polystyrene foaming during an extrusion process. The extruder associated with a gear pump is simply and quantitatively described by three continuoustly stirred tank reactors with recycling loops and one plug-flow reactor. The blowing agent used is CO2 and its obtained by thermal decomposition of a chemical blowing agent (CBA). This approach allows to optimize the density of the foam in accordance with the CBA kinetic of decomposition.

  5. Simulations of Ground-Water Flow and Residence Time near Woodbury, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Brown, Craig J.

    2007-01-01

    Water withdrawn for public use from glacial stratified deposits in Woodbury, Connecticut, is a mixture of water from different source areas, each having a characteristic water-quality signature. The physical processes leading to this mixture were explored using a numerical model to simulate steady-state ground-water source areas and residence times for a public water-supply well (PSW-1) in Woodbury. Upland areas contribute water to the well that is primarily from undeveloped and agricultural land. Valley bottoms contribute water to the well that is primarily from developed land. From 1985 to 2002, 6 percent of the contributing recharge area to the well changed from agricultural and undeveloped to developed land. The pattern of recharge areas and land use causes stratification of ground water by residence time and by characteristic water quality, which is related to land use. As land use changes with time, the water-quality signature of developed land moves deeper into the aquifer. Predicted nitrate concentrations decreased from 1985 to 1995 because of the conversion from agricultural land to developed land, but then began to increase after 1995 because of the conversion of undeveloped land to developed land. Total dissolved solids concentrations, on the other hand, increased from 1985 to 2002 because agriculture is associated with lower total dissolved solids concentrations than is developed land. About 40 percent of the water withdrawn from PSW-1 originated as upland recharge before flowing through glacial deposits in the valley. About 44 percent of the water originated as recharge in either fluvial deposits (mean residence time 7 years) or deltaic deposits (mean residence time 4 years). About 16 percent of the water originated as recharge through storm drains with ground-water discharge (often known as 'dry wells'). The residence time for water that originated as recharge in dry wells is 2 to 4 years, and the mean residence time is 3 years. Dry wells are a fast

  6. Classification of Animal Movement Behavior through Residence in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Orben, Rachael A.; Tolkova, Irina; Thompson, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Identification and classification of behavior states in animal movement data can be complex, temporally biased, time-intensive, scale-dependent, and unstandardized across studies and taxa. Large movement datasets are increasingly common and there is a need for efficient methods of data exploration that adjust to the individual variability of each track. We present the Residence in Space and Time (RST) method to classify behavior patterns in movement data based on the concept that behavior states can be partitioned by the amount of space and time occupied in an area of constant scale. Using normalized values of Residence Time and Residence Distance within a constant search radius, RST is able to differentiate behavior patterns that are time-intensive (e.g., rest), time & distance-intensive (e.g., area restricted search), and transit (short time and distance). We use grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) GPS tracks to demonstrate RST’s ability to classify behavior patterns and adjust to the inherent scale and individuality of each track. Next, we evaluate RST’s ability to discriminate between behavior states relative to other classical movement metrics. We then temporally sub-sample albatross track data to illustrate RST’s response to less resolved data. Finally, we evaluate RST’s performance using datasets from four taxa with diverse ecology, functional scales, ecosystems, and data-types. We conclude that RST is a robust, rapid, and flexible method for detailed exploratory analysis and meta-analyses of behavioral states in animal movement data based on its ability to integrate distance and time measurements into one descriptive metric of behavior groupings. Given the increasing amount of animal movement data collected, it is timely and useful to implement a consistent metric of behavior classification to enable efficient and comparative analyses. Overall, the application of RST to objectively explore and compare behavior patterns in movement data

  7. Classification of Animal Movement Behavior through Residence in Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leigh G; Orben, Rachael A; Tolkova, Irina; Thompson, David R

    2017-01-01

    Identification and classification of behavior states in animal movement data can be complex, temporally biased, time-intensive, scale-dependent, and unstandardized across studies and taxa. Large movement datasets are increasingly common and there is a need for efficient methods of data exploration that adjust to the individual variability of each track. We present the Residence in Space and Time (RST) method to classify behavior patterns in movement data based on the concept that behavior states can be partitioned by the amount of space and time occupied in an area of constant scale. Using normalized values of Residence Time and Residence Distance within a constant search radius, RST is able to differentiate behavior patterns that are time-intensive (e.g., rest), time & distance-intensive (e.g., area restricted search), and transit (short time and distance). We use grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) GPS tracks to demonstrate RST's ability to classify behavior patterns and adjust to the inherent scale and individuality of each track. Next, we evaluate RST's ability to discriminate between behavior states relative to other classical movement metrics. We then temporally sub-sample albatross track data to illustrate RST's response to less resolved data. Finally, we evaluate RST's performance using datasets from four taxa with diverse ecology, functional scales, ecosystems, and data-types. We conclude that RST is a robust, rapid, and flexible method for detailed exploratory analysis and meta-analyses of behavioral states in animal movement data based on its ability to integrate distance and time measurements into one descriptive metric of behavior groupings. Given the increasing amount of animal movement data collected, it is timely and useful to implement a consistent metric of behavior classification to enable efficient and comparative analyses. Overall, the application of RST to objectively explore and compare behavior patterns in movement data can

  8. Tracing time scales of fluid residence and migration in the crust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Purtschert, R.; Jiang, W.; Lu, Z.; Müller, P.; Yang, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal fluids (water, gas and oil) mediate chemical reactions, and they may transport, concentrate or disperse elements in the crust; the fluids are often valuable resources in their own right. In this context, determining the time scales of fluid transport and residence time is essential for understanding geochemical cycle of elements, as well as risk and resource management. Crustal fluids contain stable and radioactive noble gases indigenous to the fluid, which may be of magmatic or atmospheric origin of various ages. In addition, radiogenic and nucleogenic noble gases (both stable and radioactive) are continuously produced by the decay of U, Th and K and related nuclear reactions in the crust at known rates and in known relative proportions. They may be released from their production sites and incorporated into the fluid, acting as natural spikes to trace fluid flow. The concentrations of a noble gas isotope in a crustal fluid in a system devoid of phase separation or mixing varies as a function of decay time and supply from the production sites into the fluids. The release rate of noble gases from the production sites in minerals to the fluid phase may be determined uniquely through the studies of noble gas radionuclides (Yokochi et al., 2012), which is fundamental to the behavior of volatile elements in geochemistry. A pilot study of noble gas radionuclides in an active geothermal system was performed at Yellowstone National Park (Yokochi et al., 2013). Prior studies of the Yellowstone system using stable noble gas isotopes show that the thermal fluids contain a mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and crustal components. Noble gas radionuclide measurements provide new chronometric constraints regarding the subsurface residence times of Yellowstone thermal fluids. Upper limits on deep thermal fluid mean residence times, estimated from 39Ar/40Ar* ratios, range from 118 to 137 kyr for features in the Gibbon and Norris Geyser Basin areas, and are about 16 kyr in

  9. Percolation of clusters with a residence time in the bond definition: Integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Lado, Fred; Lomba, Enrique; Vericat, Fernando

    2005-03-01

    We consider the clustering and percolation of continuum systems whose particles interact via the Lennard-Jones pair potential. A cluster definition is used according to which two particles are considered directly connected (bonded) at time t if they remain within a distance d, the connectivity distance, during at least a time of duration tau, the residence time. An integral equation for the corresponding pair connectedness function, recently proposed by two of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 61, R6067 (2000)], is solved using the orthogonal polynomial approach developed by another of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 55, 426 (1997)]. We compare our results with those obtained by molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Groundwater Residence Times: A Key Parameter for Investigating Effects of River Restoration on Riverbank Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Tobias; Hoehn, Eduard; Schneider, Philipp; Schirmer, Mario; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2010-05-01

    Many Swiss municipal pumping wells, located near the banks of a losing river, are designed to capture a mixture of freshly infiltrated river water and old alluvial groundwater. Riverbank filtration is assumed to substantially reduce concentrations of pathogens, pesticides, and organic pollutants relative to the river water. Although the number of river restoration projects increases, the effects of river restoration on riverbank filtration are still not well understood. River restoration includes widening of the riverbed and removal of bank armoring in order to establish a more natural sediment transport regime and give the river more space. These measures improve ecological habitat diversity and contribute to flood protection. However, they may cause conflicts with groundwater abstraction for drinking water, because travel times from rivers to pumping stations may be significantly reduced. In Switzerland the minimum mean travel time required for the protection of a drinking-water well is 10 days. Thus, for detailed investigation on river water infiltration into the aquifer, the distribution of groundwater travel times from rivers to observation and production wells and mixing ratios of freshly infiltrated and older alluvial groundwater are key parameters. Due to the high hydraulic conductivity of most Swiss prealpine gravel aquifers, the residence time of water entering many pumping wells is the range of weeks. Therefore, special methods are needed to assess residence times of young groundwater. We analyze time series of electrical conductivity in the river and adjacent groundwater observation wells to investigate travel times of young hyporheic groundwater in adjoining channelized and restored sections of the River Thur in North-East Switzerland. The test site has been established by the RECORD Project (Assessment and Modeling of Coupled Ecological and Hydrological Dynamics in the Restored Corridor of a River (Restored Corridor Dynamics)). To quantify residence

  11. Sex Differences in Neuropsychological Function and Manganese in Air, Blood, Hair, and Toenails in Ohio Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: This study compares manganese (Mn) in air, blood, hair, and toenails and neuropsychological function of 110 women and 76 men, environmentally exposed to Mn in air (Mn-air) in two Ohio towns from a ferromanganese smelter and a soil Mn-packaging facility.Method: Biomark...

  12. Residence times in a hypersaline lagoon: Using salinity as a tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudge, Stephen M.; Icely, John D.; Newton, Alice

    2008-04-01

    Generally the waters of the Ria Formosa Lagoon, Portugal have a short residence time, in the order of 0.5 days (Tett, P., Gilpin, L., Svendsen, H., Erlandsson, C.P., Larsson, U., Kratzer, S., Fouilland, E., Janzen, C., Lee, J., Grenz, C., Newton, A., Ferreira, J.G., Fernandes, T., Scory, S., 2003. Eutrophication and some European waters of restricted exchange. Continental Shelf Research 23, 1635-1671). This estimation is based on the measurements of currents and the modelling of water exchange at the outlets to the ocean. However, observations of the temperature and salinity in the inner channels imply that residence time is greater in these regions of the lagoon. To resolve this apparent contradiction, spatial measurements of the temperature and salinity were made with a meter for conductivity, temperature and depth along the principal channels of the western portion of the lagoon, with a sampling frequency of two per second. Evaporation rates of 5.4 mm day -1 were measured in a salt extraction pond adjacent to the lagoon and used to determine the residence time through salinity differences with the incoming seawater. In June 2004, the water flooding in from the ocean had an average salinity of 36.07 which contrasted with a maximum of 37.82 at mid ebb on a spring tide, corresponding to a residence time of >7 days; the mean residence time was 2.4 days. As the tide flooded into the channels, the existing water was advected back into the lagoon. Although there was a small amount of mixing with water from another inlet, the water body from the inner lagoon essentially remained distinct with respect to temperature and salinity characteristics. The residence time of the water was further prolonged at the junction between the main channels, where distinct boundaries were observed between the different water masses. As the water ebbed out, the shallow Western Channel was essentially isolated from the rest of the outer lagoon, and the water from this channel was forced

  13. An influential factor for external radiation dose estimation for residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident-time spent outdoors for residents in Iitate Village.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Sakata, Ritsu; Ozasa, Kotaro; Hayashi, Masayuki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have been conducted on radiation doses to residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Time spent outdoors is an influential factor for external dose estimation. Since little information was available on actual time spent outdoors for residents, different values of average time spent outdoors per day have been used in dose estimation studies on the FDNPP accident. The most conservative value of 24 h was sometimes used, while 2.4 h was adopted for indoor workers in the UNSCEAR 2013 report. Fukushima Medical University has been estimating individual external doses received by residents as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey by collecting information on the records of moves and activities (the Basic Survey) after the accident from each resident. In the present study, these records were analyzed to estimate an average time spent outdoors per day. As an example, in Iitate Village, its arithmetic mean was 2.08 h (95% CI: 1.64-2.51) for a total of 170 persons selected from respondents to the Basic Survey. This is a much smaller value than commonly assumed. When 2.08 h is used for the external dose estimation, the dose is about 25% (23-26% when using the above 95% CI) less compared with the dose estimated for the commonly used value of 8 h.

  14. The Role of Noble Gases in Defining the Mean Residence Times of Fluids within Precambrian Crustal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Fellowes, J.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; McDermott, J. M.; Holland, G.; Mabry, J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Brines rich in N2, H2, CH4 and He hosted within Precambrian crustal rocks are known to sustain microbial life [1]. The geological systems containing these brines have the potential to isolate organisms over planetary timescales and so can provide unique insight into the diversity and evolution of terrestrial life [1-3]. Long considered geological outliers, the prevalence of systems containing these ancient, deep fracture waters is only now being revealed. Recent studies demonstrate the Precambrian crust which accounts for ~70% of total crustal surface area has a global hydrogen production comparable to marine systems [2]. In addition to H2-producing reactions (e.g. radiolysis and serpentinization), a diversity of CH4-producing reactions also occur in these systems through both microbial and water-rock interactions [1, 2]. However, the role these Precambrian systems have in global hydrogen and carbon cycles is poorly understood. For this we need good constraints on the origins, residence times and degree of microbial activity of the fluids within these systems as well as the degree of interaction with external systems. Fortunately, noble gases are ideal for this role [1,3]. Previous noble gas analysis of N2, H2, CH4 and He-rich fluid samples collected at 2.4 km depth from a Cu-Zn mine in Timmins, Ontario, identified isolated fracture fluids with the oldest residence times ever observed (>1.1 Ga) [3]. This study has been significantly expanded now to fluids from an even greater depth (3 km) at Timmins, and from two new mines in the Sudbury Basin. Preliminary data from the deeper Timmins level indicate a new closed system with 136Xe/130Xe ratios 93% above modern air values (20% at 2.4 km) and an early atmosphere 124Xe/130Xe signal approaching the age of the host rock (~2.7 Ga) [4]. In comparison, the Sudbury system indicates exchange with an external source, being highly enriched in helium (30% gas volume) but with a low fissiogenic 136Xe/130Xe excess (10-38% above

  15. Mineralogical Controls over Carbon Storage and Residence Times in Grassland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains approximately three times more carbon than the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation contain combined. However, it is not well understood why some SOM persists for a long time while other SOM decomposes quickly. For future climate predictions, representing soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics accurately in Earth system models is essential. Soil minerals stabilize organic carbon in soil; however, there are gaps in our understanding of how soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon. To investigate the impact of soil mineralogy on SOM dynamics, we used a new model (Biotic and Abiotic Model of SOM—BAMS1 [Riley et al., 2014]) integrated with a three-dimensional, multiphase reactive transport solver (TOUGHREACT). The model represents bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, gaseous diffusion, aqueous advection and diffusion, and adsorption and desorption processes. BAMS1 can predict bulk SOM and radiocarbon signatures without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates. Results show a reasonable match between observed and simulated depth-resolved SOM and ∆14C in grassland ecosystems (soils formed on terraces south of Eureka, California, and the Central Chernozem Region of Russia) and were consistent with expectations of depth-resolved profiles of lignin content and fungi:aerobic bacteria ratios. Results also suggest that clay-mineral surface area and soil sorption coefficients constitute dominant controls over organic carbon stocks and residence times, respectively. Bibliography: Riley, W.J., F.M. Maggi, M. Kleber, M.S. Torn, J.Y. Tang, D. Dwivedi, and N. Guerry (2014), Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics, Geoscientific Model Development, vol. 7, 1335

  16. Predicting mean residence time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone of restored streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zones of streams and rivers have been identified as hotspots for biogeochemical reactions in the aquatic environment, making the retention time and exchange velocity of the hyporheic zone essential parameters in the modelling of these processes. However, exact site-specific values of those parameters are often missing in stream restoration projects because there are no well-defined scaling relationships linking them to measurable reach characteristics. In this study we derive semi-analytical solutions for the retention time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone. In particular the effect on hyporheic exchange is expressed by the use of physically based models and by superimposing different geomorphologic features of different scales. It is suggested that all exchange phenomena can be modelled as head anomalies expressed with a harmonic distribution along the stream with specific wavelength and head amplitude. The maximum head of an exchange phenomena is either dominated by hydrodynamic or hydrostatic water pressure, depending on the size of the feature causing the exchange. The theory leads to constitutive relationships for exchange velocity and residence time expressed as functions of the distribution of wavelengths, distribution of head amplitude and hydraulic conductivity. In order to validate and evaluate certain empirical coefficients, a number of Rhodamine WT tracer tests were performed in a partly restored agricultural stream in the south of Sweden called the Tullstorps brook. To evaluate the tracer test in sections where remediation actions have been undertaken we used the method of temporal moments. In conjunction with the tracer tests a characterisation of the stream was carried out where hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and stream morphology was measured. The study verifies that the residence time in the hyporheic zone decreases with the maximum hydraulic head of the largest (dominating) geomorphic feature of the reach, and

  17. Geometrical effects on the electron residence time in semiconductor nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Koochi, Hakimeh; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-09-07

    We have used random walk (RW) numerical simulations to investigate the influence of the geometry on the statistics of the electron residence time τ{sub r} in a trap-limited diffusion process through semiconductor nano-particles. This is an important parameter in coarse-grained modeling of charge carrier transport in nano-structured semiconductor films. The traps have been distributed randomly on the surface (r{sup 2} model) or through the whole particle (r{sup 3} model) with a specified density. The trap energies have been taken from an exponential distribution and the traps release time is assumed to be a stochastic variable. We have carried out (RW) simulations to study the effect of coordination number, the spatial arrangement of the neighbors and the size of nano-particles on the statistics of τ{sub r}. It has been observed that by increasing the coordination number n, the average value of electron residence time, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} rapidly decreases to an asymptotic value. For a fixed coordination number n, the electron's mean residence time does not depend on the neighbors' spatial arrangement. In other words, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} is a porosity-dependence, local parameter which generally varies remarkably from site to site, unless we are dealing with highly ordered structures. We have also examined the effect of nano-particle size d on the statistical behavior of τ{sup ¯}{sub r}. Our simulations indicate that for volume distribution of traps, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} scales as d{sup 2}. For a surface distribution of traps τ{sup ¯}{sub r} increases almost linearly with d. This leads to the prediction of a linear dependence of the diffusion coefficient D on the particle size d in ordered structures or random structures above the critical concentration which is in accordance with experimental observations.

  18. The role of buoyancy orientation on bubble residence times and the related critical heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Brusstar, M.J.; Merte, H. Jr.; Keller, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of the effects of buoyancy orientation on the critical heat flux (CHF) in subcooled forced convection boiling of R113 are presented, examining the motion of the vapor above the heater surface and its possible influence on the feed of liquid to the surface. At the low flow velocity of 4 cm/s used, the buoyancy force acting on the vapor dominates over the flow inertia, and the measured CHF values show a strong dependence on the orientation of the heater surface with respect to gravity. The transient and time-averaged behavior of the vapor above the surface at heat flux levels close to the CHF is characterized using hot wire anemometry. Through this, a description of the behavior of the largest vapor bubbles is obtained, which is considered to be of primary importance to the processes by which liquid is fed to the heater surface at these high heat flux levels. The mean residence time of the largest bubbles above the heater surface at a given heater orientation is also determined from the hot wire data. The reciprocal of the mean residence time is found to correlate directly with the measured CHF values for the different orientations and subcoolings, showing that the amount of energy absorbed in the vapor formation process during the bubble residence time is constant for all heater orientations at a given subcooling, and demonstrates that the motion of the largest bubbles determines the CHF. This suggests that the relative effects of buoyancy orientation on the CHF can be modeled by considering only the motion of the largest bubbles in the immediate vicinity of the heater surface.

  19. Groundwater residence times in Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia, USA: A multi-tracer approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Nelms, D.L.; Michel, R.L.; Schlosser, P.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic properties of water discharging from springs and wells in Shenandoah National Park (SNP), near the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA, USA were monitored to obtain information on groundwater residence times. Investigated time scales included seasonal (wet season, April, 1996; dry season, August-September, 1997), monthly (March through September, 1999) and hourly (30-min interval recording of specific conductance and temperature, March, 1999 through February, 2000). Multiple environmental tracers, including tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), sulfur-35 (35S), and stable isotopes (??18O and ??2H) of water, were used to estimate the residence times of shallow groundwater discharging from 34 springs and 15 wells. The most reliable ages of water from springs appear to be based on SF6 and 3H/3He, with most ages in the range of 0-3 years. This range is consistent with apparent ages estimated from concentrations of CFCs; however, CFC-based ages have large uncertainties owing to the post-1995 leveling-off of the CFC atmospheric growth curves. Somewhat higher apparent ages are indicated by 35S (> 1.5 years) and seasonal variation of ??18O (mean residence time of 5 years) for spring discharge. The higher ages indicated by the 35S and ??18O data reflect travel times through the unsaturated zone and, in the case of 35S, possible sorption and exchange of S with soils or biomass. In springs sampled in April, 1996, apparent ages derived from the 3H/3He data (median age of 0.2 years) are lower than those obtained from SF6 (median age of 4.3 years), and in contrast to median ages from 3H/3He (0.3 years) and SF6 (0.7 years) obtained during the late summer dry season of 1997. Monthly samples from 1999 at four springs in SNP had SF6 apparent ages of only 1.2 to 2.5 ?? 0.8 years, and were consistent with the 1997 SF6 data. Water from springs has low excess air (0-1 cm3 kg-1) and N2-Ar temperatures that vary

  20. Root microbiota dynamics of perennial Arabis alpina are dependent on soil residence time but independent of flowering time

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Nina; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Agler, Matthew T; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kemen, Eric; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Wunder, Jörg; Coupland, George; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent field and laboratory experiments with perennial Boechera stricta and annual Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the root microbiota influences flowering time. Here we examined in long-term time-course experiments the bacterial root microbiota of the arctic-alpine perennial Arabis alpina in natural and controlled environments by 16S rRNA gene profiling. We identified soil type and residence time of plants in soil as major determinants explaining up to 15% of root microbiota variation, whereas environmental conditions and host genotype explain maximally 11% of variation. When grown in the same soil, the root microbiota composition of perennial A. alpina is largely similar to those of its annual relatives A. thaliana and Cardamine hirsuta. Non-flowering wild-type A. alpina and flowering pep1 mutant plants assemble an essentially indistinguishable root microbiota, thereby uncoupling flowering time from plant residence time-dependent microbiota changes. This reveals the robustness of the root microbiota against the onset and perpetual flowering of A. alpina. Together with previous studies, this implies a model in which parts of the root microbiota modulate flowering time, whereas, after microbiota acquisition during vegetative growth, the established root-associated bacterial assemblage is structurally robust to perturbations caused by flowering and drastic changes in plant stature. PMID:27482927

  1. Residence time and movements of postbreeding shorebirds on the northern coast of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Audrey R.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Powell, A.N.; Kendall, S.J.; Nigro, Debora A.

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little is known about shorebird movements across the coast of northern Alaska, yet postbreeding shorebirds use this coastline extensively prior to fall migration. We deployed 346 radio transmitters on 153 breeding and 193 postbreeding shorebirds of five species from 2005 to 2007.We examined two hypotheses regarding postbreeding shorebirds' movements: (1) whether such movements reflect ultimate routes of southbound migration and (2) whether migration strategy (length of flights) or timing of molt in relation to migration (molt occurring in breeding or winter range) are more influential in determining postbreeding shorebirds' behavior. Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) moved east, consistent with the direction of their ultimate migration, but patterns of other species' movements did not reflect ultimate migration direction. Timing of postnuptial molt appeared to have more influence over residence time and movements than did migration strategy. Postcapture residence time for the Semipalmated Sandpiper was less than for the Western Sandpiper (C. mauri) and significantly less than for Dunlin (C. alpina), and the Semipalmated Sandpiper's movements between were quicker and more frequent than those of the Dunlin. We expected to see the opposite patterns if migration strategy were more influential. Our data shed light on how different shorebird species use the northern Alaska coast after breeding: most species are likely to be stopping over at postbreeding areas, whereas the Dunlin and some Western Sandpipers may be staging. We suggest the coast of northern Alaska be viewed as an interconnected network of postbreeding sites that serve multiple populations of breeding shorebirds. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  2. In-vivo characterization of 2D residence time maps in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Shadden, Shawn; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Thrombus formation is a multifactorial process involving biology and hemodynamics. Blood stagnation and wall shear stress are linked to thrombus formation. The quantification of residence time of blood in the left ventricle (LV) is relevant for patients affected by ventricular contractility dysfunction. We use a continuum formulation to compute 2D blood residence time (TR) maps in the LV using in-vivo 2D velocity fields in the apical long axis plane obtained from Doppler-echocardiography images of healthy and dilated hearts. The TR maps are generated integrating in time an advection-diffusion equation of a passive scalar with a time-source term. This equation represents the Eulerian translation of DTR / D t = 1 and is solved numerically with a finite volume method on a Cartesian grid using an immersed boundary for the LV wall. Changing the source term and the boundary conditions allows us to track blood transport (direct and retained flow) in the LV and the topology of early (E) and atrial (A) filling waves. This method has been validated against a Lagrangian Coherent Structures analysis, is computationally inexpensive and observer independent, making it a potential diagnostic tool in clinical settings.

  3. Geomorphic Control on Mineral and Fluid Residence Times and Implications for the Hydrochemistry of Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; West, A. J.; Clark, K. E.; Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how hydrologic and geochemical processes are coupled, and how this coupling is linked to geomorphic boundary conditions, remains a fundamental problem in the Geosciences, with implications from hydrology and ecosystem science to the geologic carbon cycle. In this study, we present paired measurements of water chemistry and river runoff in four nested catchments spanning the transition from the Andes Mountains to the foreland floodplain in Peru. These data provide insight into the linkages between catchment hydrology and weathering across a dramatic geomorphic gradient. Along the studied gradient, bedrock-derived solute concentrations range from being nearly constant in the Andes to showing significant dilution in response to increasing runoff in the foreland floodplain. Mean catchment slope appears to be a robust predictor of the power law exponent relating solute concentrations and runoff, which implies that erosional processes are an underlying control on concentration-runoff relationships. A number of factors may explain the observed slope-dependency of concentration-runoff relationships, including both mineral and fluid residence times. Seasonal variation in the δD of the Andean rivers is significantly damped relative to variation in the δD of precipitation. Along with consideration of the annual water budget, these data suggest that water is transiently stored within fractured bedrock in the Andean catchments. Across the entire study area, the seasonal variation in the δD of tributaries (i.e. streams that drain only a narrow range of elevations) increases with decreasing mean catchment elevation, which suggests that fluid residence times are shorter in the foreland floodplain relative to the Andes. Together, we interpret these factors to suggest that erosional processes, by modulating both the residence time of water and minerals in the critical zone, control the hydrologic sensitivity of weathering processes along the Andes-to-Amazon gradient.

  4. Spatial distribution of triazine residues in a shallow alluvial aquifer linked to groundwater residence time.

    PubMed

    Sassine, Lara; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Khaska, Mahmoud; Verdoux, Patrick; Meffre, Patrick; Benfodda, Zohra; Roig, Benoît

    2016-07-22

    At present, some triazine herbicides occurrence in European groundwater, 13 years after their use ban in the European Union, remains of great concern and raises the question of their persistence in groundwater systems due to several factors such as storage and remobilization from soil and unsaturated zone, limited or absence of degradation, sorption in saturated zones, or to continuing illegal applications. In order to address this problem and to determine triazine distribution in the saturated zone, their occurrence is investigated in the light of the aquifer hydrodynamic on the basis of a geochemical approach using groundwater dating tracers ((3)H/(3)He). In this study, atrazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deethylterbuthylazine are measured in 66 samples collected between 2011 and 2013 from 21 sampling points, on the Vistrenque shallow alluvial aquifer (southern France), covered by a major agricultural land use. The frequencies of quantification range from 100 to 56 % for simazine and atrazine, respectively (LQ = 1 ng L(-1)). Total triazine concentrations vary between 15 and 350 ng L(-1) and show three different patterns with depth below the water table: (1) low concentrations independent of depth but related to water origin, (2) an increase in concentrations with depth in the aquifer related to groundwater residence time and triazine use prior to their ban, and (3) relatively high concentrations at low depths in the saturated zone more likely related to a slow desorption of these compounds from the soil and unsaturated zone. The triazine attenuation rate varies between 0.3 for waters influenced by surface water infiltration and 4.8 for water showing longer residence times in the aquifer, suggesting an increase in these rates with water residence time in the saturated zone. Increasing triazine concentrations with depth is consistent with a significant decrease in the use of these pesticides for the last 10

  5. Characterization of Air Manganese Exposure Estimates for Residents in Two Ohio Towns

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to derive receptor-specific outdoor exposure concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and respirable (dae ≤1O µm) air manganese (air-Mn) for East Liverpool and Marietta (Ohio) in the absence of facility emissions data, but where long-t...

  6. The Value of Time in Air Travel: Theory and Evidence,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The roles of time and money cost in the demand for air travel are analyzed. The first step is to construct the theory of consumer demand under a...time constraint and to deduce its theorems. Then these theorems are applied to air travel through use of a total price demand function. This analysis...air travel . Many results concerning elasticities are obtained, including a necessary relationship between the time, price, and total price

  7. The roles of mean residence time on herd behavior in a financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Cheng; Li, Yun-Xian; Tang, Nian-Sheng; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the herd behavior of stock prices in a finance system with the Heston model. Based on parameter estimation of the Heston model obtained by minimizing the mean square deviation between the theoretical and empirical return distributions, we simulate mean residence time of positive return (MRTPR). Plots of MRTPR against the amplitude or mean reversion of volatility demonstrate a phenomenon of herd behavior for a positive cross correlation between noise sources of the Heston model. Also, for a negative cross correlation, a phenomenon of herd behavior is observed in plots of MRTPR against the long-run variance by increasing amplitude or mean reversion of volatility.

  8. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiharto; Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Abidin, Zainal

    2010-12-23

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  9. Residence times in shallow waters help explain regional differences in Wadden Sea eutrophication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2016-11-01

    Regional variations in eutrophication levels of tidal basins in the Wadden Sea can be caused by external factors, like organic matter import, and internal factors like the morphology and hydrodynamics of the receiving tidal basin. For instance, benthic nutrients from remineralized organic matter may be more concentrated in shallow basins or diluted in basins with high exchange rates. In addition, the location of a monitoring station may determine which basin-specific water masses are actually observed. In the present paper a hydrodynamic intertidal imprint (IMP) is estimated for ten stations in various tidal basins of the Wadden Sea. The fraction of time water masses spent in intertidal areas prior to observation is calculated by linking the Lagrangian transport module PELETS to already existing hourly reconstructions of currents between 1959 and 2003. Irrespective of water depth, additional calculations of mean residence times (MRT) in the Wadden Sea indicate whether, in the case of low IMP values, water masses originate from coastal areas or tidal channels. Results show distinct regional differences, with highest values in the eastern part of the Dutch sector of the southern Wadden Sea (IMP=77%, MRT=99%) and lowest values in the German/Danish sector of the northern Wadden Sea (IMP=1.1%, MRT=21%). The IMP correlates positively with observed nutrient levels (R2=0.83). Evidently, this residence time-based intertidal signal is pivotal in explaining regional variations in eutrophication levels revealed by long-term comparative data from different monitoring stations.

  10. Residence times in shallow waters help explain regional differences in Wadden Sea eutrophication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2017-04-01

    Regional variations in eutrophication levels of tidal basins in the Wadden Sea can be caused by external factors, like organic matter import, and internal factors like the morphology and hydrodynamics of the receiving tidal basin. For instance, benthic nutrients from remineralized organic matter may be more concentrated in shallow basins or diluted in basins with high exchange rates. In addition, the location of a monitoring station may determine which basin-specific water masses are actually observed. In the present paper a hydrodynamic intertidal imprint (IMP) is estimated for ten stations in various tidal basins of the Wadden Sea. The fraction of time water masses spent in intertidal areas prior to observation is calculated by linking the Lagrangian transport module PELETS to already existing hourly reconstructions of currents between 1959 and 2003. Irrespective of water depth, additional calculations of mean residence times (MRT) in the Wadden Sea indicate whether, in the case of low IMP values, water masses originate from coastal areas or tidal channels. Results show distinct regional differences, with highest values in the eastern part of the Dutch sector of the southern Wadden Sea (IMP=77%, MRT=99%) and lowest values in the German/Danish sector of the northern Wadden Sea (IMP=1.1%, MRT=21%). The IMP correlates positively with observed nutrient levels (R2=0.83). Evidently, this residence time-based intertidal signal is pivotal in explaining regional variations in eutrophication levels revealed by long-term comparative data from different monitoring stations.

  11. Indoor air quality in 24 California residences designed as high-performance homes

    SciTech Connect

    Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California. Although the mechanically vented homes were six times as airtight as non-mechanically ventilated homes (medians of 1.1 and 6.1 ACH50, n=11 and n=8, respectively), their use of mechanical ventilation systems and possibly window operation meant their median air exchange rates were almost the same (0.30 versus 0.32 hr-1, n=8 and n=8, respectively). Pollutant levels were also similar in vented and unvented homes. In addition, these similarities were achieved despite numerous observed faults in complex mechanical ventilation systems. More rigorous commissioning is still recommended. Cooking exhaust systems were used inconsistently and several suffered from design flaws. Failure to follow best practices led to IAQ problems in some cases. Ambient nitrogen dioxide standards were exceeded or nearly so in four homes that either used gas ranges with standing pilots, or in Passive House-style homes that used gas cooking burners without venting range hoods. Homes without active particle filtration had particle count concentrations approximately double those in homes with enhanced filtration. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials; consistent with this, formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional, new CA homes built before 2008. Emissions of ultrafine particles (with diameters <100 nm) were dramatically lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. These results indicate that high performance homes can achieve

  12. Is stratospheric air getting younger with time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Sanz, Beatriz; Chipperfield, Martyn; Dee, Dick; Simmons, Adrian; Stiller, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Most climate models have predicted that with the increase in greenhouse gases concentrations, the stratospheric circulation will intensify, showing younger age-of-air (AoA) values in this region (e.g. Butchart et al., 2010; WMO, 2011). However, balloon and satellite observations do not agree with the widespread modelled trend towards younger age-of-air (Engel et al., 2009; Stiller et al., 2012). To increase our confidence in climate-chemistry projections, the causes for the apparent age-of-air disagreement between observations and most models need to be identified. Here we have carried out stratospheric simulations with a chemistry transport model (CTM) to evaluate the stratospheric circulation with the ERA-Interim dataset produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The ERA-Interim reanalysis provides age-of-air (AoA) distributions in very good agreement with observations in the lower stratosphere. Given this agreement, we have used our simulations to quantify interannual variability and trends in the stratospheric AoA for the whole ERA-Interim period (1979-present). Our model results with ERA-Interim fields disagree with the decreasing tendency in age-of-air widespread in most models, but are in good agreement with the recent age-of-air studies based on observations. To explore potential causes for the AoA trends in our model, Lagrangian calculations are also performed to assess mixing processes for the ERA-Interim period. Potential links between our modelled AoA trends and stratospheric ozone evolution are also shown. References: Butchart, et al., 2010. J. Climate, 23, 5349-5374, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3404.1. Engel et al., 2009. Nat. Geosci. 2: 28-31, doi:10.1038/ngeo388. Stiller et al., 2012. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12: 3311-3331, doi:10.5194/acp-12-3311-2012. WMO. 2011. Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project -Report No. 52.

  13. Residence times of stream-groundwater exchanges due to transient stream stage fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, James L.; Shanafield, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The biogeochemical functioning of stream ecosystems is heavily dependent on water and water-borne nutrient fluxes between the stream itself and the streambed and banks (i.e., the hyporheic zone). The travel time of water exchanges through the hyporheic zone has been investigated previously; however, these studies have primarily modeled exchanges under steady state conditions assuming spatial pressure variations. This assumes that the hydraulic gradients that drive the exchanges are maintained the whole time the stream water remains in the bed or banks, which is unrealistic. Therefore, in this study we use a transient approach to investigate residence time distributions (RTDs) of bank inflow and bank outflow during both regular, diurnal stream stage variations and storm flow events. We demonstrate that RTDs reflect the timing and magnitude bank inflows, rather than smooth RTDs. We also show that small percentages of water from a given bank inflow event may be present in bank outflows for long periods of time, due to dispersion and diffusion within the bank, and lower rates of bank outflow, relative to bank inflow. This is apparent in the synthetic model of a single storm flow event, where 10% remained in the bank after 50 days. Additionally, residence times for a given bank inflow event are longer when repeated events occur, because the bank outflows from one event are "interrupted" by an increase in stream stage during a successive event. For example, field data capturing events of variable timing and magnitude showed that 70 days after each of three storm flow events occurred, 40, 12 and 30% of the bank inflow event remained in the banks. These cases indicate that bank exchanges are temporally dynamic and the RTDs of return flows can have significant tailing, which will dictate rates of nutrient exchange within the near-stream environment.

