Science.gov

Sample records for air revitalization subsystem

  1. Preprototype independent air revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and maturity of a preprototype, three-person capacity, automatically controlled and monitored, self-contained independent air revitalization subsystem were evaluated. The subsystem maintains the cabin partial pressure of oxygen at 22 kPa (3.2 psia) and that of carbon dioxide at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) over a wide range of cabin air relative humidity conditions. Consumption of water vapor by the water vapor electrolysis module also provides partial humidity control of the cabin environment. During operation, the average carbon dioxide removal efficiency at baseline conditions remained constant throughout the test at 84%. The average electrochemical depolarized concentrator cell voltage at the end of the parametric/endurance test was 0.41 V, representing a very slowly decreasing average cell voltage. The average water vapor electrolysis cell voltage increased only at a rate of 20 mu/h from the initial level of 1.67 V to the final level of 1.69 V at conclusion of the testing.

  2. Advanced air revitalization system testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    A previously developed experimental air revitalization system was tested cyclically and parametrically. One-button startup without manual interventions; extension by 1350 hours of tests with the system; capability for varying process air carbon dioxide partial pressure and humidity and coolant source for simulation of realistic space vehicle interfaces; dynamic system performance response on the interaction of the electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator, the Sabatier carbon dioxide reduction subsystem, and the static feed water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem, the carbon dioxide concentrator module with unitized core technology for the liquid cooled cell; and a preliminary design for a regenerative air revitalization system for the space station are discussed.

  3. Shuttle Orbiter Atmospheric Revitalization Pressure Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walleshauser, J. J.; Ord, G. R.; Prince, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The Atmospheric Revitalization Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS) provides oxygen partial pressure and total pressure control for the habitable atmosphere of the Shuttle for either a one atmosphere environment or an emergency 8 PSIA mode. It consists of a Supply Panel, Control Panel, Cabin Pressure Relief Valves and Electronic Controllers. The panels control and monitor the oxygen and nitrogen supplies. The cabin pressure relief valves protect the habitable environment from overpressurization. Electronic controllers provide proper mixing of the two gases. This paper describes the ARPCS, addresses the changes in hardware that have occurred since the inception of the program; the performance of this subsystem during STS-1 and STS-2; and discusses future operation modes.

  4. Ames Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Roger Z.

    2015-01-01

    This is an informal presentation presented to the University of Colorado, Boulder Bioastronautics group seminar. It highlights the key focal areas of the Air Revitalization Group research over the past year, including progress on the CO2 Removal and Compression System, testing of CDRA drying bed configurations, and adsorption research.

  5. Challenges in the development of the orbiter atmosphere revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. N.; Swider, J.; Wojnarowski, J.; Decrisantis, A.; Ord, G. R.; Walleshauser, J. J.; Gibb, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter atmospheric revitalization subsystem provides thermal and contaminant control as well as total- and oxygen partial-pressure control of the environment within the orbiter crew cabin. Challenges that occurred during the development of this subsystem for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The design of the rotating hardware elements of the system (pumps, fans, etc.) required significant development to meet the requirements of long service life, maintainability, and high cycle-fatigue life. As a result, a stringent development program, particularly in the areas of bearing life and heat dissipation, was required. Another area requiring significant development was cabin humidity control and condensate collection.

  6. Space shuttle revitalization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrone, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle air revitalization system is discussed. The sequential steps in loop closure are examined and a schematic outline of the regenerative air revitalization system is presented. Carbon dioxide reduction subsystem concepts are compared. Schemes are drawn for: static feedwater electrolysis cell, solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis cell, air revitalization system, nitrogen generation reactions, nitrogen subsystem staging, vapor compression distillation subsystem, thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem, catalytic distillation water reclamation subsystem, and space shuttle solid waste management system.

  7. Air and water quality monitor assessment of life support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Ken; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Holder, D.; Humphries, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preprotype air revitalization and water reclamation subsystems (Mole Sieve, Sabatier, Static Feed Electrolyzer, Trace Contaminant Control, and Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporative Subsystem) were operated and tested independently and in an integrated arrangement. During each test, water and/or gas samples were taken from each subsystem so that overall subsystem performance could be determined. The overall test design and objectives for both subsystem and integrated subsystem tests were limited, and no effort was made to meet water or gas specifications. The results of chemical analyses for each of the participating subsystems are presented along with other selected samples which were analyzed for physical properties and microbiologicals.

  8. Advanced air revitalization system modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Baumann, Liese; Jeng, Frank; Christian, Steve; Edeer, Marybeth; Lin, Chin

    1990-01-01

    To support manned lunar and Martian exploration, an extensive evaluation of air revitalization subsystems (ARS) is being conducted. The major operations under study include carbon dioxide removal and reduction; oxygen and nitrogen production, storage, and distribution; humidity and temperature control; and trace contaminant control. A comprehensive analysis program based on a generalized block flow model was developed to facilitate the evaluation of various processes and their interaction. ASPEN PLUS was used in modelling carbon dioxide removal and reduction. Several life support test stands were developed to test new and existing technologies for their potential applicability in space. The goal was to identify processes which use compact, lightweight equipment and maximize the recovery of oxygen and water. The carbon dioxide removal test stands include solid amine/vacuum desorption (SAVD), regenerative silver oxide chemisorption, and electrochemical carbon dioxide concentration (EDC). Membrane-based carbon dioxide removal and humidity control, catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, and catalytic oxidation of trace contaminants were also investigated.

  9. Space shuttle atmospheric revitalization subsystem/active thermal control subsystem computer program (users manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A shuttle (ARS) atmosphere revitalization subsystem active thermal control subsystem (ATCS) performance routine was developed. This computer program is adapted from the Shuttle EC/LSS Design Computer Program. The program was upgraded in three noteworthy areas: (1) The functional ARS/ATCS schematic has been revised to accurately synthesize the shuttle baseline system definition. (2) The program logic has been improved to provide a more accurate prediction of the integrated ARS/ATCS system performance. Additionally, the logic has been expanded to model all components and thermal loads in the ARS/ATCS system. (3) The program is designed to be used on the NASA JSC crew system division's programmable calculator system. As written the new computer routine has an average running time of five minutes. The use of desk top type calculation equipment, and the rapid response of the program provides the NASA with an analytical tool for trade studies to refine the system definition, and for test support of the RSECS or integrated Shuttle ARS/ATCS test programs.

  10. Functional Performance of an Enabling Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem Architecture for Deep Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Greenwood, Zachary W.; Kayatin, Matthew J.; Newton, Robert L.; Parrish, Keith J.; Roman, Monsi C.; Takada, Kevin C.; Miller, Lee A.; Scott, Joseph P.; Stanley, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    A subsystem architecture derived from the International Space Station's (ISS) Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) has been functionally demonstrated. This ISS-derived architecture features re-arranged unit operations for trace contaminant control and carbon dioxide removal functions, a methane purification component as a precursor to enhance resource recovery over ISS capability, operational modifications to a water electrolysis-based oxygen generation assembly, and an alternative major atmospheric constituent monitoring concept. Results from this functional demonstration are summarized and compared to the performance observed during ground-based testing conducted on an ISS-like subsystem architecture. Considerations for further subsystem architecture and process technology development are discussed.

  11. An integrated regenerative air revitalization system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, G. P.; Heppner, D. B.; Schubert, F. H.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    Progress towards development of an air revitalization system (ARS) for spacecraft breathable atmosphere regeneration is assessed, and a preliminary design for a one-person ARS is described. The ARS is considered a necessary component of any permanently manned orbital station, and studies have demonstrated that penalties for expendable air supplies justify an ARS for missions longer than 40 days. CO2 must be removed and O2 returned along with N2, which can be extracted from hydrazine, with the H2 component returning to the operation of the CO2 reduction subsystem. An experimental ARS (ARX-1) features a cabin humidity control unit, a CO2 concentrator, an air-cooled CO2 reduction reactor, an oxygen generator (electrolysis), the hydrazine N2 generator, and a water handling unit. A 120-day test demonstrated one-button startup and 480 hr operation in a normal mode.

  12. Development of a Test Facility for Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Sao-Dung; Lin, Amy; Campbell, Melissa; Smith, Frederick; Curley, Su

    2007-01-01

    Development of new air revitalization system (ARS) technology can initially be performed in a subscale laboratory environment, but in order to advance the maturity level, the technology must be tested in an end-to-end integrated environment. The Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center serves as a ground test bed for evaluating emerging ARS technologies in an environment representative of spacecraft atmospheres. At the center of the ARTEF is a hypobaric chamber which serves as a sealed atmospheric chamber for closed loop testing. A Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) was custom-built to simulate the consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide, moisture and heat of up to eight persons. A multitude of gas analyzers and dew point sensors are used to monitor the chamber atmosphere upstream and downstream of a test article. A robust vacuum system is needed to simulate the vacuum of space. A reliable data acquisition and control system is required to connect all the subsystems together. This paper presents the capabilities of the integrated test facility and some of the issues encountered during the integration.

  13. Electrochemical air revitalization system optimization investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.

    1975-01-01

    A program to characterize a Breadboard of an Electrochemical Air Revitalization System (BEARS) was successfully completed. The BEARS is composed of three components: (1) a water vapor electrolysis module (WVEM) for O2 production and partial humidity control, (2) an electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator module (EDCM) for CO2 control, and (3) a power-sharing controller, designed to utilize the power produced by the EDCM to partially offset the WVEM power requirements. It is concluded from the results of this work that the concept of electrochemical air revitalization with power-sharing is a viable solution to the problem of providing a localized topping force for O2 generation, CO2 removal and partial humidity control aboard manned spacecraft. Continued development of the EARS concept is recommended, applying the operational experience and limits identified during the BEARS program to testing of a one-man capacity system and toward the development of advanced system controls to optimize EARS operation for given interfaces and requirements. Successful completion of this development will produce timely technology necessary to plan future advanced environmental control and life support system programs and experiments.

  14. Evaluation of an Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem for Deep Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Conrad, Ruth E.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Greenwood, Zachary W.; Kayatin, Matthew J.; Knox, James C.; Newton, Robert L.; Parrish, Keith J.; Takada, Kevin C.; Miller, Lee A.; Scott, Joseph P.; Stanley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    An Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) suitable for deployment aboard deep space exploration mission vehicles has been developed and functionally demonstrated. This modified ARS process design architecture was derived from the International Space Station's (ISS) basic ARS. Primary functions considered in the architecture include trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide removal, carbon dioxide reduction, and oxygen generation. Candidate environmental monitoring instruments were also evaluated. The process architecture rearranges unit operations and employs equipment operational changes to reduce mass, simplify, and improve the functional performance for trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide removal, and oxygen generation. Results from integrated functional demonstration are summarized and compared to the performance observed during previous testing conducted on an ISS-like subsystem architecture and a similarly evolved process architecture. Considerations for further subsystem architecture and process technology development are discussed.

  15. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the atmospheric revitalization pressure control subsystem FMEA/CIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiidi, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the atmospheric Revitalization Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL proposed Post 51-L updates based upon the CCB/PRCB presentations and an informal criticality summary listing. A discussion of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter ARPCS hardware.

  16. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  17. International Space Station Atmosphere Control and Supply, Atmosphere Revitalization, and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem - Verification for Node 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 ACS, AR, and WRM design and detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for Node 1.

  18. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the atmospheric revitalization pressure control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiidi, M. J.; Duffy, R. E.; Mclaughlin, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis/Critical Items List (FMEA/CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Atmospheric Revitalization and Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS) are documented. The ARPCS hardware was categorized into the following subdivisions: (1) Atmospheric Make-up and Control (including the Auxiliary Oxygen Assembly, Oxygen Assembly, and Nitrogen Assembly); and (2) Atmospheric Vent and Control (including the Positive Relief Vent Assembly, Negative Relief Vent Assembly, and Cabin Vent Assembly). The IOA analysis process utilized available ARPCS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  19. International Space Station Program Phase 3 Integrated Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Franks, G. D.; Knox, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Testing of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. Segment baseline configuration of the Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was conducted as part of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design and development program. This testing was designed to answer specific questions regarding the control and performance of the baseline ARS subassemblies in the ISS U.S. Segment configuration. These questions resulted from the continued maturation of the ISS ECLSS configuration and design requirement changes since 1992. The test used pressurized oxygen injection, a mass spectrometric major constituent analyzer, a Four-Bed Molecular Sieve Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, and a Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly to maintain the atmospheric composition in a sealed chamber at ISS specifications for 30 days. Human metabolic processes for a crew of four were simulated according to projected ISS mission time lines. The performance of a static feed water electrolysis Oxygen Generator Assembly was investigated during the test preparation phases; however, technical difficulties prevented its use during the integrated test. The Integrated ARS Test (IART) program built upon previous closed-door and open-door integrated testing conducted at MSFC between 1987 and 1992. It is the most advanced test of an integrated ARS conducted by NASA to demonstrate its end-to-end control and overall performance. IART test objectives, facility design, pretest analyses, test and control requirements, and test results are presented.

  20. Mathematical model of one-man air revitalization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for simulating the steady state performance in electrochemical CO2 concentrators which utilize (NMe4)2 CO3 (aq.) electrolyte. This electrolyte, which accommodates a wide range of air relative humidity, is most suitable for one-man air revitalization systems. The model is based on the solution of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations derived from mass transport and rate equations for the processes which take place in the cell. The boundary conditions are obtained by solving the mass and energy transport equations. A shooting method is used to solve the differential equations.

  1. One-man electrochemical air revitalization system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schbert, F. H.; Marshall, R. D.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A program to evaluate the performance of a one man capacity, self contained electrochemical air revitalization system was successfully completed. The technology readiness of this concept was demonstrated by characterizing the performance of this one man system over wide ranges in cabin atmospheric conditions. The electrochemical air revitalization system consists of a water vapor electrolysis module to generate oxygen from water vapor in the cabin air, and an electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator module to remove carbon dioxide from the cabin air. A control/monitor instrumentation package that uses the electrochemical depolarized concentrator module power generated to partially offset the water vapor electrolysis module power requirements and various structural fluid routing components are also part of the system. The system was designed to meet the one man metabolic oxygen generation and carbon dioxide removal requirements, thereby controlling cabin partial pressure of oxygen at 22 kN/sq m and cabin pressure of carbon dioxide at 400 N/sq m over a wide range in cabin air relative humidity conditions.

  2. One man electrochemical air revitalization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, J. C.; Aylward, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An integrated water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hydrogen depolarized CO2 concentrator (HDC) system sized for one man support over a wide range of inlet air conditions was designed, fabricated, and tested. Data obtained during 110 days of testing verified that this system can provide the necessary oxygen, CO2 removal, and partial humidity control to support one man (without exceeding a cabin partial pressure of 3.0 mmHg for CO2 and while maintaining a 20% oxygen level), when operated at a WVE current of 50 amperes and an HDC current of 18 amperes. An evaluation to determine the physical properties of tetramethylammonium bicarbonate (TMAC) and hydroxide was made. This provides the necessary electrolyte information for designing an HDC cell using TMAC.

  3. Integrated Evaluation of Closed Loop Air Revitalization System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s vision and mission statements include an emphasis on human exploration of space, which requires environmental control and life support technologies. This Contractor Report (CR) describes the development and evaluation of an Air Revitalization System, modeling and simulation of the components, and integrated hardware testing with the goal of better understanding the inherent capabilities and limitations of this closed loop system. Major components integrated and tested included a 4-Bed Modular Sieve, Mechanical Compressor Engineering Development Unit, Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and a Sabatier Engineering and Development Unit. The requisite methodolgy and technical results are contained in this CR.

  4. Technology advancement of an oxygen generation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. K.; Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An oxygen generation subsystem based on water electrolysis was developed and tested to further advance the concept and technology of the spacecraft air revitalization system. Emphasis was placed on demonstrating the subsystem integration concept and hardware maturity at a subsystem level. The integration concept of the air revitalization system was found to be feasible. Hardware and technology of the oxygen generation subsystem was demonstrated to be close to the preprototype level. Continued development of the oxygen generation technology is recommended to further reduce the total weight penalties of the oxygen generation subsystem through optimization.

  5. Development of an expert system for analysis of Shuttle atmospheric revitalization and pressure control subsystem anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafuse, Sharon A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the Shuttle Leak Management Expert System (SLMES), a preprototype expert system developed to enable the ECLSS subsystem manager to analyze subsystem anomalies and to formulate flight procedures based on flight data. The SLMES combines the rule-based expert system technology with the traditional FORTRAN-based software into an integrated system. SLMES analyzes the data using rules, and, when it detects a problem that requires simulation, it sets up the input for the FORTRAN-based simulation program ARPCS2AT2, which predicts the cabin total pressure and composition as a function of time. The program simulates the pressure control system, the crew oxygen masks, the airlock repress/depress valves, and the leakage. When the simulation has completed, other SLMES rules are triggered to examine the results of simulation contrary to flight data and to suggest methods for correcting the problem. Results are then presented in form of graphs and tables.

  6. Final-Approach-Spacing Subsystem For Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz; Bergeron, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    Automation subsystem of computers, computer workstations, communication equipment, and radar helps air-traffic controllers in terminal radar approach-control (TRACON) facility manage sequence and spacing of arriving aircraft for both efficiency and safety. Called FAST (Final Approach Spacing Tool), subsystem enables controllers to choose among various levels of automation.

  7. Dynamic Model of the BIO-Plex Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Cory; Meyers, Karen; Duffield, Bruce; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BIO-Plex facility will need to support a variety of life support system designs and operation strategies. These systems will be tested and evaluated in the BIO-Plex facility. An important goal of the life support program is to identify designs that best meet all size and performance constraints for a variety of possible future missions. Integrated human testing is a necessary step in reaching this goal. System modeling and analysis will also play an important role in this endeavor. Currently, simulation studies are being used to estimate air revitalization buffer and storage requirements in order to develop the infrastructure requirements of the BIO-Plex facility. Simulation studies are also being used to verify that the envisioned operation strategy will be able to meet all performance criteria. In this paper, a simulation study is presented for a nominal BIO-Plex scenario with a high-level of crop growth. A general description of the dynamic mass flow model is provided, along with some simulation results. The paper also discusses sizing and operations issues and describes plans for future simulation studies.

  8. AEROMETRIC INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM - AIRS FACILITY SUBSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) is a computer-based repository of information about airborne pollution in the United States and various World Health Organization (WHO) member countries. AIRS is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and runs on t...

  9. STS-32 OV-102 air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During STS-32, onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, a leakage problem at environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator A below the middeck is solved with a plastic bag and a towel. The towel inserted inside a plastic bag absorbed the water that had collected at the separator inlet.

  10. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake... STANDARDS Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.57 Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem. The following requirements apply to vehicles with air brake and...

  11. Thirsty Walls: A New Paradigm for Air Revitalization in Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Brennecke, Joan; Weislogel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Carbon Dioxide removal systems on submarines are compact and reliable. They use solubility chemistry. They spray a Carbon Dioxide adsorbing chemical directly into the air stream, and allow the liquid to settle. Carbon Dioxide removal systems on ISS are large and need repair. They use adsorption chemistry. They force air through a bed packed with granular zeolite, and heat the bed to desorb the Carbon Dioxide. The thermal cycles cause the zeolite to dust. New advances in additive manufacturing, and a better understanding of uid behavior in microgravity make it possible to expose a liquid directly to air in a microgravity environment. It is now practical to use submarine style solubility chemistry for atmosphere revitalization in space. It is now possible to develop space systems that achieve submarine levels of reliability. New developments in Ionic Liquid research make it possible to match the solubility performance characteristics of MEA used on submarines - with Ionic Liquids that do not release chemical vapors into the air. "Thirsty Walls" provide gentle, passive contact between ventilation air and Air Revitalization functions of temperature control, relative humidity control, and Carbon Dioxide removal. "Thirsty Walls" eliminates the need of large blowers and compressors that need to force air at high velocities through restrictive Air Revitalization hardware.

  12. STS-32 OV-102 air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During STS-32, onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, a leakage problem at environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator A below the middeck is documented in this closeup view. Note the many bubbles around the separator. The crew cleared out stowage bags, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) cannisters and other materials to get at the problem. It was eventually repaired.

  13. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  14. Air Revitalization System Enables Excursions to the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Paragon Space Development Corporation, based in Tucson, Arizona has had a long history of collaboration with NASA, including developing a modular air purification system under the Commercial Crew Development Program, designed to support the commercial space sector. Using that device and other NASA technology, startup company World View is now gearing up to take customers on helium balloon rides to the stratosphere.