  14. Macrotextured spoked surfaces reduce the residence time of a bouncing Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Colin J.; Shiri, Samira; Bird, James C.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid drops can bounce when they impact non-wetting surfaces. Recently, studies have demonstrated that the time that the bouncing drop contacts a superhydrophobic surface can be reduced by incorporating ridged macrotextures on the surface. Yet the existing models aimed at explaining this phenomenon offer incompatible predictions of the contact time when a drop impacts multiple intersecting macrotextures, or spokes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the effects of the macrotexture on the drop hydrodynamics extend to non-wetting surfaces in which direct contact is avoided by a thin vapor layer. Here we demonstrate that the phenomenon observed for macrotextured, superhydrophobic surfaces extends to macrotextured, wettable surfaces above the Leidenfrost temperature. We show that the number of droplets and overall residence time both depend on the number of intersecting spokes. Finally, we compare and contrast our results with mechanistic models to rationalize various elements of the phenomenon.

  15. Chemotaxis Increases the Residence Time of Bacteria in Granular Media Containing Distributed Contaminant Sources.

    PubMed

    Adadevoh, Joanna S T; Triolo, Sarah; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Ford, Roseanne M

    2016-01-05

    The use of chemotactic bacteria in bioremediation has the potential to increase access to, and the biotransformation of, contaminant mass within the subsurface. This laboratory-scale study aimed to understand and quantify the influence of chemotaxis on the residence times of pollutant-degrading bacteria within homogeneous treatment zones. Focus was placed on a continuous-flow sand-packed column in which a uniform distribution of naphthalene crystals created distributed sources of dissolved-phase contaminant. A 10 mL pulse of Pseudomonas putida G7, which is chemotactic to naphthalene, and Pseudomonas putida G7 Y1, a nonchemotactic mutant strain, were simultaneously introduced into the sand-packed column at equal concentrations. Breakthrough curves obtained from experiments conducted with and without naphthalene were used to quantify the effect of chemotaxis on transport parameters. In the presence of the chemoattractant, longitudinal dispersion of PpG7 increased by a factor of 3, and percent recovery decreased by 43%. In contrast, PpG7 Y1 transport was not influenced by the presence of naphthalene. The results imply that pore-scale chemotaxis responses are evident at an interstitial velocity of 1.8 m/day, which is within the range of typical groundwater flow. Within the context of bioremediation, chemotaxis may work to enhance bacterial residence times in zones of contamination, thereby improving treatment.

  16. Residence times in subsurface hydrological systems, introduction to the Special Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Ginn, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Interest in the residence time distribution (RTD) as a comprehensive measure of subsurface hydrologic systems is growing. This focus is resulting from recognition that diverse vadose zone, groundwater flows, and transfer between hydrological compartments, are fundamentally related to the system RTD. Furthermore, transport of chemical or biological species and the biogeochemical activities that govern their fate, is principally reflected by the system RTD. Thus the RTD is used in geochemical interpretation of environmental tracers, in direct reactive transport approaches, and ultimately for sustainability and protection assessments in the consideration of transient boundary flows due to climate change or other causes, anthropogenic and/or natural. The RTD has been handled in the past primarily as a byproduct of models. It is now increasingly viewed as an integrative characteristic for which shape-free and generic distributions are developed, that links conceptual hydrology, characterization data, and mathematical models. Intermediary between mechanistic modeling, geochemical data and predictions, the role for residence time distribution is to represent consistently the flow, transport and reactivity processes while reaching the objective of biogeochemical interpretation and sustainability assessment. After some outline of the scientific context, we introduce the contributions of this special issue and conclude with the emerging challenges.

  17. The reactive transport of trichloroethene is influenced by residence time and microbial numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haest, P. J.; Philips, J.; Springael, D.; Smolders, E.

    2011-01-01

    The dechlorination rate in a flow-through porous matrix can be described by the species specific dechlorination rate observed in a liquid batch unless mass transport limitations prevail. This hypothesis was examined by comparing dechlorination rates in liquid batch with that in column experiments at various flow rates (3-9-12 cm day - 1 ). Columns were loaded with an inoculated sand and eluted with a medium containing 1 mM trichloroethene (TCE) for 247 days. Dechlorination in the column treatments increased with decreasing flow rate, illustrating the effect of the longer residence time. Zeroth order TCE or cis-DCE degradation rates were 4-7 folds larger in columns than in corresponding batch systems which could be explained by the higher measured Geobacter and Dehalococcoides numbers per unit pore volume in the columns. The microbial numbers also explained the variability in dechlorination rate among flow rate treatments marked by a large elution of the dechlorinating species' yield as flow increased. Stop flow events did not reveal mass transport limitations for dechlorination. We conclude that flow rate effects on reactive transport of TCE in this coarse sand are explained by residence time and by microbial transport and that mass transport limitations in this porous matrix are limited.

  18. Tritium activity concentrations and residence times of groundwater collected in Rokkasho, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hidenao; Ueda, Shinji; Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Tritium ((3)H) concentrations were measured in groundwater samples from four surface wells (4-10 m deep), four shallow wells (24-26.5 m deep) and a 150-m-deep well in the Futamata River catchment area, which is adjacent to the large-scale commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. The (3)H concentrations in most of the surface- and shallow-well samples (<0.03-0.57 Bq l(-1)) were similar to those in precipitation (annual mean: 0.31-0.79 Bq l(-1)), suggesting that the residence time of the water in those wells was 0-15 y. The (3)H concentrations in the samples from a 26-m-deep well and the 150-m-deep well were lower than those in the other wells, indicating that groundwater with a long residence time exists in deep aquifers and the estuary area of the catchment. It is not clear whether (3)H released during test operation of the plant with actual spent nuclear fuel affected the (3)H concentrations observed in this study.

  19. A non-discrete method for computation of residence time in fluid mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular simulations provide a promising means to predict risk of thrombosis in grafts, devices, and surgical anatomies in adult and pediatric patients. Although the pathways for platelet activation and clot formation are not yet fully understood, recent findings suggest that thrombosis risk is increased in regions of flow recirculation and high residence time (RT). Current approaches for calculating RT are typically based on releasing a finite number of Lagrangian particles into the flow field and calculating RT by tracking their positions. However, special care must be taken to achieve temporal and spatial convergence, often requiring repeated simulations. In this work, we introduce a non-discrete method in which RT is calculated in an Eulerian framework using the advection-diffusion equation. We first present the formulation for calculating residence time in a given region of interest using two alternate definitions. The physical significance and sensitivity of the two measures of RT are discussed and their mathematical relation is established. An extension to a point-wise value is also presented. The methods presented here are then applied in a 2D cavity and two representative clinical scenarios, involving shunt placement for single ventricle heart defects and Kawasaki disease. In the second case study, we explored the relationship between RT and wall shear stress, a parameter of particular importance in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Residence time and conversion in the extrusion of chemically reactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Jaluria, Y.

    1999-07-01

    Extrusion is one of the most versatile and energy-efficient processes for the manufacture of polymer products, including food, pharmaceuticals and plastics. Many functions including mixing, cooking and chemical reaction can be performed in an extruder. Here, twin-screw extruders offer improved control of the residence time distribution (RTD) and mixing in materials such as plastics, rubber and food. Based on the flow and the heat transfer characteristics obtained for a self-wiping, co-rotating twin-screw extruder, the residence time and chemical reaction are studied by tracking the particles. For normally starve-fed twin-screw extruders, the length of the completely filled section is calculated as function of the process variables using the coupling of the flow with the die. With a model of the solid conveying section, the RTD for the whole extruder is calculated for corn meal at different screw speeds and flow rates. The calculated variation of RTD with the screw speed and the flow rate yields good agreement with observations from many experiments. The variation of the fully filled section length, chemical conversion and mixing effectiveness are also obtained under different operation conditions. Most of the results are in qualitative agreement with experimental results and may be used as guidelines for extruder design and determination of optimal operating condition.

  1. Chemotaxis Increases the Residence Time Distribution of Bacteria in Granular Media Containing Distributed Contaminant Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adadevoh, J.; Triolo, S.; Ramsburg, C. A.; Ford, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of chemotactic bacteria in bioremediation has the potential to increase access to, and biotransformation of, contaminant mass within the subsurface environment. This laboratory-scale study aimed to understand and quantify the influence of chemotaxis on residence times of pollutant-degrading bacteria within homogeneous treatment zones. Focus was placed on a continuous flow sand-packed column system in which a uniform distribution of naphthalene crystals created distributed sources of dissolved phase contaminant. A 10 mL pulse of Pseudomonas putida G7, which is chemotactic to naphthalene, and Pseudomonas putida G7 Y1, a non-chemotactic mutant strain, were simultaneously introduced into the sand-packed column at equal concentrations. Breakthrough curves obtained for the bacteria from column experiments conducted with and without naphthalene were used to quantify the effect of chemotaxis on transport parameters. In the presence of the chemoattractant, longitudinal dispersivity of PpG7 increased by a factor of 3 and percent recovery decreased from 21% to 12%. The results imply that pore-scale chemotaxis responses are evident at an interstitial fluid velocity of 1.7 m/d, which is within the range of typical groundwater flow. Within the context of bioremediation, chemotaxis may work to enhance bacterial residence times in zones of contamination thereby improving treatment.

  2. A non-discrete method for computation of residence time in fluid mechanics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular simulations provide a promising means to predict risk of thrombosis in grafts, devices, and surgical anatomies in adult and pediatric patients. Although the pathways for platelet activation and clot formation are not yet fully understood, recent findings suggest that thrombosis risk is increased in regions of flow recirculation and high residence time (RT). Current approaches for calculating RT are typically based on releasing a finite number of Lagrangian particles into the flow field and calculating RT by tracking their positions. However, special care must be taken to achieve temporal and spatial convergence, often requiring repeated simulations. In this work, we introduce a non-discrete method in which RT is calculated in an Eulerian framework using the advection-diffusion equation. We first present the formulation for calculating residence time in a given region of interest using two alternate definitions. The physical significance and sensitivity of the two measures of RT are discussed and their mathematical relation is established. An extension to a point-wise value is also presented. The methods presented here are then applied in a 2D cavity and two representative clinical scenarios, involving shunt placement for single ventricle heart defects and Kawasaki disease. In the second case study, we explored the relationship between RT and wall shear stress, a parameter of particular importance in cardiovascular disease.

  3. Prevalence and Cost of Full-Time Research Fellowships During General Surgery Residency – A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Charles M.; Klingensmith, Mary E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. Summary Background Data General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1-3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Methods Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Results Response rate was 200/239 (84%). A total of 381 out of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and post-residency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (p<0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of ACGME work hour regulations for clinical residents, while a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Conclusions Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. While performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after post-graduate training. PMID:19106692

  4. Residence Times of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead in Off-Channel Tidal Freshwater Habitats, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We estimated seasonal residence times of acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids in off-channel, tidal freshwater habitats of the Columbia River near the Sandy River delta (rkm 198; 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011) and Cottonwood Island (rkm 112; 2012).

  5. The effect of residence time on the dynamics of a condensating aerosol in a Hiemenz-type stagnation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshaarawi, Amjad; Zhou, Kun; Scribano, Gianfranco; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Clean Combustion Research Center Team

    2013-11-01

    The effect of residence time on the formation and growth of a condensating aerosol is simulated in a Hiemenz-type stagnation flow setup, for which a unique and well-defined time scale characterizes the velocity field. In this configuration, a hot stream saturated with dibutyle phthalate (DBP) vapor mixes with a cold dry stream. A mixing layer forms at the stagnation plane triggering supersaturation and droplets are generated by homogeneous nucleation. Aerosol dynamics are simulated using the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM). Two regimes related to the flow residence time are observed, i.e., a nucleation regime and a condensation regime. The nucleation regime, at short residence times, is characterized by the consumption of DBP vapor into droplets having a negligible effect on the vapor phase. In this regime, both the number density and volume fraction of droplets increase with residence time. In the condensation regime, at long residence times, vapor condensation consumes the vapor phase considerably. For longer residence times, more vapor is consumed, resulting in lower number densities due to the lower nucleation rates, whereas the volume fraction saturates.

  6. Numerical model of circulation and residence times in the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donncha, Fearghal; Ragnoli, Emanuele

    2014-05-01

    parameters. The resultant time-series comprised tidal harmonic constituents and residuals composed of primarily density-driven and wind-driven (near surface) currents. To further decompose the residual currents time series are further filtered based on the differing scaling times of both wind-driven (days) and density-driven (weeks) flows. The resulting datasets enable a comprehensive classification of the relative influence of tides, wind and density effects across the domain. As a summary measure of circulation within the region, the model was used to compute the residence time for a water parcel in the gulf. Several transport time scales were calculated, including the average residence time and variations across the region. Residence statistics provide several insights into circulation in the gulf, in particular, knowledge of circulation patterns through the Straits of Hormuz, regional variation of residence times from North-South, and the impacts of wind and density-driven circulation on particle renewal within the domain.

  7. Effective denitrification at the groundwater surface-water interface: exposure rather than residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Effective processing of material in aquatic systems, e. g. removal of nitrate upon denitrification, requires sufficient reaction time. This statement sounds trivial albeit its implication for biogeochemistry seems to be not fully recognized. The time teff required for effective processing of nitrate is controlled by the underlying biogeochemical rate law. In the simplest case of a 1st order reaction, teff is often calculated as the time when 63% of the initial concentration is consumed setting teff as 1/kreaction. It may, however, be more appropriate to derive teff,90%or teff,99% from the respective rate law. Hence a minimum time t > teff is required that exposes a specific biogeochemical process to conditions favourable for this process, which is anoxia in case of denitrification. This exposure time τexp is not necessarily identical to the residence time τ of water in the particular system or flow path. Rather, the exposure time can be much shorter and may even fluctuate with time. As a consequence, Damköhler numbers (Da = τexp/teff) for denitrification < 1 may be the consequence even though the age of water may be comparatively high. We therefore argue that the key for understanding denitrification efficiency at the groundwater surface-water interface (or in groundwater systems in general) is the quantification of the exposure time. This contribution therefore aims i) to estimate exposure times required for effective denitrification based on an analysis of rate constants for denitrification, ii) to relate these time scales to typical residence time distributions found at the groundwater surface-water interface and iii) to discuss implications for denitrification efficiencies. References: Oldham, C; Farrow, DE; Peiffer, S (2013): A generalized Damköhler number for classifying material processing in hydrological systems, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, 1133-1148 Frei, S; Knorr, KH; Peiffer, S; Fleckenstein, J (2012): Surface micro-topography causes

  8. Coupling groundwater residence time and 234U/238U isotopic ratios in a granitic catchment (Vosges, Eastern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viville, Daniel; Aquilina, Luc; Ackerer, Julien; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Granet, Mathieu; Perrone, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    Weathering processes are active in surface waters but groundwater also represents no neglectable chemical fluxes. As residence-time in groundwater are high, silicate weathering might take place and control Si, Ca and C fluxes. Weathering processes can be deduced from U isotopic ratios but the kinetics of these processes remain relatively poorly constrained. In order to better characterize these processes, we have coupled residence-times deduced from anthropogenic gases (CFC and SF6) analysis and 234U/238U isotopic ratios determination. Samples were collected in the Strengbach catchment (Hydro-geochemical Observatory OHGE, Vosges, eastern France). Two campaigns were carried out in May and August 2015 during two highly contrasted hydro-climatic periods. Both springs and boreholes down to 80 m depth have been sampled. A very clear geochemical distinction is observed between groundwater from surface springs and deeper groundwater from boreholes. Springs show much lower residence-time (few years) and specific chemical composition. Deeper groundwater have residence-time of several decades and different geochemical composition. A clear SF6 production is observed with increasing SF6 concentrations with residence-time. The campaign of May is characterized by highly groundwater levels and spring fluxes. All groundwater show very low residence time, except in the boreholes at depth greater than 40 m. Conversely, during low groundwater-level period in August, the residence times are much higher and CFC concentrations indicate a large mixing process between surface groundwater and deeper levels. The 234U/238U isotopic ratios confirm this vertical zonation in the boreholes, with much higher activity ratios in the deep ground-waters from borehole than in the surface and spring waters; Such high U activity ratios are indicative of long water-rock interactions, which is consistent with the long residence times deducted from the CFC and SF6 data.

  9. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata.

    PubMed

    Boks, Niels P; Kaper, Hans J; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-12-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces, although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients were similar for hydrophilic and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass, likely because initial desorption is controlled by attractive Lifshitz-Van der Waals interactions, which are comparable on both substratum surfaces. However, significantly slower decay times of the desorption rate coefficients are found for hydrophilic glass than for hydrophobic DDS-coated glass. This difference is suggested to be due to the acid-base interactions between staphylococci and these surfaces, which are repulsive on hydrophilic glass and attractive on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass. Final desorption rate coefficients are higher on hydrophilic glass than on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass, due to the so called hydrophobic effect, facilitating a closer contact on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass.

  10. Evaluation of indoor air composition time variation in air-tight occupied spaces during night periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Detelin

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an easy-to-understand procedure for prediction of indoor air composition time variation in air-tight occupied spaces during the night periods. The mathematical model is based on the assumptions for homogeneity and perfect mixing of the indoor air, the ideal gas model for non-reacting gas mixtures, mass conservation equations for the entire system and for each species, a model for prediction of basal metabolic rate of humans as well as a model for prediction of O2 consumption rate and both CO2 and H2O generation rates by breathing. Time variation of indoor air composition is predicted at constant indoor air temperature for three scenarios based on the analytical solution of the mathematical model. The results achieved reveal both the most probable scenario for indoor air time variation in air-tight occupied spaces as well as the cause for morning tiredness after having a sleep in a modern energy efficient space.

  11. Sources of groundwater nitrate revealed using residence time and isotope methods

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K B; Ekwurzel, B; Esser, B K; Hudson, G B; Moran, J E

    2004-10-07

    Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, CA, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, {delta}{sup 15}N values greater than 10{per_thousand} indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low-nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations up to 53 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1}. In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos increases the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. The low {delta}{sup 15}N value (3.1{per_thousand}) in this location implicates synthetic fertilizer. In addition to these anthropogenic sources, natural nitrate background levels between 15 and 20 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1} are found in deep wells with residence times greater than 50 years.

  12. Estimating renewal timescales with residence time and connectivity in an urban man-made lake in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueping; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Residence times and connectivity are computed for 12 subregions in an urban man-made lake in China using a high-resolution tracer-transport model. The renewal timescales are explicitly defined and computed for two groups of four freshwater inflow scenarios related to water diversion projects. First, the timescale values are computed and compared using different computational criteria for the upper limit of integration in the residence time equation. The sensitivity analysis suggests that a calculation time of 300 days is necessary to satisfy the relative error (0.001) and 5 % cutoff value criteria. Secondly, the residence times can range from 1.5 to 102 and 1.0 to 66 days under low and high flow conditions, respectively. Water in the inner lake would reside in the lake for less than 66 days prior to exiting the region of interest. The timescale values can be applied to impact studies that investigate the extent of sudden water pollution events that initially affect a subdomain of a lake. Finally, the lacustrine residence times are decomposed into the different subregion residence times, resulting in a connectivity matrix. This matrix can illustrate preferential connections among the individual subregions and reveal hidden patterns relating to local hydrodynamics in the lake.

  13. Attack of the vog: Natural air pollution has residents of Hawaii all choked up

    SciTech Connect

    Monastersky, R.

    1995-05-06

    In Hawaii, measurements of sulfur dioxide of 600-1000 ppb have been measured, almost as high as the deadly London Fog of 1952. The Kilauea Volcano has produced a slow but steady supply of lava since 1986, emiting as a by product about 1,000 tones of sulfur dioxide gas each day, one of the biggest air pollution sources on the island. This article examines the origins of the `Vog` and discusses its effect on human health, comparing it to National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  14. Evaluation of flowpaths and mean resident time of water in a riparian wetland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augeard, B.; Michelin, J.; Kao, C.

    2003-04-01

    Hydrology is an essential issue to evaluate hydrological, biochemical, or ecological functions of riparian wetlands. Our study focuses on the influence of hydrological processes on subsurface denitrification efficiency. The study site is a riparian wetland (3.2 ha) drained by a temporary stream Les Roises (catchment area 1260 ha) located in Champagne crayeuse 150 km east from Paris, France. This site is characterized by 1-2 m of peat deposits overlying a 10 m depth chalk aquifer. The main wetland inflow is controlled by the chalk aquifer water table level. Measurements of peat permeability indicate the presence of a deep, more decomposed and less permeable layer which isolates the uppermost peat from chalk. A previous study has demonstrated that denitrification occurs in peat during the wetland submersion period. Less intense denitrification has also been observed in the chalk aquifer during the lower water table period. Stream flow and groundwater level monitoring were used to estimate the water budget of peat and to determine the mean resident time of water in peat during both the submersion period and the water table recession. Chalk groundwater flow simulations for the whole catchment have been performed using MODFLOW model to reproduce the observed water table temporal variations. The model also estimates groundwater fluxes bonding the wetland. These fluxes are used as boundary conditions for a wetland profile model developed using HYDRUS 2D. Proportions of ground water flow passing through and under the peat towards the river have been evaluated from steady state simulations. Computed results indicate that 15-25% of the watershed water flows through the peat during the submersion period. The mean resident time of the water in peat soil is about one week. During water table recession only 1% of the water flows through the peatland but the resident time is much higher. Such results suggest that the efficiency of this type of riparian wetland in removing

  15. Drinking water residence time in distribution networks and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Sarah C; Moe, Christine L; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E

    2009-06-01

    We examined whether the average water residence time, the time it takes water to travel from the treatment plant to the user, for a zip code was related to the proportion of emergency department (ED) visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness among residents of that zip code. Individual-level ED data were collected from all hospitals located in the five-county metro Atlanta area from 1993 to 2004. Two of the largest water utilities in the area, together serving 1.7 million people, were considered. People served by these utilities had almost 3 million total ED visits, 164,937 of them for GI illness. The relationship between water residence time and risk for GI illness was assessed using logistic regression, controlling for potential confounding factors, including patient age and markers of socioeconomic status (SES). We observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for residents of zip codes with the longest water residence times compared with intermediate residence times (odds ratio (OR) for Utility 1 = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03, 1.10; OR for Utility 2 = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.08). The results suggest that drinking water contamination in the distribution system may contribute to the burden of endemic GI illness.

  16. Residence time distribution measurements in a pilot-scale poison tank using radiotracer technique.

    PubMed

    Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K; Maheshwari, N K

    2015-09-01

    Various types of systems are used to control the reactivity and shutting down of a nuclear reactor during emergency and routine shutdown operations. Injection of boron solution (borated water) into the core of a reactor is one of the commonly used methods during emergency operation. A pilot-scale poison tank was designed and fabricated to simulate injection of boron poison into the core of a reactor along with coolant water. In order to design a full-scale poison tank, it was desired to characterize flow of liquid from the tank. Residence time distribution (RTD) measurement and analysis was adopted to characterize the flow dynamics. Radiotracer technique was applied to measure RTD of aqueous phase in the tank using Bromine-82 as a radiotracer. RTD measurements were carried out with two different modes of operation of the tank and at different flow rates. In Mode-1, the radiotracer was instantaneously injected at the inlet and monitored at the outlet, whereas in Mode-2, the tank was filled with radiotracer and its concentration was measured at the outlet. From the measured RTD curves, mean residence times (MRTs), dead volume and fraction of liquid pumped in with time were determined. The treated RTD curves were modeled using suitable mathematical models. An axial dispersion model with high degree of backmixing was found suitable to describe flow when operated in Mode-1, whereas a tanks-in-series model with backmixing was found suitable to describe flow of the poison in the tank when operated in Mode-2. The results were utilized to scale-up and design a full-scale poison tank for a nuclear reactor.

  17. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-04-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species' native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the inclusion

  18. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    PubMed

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  19. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET.

    PubMed

    Robers, Matthew B; Dart, Melanie L; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Zimprich, Chad A; Kirkland, Thomas A; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V

    2015-12-03

    The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment.

  20. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET

    PubMed Central

    Robers, Matthew B.; Dart, Melanie L.; Woodroofe, Carolyn C.; Zimprich, Chad A.; Kirkland, Thomas A.; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R.; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R.; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L.; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L.; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G.; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment. PMID:26631872

  1. Optimal beam pattern to maximize inclusion residence time in an electron beam melting hearth

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J. van den

    1997-02-01

    Approximate probabilities of inclusion survival through an electron beam melting hearth are computed from nitride dissolution rates, flotation velocities, and residence times. Dissolution rates were determined by measuring shrinkage rates of pure TiN and nitrided sponge in small pools of molten titanium in an electron beam melting hearth. Flotation velocities were calculated using correlations for fluid flow around spheres, and show that particles sink or float unless their densities are extremely close to that of molten titanium. Flow field characteristics which lead to effective inclusion removal are discussed in terms of heat flux pattern required to produce them, based on the electron beam`s unique ability to impart a nearly arbitrary heat flux pattern to the melt surface.

  2. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F. Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  3. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time.

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  4. Using Residence Time Distributions (RTDs) to Address the Traceability of Raw Materials in Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Engisch, William; Muzzio, Fernando

    Continuous processing in pharmaceutical manufacturing is a relatively new approach that has generated significant attention. While it has been used for decades in other industries, showing significant advantages, the pharmaceutical industry has been slow in its adoption of continuous processing, primarily due to regulatory uncertainty. This paper aims to help address these concerns by introducing methods for batch definition, raw material traceability, and sensor frequency determination. All of the methods are based on established engineering and mathematical principles, especially the residence time distribution (RTD). This paper introduces a risk-based approach to address content uniformity challenges of continuous manufacturing. All of the detailed methods are discussed using a direct compaction manufacturing line as the main example, but the techniques can easily be applied to other continuous manufacturing methods such as wet and dry granulation, hot melt extrusion, capsule filling, etc.

  5. Residence time distributions for hydrologic systems: Mechanistic foundations and steady-state analytical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Sarah; Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Massoudieh, Arash; Bresciani, Etienne; McCallum, James

    2016-12-01

    This review presents the physical mechanisms generating residence time distributions (RTDs) in hydrologic systems with a focus on steady-state analytical solutions. Steady-state approximations of the RTD in hydrologic systems have seen widespread use over the last half-century because they provide a convenient, simplified modeling framework for a wide range of problems. The concept of an RTD is useful anytime that characterization of the timescales of flow and transport in hydrologic systems is important, which includes topics like water quality, water resource management, contaminant transport, and ecosystem preservation. Analytical solutions are often adopted as a model of the RTD and a broad spectrum of models from many disciplines has been applied. Although these solutions are typically reduced in dimensionality and limited in complexity, their ease of use makes them preferred tools, specifically for the interpretation of tracer data. Our review begins with the mechanistic basis for the governing equations, highlighting the physics for generating a RTD, and a catalog of analytical solutions follows. This catalog explains the geometry, boundary conditions and physical aspects of the hydrologic systems, as well as the sampling conditions, that altogether give rise to specific RTDs. The similarities between models are noted, as are the appropriate conditions for their applicability. The presentation of simple solutions is followed by a presentation of more complicated analytical models for RTDs, including serial and parallel combinations, lagged systems, and non-Fickian models. The conditions for the appropriate use of analytical solutions are discussed, and we close with some thoughts on potential applications, alternative approaches, and future directions for modeling hydrologic residence time.

  6. Sources and Residence Times of Groundwater in Shasta County, CA Determined by Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E.; Moran, J. E.; Deinhart, A.; Roberts, S. K.; Esser, B.; Visser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Large-volume springs are a significant source of water to communities in Shasta County. Aquifers in this region are developed in young volcanic formations and the age and flow of groundwater is not well characterized, making predicting the impact of drought and climate change on spring flow difficult. To better understand the water resources and the hydrogeology of the region and to better constrain the age of water produced by springs, we have sampled water from wells, springs, and streams for a suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers. We are using isotopic tracers because of the limited number of sampling points over a large area, leaving traditional hydrogeologic methods such as water levels and pump tests inadequate for a regional study. We analyzed samples for sulfur-35 (87.4 day half-life) and found detections in two springs, confirming the presence of a fraction of recently (1-2 years) recharged groundwater. Tritium (12.3 year half-life) activities show that some wells produce water recharged more than 5 decades ago, but most produce more recently recharged water. We will also report results for sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life), krypton-85 (10.8 year half-life), carbon-14 (5,730 year half-life), dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, and helium isotopic composition. These isotopes are applied to determine the age (residence time) of groundwater over a broad age distribution, from less than one year to tens of thousands of years. These tracers should also provide information on aquifer volumes, help delineate groundwater flow, and help to identify recharge areas. A collection of groundwater ages from springs at high elevations to wells in the upper Sacramento Valley will help delineate groundwater flowpaths. Finally, groundwater residence times will help determine groundwater volume and recharge rates, and resolve questions related to drought vulnerability and effective adjustments in water resource management.

  7. An Ophthalmic Formulation of Disulfiram Nanoparticles Prolongs Drug Residence Time in Lens.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Mano, Yu; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) is a dimer of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) that we previously added to a solution of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (DSF solution). We found that the instillation of this DSF solution delayed lens opacification in a hereditary cataractous ICR/f rat. In this study, we attempted to design an ophthalmic formulation containing DSF nanoparticles for use as a lens targeted drug delivery system (nano-DSF suspension), and investigated the changes in drug content in the lens after the instillation of DSF solution or nano-DSF suspension. The nano-DSF suspension was prepared by a bead mill method to yield a mean particle size of nano-DSF of 181 nm. Following the instillation of 1.4% DSF solution or the nano-DSF suspension, DDC was detected only in the aqueous humor and lens; in both, the area under the curve (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) for the nano-DSF suspension were higher than for the DSF solution. In addition, we found that the DDC residence time in the cortex and nucleus of the lens was higher than in the capsule-epithelium. Although DDC was not detected in the cortex and nucleus of lenses following the instillation of the 1.4% DSF solution, the instillation of a 1.4% nano-DSF suspension led to the accumulation of DDC in both areas. In conclusion, it is possible that the instillation of a nano-DSF suspension can supply more DDC into the aqueous humor and lens than a conventional formulation, and these findings provide information significant for the prevention of cataracts and the design of a lens targeted drug delivery system.

  8. Multi-scale field investigation of water flow pathways and residence times in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, S. W.; Troch, P. A.; Desilets, S. E.

    2006-12-01

    The "sky islands" of Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States form a unique complex of about 27 mountain ranges whose ecosystems support many perennial and ephemeral streams in an arid climate. Among these sky islands are the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, AZ, with a peak elevation of 9157 ft at Mt. Lemmon. Sabino Canyon Creek is the main stream which runs on the south face of the mountain range. It usually flows from July through April with an average daily flow of approximately 0.28 m3/s (10 cfs). However, flash floods are common both during summer as a result of intense monsoon rains and during spring because of rapid snowmelt. During these events, flow increases rapidally, reaching peak flows up to 480 m3/s (16,000 cfs, July 2006). Characterizing water flow pathways and residence times in these complex catchments is important for improving flash flood warning systems, estimating mountain front recharge, managing forest and wild fires, and understanding ecosystem functions. In the summer of 2006, we set up an extensive hydrometrical and hydro-chemical monitoring network in Sabino Canyon Creek, comprising 40 tipping bucket rain gauges (two of which were equipped to automatically collect rainwater samples), 5 automatic surface water level stations (three of which were equipped with auto samplers), and 8 manual soil lysimeters. In addition, several rain and stream water grab samples were collected manually during intensive rain events. Water samples are analyzed for major ions and liquid water isotopic concentration (2H and 18O) in rain, soil, ground and surface water. The data allows for a detailed reconstruction of water flow pathways and residence times at 3 different catchment scales (2 km2, 8 km2, and 91 km2) during the recorded flow events, including the highest monsoon rainfall-runoff event ever recorded in these mountains.

  9. Flowpaths, source water contributions and water residence times in a Mexican tropical dry forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrick, Kegan K.; Branfireun, Brian A.

    2015-10-01

    Runoff in forested tropical catchments has been frequently described in the literature as dominated by the rapid translation of rainfall to runoff through surface and shallow subsurface pathways. However, studies examining runoff generation in tropical catchments with highly permeable soils have received little attention, particularly in tropical dry forests. We present a study focused on identifying the dominant flowpaths, water sources and stream water residence times in a tropical dry forest catchment near the Pacific coast of central Mexico. During the wet season, pre-event water contributions to stormflow ranged from 72% to 97%, with the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium closely coupling the geochemistry of baseflow and groundwater from the narrow riparian/near-stream zone. Baseflow from the intermittent stream showed a strongly damped isotopic signature and a mean baseflow residence time of 52-110 days was estimated. These findings all suggest that instead of the surface and near-surface subsurface lateral pathways observed over many tropical catchments, runoff is generated through vertical flow processes and the displacement and discharge of stored water from the saturated zone. As the wet season progressed, contributions from the saturated zone persisted; however, the stormflow and baseflow geochemistry suggests that the contributing area of the catchment increased. Our results show that during the early part of the wet season, runoff originated primarily from the headwater portion of the catchment. As the wet season progressed and catchment wetness increased, connectivity among sub-basin was improved, resulting in runoff contributions from across the entire catchment.

  10. Household Cooking Fuel Use among Residents of a Sub-Urban Community in Nigeria: Implications for Indoor Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Isara, Alphonsus Rukevwe; Aigbokhaode, Adesuwa Queen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the types of household cooking fuel used by residents of Isiohor community in Edo State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 133 household heads or their representatives in Isiohor Community in Edo State, Nigeria. Data collection was by means of a structured interviewer administered questionnaire. Results: Half (50.3%) of the households studied were made up of 4-6 persons living in them. Sixty-two (46.6%) respondents had tertiary level of education and a third 44 (33.1%) earned between 21,000 and 30,000 naira (150-200 dollars) monthly. Forty six (34.6%) and 27 (20.3%) respondents live in passage houses and flats respectively. Two thirds (68.4%) of the respondents cook their food indoors. The predominant household cooking fuels used by the respondents were cooking gas (51.1%), Kerosene (45.9%), vegetables (25.6%) and firewood (14.3%). Majority 106 (79.7%) had poor knowledge of the health effects of prolonged exposure to smoke arising from indoor cooking. There was a statistically significant association between the occupation of the respondents and the type of household cooking fuel used (p=0.002). Conclusion: The use of unclean indoor cooking fuel was high among the residents of Isiohor community in Edo State, Nigeria. Also, there was poor knowledge of the health effects of prolonged exposure to smoke from unclean cooking fuel among the respondents and this has serious implications for indoor air pollution. There is an urgent need for health/hygiene education on the health effects of use of unclean indoor cooking fuel among these residents. There is also need for use of clean/green cooking stoves and construction of exhaust ventilation pipes in these households. PMID:25610326

  11. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

    2015-07-01

    Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California.

  12. Estimation of the effects of ambient air pollution on life expectancy of urban residents in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuicui; Zhou, Xiaodan; Chen, Renjie; Duan, Xiaoli; Kuang, Xingya; Kan, Haidong

    2013-12-01

    The air quality in China's cities has improved in recent years, but its impact on public health has rarely been investigated. This study was aimed at estimating the potential effects of air quality on life expectancy between 2003 and 2010 in China. We collected annual average concentrations of particulate matter less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) in 113 key cities, covering all provinces in China, along with the national average age-specific mortality from 2003 to 2010. We constructed a cause-eliminated life table after excluding premature deaths attributable to PM10. The annual average PM10 levels in these cities decreased from 125.3 μg m-3 in 2003 to 88.3 μg m-3 in 2010. As the result, life expectancy loss due to PM10 decreased from 2.13 years in 2003 to 1.30 years in 2010. The estimated life expectancy increase due to PM10 mitigation accounted for 34% of the total increase in life expectancy in the same period. Our results suggested that air quality might have contributed substantially to life expectancy in China.

  13. Transit and residence times in the Adriatic Sea surface as derived from drifter data and Lagrangian numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, P.-M.; Hariri, S.

    2013-08-01

    Statistics of transit and residence times in the Adriatic Sea surface, a semi-enclosed basin of the Mediterranean, are estimated from drifter data and Lagrangian numerical simulations. The results obtained from the drifters are generally underestimated given their short operating lifetimes (half life of ∼40 days) compared to the transit and residence times. This bias can be removed by considering a large amount of numerical particles whose trajectories are integrated over a long time (750 days) with a statistical advection-dispersion model of the Adriatic surface circulation. Numerical particles indicate that the maximum transit time to exit the basin is about 216-260 days for particles released near the northern tip of the Adriatic, and that a particle entering on the eastern Otranto Channel will typically exit on the other side of the channel after 170-185 days. A duration of 150-168 days is estimated as the residence time in the Adriatic Basin.

  14. Transit and residence times in the surface Adriatic Sea as derived from drifter data and Lagrangian numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, P.-M.; Hariri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics of transit and residence times in the surface Adriatic Sea, a semi-enclosed basin of the Mediterranean, are estimated from drifter data and Lagrangian numerical simulations. The results obtained from the drifters are generally underestimated given their short operating lifetimes (half life of ~ 40 days) compared to the transit and residence times. This bias can be removed by considering a large amount of numerical particles whose trajectories are integrated over a long time (750 days) with a statistical advection-diffusion model of the Adriatic surface circulation. Numerical particles indicate that the maximum transit time to exit the basin is about 216-260 days for objects released near the northern tip of the Adriatic, and that a particle entering on the eastern Otranto Channel will typically exit on the other side of the Channel after 170-185 days. A value of 150-168 days is estimated for the residence time in the Adriatic basin.

  15. Biofilm growth in gravel bed streams controls solute residence time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Hanrahan, Brittany; Bolster, Diogo; Tank, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Streambed substrates harbor a rich biome responsible for biogeochemical processing in riverine waters. Beyond their biological role, the presence of benthic and hyporheic biofilms can play an important role in influencing large-scale transport of solutes, even for conservative tracers. As biofilms grow and accumulate biomass, they actively interact with and influence surface and subsurface flow patterns. To explore this effect, we conducted experiments at the Notre Dame Linked Ecosystems Experimental Facility in four outdoor streams, each with different gravel beds. Over the course of 20 weeks we conducted transport experiments in each of these streams and observed different patterns in breakthrough curves as biofilms grew on the substrate. Biofilms played a major role in shaping the observed conservative transport patterns. Overall, while the presence of biofilms led to a decreased exchange rate between the fast (mobile) and slow (immobile) parts of the flow domain, water that was exchanged tended to be stored in the slow regions for longer times once biofilms had established. More specifically, we observed enhanced longitudinal dispersion in breakthrough curves as well as broader residence time distributions when biofilms were present. Biofilm colonization over time homogenized transport patterns across the four streams that were originally very distinct. These results indicate that stream biofilms exert a strong control on conservative solute transport in streams, a role that to date has not received enough attention.

  16. Residency times and patterns of movement of postbreeding dunlin on a subarctic staging area in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warnock, Nils; Handel, Colleen M.; Gill, Robert E.; McCaffery, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how individuals use key resources is critical for effective conservation of a population. The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska is the most important postbreeding staging area for shorebirds in the subarctic North Pacific, yet little is known about movements of shorebirds there during the postbreeding period. To address this information gap, we studied residency times and patterns of movement of 17 adult and 17 juvenile radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) on the YKD between early August and early October 2005. Throughout this postbreeding period, during which Dunlin were molting, most birds were relocated within a 130 km radius of their capture site on the YKD, but three birds were relocated more than 600 km to the south at estuaries along the Alaska Peninsula. On average, juvenile Dunlin were relocated farther away from the banding site (median relocation distance = 36.3 km) than adult Dunlin (median relocation distance = 8.8 km). Post-capture, minimum lengths of stay by Dunlin on the YKD were not significantly different between juveniles (median = 19 days) and adults (median = 23 days), with some birds staging for more than 50 days. Body mass at time of capture was the best single variable explaining length of stay on the YKD, with average length of stay decreasing by 2.5 days per additional gram of body mass at time of capture. Conservation efforts for postbreeding shorebirds should consider patterns of resource use that may differ not only by age cohort but also by individual condition.

  17. Residence and transit times of MinD in E. coli bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Maximiliano; Kelly, Corey; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    A key step in the life of a bacterial cell is its division into two daughters cells of equal size. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that an equal partitioning of the main cell components is obtained, which is critical for the viability of the daughter cells. In E. coli this regulation is accomplished in part by the Min protein system, that determines the localization of the division machinery. Of particular interest is the MinD protein that exhibits an oscillation between the poles in the rod shaped bacteria. The oscillation relies on a ATP mediated dimerization of the MinD protein that allows its insertion into the inner membrane at one of the poles of the cell, followed by an interaction with the MinE protein, which releases the MinD from the membrane, allowing it to travel to the other pole of the cell where the cycle is repeated. We have studied the spatio-temporal characteristics of the MinD oscillation from which we extract the average times for the two main processes that determine the oscillation period: the residence time in the membrane and the transit time to travel the length of the cell. Additionally, we explore how these two timescales are affected by stresses on the bacterial cells due to unfavorable physiological conditions.

  18. A Randomized Cross-over Air Filtration Intervention Trial for Reducing Cardiovascular Health Risks in Residents of Public Housing near a Highway

    PubMed Central

    Padró-Martínez, Luz T.; Owusu, Emmanuel; Reisner, Ellen; Zamore, Wig; Simon, Matthew C.; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Brown, Carrie A.; Chung, Mei; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-generated ultrafine particles (UFP; particles <100 nm) is likely a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We conducted a trial of high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filtration in public housing near a highway. Twenty residents in 19 apartments living <200 m from the highway participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover trial. A HEPA filter unit and a particle counter (measuring particle number concentration (PNC), a proxy for UFP) were installed in living rooms. Participants were exposed to filtered air for 21 days and unfiltered air for 21 days. Blood samples were collected and blood pressure measured at days 0, 21 and 42 after a 12-hour fasting period. Plasma was analyzed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha-receptor II (TNF-RII) and fibrinogen. PNC reductions ranging from 21% to 68% were recorded in 15 of the apartments. We observed no significant differences in blood pressure or three of the four biomarkers (hsCRP, fibrinogen, and TNF-RII) measured in participants after 21-day exposure to HEPA-filtered air compared to measurements after 21-day exposure to sham-filtered air. In contrast, IL-6 concentrations were significantly higher following HEPA filtration (0.668 pg/mL; CI = 0.465–0.959) compared to sham filtration. Likewise, PNC adjusted for time activity were associated with increasing IL-6 in 14- and 21-day moving averages, and PNC was associated with decreasing blood pressure in Lags 0, 1 and 2, and in a 3-day moving average. These negative associations were unexpected and could be due to a combination of factors including exposure misclassification, unsuccessful randomization (i.e., IL-6 and use of anti-inflammatory medicines), or uncontrolled confounding. Studies with greater reduction in UFP levels and larger sample sizes are needed. There also needs to be more complete assessment of resident time activity and of outdoor vs. indoor source contributions

  19. A Randomized Cross-over Air Filtration Intervention Trial for Reducing Cardiovascular Health Risks in Residents of Public Housing near a Highway.

    PubMed

    Padró-Martínez, Luz T; Owusu, Emmanuel; Reisner, Ellen; Zamore, Wig; Simon, Matthew C; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Brown, Carrie A; Chung, Mei; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L

    2015-07-10

    Exposure to traffic-generated ultrafine particles (UFP; particles <100 nm) is likely a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We conducted a trial of high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filtration in public housing near a highway. Twenty residents in 19 apartments living <200 m from the highway participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover trial. A HEPA filter unit and a particle counter (measuring particle number concentration (PNC), a proxy for UFP) were installed in living rooms. Participants were exposed to filtered air for 21 days and unfiltered air for 21 days. Blood samples were collected and blood pressure measured at days 0, 21 and 42 after a 12-hour fasting period. Plasma was analyzed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha-receptor II (TNF-RII) and fibrinogen. PNC reductions ranging from 21% to 68% were recorded in 15 of the apartments. We observed no significant differences in blood pressure or three of the four biomarkers (hsCRP, fibrinogen, and TNF-RII) measured in participants after 21-day exposure to HEPA-filtered air compared to measurements after 21-day exposure to sham-filtered air. In contrast, IL-6 concentrations were significantly higher following HEPA filtration (0.668 pg/mL; CI = 0.465-0.959) compared to sham filtration. Likewise, PNC adjusted for time activity were associated with increasing IL-6 in 14- and 21-day moving averages, and PNC was associated with decreasing blood pressure in Lags 0, 1 and 2, and in a 3-day moving average. These negative associations were unexpected and could be due to a combination of factors including exposure misclassification, unsuccessful randomization (i.e., IL-6 and use of anti-inflammatory medicines), or uncontrolled confounding. Studies with greater reduction in UFP levels and larger sample sizes are needed. There also needs to be more complete assessment of resident time activity and of outdoor vs. indoor source contributions

  20. “We are used to this”: a qualitative assessment of the perceptions of and attitudes towards air pollution amongst slum residents in Nairobi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People’s perceptions of and attitudes towards pollution are critical for reducing exposure among people and can also influence the response to interventions that are aimed at encouraging behaviour change. This study assessed the perceptions and attitudes of residents in two slums in Nairobi regarding air pollution. Methods We conducted focus group discussions with residents aged 18 years and above using an emergent design in the formulation of the study guide. A thematic approach was used in data analysis. Results The discussions revealed that the two communities experience air pollution arising mainly from industries and dump sites. There was an apparent disconnect between knowledge and practice, with individuals engaging in practices that placed them at high risk of exposure to air pollution. Residents appear to have rationalized the situation in which they live in and were resigned to these conditions. Consequently, they expressed lack of agency in addressing prevalent air pollution within their communities. Conclusions Community-wide education on air pollution and related health effects together with the measures needed to reduce exposure to air pollution are necessary towards reducing air pollution impacts. A similar city-wide study is recommended to enable comparison of perceptions along socio-economic groups and neighbourhoods. PMID:24597487

  1. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  2. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.; Case, N.; Clark, T.G.; Emery, J.F.; Patton, B.D.; Rodgers, B.R.; Villiers-Fisher, J.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be /sup 133/Xe, and /sup 198/Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing.

  3. Determining the True Residence Time Distribution Curve of Phase I System

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.

    1982-08-24

    Previous engineering analysis of the Br82 tracer experiments failed to account for the fact that the fluid was being recirculated during these tests. Thus, the concentration vs. volume curves shown in the Run Segments 4 and 5 reports and elsewhere are not really the response of the system to a pulse of tracer. These data are complicated by the fact that at later times most of the tracer being measured was not the original pulse, but the tracer on its second or third pass through the reservoir. When this recirculation effect is subtracted out of the original concentration vs. volume curves, the true residence time distribution (RTD) for the Phase I system indicates that the "long tail" on these curves is not caused by dispersion but results almost entirely from recirculation. The RTD curve for this system cannot be modeled precisely using a one parameter model, but can probably be described by a combination of hydrodynamic and turbulent dispersion in a single fracture. Alternatively, flow through multiple fractures could easily result in the RTD curves determined during Run Segments 4 and 5.

  4. Seasonal variation of residence time in spring and groundwater evaluated by CFCs and numerical simulation in mountainous headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Watanabe, Yasuto; Ikeda, Koichi; Yano, Shinjiro; Abe, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    Headwater catchments in mountainous region are the most important recharge area for surface and subsurface waters, additionally time information of the water is principal to understand hydrological processes in the catchments. However, there have been few researches to evaluate variation of residence time of subsurface water in time and space at the mountainous headwaters especially with steep slope. We investigated the temporal variation of the residence time of the spring and groundwater with tracing of hydrological flow processes in mountainous catchments underlain by granite, Yamanashi Prefecture, central Japan. We conducted intensive hydrological monitoring and water sampling of spring, stream and ground waters in high-flow and low-flow seasons from 2008 through 2013 in River Jingu Watershed underlain by granite, with an area of approximately 15 km2 and elevation ranging from 950 m to 2000 m. The CFCs, stable isotopic ratios of oxygen-18 and deuterium, inorganic solute constituent concentrations were determined on all water samples. Also, a numerical simulation was conducted to reproduce of the average residence times of the spring and groundwater. The residence time of the spring water estimated by the CFCs concentration ranged from 10 years to 60 years in space within the watershed, and it was higher (older) during the low flow season and lower (younger) during the high flow season. We tried to reproduce the seasonal change of the residence time in the spring water by numerical simulation, and the calculated residence time of the spring water and discharge of the stream agreed well with the observed values. The groundwater level was higher during the high flow season and the groundwater dominantly flowed through the weathered granite with higher permeability, whereas that was lower during the low flow season and that flowed dominantly through the fresh granite with lower permeability. This caused the seasonal variation of the residence time of the spring

  5. Residence and Migration of First-Time Freshmen Enrolled in Higher Education Institutions: Fall 1994. E.D. TABS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbett, Samuel

    This report presents 23 tables of data on residence and migration of first-time freshmen based on the 1994 "Fall Enrollment" survey, part of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. The survey counted 2.14 million first-time freshmen. More than 366,000 (17 percent) migrated between states. The percent of freshmen who left…

  6. Naturalization of central European plants in North America: species traits, habitats, propagule pressure, residence time.

    PubMed

    Pyšek, Petr; Manceur, Ameur M; Alba, Christina; McGregor, Kirsty F; Pergl, Jan; Stajerová, Katerina; Chytrý, Milan; Danihelka, Jiří; Kartesz, John; Klimesova, Jitka; Lucanova, Magdalena; Moravcová, Lenka; Nishino, Misako; Sadlo, Jiri; Suda, Jan; Tichy, Lubomir; Kühn, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    The factors that promote invasive behavior in introduced plant species occur across many scales of biological and ecological organization. Factors that act at relatively small scales, for example, the evolution of biological traits associated with invasiveness, scale up to shape species distributions among different climates and habitats, as well as other characteristics linked to invasion, such as attractiveness for cultivation (and by extension propagule pressure). To identify drivers of invasion it is therefore necessary to disentangle the contribution of multiple factors that are interdependent. To this end, we formulated a conceptual model describing the process of invasion of central European species into North America based on a sequence of "drivers." We then used confirmatory path analysis to test whether the conceptual model is supported by a statistical model inferred from a comprehensive database containing 466 species. The path analysis revealed that naturalization of central European plants in North America, in terms of the number of North American regions invaded, most strongly depends on residence time in the invaded range and the number of habitats occupied by species in their native range. In addition to the confirmatory path analysis, we identified the effects of various biological traits on several important drivers of the conceptualized invasion process. The data supported a model that included indirect effects of biological traits on invasion via their effect on the number of native range habitats occupied and cultivation in the native range. For example, persistent seed banks and longer flowering periods are positively correlated with number of native habitats, while a stress-tolerant life strategy is negatively correlated with native range cultivation. However, the importance of the biological traits is nearly an order of magnitude less than that of the larger scale drivers and highly dependent on the invasion stage (traits were associated

  7. Watershed Influences on Residence Time and Oxygen Reduction Rates in an Agricultural Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, C. L.; Tesoriero, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural use of synthetic fertilizers and animal manure has led to increased crop production, but also elevated nitrogen concentrations in groundwater, resulting in impaired water quality. Groundwater oxygen concentrations are a key indicator of potential biogeochemical processes, which control water/aquifer interactions and contaminant transport. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program has a long-history of studying nutrient transport and processing across the United States and the Glacial Aquifer system in particular. A series of groundwater well networks in Eastern Wisconsin is being used to evaluate the distribution of redox reaction rates over a range of scales with a focus on dissolved O2 reduction rates. An analysis of these multi-scale networks elucidates the influence of explanatory variables (i.e.: soil type, land use classification) on reduction rates and redox reactions throughout the Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo watersheds. Multiple tracers including dissolved gasses, tritium, helium, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and carbon-14 were used to estimate groundwater ages (0.8 to 61.2 yr) at over 300 locations. Our results indicate O2 reduction rates along a flowpath study area (1.2 km2) of 0.15 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.12 to 0.18 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) up to 0.41 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.23 to 0.89 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) for a larger scale land use study area (3,300 km2). Preliminary explanatory variables that can be used to describe the variability in reduction rates include soil type (hydrologic group, bulk density) and chemical concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate, silica). The median residence time expected to reach suboxic conditions (≤ 0.4 mg O2 L-1) for the flowpath and the land use study areas was 66 and 25 yr, respectively. These results can be used to elucidate and differentiate the impact of residence time on groundwater quality vulnerability and sustainability in agricultural regions without complex flow models.

  8. Residence time, mineralization processes and groundwater origin within a carbonate coastal aquifer with a thick unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, S.; Huneau, F.; Garel, E.; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.; Jaunat, J.; Celle-Jeanton, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at establishing groundwater residence times, identifying mineralization processes and determining groundwater origins within a carbonate coastal aquifer with thick unsaturated zone and lying on a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach (major ions, SiO2, Br-, Ba+, Sr2+, 18O, 2H, 13C, 3H, Ne, Ar) combined with a groundwater residence time determination using CFCs and SF6 allows defining the global setting of the study site. A typical mineralization conditioned by the sea sprays and the carbonate matrix helped to validate the groundwater weighted residence times from using a binary mixing model. Terrigenic SF6 excesses have been detected and quantified, which permits to identify a groundwater flow from the surrounding fractured granites towards the lower aquifer principally. The use of CFCs and SF6 as a first hydrogeological investigation tool is possible and very relevant despite the thick unsaturated zone and the hydraulic connexion with a granitic environment.

  9. Air pollution and respiratory symptoms among children with asthma: Vulnerability by corticosteroid use and residence area☆

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Toby C.; Robins, Thomas G.; Mentz, Graciela B.; Zhang, Xiaohui; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Lin, Xihong; Keeler, Gerald J.; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Yip, Fuyuen Y.; O’Neill, Marie S.; Parker, Edith A.; Israel, Barbara A.; Max, Paul T.; Reyes, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Information on how ambient air pollution affects susceptible populations is needed to ensure protective air quality standards. Objectives To estimate the effect of community-level ambient particulate matter (PM) and ozone (O3) on respiratory symptoms among primarily African-American and Latino, lower-income asthmatic children living in Detroit, Michigan and to evaluate factors associated with heterogeneity in observed health effects. Methods A cohort of 298 children with asthma was studied prospectively from 1999 to 2002. For 14 days each season over 11 seasons, children completed a respiratory symptom diary. Simultaneously, ambient pollutant concentrations were measured at two community-level monitoring sites. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were fit for each respiratory symptom in single pollutant models, looking for interactions by area or by corticosteroid use, a marker of more severe asthma. Exposures of interest were: daily concentrations of PM<10 μm, <2.5 μm, and between 10 and 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10, PM2.5, and PM10–2.5, respectively), the daily 8-hour maximum concentration of O3 (8HrPeak), and the daily 1-hour maximum concentration of O3 (1HrPeak). Results Outdoor PM2.5, PM10, 8HrPeak, and 1HrPeak O3 concentrations were associated with increased odds of respiratory symptoms, particularly among children using corticosteroid medication and among children living in the southwest community of Detroit. Similar patterns of associations were not seen with PM10–2.5. Conclusions PM2.5 and O3 at levels near or below annual standard levels are associated with negative health impact in this population of asthmatic children. Variation in effects within the city of Detroit and among the subgroup using steroids emphasizes the importance of spatially refined exposure assessment and the need for further studies to elucidate mechanisms and effective risk reduction interventions. PMID:23273373

  10. Aerosol residence times and changes in radioiodine-131I and radiocaesium-137 Cs activity over Central Poland after the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Długosz-Lisiecka, Magdalena; Bem, Henryk

    2012-05-01

    The first detectable activities of radioiodine (131)I, and radiocaesium (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the air over Central Poland were measured in dust samples collected by the ASS-500 station in the period of 21(st) to 24(th) of March, 2011. However, the highest activity of both fission products, (131)I and (137)Cs: 8.3 mBq m(-3) and 0.75 mBq m(-3), respectively, were obtained in the samples collected on 30(th) March, i.e.∼18 days after the beginning of the fission products' discharge from the damaged units of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The simultaneously determined corrected aerosol residence time for the same samples by (210)Pb/(210)Bi and (210)Pb/(210)Po methods was equal to 10 days. Additionally, on the basis of the activity ratio of two other natural cosmogenic radionuclides, (7)Be and (22)Na in these aerosol samples, it was possible to estimate the aerosol residence time at ∼150 days for the solid particles coming from the stratospheric fallout. These data, as well as the differences in the activity size distribution of (7)Be and (131)I in the air particulate matter, show, in contrast to the Chernobyl discharge, a negligible input of stratospheric transport of Fukushima-released fission products.

  11. Variability of Residence Time tracer Concentrations at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory during the California Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Stacy, E.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bibby, R. K.; Deinhart, A.; Schorzman, K.; Egnatuk, C. M.; Conklin, M. H.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    California water supply from high elevation snow melt is vulnerable to climate change and prolonged drought conditions. Reduced snow pack and earlier snow melt will result in a greater reliance on man-made reservoirs and subsurface catchment storage. To gain insight into the subsurface storage volume of high elevation catchments, we studied the residence time distribution of surface water leaving the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Since October 2014, we have collected monthly samples of two residence time tracers with contrasting half-lives: sulfur-35 (87.5 days) and tritium (12.32 years). Upstream catchment area at the three nested sampling locations is 1 km2 (P301 sub-catchment), 4 km2 (Providence Creek) and ~50 km2 (Big Creek). Samples were analyzed at LLNL by low level liquid scintillation counting and noble gas mass spectrometry after helium accumulation. Variations in tracer concentrations in precipitation, both for tritium (11-24 pCi/L) and sulfur-35 (24-100 mBq/L), complicate straightforward interpretation of residence times. Sulfur-35 concentrations show that last year precipitation contributes 1% - 10% of total stream flow, even during peak snowmelt. Tritium concentrations in stream flow vary between 40% and 60% of the initial concentration in precipitation (15.5 pCi/L), indicating that water leaving the catchment has a residence time on the order of years to decades. Additional analyses of sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life) will aid in deconvoluting the residence time distribution. These low tracer concentrations can be attributed to current severe drought conditions, resulting in low discharge rates and longer residence times. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675107

  12. Groundwater residence time : tell me who you are and I will tell which information you may provide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Kolbe, Tamara; Marçais, Jean; Leray, Sarah; Abbott, Ben; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater residence-time or ages have been widely used in hydrogeology during the last decades. Following tritium measurements, anthropogenic gases (CFC, SF6, 35Kr) have been developed. They provide information at the aquifer scale on long residence times. They complement the more localized data obtained from sparse boreholes with hydraulic and geophysical methods. Anthropogenic tracer concentrations are most generally considered as "Groundwater ages" using a piston flow model providing an order of magnitude for the residence time. More advanced information can however be derived from the combined analysis of the tracer concentrations. For example, the residence time distribution over the last 50 years can be well approached by the concentration of two sufficient different anthropogenic tracers in the group (CFC, SF6, 35Kr), i.e. tracers whose anthropogenic chronicles are sufficiently different. And, with additional constrains on geological and hydraulic properties, groundwater ages contribute to characterize the aquifer structures and the groundwater resources. Complex geological environments also include old groundwater bodies in extremely confined aquifer sections. In such cases, various tracers are related to highly different processes. CFCs can be taken as a marker of modern contamination to track exchanges between shallower and deeper aquifers, leakage processes, and modification of circulations linked to recent anthropogenic changes. 14C or 36Cl can be used to evidence much older processes but have to be related to the history of the chemical element itself. Numerous field studies in fact demonstrate the broad-range extent of the residence time distribution spanning in some cases several orders of magnitude. Flow and transport models in heterogeneous structures confirm such wide residence times and help to characterize their distribution. Residence times also serve as a privileged interface to the fate of some contaminants in aquifers or to trace

  13. RELIANCE ON GEOCODED MATERNAL RESIDENCE: IMPACT ON A POPULATION-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Unbiased geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing population-based case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded res...

  14. Effects of residence time on summer nitrate uptake in Mississippi River flow-regulated backwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, W.F.; Richardson, W.B.; Soballe, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate uptake may be improved in regulated floodplain rivers by increasing hydrological connectivity to backwaters. We examined summer nitrate uptake in a series of morphologically similar backwaters on the Upper Mississippi River receiving flow-regulated nitrate loads via gated culverts. Flows into individual backwaters were held constant over a summer period but varied in the summers of 2003 and 2004 to provide a range of hydraulic loads and residence times (??). The objectives were to determine optimum loading and ?? for maximum summer uptake. Higher flow adjustment led to increased loading but lower ?? and contact time for uptake. For highest flows, ?? was less than 1 day resulting in lower uptake rates (Unet, 4000 m). For low flows, ?? was greater than 5 days and U% approached 100%, but Unet was 200 mg m-2 day-1. Snet was < half the length of the backwaters under these conditions indicating that most of the load was assimilated in the upper reaches, leading to limited delivery to lower portions. Unet was maximal (384-629 mg m-2 day-1) for intermediate flows and ?? ranging between 1 and 1.5 days. Longer Snet (2000-4000 m) and lower U% (20-40%) reflected limitation of uptake in upper reaches by contact time, leading to transport to lower reaches for additional uptake. Uptake by ???10 000 ha of reconnected backwaters along the Upper Mississippi River (13% of the total backwater surface area) at a Unet of ???630 mg m-2 day-1 would be the equivalent of ???40% of the summer nitrate load (155 mg day-1) discharged from Lock and Dam 4. These results indicate that backwater nitrate uptake can play an important role in reducing nitrate loading to the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Rn as a geochemical tool for estimating residence times in the hyporheic zone and its application to biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, Benjamin; Dörner, Sebastian; Ebertshäuser, Marlene Esther; Glaser, Barbara; Klug, Maria; Pittroff, Marco; Pieruschka, Ines; Waldemer, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    The hyporheic zone is at the interface between groundwater and surface water systems. It is also often a geochemical and redox boundary between typically reduced groundwater and oxic surface water. It experiences dynamic physical and chemical conditions as both groundwater fluxes and surface water levels vary in time and space. This can be particularly important for processes such as biogeochemical processing of nutrients and carbon. There has recently been an increasing focus on coupling residence times of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. While geochemical profiles can be readily measured using established geochemical sampling techniques (e.g. peepers), quantifying surface water residence times and flow paths within the hyporheic zone is more elusive. The nobel gas radon offers a method for quantification of surface water residence times in the hyporheic zone. Radon activities are typically low in surface waters due to degassing to the atmosphere and decay. However once the surface water flows into the hyporheic zone radon accumulates along the flow path due to emanation from the sediments. Using simple analytical equations the water residence time can be calculated based on the difference between measured 222Rn activities and 222Rn activities at secular equilibrium, with a maximum limit of about 20 days (depending on measurement precision). Rn is particularly suited to residence time measurements in the hyporheic zone since it does not require addition of tracers to the stream nor does it require complex simulations and assumptions (such as 1D vertical flow) as for temperature measurements. As part of the biogeochemistry course at the University of Bayreuth, we have investigated the coupling of redox processes and water residence times in the hyporheic zone using 222Rn as a tracer for residence time. Of particular interest were nitrate and sulfate reduction and methane and CO2 production. Measurements were made in a sandy section

  16. Treating Stormwater with Green Infrastructure: Plants, Residence Time Distributions, and the Removal of Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.; Winfrey, B.; Mehring, A.

    2015-12-01

    In many cities, green infrastructure is increasingly used to capture and treat stormwater runoff, due to the many opportunities these systems afford for protecting receiving water quality and ecology while mitigating water scarcity. Here, we focus on how plants affect the removal of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in newly-constructed stormwater biofilters, a type of green infrastructure consisting of unconsolidated granular media containing one or more plant species. Input-response experiments were carried out using both non-reactive (salt) and reactive (sewage) tracers on six laboratory-scale (~1m long by 24 cm diameter) biofilters, half of which were planted with the sedge Carex appressa (treatment replicates) and half of which were unplanted (control replicates). C. appressa modifies the residence time distribution (RTD) in a biofilter by creating preferential flow paths along which water and mass can move quickly, but does not appear to alter the intrinsic rate at which FIB are removed. Thus, the "green" component of green infrastructure can alter pollutant removal by changing the RTD, with or without a concomitant change in pollutant reactivity.

  17. Mean water residence times in the pre-alpine Rietholzbach catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, I.; Bernasconi, S.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2009-04-01

    The Rietholzbach catchment is a small, hilly pre-alpine basin in the north-eastern part of Switzerland. Its area is 3.31 km2 and it covers an altitude range between 682 and 950 m. The area is only sparsely populated and primarily used as pasture land (67 %), on steep slopes the land use is forest (25 %). A hydrological peculiarity is the congruence of surface and sub-surface catchment area. In 1975 measurements were initiated to determine and understand the water balance and its processes. Isotope measurements of all components of the water cycle started in 1994. The water samples of precipitation, soil water (discharge of a lysimeter), ground water, and river water are taken approximately bi-weekly. All samples are prepared by the CO2 gas equilibration technique and are analysed in terms of the oxygen isotopes by mass spectrometry. The samples are taken either at the gauge at the outflow of the catchment or next to the main measurement site in the upper third of the catchment where an other gauge, three groundwater wells, the lysimeter and the meteorological sensors are installed in close vicinity. Based on these data series this contribution will present estimates of the mean water residence times in the different components of the catchment.

  18. Quantifying the residence time distribution of surface transient storage in streams: A computational fluid dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T. R.; Drost, K. J.; Haggerty, R.; Apte, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    Transient storage is the sum of surface transient storage (STS) and hyporheic transient storage (HTS) and separating the two storage components is challenging. A number of studies have attempted to determine the relationship between transient storage and stream channel properties; however, difficulties ensue when attempting to calculate STS. The present study attempts to develop a predictive relationship between a stream's STS residence time distribution (RTD) to physically-based and field-measureable properties of natural streams. Our approach is to use field measurements to constrain a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of STS and use both to develop and test a predictive model of STS RTD. Field sites were located on Oak and Soap creeks in the Willamette Valley near Corvallis, Oregon. Data collection included: (1) obtaining detailed stream and STS zone morphologies through dense survey measurements; (2) determining turbulence parameters and CFD model boundary inputs from stream and storage zone velocity measurements with a Marsh-McBirney and acoustic Doppler velocimeter; (3) quantifying the RTD and its mean using salt tracer injections and electrical conductivity probes; and (4) estimating mixing layer parameters using velocity measurements and a visual dye. Preliminary results from the CFD model and comparison to field data will be presented, and resulting insights into the RTD.

  19. Structure-guided residence time optimization of a dabigatran reversal agent

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Felix; van Ryn, Joanne; Litzenburger, Tobias; Ritter, Michael; Seeliger, Daniel; Nar, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternatives to vitamin-K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy. However, anticoagulation therapy in general is associated with an elevated risk of bleeding. Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®) and is currently in Phase 3 studies. Here, we report data on the antibody fragment aDabi-Fab2, a putative backup molecule for idarucizumab. Although aDabi-Fab2 completely reversed effects of dabigatran in a rat model in vivo, we observed significantly reduced duration of action compared to idarucizumab. Rational protein engineering, based on the X-ray structure of aDabi-Fab2, led to the identification of mutant Y103W. The mutant had optimized shape complementarity to dabigatran while maintaining an energetically favored hydrogen bond. It displayed increased affinity for dabigatran, mainly driven by a slower off-rate. Interestingly, the increased residence time translated into longer duration of action in vivo. It was thus possible to further enhance the efficacy of aDabi-Fab2 based on rational design, giving it the potential to serve as a back-up candidate for idarucizumab. PMID:26047352

  20. Liquid flow residence time in a fibrous fixed bed reactor with recycle.

    PubMed

    Martinov, Martin; Hadjiev, Dimiter; Vlaev, Serafim

    2010-02-01

    Waste removal efficiency of gas-liquid biofilter reactors for waste water treatment depends on its flow regime and residence time distribution (RTD) as key parameters of bio-reactor performance. The present study reports RTD regime in a fibrous fixed bed biofilm reactor related to a fluid velocity range appropriate for biofilm operation. The data from tracer experiments are correlated in terms of the one-parameter "tanks-in-series" model. The aerated fibrous bed reactor RTD function is found to be dependent on net liquid and gas phase superficial velocity U(L) and U(G). Liquid internal recirculation exhibited small effect comparable with the effect of net liquid flow. A power law relationship relating the number of perfectly mixed cells with liquid and gas superficial velocity is elaborated. Assuming similarity of the prototype and real vessels' flow fields, the equation as well as its corresponding range of fluid velocity can be used for bio-reactor design and scale-up. Comparison over the model parameters obtained in fixed bed bubble columns at low fluid velocity shows the results of this study to be comparable with previous data of mesh wire packing.

  1. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence Time

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2012-03-15

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37 C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37 C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Structure-guided residence time optimization of a dabigatran reversal agent.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Felix; van Ryn, Joanne; Litzenburger, Tobias; Ritter, Michael; Seeliger, Daniel; Nar, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternatives to vitamin-K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy. However, anticoagulation therapy in general is associated with an elevated risk of bleeding. Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®) and is currently in Phase 3 studies. Here, we report data on the antibody fragment aDabi-Fab2, a putative backup molecule for idarucizumab. Although aDabi-Fab2 completely reversed effects of dabigatran in a rat model in vivo, we observed significantly reduced duration of action compared to idarucizumab. Rational protein engineering, based on the X-ray structure of aDabi-Fab2, led to the identification of mutant Y103W. The mutant had optimized shape complementarity to dabigatran while maintaining an energetically favored hydrogen bond. It displayed increased affinity for dabigatran, mainly driven by a slower off-rate. Interestingly, the increased residence time translated into longer duration of action in vivo. It was thus possible to further enhance the efficacy of aDabi-Fab2 based on rational design, giving it the potential to serve as a back-up candidate for idarucizumab.

  3. Transport in lymphatic capillaries. I. Macroscopic measurements using residence time distribution theory.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Berk, D A; Jain, R K

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel integrative method for characterizing transport in the lymphatic capillaries in the tail of the anesthetized mouse, which is both sensitive and reproducible for quantifying uptake and flow. Interstitially injected, fluorescently labeled macromolecules were used to visualize and quantify these processes. Residence time distribution (RTD) theory was employed to measure net flow velocity in the lymphatic network as well as to provide a relative measure of lymphatic uptake of macromolecules from the interstitium. The effects of particle size and injection pressure were determined. The uptake rate was found to be independent of particle size in the range of a 6- to 18-nm radius; beyond this size, the interstitial matrix seemed to pose a greater barrier. A comparison of 10 vs. 40 cmH2O injection pressure showed a significant influence on the relative uptake rate but not on the net velocity within the network (3.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.8 +/- 1.0 micron/s). This suggested the presence of a systemic driving force for baseline lymph propulsion that is independent of the local pressure gradients driving the uptake. This model can be used to examine various aspects of transport physiology of the initial lymphatics.

  4. Effect of timed secondary-air injection on automotive emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, K. P.

    1973-01-01

    A single cylinder of an automotive V-8 engine was fitted with an electronically timed system for the pulsed injection of secondary air. A straight-tube exhaust minimized any mixing other than that produced by secondary-air pulsing. The device was operated over a range of engine loads and speeds. Effects attributable to secondary-air pulsing were found, but emission levels were generally no better than using the engine's own injection system. Under nontypical fast-idle, no-load conditions, emission levels were reduced by roughly a factor of 2.

  5. Assessment of the vaginal residence time of biomarkers of semen exposure☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea; Jacot, Terry; Melendez, Johan; Kimble, Thomas; Snead, Margaret; Jamshidi, Roxanne; Wheeless, Angie; Archer, David F.; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Mauck, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this pilot study is to determine and compare the residence time in the vagina of biomarkers of semen exposure for up to 15 days post exposure. The biomarkers are prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Y chromosome DNA, the sex determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) and testis-specific protein Y-encoded 4 (TSPY4). The secondary objectives are to determine if biomarker concentrations differed between intercourse and inoculation groups, to establish whether the sampling frequency post exposure affected biomarker concentrations and decay profile and to determine if biomarker concentrations in vaginal swabs obtained by the participant at home were similar to swabs obtained by the nurse in the clinic. Study design We randomized healthy women to unprotected intercourse (n=17) versus vaginal inoculation with the male partner’s semen in the clinic (n=16). Women were then further randomized to have vaginal swabs obtained at either 7 or 4 time points after semen exposure, up to 15 days post exposure, either obtained at home by the participant or in the clinic by the research nurse. Results PSA and SRY were markers of recent semen exposure. TSPY4 was detectable in approximately 50% of participants at 15 days post exposure. Unprotected intercourse resulted in significantly higher concentrations of select biomarkers. Sampling frequency and home versus clinic sampling had no significant effect on biomarker concentrations. Conclusions Objective biomarkers of recent or distant semen exposure may have great utility for verifying protocol compliance in a variety of clinical trials. PMID:27259675

  6. Phosphorus as indicator of magmatic olivine residence time, morphology and growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Alexander; Batanova, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is among of slowest elements by diffusion rate in silicate melts and crystals (e.g. Spandler et al, 2007). In the same time it is moderately incompatible to compatible with olivine (Brunet & Chazot, 2001; Grant & Kohn, 2013). This makes phosphorus valuable tracer of olivine crystallization in natural conditions. Indeed, it is shown that natural magmatic olivine crystals commonly posses strong and complicated zoning in phosphorus (Milman-Barris et al, 2008; Welsch et al, 2014). In this paper we intend to review phosphorus behavior in olivine in published experimental and natural olivine studies and present large set of new EPMA data on phosphorus zoning in olivine phenocrysts from MORBs, OIBs, komatiites and kimberlites. We will show that sharp olivine zones enriched in phosphorus by a factor of 10-20 over prediction by equilibrium partition may be due to formation of P-rich boundary layer on the interface of fast growing olivine. This is proved by finding of small-size (normally 10 mkm or less) exceptionally P-rich melt inclusions in olivine, which are otherwise similar in composition to typical melt. These observations could provide potential olivine growth speedometer. We will also demonstrate, that sharp zoning in phosphorus may provide valuable information on the residence time of olivine crystals in different environments: magma chambers and conduits as well as mantle sources. This study has been founded by Russian Science Foundation grant 14-17-00491. References: Spandler, et al, 2007, Nature, v. 447, p. 303-306; Brunet & Chazot, 2001, Chemical Geology, v. 176, p. 51-72; Grant & Kohn, 2013, American Mineralogist, v. 98, p. 1860-1869; Milman-Barris et al, 2008, Contr. Min. Petrol. v. 155, p.739-765; Welsch et al, 2014, Geology, v. 42, p.867-870.