  15. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  16. Development of a Next-Generation Membrane-Integrated Adsorption Processor for CO2 Removal and Compression for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila; LeVan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    The current CO2 removal technology of NASA is very energy intensive and contains many non-optimized subsystems. This paper discusses the concept of a next-generation, membrane integrated, adsorption processor for CO2 removal nd compression in closed-loop air revitalization systems. This processor will use many times less power than NASA's current CO2 removal technology and will be capable of maintaining a lower CO2 concentration in the cabin than that can be achieved by the existing CO2 removal systems. The compact, consolidated, configuration of gas dryer, CO2 separator, and CO2 compressor will allow continuous recycling of humid air in the cabin and supply of compressed CO2 to the reduction unit for oxygen recovery. The device has potential application to the International Space Station and future, long duration, transit, and planetary missions.

  17. Air-Cooled Design of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.; Rosen, Micha; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan; Cavalcante, Celio L.

    2004-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts. This paper discusses the mechanical design and the results of thermal model validation tests of a TSAC that uses air as the cooling medium.

  18. Closed-loop Habitation Air Revitalization Model for Regenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Maxwell M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary function of any life support system is to keep the crew alive by providing breathable air, potable water, edible food, and for disposal of waste. In a well-balanced or regenerative life support system, the various components are each using what is available and producing what is needed by other components so that there will always be enough chemicals in the form in which they are needed. Humans are not just users, but also one of the participating parts of the system. If a system could continuously recycle the original chemicals, this would make it virtually a Closed-loop Habitation (CH). Some difficulties in trying to create a miniature version of a CH are briefly discussed. In a miniature CH, a minimal structure must be provided and the difference must be made up by artificial parts such as physicochemical systems that perform the conversions that the Earth can achieve naturally. To study the interactions of these parts, a computer model was designed that simulates a miniature CH with emphasis on the air revitalization part. It is called the Closed-loop Habitation Air Revitalization Model (CHARM).

  19. An Air Revitalization Model (ARM) for Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Maxwell M.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the air revitalization model (ARM) is to determine the minimum buffer capacities that would be necessary for long duration space missions. Several observations are supported by the current configuration sizes: the baseline values for each gas and the day to day or month to month fluctuations that are allowed. The baseline values depend on the minimum safety tolerances and the quantities of life support consumables necessary to survive the worst case scenarios within those tolerances. Most, it not all, of these quantities can easily be determined by ARM once these tolerances are set. The day to day fluctuations also require a command decision. It is already apparent from the current configuration of ARM that the tighter these fluctuations are controlled, the more energy used, the more nonregenerable hydrazine consumed, and the larger the required capacities for the various gas generators. All of these relationships could clearly be quantified by one operational ARM.

  20. Multi-Agent Diagnosis and Control of an Air Revitalization System for Life Support in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Kowing, Jeffrey; Nieten, Joseph; Graham, Jeffrey s.; Schreckenghost, Debra; Bonasso, Pete; Fleming, Land D.; MacMahon, Matt; Thronesbery, Carroll

    2000-01-01

    An architecture of interoperating agents has been developed to provide control and fault management for advanced life support systems in space. In this adjustable autonomy architecture, software agents coordinate with human agents and provide support in novel fault management situations. This architecture combines the Livingstone model-based mode identification and reconfiguration (MIR) system with the 3T architecture for autonomous flexible command and control. The MIR software agent performs model-based state identification and diagnosis. MIR identifies novel recovery configurations and the set of commands required for the recovery. The AZT procedural executive and the human operator use the diagnoses and recovery recommendations, and provide command sequencing. User interface extensions have been developed to support human monitoring of both AZT and MIR data and activities. This architecture has been demonstrated performing control and fault management for an oxygen production system for air revitalization in space. The software operates in a dynamic simulation testbed.

  1. Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

  2. Optimum dry-cooling sub-systems for a solar air conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. L. S.; Namkoong, D.

    1978-01-01

    Dry-cooling sub-systems for residential solar powered Rankine compression air conditioners were economically optimized and compared with the cost of a wet cooling tower. Results in terms of yearly incremental busbar cost due to the use of dry-cooling were presented for Philadelphia and Miami. With input data corresponding to local weather, energy rate and capital costs, condenser surface designs and performance, the computerized optimization program yields design specifications of the sub-system which has the lowest annual incremental cost.

  3. Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) phase 3 simplified integrated test trace contaminant control subsystem performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system testing has been conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center since 1986. The phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted from July 30, 1989, through August 11, 1989, tested an integrated air revitalization system. During this test, the trace contaminant control subsystem (TCCS) was directly integrated with the bleed stream from the carbon dioxide reduction subsystem. The TCCS performed as expected with minor anomalies. The test set the basis for further characterizing the TCCS performance as part of advance air revitalization system configurations.

  4. Language Revitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne

    2003-01-01

    Surveys developments in language revitalization and language death. Focusing on indigenous languages, discusses the role and nature of appropriate linguistic documentation, possibilities for bilingual education, and methods of promoting oral fluency and intergenerational transmission in affected languages. (Author/VWL)

  5. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-tension shall be sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open... sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open the drain cocks...

  6. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-tension shall be sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open... sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open the drain cocks...

  7. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-tension shall be sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open... sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open the drain cocks...

  8. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-tension shall be sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open... sufficient to prevent slippage. Inspection procedure. With the air system charged, open the drain cocks...

  9. Long-Duration Testing of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Micha; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of long-duration testing of a temperature-swing adsorption compressor that has application in the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop. The air revitalization system of the ISS operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from Earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low-pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. The TSAC was developed and its operation was successfully verified in integration tests with the flight-like Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) at Marshall Space Flight Center prior to the long-duration tests. Long-duration tests reveal the impacts of repeated thermal cycling on the compressor components and the adsorbent material.

  10. Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support System (ASCLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Roger F.

    1987-01-01

    The Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support Systems (ASCLSS) program has successfully developed and demonstrated a generic approach to the automation and control of space station subsystems. The automation system features a hierarchical and distributed real-time control architecture which places maximum controls authority at the lowest or process control level which enhances system autonomy. The ASCLSS demonstration system pioneered many automation and control concepts currently being considered in the space station data management system (DMS). Heavy emphasis is placed on controls hardware and software commonality implemented in accepted standards. The approach demonstrates successfully the application of real-time process and accountability with the subsystem or process developer. The ASCLSS system completely automates a space station subsystem (air revitalization group of the ASCLSS) which moves the crew/operator into a role of supervisory control authority. The ASCLSS program developed over 50 lessons learned which will aide future space station developers in the area of automation and controls..

  11. Owens-Illinois subsystem design package for the SEC-601 air-cooled solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The subsystem design of the SEC-601 solar collector was evaluated. The collector is of modular design and is approximately 12 feet three inches wide and eight feet seven inches tall. It contains 72 collector tube elements and weighs approximately 300 pounds. Included in this report are the subsystem performance specifications and the assembly and installation drawings of the solar collectors and manifold.

  12. Revitalization of School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Andrea Barlow

    This study analyzed current practices in the revitalization of school buildings and assimilates data that can be used by school administrators when deciding on revitalization issues. Data from nine revitalized schools since 1985 and a literature review of the elements for planning the revitalization of school facilities indicate that structural…

  13. Integrated Testing of a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J. C.; Mulloth, Lila; Frederick, Kenneth; Affleck, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. This paper describes the integrated test results of a flight-like CDRA and a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for carbon dioxide removal and compression. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of CDRA.

  14. Performance/Design Requirements and Detailed Technical Description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem for Integration into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, A. K.; And Others

    The performance/design requirements and a detailed technical description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem to be integrated into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System are described. The subsystem may be used for computer-assisted lesson construction and has presentation capability for on-the-job training for data automation, staff, and…

  15. Air Revitalization Using Superoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter C.; Spitze, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Pellets made from powder mixtures of potassium superoxide, KO2, and calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2, proven markedly superior to pellets of pure KO2 for adding O2 to and removing CO2 from atmospheric-pressure flow of humidified CO2 in He. Superoxides used extensively to supply O2 and scrub CO2 in variety of ambient-pressure life-support applications, including portable self-contained breathing apparatuses, spacecraft, and undersea submersible craft.

  16. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric Revitalization (AR) is the term the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) uses to encompass the engineered systems that maintain a safe, breathable gaseous atmosphere inside a habitable space cabin. An AR subsystem is a key part of the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system for habitable space cabins. The ultimate goal for AR subsystem designers is to 'close the loop', that is, to capture gaseous human metabolic products, specifically water vapor (H2O) and Carbon dioxide (CO2), for maximal Oxygen (o2) recovery and to make other useful resources from these products. The AR subsystem also removes trace chemical contaminants from the cabin atmosphere to preserve cabin atmospheric quality, provides O2 and may include instrumentation to monitor cabin atmospheric quality. Long duration crewed space exploration missions require advancements in AR process technologies in order to reduce power consumption and mass and to increase reliability compared to those used for shorter duration missions that are typically limited to Low Earth Orbit. For example, current AR subsystems include separate processors and process air flow loops for removing metabolic CO2 and volatile organic tract contaminants (TCs). Physical adsorbents contained in fixed, packed beds are employed in these processors. Still, isolated pockets of high carbon dioxide have been suggested as a trigger for crew headaches and concern persists about future cabin ammonia (NH3) levels as compared with historical flights. Developers are already focused on certain potential advancements. ECLS systems engineers envision improving the AR subsystem by combining the functions of TC control and CO2 removal into a single regenerable process and moving toward structured sorbents - monoliths - instead of granular material. Monoliths present a lower pressure drop and eliminate particle attrition problems that result from bed containment. New materials and configurations offer promise for

  17. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve and a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS and liquid-cooled TSAC testing conducted during the period of March 3 to April 18, 2003. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of CDRA.

  18. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Heppner, D. B.; Bunnell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The most promising concept for a regenerative CO2 removal system for long duration manned space flight is the Electrochemical CO2 Concentrator (EDC), which allows for the continuous, efficient removal of CO2 from the spacecraft cabin. This study addresses the advancement of the EDC system by generating subsystem and ancillary component reliability data through extensive endurance testing and developing related hardware components such as electrochemical module lightweight end plates, electrochemical module improved isolation valves, an improved air/liquid heat exchanger and a triple redundant relative humidity sensor. Efforts included fabrication and testing the EDC with a Sabatier CO2 Reduction Reactor and generation of data necessary for integration of the EDC into a space station air revitalization system. The results verified the high level of performance, reliability and durability of the EDC subsystem and ancillary hardware, verified the high efficiency of the Sabatier CO2 Reduction Reactor, and increased the overall EDC technology engineering data base. The study concluded that the EDC system is approaching the hardware maturity levels required for space station deployment.

  19. AEROMETRIC INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (AIRS) -GEOGRAPHIC, COMMON, AND MAINTENANCE SUBSYSTEM (GCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) is a computer-based repository of information about airborne pollution in the United States and various World Health Organization (WHO) member countries. AIRS is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and runs on t...

  20. Air-liquid solar collector for solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and hot water subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of quarterly reports consisting of the installation and layout design of the air collector system for commercial applications, completion of the preliminary design review, detailed design efforts, and preparation of the verification test plan are given. Performance specifications and performance testing of a prototype model of a two manifold, 144 tube air collector array is presented.

  1. Modeling of Revitalization of Atmospheric Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was initiated in September of 2011 as part of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Under the ARREM project, testing of sub-scale and full-scale systems has been combined with multiphysics computer simulations for evaluation and optimization of subsystem approaches. In particular, this paper describes the testing and modeling of the water desiccant subsystem of the carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA). The goal is a full system predictive model of CDRA to guide system optimization and development.

  2. Development of a six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide collection subsystem for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    Life Systems, working with NASA, has developed an electrochemical, six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem (CX-6) designed to normally remove 13.2 lb/day of CO2 while maintaining the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of the cabin atmosphere at 3 mm Hg or less. The CX-6 was subjected to extensive parametric and endurance testing. The effects of operating conditions on CO2 removal and electrical efficiencies were determined, including effects of hydrogen (H2) flow rate, process airflow rate, pCO2, operating temperature and current density. A total of 209 days of operation was accumulated. The subsystem was designed with self-contained electronic control and monitoring instrumentation. The CX-6 was redesigned and repackaged into the CO2 collection subsystem for the air revitalization group of the space station prototype.

  3. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  4. The shuttle orbiter cabin atmospheric revitalization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, C. F.; Owens, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The Orbiter Atmospheric Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) and Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS) are designed to provide the flight crew and passengers with a pressurized environment that is both life-supporting and within crew comfort limitations. The ARPCS is a two-gas (oxygen-nitrogen) system that obtains oxygen from the Power Reactant Supply and Distribution (PRSD) subsystem and nitrogen from the nitrogen storage tanks. The ARS includes the water coolant loop; cabin CO2, odor, humidity and temperature control; and avionics cooling. Baseline ARPCS and ARS changes since 1973 include removal of the sublimator from the water coolant loop, an increase in flowrates to accommodate increased loads, elimination of the avionics bay isolation from the cabin, a decision to have an inert vehicle during ferry flight, elimination of coldwall tubing around windows and hatches, and deletion of the cabin heater.

  5. Development of a Planning and Institutional Research Subsystem at Grambling State University. AIR 1983 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Harold W.; Davis, Bobby

    The development and implementation of a planning and institutional research subsystem by Grambling State University (GSU) are described. Three components of the subsystem are as follows: the Grambling Institutional Data System (GRIDS), simulation and forecasting models, and the management reporting system. The way that GSU has improved the…

  6. Power Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluksdahl, Betsy

    1991-01-01

    Topics concerning the Common Lunar Lander are presented in view graph form and include: energy storage and power generation; electrical power distribution and control; pyrotechniques; input from other subsystems; and design refinement following vehicle integration.

  7. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  8. Development of a Low-Power CO2 Removal and Compression System for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization in Future Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Moate, Joe R.

    2005-01-01

    The current CO2 removal technology of NASA is very energy intensive and contains many non-optimized subsystems. This paper discusses the design and prototype development of a two-stage CO2 removal and compression system that will utilize much less power than NASA s current CO2 removal technology. This integrated system contains a Nafion membrane followed by a residual water adsorber that performs the function of the desiccant beds in the four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) system of the International Space Station (ISS). The membrane and the water adsorber are followed by a two-stage CO2 removal and compression subsystem that satisfies the operations of the CO2 adsorbent beds of the 4BMS aid the interface compressor for the Sabatier reactor connection. The two-stage compressor will utilize the principles of temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compression technology for CO2 removal and compression. The similarities in operation and cycle times of the CO2 removal (first stage) and compression (second stage) operations will allow thermal coupling of the processes to maximize the efficiency of the system. In addition to the low-power advantage, this processor will maintain a lower CO2 concentration in the cabin than that can be achieved by the existing CO2 removal systems. The compact, consolidated, configuration of membrane gas dryer and CO2 separator and compressor will allow continuous recycling of humid air in the cabin and supply of compressed CO2 to the reduction unit for oxygen recovery. The device has potential application to the International Space Station and future, long duration, transit, and planetary missions.

  9. Designing Indigenous Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermes, Mary; Bang, Megan; Marin, Ananda

    2012-01-01

    Endangered Indigenous languages have received little attention within the American educational research community. However, within Native American communities, language revitalization is pushing education beyond former iterations of culturally relevant curriculum and has the potential to radically alter how we understand culture and language in…

  10. Modeling of Atmosphere Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, James; Kittredge, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    NASA's AES is pioneering new approaches for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. All spacecraft systems must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Here, we show work related to improving system efficiency and reliability for water separation systems on crewed vehicles and the initial development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project

  11. Energy efficiency in military housing: Monitoring to support revitalization guidebook

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the US Army, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy to develop a guidebook to be used by architectural and engineering firms in the design phases of military family housing revitalization projects. The purpose of the guidebook is to ensure that energy efficiency is properly addressed in revitalization projects. Monitoring space-heating and cooling energy used in houses both before and after they are revitalized is necessary in order to assess the amount of energy saved by the revitalization process. Three different methods of conducting monitoring experiments are discussed, as well as the methods of data analysis to be used. Houses will be monitored individually using standard gas and electric meters to obtain heating and cooling data for the houses. The authors recommend conducting monitoring programs at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, and Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, because of their project schedules and potential for savings. They do not recommend doing any monitoring at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, because of the relatively small savings that they expect revitalization to accomplish there. They do not recommend seeking out alternative sites for monitoring because of the time required to become familiar with the installation and also because revitalization schedules at alternative sites may be no better than those at the sites they inspected.

  12. Motivation: revitalizing performance.

    PubMed

    Andersen, C

    1996-08-01

    It is difficult for health information managers to maintain their career motivation in times of financial cutbacks, reforms, and changing technologies. Diminished motivation leads to poor job performance, which harms the department's productivity and the manager s job security. Revitalizing performance through improved motivation does not depend on fate. The article explains why motivation diminishes and suggests a plan for recapturing lost motivation. PMID:10159539

  13. Revitalizing the aged brain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhilash K

    2011-05-01

    Optimal cognitive and emotional function is vital to independence, productivity, and quality of life. Cognitive impairment without dementia may be seen in 16% to 33% of adults older than 65 years, and is associated with significant emotional distress. Cognitive and emotional well-being are inextricably linked. This article qualifies revitalizing the aged brain, discusses neuroplasticity, and suggests practical neuroplasticity-based strategies to improve the cognitive and emotional well-being of older adults. PMID:21549872

  14. Revitalizing Communities in New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitzl, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The New Mexico Rural Revitalization Initiative (NMRRI), an innovative program to enhance the growth and development of rural communities, involves schools and students as part of a holistic approach. The program requires community members to take responsibility for revitalizing their economy and fosters an entrepreneurial spirit among students.

  15. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders that give promise for revitalizing therapeutics and may thus answer industry's concerns. PMID:24317307

  16. Development of a three-man preprototype CO2 collection subsystem for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.; Quattrone, P. D.; Marshall, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Future long-duration manned space missions will require regenerable carbon dioxide (CO2) collection concepts such as the Electrochemical Depolarized CO2 Concentrator (EDC). A three-man-capacity preprototype CO2 Collection Subsystem (CS-3) is being developed for eventual flight demonstration as part of the Air Revitalization System (ARS) of the Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) experiment. The CS-3 employs an EDC to concentrate CO2 from the low partial-pressure levels required of spacecraft atmospheres to high partial-pressure levels needed for oxygen (O2) recovery through CO2 reduction processes. The CS-3 is sized to remove a nominal 3.0 kg/day (6.6 lb/day) of the CO2 to maintain the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of the cabin atmosphere at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) or less. This paper presents the preprototype design, configuration, operation, and projected performance characteristics.

  17. Automated subsystems control development. [for life support systems of space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, R. F.; Heppner, D. B.; Samonski, F. H., Jr.; Lance, N., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    NASA has the objective to launch a Space Station in the 1990s. It has been found that the success of the Space Station engineering development, the achievement of initial operational capability (IOC), and the operation of a productive Space Station will depend heavily on the implementation of an effective automation and control approach. For the development of technology needed to implement the required automation and control function, a contract entitled 'Automated Subsystems Control for Life Support Systems' (ASCLSS) was awarded to two American companies. The present paper provides a description of the ASCLSS program. Attention is given to an automation and control architecture study, a generic automation and control approach for hardware demonstration, a standard software approach, application of Air Revitalization Group (ARG) process simulators, and a generic man-machine interface.

  18. Simulation Helps Improve Atmosphere Revitalization Systems for Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Coker, RObert

    2014-01-01

    Life support systems for manned spacecraft must provide breathable air and drinkable water for the astronauts. Through the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project, engineers at NASA are developing atmosphere control devices for the safety of the onboard crew. The atmosphere in a manned spacecraft needs to be regularly revitalized in order to ensure the safety of the astronauts and the success of the space mission. For missions lasting a few months, this means air is continuously dehumidified, water collected for re-use, and carbon dioxide (CO2) ejected. One component of the onboard atmosphere control system is a water-saving device that Jim Knox, aerospace engineer at NASA, is optimizing through the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project. He is leading a team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (Huntsville, Alabama) that is aiming to make the assembly more cost-effective and efficient by reducing its power usage and maximizing the water saved; their goal is to save 80-90% of the water in the air. They hope to offer flight system developers at NASA an integrated approach to atmosphere revitalization and water collection that will ultimately increase the time and distance space missions can travel.

  19. SMARTE: IMPROVING REVITALIZATION DECISIONS - OCTOBER 3, 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools -electronic) is a web-based decision support tool being developed by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) in partnership with the Office of Brownfields Cleanup and Revitalization (OBCR), the Interstate Tec...