  7. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Abramowitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified the first-order representation of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of current state-of-the-art models of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k) and the sensitivity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10) on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C, which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitude carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers, it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be more constrained by available data sets of carbon stocks.

  8. Reflections in a time of transition: orthopaedic faculty and resident understanding of accreditation schemes and opinions on surgical skills feedback

    PubMed Central

    Gundle, Kenneth R.; Mickelson, Dayne T.; Hanel, Doug P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Orthopaedic surgery is one of the first seven specialties that began collecting Milestone data as part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System (NAS) rollout. This transition from process-based advancement to outcome-based education is an opportunity to assess resident and faculty understanding of changing paradigms, and opinions about technical skill evaluation. Methods In a large academic orthopaedic surgery residency program, residents and faculty were anonymously surveyed. A total of 31/32 (97%) residents and 29/53 (55%) faculty responded to Likert scale assessments and provided open-ended responses. An internal end-of-rotation audit was conducted to assess timeliness of evaluations. A mixed-method analysis was utilized, with nonparametric statistical testing and a constant-comparative qualitative method. Results There was greater familiarity with the six core competencies than with Milestones or the NAS (p<0.05). A majority of faculty and residents felt that end-of-rotation evaluations were not adequate for surgical skills feedback. Fifty-eight per cent of residents reported that end-of-rotation evaluations were rarely or never filled out in a timely fashion. An internal audit demonstrated that more than 30% of evaluations were completed over a month after rotation end. Qualitative analysis included themes of resident desire for more face-to-face feedback on technical skills after operative cases, and several barriers to more frequent feedback. Discussion The NAS and outcome-based education have arrived. Residents and faculty need to be educated on this changing paradigm. This transition period is also a window of opportunity to address methods of evaluation and feedback. In our orthopaedic residency, trainees were significantly less satisfied than faculty with the amount of technical and surgical skills feedback being provided to trainees. The quantitative and qualitative analyses converge on one

  9. Atmospheric residence times from transpiration and evaporation to precipitation: An age-weighted regional evaporation tagging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianhui; Knoche, Hans Richard; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The atmospheric water residence time is a fundamental descriptor that provides information on the timescales of evaporation and precipitation. In this study, a regional climate model-based evaporation tagging algorithm is extended with an age tracer approach to calculate moisture residence times, defined as time between the original evaporation and the returning of water masses to the land surface as precipitation. Our case study addresses how long this time is for the transpired and for the direct evaporated moisture. Our study region is the Poyang Lake region in Southeast China, the largest freshwater lake in the country. We perform simulations covering the period from October 2004 to December 2005. In 2005, 11% of direct evaporated water (10% of transpired water) precipitates locally. Direct evaporated water accounts for 64% and transpired water for 36% of the total tagged moisture with a mean age of around 36 h for both. Considering precipitation, a large proportion (69%) originates from direct evaporated water with a mean atmospheric residence time of 6.6 h and a smaller amount from transpired water with a longer residence time of 10.7 h. Modulated by the East Asian monsoon, the variation of the meteorological conditions, the magnitude of the partitioned moisture, and the corresponding residence time patterns change seasonally and spatially and reveal the different fate of transpired and direct evaporated water in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. We conclude that our methodological approach has the potential to be used for addressing how timescales of the hydrological cycle changes regionally under global warming.

  10. Tracer travel and residence time distributions in highly heterogeneous aquifers: Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2016-12-01

    The driving mechanism of tracer transport in aquifers is groundwater flow which is controlled by the heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. We show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer are coupled in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity field and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. DESIGN: Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. SETTING: Paediatric residency program at BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. INTERVENTIONS: The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. RESULTS: A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. CONCLUSIONS: A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes. PMID:23372405

  12. Residence Times of Molecular Complexes in Solution from NMR Data of Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bond Scalar Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Kemme, Catherine A; Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Nguyen, Dan; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-03-03

    The residence times of molecular complexes in solution are important for understanding biomolecular functions and drug actions. We show that NMR data of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings can yield information on the residence times of molecular complexes in solution. The molecular exchange of binding partners via the breakage and reformation of a complex causes self-decoupling of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings, and this self-decoupling effect depends on the residence time of the complex. For protein-DNA complexes, we investigated the salt concentration dependence of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the protein side-chain (15)N and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei, from which the residence times were analyzed. The results were consistent with those obtained by (15)Nz-exchange spectroscopy. This self-decoupling-based kinetic analysis is unique in that it does not require any different signatures for the states involved in the exchange, whereas such conditions are crucial for kinetic analyses by typical NMR and other methods.

  13. Water Residence Times and Their Relation to Soil and Aquifer Properties and Degree of Urbanization (Croton Water Supply Area, NY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D.; Kendall, C.; McDonnell, J.

    2002-05-01

    Water residence times were determined in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY. The watersheds (less than 1 km2 drainage area) have different amounts of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on roads and slow flow through subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wetlands, hillslopes) . Measurements of the Oxygen-18 content of throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were performed bi-weekly over a period of 2 years. Mean water residence times of the stream water, soil water and groundwater were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes. There are small but significant differences in the isotopic content of waters in each watershed, along with soil and aquifer properties as a function of the level of urbanization. Longer groundwater residence times (up to more than 2 years) were estimated in wetland zones without direct communication with streams in comparison to hillslope areas (up to more than 1 year). In highly urbanized areas, mixing of natural runoff generation processes with urbanization effects such as the influence of septic plumes results in a complex spectrum of residence times in soil waters and groundwaters. We illustrate the possibilities of using stable isotope measurements to describe small-scale complex runoff generation processes in watersheds.

  14. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers.

  15. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers. PMID:26893890

  16. Examination of residence time and its relevance to water quality within a coastal mega-structure: The Palm Jumeirah Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, Geórgenes H.; Kjerfve, Björn; Feary, David A.

    2012-10-01

    SummaryA numerical modeling study was carried out to compute average residence time in the semi-enclosed lagoon formed by the man-made island Palm Jumeirah (Dubai, United Arab Emirates), termed Palm Jumeirah Lagoon (PJL). The PJL encompasses a main island axis with 17 'fronds' radiating from this axis, all encapsulated within a semi-circular breakwater system. A coupled hydrodynamic and solute transport model was developed for the waters of the PJL, based on depth-integrated conservation equations. Numerical model predictions were then verified against a set of field-measured hydrodynamic data. Model-predicted water elevations and velocities were in good agreement with field measurements. Residence times for this tidal dominated system were investigated through numerical experiments using a conservative tracer as a surrogate. The results indicated that average residence time varied spatially throughout the PJL depending on tidal flushing. Average residence time was unequally distributed throughout the PJL, with the eastern side showing higher flushing times than the western side. In addition, there were also differences between sections of the PJL in average residence time of a tracer: between frond tips and the surrounding breakwater the tracer was reduced to 30-40% of its original value after approximately 1 week, while a tracer placed between the fronds was reduced to 30-40% of its value after 20 days. The findings of this research provide vital information for understanding the water transport process in this man-made lagoon, and will be important in assessing the potential impact on coastal water quality conditions in coastal developments within the Middle East.

  17. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  18. 210Po and 210Pb distributions and residence times in the nearshore region of Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yingtao; Urban, Noel R.

    2004-10-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclide, 210Pb, and its decay daughter, 210Po, were measured in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Lake Superior. Water, suspended particles, sediment trap material (settling particles), and sediment cores and grab samples were collected along three transects that stretched from 1 to 20 km from shore. Departures from secular equilibrium (activity ratio of 210Po:210Pb = 1) were observed for most samples. 210Po-deficiency was observed in both suspended particles (TSP) with a ratio of 0.43 ± 0.05 (±95% confidence interval (CI)) and settling particles with a ratio of 0.57 ± 0.04; higher ratios in the settling particles resulted from an admixture of resuspended sediments. Ratios in the dissolved phase were 0.45 ± 0.12. Approximately 83% and 85% of total 210Po and 210Pb in the water column was in the particulate phase. No evidence of biological uptake of Po was found. Seasonal and spatial variability in activities and ratios was small. Using steady state solutions to the mass balance equations for both isotopes, similar residence times in the water column were calculated for 210Po and 210Pb (55 ˜ 75 days in a 150-m-deep water column). It was possible to calibrate a one-box model for the paired isotopes so that the model output closely matched rates of sediment and isotope resuspension estimated from sediment traps. However, this calibration required a fractionation of the isotopes during resuspension. The particle settling velocity was estimated to be 2.3 m d-1, which also is in agreement with the estimate (2.4 ± 2.2 m d-1) from sediment traps. These results indicate rapid fluxes of radioisotopes and sediments through the water column largely driven by resuspension of sediments in nearshore areas.

  19. Residence times of groundwater and nitrate transport in coastal aquifer systems: Daweijia area, northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongmei; Cao, Guoliang; McCallum, James; Song, Xianfang

    2015-12-15

    Groundwater within the coastal aquifer systems of the Daweijia area in northeastern China is characterized by a large of variations (33-521mg/L) in NO3(-) concentrations. Elevated nitrate concentrations, in addition to seawater intrusion in the Daweijia well field, both attributable to anthropogenic activities, may impact future water-management practices. Chemical and stable isotopic (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) analysis, (3)H and CFCs methods were applied to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the distribution of groundwater mean residence time (MRT) and nitrate transport, and to identify sources of nitrate concentrations in the complex coastal aquifer systems. There is a relatively narrow range of isotopic composition (ranging from -8.5 to -7.0‰) in most groundwater. Generally higher tritium contents observed in the wet season relative to the dry season may result from rapid groundwater circulation in response to the rainfall through the preferential flow paths. In the well field, the relatively increased nitrate concentrations of groundwater, accompanied by the higher tritium contents in the wet season, indicate the nitrate pollution can be attributed to domestic wastes. The binary exponential and piston-flow mixing model (BEP) yielded feasible age distributions based on the conceptual model. The good inverse relationship between groundwater MRTs (92-467years) and the NO3(-) concentrations in the shallow Quaternary aquifers indicates that elevated nitrate concentrations are attributable to more recent recharge for shallow groundwater. However, there is no significant relationship between the MRTs (8-411years) and the NO3(-) concentrations existing in the carbonate aquifer system, due to the complex hydrogeological conditions, groundwater age distributions and the range of contaminant source areas. Nitrate in the groundwater system without denitrification effects could accumulate and be transported for tens of years, through the complex carbonate

  20. Carbon residence time dominates uncertainty in terrestrial vegetation responses to future climate and atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Friend, Andrew D; Lucht, Wolfgang; Rademacher, Tim T; Keribin, Rozenn; Betts, Richard; Cadule, Patricia; Ciais, Philippe; Clark, Douglas B; Dankers, Rutger; Falloon, Pete D; Ito, Akihiko; Kahana, Ron; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R; Nishina, Kazuya; Ostberg, Sebastian; Pavlick, Ryan; Peylin, Philippe; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Vuichard, Nicolas; Warszawski, Lila; Wiltshire, Andy; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-03-04

    Future climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 are expected to cause major changes in vegetation structure and function over large fractions of the global land surface. Seven global vegetation models are used to analyze possible responses to future climate simulated by a range of general circulation models run under all four representative concentration pathway scenarios of changing concentrations of greenhouse gases. All 110 simulations predict an increase in global vegetation carbon to 2100, but with substantial variation between vegetation models. For example, at 4 °C of global land surface warming (510-758 ppm of CO2), vegetation carbon increases by 52-477 Pg C (224 Pg C mean), mainly due to CO2 fertilization of photosynthesis. Simulations agree on large regional increases across much of the boreal forest, western Amazonia, central Africa, western China, and southeast Asia, with reductions across southwestern North America, central South America, southern Mediterranean areas, southwestern Africa, and southwestern Australia. Four vegetation models display discontinuities across 4 °C of warming, indicating global thresholds in the balance of positive and negative influences on productivity and biomass. In contrast to previous global vegetation model studies, we emphasize the importance of uncertainties in projected changes in carbon residence times. We find, when all seven models are considered for one representative concentration pathway × general circulation model combination, such uncertainties explain 30% more variation in modeled vegetation carbon change than responses of net primary productivity alone, increasing to 151% for non-HYBRID4 models. A change in research priorities away from production and toward structural dynamics and demographic processes is recommended.

  1. Estimation of ground water residence times in the Critical zone: insight from U activity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, Francois; Ackerer, Julien; Lucas, Yann; viville, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  2. River delta network hydraulic residence time distributions and their role in coastal nutrient biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, M. R.; Castaneda, E.; Twilley, R.; Hodges, B. R.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    River deltas have the potential to mitigate increased nutrient loading to coastal waters by acting as biofilters that reduce the impact of nutrient enrichment on downstream ecosystems. Hydraulic residence time (HRT) is known to be a major control on biogeochemical processes and deltaic floodplains are hypothesized to have relatively long HRTs. Hydrological connectivity and delta floodplain inundation induced by riverine forces, tides, and winds likely alter surface water flow patterns and HRTs. Since deltaic floodplains are important elements of delta networks and receive significant fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients from distributary channels, biogeochemical transformations occurring within these zones could significantly reduce nutrient loading to coastal receiving waters. However, network-scale estimates of HRT in river deltas are lacking and little is known about the effects of tides, wind, and the riverine input on the HRT distribution. Subsequently, there lacks a benchmark for evaluating the impact of engineered river diversions on coastal nutrient ecology. In this study, we estimate the HRT of a coastal river delta by using hydrodynamic modeling supported by field data and relate the HRT to spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate levels measured at discrete stations inside a delta island at Wax Lake Delta. We highlight the control of the degree of hydrological connectivity between distributary channels and interdistributary islands on the network HRT distribution and address the roles of tides and wind on altering the shape of the distribution. We compare the observed nitrate concentrations to patterns of channel-floodplain hydrological connectivity and find this connectivity to play a significant role in the nutrient removal. Our results provide insight into the potential role of deltaic wetlands in reducing the nutrient loading to near-shore waters in response to large-scale river diversions.

  3. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  4. Sustained Residence Times for Miocene Silicic Magmas of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H. E.; Nash, B. P.

    2001-12-01

    The length of time over which large volume silicic magmas may persist in the crust is poorly constrained, and recent estimates have ranged from a few tens of thousands of years to over 1.0 myr. Compositional relationships among the ten eruptive units of the 12.7 - 10.5 Ma Cougar Point Tuff suggest that a common, long-lived reservoir for these magmas persisted throughout the 2.2 myr explosive phase of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center along the track of the Yellowstone hotspot. Low crystal content and high temperatures (usually greater than 900 degrees C) indicate that the magmas were close to their liquidi. Evidence for the persistence of several discrete magma volumes in the reservoir is contained in multiple compositional modes of glass in basal fallout tuffs and in the recurrence of identical sets of mineral compositional modes in successive eruptions. Multiple modes of glass composition are a common feature in many explosive eruptions of the Yellowstone hotspot. In the Cougar Point Tuff, recurrence intervals of identical modes of glass and pyroxene range from 0.3 to 1.1 Ma, and suggest residence times of similar duration. Pyroxene thermometry indicates that compositionally distinct liquids erupted in the same event differed in temperature by 25-70 degrees C. Eruption ages, pyroxene and glass compositions, magma temperatures, and isotopic ratios for the Cougar Point Tuff are consistent with a long-lived, dynamically evolving magma reservoir that was chemically and thermally zoned in a step-wise fashion, and composed of multiple discrete compositional layers. A continental hotspot, where heat is supplied continually to the lower crust by advection of basalt from the mantle, is the optimum tectonic setting for sustaining silicic melts near their liquidi for extended durations. Neodymium isotopic ratios in the Cougar Point Tuff increase systematically with successive eruptions (eNd -8.5 to -6.6), and record a substantial and increasing mantle contribution to the

  5. Estimation of gastric residence time of the Heidelberg capsule in humans: effect of varying food composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaverian, P.; Ferguson, R.K.; Vlasses, P.H.; Rocci, M.L. Jr.; Oren, A.; Fix, J.A.; Caldwell, L.J.; Gardner, C.

    1985-08-01

    In animal and human studies, the gastric emptying of large (greater than 1 mm) indigestible solids is due to the activity of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex. The gastric residence time (GRT) of an orally administered, nondigestible, pH-sensitive, radiotelemetric device (Heidelberg capsule) was evaluated in three studies in healthy volunteers. In 6 subjects, the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule was compared with the half-emptying time (t1/2) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with technetium 99m after a 4-ml/kg liquid fatty meal. The mean (+/-SD) GRT (4.3 +/- 1.4 h) was significantly (p less than 0.001) longer than the mean t1/2 (1.1 +/- 0.3 h); the GRT was prolonged compared with the t1/2 in each subject. In a randomized, crossover trial in 10 subjects, frequent feeding caused a dramatic prolongation in mean GRT of the capsule compared with the fasting state (greater than 14.5 vs. 0.5 h, p less than 0.005). In another crossover study in 6 subjects, the GRT of the capsule was evaluated after an overnight fast, a standard breakfast including solid food, and a liquid meal (i.e., 200 ml of diluted light cream). The mean GRT was 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the liquid meal vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 h after fasting (p less than 0.025). The mean GRT after the breakfast was 4.8 +/- 1.5 h, which was significantly greater than that after fasting (p less than 0.001) and after the liquid meal (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule is a marker of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in humans, the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex can be markedly delayed by frequent feedings with solids, and the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex is delayed by both liquid and solid meals.

  6. Training for Efficiency: Work, Time, and Systems-Based Practice in Medical Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymczak, Julia E.; Bosk, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Medical residency is a period of intense socialization with a heavy workload. Previous sociological studies have identified efficiency as a practical skill necessary for success. However, many contextual features of the training environment have undergone dramatic change since these studies were conducted. What are the consequences of these…

  7. A multitracer study of radionuclides in Lake Zurich, Switzerland: 2. Residence times, removal processes, and sediment focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, E.; Santschi, P. H.; Beer, J.

    1991-09-01

    Residence and settling times of particles and particle-reactive nuclides evaluated from in situ tracer studies can be used as diagnostic indicators of trace element pathways in lakes. Natural (e.g., 210Pb, 7Be, and 10Be ) and artificial (i.e., Chernobyl 137Cs) radionuclide fluxes through Lake Zurich (at 50 and 130 m depth) from 1983 to 1987, atmospheric fluxes of the same nuclides and fluxes of 10Be during 1987 allowed the calculation of nuclide residence times as well as particle settling and transit velocities in Lake Zurich. The residence time of 210Pb in the lake is approximately 1 month and, hence, of the same order as the residence times of particles and stable Pb. Steady state residence times for 7Be were calculated as 150-170 days, while non steady state, instantaneous removal residence times ranged from 50 to 800 days. Polonium 210 was removed from Lake Zurich with removal times of 10-26, months indicating slow removal processes or efficient recycling in the lake water. Transit velocities of particles, calculated from the attenuation of Chernobyl 137Cs fluxes at 50 m and 130 m depth during early May 1986, were 17 m d-1, while 2-4.5 m d-1 was calculated as an effective settling velocity from the attenuation of 7Be fluxes at 130 m depth as compared to 50 m depth. Model calculations reveal that the overall removal process of atmospherically deposited 7Be from the water column to the sediments is mainly controlled by the adsorption/coagulation step and not by the rate of particle settling. Extra inputs of 10Be, 210Pb, or 137Cs into the lower trap (i.e., "rebound flux"), originating from episodic lateral inputs of fine particles with a high content of 210Pb, 10Be, and 137s, were observed during the lake stratification period (i.e., summer). This novel observation of summertime radionuclide and sediment focusing is different from previously described wind-generated resuspension and focusing effects caused by river plumes and lake sediments during the stagnation

  8. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180{degrees}C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100{degrees}C. Above 100{degrees}C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  9. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180[degrees]C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100[degrees]C. Above 100[degrees]C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  10. Residence times of fine tropospheric aerosols as determined by {sup 210}Pb progeny.

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Drayton, P. J.; Cunningham, M. M.; Mielcarek, C.; Ravelo, R.; Wagner, C.

    1999-10-05

    Fine tropospheric aerosols can play important roles in the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The fine aerosols can act directly to cool the atmosphere by scattering incoming solar radiation, as well as indirectly by serving as cloud condensation nuclei. Fine aerosols, particularly carbonaceous soots, can also warm the atmosphere by absorbing incoming solar radiation. In addition, aerosols smaller than 2.5 {micro}m have recently been implicated in the health effects of air pollution. Aerosol-active radioisotopes are ideal tracers for the study of atmospheric transport processes. The source terms of these radioisotopes are relatively well known, and they are removed from the atmosphere only by radioactive decay or by wet or dry deposition of the host aerosol. The progeny of the primordial radionuclide {sup 238}U are of particular importance to atmospheric studies. Uranium-238 is common throughout Earth's crust and decays to the inert gas {sup 222}Rn, which escapes into the atmosphere. Radon-222 decays by the series of alpha and beta emissions shown in Figure 1 to the long-lived {sup 210}Pb. Once formed, {sup 210}Pb becomes attached to aerosol particles with average attachment times of 40 s to 3 min.

  11. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species’ native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the

  12. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  13. Patterns and processes of fluvial discontinuity and sediment residence times on the lower Macquarie River, Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Zacchary; Ralph, Timothy; Hesse, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The supply, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment are important factors determining the morphology of lowland rivers that experience channel breakdown and have wetlands on their lower reaches. Sediment supply and residence time determine whether reaches accumulate sediment (wetland areas) or erode sediment (channelised areas). This research investigated how processes of sedimentation and erosion drive channel breakdown and reformation in the Macquarie Marshes, a large anastomosing wetland system in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Channel breakdown is attributed to a dominance of in-stream sedimentation that leads to a point where single-thread river channels cannot be maintained and so avulsion and floodout processes create smaller distributary channels and wetlands. Avulsions may reconnect channels, changing the sediment supply regime in those particular channels. Channel reformation occurs on the trunk stream where the floodplain gradient steepens enough to allow convergence of small tributaries, locally increasing stream power (and erosive energy in channels). As each river reach reforms following channel breakdown, the channel is smaller, shallower and straighter than the previous reach. One reach in this system recently (in the 1970s) became connected with a parallel channel through avulsion and has morphological characteristics that indicate a significant change in flow and sediment supply. In a pilot study using uranium-series disequilibrium methods and OSL dating, a sediment residence time of 58 +/- 2 ka was determined for sediment in the base of the active channel and a sediment residence time of 153 +/- 5 ka was determined for sediment buried in an adjacent meander that was cut off from the main channel 1,000 years ago. The apparent dramatic decrease in sediment residence time to this active channel poses an interesting question about the role of relatively new channels in transporting and depositing sediment more rapidly than the

  14. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; George, Anthe

    2015-08-26

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amountsmore » of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. In conclusion, the reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high

  15. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; George, Anthe

    2015-08-26

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. In conclusion, the reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high

  16. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  17. PCB-containing wood floor finish is a likely source of elevated PCBs in residents' blood, household air and dust: a case study of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, Ruthann A; Seryak, Liesel M; Brody, Julia G

    2008-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants identified worldwide as human blood and breast milk contaminants. Because they bioaccumulate, consumption of meat, fish, and dairy products predicts human blood concentrations. PCBs were also used widely in building materials, including caulks and paints, but few studies have evaluated the contribution of these exposures to body burden. Methods In an earlier study, we detected PCBs in indoor air in 31% of 120 homes on Cape Cod, MA. Two of the homes had much higher concentrations than the rest, so we retested to verify the initial finding, evaluate blood PCB concentrations of residents, and identify the PCB source. Results Air and dust concentrations remained elevated over 5 years between initial and follow-up sampling. Blood serum concentrations of PCBs in residents of the homes were generally elevated above the 95th percentile of a representative sample of the US population. Serum concentrations in residents and air and dust concentrations were especially high in a home where a resident reported use of PCB-containing floor finish in the past, and where the floor of one room was sanded and refinished just prior to sample collection. Conclusion This case-study suggests that PCB residues in homes may be more significant contributors to overall exposure than diet for some people, and that use of a commercially-available PCB-containing wood floor finish in residences during the 1950s and 1960s is an overlooked but potentially important source of current PCB exposure in the general population. PMID:18201376

  18. Recovering FICA tax paid on resident stipends: time for a strategic review.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Teaching hospitals often have tens of millions in FICA-tax refund claims pending with the IRS-claims that reach back to taxes paid in the mid-1990s. Court decisions rendered over the past few years in this area have been positive for teaching hospitals and their residents. In light of recent trends, it would be prudent for teaching hospitals to update their strategies for moving these long-pending refund claims forward to a successful resolution.

  19. Caregiver Person-Centeredness and Behavioral Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Timed-Event Sequential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Roberts, Tonya J.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Brown, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that person-centered caregiving approaches may reduce dementia-related behavioral symptoms; however, little is known about the sequential and temporal associations between specific caregiver actions and behavioral symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify sequential associations between caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and the temporal variation within these associations. Design and Methods: Videorecorded observations of naturally occurring interactions (N = 33; 724min) between 12 nursing home (NH) residents with dementia and eight certified nursing assistants were coded for caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and analyzed using timed-event sequential analysis. Results: Although caregiver actions were predominantly person-centered, we found that resident behavioral symptoms were significantly more likely to occur following task-centered caregiver actions than person-centered actions. Implications: Findings suggest that the person-centeredness of caregivers is sequentially and temporally related to behavioral symptoms in individuals with dementia. Additional research examining the temporal structure of these relationships may offer valuable insights into the utility of caregiver person-centeredness as a low-cost strategy for improving behavioral symptom management in the NH setting. PMID:26055782

  20. Increasing functional modularity with residence time in the co-distribution of native and introduced vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Hui, Cang; Richardson, David M; Pyšek, Petr; Le Roux, Johannes J; Kučera, Tomáš; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    Species gain membership of regional assemblages by passing through multiple ecological and environmental filters. To capture the potential trajectory of structural changes in regional meta-communities driven by biological invasions, one can categorize species pools into assemblages of different residence times. Older assemblages, having passed through more environmental filters, should become more functionally ordered and structured. Here we calculate the level of compartmentalization (modularity) for three different-aged assemblages (neophytes, introduced after 1500 AD; archaeophytes, introduced before 1500 AD, and natives), including 2,054 species of vascular plants in 302 reserves in central Europe. Older assemblages are more compartmentalized than younger ones, with species composition, phylogenetic structure and habitat characteristics of the modules becoming increasingly distinctive. This sheds light on two mechanisms of how alien species are functionally incorporated into regional species pools: the settling-down hypothesis of diminishing stochasticity with residence time, and the niche-mosaic hypothesis of inlaid neutral modules in regional meta-communities.

  1. Atmospheric residence time of (210)Pb determined from the activity ratios with its daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Semertzidou, P; Piliposian, G T; Appleby, P G

    2016-08-01

    The residence time of (210)Pb created in the atmosphere by the decay of gaseous (222)Rn is a key parameter controlling its distribution and fallout onto the landscape. These in turn are key parameters governing the use of this natural radionuclide for dating and interpreting environmental records stored in natural archives such as lake sediments. One of the principal methods for estimating the atmospheric residence time is through measurements of the activities of the daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po, and in particular the (210)Bi/(210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios. Calculations used in early empirical studies assumed that these were governed by a simple series of equilibrium equations. This approach does however have two failings; it takes no account of the effect of global circulation on spatial variations in the activity ratios, and no allowance is made for the impact of transport processes across the tropopause. This paper presents a simple model for calculating the distributions of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po at northern mid-latitudes (30°-65°N), a region containing almost all the available empirical data. By comparing modelled (210)Bi/(210)Pb activity ratios with empirical data a best estimate for the tropospheric residence time of around 10 days is obtained. This is significantly longer than earlier estimates of between 4 and 7 days. The process whereby (210)Pb is transported into the stratosphere when tropospheric concentrations are high and returned from it when they are low, significantly increases the effective residence time in the atmosphere as a whole. The effect of this is to significantly enhance the long range transport of (210)Pb from its source locations. The impact is illustrated by calculations showing the distribution of (210)Pb fallout versus longitude at northern mid-latitudes.

  2. Hydrodynamics, temperature/salinity variability and residence time in the Chilika lagoon during dry and wet period: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanty, M. M.; Mohanty, P. K.; Pattnaik, A. K.; Panda, U. S.; Pradhan, S.; Samal, R. N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigated the hydrodynamics, spatio-temporal variability of temperature/salinity and the residence time of tracer concentrations in a largest brackish water coastal lagoon in Asia, namely the Chilika lagoon, India. An integrated approach combined the measurement and 2D hydrodynamic-advection/dispersion model is used to simulate circulation and temperature/salinity, and estimated the water residence time in lagoon under different forcing mechanisms, such as tide, wind and freshwater discharge during the dry and wet periods. Water circulation inside the lagoon is simulated when wind is included with the tide only forcing during dry period, and freshwater influx is included with the tide and wind forcing during wet period. Under the realistic forcing conditions, the computed temporal variability of water temperature and salinity are well correlated with the measurements in both the periods. The spatial variations of water temperature within the lagoon is influenced by the meteorological conditions, tide and freshwater influx as well as the shallowness of the lagoon, whereas the salinity is spatially controlled by the freshwater influx from the riverine system and seawater intrusion through the tidal inlets. The numerical model results show that in the Chilika lagoon tidal and river influx affect significantly the residence time spatially, and is site specific. The residence time varies from values of 4-5 days in the outer channel (OC) and 132 days at the northern sector (NS) in the main body of lagoon. The current study represents a first attempt to use a combined model approach, which is therefore, a useful tool to support the ecological implication of the lagoon ecosystem.

  3. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Zhang, Yong; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-12-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3- reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He), 14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3- and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3- reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3- trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  4. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant; Zhang, Yong; Starn, Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3− reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He),14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3− and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3− reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3− trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  5. Natural radionuclides (210)Po and (210)Pb in the Delaware and Chesapeake Estuaries: modeling scavenging rates and residence times.

    PubMed

    Marsan, D; Rigaud, S; Church, T

    2014-12-01

    During the spring and summer months of 2012, (210)Po and (210)Pb activity were measured in the dissolved and particulate phases from the Delaware and upper Chesapeake estuaries. The upper Delaware estuary, near the freshwater end member, was characterized by high-suspended matter concentrations that scavenged dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb. Box models were applied using mass balance calculations to assess the nuclides residence times in each estuary. Only 60% of the dissolved (210)Po and 55% of the dissolved (210)Pb from the Delaware estuary were exported to coastal waters. A large fraction of soluble (210)Po and (210)Pb within the estuary was either reversibly adsorbed onto suspended particles, trapped in sediment accumulation zones (such as intertidal marshes), bioaccumulated into phytoplankton and discharged to the coastal ocean. The upper Chesapeake estuary was largely characterized by sub-oxic bottom waters that contained higher concentrations of dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb, hypothesized to be subjected to redox cycling of manganese. The Delaware and Chesapeake estuary mean residence times for (210)Po differed significantly at 86 ± 7 and 126 ± 10 days respectively, while they were similar for (210)Pb (67 ± 6-55 ± 5 days). The difference in residence times corresponds to the greater extent of biogeochemical scavenging and regeneration processes within the upper Chesapeake.

  6. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents. PMID:27094554

  7. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  8. SUBSURFACE RESIDENCE TIMES AS AN ALGORITHM FOR AQUIFER SENSITIVITY MAPPING: TESTING THE CONCEPT WITH ANALYTIC ELEMENT GROUND WATER MODELS IN THE CONTENTNEA CREEK BASIN, NORTH CAROLINA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to test the utility of simple functions of spatially integrated and temporally averaged ground water residence times in shallow "groundwatersheds" with field observations and more detailed computer simulations. The residence time of water in the...

  9. Daily variation of radon gas and its short-lived progeny concentration near ground level and estimation of aerosol residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Mohery; A, M. Abdallah; A, Ali; S, S. Baz

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of radon (222Rn) gas and its short-lived progenies 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Po were continuously monitored every four hours at the ground level in Jeddah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed three times every week, starting from November 2014 to October 2015. A method of electrostatic precipitation of positively charged 218Po and 214Po by a positive voltage was applied for determining 222Rn gas concentration. The short-lived 222Rn progeny concentration was determined by using a filter holder connected with the alpha-spectrometric technique. The meteorological parameters (relative air humidity, air temperature, and wind speed) were determined during the measurements of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. 222Rn gas as well as its short-lived progeny concentration display a daily and seasonal variation with high values in the night and early morning hours as compared to low values at noon and in the afternoon. The observed monthly atmospheric concentrations showed a seasonal trend with the highest values in the autumn/winter season and the lowest values in the spring/summer season. Moreover, and in parallel with alpha-spectrometric measurements, a single filter-holder was used to collect air samples. The deposited activities of 214Pb and the long-lived 222Rn daughter 210Pb on the filter were measured with the gamma spectrometric technique. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb by both techniques were found to be relatively equal largely. The highest mean seasonally activity concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn/winter season while the lowest mean were observed in the spring/summer season. The mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmospheric air could be estimated from the activity ratios of 210Pb/214Pb. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Grant No. 291/965/1434).

  10. Mapping real-time air pollution health risk for environmental management: Combining mobile and stationary air pollution monitoring with neural network models.

    PubMed

    Adams, Matthew D; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution poses health concerns at the global scale. The challenge of managing air pollution is significant because of the many air pollutants, insufficient funds for monitoring and abatement programs, and political and social challenges in defining policy to limit emissions. Some governments provide citizens with air pollution health risk information to allow them to limit their exposure. However, many regions still have insufficient air pollution monitoring networks to provide real-time mapping. Where available, these risk mapping systems either provide absolute concentration data or the concentrations are used to derive an Air Quality Index, which provides the air pollution risk for a mix of air pollutants with a single value. When risk information is presented as a single value for an entire region it does not inform on the spatial variation within the region. Without an understanding of the local variation residents can only make a partially informed decision when choosing daily activities. The single value is typically provided because of a limited number of active monitoring units in the area. In our work, we overcome this issue by leveraging mobile air pollution monitoring techniques, meteorological information and land use information to map real-time air pollution health risks. We propose an approach that can provide improved health risk information to the public by applying neural network models within a framework that is inspired by land use regression. Mobile air pollution monitoring campaigns were conducted across Hamilton from 2005 to 2013. These mobile air pollution data were modelled with a number of predictor variables that included information on the surrounding land use characteristics, the meteorological conditions, air pollution concentrations from fixed location monitors, and traffic information during the time of collection. Fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide were both modelled. During the model fitting process we reserved

  11. The response of streambed nitrogen cycling to spatial and temporal hyporheic vertical flux patterns and associated residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Lautz, L. K.; Hare, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Small beaver dams enhance the development of patchy micro-environments along the stream corridor by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This generates intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of oxygen and redox sensitive solutes between the water column and the streambed, and exert control on the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. Specifically, flowpaths from the stream into the subsurface with low residence times create oxic conditions that favor nitrification, while flowpaths with longer residence times become anoxic and favor denitrification. To investigate these processes we collected vertical profiles of pore water upstream of two beaver dams in Wyoming, USA at nine locations with varied morphology. We sampled pore water to the 0.55 m depth every week for five weeks as stream discharge dropped by 45% and subsequently measured concentrations of dissolved oxygen and several redox sensitive solutes, including nitrate. Additionally, estimates of hyporheic flux along these nine vertical profiles through time were made using high-resolution heat data combined with 1-D heat transport modeling. The data show that areas of rapid, deep hyporheic flux at the glides immediately upstream of the dams were oxygen rich, and were generally sites of moderate net nitrification to at least the 0.35 m depth. These conditions were relatively steady over the study period. Hyporheic zones at sediment bars closest to the dams were hotspots of nitrate production to a depth of 0.35 m, with nitrate concentrations increasing by as much as 400% as vertical flux fell sharply and residence times increased over the study period. In contrast, shallow bars farther upstream from the dams showed increasing fluxes and decreased residence times, which caused a shift from net denitrification to net nitrification over the period at shallow depths. These results support previous work indicating threshold behavior of nitrogen cycling in response to

  12. Impact of Timing of Birth and Resident Duty-Hour Restrictions on Outcome of Small Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Edward F.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Morriss, Frank H.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the impact of birth at night, on the weekend, and during July or August – the first months of the academic year – and the impact of resident duty-hour restrictions on mortality and morbidity of VLBW infants. METHODS Outcomes were analyzed for 11,137 infants with birth weight 501–1250 grams enrolled in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network registry 2001–2005. Approximately half were born before the introduction of resident duty-hour restrictions in 2003. Follow-up assessment at 18–22 months was completed for 4,508 infants. Mortality (7-day and 28-day), short-term morbidities, and neurodevelopmental outcome were examined with respect to the timing of birth: night vs day, weekend vs weekday, and July or August vs other months, and after vs before implementation of resident duty-hour restrictions. RESULTS There was no effect of hour, day, or month of birth on mortality and no impact on the risks of short-term morbidities except the risk of ROP requiring operative treatment was lower for infants born during the late night hours than during the day. There was no impact of timing of birth on neurodevelopmental outcome except the risk of hearing impairment or death was slightly lower among infants born in July or August compared with other months. The introduction of resident and fellow duty-hour restrictions had no impact on mortality or neurodevelopmental outcome. The only change in short-term morbidity after duty-hour restrictions were introduced was an increase in the risk of ROP (stage 2 or higher). CONCLUSION In this network of academic centers, the timing of birth and the introduction of duty-hour restrictions had little effect on the risks of mortality and morbidity of VLBW infants, suggesting that staffing patterns were adequate to provide consistent care. PMID:20643715

  13. Residence times and nitrate transport in ground water discharging to streams in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Phillips, Scott; Donnelly, Colleen A.; Speiran, Gary K.; Plummer, L. Niel; Bohlke, John-Karl; Focazio, Michael J.; Burton, William C.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    One of the major water-quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay is an overabundance of nutrients from the streams and rivers that discharge to the Bay. Some of these nutrients are from nonpoint sources such as atmospheric deposition, agricultural manure and fertilizer, and septic systems. The effects of efforts to control nonpoint sources, however, can be difficult to quantify because of the lag time between changes at the land surface and the response in the base-flow (ground water) component of streams. To help resource managers understand the lag time between implementation of management practices and subsequent response in the nutrient concentrations in the base-flow component of streamflow, a study of ground-water discharge, residence time, and nitrate transport in springs throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and in four smaller watersheds in selected hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMRs) was conducted. The four watersheds were in the Coastal Plain Uplands, Piedmont crystalline, Valley and Ridge carbonate, and Valley and Ridge siliciclastic HGMRs. A study of springs to estimate an apparent age of the ground water was based on analyses for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons in water samples collected from 48 springs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Results of the analysis indicate that median age for all the samples was 10 years, with the 25th percentile having an age of 7 years and the 75th percentile having an age of 13 years. Although the number of samples collected in each HGMR was limited, there did not appear to be distinct differences in the ages between the HGMRs. The ranges were similar between the major HGMRs above the Fall Line (modern to about 50 years), with only two HGMRs of small geographic extent (Piedmont carbonate and Mesozoic Lowland) having ranges of modern to about 10 years. The median values of all the HGMRs ranged from 7 to 11 years. Not enough samples were collected in the Coastal Plain for comparison. Spring samples showed slightly

  14. Latitude of residence and position in time zone are predictors of cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth.