  20. Installation package for the Solaron solar subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information that is intended to be a guide for installation, operation, and maintenance of the various solar subsystems is presented. The subsystems consist of the following: collectors, storage, transport (air handler) and controller for heat pump and peak storage. Two prototype residential systems were installed at Akron, Ohio, and Duffield, Virginia.

  1. Lightside Atmospheric Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Cushman, R. J.; Hultman, M. M.; Nason, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The system was studied as a replacement to the present baseline LiOH system for extended duration shuttle missions. The system consists of three subsystems: a solid amine water desorbed regenerable carbon dioxide removal system, a water vapor electrolysis oxygen generating system, and a Sabatier reactor carbon dioxide reduction system. The system is designed for use on a solar powered shuttle vehicle. The majority of the system's power requirements are utilized on the Sun side of each orbit, when solar power is available.

  2. HVAC [Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning] subsystem design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1986-06-01

    The HVAC system is a subsystem within the Mechanical Services Group (MSG). The HVAC system for the 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR Plant presently consists of ten, nonsafety-related subsystems located in the Nuclear Island (NI) and Energy Conversion Area (ECA) of the plant.

  3. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.

  4. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Supply Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the Node 1 ECLS ACS subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for that subsystem.

  5. MPP disk subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A disk subsystem for the Massively Parallel processor (MPP) is designed to the block diagram level. The subsystem is capable of storing 4,992 megabytes of data, expandable to 39,936 megabytes. The subsystem is capable of transferring data to the MPP Staging Memory at a rate of 25 megabytes/second, expandable to 100 megabytes/second. A lower cost disk subsystem is also presented. This alternate subsystem is capable of storing 3,744 megabytes with a transfer rate of 10.6 megabyte/second.

  6. Language Acquisition and Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, William; Hattori, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    Intergenerational transmission, the ultimate goal of language revitalization efforts, can only be achieved by (re)establishing the conditions under which an imperiled language can be acquired by the community's children. This paper presents a tutorial survey of several key points relating to language acquisition and maintenance in children,…

  7. Rethinking Native American Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    As many linguists continue to work with and analyze First Nations/Native American languages, the consensus opinion usually direly predicts the loss of daily use for almost all of the extant Indigenous languages. Tremendous efforts are being expended for renewing, revitalizing, and restoring these languages to everyday use. The model upon which…

  8. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Sewy, D.; Pickering, C.; Sauers, R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the phase 2 of the power subsystem automation study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using computer software to manage an aspect of the electrical power subsystem on a space station. The state of the art in expert systems software was investigated in this study. This effort resulted in the demonstration of prototype expert system software for managing one aspect of a simulated space station power subsystem.

  9. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 2, Appendix A: Fixed bed gasifier and sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem computer model development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, E.; Russell, W.; Leach, J.W.

    1990-08-01

    Computer models have been developed for evaluating conceptual designs of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants. An overall system model was developed for performing thermodynamic cycle analyses, and detailed models were developed for predicting performance characteristics of fixed bed coal gasifiers and hot gas clean up subsystem components. The overall system model performs mass and energy balances and does chemical equilibrium analyses to determine the effects of changes in operating conditions, or to evaluate proposed design changes. An existing plug flow model for fixed bed gasifiers known as the Wen II model was revised and updated. Also, a spread sheet model of zinc ferrite sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem was developed. Parametric analyses were performed to determine how performance depends on variables in the system design. The work was done to support CRS Sirrine Incorporated in their study of standardized air blown coal gasifier gas turbine concepts.

  10. Minimal noise subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Byrd, Mark; Jacobs, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    A system subjected to noise contains a decoherence-free subspace or subsystem (DFS) only if the noise possesses an exact symmetry. Here we consider noise models in which a perturbation breaks a symmetry of the noise, so that if S is a DFS under a given noise process it is no longer so under the new perturbed noise process. We ask whether there is a subspace or subsystem that is more robust to the perturbed noise than S . To answer this question we develop a numerical method that allows us to search for subspaces or subsystems that are maximally robust to arbitrary noise processes. We apply this method to a number of examples, and find that a subsystem that is a DFS is often not the subsystem that experiences minimal noise when the symmetry of the noise is broken by a perturbation. We discuss which classes of noise have this property.

  11. International Space Station Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Verification for Node 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem design. The paper will also provide a discussion of the detailed Element Verification methodologies for nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem operations utilized during the Qualification phase.

  12. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Greg

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/output library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.

  13. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/outputmore » library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.« less

  14. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  15. DIRECTORY OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR LAND REVITALIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information profiles on the various EPA and other Federal programs who offer financial and in-kind assistance for site cleanup activities related to revitalization and reuse. Each profile indicates contact, eligibility, and descriptions of the programs.

  16. Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation of Atmosphere Revitalization and Environmental Monitoring Systems for Long Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Perry, Jay L.; Jan, Darrell L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project is working to mature optimum atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring system architectures. It is the project's objective to enable exploration beyond Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) and improve affordability by focusing on three primary goals: 1) achieving high reliability, 2) reducing dependence on a ground-based logistics resupply model, and 3) maximizing commonality between atmosphere revitalization subsystem components and those needed to support other exploration elements. The ARREM project's strengths include using existing developmental hardware and testing facilities, when possible, and and a well-coordinated effort among the NASA field centers that contributed to past ARS and EMS technology development projects.

  17. NEP power subsystem modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harty, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system optimization code consists of a master module and various submodules. Each of the submodules represents a subsystem within the total NEP power system. The master module sends commands and input data to each of the submodules and receives output data back. Rocketdyne was responsible for preparing submodules for the power conversion (both K-Rankine and Brayton), heat rejection, and power management and distribution.

  18. Pressure Garment Subsystem Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Constellation program pressure garment subsystem (PGS) team has created a technical roadmap that communicates major technical questions and how and when the questions are being answered in support of major project milestones. The roadmap is a living document that guides the team priorities. The roadmap also communicates technical reactions to changes in project priorities and funding. This paper presents the roadmap and discusses specific roadmap elements in detail as representative examples to provide insight into the meaning and use of the roadmap.

  19. The MAP Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary T.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, integration, test, performance, and lessons learned of NASA's Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) propulsion subsystem. MAP was launched on a Delta-II launch vehicle from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 30, 2001. Due to instrument thermal stability requirements, the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point was selected for the mission orbit. The L2 trajectory incorporated phasing loops and a lunar gravity assist. The propulsion subsystem's requirements are to manage momentum, perform maneuvers during the phasing loops to set up the lunar swingby, and perform stationkeeping at L2 for 2 years. MAP's propulsion subsystem uses 8 thrusters which are located and oriented to provide attitude control and momentum management about all axes, and delta-V in any direction without exposing the instrument to the sun. The propellant tank holds 72 kg of hydrazine, which is expelled by unregulated blowdown pressurization. Thermal management is complex because no heater cycling is allowed at L2. Several technical challenges presented themselves during I and T, such as in-situ weld repairs and in-situ bending of thruster tubes to accommodate late changes in the observatory CG. On-orbit performance has been nominal, and all phasing loop, mid-course correction, and stationkeeping maneuvers have been successfully performed to date.

  20. SMARTE: HELPING COMMUNITIES OVERCOME OBSTACLES TO REVITALIZATION - JUNE 28, 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools -electronic) is a web-based decision support tool being developed by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) in partnership with the Office of Brownfields Cleanup and Revitalization (OBCR), the Interstate Tec...

  1. SMARTE: HELPING COMMUNITIES EVALUATE REUSE OPTIONS AND OVERCOME REVITALIZATION OBSTACLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools electronic) is a web-based decision support tool being developed by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) in partnership with the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR), the Interstate Techn...

  2. Pressure relief subsystem design description

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    The primary function of the Pressure Relief Subsystem, a subsystem of the Vessel System, is to provide overpressure protection to the Vessel System. When the overpressure setpoint is reached, pressure is reduced by permitting the flow of primary coolant out of the Vessel System. This subsystem also provides the flow path by which purified helium is returned to the vessel system, either as circulating purge/flow from the Helium Purification Subsystem or make-up helium from the Helium Storage and Transfer Subsystem.

  3. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  4. Tribal Languages and the Challenges of Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Christine P.

    2005-01-01

    Although school- and university-based language programs can help strengthen threatened Indigenous languages, language revitalization at its heart involves reestablishing traditional functions of language use in the context of everyday speaker interactions. The inherent dynamics of Native oral language traditions suggest the limitations of…

  5. Revitalizing the Land Grant University: An Abridgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, G. Edward

    The institutional mission orientation of land grant universities and problems faced by these institutions are discussed, along with five tasks involved in redefining and revitalizing the land grant university. A traditional responsibility of land grant universities was to apply science and technology to solve societal problems. Faculty were…

  6. GET SMARTE: DECISION TOOLS TO REVITALIZE BROWNFIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools-electronic) is an open-source, web-based, decision-support system for developing and evaluating future use scenarios for potentially contaminated sites (i.e., brownfields). It contains resources and analysis tools...

  7. Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, William L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of community college student services. As program development models, considers Miami-Dade Community College's computer-based instructional management system; entrepreneurial fee-based services; and divestment of situational or special-interest services to student groups. In…

  8. Integration of the electrochemical depolorized CO2 concentrator with the Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.; Hallick, T. M.

    1976-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of spacecraft atmospheres require an Oxygen Reclamation System (ORS) for the collection of carbon dioxide and water vapor and the recovery of oxygen from these metabolic products. Three life support subsystems uniquely qualified to form such an ORS are an Electrochemical CO2 Depolarized Concentrator (EDC), a CO2 Reduction Subsystem (BRS) and a Water Electrolysis Subsystem (WES). A program to develop and test the interface hardware and control concepts necessary for integrated operation of a four man capacity EDC with a four man capacity BRS was successfully completed. The control concept implemented proved successful in operating the EDC with the BRS for both constant CO2 loading as well as variable CO2 loading, based on a repetitive mission profile of the Space Station Prototype (SSP).

  9. The Calipso Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth s cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system s operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system s survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  10. Waste collection subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Practical ways were explored of improving waste compaction and of providing rapid turnaround between flights at essentially no cost for the space shuttle waste collection subsystem commode. Because of the possible application of a fully developed shuttle commode to the space station, means of providing waste treatment without overboard venting were also considered. Three basic schemes for compaction and rapid turnaround, each fully capable of meeting the objectives, were explored in sufficient depth to bring out the characteristic advantages and disadvantages of each. Tradeoff comparisons were very close between leading contenders and efforts were made to refine the design concepts sufficiently to justify a selection. The concept selected makes use of a sealed canister containing wastes that have been forcibly compacted, which is removable in flight. No selection was made between three superior non-venting treatment methods owing to the need for experimental evaluations of the processes involved. A system requirements definition document has been prepared to define the task for a test embodiment of the selected concept.

  11. Mars Exploration Rover telecommunications subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilland, Jeffrey; Bhanji, Alaudin M.; Estabrook, Polly

    2004-04-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission is designed to investigate Martian geology, investigate the role of water, and seek information on the climate history of the red planet at two sites. The Telecommunications Subsystem consists of the Radio Frequency Subsystem (RFS) operating at 7.1/8.4GHz (X-band), the Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Subsystem operating at 401/437MHz, the RFS and UHF Antenna Subsystem and the Radar Altimeter Subsystem (RAS) operating at 4.3 GHz (C-band). Science data return is enhanced through UHF relay communications with the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter up to 128 kbps. Relay communications will also be demonstrated with the ESA Mars Express orbiter.

  12. Subsystems component definitions summary program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A. Don; Thomas, Carolyn C.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Hall, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program, the Subsystems Component Definitions Summary (SUBCOMDEF), was developed to provide a quick and efficient means of summarizing large quantities of subsystems component data in terms of weight, volume, resupply, and power. The program was validated using Space Station Freedom Program Definition Requirements Document data for the internal and external thermal control subsystem. Once all component descriptions, unit weights and volumes, resupply, and power data are input, the user may obtain a summary report of user-specified portions of the subsystem or of the entire subsystem as a whole. Any combination or all of the parameters of wet and dry weight, wet and dry volume, resupply weight and volume, and power may be displayed. The user may vary the resupply period according to individual mission requirements, as well as the number of hours per day power consuming components operate. Uses of this program are not limited only to subsystem component summaries. Any applications that require quick, efficient, and accurate weight, volume, resupply, or power summaries would be well suited to take advantage of SUBCOMDEF's capabilities.

  13. Revitalizing the Small Town Mainstreet. Hard Times: Communities in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Edward A.; Bentley, Marion T.

    Presenting a base of general information that local business people and government officials involved with downtown revitalization should be familiar with in order to understand the range of options available and factors that will influence the outcomes of any revitalization program, the paper summarizes current theories, trends, studies, and…

  14. Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Kittredge, Kenneth; Xoker, Robert F.; Cummings, Ramona; Gomez, Carlos F.

    2012-01-01

    "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations. A companion paper discusses the hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  15. Revitalization - an organizational program for the individual

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.M.

    1983-07-01

    Progressive devitalization is a malady that afflicts many workers resulting in tremendous costs to organizations. This malady has long been recognized by management but little has been done to treat it. A new approach to the problem has been insitituted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in the form of a group program called Revitalization. Early results have been very encouraging. The program will continue to be designed and improved in the hope of bringing more productivity to the organization and self-esteem to the individual.

  16. Space power subsystem automation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The technology issues involved in power subsystem automation and the reasonable objectives to be sought in such a program were discussed. The complexities, uncertainties, and alternatives of power subsystem automation, along with the advantages from both an economic and a technological perspective were considered. Whereas most spacecraft power subsystems now use certain automated functions, the idea of complete autonomy for long periods of time is almost inconceivable. Thus, it seems prudent that the technology program for power subsystem automation be based upon a growth scenario which should provide a structured framework of deliberate steps to enable the evolution of space power subsystems from the current practice of limited autonomy to a greater use of automation with each step being justified on a cost/benefit basis. Each accomplishment should move toward the objectives of decreased requirement for ground control, increased system reliability through onboard management, and ultimately lower energy cost through longer life systems that require fewer resources to operate and maintain. This approach seems well-suited to the evolution of more sophisticated algorithms and eventually perhaps even the use of some sort of artificial intelligence. Multi-hundred kilowatt systems of the future will probably require an advanced level of autonomy if they are to be affordable and manageable.

  17. Solar-electric propulsion breadboard thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    A solar-electric propulsion breadboard thrust subsystem has been designed, built, and tested. A 1500-h test was performed to demonstrate the functional capabilities of the subsystem. Described are the subsystem functions and testing process. The results show that the ground work has been established for development of an engineering model of the thrust subsystem.

  18. Revitalization of Basic Business Education at All Instructional Levels. National Business Education Yearbook, No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Eugene, Ed.

    This yearbook, consisting of 15 papers, deals with the revitalization of basic business education at all levels of instruction. The focus of the papers is on revitalizing basic business education in general, revitalizing the subject areas of basic business eudcation, revitalizing business education through instructional strategies, and…

  19. Status of the Space Station water reclamation and management subsystem design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, R. M.; Mortazavi, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    A development status report is presented for the NASA Space Station's water reclamation and management (WRM) system, for which the candidate phase change-employing processing technologies are an air evaporation subsystem, a thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem, and the vapor compression distillation subsystem. These WRM candidates employ evaporation to effect water removal from contaminants, but differ in their control of the vapor/liquid interface in zero-gravity and in the recovery of the latent heat of vaporization.

  20. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Rossa W.; Zoll, August H.

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  1. Spacelab data management subsystem phase B study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Spacelab data management system is described. The data management subsystem (DMS) integrates the avionics equipment into an operational system by providing the computations, logic, signal flow, and interfaces needed to effectively command, control, monitor, and check out the experiment and subsystem hardware. Also, the DMS collects/retrieves experiment data and other information by recording and by command of the data relay link to ground. The major elements of the DMS are the computer subsystem, data acquisition and distribution subsystem, controls and display subsystem, onboard checkout subsystem, and software. The results of the DMS portion of the Spacelab Phase B Concept Definition Study are analyzed.

  2. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  3. Integrated testing of an electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator /EDC/ and a Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem /BRS/. [in spaceborne oxygen reclamation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Clark, D. C.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    An oxygen reclamation system (ORS) in a spacecraft has the task to revitalize the spacecraft atmosphere by recovering the elementary oxygen from metabolically produced carbon dioxide and water vapor. Life support subsystems which can form such an ORS are an electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator (EDC), a Bosch carbon dioxide reduction subsystem (BRS), and an oxygen generation subsystem (OGS). A total recovery of the oxygen from metabolically generated carbon dioxide can be obtained with the aid of system composed of the considered three subsystems. Attention is given to the control concept which assures an integrated operation of the EDC, BRS, and OGS. A description is presented of the test results obtained during 86 days of testing.

  4. SMARTE: IMPROVING REVITALIZATION DECISIONS - PRESENTATION FOR ETV INTERNATIONAL FORUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools - electronic) is an open-source, web-based, decision-support system for developing and evaluating alternative reuse scenarios for potentially contaminated sites (e.g., brownfields). It is being developed collabora...

  5. Life support subsystem monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Kostell, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of the need for instrumentation in manned spacecraft life-support subsystems has increased significantly over the past several years. Of the required control and monitoring instrumentation, this paper will focus on the monitoring instrumentation as applied to life-support subsystems. The initial approach used independent sensors, independent sensor signal conditioning circuitry, and independent logic circuitry to provide shutdown protection only. This monitoring system was replaced with a coordinated series of printed circuit cards, each of which contains all the electronics to service one sensor and provide performance trend information, fault detection and isolation information, and shutdown protection. Finally, a review of sensor and instrumentation problems is presented, and the requirement for sensors with built-in signal conditioning and provisions for in situ calibration is discussed.

  6. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  7. Tracking subsystem test requirements survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. H.; Tatosian, C. G.; Bynum, M. C.; Zook, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the test and checkout requirements of the tracking portion of the communications and tracking subsystem was performed to evaluate adequacy of planned tests and test requirement documents. Emphasis is placed on identifying test completeness, duplications, and omissions. Items that may save time, aid in testing, and present a more complete integrated test program are also noted. The results of this survey are summarized.

  8. Update: Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the lack of funding and focus on force measurement over the past several years, focusing specifically on strain-gage balances. NASA partnered with the U.S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem and established the National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) project. This paper provides an update on the team's status for revitalizing the government's balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the these critical measurement devices.

  9. SP-100 Reactor Subsystem Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Scott F.

    1994-07-01

    The SP-100 reactor subsystem consists of the pressure vessel, vessel internals, and fuel elements. Type A (standard) Nb-1Zr and rhenium materials development efforts related to fabrication of the vessel, vessel internals, and fuel cladding/liner have been completed. Type A and Type C (PWC-11) Nb-1Zr loop fabrication has been successfully demonstrated by prototypic testing with flowing lithium at 1350 K for 1500 hr. Development of UN fuel has been completed, and the performance validated by irradiation testing to the full life (7 yr. full power) burnup of 6 atom %. Neutronic and hydraulic core performance have been validated by engineering mockup critical experiments in the Zero Power Physics Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, and detailed core hydraulic flow testing with water. Essentially all feasibility issues have been settled for the full life SP-100 reactor subsystem. Remaining SP-100 reactor subsystem development efforts are focused on further reducing mass by the use of Type C (PWC-11) Nb-1Zr rather than Type A, and demonstrating fuel life for beyond full life to perhaps 9 atom % burnup.

  10. LaRC 20-Year Center Revitalization Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangum, Cathy H.; Harris, Charles E.; Allen, Cheryl L.; Craft, Stephen J.; Hope, Drew J.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Mastaler, Michael D; Weiser, Erik S.

    2012-01-01

    LaRC has developed a 20-Year Center Revitalization Plan. The objective of this plan is to assure that the center infrastructure is sustainable for the long-term and that the center will have the essential facilities and laboratories to execute the future NASA mission. The plan was developed by a centerwide team, VITAL, and was approved by the Center Leadership Council (CLC) in March 2012. The revitalization plan will be implemented through the Center Master Planning process.

  11. The Human Subsystem - Definition and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonBengston, Kristian; Twyford, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the use of the human subsystem in development phases of human space flight. Any space mission has clearly defined subsystems, managed by experts attached to these. Clearly defined subsystems and correct use provide easier and more efficient development for each independent subsystem and for the relation between these subsystems. Furthermore, this paper will argue that a defined subsystem related to humans in space has not always been clearly present, and that correct implementation is perhaps missing, based on experience and survey data. Finally, the authors will discuss why the human subsystem has not been fully integrated, why it must be a mandatory part of the programming, a re-definition of the human subsystem, and suggestions of methods to improve the integration of human factors in the development.