    PubMed

    Borisenkov, Mikhail F

    2011-03-01

    According to the hypothesis of circadian disruption, external factors that disturb the function of the circadian system can raise the risk of malignant neoplasm and reduce life span. Recent work has shown that the functionality of the circadian system is dependent not only on latitude of residence but also on the region's position in the time zone. The purpose of the present research was to examine the influence of latitude and time zone on cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was carried out on residents of 59 regions of the European part of the Russian Federation (EPRF) using age-standardized parameters (per 100,000) of cancer incidence (CI), cancer mortality (CM), and life expectancy at birth (LE, yrs) as dependent variables. The geographical coordinates (latitude and position in the time zone) of the regions were used as independent variables, controlling for the level of economic development in the regions. The same analysis was carried out for LE in 31 regions in China. Latitude was the strongest predictor of LE in the EPRF population; it explained 48% and 45% of the variability in LE of women and men, respectively. Position within the time zone accounted for an additional 4% and 3% variability of LE in women and men, respectively. The highest values for LE were observed in the southeast of the EPRF. In China, latitude was not a predictor of LE, whereas position in the time zone explained 15% and 18% of the LE variability in women and men, respectively. The highest values of LE were observed in the eastern regions of China. Both latitude and position within the time zone were predictors for CI and CM of the EPRF population. Latitude was the best predictor of stomach CI and CM; this predictor explained 46% and 50% of the variability, respectively. Position within the time zone was the best predictor of female breast CM; it explained 15% of the variability. In most cases, CI and CM increased

  15. A new time-space accounting scheme to predict stream water residence time and hydrograph source components at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayama, Takahiro; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrograph source components and stream water residence time are fundamental behavioral descriptors of watersheds but, as yet, are poorly represented in most rainfall-runoff models. We present a new time-space accounting scheme (T-SAS) to simulate the pre-event and event water fractions, mean residence time, and spatial source of streamflow at the watershed scale. We use a physically based hydrologic model together with field data from the well-studied Maimai M8 watershed and HJ Andrews WS10 watershed to explore how catchment properties, particularly soil depth, controls the age and source of streamflow. Our model simulates unsaturated, saturated subsurface, and surface rainfall-runoff processes. We first demonstrate the ability of the model to capture hydrograph dynamics and compare the model flow component and age simulations against measured values at the two sites. We show that the T-SAS approach can capture flow and transport dynamics for the right dominant process reasons. We then conduct a series of virtual experiments by switching soil depths between the two watersheds to understand how soil depth and its distribution control water age and source. Results suggest that thicker soils increase mean residence time and damp its temporal dynamics in response to rainfall inputs. Soil depth influenced the geographic source of streamflow, whereas pre-event water sources became more concentrated to near stream zones as soil depth increased. Our T-SAS approach provides a learning tool for linking the dynamics of residence time and time-space sources of flow at the watershed scale and may be a useful framework for other distributed rainfall-runoff models.

  16. Maintaining social cohesion is a more important determinant of patch residence time than maximizing food intake rate in a group-living primate, Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Kazahari, Nobuko

    2014-04-01

    Animals have been assumed to employ an optimal foraging strategy (e.g., rate-maximizing strategy). In patchy food environments, intake rate within patches is positively correlated with patch quality, and declines as patches are depleted through consumption. This causes patch-leaving and determines patch residence time. In group-foraging situations, patch residence times are also affected by patch sharing. Optimal patch models for groups predict that patch residence times decrease as the number of co-feeding animals increases because of accelerated patch depletion. However, group members often depart patches without patch depletion, and their patch residence time deviates from patch models. It has been pointed out that patch residence time is also influenced by maintaining social proximity with others among group-living animals. In this study, the effects of maintaining social cohesion and that of rate-maximizing strategy on patch residence time were examined in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). I hypothesized that foragers give up patches to remain in the proximity of their troop members. On the other hand, foragers may stay for a relatively long period when they do not have to abandon patches to follow the troop. In this study, intake rate and foraging effort (i.e., movement) did not change during patch residency. Macaques maintained their intake rate with only a little foraging effort. Therefore, the patches were assumed to be undepleted during patch residency. Further, patch residence time was affected by patch-leaving to maintain social proximity, but not by the intake rate. Macaques tended to stay in patches for short periods when they needed to give up patches for social proximity, and remained for long periods when they did not need to leave to keep social proximity. Patch-leaving and patch residence time that prioritize the maintenance of social cohesion may be a behavioral pattern in group-living primates.

  17. A wintertime study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor and outdoor air in a big student residence in Algiers, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Khedidji, Sidali; Ladji, Riad; Yassaa, Noureddine

    2013-07-01

    The wintertime concentrations and diel cycles of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated to atmospheric particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter lesser than 10 μm were determined at the biggest student residence in Algeria located in Bab-Ezzouar, 15 km southeast from Algiers city area. Samplings were carried out from December 2009 to March 2010, and organic compounds were characterized using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection. Volatile PAHs were also monitored inside some student residence rooms in order to evaluate the impact of indoor air pollution to student health. For the sake of comparison, aerial concentrations of n-alkanes and PAHs were determined in parallel in the Oued Smar industrial zone and two suburban areas, all located in Algiers. Total concentrations recorded in CUB1 student residence ranged from 101 to 204 ng m(-3) for n-alkanes and from 8 to 87 ng m(-3) for PAHs. Diel cycles have shown that, while concentrations of n-alkanes peaked at morning and afternoon-evening and dropped at night, those of PAHs exhibited higher levels at morning and night and lower levels at afternoon-evening, likely due to the reactivity of some PAHs. As expected, the indoor levels of PAHs were larger than in the outdoor of the student residence and were of serious health concern. Overall, the concentrations of n-alkanes and PAHs were as high as those observed in the industrial zone and higher than the two suburban sites.

  18. Simultaneous service approach for reducing air passenger queue time

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.A.; Sodeinde, T.

    2000-02-01

    Simultaneous service offers service-oriented organizations, such as the air passenger transportation industry, the opportunity to differentiate themselves by providing superior customer service. The concept of simultaneous service is analogous to the concept of simultaneous engineering. However, while simultaneous engineering strives to minimize product development time, simultaneous service strives to minimize customer processing time. Overall customer processing time is reduced by the identification and simultaneous alignment of previously sequentially executed customer service activities. A simultaneous service approach was applied to the international ticketing counter at a major international airport. This involved developing both equipment and operational policy alternatives to the normal sequencing of the ticketing and baggage check-in process. A total of five alternative simultaneous service approaches were investigated. Simulation analysis of these alternatives indicates that a 36% improvement in customer queue and servicing time was possible with this approach.

  19. Tropospheric concentrations of methylchloroform, CH3CCl3, in January 1978 and estimates of the atmospheric residence times for hydrohalocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Makide, Yoshihiro; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1981-01-01

    The ground level tropospheric concentrations of CH3CCl3 were measured from 55°N to 53°S during the time period around Jan. 1, 1978. The northern temperate zone concentration of CH3CCl3 averaged 94.6 ± 4.0 × 10-12 by volume. The southern temperate zone concentration averaged 65.2 ± 1.3 × 10-12, for a worldwide average of 80 × 10-12 by volume. The ratio of concentrations between the two zones is 1.45 ± 0.07. The observed CH3CCl3 concentrations correspond to 0.52 ± 0.05 times the atmospheric release to that date, corresponding to an atmospheric residence time of 6.9 ± 1.2 yr. The atmospheric residence times for 22 other hydrohalocarbon molecules were estimated in comparison to that of CH3CCl3 through the relative rates of reaction with OH radicals. PMID:16593096

  20. Balance and residence times of 210Pb and 210Po in surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masqué, P.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Bruach, J. M.; Palacios, E.; Canals, M.

    2002-10-01

    Concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides 210Pb and 210Po were determined in both the dissolved (<0.2 μm) and particulate (>0.2 μm) fractions in surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. About 4-8% of the 210Pb activity was observed to be associated to particles, which were determined as being mostly biogenic. The 210Po content in the particulate fraction was generally greater than that of 210Pb, accounting for about 20% of the total activity. Total activities of 210Pb and 210Po were found to be in equilibrium. 226Ra concentrations were also determined in an effort to investigate its occurrence in Mediterranean waters. 226Ra was in excess to both 210Pb and 210Po, with a mean concentration of 1.72±0.03 Bq m -3. Steady-state balance equations of the three radionuclides permit calculation of residence times for 210Pb and 210Po in surface waters (0.8 and 3.0 yr, respectively). 210Po residence times were almost one order of magnitude higher than mostly reported values. Polonium is known to manifest higher affinity and different binding mechanisms (by entering the organic cycle) to biogenic material than 210Pb. Several processes, such as 210Po uptake by buoyant particles and recycling of organic matter in the surface layer, could lead to such long residence times of 210Po and, therefore, of organic particles in surface waters. Larger 210Po atmospheric fluxes than those here considered and inputs from rivers and/or fine-grained sediment resuspension could also help to explain the observation, although presumably to a lesser extent.

  1. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  2. Toward real-time en route air traffic control optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Matthew Robert

    The increase in air traffic along the existing jet route structure has led to inefficiencies and frequent congestion in en route airspace. Analysis of air-traffic data suggests that direct operating costs might be reduced by about 4.5%, or $500 million per year, if aircraft were permitted to fly optimal wind routes instead of the structured routes allowed today. To enable aircraft to fly along unstructured optimal routes safely, automation is required to aid air-traffic controllers. This requires the global solution for conflict-free optimal routes for many aircraft in real time. The constraint that all aircraft must maintain adequate separation from one another results in a greater-than-exponential increase in the complexity of the multi-aircraft optimization problem. The main challenges addressed in this dissertation are in the areas of optimal wind routing, computationally efficient aircraft conflict detection, and efficient conflict resolution. A core contribution is the derivation of an analytical neighboring optimal control solution for the efficient computation of optimal wind routes. The neighboring optimal control algorithm uses an order of magnitude less computational effort to achieve the same performance as existing algorithms, and is easily extended to compute near-optimal conflict free trajectories. A conflict detection algorithm as been developed which eliminates the need to compute inter-aircraft distances. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate an integrated horizontal route-optimization and conflict-resolution method for air-traffic control. Conflict-free solutions have been computed for roughly double the current-day traffic density for a single flight level (over 600 aircraft) in less than 1 minute on a 450-MHz UNIX work station. This corresponds to a computation rate of better than 25 optimal routes per second. Extrapolation of the two-dimensional results to the multi-flight-level domain suggests that the complete solution for optimal

  3. Air pollutants degrade floral scents and increase insect foraging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Jose D.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Roulston, T.'ai; Chen, Bicheng; Pratt, Kenneth R.

    2016-09-01

    Flowers emit mixtures of scents that mediate plant-insect interactions such as attracting insect pollinators. Because of their volatile nature, however, floral scents readily react with ozone, nitrate radical, and hydroxyl radical. The result of such reactions is the degradation and the chemical modification of scent plumes downwind of floral sources. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are developed to investigate dispersion and chemical degradation and modification of floral scents due to reactions with ozone, hydroxyl radical, and nitrate radical within the atmospheric surface layer. Impacts on foraging insects are investigated by utilizing a random walk model to simulate insect search behavior. Results indicate that even moderate air pollutant levels (e.g., ozone mixing ratios greater than 60 parts per billion on a per volume basis, ppbv) substantially degrade floral volatiles and alter the chemical composition of released floral scents. As a result, insect success rates of locating plumes of floral scents were reduced and foraging times increased in polluted air masses due to considerable degradation and changes in the composition of floral scents. Results also indicate that plant-pollinator interactions could be sensitive to changes in floral scent composition, especially if insects are unable to adapt to the modified scentscape. The increase in foraging time could have severe cascading and pernicious impacts on the fitness of foraging insects by reducing the time devoted to other necessary tasks.

  4. Time-based air traffic management using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Scoggins, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype expert system has been developed for the time scheduling of aircraft into the terminal area. The three functions of the air-traffic-control schedule advisor are as follows: (1) for each new arrival, it develops an admisible flight plan for that aircraft; (2) as the aircraft progresses through the terminal area, it monitors deviations from the aircraft's flight plan and provides advisories to return the aircraft to its assigned schedule; and (3) if major disruptions such as missed approaches occur, it develops a revised plan. The advisor is operational on a Symbolics 3600, and is programmed in MRS (a logic programming language), Lisp, and Fortran.

  5. Time-Accurate Numerical Simulations of Synthetic Jet Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupesh, K-A. B.; Ravi, B. R.; Mittal, R.; Raju, R.; Gallas, Q.; Cattafesta, L.

    2007-01-01

    The unsteady evolution of three-dimensional synthetic jet into quiescent air is studied by time-accurate numerical simulations using a second-order accurate mixed explicit-implicit fractional step scheme on Cartesian grids. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations of synthetic jet are carried out at a Reynolds number (based on average velocity during the discharge phase of the cycle V(sub j), and jet width d) of 750 and Stokes number of 17.02. The results obtained are assessed against PIV and hotwire measurements provided for the NASA LaRC workshop on CFD validation of synthetic jets.

  6. Time-based air traffic management using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Scoggins, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype expert system was developed for the time scheduling of aircraft into the terminal area. The three functions of the air traffic control schedule advisor are as follows: first, for each new arrival, it develops an admissible flight plan for that aircraft. Second, as the aircraft progresses through the terminal area, it monitors deviations from the flight plan and provides advisories to return the aircraft to its assigned schedule. Third, if major disruptions such as missed approaches occur, it develops a revised plan. The advisor is operational on a Symbolics 3600, and is programed in MRS (a logic programming language), Lisp, and FORTRAN.

  7. Multi-tracer investigation of groundwater residence time in a karstic aquifer: Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Lewis; Huff, G. F.

    2010-03-01

    Several natural and anthropogenic tracers have been used to evaluate groundwater residence time within a karstic limestone aquifer in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Natural groundwater discharge occurs in the lower Pecos Valley from a region of karst springs, wetlands and sinkhole lakes at Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, on the northeast margin of the Roswell Artesian Basin. The springs and sinkholes are formed in gypsum bedrock that serves as a leaky confining unit for an artesian aquifer in the underlying San Andres limestone. Because wetlands on the Refuge provide habitat for threatened and endangered species, there is concern about the potential for contamination by anthropogenic activity in the aquifer recharge area. Estimates of the time required for groundwater to travel through the artesian aquifer vary widely because of uncertainties regarding karst conduit flow. A better understanding of groundwater residence time is required to make informed decisions about management of water resources and wildlife habitat at Bitter Lakes. Results indicate that the artesian aquifer contains a significant component of water recharged within the last 10-50 years, combined with pre-modern groundwater originating from deeper underlying aquifers, some of which may be indirectly sourced from the high Sacramento Mountains to the west.

  8. Multi-Tracer Investigation of Groundwater Residence Time in a Karstic Aquifer: Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, L. A.; Huff, R.

    2009-12-01

    Several natural and anthropogenic tracers are used to evaluate groundwater residence time within the karstic limestone aquifer of the Roswell Artesian Basin, southeastern New Mexico, USA. Natural groundwater discharge occurs in the lower Pecos Valley from a region of karst springs, wetlands and sinkhole lakes at Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. The springs and sinkholes are formed in gypsum bedrock that serves as a leaky confining unit for an artesian aquifer in the underlying San Andres limestone. Because wetlands on the Refuge provide habitat for a number of threatened and endangered species, Refuge managers have expressed concern about the potential for contamination by anthropogenic activity in the aquifer recharge area. Estimates of the time required for groundwater to travel through the artesian aquifer vary widely because of uncertainties regarding the role of karst conduit flow. A better understanding of groundwater residence time is thus required to make informed decisions about management of water resources and wildlife habitat at Bitter Lakes. Results of tracer investigations indicate that the artesian aquifer contains a significant component of water recharged within the last 10 to 50 years, combined with pre-modern groundwater originating from deeper underlying aquifers, some of which may be indirectly sourced from the high Sacramento Mountains to the west.

  9. Para-chlorophenol containing synthetic wastewater treatment in an activated sludge unit: effects of hydraulic residence time.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Fikret; Konya, Isil

    2007-07-01

    Due to the toxic nature of chlorophenol compounds present in some chemical industry effluents, biological treatment of such wastewaters is usually realized with low treatment efficiencies. Para-chlorophenol (4-chlorophenol, 4-CP) containing synthetic wastewater was treated in an activated sludge unit at different hydraulic residence times (HRT) varying between 5 and 30 h while the feed COD (2500 mg l(-1)), 4-CP (500 mg l(-1)) and sludge age (SRT, 10 days) were constant. Effects of HRT variations on COD, 4-CP, toxicity removals and on settling characteristics of the sludge were investigated. Percent COD removals increased and the effluent COD concentrations decreased when HRT increased from 5 to 15 h and remained almost constant for larger HRT levels. Nearly, 91% COD and 99% 4-CP removals were obtained at HRT levels above 15 h. Because of the highly concentrated microbial population at HRT levels of above 15 h, low effluent (reactor) 4-CP concentrations and almost complete toxicity removals were obtained. High biomass concentrations obtained at HRT levels above 15 h were due to low 4-CP contents in the aeration tank yielding negligible inhibition effects and low maintenance requirements. The sludge volume index (SVI) decreased with increasing HRT up to 15 h due to high biomass concentrations at high HRT levels resulting in well settling sludge with low SVI values. Hydraulic residence times above 15 h resulted in more than 90% COD and complete 4-CP and toxicity removals along with well settling sludge.

  10. A [32P]-NAD+-based method to identify and quantitate long residence time enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weixuan; Neckles, Carla; Chang, Andrew; Bommineni, Gopal Reddy; Spagnuolo, Lauren; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Nina; Lai, Christina; Truglio, James; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The classical methods for quantifying drug-target residence time (tR) use loss or regain of enzyme activity in progress curve kinetic assays. However, such methods become imprecise at very long residence times, mitigating the use of alternative strategies. Using the NAD(P)H-dependent FabI enoyl-ACP reductase as a model system, we developed a Penefsky column-based method for direct measurement of tR, where the off-rate of the drug was determined with radiolabeled [adenylate-32P] NAD(P+) cofactor. Twenty-three FabI inhibitors were analyzed and a mathematical model was used to estimate limits to the tR values of each inhibitor based on percent drug-target complex recovery following gel filtration. In general, this method showed good agreement with the classical steady state kinetic methods for compounds with tR values of 10-100 min. In addition, we were able to identify seven long tR inhibitors (100-1500 min) and to accurately determine their tR values. The method was then used to measure tR as a function of temperature, an analysis not previously possible using the standard kinetic approach due to decreased NAD(P)H stability at elevated temperatures. In general, a 4-fold difference in tR was observed when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 37 °C . PMID:25684450

  11. Treatment of zinc-rich acid mine water in low residence time bioreactors incorporating waste shells and methanol dosing.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Davis, J; Silva, V; Jarvis, A P

    2011-10-15

    Bioreactors utilising bacterially mediated sulphate reduction (BSR) have been widely tested for treating metal-rich waters, but sustained treatment of mobile metals (e.g. Zn) can be difficult to achieve in short residence time systems. Data are presented providing an assessment of alkalinity generating media (shells or limestone) and modes of metal removal in bioreactors receiving a synthetic acidic metal mine discharge (pH 2.7, Zn 15 mg/L, SO(4)(2-) 200mg/L, net acidity 103 mg/L as CaCO(3)) subject to methanol dosing. In addition to alkalinity generating media (50%, v.v.), the columns comprised an organic matrix of softwood chippings (30%), manure (10%) and anaerobic digested sludge (10%). The column tests showed sustained alkalinity generation, which was significantly better in shell treatments. The first column in each treatment was effective throughout the 422 days in removing >99% of the dissolved Pb and Cu, and effective for four months in removing 99% of the dissolved Zn (residence time: 12-14 h). Methanol was added to the feedstock after Zn breakthrough and prompted almost complete removal of dissolved Zn alongside improved alkalinity generation and sulphate attenuation. While there was geochemical evidence for BSR, sequential extraction of substrates suggests that the bulk (67-80%) of removed Zn was associated with Fe-Mn oxide fractions.

  12. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme

    PubMed Central

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ′E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ′E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models. PMID:26541245

  13. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme.

    PubMed

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-11-06

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ'E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ'E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models.

  14. Residence times of shallow groundwater in West Africa: implications for hydrogeology and resilience to future changes in climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, D. J.; MacDonald, A. M.; Tijani, M. N.; Darling, W. G.; Gooddy, D. C.; Bonsor, H. C.; Araguás-Araguás, L. J.

    2013-05-01

    Although shallow groundwater (<50 mbgl) sustains the vast majority of improved drinking-water supplies in rural Africa, there is little information on how resilient this resource may be to future changes in climate. This study presents results of a groundwater survey using stable isotopes, CFCs, SF6, and 3H across different climatic zones (annual rainfall 400-2,000 mm/year) in West Africa. The purpose was to quantify the residence times of shallow groundwaters in sedimentary and basement aquifers, and investigate the relationship between groundwater resources and climate. Stable-isotope results indicate that most shallow groundwaters are recharged rapidly following rainfall, showing little evidence of evaporation prior to recharge. Chloride mass-balance results indicate that within the arid areas (<400 mm annual rainfall) there is recharge of up to 20 mm/year. Age tracers show that most groundwaters have mean residence times (MRTs) of 32-65 years, with comparable MRTs in the different climate zones. Similar MRTs measured in both the sedimentary and basement aquifers suggest similar hydraulic diffusivity and significant groundwater storage within the shallow basement. This suggests there is considerable resilience to short-term inter-annual variation in rainfall and recharge, and rural groundwater resources are likely to sustain diffuse, low volume abstraction.

  15. A new methodology for measurement of sludge residence time distribution in a paddle dryer using X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Charlou, Christophe; Milhé, Mathieu; Sauceau, Martial; Arlabosse, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Drying is a necessary step before sewage sludge energetic valorization. Paddle dryers allow working with such a complex material. However, little is known about sludge flow in this kind of processes. This study intends to set up an original methodology for sludge residence time distribution (RTD) measurement in a continuous paddle dryer, based on the detection of mineral tracers by X-ray fluorescence. This accurate analytical technique offers a linear response to tracer concentration in dry sludge; the protocol leads to a good repeatability of RTD measurements. Its equivalence to RTD measurement by NaCl conductivity in sludge leachates is assessed. Moreover, it is shown that tracer solubility has no influence on RTD: liquid and solid phases have the same flow pattern. The application of this technique on sludge with different storage duration at 4 °C emphasizes the influence of this parameter on sludge RTD, and thus on paddle dryer performances: the mean residence time in a paddle dryer is almost doubled between 24 and 48 h of storage for identical operating conditions.

  16. Increasing functional modularity with residence time in the co-distribution of native and introduced vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Cang; Richardson, David M.; Pyšek, Petr; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Kučera, Tomáš; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    Species gain membership of regional assemblages by passing through multiple ecological and environmental filters. To capture the potential trajectory of structural changes in regional meta-communities driven by biological invasions, one can categorize species pools into assemblages of different residence times. Older assemblages, having passed through more environmental filters, should become more functionally ordered and structured. Here we calculate the level of compartmentalization (modularity) for three different-aged assemblages (neophytes, introduced after 1500 AD; archaeophytes, introduced before 1500 AD, and natives), including 2,054 species of vascular plants in 302 reserves in central Europe. Older assemblages are more compartmentalized than younger ones, with species composition, phylogenetic structure and habitat characteristics of the modules becoming increasingly distinctive. This sheds light on two mechanisms of how alien species are functionally incorporated into regional species pools: the settling-down hypothesis of diminishing stochasticity with residence time, and the niche-mosaic hypothesis of inlaid neutral modules in regional meta-communities. PMID:24045305

  17. Functional efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor agonists is positively correlated to their receptor residence time

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The adenosine A2A receptor belongs to the superfamily of GPCRs and is a promising therapeutic target. Traditionally, the discovery of novel agents for the A2A receptor has been guided by their affinity for the receptor. This parameter is determined under equilibrium conditions, largely ignoring the kinetic aspects of the ligand-receptor interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the binding kinetics of A2A receptor agonists and explore a possible relationship with their functional efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We set up, validated and optimized a kinetic radioligand binding assay (a so-called competition association assay) at the A2A receptor from which the binding kinetics of unlabelled ligands were determined. Subsequently, functional efficacies of A2A receptor agonists were determined in two different assays: a novel label-free impedance-based assay and a more traditional cAMP determination. KEY RESULTS A simplified competition association assay yielded an accurate determination of the association and dissociation rates of unlabelled A2A receptor ligands at their receptor. A correlation was observed between the receptor residence time of A2A receptor agonists and their intrinsic efficacies in both functional assays. The affinity of A2A receptor agonists was not correlated to their functional efficacy. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study indicates that the molecular basis of different agonist efficacies at the A2A receptor lies within their different residence times at this receptor. PMID:22324512

  18. Improving AirNow Air Quality Products with NASA Near-Real-Time Remote Sensing Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, T.; Pasch, A. N.; DeWinter, J. L.; Haderman, M.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program provides the public with real-time and forecasted air quality conditions. Millions of people each day use it to protect their health. The AirNow program (http://www.airnow.gov), reports ground-level ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in a standardized index called the Air Quality Index (AQI). AirNow aggregates information from over 130 state, local, and federal air quality agencies and provides tools for over 2,000 agency staff responsible for monitoring, forecasting, and communicating local air quality. Each hour, AirNow systems generate thousands of maps and products. This presentation will describe how AirNow is benefiting from NASA's remote sensing data. We will describe two applications of NASA near-real-time remote sensing data within AirNow through case studies, focusing specifically on days when large spatial gradients in AQI and wildfire smoke impacts were observed. The first case study will show how AirNow is merging satellite-estimated PM2.5 concentrations into the AQI maps via the AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP). AirNow derives these satellite estimates using NASA/NOAA satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals and GEOS-Chem modeled ratios of surface PM2.5 concentrations to AOD. The second case study will show how NASA's Global Image Browse Services (GIBS) provides a near-real-time satellite product in AirNow-Tech for agency users to quickly identify smoke plumes and access air quality conditions in data-sparse areas during wildland fires.

  19. Mixing and Residence Time Distribution in an Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Asad, Amjad; Kratzsch, Christoph; Schwarze, Rüdiger; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2017-02-01

    Tracer dispersion experiments were carried out in a multi-strand tundish by injecting 1 (N) NaCl solution into water. The variation of dimensionless concentration-time curves known as C-curves and mixing times with different gas flow rates were studied. The proportions of dead, mixed, and dispersed plug volumes were calculated using the `modified mixed model.' The observations were explained by analyzing the behavior of the bubble plume, incoming jet velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy within the tundish.

  20. Nurses' personal statements about factors that influence their decisions about the time they spend with residents with long-term mental illness living in psychiatric group dwellings.

    PubMed

    Hellzén, Ove

    2004-09-01

    One seldom-discussed issue is the factors that influence nurses' decisions about the time they spend with residents in psychiatric care. This study uses a qualitative naturalistic approach and consists of an analysis of focus-group interviews with nurses, which aimed to identify factors affecting nurses' decisions about being with or being nonattendant in their relationship with their residents. Two series of focus-group interviews were conducted, interpreted and analysed through content analysis. The study included all the staff (n=32) at two municipal psychiatric group dwellings housing residents mainly with a diagnosis of long-term schizophrenia. This study revealed that the main factor that determined nurses' nurse/resident time together or nonattendance time was whether they liked or disliked the individual resident. One possible explanation is the carers' change from a perspective in which the nursing care was given on the basis of each resident's needs and rights, based on the individual nurse's professional judgement, to a consumer perspective, which leads to a change in responsibility from themselves to the individual residents.

  1. Transport and residence times of tropospheric aerosols inferred from a global three-dimensional simulation of Pb-210

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkanski, Yves J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Gardner, Geraldine M.; Graustein, William C.; Turekian, Karl K.

    1993-01-01

    A global three-dimensional model is used to investigate the transport and tropospheric residence time of Pb-210, an aerosol tracer produced in the atmosphere by radioactive decay of Rn-222 emitted from soils. The model uses meteorological input with 4 deg x 5 deg horizontal resolution and 4-hour temporal resolution from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model (GCM). It computes aerosol scavenging by convective precipitation as part of the wet convective mass transport operator in order to capture the coupling between vertical transport and rainout. Scavenging in convective precipitation accounts for 74% of the global Pb-210 sink in the model; scavenging in large-scale precipitation accounts for 12%, and scavenging in dry deposition accounts for 14%. The model captures 63% of the variance of yearly mean Pb-210 concentrations measured at 85 sites around the world with negligible mean bias, lending support to the computation of aerosol scavenging. There are, however, a number of regional and seasonal discrepancies that reflect in part anomalies in GCM precipitation. Computed residence times with respect to deposition for Pb-210 aerosol in the tropospheric column are about 5 days at southern midlatitudes and 10-15 days in the tropics; values at northern midlatitudes vary from about 5 days in winter to 10 days in summer. The residence time of Pb-210 produced in the lowest 0.5 km of atmosphere is on average four times shorter than that of Pb-210 produced in the upper atmosphere. Both model and observations indicate a weaker decrease of Pb-210 concentrations between the continental mixed layer and the free troposphere than is observed for total aerosol concentrations; an explanation is that Rn-222 is transported to high altitudes in wet convective updrafts, while aerosols and soluble precursors of aerosols are scavenged by precipitation in the updrafts. Thus Pb-210 is not simply a tracer of aerosols produced in the continental boundary layer, but

  2. Distribution of residence times as a marker to distinguish different pathways for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Samuel L; Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-10-01

    Electron transport through a nanoscale system is an inherently stochastic quantum mechanical process. Electric current is a time series of electron tunneling events separated by random intervals. Thermal and quantum noise are two sources of this randomness. In this paper we use the quantum master equation to consider the following questions. (i) Given that an electron has tunneled into the electronically unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (the tunneling path)? (ii) Given that an electron tunneled into the unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (a tunneling path)? (iii) What are the distributions of these times? We show that electron correlations suppress the difference between the electron tunneling path and an electron tunneling path.

  3. Distribution of residence times as a marker to distinguish different pathways for quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-10-01

    Electron transport through a nanoscale system is an inherently stochastic quantum mechanical process. Electric current is a time series of electron tunneling events separated by random intervals. Thermal and quantum noise are two sources of this randomness. In this paper we use the quantum master equation to consider the following questions. (i) Given that an electron has tunneled into the electronically unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (the tunneling path)? (ii) Given that an electron tunneled into the unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (a tunneling path)? (iii) What are the distributions of these times? We show that electron correlations suppress the difference between the electron tunneling path and an electron tunneling path.

  4. What can environmental tracer concentrations tell us about groundwater residence time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, J. L.; Engdahl, N. B.; Cook, P. G.; Simmons, C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of groundwater age distributions through the use on lumped parameter models and environmental tracer concentrations is an ongoing practice. These models are based on simple geometries and sampling conditions and may not be applicable outside of ideal conditions, limiting the results that can be obtained. We have developed a method that requires no underlying assumptions about the structure of the groundwater age distribution. This method assumes that the convolution relationship describes the relationship between temporal atmospheric concentrations and measured groundwater sample concentrations. We looked at synthetically generated groundwater age distributions and a number of levels of tracer data including a long time series of tritium, the use of CFCs and SF6 sampled at various times and the use of CFCs, SF6, 3H and 14C sampled at a single time. In general, we found that environmental tracers are not very informative of groundwater age distributions resulting in estimates being highly non-unique. The exception was the use of a time series of tritium data. Tritium is more informative due to the temporal variations of atmospheric concentrations and a short half-life reducing the correlation of sequential measurements. The ability of CFC compounds to estimate entire distributions was limited due to the lack of variation in temporal atmospheric concentrations and correlation between sampled concentrations. Despite varying ability of the method to predict whole distributions, some indicators such as the mean age and some arrival time statistics were estimated well by the method. The implications of this show that care should be taken in the choice of lumped parameter model used in conjunction with environmental tracer techniques to constrain entire groundwater age distributions. Interestingly, the ability to correct for mixing bias of mean ages despite poor estimates of entire groundwater age distributions shows some promise.

  5. Structure, provenance and residence time of terrestrial organic carbon: insights from Programmed temperature Pyrolysis-Combustion of river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Galy, V.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Roe, K. M.; Williams, E. K.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial organic carbon (OC) represents one of the largest reservoirs of C on earth and thus plays a crucial role in the global C cycle, participating to the regulation of atmospheric chemistry. While degradation of sedimentary OC (petrogenic C) is a source of CO2 for the atmosphere, burial of biospheric C (e.g. plant debris and soil OC) is a long-term sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Over short timescales, the atmospheric CO2 level is also sensitive to variations of the residence time of carbon in continental reservoirs. Fluvial transport plays a crucial role in the organic carbon cycle, constituting the connection between the different reservoirs and promoting the transfer of C from one reservoir to the other. Moreover, thanks to the integrating effect of erosion, studying river sediments allows the spatial and temporal integration of organic carbon exchanges occurring in a given basin. OC transported by rivers (riverine OC) is known to be extremely heterogeneous in nature and reactivity, however; ranging from extremely refractory petrogenic C (e.g. graphite) to soil complex OC to labile vegetation debris. Here we use a recently developed method, a programmed-temperature pyrolysis-combustion system (PTP-CS) coupled to multiisotopic analysis, to determine the reactivity, age and nature of OC in river sediments. The method takes advantage of the wide range of reactivity and radiocarbon content of different components of riverine OC. We submitted to PTP-CS a set of river sediments from 1) the Ganges-Brahmputra river system and, 2) the lower Mississippi river. Preliminary results highlight the heterogeneous nature of riverine OC. Different components of the riverine OC pool decompose at different temperature and are characterized by extremely variable isotopic compositions. The decomposition of radiocarbon dead petrogenic C at very high temperature allows estimating the respective contribution of biospheric and petrogenic C. Moreover, biospheric OC appears to

  6. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977-1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990-1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953-1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  7. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977–1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990–1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953–1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  8. Short residence time hydropyrolysis of coal. Technical progress report, 1 January-31 March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Saville, D. A.; Russel, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    This report sets forth the current status of our efforts to model the hydropyrolysis process on the scale of a single coal particle. Several oversimplifications of the original model have been identified and the more general analysis begun. As emphasized in the literature, the effect of time-temperature history, or nonisothermal reaction conditions, appears to be important and is being incorporated into the model. An increased internal pressure due to the restricted escape of volatiles can increase the rate of deposition and also cause the swelling of plastic coal particles. Our efforts reported here should lead to realistic descriptions of these processes.

  9. a Survey on Health Effects due to Aircraft Noise on Residents Living around Kadena Air Base in the Ryukyus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Taira, K.; Ito, A.; Nakasone, T.

    1997-08-01

    Results are reported of a questionnaire survey relating to a scale for general health, the Todai Health Index, in a town, bordering on a large U.S. airbase in the Ryukyus. The level of aircraft noise exposure, in the town, expressed by WECPNL, ranges from 75 to 95 or more. The sample size was 1200, including a 200 person “control” group. Results of the analysis of the responses in terms of the noise exposure suggest that the exposed residents suffer psychosomatic effects, especially perceived psychological disorders, due to the noise exposure to military aircraft, and that such responses increase with the level of noise exposure.

  10. Estimating estuarine flushing and residence times in Charlotte Harbor, Florida, via salt balance and a box model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; McPherson, B.F.

    1991-01-01

    The new concept is that, over many tidal cycles, the tidally averaged "flow' (Qg) of water from the Gulf of Mexico, with a salinity of 35???, can be treated as a constant at any point in the estuary. This flow is used in a simple mixing equation to predict salinity in the estuary at different river inflows, and the predicted salinities are used to compute residence times for water in the estuary. The techniques developed to achieve optimal precision in the relation between river inflow and salinity include a newly derived equation to fit Qg by a least-squares method and a procedure to determine the optimal averaging period for river inflow. Results from Charlotte Harbor indicate that, under average (70 m3s-1) river inflow, 95% of the original water present in the harbor flushes into the gulf in 130 d. -from Authors

  11. Assessing the effects of solids residence time and volatile fatty acid augmentation on biological phosphorus removal using real wastewater.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Christopher J; Coats, Erik R; Loge, Frank J

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the research presented herein was to evaluate the effects of solids residence time (SRT) and organic acid augmentation on biological phosphorus removal (BPR), with a focus on how these operational variables affect key metabolisms and the distribution of the microbial population. Using laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors seeded with a mixed microbial consortium and fed real wastewater, we observed that longer SRTs can improve BPR performance; organic acid augmentation can stabilize BPR, but it is not necessary for process success; and higher volatile suspended solids concentrations correlate with improved phosphorus removal. The results also suggest that organic acids may not be critical in driving anaerobic phosphorus release, but in driving aerobic growth. Finally, given an observed population similarity across all tested bioreactors, BPR variability appears to be less influenced by the presence of specific microbes and more affected by the induction of critical metabolisms.

  12. Determining possible thrombus sites in an extracorporeal device, using computational fluid dynamics-derived relative residence time.

    PubMed

    Gorring, N; Kark, L; Simmons, A; Barber, T

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of conditions that may result in thrombus formation is a useful application of computational fluid dynamics. A number of techniques exist, based on the consideration of wall shear stress and regions of low blood flow; however, no clear guideline exists for the best practice of their use. In this paper, the sensitivity of each parameter and the specific mechanical forces are explained, before the optimal indicator of thrombosis risk is outlined. An extracorporeal access device cavity provides a suitable geometry to test the methodology. The recommended method for thrombus prediction considers areas with a calculated residence time (RT) and shear strain rate (SSR) thresholds, here set to RT>1 and SSR < 10 s(- 1). Evidence of thrombosis was found for physiological waveforms with an absence of reverse flow, which is expected to 'wash out' the cavity. The predicted thrombosis sites compare well with evidence collected from explanted devices.

  13. Polymer binding to carbon nanotubes in aqueous dispersions: residence time on the nanotube surface as obtained by NMR diffusometry.

    PubMed

    Frise, Anton E; Pagès, Guilhem; Shtein, Michael; Pri Bar, Ilan; Regev, Oren; Furó, István

    2012-03-08

    The binding of block copolymer Pluronic F-127 in aqueous dispersions of single- (SWCNT) and multiwalled (MWCNT) carbon nanotubes has been studied by pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. We show that a major fraction of polymers exist as a free species while a minor fraction is bound to the carbon nanotubes (CNT). The polymers exchange between these two states with residence times on the nanotube surface of 24 ± 5 ms for SWCNT and of 54 ± 11 ms for MWCNT. The CNT concentration in the solution was determined by improved thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicating that the concentration of SWCNT dispersed by F-127 was significantly higher than that for MWCNT. For SWCNT, the area per adsorbed Pluronic F-127 molecule is estimated to be about 40 nm(2).

  14. LUMPED: a Visual Basic code of lumped-parameter models for mean residence time analyses of groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozyurt, N. N.; Bayari, C. S.

    2003-02-01

    A Microsoft ® Visual Basic 6.0 (Microsoft Corporation, 1987-1998) code of 15 lumped-parameter models is presented for the analysis of mean residence time in aquifers. Groundwater flow systems obeying plug and exponential flow models and their combinations of parallel or serial connection can be simulated by these steady-state models which may include complications such as bypass flow and dead volume. Each model accepts tritium, krypton-85, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6) as environmental tracer. Retardation of gas tracers in the unsaturated zone and their degradation in the flow system may also be accounted for. The executable code has been tested to run under Windows 95 or higher operating systems. The results of comparisons between other comparable codes are discussed and the limitations are indicated.

  15. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times.

    PubMed

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-02-02

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85-88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73-82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42-0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64-0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types.

  16. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, A. Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R.; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85–88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73–82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42–0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64–0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types. PMID:26787856

  17. NMR-based estimates of the molecular dimensions in wildfire charcoal: Implications for predictions of biochar residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, William; Kane, Evan; Huang, Rixiang; Von Bargen, Justin; Davis, Rebecca; Ohlson, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to energy and fuels generates charcoal as a co-product. Charcoals derived from sustainable biomass sources—biochars—are an inherently stable form of carbon, relatively long residence times in the environment. Biochars can have potentially beneficial properties as soil fertility amendments, which has further stimulated research on the use of biochars for soil carbon sequestration as a climate change mitigation strategy. However, it is challenging to assess the long-term stability of biochar carbon using laboratory or field incubations because these are comprised of short-term observations. In this study, we make use of ancient charcoals from the boreal forests of Alaska and Scandanavia. We have deliberately selected charcoals from organic soil horizons, as to investigate the inherent biological and chemical stability of charcoal C without the protective influence of soil minerals. We use 14C radiocarbon dating to determine the age of the charcoals, differential scanning calorimetry to assess thermal stability, and solid-state 13C NMR to assess the chemical structure. Specifically, we employ C-H dipolar-dephasing NMR experiments to estimate the relative abundance and molecular dimensions of condensed aromatic domains and aliphatic structures. We test the hypothesis that the environmental stability, as determined by apparent 14C age and thermal stability, is related to the extent of ring condensation in the charcoal structure. Preliminary results suggest that the dimension of the condensed aromatic ring clusters may be an important molecular parameter to include in algorithms used to model/predict the residence time of charcoal and biochar C in soil.

  18. An experimental study of the role of particle diffusive convection on the residence time of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, E.; Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, M.

    2013-12-01

    The longevity of volcanic ash clouds generated by explosive volcanic plumes is difficult to predict. Diffusive convective instabilities leading to the production of internal layering are known to affect the stability and longevity of these clouds, but the detailed mechanisms controlling particle dynamics and sedimentation are poorly understood. We present results from a series of analog experiments reproducing diffusive convection in a 2D (Hele-Shaw) geometry, which allow us to constrain conditions for layer formation, sedimentation regime and cloud residence time as a function of only the source conditions. We inject a turbulent particle-laden jet sideways into a tank containing a basal layer of salt water and an upper layer of fresh water, which ultimately spreads as a gravity current. After the injection is stopped, particles in suspension settle through the cloud to form particle boundary layers (PBL) at the cloud base. We vary the initial particle concentration of the plume and the injection velocity over a wide range of conditions to identify and characterize distinct regimes of sedimentation. Our experiments show that convective instabilities driven as a result of differing diffusivities of salt and particles lead to periodic layering over a wide range of conditions expected in nature. The flux of particles from layered clouds and the thicknesses of the layers are understood using classical theory for double diffusive convection adjusted for the hydrodynamic diffusion of particles. Although diffusive convection increases sedimentation rates for the smallest particles (<30 μm) its overall effect is to extend the cloud residence time to several hours by maintaining larger particles in suspension within the layers, which is several orders of magnitude longer than expected when considering individual settling rates.

  19. Multi-scale field investigation of water flow pathways and residence times in mountainous catchments during monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Lyon, S. W.; Desilets, S.

    2007-05-01

    The "sky islands" of Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States form a unique complex of about 27 mountain ranges whose ecosystems support many perennial and ephemeral streams in an arid climate. Among these sky islands are the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, AZ, with a peak elevation of 9157 ft at Mt. Lemmon. Sabino Canyon Creek is the main stream which runs on the south face of the mountain range. It usually flows from July through April with an average daily flow of approximately 0.28 m3/s (10 cfs). However, flash floods are common both during summer as a result of intense monsoon rains and during spring because of rapid snowmelt. During these events, flow increases drastically, reaching peak flows up to 480 m3/s (15,984 cfs, July 2006). Characterizing water flow pathways and residence times in these complex catchments is important for improving flash flood warning systems, estimating mountain front recharge, managing forest and wild fires, and understanding ecosystem functions. In the summer of 2006, we set up an extensive hydrometrical and hydro- chemical monitoring network in Sabino Canyon Creek, comprising 40 tipping bucket rain gauges (two of which were equipped to automatically collect rainwater samples), 5 automatic surface water level stations (three of which were equipped with auto samplers), and 8 manual soil lysimeters. In addition, several rain and stream water grab samples were collected manually during intensive rain events. Water samples are analyzed for major ions and liquid water isotopic concentration (2H and 18O) in rain, soil, ground and surface water. The data allows for a detailed reconstruction of water flow pathways and residence times at 3 different catchment scales (2 km2, 8 km2, and 91 km2) during the recorded flow events, including the highest monsoon rainfall-runoff event ever recorded in these mountains.

  20. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Asthma Prevalence in Different Population Groups Residing in Eastern Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Amit Kr; Tchounwou, Paul B; Tuluri, Francis

    2016-03-29

    Air pollution has been an on-going research focus due to its detrimental impact on human health. However, its specific effects on asthma prevalence in different age groups, genders and races are not well understood. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the association between selected air pollutants and asthma prevalence in different population groups during 2010 in the eastern part of Texas, USA.The pollutants considered were particulate matter (PM2.5 with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 micrometers) and surface ozone. The population groups were categorized based on age, gender, and race. County-wise asthma hospital discharge data for different age, gender, and racial groups were obtained from Texas Asthma Control Program, Office of Surveillance, Evaluation and Research, Texas Department of State Health Services. The annual means of the air pollutants were obtained from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)'s air quality system data mart program. Pearson correlation analyzes were conducted to examine the relationship between the annual mean concentrations of pollutants and asthma discharge rates (ADR) for different age groups, genders, and races. The results reveal that there is no significant association or relationship between ADR and exposure of air pollutants (PM2.5, and O₃). The study results showed a positive correlation between PM2.5 and ADR and a negative correlation between ADR and ozone in most of the cases. These correlations were not statistically significant, and can be better explained by considering the local weather conditions. The research findings facilitate identification of hotspots for controlling the most affected populations from further environmental exposure to air pollution, and for preventing or reducing the health impacts.

  1. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Asthma Prevalence in Different Population Groups Residing in Eastern Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Gorai, Amit Kr.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Tuluri, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution has been an on-going research focus due to its detrimental impact on human health. However, its specific effects on asthma prevalence in different age groups, genders and races are not well understood. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the association between selected air pollutants and asthma prevalence in different population groups during 2010 in the eastern part of Texas, USA.The pollutants considered were particulate matter (PM2.5 with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 micrometers) and surface ozone. The population groups were categorized based on age, gender, and race. County-wise asthma hospital discharge data for different age, gender, and racial groups were obtained from Texas Asthma Control Program, Office of Surveillance, Evaluation and Research, Texas Department of State Health Services. The annual means of the air pollutants were obtained from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)’s air quality system data mart program. Pearson correlation analyzes were conducted to examine the relationship between the annual mean concentrations of pollutants and asthma discharge rates (ADR) for different age groups, genders, and races. The results reveal that there is no significant association or relationship between ADR and exposure of air pollutants (PM2.5, and O3). The study results showed a positive correlation between PM2.5 and ADR and a negative correlation between ADR and ozone in most of the cases. These correlations were not statistically significant, and can be better explained by considering the local weather conditions. The research findings facilitate identification of hotspots for controlling the most affected populations from further environmental exposure to air pollution, and for preventing or reducing the health impacts. PMID:27043587

  2. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  3. The dependence of estuarine turbidity on tidal intrusion length, tidal range and residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uncles, R.J.; Stephens, J.A.; Smith, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    times for solutes than shorter systems and that larger tides tend to reduce flushing times, although the tidal influence is secondary. Short, rapidly flushed estuaries quickly lose their erodable fine sediment to the coastal zone during freshets and during the ebbing currents of spring tides. Turbidity is therefore small during low runoff, low wave activity conditions. Very long, very slowly flushed estuaries are unlikely to lose a significant fraction of their resuspended sediments during freshets or individual ebb tides and are therefore able to accumulate large and increasing amounts of fine sediment in the long-term. Turbidity within them is therefore high during the fast currents of large spring tides. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Infectious Diseases in Immigrant Population Related to the Time of Residence in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Fernando; Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa; Vázquez-Villegas, José; Cabeza-Barrera, M Isabel; Soriano-Pérez, Manuel J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the data on the main imported infectious diseases and public health issues arising from the risk of transmission of tropical and common diseases in the immigrant population. During the period of study, 2,426 immigrants were attended in the Tropical Medicine Unit of the Hospital of Poniente. For each patient, a complete screening for common and tropical diseases was performed. The prevalence and main features of intestinal and urinary parasites, microfilarias, Chagas disease, malaria, hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses, extrapulmonary tuberculosis and syphilis was investigated taking into account the length of stay in Spain. Sub-Saharan Africa patients who had lived for <3 years in Spain had a high significantly number of infections produced by hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma mansoni, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Plasmodium spp. In patients who had lived for more than 3 years, there were significantly high rates of HBV infections, although HBV rates in sub-Saharan African patients are high even if the patients have been in Spain for <3 years. However, patients with large stays in Spain had also an important number of parasitological diseases. The main objective of the diagnosis is to avoid important public health problems and further complications in patients. It is advisable to carry out a screening of the main transmissible infections in all immigrant population regardless of the time outside their country. This screening should be individualized according to the geographical area of origin.

  5. Health effects of particulate air pollution: time for reassessment?

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C A; Bates, D V; Raizenne, M E

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have observed health effects of particulate air pollution. Compared to early studies that focused on severe air pollution episodes, recent studies are more relevant to understanding health effects of pollution at levels common to contemporary cities in the developed world. We review recent epidemiologic studies that evaluated health effects of particulate air pollution and conclude that respirable particulate air pollution is likely an important contributing factor to respiratory disease. Observed health effects include increased respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, increased hospitalizations and other health care visits for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, increased respiratory morbidity as measured by absenteeism from work or school or other restrictions in activity, and increased cardiopulmonary disease mortality. These health effects are observed at levels common to many U.S. cities including levels below current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate air pollution. Images Figure 1. PMID:7656877

  6. Clearing the Air: Smoke-Free Housing Policies, Smoking, and Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Affordable Housing Residents in Minnesota, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Reckinger, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction During the past 30 years, local and state tobacco use control laws in the United States have helped reduce smoking prevalence and exposure to secondhand smoke, but progress among low socioeconomic populations has been slow. Implementing smoke-free housing policies in affordable housing may help address this issue. The purpose of our study was to assess how such policies affect smoking rates and exposure to secondhand smoke among residents of affordable housing. Methods We conducted a pretest–posttest longitudinal study of 180 residents from 8 affordable housing properties in Minnesota. Participating properties agreed to adopt a smoke-free housing policy covering indoor grounds, and 3 of these properties also prohibited smoking on all outdoor grounds. Policies were implemented with assistance from local public health departments and the Statewide Health Improvement Program. Participants completed surveys one month before policy implementation and 6 months postimplementation. Surveys assessed smoking, quit attempts, and indoor and outdoor secondhand smoke exposure. Results Results indicated a significant reduction in nonsmokers’ indoor exposure to secondhand smoke (F 1,144 = 22.69, P < .001) and no change in outdoor exposure to secondhand smoke from Time 1 (pretest) to Time 2 (posttest) (F 1,140 = 2.17, P = .14). However, when examining sites that only prohibited smoking indoors, we observed an increase in outdoor secondhand smoke exposure that approached significance (F 1,118 = 3.76, P = .055). Results showed no change in quit attempts over time, but 77% of residents who smoked at pretest reported reducing the amount that they smoked at posttest, and an additional 5% reported that they had quit. Conclusions Smoke-free housing policies may be an effective strategy to reduce exposure to indoor secondhand exposure and promote decreased cigarette smoking among residents of affordable housing. PMID:27536903

  7. Continuous, high-resolution spatial mapping of water isotopes: improving tools for quantifying local evaporation and residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffrey A.; Winkler, Renato; Downing, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes of water (d2H, d18O) are unique tracers of many hydrological processes including evaporation, precipitation, reservoir mixing and residence time. Historically, discrete water samples have been collected and analyzed via either Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, or more recently laser-based spectroscopic methods, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). However, the analysis of discrete samples precludes the ability to construct high resolution water isotope data sets through time and space. By coupling a recently developed front-end peripheral device (Continuous Water Sampler or CWS) to a CRDS analyzer (Picarro L2130-i), we continuously measured and spatially mapped water isotopes on a transect of the Sacramento River Delta following an extended period of drought. More than two-thousand five-second average d18O and d2H measurements were made aboard the R/V King (USGS) over a six-hour period. In addition to water isotopes, nitrate, chlorophyll, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence, and other water quality parameters were also measured continuously. As you travel northeast up the delta, surface waters become progressively more enriched in 18O and 2H, while nitrate decreased in concentration and chlorophyll and DOM increased. We utilize the spatially-mapped isotope data within a single transect to understand local evaporation and residence time by (i) utilizing the secondary parameter, d-excess, and (ii) using a simple mass balance model of water moving through the system (inflow, outflow and evaporation). Additional transects, to be conducted during the rainy season, should highlight how the Delta system evolves seasonally. In concert with other data previously collected from the Sacramento River Delta, we suggest the lower region represents a mixture of river waters derived from the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the more marine waters from the mouth of the San Francisco Bay. Moving NE up the Delta into shallow sloughs through flooded wetlands

  8. Characterization of surface and ground water δ18O seasonal variation and its use for estimating groundwater residence times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Schuster, Paul; Kendall, Carol; Reddy, Micaela B.

    2006-01-01

    18O is an ideal tracer for characterizing hydrological processes because it can be reliably measured in several watershed hydrological compartments. Here, we present multiyear isotopic data, i.e. 18O variations (δ18O), for precipitation inputs, surface water and groundwater in the Shingobee River Headwaters Area (SRHA), a well-instrumented research catchment in north-central Minnesota. SRHA surface waters exhibit δ18O seasonal variations similar to those of groundwaters, and seasonal δ18O variations plotted versus time fit seasonal sine functions. These seasonal δ18O variations were interpreted to estimate surface water and groundwater mean residence times (MRTs) at sampling locations near topographically closed-basin lakes. MRT variations of about 1 to 16 years have been estimated over an area covering about 9 km2 from the basin boundary to the most downgradient well. Estimated MRT error (±0·3 to ±0·7 years) is small for short MRTs and is much larger (±10 years) for a well with an MRT (16 years) near the limit of the method. Groundwater transit time estimates based on Darcy's law, tritium content, and the seasonal δ18O amplitude approach appear to be consistent within the limits of each method. The results from this study suggest that use of the δ18O seasonal variation method to determine MRTs can help assess groundwater recharge areas in small headwaters catchments.

  9. Characterization of surface and ground water δ18O seasonal variation and its use for estimating groundwater residence times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Schuster, Paul F.; Kendall, Carol; Reddy, Micaela B.

    2006-01-01

    18O is an ideal tracer for characterizing hydrological processes because it can be reliably measured in several watershed hydrological compartments. Here, we present multiyear isotopic data, i.e. 18O variations (δ18O), for precipitation inputs, surface water and groundwater in the Shingobee River Headwaters Area (SRHA), a well-instrumented research catchment in north-central Minnesota. SRHA surface waters exhibit δ18O seasonal variations similar to those of groundwaters, and seasonal δ18O variations plotted versus time fit seasonal sine functions. These seasonal δ18O variations were interpreted to estimate surface water and groundwater mean residence times (MRTs) at sampling locations near topographically closed-basin lakes. MRT variations of about 1 to 16 years have been estimated over an area covering about 9 km2 from the basin boundary to the most downgradient well. Estimated MRT error (±0·3 to ±0·7 years) is small for short MRTs and is much larger (±10 years) for a well with an MRT (16 years) near the limit of the method. Groundwater transit time estimates based on Darcy's law, tritium content, and the seasonal δ18O amplitude approach appear to be consistent within the limits of each method. The results from this study suggest that use of the δ18O seasonal variation method to determine MRTs can help assess groundwater recharge areas in small headwaters catchments.

  10. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  11. Relationship between pulmonary function and indoor air pollution from coal combustion among adult residents in an inner-city area of southwest China.

    PubMed

    Jie, Y; Houjin, H; Xun, M; Kebin, L; Xuesong, Y; Jie, X

    2014-11-01

    Few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 mm in diameter (PM₂.₅) in relation to a change in lung function among adults in a population. The aim of this study was to assess the association of coal as a domestic energy source to pulmonary function in an adult population in inner-city areas of Zunyi city in China where coal use is common. In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers. Several sociodemographic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and ventilatory function measurements including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared between the 2 groups. The amount of PM₂.₅ was also measured in all residences. There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group. In multivariate analysis, current exposure to coal smoke was associated with a 31.7% decrease in FVC, a 42.0% decrease in FEV₁, a 7.46% decrease in the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and a 23.1% decrease in PEFR in adult residents. The slope of lung function decrease for Chinese adults is approximately a 2-L decrease in FVC, a 3-L decrease in FEV₁, and an 8 L/s decrease in PEFR per count per minute of PM₂.₅ exposure. These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

  12. Household air pollution and personal exposure risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among rural residents in Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Shen, G; Huang, Y; Zhang, Y; Han, Y; Wang, R; Shen, H; Su, S; Lin, N; Zhu, D; Pei, L; Zheng, X; Wu, J; Wang, X; Liu, W; Wong, M; Tao, S

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of pollutants of widespread concerns. Gaseous and size-segregated particulate-phase PAHs were collected in indoor and outdoor air in rural households. Personal exposure was measured and compared to the ingestion exposure. The average concentrations of 28 parent PAHs and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were 9000 ± 8390 and 131 ± 236 ng/m(3) for kitchen, 2590 ± 2270 and 43 ± 95 ng/m(3) for living room, and 2800 ± 3890 and 1.6 ± 0.7 ng/m(3) for outdoor air, respectively. The mass percent of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds with 5-6 rings contributed 1.3% to total 28 parent PAHs. Relatively higher fractions of HMW PAHs were found in indoor air compared to outdoor air. Majorities of particle-bound PAHs were found in the finest PM0.25 , and the highest levels of fine PM0.25 -bound PAHs were in the kitchen using peat and wood as energy sources. The 24-h personal PAH exposure concentration was 2100 ± 1300 ng/m(3) . Considering energies, exposures to those using wood were the highest. The PAH inhalation exposure comprised up to about 30% in total PAH exposure through food ingestion and inhalation, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) for lung cancer in the region was 0.85%. The risks for inhaled and ingested intakes of PAHs were 1.0 × 10(-5) and 1.1 × 10(-5) , respectively.

  13. Quantifying the residence time and flushing characteristics of a shallow, back-barrier estuary: Application of hydrodynamic and particle tracking models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Estuarine residence time is a major driver of eutrophication and water quality. Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH), New Jersey, is a lagoonal back-barrier estuary that is subject to anthropogenic pressures including nutrient loading, eutrophication, and subsequent declines in water quality. A combination of hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling was used to identify the mechanisms controlling flushing, residence time, and spatial variability of particle retention. The models demonstrated a pronounced northward subtidal flow from Little Egg Inlet in the south to Pt. Pleasant Canal in the north due to frictional effects in the inlets, leading to better flushing of the southern half of the estuary and particle retention in the northern estuary. Mean residence time for BB-LEH was 13 days but spatial variability was between ∼0 and 30 days depending on the initial particle location. Mean residence time with tidal forcing alone was 24 days (spatial variability between ∼0 and 50 days); the tides were relatively inefficient in flushing the northern end of the Bay. Scenarios with successive exclusion of physical processes from the models revealed that meteorological and remote offshore forcing were stronger drivers of exchange than riverine inflow. Investigations of water quality and eutrophication should take into account spatial variability in hydrodynamics and residence time in order to better quantify the roles of nutrient loading, production, and flushing.

  14. On the use of late-time peaks of residence time distributions for the characterization of hierarchically nested groundwater flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wörman, Anders; Bresciani, Etienne; Wan, Li; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Jiang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies on the characterization of hierarchically nested groundwater flow systems have mainly been based on the spatial distribution analyses of groundwater pathways. In this paper, by considering the discrete nature of the temporal behavior induced by different hierarchical flow systems, a new approach is proposed. The core of this approach is to use the critical residence times defined by the late-time peaks of residence time distributions (RTDs) to divide the groundwater flow field into local, intermediate and regional systems as described by Tóth (1963). We first introduce Tóthian basins of a 2D cross section and a 3D domain as synthetic test cases. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by comparing the partitioning results given by the dividing streamlines associated with internal stagnation points in the 2D Tóthian basin and by the hydraulic connections between recharge and discharge zones in the 3D Tóthian basin. Then, the Dosit River Watershed in Northwestern China is introduced as a field case study. Using the calibrated 3D groundwater flow model, one distinct late-time peak is identified from the RTD and indicates that the Dosit River Watershed can generally be regarded as a two-order nested flow structure with local and regional flow systems. This approach can be used to identify the volumes occupied by different orders of flow systems in 3D, and therefore opens up a new perspective in the study of the 3D nature of basin-scale groundwater flow.

  15. The Evolution and Increasing Complexity of the Resident Assistant Role in the United States from Colonial to Modern Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Katherine B.; Davidson, Denise L.; Bauman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the resident assistant position and its history are important to understanding its increasing complexities. In this article we examine how court cases and federal legislation, along with changes in popular culture, have altered and shaped the role of the resident assistant. Our premise is that this role, originally relatively…

  16. Are the residents of former Yugoslavia still exposed to elevated PCB levels due to the Balkan wars? Part 1: Air sampling in Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jirí; Kostrhounová, Romana; Holoubek, Ivan

    2007-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) spilled into the environment as a result of damaged industrial and military targets, natural resources, and infrastructure during the Balkan wars still pose a problem several years later. The aim of this project was to investigate an extent to which the residents of former Yugoslavia are exposed to elevated levels of POPs as a consequence of the wars. The atmospheric as well as the soil levels of PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were determined in Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina during five high volume air sampling campaigns in 2003 and 2004. A considerable contamination of several sites was detected (PCB concentrations in the atmosphere ranged between 67 pg m(-3) and 40 ng m(-3) for the sum of 7 indicator congeners) and the levels are reported in this article.

  17. A Study of the Combined Effects of Physical Activity and Air Pollution on Mortality in Elderly Urban Residents: The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort

    PubMed Central

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Mendez, Michelle Ann; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Hertel, Ole; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    K, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ. 2015. A study of the combined effects of physical activity and air pollution on mortality in elderly urban residents: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort. Environ Health Perspect 123:557–563; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408698 PMID:25625237

  18. Imputation of missing data in time series for air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junger, W. L.; Ponce de Leon, A.

    2015-02-01

    Missing data are major concerns in epidemiological studies of the health effects of environmental air pollutants. This article presents an imputation-based method that is suitable for multivariate time series data, which uses the EM algorithm under the assumption of normal distribution. Different approaches are considered for filtering the temporal component. A simulation study was performed to assess validity and performance of proposed method in comparison with some frequently used methods. Simulations showed that when the amount of missing data was as low as 5%, the complete data analysis yielded satisfactory results regardless of the generating mechanism of the missing data, whereas the validity began to degenerate when the proportion of missing values exceeded 10%. The proposed imputation method exhibited good accuracy and precision in different settings with respect to the patterns of missing observations. Most of the imputations obtained valid results, even under missing not at random. The methods proposed in this study are implemented as a package called mtsdi for the statistical software system R.

  19. Time Relevance of Convective Weather Forecast for Air Traffic Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William N.

    2006-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is handling nearly 120,000 flights a day through its Air Traffic Management (ATM) system and air traffic congestion is expected to increse substantially over the next 20 years. Weather-induced impacts to throughput and efficiency are the leading cause of flight delays accounting for 70% of all delays with convective weather accounting for 60% of all weather related delays. To support the Next Generation Air Traffic System goal of operating at 3X current capacity in the NAS, ATC decision support tools are being developed to create advisories to assist controllers in all weather constraints. Initial development of these decision support tools did not integrate information regarding weather constraints such as thunderstorms and relied on an additional system to provide that information. Future Decision Support Tools should move towards an integrated system where weather constraints are factored into the advisory of a Decision Support Tool (DST). Several groups such at NASA-Ames, Lincoln Laboratories, and MITRE are integrating convective weather data with DSTs. A survey of current convective weather forecast and observation data show they span a wide range of temporal and spatial resolutions. Short range convective observations can be obtained every 5 mins with longer range forecasts out to several days updated every 6 hrs. Today, the short range forecasts of less than 2 hours have a temporal resolution of 5 mins. Beyond 2 hours, forecasts have much lower temporal. resolution of typically 1 hour. Spatial resolutions vary from 1km for short range to 40km for longer range forecasts. Improving the accuracy of long range convective forecasts is a major challenge. A report published by the National Research Council states improvements for convective forecasts for the 2 to 6 hour time frame will only be achieved for a limited set of convective phenomena in the next 5 to 10 years. Improved longer range forecasts will be probabilistic

  20. Seasonal recharge and mean residence times of soil and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ke; Chen, Hongsong; Nie, Yunpeng; Wang, Kelin

    2015-01-01

    Soil and epikarst play an important role in the hydrological cycle in karst regions. This paper focuses on investigating the seasonal recharge and mean residence time (MRT) of soil water and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China. The deuterium contents in precipitation, creek, soil baseflow (direct recharge of the saturated soil water to the stream), epikarst spring, and soil waters were monitored weekly for two years, and MRT was calculated by an exponential model (EM) and a dispersion model (DM). The obvious seasonal variation of deuterium in rainfall was buffered in epikarst water, indicating sufficient water mixing. Soil baseflow contained less rainy-season rainwater than epikarst spring discharge, reflecting the retarded effect of soil thickness on rainwater recharge. MRTs of all water bodies were 41-71 weeks, and soils in the depression extended those of shallow groundwater. This demonstrated that the deep soil layer played an important role in karst hydrological processes in the study catchment. The creek was recharged mostly by rainfall through epikarst, indicating its crucial role in water circulation. These results showed epikarst had a strong water-holding capacity and also delayed water contact time with dolomite. PMID:25959092

  1. Seasonal recharge and mean residence times of soil and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Chen, Hongsong; Nie, Yunpeng; Wang, Kelin

    2015-05-11

    Soil and epikarst play an important role in the hydrological cycle in karst regions. This paper focuses on investigating the seasonal recharge and mean residence time (MRT) of soil water and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China. The deuterium contents in precipitation, creek, soil baseflow (direct recharge of the saturated soil water to the stream), epikarst spring, and soil waters were monitored weekly for two years, and MRT was calculated by an exponential model (EM) and a dispersion model (DM). The obvious seasonal variation of deuterium in rainfall was buffered in epikarst water, indicating sufficient water mixing. Soil baseflow contained less rainy-season rainwater than epikarst spring discharge, reflecting the retarded effect of soil thickness on rainwater recharge. MRTs of all water bodies were 41-71 weeks, and soils in the depression extended those of shallow groundwater. This demonstrated that the deep soil layer played an important role in karst hydrological processes in the study catchment. The creek was recharged mostly by rainfall through epikarst, indicating its crucial role in water circulation. These results showed epikarst had a strong water-holding capacity and also delayed water contact time with dolomite.

  2. Water availability limits tree productivity, carbon stocks, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Logan T.; Law, Beverly E.; Hudiburg, Tara W.

    2017-01-01

    Water availability constrains the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems and is projected to change in many parts of the world over the coming century. We quantified the response of tree net primary productivity (NPP), live biomass (BIO), and mean carbon residence time (CRT = BIO / NPP) to spatial variation in water availability in the western US. We used forest inventory measurements from 1953 mature stands (> 100 years) in Washington, Oregon, and California (WAORCA) along with satellite and climate data sets covering the western US. We summarized forest structure and function in both domains along a 400 cm yr-1 hydrologic gradient, quantified with a climate moisture index (CMI) based on the difference between precipitation and reference evapotranspiration summed over the water year (October-September) and then averaged annually from 1985 to 2014 (CMIwy). Median NPP, BIO, and CRT computed at 10 cm yr-1 intervals along the CMIwy gradient increased monotonically with increasing CMIwy across both WAORCA (rs = 0.93-0.96, p < 0.001) and the western US (rs = 0.93-0.99, p < 0.001). Field measurements from WAORCA showed that median NPP increased from 2.2 to 5.6 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 between the driest and wettest 5 % of sites, while BIO increased from 26 to 281 Mg C ha-1 and CRT increased from 11 to 49 years. The satellite data sets revealed similar changes over the western US, though these data sets tended to plateau in the wettest areas, suggesting that additional efforts are needed to better quantify NPP and BIO from satellites in high-productivity, high-biomass forests. Our results illustrate that long-term average water availability is a key environmental constraint on tree productivity, carbon storage, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US, underscoring the need to assess potential ecosystem response to projected

  3. TEMPORAL SIGNATURES OF AIR QUALITY OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL OUTPUTS: DO TIME SERIES DECOMPOSITION METHODS CAPTURE RELEVANT TIME SCALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time series decomposition methods were applied to meteorological and air quality data and their numerical model estimates. Decomposition techniques express a time series as the sum of a small number of independent modes which hypothetically represent identifiable forcings, thereb...

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation by limonene ozonolysis: Parameterizing multi-generational chemistry in ozone- and residence time-limited indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Terpene ozonolysis reactions can be a strong source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. SOA formation can be parameterized and predicted using the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), also known as the SOA yield, which quantifies the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized terpene. Limonene is a monoterpene that is at sufficient concentrations such that it reacts meaningfully with ozone indoors. It has two unsaturated bonds, and the magnitude of the limonene ozonolysis AMF varies by a factor of ∼4 depending on whether one or both of its unsaturated bonds are ozonated, which depends on whether ozone is in excess compared to limonene as well as the available time for reactions indoors. Hence, this study developed a framework to predict the limonene AMF as a function of the ozone [O3] and limonene [lim] concentrations and the air exchange rate (AER, h-1), which is the inverse of the residence time. Empirical AMF data were used to calculate a mixing coefficient, β, that would yield a 'resultant AMF' as the combination of the AMFs due to ozonolysis of one or both of limonene's unsaturated bonds, within the volatility basis set (VBS) organic aerosol framework. Then, β was regressed against predictors of log10([O3]/[lim]) and AER (R2 = 0.74). The β increased as the log10([O3]/[lim]) increased and as AER decreased, having the physical meaning of driving the resultant AMF to the upper AMF condition when both unsaturated bonds of limonene are ozonated. Modeling demonstrates that using the correct resultant AMF to simulate SOA formation owing to limonene ozonolysis is crucial for accurate indoor prediction.

  5. Temperature and residence time controls on an estuarine harmful algal bloom: Modeling hydrodynamics and Alexandrium fundyense in Nauset estuary.