  12. TOPS attitude propulsion subsystem technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1971-01-01

    The thermoelectric outer-planet spacecraft (TOPS) attitude propulsion subsystem effort is summarized. It includes the tradeoff rationale that went into the selection of anhydrous hydrazine as the propellant, and a brief description of three types of 0.445-N (100-mlbf) thrusters that were purchased for in-house evaluation. A discussion is also included of the 0.2224-N (50-mlbf)-developed thrusters and their integration with a portable, completely enclosed, propulsion module that was designed and developed to support the TOPS single-axis attitude control tests in the celestarium.

  13. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  14. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Fort, J. H.; Schubert, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and development of a test stand for the Nitrogen Generation Module (NGM) and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described. Over 900 hours of parametric testing were achieved. The results from this testing were then used to design an advanced NGM and a self contained, preprototype Nitrogen Supply Subsystem. The NGM consists of three major components: nitrogen generation module, pressure controller and hydrazine storage tank and ancillary components. The most important improvement is the elimination of all sealing surfaces, achieved with a total welded or brazed construction. Additionally, performance was improved by increasing hydrogen separating capability by 20% with no increase in overall packaging size.

  15. Vessel support subsystem design description. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.A.; Mehta, D.D.

    1987-07-01

    The Vessel Support Subsystem is one of three subsystems comprising the Vessel System of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor 4 x 350 MW(t) Plant. The design of this subsystem has been developed by means of the Integrated Approach. This document establishes the functions and system design requirements of the Vessel Support Subsystem from the Functional Analysis, and includes institutional requirements from the Overall Plant Design Specification and the Vessel System Design Description. A description of the subsystem design which satisfies these requirements is presented. Lower-tier requirements at the subsystem level are next defined for the component design. This document also includes information on aspects of subsystem construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning.

  16. International Space Station United States Laboratory Module Water Recovery Management Subsystem Verification from Flight 5A to Stage ULF2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Labuda, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system comprises of seven subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), Vacuum System (VS), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), and Waste Management (WM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the United States (U.S.) Laboratory Module WRM design and detailed element methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase of the U.S. Laboratory Module prior to launch and the Qualification of all of the modification kits added to it from Flight 5A up and including Stage ULF2.

  17. Effects of Cabin Upsets on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) utilizes adsorption technology as part of contaminant removal systems designed for long term missions. A variety of trace contaminants can be effectively removed from gas streams by adsorption onto activated carbon. An activated carbon adsorption column meets NASA's requirements of a lightweight and efficient means of controlling trace contaminant levels aboard spacecraft and space stations. The activated carbon bed is part of the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) which is utilized to purify the cabin atmosphere. TCCS designs oversize the adsorption columns to account for irregular fluctuations in cabin atmospheric conditions. Variations in the cabin atmosphere include changes in contaminant concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. Excessively large deviations from typical conditions can result from unusual crew activity, equipment malfunctions, or even fires. The research carried out under this award focussed in detail on the effects of cabin upsets on the performance of activated carbon adsorption columns. Both experiments and modeling were performed with an emphasis on the roll of a change in relative humidity on adsorption of trace contaminants. A flow through fixed-bed apparatus was constructed at the NASA Ames Research Center, and experiments were performed there. Modeling work was performed at the University of Virginia.

  18. Effects of Cabin Upsets on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) utilizes adsorption technology as part of contaminant removal systems designed for long term missions. A variety of trace contaminants can be effectively removed from gas streams by adsorption onto activated carbon. An activated carbon adsorption column meets NASA's requirements of a lightweight and efficient means of controlling trace contaminant levels aboard spacecraft and space stations. The activated carbon bed is part of the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) which is utilized to purify the cabin atmosphere. TCCS designs oversize the adsorption columns to account for irregular fluctuations in cabin atmospheric conditions. Variations in the cabin atmosphere include changes in contaminant concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. Excessively large deviations from typical conditions can result from unusual crew activity, equipment malfunctions, or even fires. The research carried out under this award focussed in detail on the effects of cabin upsets on the performance of activated carbon adsorption columns. Both experiments and modeling were performed with an emphasis on the roll of a change in relative humidity on adsorption of trace contaminants. A flow through fixed-bed apparatus was constructed at the NASA Ames Research Center, and experiments were performed there by W. Scot Appel under the direction of Dr. John E. Finn. Modeling work was performed at the University of Virginia and at Vanderbilt University by W. Scot Appel under the direction of M. Douglas LeVan. All three participants collaborated in all of the various phases of the research. The most comprehensive document describing the research is the Ph.D. dissertation of W. Scot Appel. Results have been published in several papers and presented in talks at technical conferences. All documents have been transmitted to Dr. John E. Finn.

  19. CO2 Removal and Atmosphere Revitalization Systems for Next Generation Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Bernadette; Mulloth, Lila M.; Varghese, Mini M.; Hogan, John Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Removal of metabolic CO2 from breathing air is a vital process for life support in all crewed space missions. A CO2 removal processor called the Low Power CO2 Removal (LPCOR) system is being developed in the Bioengineering Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. LPCOR utilizes advanced adsorption and membrane gas separation processes to achieve substantial power and mass reduction when compared to the state-of-the-art carbon dioxide removal assembly (CORA) of the US segment of the International Space Station (ISS). LPCOR is an attractive alternative for use in commercial spacecraft for short-duration missions and can easily be adapted for closed-loop life support applications. NASA envisions a next-generation closed-loop atmosphere revitalization system that integrates advanced CO2 removal, O2 recovery, and trace contaminant control processes to improve overall system efficiency. LPCOR will serve as the front end to such a system. LPCOR is a reliable air revitalization technology that can serve both the near-term and long-term human space flight needs of NASA and its commercial partners.

  20. Planning for Small Town Revitalization: Economic Development Invigorates the Columbia Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick G.

    1991-01-01

    Describes rural revitalization efforts for small towns in central Washington. Planning analysis by Eastern Washington University faculty and students emphasizes community participation. Details revitalization of the town of Wilbur from planning stages to final outcomes. Describes overall project results. (KS)

  1. Trace Contaminant Testing with the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy Lin; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Broerman, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Every spacecraft atmosphere contains trace contaminants resulting from offgassing by cabin materials and human passengers. An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). Part of the risk mitigation effort for this new technology is the study of how atmospheric trace contaminants will affect and be affected by the technology. One particular area of concern is ammonia, which, in addition to the normal spacecraft sources, can also be off-gassed by the amine-based sorbent. In the first half of 2009, tests were performed with typical cabin atmosphere levels of five of the most common trace gases, most of which had not yet been tested with this technology. A subscale sample of the sorbent was exposed to each of the chemicals mixed into a stream of moist, CO2-laden air, and the CO2 adsorption capacity of the sorbent was compared before and after the exposure. After these typical-concentration chemicals were proven to have negligible effect on the subscale sample, tests proceeded on a full-scale test article in a sealed chamber with a suite of eleven contaminants. To isolate the effects of various test rig components, several extended-duration tests were run: without injection or scrubbing, with injection and without scrubbing, with injection and scrubbing by both the test article and dedicated trace contaminant filters, and with injection and scrubbing by only the test article. The high-level results of both the subscale and full-scale tests are examined in this paper.

  2. Trace Contaminant Testing with the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Broerman, Craig D.; Campbell, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Every spacecraft atmosphere contains trace contaminants resulting from offgassing by cabin materials and human passengers. An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). Part of the risk mitigation effort for this new technology is the study of how atmospheric trace contaminants will affect and be affected by the technology. One particular area of concern is ammonia, which, in addition to the normal spacecraft sources, can also be offgassed by the amine-based sorbent. In the spring of 2009, tests were performed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) with typical cabin atmosphere levels of five of the most common trace gases, most of which had not yet been tested with this technology. A subscale sample of the sorbent was exposed to each of the chemicals mixed into a stream of moist, CO2-laden air, and the CO2 adsorption capacity of the sorbent was compared before and after the exposure. After these typical-concentration chemicals were proven to have negligible effect on the subscale sample, tests proceeded on a full-scale test article in a sealed chamber with a suite of eleven contaminants. To isolate the effects of various test rig components, several extended-duration tests were run: without injection or scrubbing, with injection and without scrubbing, with injection of both contaminants and metabolic CO2 and water vapor loads and scrubbing by both the test article and dedicated trace contaminant filters, and with the same injections and scrubbing by only the test article. The high-level results of both the subscale and full-scale tests are examined in this paper.

  3. Development and Testing of a Sorbent-Based Atmosphere Revitalization System 2010/2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee A.; Knox, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft being developed for future exploration missions incorporate Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) that limit weight, power, and volume thus requiring systems with higher levels of efficiency while maintaining high dependability and robustness. For air revitalization, an approach that meets those goals utilizes a regenerative Vacuum-Swing Adsorption (VSA) system that removes 100% of the CO2 from the cabin atmosphere as well as 100% of the water. A Sorbent Based Atmosphere Revitalization (SBAR) system is a VSA system that utilizes standard commercial adsorbents that have been proven effective and safe in spacecraft including Skylab and the International Space Station. The SBAR system is the subject of a development, test, and evaluation program that is being conducted at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. While previous testing had validated that the technology is a viable option, potential improvements to system design and operation were identified. Modifications of the full-scale SBAR test articles and adsorption cycles have been implemented and have shown significant performance gains resulting in a decrease in the consumables required for a mission as well as improved mission safety. Previous testing had utilized single bed test articles, during this period the test facility was enhanced to allow testing on the full 2-bed SBAR system. The test facility simulates a spacecraft ECLSS and allows testing of the SBAR system over the full range of operational conditions using mission simulations that assess the real-time performance of the SBAR system during scenarios that include the metabolic transients associated with extravehicular activity. Although future manned missions are currently being redefined, the atmosphere revitalization requirements for the spacecraft are expected to be quite similar to the Orion and the Altair vehicles and the SBAR test program addressed validation to the defined mission requirements as well as operation

  4. Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alland, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes my work with the Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS) team during the summer of 2011. It gives some background on the motivation for this project and describes the expected benefit to the Cassini program. It then introduces the two tasks that I worked on - an automatic system auditing tool and a series of corrections to the Cassini Sequence Generator (SEQ_GEN) - and the specific objectives these tasks were to accomplish. Next, it details the approach I took to meet these objectives and the results of this approach, followed by a discussion of how the outcome of the project compares with my initial expectations. The paper concludes with a summary of my experience working on this project, lists what the next steps are, and acknowledges the help of my Cassini colleagues.

  5. Keck adaptive optics: control subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1996-03-08

    Adaptive optics on the Keck 10 meter telescope will provide an unprecedented level of capability in high resolution ground based astronomical imaging. The system is designed to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance with Strehl {gt} 0.3 n median Keck seeing of r0 = 25 cm, T =10 msec at 500 nm wavelength. The system will be equipped with a 20 watt sodium laser guide star to provide nearly full sky coverage. The wavefront control subsystem is responsible for wavefront sensing and the control of the tip-tilt and deformable mirrors which actively correct atmospheric turbulence. The spatial sampling interval for the wavefront sensor and deformable mirror is de=0.56 m which gives us 349 actuators and 244 subapertures. This paper summarizes the wavefront control system and discusses particular issues in designing a wavefront controller for the Keck telescope.

  6. FUSE satellite electrical power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Roufberg, L.; Noah, K.

    1998-07-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite will be placed into a low earth orbit to investigate astrophysical processes related to the formation and development of the early universe. The FUSE satellite is considered a pathfinder for NASA's Mid-Class Explorers (MIDEX). To reduce mission cost and development time while delivering quality science, NASA has enforced strict cost caps with a clear definition of high-level science objectives. As a result, a significant design driver for the electrical power subsystem (EPS) was to minimize cost. The FUSE EPS is a direct energy transfer, unregulated bus architecture, with batteries directly on the bus and solar array power limted by pulse-width-modulated shunt regulators. The power subsystem electronics (PSE) contains circuitry to control battery charging, provide power to the loads, and provide fault protection. The electronics is based on the PSE which Orbital (formerly, Fairchild Space) designed and built for NASA/GSFC's XTE spacecraft. However, the FUSE PSE design incorporates a number of unique features to meet the mission requirements. To minimize size of the solar panels due to stowed attachment constraints, GaAs/Ge solar cells were selected. This is the first time this type of large area, thinned solar cell with integral bypass diodes are being used for a NASA LEO mission. The solar panels support a satellite load power of 520W. Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) batteries are used which are identical to the RADARSAT-I design, except for different temperature sensors. This is the first mission for which Orbital is using SAFT NiCd batteries. The spacecraft bus, including the EPS, has successfully completed environmental testing and has been delivered for instrument integration. Tradeoffs involved in designing the EPS and selecting components based on the requirements are discussed. Analyses including solar array and battery sizing and energy balance are presented in addition to results from testing the flight

  7. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dahlausen, M. J.; Schubert, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    The fabrication of a one-person Electrochemical Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator subsystem incorporating advanced electrochemical, mechanical, and control and monitor instrumentation concepts is discussed. This subsystem included an advanced liquid cooled unitized core composite cell module and integrated electromechanical components. Over 1800 hours with the subsystem with removal efficiencies between 90%. and 100%; endurance tests with a Fluid Control Assembly which integrates 11 gas handling components of the subsystem; and endurance testing of a coolant control assembly which integrates a coolant pump, diverter valve and a liquid accumulator were completed.

  8. Electronic Components Subsystems and Equipment: a Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in electronic components, subsystems, and equipment are summarized. Topics discussed include integrated circuit components and techniques, circuit components and techniques, and cables and connectors.

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle environmental control subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitner, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    An environmental control subsystem (ECS) in electric and hybrid vehicles is studied. A combination of a combustion heater and gasoline engine (Otto cycle) driven vapor compression air conditioner is selected. The combustion heater, the small gasoline engine, and the vapor compression air conditioner are commercially available. These technologies have good cost and performance characteristics. The cost for this ECS is relatively close to the cost of current ECS's. Its effect on the vehicle's propulsion battery is minimal and the ECS size and weight do not have significant impact on the vehicle's range.

  10. Equilibrating temperaturelike variables in jammed granular subsystems.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-02-01

    Although jammed granular systems are athermal, several thermodynamiclike descriptions have been proposed which make quantitative predictions about the distribution of volume and stress within a system and provide a corresponding temperaturelike variable. We perform experiments with an apparatus designed to generate a large number of independent, jammed, two-dimensional configurations. Each configuration consists of a single layer of photoelastic disks supported by a gentle layer of air. New configurations are generated by cyclically dilating, mixing, and then recompacting the system through a series of boundary displacements. Within each configuration, a bath of particles surrounds a smaller subsystem of particles with a different interparticle friction coefficient than the bath. The use of photoelastic particles permits us to find all particle positions as well as the vector forces at each interparticle contact. By comparing the temperaturelike quantities in both systems, we find compactivity (conjugate to the volume) does not equilibrate between the systems, while the angoricity (conjugate to the stress) does. Both independent components of the angoricity are linearly dependent on the hydrostatic pressure, in agreement with predictions of the stress ensemble. PMID:23414047

  11. The CALIPSO Integrated Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth's cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system's operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system's survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  12. Private quantum subsystems and quasiorthogonal operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Jeremy; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Kribs, David W.; Laflamme, Raymond; Pereira, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the n-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory.

  13. Mission payloads subsystem description, revision 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Mission Payloads Subsystem (MPLS) which utilizes a simplified trajectory model to generate a list of missions for the Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE) program is described. The MPLS is the mechanism that forms the basis of input for the other subsystems of SAMPLE and various post processors.

  14. Apollo experience report: Lunar module instrumentation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, D. E., III; Woodfill, J. R., IV

    1972-01-01

    The design concepts and philosophies of the lunar module instrumentation subsystem are discussed along with manufacturing and systems integration. The experience gained from the program is discussed, and recommendations are made for making the subsystem more compatible and flexible in system usage. Characteristics of lunar module caution and warning circuits are presented.

  15. Application, sizing, testing and performance of the photovoltaic battery subsystem at Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brench, B. L.

    1981-11-01

    During the two years from 24 May 1978 to 7 June 1980, the battery subsystem for the 100-kW peak photovoltaic power system for Natural Bridges National Monument was designed, modified, tested, installed, retested and again modified. The subsystem includes 224 lead-acid (with calcium alloy) cells, hydrogen recombiners, an air-lift pump system and electrolyte level indicators. Problems and solutions related to these subsystem components are discussed. Further details concerning the battery selection, design, tests and performance throughout the battery's life are also included.

  16. ACCESS Sub-system Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, Matthew J.; Aldoroty, Lauren Nicole; Godon, David; Pelton, Russell; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Kimble, Randy A.; Wright, Edward L.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Feldman, Paul D.; Moos, H. Warren; Riess, Adam G.; Bohlin, Ralph; Deustua, Susana E.; Dixon, William Van Dyke; Sahnow, David J.; Lampton, Michael; Perlmutter, Saul

    2016-01-01

    ACCESS: Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to leverage significant technological advances in detectors, instruments, and the precision of the fundamental laboratory standards used to calibrate these instruments to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of laboratory absolute detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass.A cross wavelength calibration of the astrophysical flux scale to this level of precision over this broad a bandpass is relevant for the data used to probe fundamental astrophysical problems such as the SNeIa photometry based measurements used to constrain dark energy theories.We will describe the strategy for achieving this level of precision, the payload and calibration configuration, present sub-system test data, and the status and preliminary performance of the integration and test of the spectrograph and telescope. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX14AH48G supports this work.

  17. Assessing quality across healthcare subsystems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Puig, Andrea; Pagán, José A; Wong, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform efforts in Mexico have focused on the need to improve the efficiency and equity of a fragmented healthcare system. In light of these reform initiatives, there is a need to assess whether healthcare subsystems are effective at providing high-quality healthcare to all Mexicans. Nationally representative household survey data from the 2006 Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (National Health and Nutrition Survey) were used to assess perceived healthcare quality across different subsystems. Using a sample of 7234 survey respondents, we found evidence of substantial heterogeneity in healthcare quality assessments across healthcare subsystems favoring private providers over social security institutions. These differences across subsystems remained even after adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic, and health factors. Our analysis suggests that improvements in efficiency and equity can be achieved by assessing the factors that contribute to heterogeneity in quality across subsystems. PMID:19305224

  18. Reshaping Curricula: Revitalization Programs at Three Land Grant Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunde, Joyce Povlacs; And Others

    This volume contains 25 papers describing large curriculum revitalization projects from 1986 through 1991 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The papers are: "A Theoretical Context for Designing Curricula in the Agricultural and Life Sciences" (Robert G. Kranz, Jr.);…

  19. "Like Life Itself": Narrative and the Revitalization of Educational Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Richard L.

    This paper describes the efforts to use contemporary ideas about narrative to rethink educational practice at the level of "root metaphor," (Stephen Pepper) and argue that "narrative schooling" might revitalize the actual processes of schooling. There is a concern that, especially at the secondary level, public schools are experience-averse in all…

  20. The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; Hale, Ken, Ed.

    Essays in this book include the following: "Language Revitalization: An Overview" (Leanne Hinton); "Diversity in Local Language Maintenance and Restoration: A Reason for Optimism" (Anna Ash, Jessie Little Doe Fermino, Ken Hale); "Federal Language Policy and Indigenous Languages in the United States" (Leanne Hinton); "...To Help Assure the Survival…

  1. Education Empowerment Zones: Revitalizing Ohios Cities through School Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Joshua C.; Staley, Samuel R.; Hisrich, Matthew S.; Barry, Aengus L.

    This study proposes the creation of Education Empowerment Zones (EEZs) in Ohio's major cities as part of a strategy to reestablish the competitive advantage of the inner city. Combining community schools and an expanded education voucher available to the middle class, EEZs could lead revitalizing efforts by enticing middle-income families with…

  2. Daghida: Cold Lake First Nation Works towards Dene Language Revitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Heather; Rice, Sally; Wood, Valerie; Janvier, John

    A partnership between Cold Lake First Nations and the University of Alberta, the Daghida Project, aims to revitalize Dene Suline--the local dialect of the Dene language--and the culture that depends upon it. Residential schools had a devastating effect on the Dene language and way of life, disrupting normal linguistic and cultural transmission…

  3. Revitalizing Rural America: A Cooperative Extension System Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Doug

    The survival of rural American farms and communities is dependent upon expansion of income and employment opportunities in rural areas. Recognizing the growing challenge for local leaders and the contribution that educational assistance can make, the Cooperative Extension System has identified Revitalizing Rural America as a priority program for…

  4. Ojibwe Language Revitalization, Multimedia Technology, and Family Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermes, Mary; King, Kendall A.

    2013-01-01

    Although Indigenous language loss and revitalization are not new topics of academic work nor new areas of community activism (e.g., King, 2001; Grenoble & Whaley, 2006), increased attention has been paid in recent years to the ways that new technology can support efforts to teach and renew endangered languages such as Ojibwe. However, much of the…

  5. Literacy for Revitalization in the SADCC Countries of Southern Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    The role of literacy in the revitalization of societies is particularly meaningful in the context of the Southern African Development Coordination Conference (SADCC), a group of nine countries (Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe) surrounding or surrounded by the Republic of South Africa (RSA).…

  6. Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy and Indigenous Education Sovereignty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Teresa L.; Lee, Tiffany S.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Teresa L. McCarty and Tiffany S. Lee present critical culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy as a necessary concept to understand and guide educational practices for Native American learners. Premising their discussion on the fundamental role of tribal sovereignty in Native American schooling, the authors underscore and…

  7. Urban Revitalization and Entrepreneurial Strategies. Digest Number 97-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Gwyer

    Urban revitalization is an economic and social strategy that has been necessitated by decreased interest in both residence and commercialization within major cities. Urban business environments are confronted with many unique socioeconomic challenges, including discrimination against residents, negative stereotypes of urban areas, and inaccurate…

  8. Language Revitalization and Language Pedagogy: New Teaching and Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne

    2011-01-01

    Language learning and teaching of endangered languages have many features and needs that are quite different from the teaching of world languages. Groups whose languages are endangered try to turn language loss around; many new language teaching and learning strategies are emerging, to suit the special needs and goals of language revitalization.…

  9. Cultivating Common Ground: Cultural Revitalization in Anishinaabe and Anthropological Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willow, Anna J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores some of the most prominent ways that cultural revitalization has been contemplated within Anishinaabe and anthropological arenas of discourse. She draws reflexively on her own personal positionality and academic theoretical background as well as on her observations of how Anishinaabe anti-clear-cutting…

  10. GET SMARTE: DECISION TOOLS TO REVITALIZE COMMUNITIES (MAY 2006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools-electronic) is an open-source, web-based, decision-support system for developing and evaluating future use scenarios for potentially contaminated sites (i.e., brownfields). It contains resources and analysis tools...

  11. SMARTE: IMPROVING REVITALIZATION DECISIONS - PRESENTATION IN NRMRL SEMINAR SERIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools-electribuc) is an open-source, web-based, decision-support system for developing and evaluating alternative reuse scenarios for potentially contaminated sites (e.g., brownfields). It is being developed collaborati...

  12. Toward a New Era: Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, William L.

    Alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of student services in community colleges are reviewed in this paper. First, alternatives related to student services programs are considered, including: (1) the increased use of computer-assisted counseling to integrate student services more fully with mainstream academic activities; (2)…

  13. 2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraph presentation on the "2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems" project. The objective behind this project is to design, develop and test advanced avionics, power systems, power control and distribution components and subsystems for insertion into a highly reliable and low-cost system for a Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The project is divided into two sections: 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems and 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems. The following topics are discussed under the first section, 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems: supporting the NASA RLV program; high-performance guidance & control adaptation for future RLVs; Evolvable Hardware (EHW) for 3rd generation avionics description; Scaleable, Fault-tolerant Intelligent Network or X(trans)ducers (SFINIX); advance electric actuation devices and subsystem technology; hybrid power sources and regeneration technology for electric actuators; and intelligent internal thermal control. Topics discussed in the 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems program include: design, development and test of a robust, low-maintenance avionics with no active cooling requirements and autonomous rendezvous and docking systems; design and development of a low maintenance, high reliability, intelligent power systems (fuel cells and battery); and design of a low cost, low maintenance high horsepower actuation systems (actuators).

  14. Propulsion subsystem design for KOREASAT spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Young K.; Kim, Hee D.; Young, M.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the functional design and structure of the propulsion subsystem for the KOREASAT spacecraft. The KOREASAT program consists of two geostationary communication satellites for Korea presently scheduled to be launched in April and October 1995. The spacecraft propulsion subsystem consists of a hydrazine monopropellant blowdown reaction control subsystem, a STAR 30E solid apogee kick motor (AKM) and associated electronics and electrical hardware. The propulsion subsystem for KOREASAT provides the propulsive force and torque required for attitude and orbit attainment and maintenance. The thrusters used on the propulsion subsystem are 12 conventional catalytic decomposition rocket engine assemblies (REAs) with 0.9 N (0.2 lbf) thrust, and four electrothermal hydrazine thrusters (EHTs) with 0.4 N (0.1 Ibf) thrust. REAs are operated in steady-state mode or pulsed mode. EHTs are utilized only for north/south stationkeeping in steady-state mode operation, with limitation of its use during eclipse and eclipse season to conserve power. The basic functions and design requirements for propulsion mechanical and electrical components are also described. The analyses required to evaluate the propulsion subsystem performance are briefly mentioned. Propulsion component and subsystem testing are described.

  15. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor); Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  16. Subsystem design package for Solar II collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirements for the design and performance of the Solar 2 Collector Subsystem developed for use in solar heating of single family residences and mobile homes are presented. Installation drawings are included.

  17. Goddard trajectory determination subsystem: Mathematical specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. E. (Editor); Velez, C. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical specifications of the Goddard trajectory determination subsystem of the flight dynamics system are presented. These specifications include the mathematical description of the coordinate systems, dynamic and measurement model, numerical integration techniques, and statistical estimation concepts.

  18. Solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and output voltage regulation, three-axis thrust vector control, subsystem automatic control including failure detection and correction capability (using a PDP-11 computer), operation of critical elements in thermal-vacuum-, zero-gravity-type propellant storage, and data outputs from all subsystem elements. The subsystem elements, functions, unique features, and test setup are described. General features and capabilities of the test-support data system are also presented. The test program culminated in a 1500-h computer-controlled, system-functional demonstration. This included simultaneous operation of two thruster/power conditioner sets. The results of this testing phase satisfied all the program goals.

  19. More About Beam-Steering Subsystem For Laser Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Norman A.; Chen, Chien-Chu; Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about developmental beam-steering subsystem of laser-communication system. Aspects of this subsystem described previously in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069) and "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193). Reports reiterate basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem and of laser-communication system as whole. Also presents some of details of optical and mechanical design of prototype of subsystem, called Optical Communication Demonstrator.

  20. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  1. The MIST /MIUS Integration and Subsystems Test/ laboratory - A testbed for the MIUS /Modular Integrated Utility System/ program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckham, W. S., Jr.; Keune, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    The MIUS (Modular Integrated Utility System) concept is to be an energy-conserving, economically feasible, integrated community utility system to provide five necessary services: electricity generation, space heating and air conditioning, solid waste processing, liquid waste processing, and residential water purification. The MIST (MIUS Integration and Subsystem Test) integrated system testbed constructed at the Johnson Space Center in Houston includes subsystems for power generation, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), wastewater management, solid waste management, and control and monitoring. The key design issues under study include thermal integration and distribution techniques, thermal storage, integration of subsystems controls and displays, incinerator performance, effluent characteristics, and odor control.

  2. Air Systems Provide Life Support to Miners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Through a Space Act Agreement with Johnson Space Center, Paragon Space Development Corporation, of Tucson, Arizona, developed the Commercial Crew Transport-Air Revitalization System, designed to provide clean air for crewmembers on short-duration space flights. The technology is now being used to help save miners' lives in the event of an underground disaster.

  3. DOE Asset Revitalization: Sustainability and Waste Management Aspects - 12120

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.

    2012-07-01

    In February 2011 Secretary of Energy Steven Chu established a Task Force on Asset Revitalization to facilitate a discussion among the Department of Energy (DOE), communities around DOE sites, non-profits, tribal governments, the private sector, and other stakeholders to identify reuse approaches as environmental cleanup efforts at DOE sites reach completion. The Task Force was charged with exploring opportunities to reuse DOE site assets for beneficial purposes and making recommendations to the Under Secretaries of Energy, Science, and Nuclear Security on the formation of an Asset Revitalization Initiative (ARI). The ARI is a Department-wide effort to advance the beneficial reuse of the DOE's unique and diverse mix of assets including land, facilities, infrastructure, equipment, technologies, natural resources, and a highly skilled workforce. The ARI will encourage collaboration between the public and private sectors in order to achieve energy and environmental goals as well as to stimulate and diversify regional economies. The recommendations of the ARI Task Force are summarized below, focusing on the sustainability and waste management aspects. DOE's ongoing completion of cleanup efforts and modernization efforts is creating opportunities to transition under-used or excess assets to future beneficial use. The FY 2011 DOE ARI Task Force determined that DOE's assets could be reused for beneficial purposes such as clean energy production, industrial manufacturing, recreational and conversation use, and other economic development initiatives. Asset revitalization has the potential to both help achieve DOE's energy and environmental goals and diversify regional economies where the sites are located, including providing the support needed to implement large-scale projects that achieve green sustainability goals. Asset revitalization efforts could be accelerated by effectively incorporating future use plans into environmental management and remediation efforts. (authors)

  4. Algorithm Of Revitalization Programme Design For Housing Estates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostańska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Demographic problems, obsolescence of existing buildings, unstable economy, as well as misunderstanding of the mechanism that turn city quarters into areas in need for intervention result in the implementation of improvement measures that prove inadequate. The paper puts forward an algorithm of revitalization program for housing developments and presents its implementation. It also showed the effects of periodically run (10 years) three-way diagnostic tests in correlation with the concept of settlement management.

  5. Lightning testing at the subsystem level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luteran, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Testing at the subsystem or black box level for lightning hardness is required if system hardness is to be assured at the system level. The often applied philosophy of lighting testing only at the system level leads to extensive end of the line design changes which result in excessive costs and time delays. In order to perform testing at the subsystem level two important factors must be defined to make the testing simulation meaningful. The first factor is the definition of the test stimulus appropriate to the subsystem level. Application of system level stimulations to the subsystem level usually leads to significant overdesign of the subsystem which is not necessary and may impair normal subsystem performance. The second factor is the availability of test equipment needed to provide the subsystem level lightning stimulation. Equipment for testing at this level should be portable or at least movable to enable efficient testing in a design laboratory environment. Large fixed test installations for system level tests are not readily available for use by the design engineers at the subsystem level and usually require special operating skills. The two factors, stimulation level and test equipment availability, must be evaluated together in order to produce a practical, workable test standard. The neglect or subordination of either factor will guarantee failure in generating the standard. It is not unusual to hear that test standards or specifications are waived because a specified stimulation level cannot be accomplished by in-house or independent test facilities. Determination of subsystem lightning simulation level requires a knowledge and evaluation of field coupling modes, peak and median levels of voltages and currents, bandwidths, and repetition rates. Practical limitations on test systems may require tradeoffs in lightning stimulation parameters in order to build practical test equipment. Peak power levels that can be generated at specified bandwidths with

  6. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  7. Thermal analyses of power subsystem components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1990-01-01

    The hiatus in the Space Shuttle (Orbiter) program provided time for an in-depth examination of all the subsystems and their past performance. Specifically, problems with reliability and/or operating limits were and continue to be of major engineering concern. The Orbiter Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) currently operates with electric resistance line heaters which are controlled with thermostats. A design option simplification of this heater subsystem is being considered which would use self-regulating heaters. A determination of the properties and thermal operating characteristics of these self-regulating heaters was needed. The Orbiter fuel cells are cooled with a freon loop. During a loss of external heat exchanger coolant flow, the single pump circulating the freon is to be left running. It was unknown what temperature and flow rate transient conditions of the freon would provide the required fuel cell cooling and for how long. The overall objective was the development of the thermal characterization and subsequent analysis of both the proposed self-regulating APU heater and the fuel cell coolant loop subsystem. The specific objective of the APU subsystem effort was to determine the feasibility of replacing the current heater and thermostat arrangement with a self-regulating heater. The specific objective of the fuel cell coolant subsystem work was to determine the tranient coolant temperature and associated flow rates during a loss-of-external heat exchanger flow.

  8. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  9. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  10. Robust Decentralized Controller Design: Subsystem Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinová, Danica; Thuan, Nguyen Quang; Veselý, Vojtech; Marko, L'ubomír

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the robust output feedback PI controller design for complex large-scale stable systems with a state decentralized control structure. A decentralized control design procedure is proposed for static output feedback control which is based on solving robust control design problems of subsystems' size. The presented approach is based on the Generalized Gershgorin Theorem and uses the so-called equivalent subsystems approach to consider the interactions in the local robust controller design. The resulting decentralized control scheme has been successfully tested on two examples: a linearized model of three interconnected boiler-turbine subsystems and a linear model of four cooperating DC motors where the problem is to design four local PI controllers for a large scale system which will guarantee robust stability and performance of the closed-loop uncertain system.

  11. Mark 3 VLBI system: Tropospheric calibration subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric delay calibrations are implemented in the Mark 3 system with two subsystems. Estimates of the dry component of tropospheric delay are provided by accurate barometric data from a subsystem of surface meteorological sensors (SMS). An estimate of the wet component of tropospheric delay is provided by a water vapor radiometer (WVR). Both subsystems interface directly to the ASCII Transceiver bus of the Mark 3 system and are operated by the control computer. Seven WVR's under construction are designed to operate in proximity to a radio telescope and can be commanded to point along the line-of-sight to a radio source. They should provide a delay estimate that is accurate to the + or - 2 cm level.

  12. MIUS integration and subsystems test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckham, W. S., Jr.; Shows, G. C.; Redding, T. E.; Wadle, R. C.; Keough, M. B.; Poradek, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The MIUS Integration and Subsystems Test (MIST) facility at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center was completed and ready in May 1974 for conducting specific tests in direct support of the Modular Integrated Utility System (MIUS). A series of subsystems and integrated tests was conducted since that time, culminating in a series of 24-hour dynamic tests to further demonstrate the capabilities of the MIUS Program concepts to meet typical utility load profiles for a residential area. Results of the MIST Program are presented which achieved demonstrated plant thermal efficiencies ranging from 57 to 65 percent.

  13. Electrochemical energy storage subsystems study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.; Richardson, P. W.; Graff, C. L.; Jordan, M. V.; Patterson, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs (LCC) of major design and performance technology parameters for multi kW LEO and GEO energy storage subsystems using NiCd and NiH2 batteries and fuel cell/electrolysis cell devices were examined. Design, performance and LCC dynamic models are developed based on mission and system/subsystem requirements and existing or derived physical and cost data relationships. The models define baseline designs and costs. The major design and performance parameters are each varied to determine their influence on LCC around the baseline values.

  14. Small spacecraft power and thermal subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eakman, D.; Lambeck, R.; Mackowski, M.; Slifer, L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This white paper provides a general guide to the conceptual design of satellite power and thermal control subsystems with special emphasis on the unique design aspects associated with small satellites. The operating principles of these technologies are explained and performance characteristics of current and projected components are provided. A tutorial is presented on the design process for both power and thermal subsystems, with emphasis on unique issues relevant to small satellites. The ability of existing technology to meet future performance requirements is discussed. Conclusions and observations are presented that stress cost-effective, high-performance design solutions.

  15. Apollo experience report: Thermal protection subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlosky, J. E.; St.leger, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Apollo command module was the first manned spacecraft to be designed to enter the atmosphere of the earth at lunar-return velocity, and the design of the thermal protection subsystem for the resulting entry environment presented a major technological challenge. Brief descriptions of the Apollo command module thermal design requirements and thermal protection configuration, and some highlights of the ground and flight testing used for design verification of the system are presented. Some of the significant events that occurred and decisions that were made during the program concerning the thermal protection subsystem are discussed.

  16. Electrochemical Energy Storage Subsystems Study, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.; Richardson, P. W.; Graff, C. L.; Jordan, M. V.; Patterson, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs (LCC) of major design and performance technology parameters for multi kW LEO and GEO energy storage subsystems using NiCd and NiH2 batteries and fuel cell/electrolysis cell devices were examined. Design, performance and LCC dynamic models are developed based on mission and system/subsystem requirements and existing or derived physical and cost data relationships. The models are exercised to define baseline designs and costs. Then the major design and performance parameters are each varied to determine their influence on LCC around the baseline values.

  17. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavroudi, Anna; Hadzilacos, Thanasis

    2013-01-01

    Analysis, the first phase of the typical instructional design process, is often downplayed. This paper focuses on the analysis concerning a series of e-courses for collaborative adult education in semi-formal settings by reporting and generalizing results from the REVIT project. REVIT, an EU-funded research project, offered custom e-courses to…

  18. Indigenous Languages of Southeast Australia, Revitalization and the Role of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Indigenous languages of southeast Australia have often been written off as a hopeless cause in current debates about language revitalization. In this paper we question this pessimism and report on some of the progress that has been made in recent years. It will be shown that revitalization is not only possible but contributes to the strength…

  19. Inspecting the Unexpected: Language Status and Corpus Shifts as Aspects of Quichua Language Revitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kendall A.

    1999-01-01

    Drawing from the study of efforts to revitalize Quichua in the Southern Ecuadorian Highlands, this article describes what may be some of the common language corpus and language status transformations that threatened languages undergo during the process of language revitalization. (Author/VWL)

  20. Launching or Revitalizing a Teaching Center: Principles and Portraits of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Tara; Shadle, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Some teaching centers flounder while others flourish. This paper provides concrete suggestions for launching or revitalizing a teaching center, drawn from the experiences of these authors and from principles in the literature. Two center directors worked to apply the principles in the literature to their newly launched or revitalized centers. One…

  1. 77 FR 16251 - Announcement of Funding Awards, HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards, HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2010... funding awards. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 102(a)(4)(C) of the Department of Housing and Urban..., contact Ms. Susan Wilson, Director, Office of Urban Revitalization, Office of Public and Indian...

  2. From Documenting to Revitalizing an Endangered Language: Where Do Applied Linguists Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Susan D.; Tucker, Benjamin V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the distance between documenting and revitalizing endangered languages and indicates critical points at which applied linguistics can play a role. We look at language documentation, language revitalization and their relationship. We then provide some examples from our own work. We see the lack of applied linguistics as a…

  3. The Project Approach: The Revitalization of Stump Creek. Paper Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute on Man and Science, Rensselaerville, NY.

    The objective of the Project to Revitalize Stump Creek was to design and implement a comprehensive approach to community revitalization. A key aspect of the plan was transfer of ownership to town residents. The town, location and locale, and selection process were described in this report. The project activities occurred in 7 separate phases:…

  4. Rethinking Community-Based Indigenous Language Revitalization Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Man-Chiu Amay; Yudaw, Bowtung

    2013-01-01

    This article suggests a theoretical framework for re-examining the complex relationship of language, literacy, and cultural practices, across multiple generations in the context of community-based Indigenous language revitalization. In the scholarship of Indigenous language revitalization and education, researchers have shifted from viewing…

  5. Objectives at the Crossroads: Critical Theory and Self-Determination in Indigenous Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albury, Nathan John

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous language revitalization is a popular focus of critical theorists. From the perspective of sociolinguists, critical theory interrogates language policies to name and shame inequalities and propose solutions to correct injustices and emancipate the disadvantaged. From a broader perspective, language revitalization policy also resides…

  6. 75 FR 71137 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program for Fiscal Year 2009

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program for Fiscal... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the HOPE VI Revitalization grant program. This announcement contains the... concerning the HOPE VI Revitalization grant awards, contact the Ms. Leigh van Rij, Office of Public...

  7. JOB BUILDER remote batch processing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, I. G.; Orlova, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The functions of the JOB BUILDER remote batch processing subsystem are described. Instructions are given for using it as a component of a display system developed by personnel of the System Programming Laboratory, Institute of Space Research, USSR Academy of Sciences.

  8. Spectroscopic Subsystems in Nearby Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5 m telescope to study short-period systems. The data reduction is described, and mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, and for some of them the orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67 pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem, and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods matches the simple prescription proposed by the author. The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300 AU have an RV difference distribution between their components that is not compatible with the thermal eccentricity distribution f (e) = 2e but rather matches the uniform eccentricity distribution.

  9. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  10. Integrating the autonomous subsystems management process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, Barry R.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which the ranking of the Space Station Module Power Management and Distribution testbed may be achieved and an individual subsystem's internal priorities may be managed within the complete system are examined. The application of these results in the integration and performance leveling of the autonomously managed system is discussed.