    PubMed

    Ralston, David K; Brosnahan, Michael L; Fox, Sophia E; Lee, Krista; Anderson, Donald M

    2015-11-01

    A highly resolved, 3-d model of hydrodynamics and Alexandrium fundyense in an estuarine embayment has been developed to investigate the physical and biological controls on a recurrent harmful algal bloom. Nauset estuary on Cape Cod (MA, USA) consists of three salt ponds connected to the ocean through a shallow marsh and network of tidal channels. The model is evaluated using quantitative skill metrics against observations of physical and biological conditions during three spring blooms. The A. fundyense model is based on prior model applications for the nearby Gulf of Maine, but notable modifications were made to be consistent with the Nauset observations. The dominant factors controlling the A. fundyense bloom in Nauset were the water temperature, which regulates organism growth rates, and the efficient retention of cells due to bathymetric constraints, stratification, and cell behavior (diel vertical migration). Spring-neap variability in exchange altered residence times, but for cell retention to be substantially longer than the cell doubling time required both active vertical migration and stratification that inhibits mixing of cells into the surface layer by wind and tidal currents. Unlike in the Gulf of Maine, the model results were relatively insensitive to cyst distributions or germination rates. Instead, in Nauset, high apparent rates of vegetative cell division by retained populations dictated bloom development. Cyst germination occurred earlier in the year than in the Gulf of Maine, suggesting that Nauset cysts have different controls on germination timing. The model results were relatively insensitive to nutrient concentrations, due to eutrophic conditions in the highly impacted estuary or due to limitations in the spatial and temporal resolution of nutrient sampling. Cell loss rates were inferred to be extremely low during the growth phase of the bloom, but increased rapidly during the final phase due to processes that remain uncertain. The validated

  6. Temperature and residence time controls on an estuarine harmful algal bloom: Modeling hydrodynamics and Alexandrium fundyense in Nauset estuary

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, David K.; Brosnahan, Michael L.; Fox, Sophia E.; Lee, Krista; Anderson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    A highly resolved, 3-d model of hydrodynamics and Alexandrium fundyense in an estuarine embayment has been developed to investigate the physical and biological controls on a recurrent harmful algal bloom. Nauset estuary on Cape Cod (MA, USA) consists of three salt ponds connected to the ocean through a shallow marsh and network of tidal channels. The model is evaluated using quantitative skill metrics against observations of physical and biological conditions during three spring blooms. The A. fundyense model is based on prior model applications for the nearby Gulf of Maine, but notable modifications were made to be consistent with the Nauset observations. The dominant factors controlling the A. fundyense bloom in Nauset were the water temperature, which regulates organism growth rates, and the efficient retention of cells due to bathymetric constraints, stratification, and cell behavior (diel vertical migration). Spring-neap variability in exchange altered residence times, but for cell retention to be substantially longer than the cell doubling time required both active vertical migration and stratification that inhibits mixing of cells into the surface layer by wind and tidal currents. Unlike in the Gulf of Maine, the model results were relatively insensitive to cyst distributions or germination rates. Instead, in Nauset, high apparent rates of vegetative cell division by retained populations dictated bloom development. Cyst germination occurred earlier in the year than in the Gulf of Maine, suggesting that Nauset cysts have different controls on germination timing. The model results were relatively insensitive to nutrient concentrations, due to eutrophic conditions in the highly impacted estuary or due to limitations in the spatial and temporal resolution of nutrient sampling. Cell loss rates were inferred to be extremely low during the growth phase of the bloom, but increased rapidly during the final phase due to processes that remain uncertain. The validated

  7. Xenobiotic removal efficiencies in wastewater treatment plants: residence time distributions as a guiding principle for sampling strategies.

    PubMed

    Majewsky, Marius; Gallé, Tom; Bayerle, Michael; Goel, Rajeev; Fischer, Klaus; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2011-11-15

    The effect of mixing regimes and residence time distribution (RTD) on solute transport in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is well understood in environmental engineering. Nevertheless, it is frequently neglected in sampling design and data analysis for the investigation of polar xenobiotic removal efficiencies in WWTPs. Most studies on the latter use 24-h composite samples in influent and effluent. The effluent sampling period is often shifted by the mean hydraulic retention time assuming that this allows a total coverage of the influent load. However, this assumption disregards mixing regime characteristics as well as flow and concentration variability in evaluating xenobiotic removal performances and may consequently lead to biased estimates or even negative elimination efficiencies. The present study aims at developing a modeling approach to estimate xenobiotic removal efficiencies from monitoring data taking the hydraulic RTD in WWTPs into consideration. For this purpose, completely mixed tanks-in-series were applied to address hydraulic mixing regimes in a Luxembourg WWTP. Hydraulic calibration for this WWTP was performed using wastewater conductivity as a tracer. The RTD mixing approach was coupled with first-order biodegradation kinetics for xenobiotics covering three classes of biodegradability during aerobic treatment. Model simulations showed that a daily influent load is distributed over more than one day in the effluent. A 24-h sampling period with an optimal time offset between influent and effluent covers less than the half of the influent load in a dry weather scenario. According to RTD calculations, an optimized sampling strategy covering four consecutive measuring days in the influent would be necessary to estimate the full-scale elimination efficiencies with sufficient accuracy. Daily variations of influent flow and concentrations can substantially affect the reliability of these sampling results. Commonly reported negative removal

  8. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local-scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martínez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Tubau, Isabel; De Pourcq, Katrien; Grau-Martínez, Alba; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers is a technique for improving water quality and increasing groundwater resources. Understanding the fate of a potential contaminant requires knowledge of the residence time distribution (RTD) of the recharged water in the aquifer beneath. A simple way to obtain the RTDs is to perform a tracer test. We performed a pulse injection tracer test in an artificial recharge system through an infiltration basin to obtain the breakthrough curves, which directly yield the RTDs. The RTDs turned out to be very broad and we used a numerical model to interpret them, to characterize heterogeneity, and to extend the model to other flow conditions. The model comprised nine layers at the site scaled to emulate the layering of aquifer deposits. Two types of hypotheses were considered: homogeneous (all flow and transport parameters identical for every layer) and heterogeneous (diverse parameters for each layer). The parameters were calibrated against the head and concentration data in both model types, which were validated quite satisfactorily against 1,1,2-Trichloroethane and electrical conductivity data collected over a long period of time with highly varying flow conditions. We found that the broad RTDs can be attributed to the complex flow structure generated under the basin due to three-dimensionality and time fluctuations (the homogeneous model produced broad RTDs) and the heterogeneity of the media (the heterogeneous model yielded much better fits). We conclude that heterogeneity must be acknowledged to properly assess mixing and broad RTDs, which are required to explain the water quality improvement of artificial recharge basins.

  9. Denitrification in a low-temperature bioreactor system at two different hydraulic residence times: laboratory column studies.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Albin; Herbert, Roger B

    2016-09-15

    Nitrate removal rates in a mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge were determined in laboratory column studies at 5°C, 12°C, and 22°C, and at two different hydraulic residence times (HRTs; 58.2-64.0 hours and 18.7-20.6 hours). Baffles installed in the flow path were tested as a measure to reduce preferential flow behavior, and to increase the nitrate removal in the columns. The nitrate removal in the columns was simulated at 5°C and 12°C using a combined Arrhenius-Monod equation controlling the removal rate, and a first-order exchange model for incorporation of stagnant zones. Denitrification in the mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge reduced nitrate concentrations of 30 mg N L(-1) at 5°C to below detection limits at a HRT of 58.2-64.0 hours. At a HRT of 18.7-20.6 hours, nitrate removal was incomplete. The Arrhenius frequency factor and activation energy retrieved from the low HRT data supported a biochemically controlled reaction rate; the same parameters, however, could not be used to simulate the nitrate removal at high HRT. The results show an inversely proportional relationship between the advection velocity and the nitrate removal rate, suggesting that bioreactor performance could be enhanced by promoting low advection velocities.

  10. Refined assessment of associations between drinking water residence time and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Karen; Klein, Mitchel; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Panwhar, Samina; Huttinger, Alexandra; Tolbert, Paige; Moe, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Recent outbreak investigations suggest that a substantial proportion of waterborne disease outbreaks are attributable to water distribution system issues. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between modeled water residence time (WRT), a proxy for probability of microorganism intrusion into the distribution system, and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness for two water utilities in Metro Atlanta, USA during 1993-2004. We also examine the association between proximity to the nearest distribution system node, based on patients' residential address, and GI illness using logistic regression models. Comparing long (≥90th percentile) with intermediate WRTs (11th to 89th percentile), we observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for Utility 1 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.02-1.13), which had substantially higher average WRT than Utility 2, for which we found no increased risk (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.94-1.02). Examining finer, 12-hour increments of WRT, we found that exposures >48 h were associated with increased risk of GI illness, and exposures of >96 h had the strongest associations, although none of these associations was statistically significant. Our results suggest that utilities might consider reducing WRTs to <2-3 days or adding booster disinfection in areas with longer WRT, to minimize risk of GI illness from water consumption.

  11. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  12. Size of spawning population, residence time, and territory shifts of individuals in the spawning aggregation of a riverine catostomid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, T.B.; Isely, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the behavior of individual fish in a spawning aggregation, specifically how long an individual remains in an aggregation. We monitored Moxostoma robustum (Cope) (Robust Redhorse) in a Savannah River spawning aggregation during spring 2004 and 2005 to provide an estimate of the total number of adults and the number of males comprising the aggregation and to determine male residence time and movements within a spawning aggregation. Robust Redhorse were captured using prepostioned grid electrofishers, identified to sex, weighed, measured, and implanted with a passive integrated transponder. Spawning aggregation size was estimated using a multiple census mark-and-recapture procedure. The spawning aggregation seemed to consist of approximately the same number of individuals (82-85) and males (50-56) during both years of this study. Individual males were present for a mean of 3.6 ?? 0.24 days (?? SE) during the 12-day spawning period. The mean distance between successive recaptures of individual males was 15.9 ?? 1.29 m (?? SE). We conclude that males establish spawning territories on a daily basis and are present within the spawning aggregation for at least 3-4 days. The relatively short duration of the aggregation may be the result of an extremely small population of adults. However, the behavior of individuals has the potential to influence population estimates made while fish are aggregated for spawning.

  13. Traffic-related air pollution and respiratory symptoms among asthmatic children, resident in Mexico City: the EVA cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla-Nuñez, Maria-Consuelo; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Moreno-Macias, Hortensia; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Sienra-Monge, Juan-Jose; Cortez-Lugo, Marlene; Texcalac, Jose-Luis; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca; Romieu, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    Background Taffic-related air pollution has been related to adverse respiratory outcomes; however, there is still uncertainty concerning the type of vehicle emission causing most deleterious effects. Methods A panel study was conducted among 147 asthmatic and 50 healthy children, who were followed up for an average of 22 weeks. Incidence density of coughing, wheezing and breathing difficulty was assessed by referring to daily records of symptoms and child's medication. The association between exposure to pollutants and occurrence of symptoms was evaluated using mixed-effect models with binary response and poisson regression. Results Wheezing was found to relate significantly to air pollutants: an increase of 17.4 μg/m3 (IQR) of PM2.5 (24-h average) was associated with an 8.8% increase (95% CI: 2.4% to 15.5%); an increase of 34 ppb (IQR) of NO2 (1-h maximum) was associated with an 9.1% increase (95% CI: 2.3% to16.4%) and an increase of 48 ppb (IQR) in O3 levels (1 hr maximum) to an increase of 10% (95% CI: 3.2% to 17.3%). Diesel-fueled motor vehicles were significantly associated with wheezing and bronchodilator use (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.62, and IRR = 1.32; 95% CI: 0.99 to 1.77, respectively, for an increase of 130 vehicles hourly, above the 24-hour average). Conclusion Respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children were significantly associated with exposure to traffic exhaust, especially from natural gas and diesel-fueled vehicles. PMID:19014608

  14. Contrasting residence times and fluxes of water and sulfate in two small forested watersheds in Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Michel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Watershed mass balances for solutes of atmospheric origin may be complicated by the residence times of water and solutes at various time scales. In two small forested headwater catchments in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, USA, mean annual export rates of SO4= differ by a factor of 2, and seasonal variations in SO4= concentrations in atmospheric deposition and stream water are out of phase. These features were investigated by comparing 3H, 35S, ??34S, ??2H, ??18O, ??3He, CFC-12, SF6, and chemical analyses of open deposition, throughfall, stream water, and spring water. The concentrations of SO4= and radioactive 35S were about twice as high in throughfall as in open deposition, but the weighted composite values of 35S/S (11.1 and 12.1 ?? 10- 15) and ??34S (+ 3.8 and + 4.1???) were similar. In both streams (Shelter Run, Mill Run), 3H concentrations and ??34S values during high flow were similar to those of modern deposition, ??2H and ??18O values exhibited damped seasonal variations, and 35S/S ratios (0-3 ?? 10- 15) were low throughout the year, indicating inter-seasonal to inter-annual storage and release of atmospheric SO4= in both watersheds. In the Mill Run watershed, 3H concentrations in stream base flow (10-13??TU) were consistent with relatively young groundwater discharge, most ??34S values were approximately the same as the modern atmospheric deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO4= was equal to or slightly greater than the modern deposition rate. In the Shelter Run watershed, 3H concentrations in stream base flow (1-3??TU) indicate that much of the discharging ground water had been deposited prior to the onset of atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, base flow ??34S values (+ 1.6???) were significantly lower than the modern deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO4= was less than the modern deposition rate. Concentrations of 3H and 35S in Shelter Run base flow, and of 3H, 3He, CFC-12, SF6, and 35S in a spring

  15. Contrasting residence times and fluxes of water and sulfate in two small forested watersheds in Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Böhlke, John Karl; Michel, Robert L

    2009-07-01

    Watershed mass balances for solutes of atmospheric origin may be complicated by the residence times of water and solutes at various time scales. In two small forested headwater catchments in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, USA, mean annual export rates of SO(4)(=) differ by a factor of 2, and seasonal variations in SO(4)(=) concentrations in atmospheric deposition and stream water are out of phase. These features were investigated by comparing (3)H, (35)S, delta(34)S, delta(2)H, delta(18)O, delta(3)He, CFC-12, SF(6), and chemical analyses of open deposition, throughfall, stream water, and spring water. The concentrations of SO(4)(=) and radioactive (35)S were about twice as high in throughfall as in open deposition, but the weighted composite values of (35)S/S (11.1 and 12.1x10(-15)) and delta(34)S (+3.8 and +4.1 per thousand) were similar. In both streams (Shelter Run, Mill Run), (3)H concentrations and delta(34)S values during high flow were similar to those of modern deposition, delta(2)H and delta(18)O values exhibited damped seasonal variations, and (35)S/S ratios (0-3x10(-15)) were low throughout the year, indicating inter-seasonal to inter-annual storage and release of atmospheric SO(4)(=) in both watersheds. In the Mill Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (10-13 TU) were consistent with relatively young groundwater discharge, most delta(34)S values were approximately the same as the modern atmospheric deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was equal to or slightly greater than the modern deposition rate. In the Shelter Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (1-3 TU) indicate that much of the discharging ground water had been deposited prior to the onset of atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, base flow delta(34)S values (+1.6 per thousand) were significantly lower than the modern deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was less than the modern deposition rate

  16. Emissions of CO2 and criteria air pollutants from mobile sources: Insights from integrating real-time traffic data into local air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gately, Conor; Hutyra, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, on-road mobile sources were responsible for over 26% of U.S. fossil fuel carbon dioxide (ffCO2) emissions, and over 34% of both CO and NOx emissions. However, accurate representations of these emissions at the scale of urban areas remains a difficult challenge. Quantifying emissions at the scale of local streets and highways is critical to provide policymakers with the information needed to develop appropriate mitigation strategies and to guide research into the underlying process that drive mobile emissions. Quantification of vehicle ffCO2 emissions at high spatial and temporal resolutions requires a detailed synthesis of data on traffic activity, roadway attributes, fleet characteristics and vehicle speeds. To accurately characterize criteria air pollutant emissions, information on local meteorology is also critical, as the temperature and relative humidity can affect emissions rates of these pollutants by as much as 400%. As the health impacts of air pollutants are more severe for residents living in close proximity (<500m) to road sources, it is critical that inventories of these emissions rely on highly resolved source data to locate potential hot-spots of exposure. In this study we utilize real-time GPS estimates of vehicle speeds to estimate ffCO2 and criteria air pollutant emissions at multiple spatial and temporal scales across a large metropolitan area. We observe large variations in emissions associated with diurnal activity patterns, congestion, sporting and civic events, and weather anomalies. We discuss the advantages and challenges of using highly-resolved source data to quantify emissions at a roadway scale, and the potential of this methodology for forecasting the air quality impacts of changes in infrastructure, urban planning policies, and regional climate.

  17. Emissions of CO2 and criteria air pollutants from mobile sources: Insights from integrating real-time traffic data into local air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gately, C.; Hutyra, L.; Sue Wing, I.; Peterson, S.; Janetos, A.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, on-road mobile sources were responsible for over 26% of U.S. fossil fuel carbon dioxide (ffCO2) emissions, and over 34% of both CO and NOx emissions. However, accurate representations of these emissions at the scale of urban areas remains a difficult challenge. Quantifying emissions at the scale of local streets and highways is critical to provide policymakers with the information needed to develop appropriate mitigation strategies and to guide research into the underlying process that drive mobile emissions. Quantification of vehicle ffCO2 emissions at high spatial and temporal resolutions requires a detailed synthesis of data on traffic activity, roadway attributes, fleet characteristics and vehicle speeds. To accurately characterize criteria air pollutant emissions, information on local meteorology is also critical, as the temperature and relative humidity can affect emissions rates of these pollutants by as much as 400%. As the health impacts of air pollutants are more severe for residents living in close proximity (<500m) to road sources, it is critical that inventories of these emissions rely on highly resolved source data to locate potential hot-spots of exposure. In this study we utilize real-time GPS estimates of vehicle speeds to estimate ffCO2 and criteria air pollutant emissions at multiple spatial and temporal scales across a large metropolitan area. We observe large variations in emissions associated with diurnal activity patterns, congestion, sporting and civic events, and weather anomalies. We discuss the advantages and challenges of using highly-resolved source data to quantify emissions at a roadway scale, and the potential of this methodology for forecasting the air quality impacts of changes in infrastructure, urban planning policies, and regional climate.

  18. Studies of Diffusion, Atomic Hopping Frequency and Site Residence Times in Molten SiO2 by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Fraser, D. G.; Refson, K.

    2004-12-01

    , as well as radial distribution function (rdf) and density data provides a picture of the structure and dynamics of SiO2 over a range of conditions. We have developed a method for analysing residence times and 'hop' distances under varying conditions. The plots found at the URL accompanying this abstract compare diffusion of an oxygen atom at 3000K and 4000K over a 106 step (1ns) run. Peaks represent 'hopping', troughs residence in 'sites'. At temperatures of 4000K and above the concept of a discreet 'rattle and hop' diffusion mechanism breaks down to be replaced with a plasma-style situation of more continuous random movement. (1) Fraser DG, Cagin T, Demiralp E, Goddard WA, III, "New transferable interatomic potentials for simulating melting of Mg silicates near the base of mantle," A.G.U. 1998. (2) Van Beest BWH, Kramer GJ, Van Santen RA (1990) Force fields for silicas and aluminophosphates based on ab-initio calculations. Phys Rev Lett 64: 1995. (3) Gemmell AL, Refson K, Fraser DG. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Diffusion in a Silica Melt. EOS Trans AGU 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V11D-0528, 2003.

  19. Use of multiple age tracers to estimate groundwater residence times and long-term recharge rates in arid southern Oman

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Müller, Th.; Osenbrück, K.; Strauch, G.; Pavetich, S.; Al-Mashaikhi, K.-S.; Herb, C.; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Aeschbach, W.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple age tracers were measured to estimate groundwater residence times in the regional aquifer system underlying southwestern Oman. This area, known as the Najd, is one of the most arid areas in the world and is planned to be the main agricultural center of the Sultanate of Oman in the near future. The three isotopic age tracers 4He, 14C and 36Cl were measured in waters collected from wells along a line that extended roughly from the Dhofar Mountains near the Arabian Sea northward 400 km into the Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula. The wells sampled were mostly open to the Umm Er Radhuma confined aquifer, although, some were completed in the mostly unconfined Rus aquifer. The combined results from the three tracers indicate the age of the confined groundwater is < 40 ka in the recharge area in the Dhofar Mountains, > 100 ka in the central section north of the mountains, and up to and > one Ma in the Empty Quarter. The 14C data were used to help calibrate the 4He and 36Cl data. Mixing models suggest that long open boreholes north of the mountains compromise 14C-only interpretations there, in contrast to 4He and 36Cl calculations that are less sensitive to borehole mixing. Thus, only the latter two tracers from these more distant wells were considered reliable. In addition to the age tracers, δ2H and δ18O data suggest that seasonal monsoon and infrequent tropical cyclones are both substantial contributors to the recharge. The study highlights the advantages of using multiple chemical and isotopic data when estimating groundwater travel times and recharge rates, and differentiating recharge mechanisms.

  20. Estimation of groundwater residence time using environmental radioisotopes (14C,T) in carbonate aquifers, southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Samborska, Katarzyna; Różkowski, Andrzej; Małoszewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Triassic carbonate aquifers in the Upper Silesia region, affected by intense withdrawal, have been investigated by means of isotopic analyses of (14)C, δ(13)C, δ(2)H, δ(18)O and (3)H. The isotopic examinations were carried out in the 1970s and in the early 1980s, and it was the first application of tracers to estimate age and vulnerability for the contamination of groundwater in this region. Similar isotopic analyses were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with the same Triassic carbonate formation. The isotopic examinations were performed within the confined part of the carbonate formation, wherein aquifers are covered by semi-permeable deposits. The direct recharge of the aquifer occurs in the outcrop areas, but it mainly takes place due to percolation of the water through aquitards and erosional windows. The Triassic aquifer has been intensively drained by wells and by lead-zinc mines. Nowadays, the declining water demand and closure of some mines have induced a significant increase in the water table level. The detailed analysis of the results, including the radiocarbon age corrections and the comparison of radioisotope activities, has made it possible to estimate the range of residence time within the carbonate Triassic aquifer. This range from several tens to several tens of thousands indicates that the recharge of aquifers might have occurred between modern times and the Pleistocene. The apparent age of the water estimated on the basis of (14)C activity was corrected considering the carbon isotope exchange and the diffusion between mobile water in fractures and stagnant water in micropores. The obtained corrected period of recharge corresponds to the result of investigations of noble gases, which were carried out in the 1990s. In almost half of the cases, groundwater is a mixture of young and old water. The mixing processes occur mainly in areas of heavy exploitation of the aquifer.

  1. Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) seasonal presence, residence time and habitat use at darwin island, galapagos marine reserve.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Jiménez, Jesús; Smith, Franz; Doherty, Paul F; Hearn, Alex; Green, Jonathan R; Paredes-Jarrín, Jules; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The life history of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), including its reproductive ecology, still remains largely unknown. Here, we present results from the first whale shark population study around Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve. Following a diversified approach we characterized seasonal occurrence, population structure and size, and described habitat use of whale sharks based on fine scale movements around the island. Whale shark presence at Darwin Island was negatively correlated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST), with highest abundance corresponding to a cool season between July and December over six years of monitoring. From 2011 to 2013 we photo-identified 82 whale sharks ranging from 4 to 13.1 m Total Length (TL). Size distribution was bimodal, with a great majority (91.5%) of adult female individuals averaging 11.35 m±0.12 m (TL±SE), all but one showing signs of a potential pregnancy. Population dynamics models for apparently pregnant sharks estimated the presence of 3.76±0.90 (mean ± SE) sharks in the study area per day with an individual residence time of 2.09±0.51 (mean ± SE) days. Movement patterns analysis of four apparently pregnant individuals tracked with acoustic tags at Darwin Island revealed an intense use of Darwin's Arch, where no feeding or specific behavior has been recorded, together with periodic excursions around the island's vicinity. Sharks showed a preference for intermediate depths (20-30 m) with occasional dives mostly to mid-water, remaining the majority of their time at water temperatures between 24-25°C. All of our results point to Darwin Island as an important stopover in a migration, possibly with reproductive purposes, rather than an aggregation site. Current studies carried out in this area to investigate regional scale movement patterns may provide essential information about possible pupping grounds for this enigmatic species.

  2. Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) Seasonal Presence, Residence Time and Habitat Use at Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Jiménez, Jesús; Smith, Franz; Doherty, Paul F.; Hearn, Alex; Green, Jonathan R.; Paredes-Jarrín, Jules; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The life history of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), including its reproductive ecology, still remains largely unknown. Here, we present results from the first whale shark population study around Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve. Following a diversified approach we characterized seasonal occurrence, population structure and size, and described habitat use of whale sharks based on fine scale movements around the island. Whale shark presence at Darwin Island was negatively correlated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST), with highest abundance corresponding to a cool season between July and December over six years of monitoring. From 2011 to 2013 we photo-identified 82 whale sharks ranging from 4 to 13.1 m Total Length (TL). Size distribution was bimodal, with a great majority (91.5%) of adult female individuals averaging 11.35 m±0.12 m (TL±SE), all but one showing signs of a potential pregnancy. Population dynamics models for apparently pregnant sharks estimated the presence of 3.76±0.90 (mean ± SE) sharks in the study area per day with an individual residence time of 2.09±0.51 (mean ± SE) days. Movement patterns analysis of four apparently pregnant individuals tracked with acoustic tags at Darwin Island revealed an intense use of Darwin's Arch, where no feeding or specific behavior has been recorded, together with periodic excursions around the island's vicinity. Sharks showed a preference for intermediate depths (20–30 m) with occasional dives mostly to mid-water, remaining the majority of their time at water temperatures between 24–25°C. All of our results point to Darwin Island as an important stopover in a migration, possibly with reproductive purposes, rather than an aggregation site. Current studies carried out in this area to investigate regional scale movement patterns may provide essential information about possible pupping grounds for this enigmatic species. PMID:25551553

  3. On the possibility of real time air quality and toxicology assessment using multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Pinter, Mate; Utry, Noemi; Kiss-Albert, Gergely; Palagyi, Andrea; Manczinger, Laszlo; Vagvölgyi, Csaba; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present results of field measurement campaigns focusing on the in-situ characterization of absorption spectra and the health relevance of light absorbing carbonaceous (LAC) in the ambient. The absorption spectra is measured @ 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm by our state-of-the-art four-wavelength photoacoustic instrument, while for health relevance the eco- cito and genotoxicity parameters were measured using standardized methodologies. We experimentally demonstrated a correlation between the toxicities and the measured absorption spectra quantified by its wavelength dependency. Based on this correlation, we present novel possibilities on real-time air quality monitoring. LAC is extensively studied not only because of its considerable climate effects but as a serious air pollutant too. Gradually increasing number of studies demonstrated experimentally that the health effect of LAC is more serious than it is expected based on its share in total atmospheric aerosol mass. Furthermore during many local pollution events LAC not only has dominancy but it is close to exclusivity. Altogether due to its climate and health effects many studies and proposed regulations focus on the physical, chemical and toxicological properties of LAC as well as on its source apportionment. Despites of its importance, there is not yet a widely accepted standard methodology for the real-time and selective identification of LAC. There are many different reasons of that: starting from its complex inherent physicochemical features including many unknown constituents, via masking effect of ambient on the inherent physicochemical properties taking place even in case of a short residence, ending with the lack of reliable instrumentation for its health or source relevant parameters. Therefore, the methodology and instrument development for selective and reliable identification of LAC is timely and important issues in climate and air quality researches. Recently, many studies demonstrated

  4. Effect of residence time on two-step liquefaction of rice straw in a CO2 atmosphere: Differences between subcritical water and supercritical ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianhua; Wang, Jian; Li, Bingshuo; Kai, Xingping; Li, Rundong

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of temperature and residence time on liquefaction of rice straw in subcritical CO2-subcritical water (subCO2-subH2O) and in subcritical CO2-supercritical ethanol (subCO2-scEtOH), considering the final reaction temperatures (270-345°C) and residence times (15 and 30min). Residence time was identified as a crucial parameter in the subCO2-subH2O liquefaction, whereas residence time had a marginal influence on subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction. When reaction conditions were 320°C and 15min, solvents have weak impact on the quality of bio-oil, HHV 28.57MJ/kg and 28.62MJ/kg, respectively. There was an obvious difference between the subCO2-subH2O and subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction mechanisms. In subCO2-subH2O, CO2 promoted the carbonyl reaction. In subCO2-scEtOH, supercritical ethanol have the function of donating hydrogen and promoting the reaction of hydroxyl-alkylation.

  5. SUBSURFACE RESIDENCE TIMES AS AN ALGORITHM FOR AQUIFER SENSITIVITY MAPPING: TESTING THE CONCEPT WITH GROUND WATER MODELS IN THE CONTENTNEA CREEK BASIN, NORTH CAROLINA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will present a modeling and mapping assessment of landscape sensitivity to non-point source pollution as applied to a hierarchy of catchment drainages in the Coastal Plain of the state of North Carolina. Analysis of the subsurface residence time of water in shallow a...

  6. A SIMPLE MODEL OF THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LOADING, FRESHWATER RESIDENCE TIME, AND INTERNAL LOSSES ON THE NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPORT IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This simple model uses the annual loading rate of total nitrogen (TN) and the water residence time to calculate average annual TN concentration and internal loss rates (e.g. denitrification and incorporation in sediments) in an estuary, and rate of nitrogen export across the seaw...

  7. Effects of sulfuric acid loading and residence time on the composition of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate and its use as a source of xylose for xylitol bioproduction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Silvio S; Matos, Zuzel R; Carvalho, Walter

    2005-01-01

    A 2(2) full factorial design was employed to evaluate the effects of sulfuric acid loading and residence time on the composition of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate obtained in a 250-L reactor. The acid loading and the residence time were varied from 70 to 130 mg acid per gram of dry bagasse and from 10 to 30 min, respectively, while the temperature (121 degrees C) and the bagasse loading (10%) were kept constant. Both the sulfuric acid loading and the residence time influenced the concentrations of xylose and inhibitors in the hydrolysate. The highest xylose concentration (22.71 g/L) was achieved when using an acid loading of 130 mg/g and a residence time of 30 min. These conditions also led to increased concentrations of inhibiting byproducts in the hydrolysate. All of the hydrolysates were vacuum-concentrated to increase the xylose concentration, detoxified by pH alteration and adsorption into activated charcoal, and used for xylitol bioproduction in a stirred tank reactor. Neither the least (70 mg/g, 10 min) nor the most severe (130 mg/g, 30 min) hydrolysis conditions led to the best xylitol production (37.5 g/L), productivity (0.85 g/L h), and yield (0.78 g/g).

  8. Subsurface Residence Times as an Algorithm for Aquifer Sensitivity Mapping: testing the concept with analytic element ground water models in the Contentnea Creek Basin, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. R.

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this research is to test the utility of simple functions of spatially integrated and temporally averaged ground water residence times in shallow groundwatersheds with field observations and detailed computer simulations. The residence time of water in the subsurface is arguably a surrogate of aquifer sensitivity to contamination --- short contact time in subsurface media may result in reduced contaminant assimilation prior to discharge to a well or stream. Residence time is an established criterion for the delineation of wellhead protection areas. The residence time of water may also have application in assessing the connection between landscape and fair weather loadings of non-point source pollution to streams, such as the drainage of nitrogen-nitrate from agricultural fields as base flow. The field setting of this study includes a hierarchy of catchments in the Contentnea Creek basin (2600 km2) of North Carolina, USA, centered on the intensive coastal plain field study site at Lizzie, NC (1.2+km^2), run by the US Geological Survey and the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources of Raleigh, NC. Analytic element models are used to define the advective flow field and regional boundary conditions. The issues of conceptual model complexity are explored using the multi-layer object oriented analytic element model Tim, and by embedding the finite difference model MODFLOW within the analytic element model GFLOW copyright. The models are compared to observations of hydraulic head, base flow separations, and aquifer geochemistry and age dating evidence. The resulting insights are captured and mapped across the basin as zones of average aquifer residence time using ArcView copyright GIS tools. Preliminary results and conclusions will be presented. Mention of commercial software does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  9. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  10. Groundwater residence time and aquifer recharge in multilayered, semi-confined and faulted aquifer systems using environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Banks, Eddie W.; Batelaan, Okke; Kipfer, Rolf; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Cook, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The potential of environmental tracers (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C, 14C, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, N2) to assist our understanding of recharge processes, groundwater flow velocities and residence times in semi-confined, multilayered and faulted aquifer systems was tested in a coastal system with Quaternary sediments overlying Tertiary aquifers and fractured bedrock. Carbon-14 groundwater ages were found to increase with depth and distance (<1000 y near the recharge area to >30,000 y near the coast), confirming that the system is semi-confined and the palaeometeoric origin of groundwater as suggested by water stable isotopes. The presence of old groundwater near the top of deep semi-confined aquifers suggests that recharge mainly occurs in the ranges east of the basin. This is also supported by Cl concentrations, which are higher in the overlying Quaternary aquifers. Groundwater flow velocities between 0.3 and 1.8 m y-1 were estimated using 14C ages, resulting in basin recharge estimates between 0.3 × 107 and 2 × 107 m3 y-1. Radiocarbon and 4He-estimated flow velocities were generally in good agreement, although 4He accumulation rates ranging between 8 × 10-12 and 1 × 10-10 cm3 STP g-1 y-1 and 1.7-7.1 × 10-7 cm3 STP g-1 km-1 confirmed slower flow velocities in some areas. These areas could not be captured using 14C. Faults were found to play a paramount role on mixing old fluids rich in salts and 4He, although it was not possible to demonstrate the role of faults in changing flow velocities, this requiring a higher density of sampling points. Our study shows that environmental tracers have potential to study flow processes in semi-confined, faulted, multilayered aquifer systems, provided a high density of sampling points is available.

  11. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The residence time of an active versus a passive tracer in the Gulf of Aqaba: A box model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jacob; Gildor, Hezi

    A simple box model of the Gulf of Aqaba, northern Red Sea, was used in order to study the effects of large scale processes in the Gulf and Red Sea (e.g. changes in thermohaline circulation or heat input from the Red Sea) as well as the influence of human activities (e.g. tourism, urbanization and mariculture) on the nutrient budget of the Gulf. The model employs available data from the literature together with General Circulation Model output data for monthly average temperature and salinity in the upper 200 m of the northern Red Sea, and monthly average meteorological data from the northern Gulf of Aqaba for heat flux and evaporation calculations. The model was shown to be most sensitive to changes in the thermohaline flux of Red Sea water through the Tiran Strait. Simulations of temperature and salinity best agreed with measurements when an annually varying thermohaline flux (0.045 Sv in January and 0.005 Sv in July) with decoupling of the thermohaline flow from the intermediate boxes during the summer (April-October) was employed. Additionally, periodic decrease of heat input from the Red Sea associated with regional weather patterns caused prolonged vertical mixing periods during the winters and shortening the residence time of phosphate in the Gulf. Hence, warming of Red Sea water would result in shorter periods of vertical mixing in the Gulf during the winter and accumulation of phosphate in the deep reservoir. The increase in deep reservoir phosphate can also be caused by an increase in the export flux of particulate organic matter to the deep reservoir. Hence, even a small increase in net primary production perhaps resulting from external nutrient input to the Gulf will result in nutrient accumulation in the deep reservoir. According to our model a return to pre-perturbation levels of phosphate in the Gulf would take on the order of 10 2 years.

  13. Nitrogen transport and transformations in a coastal plain watershed: Influence of geomorphology on flow paths and residence times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Spruill, T.B.; Mew, H.E.; Farrell, K.M.; Harden, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen transport and groundwater-surface water interactions were examined in a coastal plain watershed in the southeastern United States. Groundwater age dates, calculated using chlorofluorocarbon and tritium concentrations, along with concentrations of nitrogen species and other redox-active constituents, were used to evaluate the fate and transport of nitrate. Nitrate is stable only in recently recharged (<10 years) water found in the upper few meters of saturated thickness in the upland portion of a surficial aquifer. Groundwater with a residence time between 10 and 30 years typically has low nitrate and elevated excess N2 concentrations, indications that denitrification has reduced nitrate concentrations. Groundwater older than 30 years also has low nitrate concentrations but contains little or no excess N2, suggesting that this water did not contain elevated concentrations of nitrate along its flow path. Nitrate transport to streams varies between first- and third-order streams. Hydrologic, lithologic, and chemical data suggest that the surficial aquifer is the dominant source of flow and nitrate to a first-order stream. Iron-reducing conditions occur in groundwater samples from the bed and banks of the first-order stream, suggesting that direct groundwater discharge is denitrified prior to entering the stream. However, nitrogen from the surficial aquifer is transported directly to the stream via a tile drain that bypasses these reduced zones. In the alluvial valley of a third-order stream the erosion of a confining layer creates a much thicker unconfined alluvial aquifer with larger zones of nitrate stability. Age dating and chemical information (SiO 2, Na/K ratios) suggest that water in the alluvial aquifer is derived from short flow paths through the riparian zone and/or from adjacent streams during high-discharge periods. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  15. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  16. Estimates of residence time and related variations in quality of ground water beneath Submarine Base Bangor and vicinity, Kitsap County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of residence time of ground water beneath Submarine Base Bangor and vicinity ranged from less than 50 to 4,550 years before present, based on analysis of the environmental tracers tritium, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and carbon-14 (14C), in 33 ground-water samples collected from wells tapping the ground-water system. The concentrations of multiple environmental tracers tritium, CFCs, and 14C were used to classify ground water as modern (recharged after 1953), pre-modern (recharged prior to 1953), or indeterminate. Estimates of the residence time of pre-modern ground water were based on evaluation of 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon present in ground water using geochemical mass-transfer modeling to account for the interactions of the carbon in ground water with carbon of the aquifer sediments. Ground-water samples were obtained from two extensive aquifers and from permeable interbeds within the thick confining unit separating the sampled aquifers. Estimates of ground-water residence time for all ground-water samples from the shallow aquifer were less than 45 years and were classified as modern. Estimates of the residence time of ground water in the permeable interbeds within the confining unit ranged from modern to 4,200 years and varied spatially. Near the recharge area, residence times in the permeable interbeds typically were less than 800 years, whereas near the discharge area residence times were in excess of several thousand years. In the deeper aquifers, estimates of ground-water residence times typically were several thousand years but ranged from modern to 4,550 years. These estimates of ground-water residence time based on 14C were often larger than estimates of ground-water residence time developed by particle-tracking analysis using a ground-water flow model. There were large uncertainties?on the order of 1,000-2,000 years?in the estimates based on 14C. Modern ground-water tracers found in some samples from large-capacity production wells

  17. A computational model of wall shear and residence time of particles conveyed by steady flow in a curved tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiriet, M.; Graham, J. M. R.; Issa, R. I.