  11. Apollo experience report: Service propulsion subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C. R.; Wood, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The significant service propulsion subsystem development, qualification, and flight experience from the early portion of the Apollo Program through the first lunar-landing mission is presented. Particular emphasis is given to problems encountered and solutions used to eliminate the problems.

  12. On reduced density matrices for disjoint subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglói, F.; Peschel, I.

    2010-02-01

    We show that spin and fermion representations for solvable quantum chains lead in general to different reduced density matrices if the subsystem is not singly connected. We study the effect for two sites in XX and XY chains as well as for sublattices in XX and transverse Ising chains.

  13. Trade Spaces in Crewed Spacecraft Atmosphere Revitalization System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.

    2010-01-01

    Developing the technological response to realizing an efficient atmosphere revitalization system for future crewed spacecraft and space habitats requires identifying and describing functional trade spaces. Mission concepts and requirements dictate the necessary functions; however, the combination and sequence of those functions possess significant flexibility. Us-ing a closed loop environmental control and life support (ECLS) system architecture as a starting basis, a functional unit operations approach is developed to identify trade spaces. Generalized technological responses to each trade space are discussed. Key performance parameters that apply to functional areas are described.

  14. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization.

    PubMed

    Ashida, A; Mitani, K; Ebara, K; Kurokawa, H; Sawada, I; Kashiwagi, H; Tsuji, T; Hayashi, S; Otsubo, K; Nitta, K

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied; one is an absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water. PMID:11537274

  15. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  16. The modular power subsystem for the multimission modular spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    The block diagram, subsystems, and components of the modular power subsystem for the multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) are described. The basic design studies were guided by considerations of cost, efficiency, simplicity, and flexibility to serve a variety of missions. Components discussed are the power regulator unit, the power control unit, the signal conditioning assembly, bus protection assembly, and the 20 Ah and 50 Ah batteries. The plan for the modular power subsystem protoflight module tests is shown. The testing has four phases: (1) component level tests, (2) subsystem integration and initial performance test, (3) subsystem protoflight environmental tests, and (4) subsystem final performance tests, qualification/acceptance review and delivery.

  17. European Society of Endodontology position statement: Revitalization procedures.

    PubMed

    Galler, K M; Krastl, G; Simon, S; Van Gorp, G; Meschi, N; Vahedi, B; Lambrechts, P

    2016-08-01

    This position statement represents a consensus of an expert committee convened by the European Society of Endodontology (ESE) on revitalization procedures. The statement is based on current clinical and scientific evidence as well as the expertise of the committee. The goal is to provide suitably trained dentists with a protocol including procedural details for the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis as well as a patient consent form. Revitalization is a biologically based treatment as an alternative to apexification in properly selected cases. Previously published review articles provide more detailed background information and the basis for this position statement (Journal of Endodontics, 39, 2013, S30; Journal of Endodontics, 39, 2013, 319; Journal of Endodontics, 40, 2014, 1045; Dental Traumatology, 31, 2015, 267; International Endodontic Journal, 2015, doi: 10.1111/iej.12606). As controlled clinical trials are lacking and new evidence is still emerging, this position statement will be updated at appropriate intervals. This might lead to changes to the protocol provided here. PMID:26990236

  18. Revitalization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Mastaler, Michael D.; Craft, Stephen J.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Hope, Drew J.; Mangum, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (Langley) was founded in 1917 as the nation's first civilian aeronautical research facility and NASA's first field center. For nearly 100 years, Langley has made significant contributions to the Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Earth Science missions through research, technology, and engineering core competencies in aerosciences, materials, structures, the characterization of earth and planetary atmospheres and, more recently, in technologies associated with entry, descent, and landing. An unfortunate but inevitable outcome of this rich history is an aging infrastructure where the longest serving building is close to 80 years old and the average building age is 44 years old. In the current environment, the continued operation and maintenance of this aging and often inefficient infrastructure presents a real challenge to Center leadership in the trade space of sustaining infrastructure versus not investing in future capabilities. To address this issue, the Center has developed a forward looking revitalization strategy that ties future core competencies and technical capabilities to the Center Master Facility Plan to maintain a viable Center well into the future. This paper documents Langley's revitalization strategy which integrates the Center's missions, the Langley 2050 vision, the Center Master Facility Plan, and the New Town repair-by-replacement program through the leadership of the Vibrant Transformation to Advance Langley (ViTAL) Team.

  19. URBAN REVITALIZATION AND SEATTLE CRIME, 1982–2000

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Derek A.; Lyons, Christopher J.; Hays, Zachary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between crime and processes of urban revitalization, or gentrification. Drawing on recent urban demography research, we hypothesize that gentrification progressed rapidly in many American cities over the last decade of the 20th century, and that these changes had implications for area crime rates. Criminological theories hold competing hypotheses for the connections between gentrification and crime, and quantitative studies of this link remain infrequent and limited. Using two measures of gentrification and longitudinal tract-level demographic and crime data for the city of Seattle, we find that many of Seattle’s downtown tracts underwent rapid revitalization during the 1990’s, and that these areas 1) saw reductions in crime relative to similar tracts that did not gentrify, and 2) were areas with higher-than-average crime at the beginning of the decade. Moreover, using a within-tract longitudinal design, we find that yearly housing investments in the 1980’s showed a modest positive association with crime change, while yearly investments in the 1990’s showed the opposite pattern. Our findings suggest a curvilinear gentrification-crime relationship, whereby gentrification in its earlier stages is associated with small increases in crime, but gentrification in its more consolidated form is associated with modest crime declines. Implications of these results for criminological theory, urban development, and broader crime patterns are discussed. PMID:25505350

  20. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM)

  1. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.; Gomez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  2. Apollo experience report: Launch escape propulsion subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo launch escape propulsion subsystem contained three solid rocket motors. The general design, development, and qualification of the solid-propellant pitch-control, tower-jettison, and launch-escape motors of the Apollo launch escape propulsion subsystem were completed during years 1961 to 1966. The launch escape system components are described in general terms, and the sequence of events through the ground-based test programs and flight-test programs is discussed. The initial ground rules established for this system were that it should use existing technology and designs as much as possible. The practicality of this decision is proved by the minimum number of problems that were encountered during the development and qualification program.

  3. Controls Interfaces for Two ALICE Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Software for the control of a laser alignment system for the Inner Tacking System (ITS) and for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) was developed for the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN. The interfaces for both subsystems use the CERN-standard hardware controls system PVSS (Prozessvisualisierungs- und Steuerungs-System). Software for the ITS has been created to measure the relative alignment of the ITS with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) so to ensure accurate particle tracking. The ITS alignment system locates laser images in four cameras. The EMC requires several subsystems to be running in order to operate properly. Software has been created and tested for the detector's high and low voltage systems, and temperature monitoring hardware. The ITS and EMC software specifications and design requirements are presented and their performance is analyzed.

  4. Fiber Bragg gratings for microwave photonics subsystems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Jianping

    2013-09-23

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging filed in which photonic technologies are employed to enable and enhance functionalities in microwave systems which are usually very challenging to fulfill directly in the microwave domain. Various photonic devices have been used to achieve the functions. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is one of the key components in microwave photonics systems due to its unique features such as flexible spectral characteristics, low loss, light weight, compact footprint, and inherent compatibility with other fiber-optic devices. In this paper, we discuss the recent development in employing FBGs for various microwave photonics subsystems, with an emphasis on subsystems for microwave photonic signal processing and microwave arbitrary waveform generation. The limitations and potential solutions are also discussed. PMID:24104174

  5. Analysis of the human operator subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lynette A.; Hunter, Ian W.

    1991-01-01

    Except in low-bandwidth systems, knowledge of the human operator transfer function is essential for high-performance telerobotic systems. This information has usually been derived from detailed analyses of tracking performance, in which the human operator is considered as a complete system rather than as a summation of a number of subsystems, each of which influences the operator's output. Studies of one of these subsystems, the limb mechanics system, demonstrate that large parameter variations can occur that can have a profound effect on the stability of force-reflecting telerobot systems. An objective of this research was to decompose the performance of the human operator system in order to establish how the dynamics of each of the elements influence the operator's responses.

  6. Apollo experience report: Electrical wiring subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general requirements of the electrical wiring subsystems and the problem areas and solutions that occurred during the major part of the Apollo Program are detailed in this report. The concepts and definitions of specific requirements for electrical wiring; wire-connecting devices; and wire-harness fabrication, checkout, and installation techniques are discussed. The design and development of electrical wiring and wire-connecting devices are described. Mission performance is discussed, and conclusions and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  7. Power and pyro subsystems for Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Shirbacheh, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Power and Pyro Subsystem (PPS) for Mars Pathfinder was designed to support the spacecraft activities during Launch, Cruise, Entry and Landing and Mars operation phases of the mission. The key design constraints were cost, volume and mass. The PPS consists of solar arrays, batteries and power electronics. This paper describes the Mars Pathfinder mission, key requirements on PPS, and PPS system architecture and description of each element of the PPS system.

  8. Portable Oxygen Subsystem (POS). [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Concept selection, design, fabrication, and testing of a Portable Subsystem (POS) for use in space shuttle operations are described. Tradeoff analyses were conducted to determine the POS concept for fabrication and testing. The fabricated POS was subjected to unmanned and manned tests to verify compliance with statement of work requirements. The POS used in the development program described herein met requirements for the three operational modes -- prebreathing, contaminated cabin, and personnel rescue system operations.

  9. Automated searching for quantum subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Crosswhite, Gregory M.; Bacon, Dave

    2011-02-15

    Quantum error correction allows for faulty quantum systems to behave in an effectively error-free manner. One important class of techniques for quantum error correction is the class of quantum subsystem codes, which are relevant both to active quantum error-correcting schemes as well as to the design of self-correcting quantum memories. Previous approaches for investigating these codes have focused on applying theoretical analysis to look for interesting codes and to investigate their properties. In this paper we present an alternative approach that uses computational analysis to accomplish the same goals. Specifically, we present an algorithm that computes the optimal quantum subsystem code that can be implemented given an arbitrary set of measurement operators that are tensor products of Pauli operators. We then demonstrate the utility of this algorithm by performing a systematic investigation of the quantum subsystem codes that exist in the setting where the interactions are limited to two-body interactions between neighbors on lattices derived from the convex uniform tilings of the plane.

  10. Mariner Mars 1971 attitude control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunds, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner Mars 1971 attitude control subsystem (ACS) is discussed. It is comprised of a sun sensor set, a Canopus tracker, an inertial reference unit, two cold gas reaction control assemblies, two rocket engine gimbal actuators, and an attitude control electronics unit. The subsystem has the following eight operating modes: (1) launch, (2) sun acquisition, (3) roll search, (4) celestial cruise, (5) all-axes inertial, (6) roll inertial, (7) commanded turn, and (8) thrust vector control. In the celestial cruise mode, the position control is held to plus or minus 0.25 deg. Commanded turn rates are plus or minus 0.18 deg/s. The attitude control logic in conjunction with command inputs from other spacecraft subsystems establishes the ACS operating mode. The logic utilizes Sun and Canopus acquisition signals generated within the ACS to perform automatic mode switching so that dependence of ground control is minimized when operating in the sun acquisition, roll search, and celestial cruise modes. The total ACS weight is 65.7 lb, and includes 5.4 lb of nitrogen gas. Total power requirements vary from 9 W for the celestial cruise mode to 54 W for the commanded turn mode.

  11. Systems integration of marketable subsystems: A collection of progress reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Monthly progress reports are given in the areas of marketable subsystems integration; development, design, and building of site data acquisition subsystems and data processing systems; operation of the solar test facility and a systems analysis.

  12. Stepping-Motion Motor-Control Subsystem For Testing Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Control subsystem closed-loop angular-position-control system causing motor and bearing under test to undergo any of variety of continuous or stepping motions. Also used to test bearing-and-motor assemblies, motors, angular-position sensors including rotating shafts, and like. Monitoring subsystem gathers data used to evaluate performance of bearing or other article under test. Monitoring subsystem described in article, "Monitoring Subsystem For Testing Bearings" (GSC-13432).

  13. Balancing reliability and cost to choose the best power subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suich, Ronald C.; Patterson, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for computing total (spacecraft) subsystem cost including both the basic subsystem cost and the expected cost due to the failure of the subsystem. This model is then used to determine power subsystem cost as a function of reliability and redundancy. Minimum cost and maximum reliability and/or redundancy are not generally equivalent. Two example cases are presented. One is a small satellite, and the other is an interplanetary spacecraft.

  14. Advanced vehicle systems assessment. Volume 2: Subsystems assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, K.

    1985-01-01

    Volume 2 (Subsystems Assessment) is part of a five-volume report entitled Advanced Vehicle Systems Assessment. Volume 2 presents the projected performance capabilities and cost characteristics of applicable subsystems, considering an additional decade of development. Subsystems of interest include energy storage and conversion devices as well as the necessary powertrain components and vehicle subsystems. Volume 2 also includes updated battery information based on the assessment of an independent battery review board (with the aid of subcontractor reports on advanced battery characteristics).

  15. Automated biowaste sampling system urine subsystem operating model, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Rosen, F.

    1973-01-01

    The urine subsystem automatically provides for the collection, volume sensing, and sampling of urine from six subjects during space flight. Verification of the subsystem design was a primary objective of the current effort which was accomplished thru the detail design, fabrication, and verification testing of an operating model of the subsystem.

  16. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem: Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Voisinet, Leeann

    1995-01-01

    A report presents additional information about laser-beam-steering apparatus described in "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193) and "More About Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19381). Reiterates basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem, with emphasis on modes of operation, basic design concepts, and initial experiments on partial prototype of apparatus.

  17. A Discussion of Oxygen Recovery Definitions and Key Performance Parameters for Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization Life Support Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 55 years, NASA has evolved life support for crewed space exploration vehicles from simple resupply during Project Mercury to the complex and highly integrated system of systems aboard the International Space Station. As NASA targets exploration destinations farther from low Earth orbit and mission durations of 500 to 1000 days, life support systems must evolve to meet new requirements. In addition to having more robust, reliable, and maintainable hardware, limiting resupply becomes critical for managing mission logistics and cost. Supplying a crew with the basics of food, water, and oxygen become more challenging as the destination ventures further from Earth. Aboard ISS the Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) supplies the crew's oxygen demand by electrolyzing water. This approach makes water a primary logistics commodity that must be managed carefully. Chemical reduction of metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2) provides a method of recycling oxygen thereby reducing the net ARS water demand and therefore minimizing logistics needs. Multiple methods have been proposed to achieve this recovery and have been reported in the literature. However, depending on the architecture and the technology approach, "oxygen recovery" can be defined in various ways. This discontinuity makes it difficult to compare technologies directly. In an effort to clarify community discussions of Oxygen Recovery, we propose specific definitions and describe the methodology used to arrive at those definitions. Additionally, we discuss key performance parameters for Oxygen Recovery technology development including challenges with comparisons to state-of-the-art.

  18. Workers' Housing Estates In Postindustrial Cities - Modernization Or Revitalization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaweł, Dariusz

    2015-09-01

    The article presents a part of the results on the physiognomy of a postindustrial city under conditions of economic transformation in Poland. The study area encompasses industrial centers located in the region of the Central Industrial District (Centralny Okręg Przemysłowy - COP) in the Świętokrzystkie and Mazowieckie voivodeships (districts). The specific urban structure of the industrial city and unemployment among its inhabitants resulting from ownership transformations generate various problems. The workers' neighborhoods and colonies, which sprouted up so quickly at the beginning of the XX century, were a supply base for the rapidly developing industrial centers. Their clear urban structure and cultural potential they possess predispose them to developing necessary repair programs. Thus, the article draws attention to this form of settlement on the one hand, and on the other characterizes the activities assumed by gminas (municipalities) in the scope of modernizing and revitalizing these areas.

  19. A method of revitalizing Sampson's theory of the Galilean satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    A method is developed by which Sampson's theory of motion of Jupiter's Galilean satellites can be revitalized by use of algebraic manipulation software on a digital computer. The technique seeks (1) to remove algebraic errors existing in the current Sampson theory, (2) to introduce some neglected effects due to solar interactions and the 3-7 commensurability between the outer two satellites, (3) to allow for nonzero amplitude and phase of the libration, (4) to allow future revision of the arbitrary constants of integration, (5) to express the final results as analytic functions of variations in the numerous arbitrary constants of integration and arbitrary parameters, and (6) to provide analytic partial derivatives by means of which the numerical values of coefficients in the expressions for the coordinates can be adjusted. The level of precision desired is one arc second (Jovicentric) for the coordinates (2, 3.3, 5.2, and 9.1 km, respectively, for satellites I through IV).

  20. Atmosphere Revitalization Technology Development for Crewed Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Harris, Danny W.

    2006-01-01

    As space exploration objectives extend human presence beyond low Earth orbit, the solutions to technological challenges presented by supporting human life in the hostile space environment must build upon experience gained during past and present crewed space exploration programs. These programs and the cabin atmosphere revitalization process technologies and systems developed for them represent the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) past and present operational knowledge base for maintaining a safe, comfortable environment for the crew. The contributions of these programs to the NASA s technological and operational working knowledge base as well as key strengths and weaknesses to be overcome are discussed. Areas for technological development to address challenges inherent with the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) are presented and a plan for their development employing unit operations principles is summarized

  1. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: Assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem, SP-100 Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, D. F.; Lillie, A. F.

    1983-06-01

    Preliminary assessment was completed of nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). Nine generic reactor subsystems were addressed for the assessment.

  2. Revitalizing primary health care--another utopian goal?

    PubMed

    Marahatta, Sujan B

    2010-01-01

    The quest for greater efficiency, fairness and responsiveness to the expectation of the people that system serve have brought about three generations of health system reforms in the twentieth century. The first generation saw the founding of national health care systems and extension to middle income nations of social insurance systems in the 1940s and 1950s. By the late 1960s the rising costs of hospital based care, its usage by better off, inaccessibility by the poor and rural population of even the most basic services heralded second generation reforms promoting primary health care as a means of achieving the affordable universal coverage. It included the best public health strategy that is prevention and the highest ethical principle of public health that is equity. It was expected the best system for reaching households with essential and affordable care, and the best route towards universal coverage. The primary health care approach though adopted universally did not materialize its notion of translating ethos of Health for All by 2000. Overall, primary health care movement by the end of 20th century became lifeless. Since the Declaration of Alma-Ata, fundamental changes have occurred affecting health service delivery, such as economic development and financing approaches, globalization of trade and knowledge, and the shift to privatization. This is the time to develop a new vision, taking into consideration the many changes affecting global health and the strategic developments in health of recent years. With this recognition, the third generation of reforms now underway in many countries is driven by the idea of responding more to demand, assuring access for the poor and emphasizing financing rather than just provision within the public sector. The key concern is: how to translate ethos of revitalizing in the reality. Otherwise the revitalizing concept will turn into utopian goal so like HFA by 2000 strategy. PMID:22610741

  3. The revitalization of the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

    PubMed Central

    Koop, C E; Ginzburg, H M

    1989-01-01

    The Public Health Service (PHS) is the second oldest uniformed service of the United States; its tradition commenced with the establishment of the Marine Hospital Service in 1798. Congress, in 1889, established the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps under the aegis of the Treasury. The Corps was created as a uniformed nonmilitary service with a distinct uniform, insignia, and with titles, pay, and retirement protocols that corresponded to those of the uniformed military services (the Armed Forces). Initially the health care system of the country, and Commissioned Corps members, were concerned with infectious and vitamin-deficiency diseases; more recently the nation's medical community has focused on cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and AIDS. A comprehensive revitalization of the Commissioned Corps began in April 1987. The intent was to restore the Commissioned Corps to its traditional leadership role as a cadre of mobile, compassionate experts ensuring the nation's health. The revitalization activities have been successful. The Commissioned Corps has approximately 5,500 active duty officers. The Surgeon General directed the development of career tracks for 11 categories of commissioned officers to increase the opportunities for professional development within the PHS and thus increase retention and professional growth. The theme for the 1989 celebration of the centennial of the Commissioned Corps is "a century of service with distinction." A hundred years from now, at the bicentennial of the Commissioned Corps, the current Surgeon General would like it to be said that the Public Health Service has had "two centuries of service with distinction." Images p106-a p107-a p107-b p108-a p109-a PMID:2495543

  4. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-03-29

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

  5. Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Skelley, Marcus L.; Woike, Mark R.; Bader, Jon B.; Marshall, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Lack of funding and lack of focus on research over the past several years, coupled with force measurement capabilities being decentralized and distributed across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers, has resulted in a significant erosion of (1) capability and infrastructure to produce and calibrate force measurement systems; (2) NASA s working knowledge of those systems; and (3) the quantity of high-quality, full-capability force measurement systems available for use in aeronautics testing. Simultaneously, and at proportional rates, the capability of industry to design, manufacture, and calibrate these test instruments has been eroding primarily because of a lack of investment by the aeronautics community. Technical expertise in this technology area is a core competency in aeronautics testing; it is highly specialized and experience-based, and it represents a niche market for only a few small precision instrument shops in the United States. With this backdrop, NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the problem, focusing specifically on strain- gage balances. The team partnered with the U.S. Air Force s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem. This paper describes the team s approach, its findings, and its recommendations, and the current status for revitalizing the government s balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the instruments.