    1993-01-01

    A finite-volume model of steady flow of an incompressible viscous fluid has been carried out in a smooth rigid 90° bend of circular cross-section. The inlet boundary conditions for laminar flow are either an entry Poiseuille regime or a constant injection velocity for a range of Dean number 140 leq De leq 430. A numerical test of turbulent flow was performed for De sim 22 100 with a flat velocity profile at the model entry. The lower the role played by the viscous forces, the larger the distance necessary to set an outer shift of the peak axial velocity. The axial velocity of laminar flow depends not only on the value of the Dean number, but also on separate effects of the Reynolds number and of the tube curvature. The larger the laminar boundary layer at the bend inlet, the nearer from the entry the bend segment where the strongest secondary motion is located. With increasing Reynolds number, the secondary flow develops over a longer bend region and the wall shear rises. Upstream and downstream effect of the bend on the shear stress, as well as flow disturbances induced by very small curvature, were observed. The residence time of conveyed particles is enhanced by the presence of a curved section in the conduit with respect to a straight pipe only at the inner edge of the straight section located downstream from the bend. When the Reynolds number rises, the flow regime remaining laminar, the residence time is smaller in the whole pipe. However for turbulent flow, the residence time, which has much smaller values, takes its highest values in the exit straight section. Les équations de conservation de la masse et de la quantité de mouvement ont été résolues pour un écoulement stationnaire d'un fluide incompressible visqueux dans un coude (angle de 90°), de parois lisses et rigides et de section droite uniforme et circulaire, par la méthode des volumes finis. Les conditions limites en entrée pour l'écoulement laminaire sont soit un profil parabolique, soit

  18. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Nur N; Lutz, Hans O; Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana; Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana

    2014-07-15

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 ma.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0°C-328 μS/cm, 9.6°C-350 μS/cm and 8.9°C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ(18)O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around -10.1‰, -9.2‰ and -8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the(18)O signal of precipitation, the (18)O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm(3)), 12 years (1,190 Mm(3)), and 12.2 years (1,210 Mm(3)), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total aquifer volumes.

  19. A proposed solution to integrating cognitive-affective neuroscience and neuropsychiatry in psychiatry residency training: The time is now.

    PubMed

    Torous, John; Stern, Adam P; Padmanabhan, Jaya L; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Perez, David L

    2015-10-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of a strong neuroscience and neuropsychiatry education in the training of psychiatry residents, achieving this competency has proven challenging. In this perspective article, we selectively discuss the current state of these educational efforts and outline how using brain-symptom relationships from a systems-level neural circuit approach in clinical formulations may help residents value, understand, and apply cognitive-affective neuroscience based principles towards the care of psychiatric patients. To demonstrate the utility of this model, we present a case of major depressive disorder and discuss suspected abnormal neural circuits and therapeutic implications. A clinical neural systems-level, symptom-based approach to conceptualize mental illness can complement and expand residents' existing psychiatric knowledge.

  20. 40 CFR 23.3 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act. 23.3 Section 23.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.3 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air...

  1. 40 CFR 23.3 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act. 23.3 Section 23.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.3 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air...

  2. 40 CFR 23.3 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act. 23.3 Section 23.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.3 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air...

  3. 40 CFR 23.3 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act. 23.3 Section 23.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.3 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air...

  4. 40 CFR 23.3 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air Act. 23.3 Section 23.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.3 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Air...

  5. SU-E-T-45: Antibody Mean Residence Time in Blood and Its Correlation with Protein Molecular Weight

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C; Williams, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Animal biodistribution data are required prior to introducing a new radiopharmaceutical into clinical trials. Protein engineering, using recombinant DNA techniques can produce a large number of related (cognate) antibodies to a given molecular target. Thus, it is important that these constructs be numerically related to one another via a single criterion. In the following, we use the mean residence time (MRT) in murine blood as this criterion. Methods: Five cognate anti-CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) antibodies were compared with regard to their MRT in whole blood of CEA-positive tumor-bearing (LS174T) mice. MRT was defined by blood AUC (area under the curve) divided by the initial blood uptake value; all in units of percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g). Cognates included single chain scFv (25 kDa), diabody (50 kDa), minibody (80 kDa), F(ab')2 (120 kDa), and intact (155 kDa) forms of the murine cT84.66 antibody against CEA. All were labeled with radioactive iodine. Results: The agents, in the sequence listed, exhibited MRT values of 1.16 +/- 0.01 h, 0.99 h, 5.06 +/- 0.70 h, 6.61 +/- 0.36 h, and 59.3 +/- 2.4 h respectively. Because of the monotonic nature of the sequence, a linear correlation analysis was performed between molecular weight (MW) and MRT or ln(MRT) of the 5 proteins. Probability of random correlation was 0.10 for MRT and 0.01 for ln(MRT). Conclusion: MRT values of cognate anti-CEA antibodies were found to be a monotonically increasing sequence with respect to MW. Cognate MW values correlated best to ln(MRT) of the protein species. Thus MRT was proportional to an exponential function of molecular weight. The extended intact antibody circulation time presumably reflected its relatively maximal MW. Presence of an intact FC segment on this native antibody may also have influenced these results.

  6. Perspective: call to action: it is time for academic institutions to appoint a resident quality and patient safety officer.

    PubMed

    Fleischut, Peter M; Evans, Adam S; Nugent, William C; Faggiani, Susan L; Kerr, Gregory E; Lazar, Eliot J

    2011-07-01

    In meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competency requirements, teaching hospitals often find it challenging to ensure effective involvement of housestaff in the area of quality and patient safety (QPS). Because housestaff are the frontline providers of care to patients, and medical errors occasionally occur based on their actions, it is essential for health care organizations to engage them in QPS processes.In early 2008 a Housestaff Quality Council (HQC) was established at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center, to improve QPS by engaging housestaff in policy and decision-making processes and to promote greater housestaff participation in QPS initiatives. It was quickly realized that the success of the HQC was highly contingent on alignment with the institution's overall QPS agenda. To this end, the position of resident QPS officer was created to strengthen the relationship between the hospital's strategic goals and the HQC. The authors describe the success of the resident QPS officers at their institution and observe that by appointing and supporting resident QPS officers, hospitals will be better able to meet their quality and safety goals, residency programs will be able to fulfill their required ACGME core competencies, and the overall quality and safety of patient care can be improved. Simultaneously, the creation of this position will help to create a new cadre of physician leaders needed to further the goals of QPS in health care.

  7. Engaging nursing home residents with dementia in activities: The effects of modeling, presentation order, time of day, and setting characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Marx, Marcia S.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the impact of setting characteristics and presentation effects on engagement with stimuli in a group of 193 nursing home residents with dementia (recruited from a total of seven nursing homes). Engagement was assessed through systematic observations using the Observational Measurement of Engagement (OME), and data pertaining to setting characteristics (background noise, light, and number of persons in proximity) were recorded via the environmental portion of the Agitation Behavior Mapping Inventory (ABMI; Cohen-Mansfield, Werner, & Marx, (1989). An observational study of agitation in agitated nursing home residents. International Psychogeriatrics, 1, 153–165). Results revealed that study participants were engaged more often with moderate levels of sound and in the presence of a small group of people (from four to nine people). As to the presentation effects, multiple presentations of the same stimulus were found to be appropriate for the severely impaired as well as the moderately cognitively impaired. Moreover, modeling of the appropriate behavior significantly increased engagement, with the severely cognitively impaired residents receiving the greatest benefit from modeling. These findings have direct implications for the way in which caregivers could structure the environment in the nursing home and how they could present stimuli to residents in order to optimize engagement in persons with dementia. PMID:20455123

  8. Single molecule tracking of Ace1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae defines a characteristic residence time for non-specific interactions of transcription factors with chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David A.; Mehta, Gunjan D.; Salomon-Kent, Ronit; Mazza, Davide; Morisaki, Tatsuya; Mueller, Florian; McNally, James G.; Karpova, Tatiana S.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo single molecule tracking has recently developed into a powerful technique for measuring and understanding the transient interactions of transcription factors (TF) with their chromatin response elements. However, this method still lacks a solid foundation for distinguishing between specific and non-specific interactions. To address this issue, we took advantage of the power of molecular genetics of yeast. Yeast TF Ace1p has only five specific sites in the genome and thus serves as a benchmark to distinguish specific from non-specific binding. Here, we show that the estimated residence time of the short-residence molecules is essentially the same for Hht1p, Ace1p and Hsf1p, equaling 0.12–0.32 s. These three DNA-binding proteins are very different in their structure, function and intracellular concentration. This suggests that (i) short-residence molecules are bound to DNA non-specifically, and (ii) that non-specific binding shares common characteristics between vastly different DNA-bound proteins and thus may have a common underlying mechanism. We develop new and robust procedure for evaluation of adverse effects of labeling, and new quantitative analysis procedures that significantly improve residence time measurements by accounting for fluorophore blinking. Our results provide a framework for the reliable performance and analysis of single molecule TF experiments in yeast. PMID:27566148

  9. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, L. Neil; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  10. Is Eruption Style Linked to Magma Residence Time at Kilauea Volcano? Results from Chemical Zoning in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, K. J.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Shea, T.; Garcia, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Kilauea is generally characterized by its modern effusive activity, but the past 2500 years were dominated by cycles of explosive and effusive eruptions lasting 100's of years (Swanson et al. 2012). These different eruption styles may reflect variable volatile contents in the source that control magma ascent rate and storage durations (e.g., Sides et al. 2014). A detailed petrological study of the dominantly explosive Keanakako'i tephras (1500-1820 CE) was undertaken to better understand the storage and transport conditions preceding high-energy eruptions. Here, we focus on preliminary results for olivine from the 1500 CE Basal Reticulite (>600 m fountain; May et al. 2015). Olivine major (Fe, Mg), minor (Mn, Ca, Ni) and trace (Li, Na, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Zn) element traverses and 2D maps were collected for 10 crystals and reveal two major populations. The dominant population has homogeneous Fo89 and Fo87 cores with thin (3-12 μm) rims of intermediate composition (Fo87.5-88.5). Normal, reverse, and complex trace element zoning (Al, P, Ti, Cr) is prominent in these otherwise homogenous (Fo, Ni, Ca, Mn) crystals. 2D maps reveal early skeletal growth and the progressive decrease of Cr from core to rim suggests olivine and Cr-spinel crystallization, which should produce significant Fo zoning. Absence of Fo zoning could imply significant storage time in a reservoir allowing homogenization. The majority of rim compositions are out of equilibrium with adhering glass, and Fe-Mg modeling indicates that their residence within the carrier melt was of a few days. A second population consists of strongly zoned (normal and reverse) crystals with a wide range of core Fo (78 to 89) and Fo82-84 rims. Timescales from Fe-Mg zoning are up to 1 year, and may record storage histories before interaction with the carrier melt. The diversity in olivine zoning suggests at least two stages of magma mixing, and a more complex evolution for the magmas that fed the reticulite eruptions

  11. Distribution of 2,4-D in air and on surfaces inside residences after lawn applications: comparing exposure estimates from various media for young children.

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, M G; Lewis, R G; Brinkman, M C; Burkholder, H M; Hines, C E; Menkedick, J R

    2001-01-01

    We collected indoor air, surface wipes (floors, table tops, and window sills), and floor dust samples at multiple locations within 11 occupied and two unoccupied homes both before and after lawn application of the herbicide 2,4-D. We measured residues 1 week before and after application. We used collected samples to determine transport routes of 2,4-D from the lawn into the homes, its subsequent distribution between the indoor surfaces, and air concentration as a function of airborne particle size. We used residue measurements to estimate potential exposures within these homes. After lawn application, 2,4-D was detected in indoor air and on all surfaces throughout all homes. Track-in by an active dog and by the homeowner applicator were the most significant factors for intrusion. Resuspension of floor dust was the major source of 2,4-D in indoor air, with highest levels of 2,4-D found in the particle size range of 2.5-10 microm. Resuspended floor dust was also a major source of 2,4-D on tables and window sills. Estimated postapplication indoor exposure levels for young children from nondietary ingestion may be 1-10 microg/day from contact with floors, and 0.2-30 microg/day from contact with table tops. These are estimated to be about 10 times higher than the preapplication exposures. By comparison, dietary ingestion of 2,4-D is approximately 1.3 microg/day. PMID:11713005

  12. Protected Graft Copolymer Excipient Leads to a Higher Acute Maximum Tolerated Dose and Extends Residence Time of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Significantly Better than Sterically Stabilized Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Reichstetter, Sandra; Castillo, Gerardo M.; Rubinstein, Israel; Nishimoto-Ashfield, Akiko; Lai, ManShun; Jones, Cynthia C.; Banjeree, Aryamitra; Lyubimov, Alex; Bloedow, Duane C.; Bogdanov, Alexei; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine and compare pharmacokinetics and toxicity of two nanoformulations of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP). Methods VIP was formulated using a micellar (Sterically Stabilized Micelles, SSM) and a polymer-based (Protected Graft Copolymer, PGC) nanocarrier at various loading percentages. VIP binding to the nanocarriers, pharmacokinetics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and acute maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the formulations after injection into BALB/c mice were determined. Results Both formulations significantly extend in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP. Formulation toxicity is dependent on loading percentage, showing major differences between the two carrier types. Both formulations increase in vivo potency of unformulated VIP and show acute MTDs at least 140 times lower than unformulated VIP, but still at least 100 times higher than the anticipated highest human dose, 1–5 μg/kg. These nanocarriers prevented a significant drop in arterial blood pressure compared to unformulated VIP. Conclusions While both carriers enhance in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP and reduce the drop in blood pressure immediately after injection, PGC is the excipient of choice to extend residence time and improve the safety of potent therapeutic peptides such as VIP. PMID:23224976

  13. Dynamic Radioactive Source for Evaluating and Demonstrating Time-dependent Performance of Continuous Air Monitors.

    PubMed

    McLean, Thomas D; Moore, Murray E; Justus, Alan L; Hudston, Jonathan A; Barbé, Benoît

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of continuous air monitors in the presence of a plutonium aerosol is time intensive, expensive, and requires a specialized facility. The Radiation Protection Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed a Dynamic Radioactive Source, intended to replace plutonium aerosol challenge testing. The Dynamic Radioactive Source is small enough to be inserted into the sampler filter chamber of a typical continuous air monitor. Time-dependent radioactivity is introduced from electroplated sources for real-time testing of a continuous air monitor where a mechanical wristwatch motor rotates a mask above an alpha-emitting electroplated disk source. The mask is attached to the watch's minute hand, and as it rotates, more of the underlying source is revealed. The measured alpha activity increases with time, simulating the arrival of airborne radioactive particulates at the air sampler inlet. The Dynamic Radioactive Source allows the temporal behavior of puff and chronic release conditions to be mimicked without the need for radioactive aerosols. The new system is configurable to different continuous air monitor designs and provides an in-house testing capability (benchtop compatible). It is a repeatable and reusable system and does not contaminate the tested air monitor. Test benefits include direct user control, realistic (plutonium) aerosol spectra, and iterative development of continuous air monitor alarm algorithms. Data obtained using the Dynamic Radioactive Source has been used to elucidate alarm algorithms and to compare the response time of two commercial continuous air monitors.

  14. Dynamic Radioactive Source for Evaluating and Demonstrating Time-dependent Performance of Continuous Air Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Thomas D.; Moore, Murray E.; Justus, Alan L.; Hudston, Jonathan A.; Barbé, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of continuous air monitors in the presence of a plutonium aerosol is time intensive, expensive, and requires a specialized facility. The Radiation Protection Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed a Dynamic Radioactive Source, intended to replace plutonium aerosol challenge testing. Furthermore, the Dynamic Radioactive Source is small enough to be inserted into the sampler filter chamber of a typical continuous air monitor. Time-dependent radioactivity is introduced from electroplated sources for real-time testing of a continuous air monitor where a mechanical wristwatch motor rotates a mask above an alpha-emitting electroplated disk source. The mask is attached to the watch’s minute hand, and as it rotates, more of the underlying source is revealed. The alpha activity we measured increases with time, simulating the arrival of airborne radioactive particulates at the air sampler inlet. The Dynamic Radioactive Source allows the temporal behavior of puff and chronic release conditions to be mimicked without the need for radioactive aerosols. The new system is configurable to different continuous air monitor designs and provides an in-house testing capability (benchtop compatible). It is a repeatable and reusable system and does not contaminate the tested air monitor. Test benefits include direct user control, realistic (plutonium) aerosol spectra, and iterative development of continuous air monitor alarm algorithms. We also used data obtained using the Dynamic Radioactive Source to elucidate alarm algorithms and to compare the response time of two commercial continuous air monitors.

  15. Dynamic Radioactive Source for Evaluating and Demonstrating Time-dependent Performance of Continuous Air Monitors

    DOE PAGES

    McLean, Thomas D.; Moore, Murray E.; Justus, Alan L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of continuous air monitors in the presence of a plutonium aerosol is time intensive, expensive, and requires a specialized facility. The Radiation Protection Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed a Dynamic Radioactive Source, intended to replace plutonium aerosol challenge testing. Furthermore, the Dynamic Radioactive Source is small enough to be inserted into the sampler filter chamber of a typical continuous air monitor. Time-dependent radioactivity is introduced from electroplated sources for real-time testing of a continuous air monitor where a mechanical wristwatch motor rotates a mask above an alpha-emitting electroplated disk source. The mask is attached tomore » the watch’s minute hand, and as it rotates, more of the underlying source is revealed. The alpha activity we measured increases with time, simulating the arrival of airborne radioactive particulates at the air sampler inlet. The Dynamic Radioactive Source allows the temporal behavior of puff and chronic release conditions to be mimicked without the need for radioactive aerosols. The new system is configurable to different continuous air monitor designs and provides an in-house testing capability (benchtop compatible). It is a repeatable and reusable system and does not contaminate the tested air monitor. Test benefits include direct user control, realistic (plutonium) aerosol spectra, and iterative development of continuous air monitor alarm algorithms. We also used data obtained using the Dynamic Radioactive Source to elucidate alarm algorithms and to compare the response time of two commercial continuous air monitors.« less

  16. Precise time technology for selected Air Force systems: Present status and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yannoni, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    Precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology is becoming increasingly significant to Air Force operations as digital techniques find expanded utility in military missions. Timing has a key role in the function as well as in navigation. A survey of the PTTI needs of several Air Force systems is presented. Current technology supporting these needs was reviewed and new requirements are emphasized for systems as they transfer from initial development to final operational deployment.

  17. Characterizing the trophic niches of stocked and resident cyprinid fishes: consistency in partitioning over time, space and body sizes.

    PubMed

    Bašić, Tea; Britton, J Robert

    2016-07-01

    Hatchery-reared fish are commonly stocked into freshwaters to enhance recreational angling. As these fishes are often of high trophic position and attain relatively large sizes, they potentially interact with functionally similar resident fishes and modify food-web structure. Hatchery-reared barbel Barbus barbus are frequently stocked to enhance riverine cyprinid fish communities in Europe; these fish can survive for over 20 years and exceed 8 kg. Here, their trophic consequences for resident fish communities were tested using cohabitation studies, mainly involving chub Squalius cephalus, a similarly large-bodied, omnivorous and long-lived species. These studies were completed over three spatial scales: pond mesocosms, two streams and three lowland rivers, and used stable isotope analysis. Experiments in mesocosms over 100 days revealed rapid formation of dietary specializations and discrete trophic niches in juvenile B. barbus and S. cephalus. This niche partitioning between the species was also apparent in the streams over 2 years. In the lowland rivers, where fish were mature individuals within established populations, this pattern was also generally apparent in fishes of much larger body sizes. Thus, the stocking of these hatchery-reared fish only incurred minor consequences for the trophic ecology of resident fish, with strong patterns of trophic niche partitioning and diet specialization. Application of these results to decision-making frameworks should enable managers to make objective decisions on whether cyprinid fish should be stocked into lowland rivers according to ecological risk.

  18. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  19. Flotation rate and residence time distribution in continuous coal froth flotation circuits and an evaluation of reagents and circuit variations for pyritic sulfur removal

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis gives the results of research conducted on several aspects of coal froth flotation. The effect of operating variables on the residence time distribution in coal froth flotation cells is discussed, and a model of the residence time distribution is presented for use with flotation rate models in scaling up from laboratory to plant scale. Flotation rate models are also investigated in detail for continuous coal froth flotation circuits. Changes in operating variables were found to affect the mean residence time in cells, but they did not have much effect on the mixing behavior. The use of a time lag was found to be an important part of rate models for continuous froth flotation cells. An important aspect of the use of such rate and residence time equations is their application to the flotation of gangue constituents, which often enter the froth by water carry-over in addition to natural flotation or flotation as slime coatings. As such, water carry-over is also investigated in this thesis for the laboratory and the plant and for both ash-forming minerals and pyrite. Maintaining a constant froth factor, the percentage of froth above the weir, in both laboratory and plant tests is believed to be a critical factor in predicting plant results using a kinetic factor ratio documented in the literature. Removing the pyrite and ash-forming minerals from coal that may be recovered by the water carry-over or other mechanisms is an important goal in coal froth flotation. This thesis also contains the results of tests with pyrite depressants and circuit variations for removal of pyritic sulfur.

  20. Performance Evaluation of a Low-Cost, Real-Time Community Air Monitoring Station

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s Village Green Project (VGP) is an example of using innovative technology to enable community-level low-cost real-time air pollution measurements. The VGP is an air monitoring system configured as a park bench located outside of a public library in Durham, NC. It co...

  1. Determining the residence time distribution of various screw elements in a co-rotating twin-screw extruder by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepschi, Alexander; Gerstorfer, Gregor; Miethlinger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The Residence Time Distribution (RTD) is key to optimizing the mixing ability of an extruder. For both sensitive and reactive materials, it is important to know how long particles remain in the barrel and how long the polymer remains, for instance, in a kneading element. To assess the influence of different screw configurations on the RTD, a low-concentration tracer particle was injected into the feeding section and measured inline by fluorescence spectroscopy1 both inside the barrel and at the extruder exit. The measurements were conducted using polypropylene with different amounts of organic peroxide. Measuring the residence time at various positions along the screw allows the RTD to be determined for just one screw element. Furthermore, we show the influence of different screw configurations on the polydispersity of polypropylene.

  2. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  3. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  4. Mixing interfaces, fluxes, residence times and redox conditions of the hyporheic zones induced by dune-like bedforms and ambient groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto; Valli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of the interface between streams and their surrounding sediment, known as the hyporheic zone, where stream waters flow through the alluvium. These pore water fluxes stem from the interaction among streambed morphology, stream hydraulics and surrounding groundwater flow. We analytically model the hyporheic hydraulics induced by a spatially uniform ambient groundwater flow made of a horizontal, underflow, and a vertical, basal, component, which mimics gaining and losing stream conditions. The proposed analytical solution allows to investigate the control of simple hydromorphological quantities on the extent, residence time and redox conditions of the hyporheic zone, and the thickness of the mixing interface between hyporheic and groundwater cells. Our analysis shows that the location of the mixing zone shallows or deepens in the sediment as a function of bedform geometry, surface hydraulic and groundwater flow. The point of stagnation, where hyporheic flow velocities vanish and where the separation surface passes through, is shallower than or coincides with the deepest point of the hyporheic zone only due to underflow. An increase of the ambient flow causes a reduction of the hyporheic zone volume similarly in both losing and gaining conditions. The hyporheic residence time is lognormally distributed under neutral, losing and gaining conditions, with the residence time moments depending on the same set of parameters describing dune morphology and stream flow.

  5. Allocation of carbon to fine root compounds and their residence times in a boreal forest depend on root size class and season.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Campbell, Catherine D; Högberg, Mona N; Richter, Andreas; Wild, Birgit; Zhou, Xuhui; Hurry, Vaughan; Linder, Sune; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Fine roots play a key role in the forest carbon balance, but their carbon dynamics remain largely unknown. We pulse labelled 50 m(2) patches of young boreal forest by exposure to (13)CO(2) in early and late summer. Labelled photosynthates were traced into carbon compounds of < 1 and 1-3 mm diameter roots (fine roots), and into bulk tissue of these and first-order roots (root tips). Root tips were the most strongly labelled size class. Carbon allocation to all size classes was higher in late than in early summer; mean residence times (MRTs) in starch increased from 4 to 11 months. In structural compounds, MRTs were 0.8 yr in tips and 1.8 yr in fine roots. The MRT of carbon in sugars was in the range of days. Functional differences within the fine root population were indicated by carbon allocation patterns and residence times. Pronounced allocation of recent carbon and higher turnover rates in tips are associated with their role in nutrient and water acquisition. In fine roots, longer MRTs but high allocation to sugars and starch reflect their role in structural support and storage. Accounting for heterogeneity in carbon residence times will improve and most probably reduce the estimates of fine root production.

  6. Permanent resident.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  7. Urban air pollution by odor sources: Short time prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettarin, Nicola; Campolo, Marina; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    A numerical approach is proposed to predict the short time dispersion of odors in the urban environment. The model is based on (i) a three dimensional computational domain describing the urban topography at fine spatial scale (1 m) and on (ii) highly time resolved (1 min frequency) meteorological data used as inflow conditions. The time dependent, three dimensional wind velocity field is reconstructed in the Eulerian framework using a fast response finite volume solver of Navier-Stokes equations. Odor dispersion is calculated using a Lagrangian approach. An application of the model to the historic city of Verona (Italy) is presented. Results confirm that this type of odor dispersion simulations can be used (i) to assess the impact of odor emissions in urban areas and (ii) to evaluate the potential mitigation produced by odor abatement systems.

  8. Landing-Time-Controlled Management Of Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Tobias, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system controls aircraft with old and new guidance equipment. Report begins with overview of concept, then reviews controller-interactive simulations. Describes fuel-conservative-trajectory algorithm, based on equations of motion for controlling landing time. Finally, presents results of piloted simulations.

  9. The Role of Shallow Landslides in the Downslope Transfer of Organic Matter and its Implications on the Residence Time of Carbon in a Tropical Mountain System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, C.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; Joseph-Haines, M.; Miller, M.

    2006-12-01

    Landslides are common features of many tropical mountains, potentially inducing significant changes in land cover and influencing carbon dynamics from local to regional scales. Landslides provide a relatively infrequent but unique mechanism that rapidly transfers organic matter stored in hillslope and low-order channel vegetation and soils to colluvial deposits in fluvial networks and floodplains on higher-order channels. While carbon stored in hillslope vegetation and soil pools may have mean residence times in the order of 10's of years, carbon stored in landslide deposits on floodplains and terraces might have mean residence times in the scale of 100's to 1,000's of years. This study is the first to explore the contribution of landslides in the transfer of organic matter and its consequences on the residence time of carbon within tropical montane watersheds. Focusing in the Sierra de las Minas mountain range in eastern Guatemala we estimated the contribution of landslides to land-cover change and carbon budgets using various remote sensing approaches to create a spatial databases of landslide scars, scoured stream channels, and debris deposits triggered by an earthquake and a rainstorm in 1976 and 1998, respectively. Landslide scars and debris flow scour areas were classified by vegetation types, and their area was converted into units of biomass, soil organic matter, and carbon content based on published data for similar vegetation types in Central America. The net transfer of organic matter and carbon were calculated as the difference between the estimated storage totals, sorted by stream-order, for pre- landslide event conditions and post-event estimates that incorporate the landslides. Even though future field efforts will begin to quantify residence times of carbon within different storage pools, we have attempted to determine an order of magnitude estimate of the residence time of debris deposits in high-order streams by considering their location relative

  10. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now

    PubMed Central

    Sabath, Bruce F.; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution – a community hospital – in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available. PMID:27802866

  11. Relationship Between the Number of Residency Applications and the Yearly Match Rate: Time to Start Thinking About an Application Limit?

    PubMed Central

    Weissbart, Steven J.; Kim, Soo Jeong; Feinn, Richard S.; Stock, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been an increase in the number of applications medical students have submitted for the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP). These additional applications are associated with significant costs and may contribute to match inefficiency. Objective We explored if match rates improved in years when an increased number of applications were submitted. Methods We analyzed yearly published data from the NRMP and the Electronic Residency Application Service for 13 specialties. A generalized linear model was used to assess the relationship between the annual match rate and the mean number of applications submitted per applicant, while controlling for the number of positions available and the number of applicants in the given year. Results Over the last 13 years there has been an increase in the mean number of applications submitted per applicant (P < .001). For the 13 assessed medical specialties, there was no statistically significant relationship between the mean number of applications per applicant per year submitted to the NRMP, and the annual match rate (odds ratios near 1.00 and nonsignificant, P values > .05). Conclusions There was no improvement in the match rate in years when medical students submitted an increased number of applications. Therefore, it would appear that the applicants do not benefit from the larger number of applications submitted. Further study is required to assess the cost and benefit of these additional applications. PMID:26217428

  12. A Real-Time Air Dispersion Modeling System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    Toxic Corridors Spills of Toxic Chemicals 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveres side If necessary and Identify by block numbe,) .This report documents a...microcomputer-based system for the real-time computation of toxic corridors associated with chemical releases. The program assists the user with...interactive input of critical meteorological parameters and accesses user-specified data bases of information regarding toxic chemical attributes. Graphic

  13. Comparison of Shoulder Range of Motion, Strength, and Playing Time in Uninjured High School Baseball Pitchers Who Reside in Warm- and Cold-Weather Climates

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Hurd, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an assumption that baseball athletes who reside in warm-weather climates experience larger magnitude adaptations in throwing shoulder motion and strength compared with their peers who reside in cold-weather climates. Hypotheses (1) The warm-weather climate (WWC) group would exhibit more pronounced shoulder motion and strength adaptations than the cold-weather climate (CWC) group, and (2) the WWC group would participate in pitching activities for a greater proportion of the year than the CWC group, with the time spent pitching predicting throwing shoulder motion and strength in both groups. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods One hundred uninjured high school pitchers (50 each WWC, CWC) were recruited. Rotational shoulder motion and isometric strength were measured and participants reported the number of months per year they pitched. To identify differences between groups, t tests were performed; linear regression was used to determine the influence of pitching volume on shoulder motion and strength. Results The WWC group pitched more months per year than athletes from the CWC group, with the number of months spent pitching negatively related to internal rotation motion and external rotation strength. The WWC group exhibited greater shoulder range of motion in all planes compared with the CWC group, as well as significantly lower external rotation strength and external/internal rotation strength ratios. There was no difference in internal rotation strength between groups, nor a difference in the magnitude of side-to-side differences for strength or motion measures. Conclusion Athletes who reside in cold- and warm-weather climates exhibit differences in throwing shoulder motion and strength, related in part to the number of months spent participating in pitching activities. The amount of time spent participating in pitching activities and the magnitude of range of motion and strength adaptations in athletes who reside

  14. Intravascular Residence Time Determination for the Cyanide Antidote Dimethyl Trisulfide in Rat by Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Deepthika; Lee, Steven; Duke, Anna; Angalakurthi, Siva; Chou, Ching-En; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Thompson, David E.

    2016-01-01

    These studies represent the first report on the intravascular residence time determinations for the cyanide antidote dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS) in a rat model by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (HPLC-UV). The newly developed sample preparation included liquid-liquid extraction by cyclohexanone. The calibration curves showed a linear response for DMTS concentrations between 0.010 and 0.30 mg/mL with R2 = 0.9994. The limit of detection for DMTS via this extraction method was 0.010 mg/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.034 mg/mL. Thus this calibration curve provided a tool for determining DMTS in the range between 0.04 and 0.30 mg/mL. Rats were given 20 mg/kg DMTS dose (in 15% Polysorbate 80) intravenously, and blood samples were taken 15, 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after DMTS injections. The data points were plotted as DMTS concentration in RBCs versus time, and the intravascular residence time was determined graphically. The results indicated a half-life of 36 min in a rat model, suggesting that the circulation time is long enough to provide a reasonable time interval for cyanide antagonism. PMID:28053802

  15. Intravascular Residence Time Determination for the Cyanide Antidote Dimethyl Trisulfide in Rat by Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Deepthika; Lee, Steven; Duke, Anna; Angalakurthi, Siva; Chou, Ching-En; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Thompson, David E; Petrikovics, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    These studies represent the first report on the intravascular residence time determinations for the cyanide antidote dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS) in a rat model by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (HPLC-UV). The newly developed sample preparation included liquid-liquid extraction by cyclohexanone. The calibration curves showed a linear response for DMTS concentrations between 0.010 and 0.30 mg/mL with R(2) = 0.9994. The limit of detection for DMTS via this extraction method was 0.010 mg/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.034 mg/mL. Thus this calibration curve provided a tool for determining DMTS in the range between 0.04 and 0.30 mg/mL. Rats were given 20 mg/kg DMTS dose (in 15% Polysorbate 80) intravenously, and blood samples were taken 15, 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after DMTS injections. The data points were plotted as DMTS concentration in RBCs versus time, and the intravascular residence time was determined graphically. The results indicated a half-life of 36 min in a rat model, suggesting that the circulation time is long enough to provide a reasonable time interval for cyanide antagonism.

  16. Residence time as a key for comprehensive assessment of the relationship between changing land use and nitrates in regional groundwater systems.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingjie; Tang, Changyuan; Song, Xianfang; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Yinghua

    2013-04-01

    In this study, an approach is put forward to study the relationship between changing land use and groundwater nitrate contamination in the Sanjiang Plain. This approach emphasizes the importance of groundwater residence time when relating the nitrates to the changing land use. The principles underlying the approach involve the assessment of groundwater residence time by CFCs and the Vogel age model and the reconstruction of the land use at the groundwater recharge time by interpolation. Nitrate trend analysis shows that nitrates have begun to leach into the aquifers since agricultural activities boomed after the 1950s. Hydrochemical analysis implies that the possible process relating to the nitrate reduction in the groundwater is the oxidation of Fe(ii)-silicates. However, the chemical kinetics of the oxidation of Fe(ii)-silicates is slow, so this denitrification process contributes little to the nitrate variations. Stepwise regression shows that the nitrate concentrations of samples had no direct relationship with the land use at the groundwater sampling time, but had a relatively strong relationship with the land use at the groundwater recharge time. Dry land is recognized as the dominant factor contributing to the elevated concentration of nitrates. The nitrogen isotope for nitrate (δ(15)N-NO3) gives a more direct result of the identification of nitrate sources: the use of manure in agricultural activities. Principle component (PC) regression shows that the process of the dry land exploitation is the major process that controls the nitrate contamination in the Sanjiang Plain.

  17. Using Open and Interoperable Ways to Publish and Access LANCE AIRS Near-Real Time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Lynnes, C.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Yang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Near-Real Time (NRT) data from the Land Atmosphere Near real time Capability for EOS (LANCE) provide the information on the global and regional atmospheric state with very low latency. An open and interoperable platform is useful to facilitate access to and integration of LANCE AIRS NRT data. This paper discusses the use of open-source software components to build Web services for publishing and accessing AIRS NRT data in the context of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The AIRS NRT data have also been made available through an OPeNDAP server. OPeNDAP allows several open-source netCDF-based tools such as Integrated Data Viewer, Ferret and Panoply to directly display the Level 2 data over the network. To enable users to locate swath data files in the OPeNDAP server that lie within a certain geographical area, graphical "granule maps" are being added to show the outline of each file on a map of the Earth. The metadata of AIRS NRT data and services is then explored to implement information advertisement and discovery in catalogue systems. Datacasting, an RSS-based technology for accessing Earth Science data and information to facilitate the subscriptions to AIRS NRT data availability, filtering, downloading and viewing data, is also discussed. To provide an easy entry point to AIRS NRT data and services, a Web portal designed for customized data downloading and visualization is introduced.

  18. Time evolution of nanosecond runaway discharges in air and helium at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-12-15

    Time- and space-resolved fast framing photography was employed to study the discharge initiated by runaway electrons in air and He gas at atmospheric pressure. Whereas in the both cases, the discharge occurs in a nanosecond time scale and its front propagates with a similar velocity along the cathode-anode gap, the later stages of the discharge differ significantly. In air, the main discharge channels develop and remain in the locations with the strongest field enhancement. In He gas, the first, diode 'gap bridging' stage, is similar to that obtained in air; however, the development of the discharge that follows is dictated by an explosive electron emission from micro-protrusions on the edge of the cathode. These results allow us to draw conclusions regarding the different conductivity of the plasma produced in He and air discharges.

  19. Residence times and age distributions of spring waters at the Semmering catchment area, Eastern Austria, as inferred from tritium, CFCs and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Han, Liangfeng; Hacker, Peter; Gröning, Manfred

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater system in the mountainous area of Semmering, Austria, was studied by environmental tracers in several karst springs. The tracers used included stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), tritium ((3)H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The tr