  6. The Mariner Mars 1971 radio frequency subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The radio frequency subsystem (RFS) for the Mariner Mars 1971 (MM'71) spacecraft is described. The MM'69 RFS was used as the baseline design for the MM'71 RFS, and the report describes the design changes made to the 1969 RFS for use on MM'71. It also cites various problems encountered during the fabrication and testing of the RFS, as well as the types of tests to which the RFS was subjected. In areas where significant problems were encountered, a detailed description of the problem and its solution is presented. In addition, some recommendations are given for modifications to the RFS and test techniques for future programs.

  7. Waves in space plasma dipole antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Waves In Space Plasma (WISP) flight experiment requires a 50-meter-long deployable dipole antenna subsystem (DASS) to radiate radio frequencies from the STS Orbiter cargo bay. The transmissions are to excite outer ionospheric plasma between the dipole and a free-flying receiver (Spartan) for scientific purposes. This report describes the singular DASS design requirements and how the resulting design satisfies them. A jettison latch is described in some detail. The latch releases the antenna in case of any problems which might prevent the bay doors from closing for re-entry and landing of the Orbiter.

  8. Vacuum control subsystem for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chapman, L.J.

    1981-06-01

    The CAMAC 170 module and CIA crate provide a convenient, cost effective method of interfacing any system requiring a large number of simple devices to be multiplexed into the Accelerator Control System. The system is ideal for relatively slowly changing systems where ten bit analog to digital conversions are sufficiently accurate. Together with vacuum interface CIA cards and prom-based software resident in the 170, this system is used to provide intelligent local monitoring and control for the Tevatron vacuum subsystems. Although not implemented in the vacuum interface, digital to analog converters could be included on the plug in modules as well, providing a total digital and analog multiplexing scheme. 2 refs.

  9. X-38 Bolt Retractor Subsystem Separation Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugless, Fedoria; Johnston, A. S.; Ahmed, R.; Garrison, J. C.; Gaines, J. L.; Waggoner, J. D.

    2002-09-01

    The Flight Robotics Laboratory FRL successfully demonstrated the X-38 bolt retractor subsystem (BRS). The BRS design was proven safe by testing in the Pyrotechnic Shock Facility (PSI) before being demonstrated in the FRL. This Technical Memorandum describes the BRS, FRL, PSF, and interface hardware. Bolt retraction time, spacecraft simulator acceleration, and a force analysis are also presented. The purpose of the demonstration was to show the FRL capability for spacecraft separation testing using pyrotechnics. Although a formal test was not performed due to schedule and budget constraints, the data will show that the BRS is a successful design concept and the FRL is suitable for future separation tests.

  10. Performances of MINISAT-01 Platform Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerezo MartÍnez, Fernando

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the MINISAT-01 mission after two year in orbit since the launch on April 21^st of 1997. It also describes the MINISAT-01 behavior during these years and describes, the evolution of the Satellite, by subsystems. Graphics of the most important parameters will be shown to display the difference between the beginning of life and two years after. The paper details the most important events during the Satellite's life such as the battery overcharge, temperature evolution, onboard computer reset, software updating, and communication failures.

  11. Equilibration of quantum systems and subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Anthony J.

    2011-05-01

    We unify two recent results concerning equilibration in quantum theory. We first generalize a proof of Reimann (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 190403), that the expectation value of 'realistic' quantum observables will equilibrate under very general conditions, and discuss its implications for the equilibration of quantum systems. We then use this to re-derive an independent result of Linden et al (2009 Phys. Rev. E 79 061103), showing that small subsystems generically evolve to an approximately static equilibrium state. Finally, we consider subspaces in which all initial states effectively equilibrate to the same state.

  12. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  13. LARES Mission: Separation and Retention Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursi, Alessandro; Camilli, Pierluigi; Piredda, Claudio; Babini, Gianni; Mangraviti, Elio

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Lares (LAser RElativity Satellite) mission, an all-Italian scientific mission launched with the Vega maiden flight in February 2012, a mechanical separation and retention subsystem (SSEP) has been developed to retain the LARES satellite during launch and release it in the final orbit. The design flow was based on the identification of the driving requirements and critical areas to guide the trade-off, design, analysis and test activities. In particular, the SSEP had to face very high environmental loads and to minimize the contact areas with the satellite that had a spherical shape. The test activity overview is provided.

  14. High temperature superconducting digital circuits and subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Pance, A.; Whiteley, S.R.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.F.; Lee, L.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.

    1993-10-01

    The advances in the fabrication of high temperature superconducting devices have enabled the demonstration of high performance and useful digital circuits and subsystems. The yield and uniformity of the devices is sufficient for circuit fabrication at the medium scale integration (MSI) level with performance not seen before at 77 K. The circuits demonstrated to date include simple gates, counters, analog to digital converters, and shift registers. All of these are mid-sized building blocks for potential applications in commercial and military systems. The processes used for these circuits and blocks will be discussed along with observed performance data.

  15. Preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. D.; Ellis, G. S.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) has evolved as the most promising approach to reclaim potable water from wastewater for future long-term manned space missions. Life Systems, Inc. (LSI), working with NASA, has developed a preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) which processes wastewater at 1.4 kg/h. The preprototype unit weighs 143 kg, occupies a volume of 0.47 cu m, and will reclaim 96 percent of the available wastewater. This unit has been tested by LSI and is scheduled for further testing at NASA-JSC. This paper presents the preprototype VCDS design, configuration, performance data, test results and flight system projections.

  16. Development of shutter subsystems for infrared imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Frank; Durfee, David; Stephenson, Stanley; Wagner, Gary

    2010-04-01

    Requirements for shutters used in Infrared Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) systems, Driver Vision Enhancement (DVE) and other thermal imaging systems are becoming increasingly more demanding. These performance requirements have been achieved using a unique, modular, reconfigurable rotary drive actuator with bi-stability and direct connection to the blade. A "Smart Shutter" acts as a complete sub-system that can be tested as an integral module. A multi-blade variant has been developed that retains the reliability of the rotary drive system and decreases the physical size of largeraperture shutters. Predictions of next-generation application-specific shutter designs will be offered in the paper.

  17. Loading operations for spacecraft propulsion subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, G. P.; Nordeng, H. O.; Ellison, J. R.

    1992-07-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of loading operations for pressurized blowdown monopropellant and pressure regulated integral bipropellant propulsion subsystems used in geosynchronous communication satellites. Propellant chemical composition, cleanliness, processing, and handling requirements are addressed. Ground servicing equipment (GSE) and propellant transfer procedures for the various loading configurations are discussed. Effects of helium solubility and helium saturation levels in both GSE carts and propellant tanks are examined. Predicted equilibrium pressures for actual postload tank pressures are compared against extensive loading data on Hughes bipropellant spacecraft. Helium tank pressurization and manifold pressurization practices are described. Propellant loading facility requirements and safety requirements are discussed.

  18. Building the IOOS data management subsystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de La Beaujardière, J.; Mendelssohn, R.; Ortiz, C.; Signell, R.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss progress to date and plans for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS??) Data Management and Communications (DMAC) subsystem. We begin by presenting a conceptual architecture of IOOS DMAC. We describe work done as part of a 3-year pilot project known as the Data Integration Framework and the subsequent assessment of lessons learned. We present work that has been accomplished as part of the initial version of the IOOS Data Catalog. Finally, we discuss near-term plans for augmenting IOOS DMAC capabilities.

  19. Operation of the yield estimation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccrary, D. G.; Rogers, J. L.; Hill, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The organization and products of the yield estimation subsystem (YES) are described with particular emphasis on meteorological data acquisition, yield estimation, crop calendars, weekly weather summaries, and project reports. During the three phases of LACIE, YES demonstrated that it is possible to use the flow of global meteorological data and provide valuable information regarding global wheat production. It was able to establish a capability to collect, in a timely manner, detailed weather data from all regions of the world, and to evaluate and convert that data into information appropriate to the project's needs.

  20. STC-DBS Electrical Power Subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, S.R.; Callen, P.; Pierce, P.; Wylie, T.

    1984-08-01

    The design of the STC-DBS (Satellite Television Corporation - Direct Broadcast Satellite) Electrical Power Subsystem presently under development at RCA Astro-Electronics is highlighted. To efficiently satisfy the payload power requirements, which are dominated by three 220W TWTAs, while at the same time permitting maximum use of already qualified designs, a dual bus system was selected. The payload bus, which operates during non-eclipse periods, is a shunt-regulated solar array bus at 100 volts. The housekeeping bus is regulated at 35.5 volts when sunlit and varies with the battery voltage during eclipse.

  1. X-38 Bolt Retractor Subsystem Separation Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rugless, Fedoria (Editor); Johnston, A. S.; Ahmed, R.; Garrison, J. C.; Gaines, J. L.; Waggoner, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Flight Robotics Laboratory FRL successfully demonstrated the X-38 bolt retractor subsystem (BRS). The BRS design was proven safe by testing in the Pyrotechnic Shock Facility (PSI) before being demonstrated in the FRL. This Technical Memorandum describes the BRS, FRL, PSF, and interface hardware. Bolt retraction time, spacecraft simulator acceleration, and a force analysis are also presented. The purpose of the demonstration was to show the FRL capability for spacecraft separation testing using pyrotechnics. Although a formal test was not performed due to schedule and budget constraints, the data will show that the BRS is a successful design concept and the FRL is suitable for future separation tests.

  2. Multimedia Technology and Indigenous Language Revitalization: Practical Educational Tools and Applications Used within Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galla, Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reports findings from a study documenting the use of multimedia technology among Indigenous language communities to assist language learners, speakers, instructors, and institutions learn about multimedia technologies that have contributed to Indigenous language revitalization, education, documentation, preservation, and…

  3. Root Maturation in Teeth Treated by Unsuccessful Revitalization: 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Žižka, Radovan; Buchta, Tomáš; Voborná, Iva; Harvan, Luboš; Šedý, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the unusual course of failed revascularization/revitalization cases. Up to this date the evidence of success and failure rates of revascularization/revitalization treatment is scarce. These case reports present "unsuccessful" revascularization/revitalization treatment of permanent immature teeth with apical periodontitis. Although the teeth were treated by protocol suggested by the American Association of Endodontists and the symptoms disappeared, maturation of teeth continued, and periapical lesion was reduced, the teeth went symptomatic during the follow-up. Subsequently, regular root canal treatment was performed. Despite chronic infection that was probably left inside the root canal after a disinfection protocol, the secondary aims of the treatment were achieved even when the primary ones were not. The possible causes of failures of revascularization/revitalization treatment and their prevention are discussed. PMID:26960577

  4. 78 FR 4426 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Revitalization Area Designation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Revitalization Area... public comments on the subject proposal. The Department accepts requests from local governments or...: Colette Pollard., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  5. 75 FR 22816 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: Revitalizing Core...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: Revitalizing Core Environmental Health Programs Through the Environmental...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the aforementioned meeting: Times...

  6. Concept Of Revitalization Of Selected Military Facilities Of Dragoons Barracks In Olsztyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagroba, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Revitalization is a complex program to restore the functioning of the neglected urban areas in terms of spatial, economic and social. Revitalization activities on post-military facilities are stopping negative phenomena, such as degradation of space, social pathology or lack of proper functioning of the area, adapted to modern needs. The object of the work is to present some aspects with the revitalization of former military facilities in the area of the Artyleryjska Street in Olsztyn. The presented design concept aims to revitalize a neglected area of the barracks, which will enable the activation site and include it in the city urban space. The method adopted in this work is the architectural project of adapting selected post-military facilities for new functions, affecting the economic development and social integration of people.

  7. SMARTE: HELPING COMMUNITIES OVERCOME OBSTACLES TO REVITALIZATION (04/23/07)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools - electronic (SMARTe), is an open-source, web-based, decision support system for developing and evaluating future reuse scenarios for potentially contaminated land. SMARTe contains information and analysis tools for all a...

  8. GET SMARTE: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM TO REVITALIZE COMMUNITIES - CABERNET 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools - electronic (SMARTe), is an open-source, web-based, decision support system for developing and evaluating future reuse scenarios for potentially contaminated land. SMARTe contains information and analysis tools for all a...

  9. Fault-tolerant multichannel demultiplexer subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Fault tolerance in future processing and switching communication satellites is addressed by showing new methods for detecting hardware failures in the first major subsystem, the multichannel demultiplexer. An efficient method for demultiplexing frequency slotted channels uses multirate filter banks which contain fast Fourier transform processing. All numerical processing is performed at a lower rate commensurate with the small bandwidth of each bandbase channel. The integrity of the demultiplexing operations is protected by using real number convolutional codes to compute comparable parity values which detect errors at the data sample level. High rate, systematic convolutional codes produce parity values at a much reduced rate, and protection is achieved by generating parity values in two ways and comparing them. Parity values corresponding to each output channel are generated in parallel by a subsystem, operating even slower and in parallel with the demultiplexer that is virtually identical to the original structure. These parity calculations may be time shared with the same processing resources because they are so similar.

  10. Automating engineering verification in ALMA subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, José; Castillo, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array is an interferometer comprising 66 individual high precision antennas located over 5000 meters altitude in the north of Chile. Several complex electronic subsystems need to be meticulously tested at different stages of an antenna commissioning, both independently and when integrated together. First subsystem integration takes place at the Operations Support Facilities (OSF), at an altitude of 3000 meters. Second integration occurs at the high altitude Array Operations Site (AOS), where also combined performance with Central Local Oscillator (CLO) and Correlator is assessed. In addition, there are several other events requiring complete or partial verification of instrument specifications compliance, such as parts replacements, calibration, relocation within AOS, preventive maintenance and troubleshooting due to poor performance in scientific observations. Restricted engineering time allocation and the constant pressure of minimizing downtime in a 24/7 astronomical observatory, impose the need to complete (and report) the aforementioned verifications in the least possible time. Array-wide disturbances, such as global power interruptions and following recovery, generate the added challenge of executing this checkout on multiple antenna elements at once. This paper presents the outcome of the automation of engineering verification setup, execution, notification and reporting in ALMA and how these efforts have resulted in a dramatic reduction of both time and operator training required. Signal Path Connectivity (SPC) checkout is introduced as a notable case of such automation.

  11. UGV: security analysis of subsystem control network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott-McCune, Sam; Kobezak, Philip; Tront, Joseph; Marchany, Randy; Wicks, Al

    2013-05-01

    Unmanned Ground vehicles (UGVs) are becoming prolific in the heterogeneous superset of robotic platforms. The sensors which provide odometry, localization, perception, and vehicle diagnostics are fused to give the robotic platform a sense of the environment it is traversing. The automotive industry CAN bus has dominated the industry due to the fault tolerance and the message structure allowing high priority messages to reach the desired node in a real time environment. UGVs are being researched and produced at an accelerated rate to preform arduous, repetitive, and dangerous missions that are associated with a military action in a protracted conflict. The technology and applications of the research will inevitably be turned into dual-use platforms to aid civil agencies in the performance of their various operations. Our motivation is security of the holistic system; however as subsystems are outsourced in the design, the overall security of the system may be diminished. We will focus on the CAN bus topology and the vulnerabilities introduced in UGVs and recognizable security vulnerabilities that are inherent in the communications architecture. We will show how data can be extracted from an add-on CAN bus that can be customized to monitor subsystems. The information can be altered or spoofed to force the vehicle to exhibit unwanted actions or render the UGV unusable for the designed mission. The military relies heavily on technology to maintain information dominance, and the security of the information introduced onto the network by UGVs must be safeguarded from vulnerabilities that can be exploited.

  12. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  13. Force protection demining system (FPDS) detection subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachery, Karen N.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-06-01

    This study describes the U.S. Army Force Protection Demining System (FPDS); a remotely-operated, multisensor platform developed for reliable detection and neutralization of both anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. The ongoing development of the prototype multisensor detection subsystem is presented, which integrates an advanced electromagnetic pulsed-induction array and ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar array on a single standoff platform. The FPDS detection subsystem is mounted on a robotic rubber-tracked vehicle and incorporates an accurate and precise navigation/positioning module making it well suited for operation in varied and irregular terrains. Detection sensors are optimally configured to minimize interference without loss in sensitivity or performance. Mine lane test data acquired from the prototype sensors are processed to extract signal- and image-based features for automatic target recognition. Preliminary results using optimal feature and classifier selection indicate the potential of the system to achieve high probabilities of detection while minimizing false alarms. The FPDS detection software system also exploits modern multi-sensor data fusion algorithms to provide real-time detection and discrimination information to the user.

  14. Instrument Pointing Subsystem /IPS/ design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammesfahr, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The Instrument Pointing Subsystem (IPS), currently under development at Dornier System, is a most versatile Spacelab subsystem providing precision pointing capabilities to any single or clustered group of scientific instruments observing inertially fixed or moving targets. The IPS comprises a three-axis gimbal system mounted to the payload aft end and a payload clamping assembly for support of the IPS mounted experiments during Orbiter launch and landing phases. The IPS control system is based on the inertial reference of a three-axis gyro package being updated by the payload mounted IPS star/sun trackers and operated in a gimbal mounted minicomputer. It enables inertial stabilization as well as slewing and target tracking operations. The functional and operational control is performed via the Spacelab S/S computer and its display and keyboard, thereby establishing a flexible and responsive operator interface in the Spacelab Module and the Orbiter AFD enabling optimized display and keyboard entries for any operational mode. The AFD accommodates in addition a hardwired panel serving for IPS emergency operations. Incorporated Experiment supporting services consist of several independent power sources, three Experiment Computer Remote Acquisition Units and direct data links to IPS and Spacelab which provide maximum flexibility for operation of independent experiment clusters and for an operational interlock between IPS and its payload.

  15. IOOS modeling subsystem: vision and implementation strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfeld, Leslie; Chao, Yi; Signell, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical modeling is vital to achieving the U.S. IOOS® goals of predicting, understanding and adapting to change in the ocean and Great Lakes. In the next decade IOOS should cultivate a holistic approach to coastal ocean prediction, and encourage more balanced investment among the observing, modeling and information management subsystems. We believe the vision of a prediction framework driven by observations, and leveraging advanced technology and understanding of the ocean and Great Lakes, would lead to a new era for IOOS that would not only produce more powerful information, but would also capture broad community support, particularly from the general public, thus allowing IOOS to develop into the comprehensive information system that was envisioned at the outset.

  16. Tracking subsystem of the SOFIA telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Hermann; Braeuninger, Christoph; Dierks, Andreas; Erdmann, Matthias; Erhard, Markus; Lattner, Klaus; Schmolke, Juergen

    2000-06-01

    The Tracking Subsystem of the SOFIA telescope consists of three high performance imagers and a dedicated tracking control unit. There are two boresighted imagers for target acquisition and tracking, one with a wide (6 degrees) and one with a fine (70 arcmin) field-of-view, and one main- telescope-optics sharing imager with a narrow field-of-view (8 arcmin) for high performance tracking. From the recorded stellar images, tracking error signals are generated by the tracker controller. The tracker controller has several features to support various tracking schemes such as tracking the telescope as an inertial platform, on- axis/offset tracking, and limb tracking. The tracker has three modes, i.e. positioning, tracking and `override'. Special features are the handling of so-called areas-of- interest in the inertial reference frame and the external imager synchronization. The paper presents the design and functional/operational performance of the imagers and the tracking control unit.

  17. NASA metrology information system: A NEMS subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, E. S., Jr.; Kern, F. A.; Yow, R. P.; Peterson, E.

    1984-01-01

    the NASA Metrology Information Systems (NMIS) is being developed as a standardized tool in managing the NASA field Center's instrument calibration programs. This system, as defined by the NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop, will function as a subsystem of the newly developed NASA Equipment Management System (NEMS). The Metrology Information System is designed to utilize and update applicable NEMS data fields for controlled property and to function as a stand alone system for noncontrolled property. The NMIS provides automatic instrument calibration recall control, instrument historical performance data storage and analysis, calibration and repair labor and parts cost data, and instrument user and location data. Nineteen standardized reports were developed to analyze calibration system operations.

  18. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  19. Verifying Correct Functionality of Avionics Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuer, Ben t.

    2005-01-01

    This project focuses on the testing of the telecommunications interface subsystem of the Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform to ensure proper functionality. The Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform is a set of basic tools designed to be used in future spacecraft. The responsibilities of the telecommunications interface include communication between the spacecraft and ground teams as well as acting as the bus controller for the system. The tests completed include bit wise read\\write tests to each register, testing of status bits, and verifying various bus controller activities. Testing is accomplished through the use of software-based simulations run on an electronic design of the system. The tests are written in Verilog Hardware Definition Language and they simulate specific states and conditions in telecommunication interfaces. Upon successful completion, the output is examined to verify that the system responded appropriately.

  20. Apollo experience report: Lunar module electrical power subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campos, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    The design and development of the electrical power subsystem for the lunar module are discussed. The initial requirements, the concepts used to design the subsystem, and the testing program are explained. Specific problems and the modifications or compromises (or both) imposed for resolution are detailed. The flight performance of the subsystem is described, and recommendations pertaining to power specifications for future space applications are made.

  1. A Statistical Approach to Establishing Subsystem Environmental Test Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a research task to evaluate structural responses at various subsystem mounting locations during spacecraft level test exposures to the environments of mechanical shock, acoustic noise, and random vibration. This statistical evaluation is presented in the form of recommended subsystem test specifications for these three environments as normalized to a reference set of spacecraft test levels and are thus suitable for extrapolation to a set of different spacecraft test levels. The recommendations are dependent upon a subsystem's mounting location in a spacecraft, and information is presented on how to determine this mounting zone for a given subsystem.

  2. Plant development, auxin, and the subsystem incompleteness theorem.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Plant morphogenesis (the process whereby form develops) requires signal cross-talking among all levels of organization to coordinate the operation of metabolic and genomic subsystems operating in a larger network of subsystems. Each subsystem can be rendered as a logic circuit supervising the operation of one or more signal-activated system. This approach simplifies complex morphogenetic phenomena and allows for their aggregation into diagrams of progressively larger networks. This technique is illustrated here by rendering two logic circuits and signal-activated subsystems, one for auxin (IAA) polar/lateral intercellular transport and another for IAA-mediated cell wall loosening. For each of these phenomena, a circuit/subsystem diagram highlights missing components (either in the logic circuit or in the subsystem it supervises) that must be identified experimentally if each of these basic plant phenomena is to be fully understood. We also illustrate the "subsystem incompleteness theorem," which states that no subsystem is operationally self-sufficient. Indeed, a whole-organism perspective is required to understand even the most simple morphogenetic process, because, when isolated, every biological signal-activated subsystem is morphogenetically ineffective. PMID:22645582

  3. Plant Development, Auxin, and the Subsystem Incompleteness Theorem

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Plant morphogenesis (the process whereby form develops) requires signal cross-talking among all levels of organization to coordinate the operation of metabolic and genomic subsystems operating in a larger network of subsystems. Each subsystem can be rendered as a logic circuit supervising the operation of one or more signal-activated system. This approach simplifies complex morphogenetic phenomena and allows for their aggregation into diagrams of progressively larger networks. This technique is illustrated here by rendering two logic circuits and signal-activated subsystems, one for auxin (IAA) polar/lateral intercellular transport and another for IAA-mediated cell wall loosening. For each of these phenomena, a circuit/subsystem diagram highlights missing components (either in the logic circuit or in the subsystem it supervises) that must be identified experimentally if each of these basic plant phenomena is to be fully understood. We also illustrate the “subsystem incompleteness theorem,” which states that no subsystem is operationally self-sufficient. Indeed, a whole-organism perspective is required to understand even the most simple morphogenetic process, because, when isolated, every biological signal-activated subsystem is morphogenetically ineffective. PMID:22645582

  4. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Cox, Marlon

    2009-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In two previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads. Another paper at this year s conference discusses similar testing with real human metabolic loads, including some closed-loop testing with emergency breathing masks. The Orion ARS is designed to also support extravehicular activity operations from a depressurized cabin. The next step in developmental testing at JSC was, therefore, to test this ARS technology in a typical closed space suit loop environment with low-pressure pure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure oxygen loop testing of a new Orion ARS technology, and was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in December 2008. The test investigated pressure drops through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors and general swing-bed performance with both umbilical configurations as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  5. First Human Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In two previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of the technology in a representative environment with simulated human metabolic loads. The next step in developmental testing at JSC was to replace the simulated humans with real humans; this testing was conducted in the spring of 2008. This first instance of human testing of a new Orion ARS technology included several cases in a sealed Orione-quivalent free volume and three cases using emergency breathing masks connected directly to the ARS loop. Significant test results presented in this paper include comparisons between the standard metabolic rates for CO2 and water vapor production published in Orion requirements documents and real-world rate ranges observed with human test subjects. Also included are qualitative assessments of process flow rate and closed-loop pressure-cycling tolerability while using the emergency masks. Recommendations for modifications to the Orion ARS design and operation, based on the test results, conclude the paper.

  6. First Human Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In two previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of the technology in a representative environment with simulated human metabolic loads. The next step in developmental testing at JSC was to replace the simulated humans with real humans; this testing was conducted in the spring of 2008. This first instance of human testing of a new Orion ARS technology included several cases in a sealed Orion-equivalent free volume and three cases using emergency breathing masks connected directly to the ARS loop. Significant test results presented in this paper include comparisons between the standard metabolic rates for CO2 and water vapor production published in Orion requirements documents and real-world rate ranges observed with human test subjects. Also included are qualitative assessments of process flow rate and closed-loop pressure-cycling tolerability while using the emergency masks. Recommendations for modifications to the Orion ARS design and operation, based on the test results, conclude the paper.

  7. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by United Technologies Corp. Aerospace Systems (UTAS, formerly Hamilton Sundstrand) and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure testing with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight project computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  8. 2009 Continued Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Swerterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment, with simulated and real human metabolic loads, in both open and closed-loop configurations. The test article design was iterated a third time before the latest series of such tests, which was performed in the first half of 2009. The new design incorporates a canister configuration modification for overall unit compactness and reduced pressure drop, as well as a new process flow control valve that incorporates both compressed gas purge and dual-end vacuum desorption capabilities. This newest test article is very similar to the flight article designs. Baseline tests of the new unit were performed to compare its performance to that of the previous test articles. Testing of compressed gas purge operations helped refine launchpad operating condition recommendations developed in earlier testing. Operating conditions used in flight program computer models were tested to validate the model projections. Specific operating conditions that were recommended by the JSC test team based on past test results were also tested for validation. The effects of vacuum regeneration line pressure on resulting cabin conditions was studied for high metabolic load periods, and a maximum pressure is recommended

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilities Revitalization Project - Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.

    2000-06-06

    The Facilities Revitalization Project (FRP) has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide new and/or refurbished research and support facilities for the Laboratory's science mission. The FRP vision is to provide ORNL staff with world-class facilities, consolidated at the X-10 site, with the first phase of construction to be completed within five years. The project will utilize a combination of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee, and private-sector funds to accomplish the new construction, with the facilities requirements to be focused on support of the ORNL Institutional Plan. This FRP Project Management Plan has been developed to provide the framework under which the project will be conducted. It is intended that the FRP will be managed as a programmatic office, with primary resources for execution of the project to be obtained from the responsible organizations within ORNL (Engineering, Procurement, Strategic Planning, etc.). The FRP Project Management Plan includes a definition of the project scope, the organizational responsibilities, and project approach, including detailed Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), followed by more detailed discussions of each of the main WBS elements: Project Planning Basis, Facility Deactivation and Consolidation, and New Facilities Development. Finally, a general discussion of the overall project schedule and cost tracking approach is provided.

  10. Nighttime Lights, Socioeconomic Development, and Revitalization Policies in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nighttime lights are typically used as a proxy for population and economic growth, yet they can also reveal socioeconomic decline. We use two night light datasets to infer socioeconomic patterns and trends in the Russian Far East, Northeast China, and North Korea, a cross-border region impacted by the 1991 collapse of the USSR. First, using the annual stable light composites from the DMSP/OLS satellites, we find that generally, nighttime lights declined in the Russian Far East, increased in Northeast China, and fluctuated in North Korea between 1992 and 2012. By 2012, lighting in most of the Russian Far East had not recovered to 1992 levels. In Northeast China, a government revitalization program may have increased lighting during the mid-2000s, suggesting sensitivity of remotely sensed nighttime lights to regional development policies. Yet caveats with DMSP/OLS data include low spatial and radiometric resolutions, saturation, and blooming. The Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Suomi NPP satellite, however, launched in October 2011, has higher quality, enabling improved monitoring of socioeconomic trends in the region. For our second night lights dataset, we use both nightly images and monthly DNB composites to make inferences regarding socioeconomic activities at finer spatial and temporal resolutions from 2012-2015. Cross-border activity in particular emerges in finer detail, allowing us to examine specific transport corridors and sites of industrial and natural resource production that involve both Russian and Chinese partners.

  11. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy; Sweterlisch, Jeffery J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight program computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  12. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Cox, Marlon R.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology. That testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment with both simulated and real human metabolic loads, and in both open and closed-loop configurations. The Orion ARS is designed to also support space-suited operations in a depressurized cabin, so the next step in developmental testing at JSC was to test the ARS technology in a typical closed space suit-loop environment with low-pressure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure, high-oxygen, closed-loop testing of the Orion ARS technology, and it was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in March 2009. The test investigated pressure drops and flow balancing through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors. General swing-bed performance was tested with both umbilical configurations, as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable suit atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  13. Giada improved calibration of measurement subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument devoted to measure the dynamical properties of the dust grains emitted by the comet. An Extended Calibration activity using the GIADA Flight Spare Model has been carried out taking into account the knowledge gained through the analyses of IDPs and cometary samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2. GIADA consists of three measurement subsystems: Grain Detection System, an optical device measuring the optical cross-section for individual dust; Impact Sensor an aluminum plate connected to 5 piezo-sensors measuring the momentum of impacting single dust grains; Micro Balance System measuring the cumulative deposition in time of dust grains smaller than 10 μm. The results of the analyses on data acquired with the GIADA PFM and the comparison with calibration data acquired during the pre-launch campaign allowed us to improve GIADA performances and capabilities. We will report the results of the following main activities: a) definition of a correlation between the 2 GIADA Models (PFM housed in laboratory and In-Flight Model on-board ROSETTA); b) characterization of the sub-systems performances (signal elaboration, sensitivities, space environment effects); c) new calibration measurements and related curves by means of the PFM model using realistic cometary dust analogues. Acknowledgements: GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a University of Kent, UK, PI proposal; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank

  14. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements optics assembly building (OAB) SSDR 1.2.2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-08-22

    This Subsystem Design Requirement (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements `for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Optics Assembly Building (OAB). These building system requirements are associated with housing and supporting the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the OAB for preparing and repairing optical and mechanical components used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser and Target Building (LTAB). This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the OAB: * Structural systems for the building spaces and operational-support equipment and building- support equipment. * Architectural building features associated with housing the space, operational cleanliness, and functional operation of the facility. * Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facility. * Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants and stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater. * Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facility and its contents. * Material handling equipment for transferring optical assemblies and other materials within building areas and to the LTAB. * Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling, cleaning, and other service to optical and mechanical components. * Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service to the building and equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities. * Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Generic design criteria, such as siting data, seismic requirements, utility availability, and other information that contributes to the OAB design, are not addressed in this document. Rather, such information is provided in SDR 001

  15. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    This Master Test Plan outlines the test program to be performed by Hamilton Standard during the Urine Water Recovery Subsystem Program. Testing is divided into three phases: (1) design support testing; development component testing; and acceptance testing. The completion of this test program verifies the subsystem operation.

  16. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  17. Subsystem radiation susceptibility analysis for deep-space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, W. S.; Poch, W.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Bilsky, H. W.; Carroll, D.

    1971-01-01

    Scientific, unmanned spacecraft on mission to Jupiter and beyond will be subjected to nuclear radiation from the natural environment and onboard nuclear power sources which may be harmful to subsystems. This report postulates these environments and discusses practical considerations to ensure confidence that the spacecraft's materials and subsystems will withstand the effects of anticipated radiation. Degradation mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Thermal energy storage subsystems. A collection of quarterly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design, development, and progress toward the delivery of three subsystems is discussed. The subsystem used a salt hydrate mixture for thermal energy storage. The program schedules, technical data, and other program activities from October 1, 1976, through December 31, 1977 are presented.

  19. OVEN & LAVA Subsystems in the RESOLVE Payload for Resource Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine E.

    2015-01-01

    A short briefing in Power Point of the status of the OVEN subsystem and the LAVA subsystems of the RESOLVE payload being developed under the Resource Prospector mission. The purpose of the mission is to sample and analyze volatile ices embedded in the lunar soil at the poles of the Moon and is expected to be conducted in the 2020 time frame.

  20. Does Normal Processing Provide Evidence of Specialised Semantic Subsystems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Laura R.; Olson, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Category-specific disorders are frequently explained by suggesting that living and non-living things are processed in separate subsystems (e.g. Caramazza & Shelton, 1998). If subsystems exist, there should be benefits for normal processing, beyond the influence of structural similarity. However, no previous study has separated the relative…

  1. Triple redundant computer system/display and keyboard subsystem interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulde, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Interfacing of the redundant display and keyboard subsystem with the triple redundant computer system is defined according to space shuttle design. The study is performed in three phases: (1) TRCS configuration and characteristics identification; (2) display and keyboard subsystem configuration and characteristics identification, and (3) interface approach definition.

  2. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional information about proposed apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). Discusses design of digital beam-steering control subsystem and, in particular, that part of design pertaining to digital compensation for frequency response of steering mirror.

  3. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Sample Delivery Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Sample Delivery Subsystem (SDS) and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this part of the subsystem.

  4. Portable oxygen subsystem. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The concept and design of a portable oxygen device for use in the space shuttle orbiter is presented. Hardware fabrication and acceptance tests (i.e., breadboard models) are outlined and discussed. Optimization of the system (for weight, volume, safety, costs) is discussed. The device is of the rebreather type, and provides a revitalized breathing gas supply to a crewman for denitrogenization and emergency activities. Engineering drawings and photographs of the device are shown.

  5. Multi-Mission Automated Task Invocation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Cecilia S.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Sayfi, Elias M.; Lee, Hyun H.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-Mission Automated Task Invocation Subsystem (MATIS) is software that establishes a distributed data-processing framework for automated generation of instrument data products from a spacecraft mission. Each mission may set up a set of MATIS servers for processing its data products. MATIS embodies lessons learned in experience with prior instrument- data-product-generation software. MATIS is an event-driven workflow manager that interprets project-specific, user-defined rules for managing processes. It executes programs in response to specific events under specific conditions according to the rules. Because requirements of different missions are too diverse to be satisfied by one program, MATIS accommodates plug-in programs. MATIS is flexible in that users can control such processing parameters as how many pipelines to run and on which computing machines to run them. MATIS has a fail-safe capability. At each step, MATIS captures and retains pertinent information needed to complete the step and start the next step. In the event of a restart, this information is retrieved so that processing can be resumed appropriately. At this writing, it is planned to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) for monitoring and controlling a product generation engine in MATIS. The GUI would enable users to schedule multiple processes and manage the data products produced in the processes. Although MATIS was initially designed for instrument data product generation,

  6. Synchronized target subsystem for automated docking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A synchronized target subsystem for use in an automated docking or station keeping system for docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle wherein the chase vehicle is provided with a video camera which provides adjacent frames each having a predetermined time duration. A light source mounted on the target vehicle flashes at a frequency which has a time duration which is a multiple of the duration time of the frames, the light being on for at least one frame duration and being off for the remainder of the cycle. An image processing unit is connected to the camera for receiving signals from the camera and subtracting one of the adjacent frames from the other to detect whether the light appears in one frame, both frames or neither frame. If the target light appears in both frames or neither frame, the image processing unit feeds a signal to a timing circuit to advance the video camera one frame. This process is continued until the target light appears in one frame and not in the other, at which time the process of advancing the video camera is stopped.

  7. Apollo experience report: Lunar module environmental control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillen, R. J.; Brady, J. C.; Collier, F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional description of the environmental control subsystem is presented. Development, tests, checkout, and flight experiences of the subsystem are discussed; and the design fabrication, and operational difficulties associated with the various components and subassemblies are recorded. Detailed information is related concerning design changes made to, and problems encountered with, the various elements of the subsystem, such as the thermal control water sublimator, the carbon dioxide sensing and control units, and the water section. The problems associated with water sterilization, water/glycol formulation, and materials compatibility are discussed. The corrective actions taken are described with the expection that this information may be of value for future subsystems. Although the main experiences described are problem oriented, the subsystem has generally performed satisfactorily in flight.

  8. External orthogonality in subsystem time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-08-01

    Subsystem density functional theory (subsystem DFT) is a DFT partitioning method that is exact in principle, but depends on approximations to the kinetic energy density functional (KEDF). One may avoid the use of approximate KEDFs by ensuring that the inter-subsystem molecular orbitals are orthogonal, termed external orthogonality (EO). We present a method that extends a subsystem DFT method, that includes EO, into the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) regime. This method therefore removes the need for approximations to the kinetic energy potential and kernel, and we show that it can accurately reproduce the supermolecular TDDFT results for weakly and strongly coupled subsystems, and for systems with strongly overlapping densities (where KEDF approximations traditionally fail). PMID:26932176

  9. Preliminary systems design study assessment report. Volume 7, Subsystem concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each. This volume contains the descriptions and other relevant information of the four subsystems required for most of the ex situ processing systems. This volume covers the metal decontamination and sizing subsystem, soils processing subsystem, low-level waste subsystem, and retrieval subsystem.

  10. Assessing Quality across Health Care Subsystems in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Andrea; Pagán, José A.; Wong, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform efforts in Mexico have focused on the need to improve the efficiency and equity of a fragmented healthcare system. In light of these reform initiatives, there is a need to assess whether healthcare subsystems are effective at providing high-quality healthcare to all Mexicans. Nationally representative household survey data from the 2006 Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (National Health and Nutrition Survey) were used to assess perceived healthcare quality across different subsystems. Using a sample of 7234 survey respondents, we found evidence of substantial heterogeneity in healthcare quality assessments across healthcare subsystems favoring private providers over social security institutions. These differences across subsystems remained even after adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic, and health factors. Our analysis suggests that improvements in efficiency and equity can be achieved by assessing the factors that contribute to heterogeneity in quality across subsystems. PMID:19305224

  11. In the Name of Language: School-Based Language Revitalization, Strategic Solidarities, and State Power in the French Basque Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidemann, Kai A.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the mobilization dynamics of a school-based minority language revitalization initiative in the French Basque Country, known as the Ikastola Movement. Bringing the study of language revitalization into dialogue with social movement theory, I discuss how the solidarity of Basque language activists was influenced by state-level…

  12. Your Language or Ours? Inclusion and Exclusion of Non-Indigenous Majorities in Maori and Sámi Language Revitalization Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albury, Nathan John

    2015-01-01

    Since the second half of the twentieth century, post-colonial governments have commonly sought to revitalize the indigenous languages their imperialist predecessors hoped to eradicate. Although the impetus to revitalize is shared, the question of excluding or including the non-indigenous majority in the revitalization process, and encouraging them…

  13. Revitalization Of The 1970s Within The `Old Town' In Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żwirek, Paweł; Fiszer, Jakub

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents selected issues in the revitalization of the façades of buildings located in the historic `Old Town' part of the city of Kraków. The subjects of the revitalization were the façades of an office building and a multi-level garage, both built in the 1970s in the administrative district of the `Old Town' in Krakow. The criteria that guided the project heads in the choice of technology and technical solutions used in the revitalization project are also presented. The paper discusses the problems associated with the implementation of a new aluminium façade on the exterior walls, which were characterized by very large inaccuracies, significantly exceeding tolerance values.

  14. The revitalization of U.S. dental education.

    PubMed

    DePaola, Dominick P

    2008-02-01

    Revitalization of dental education in the United States is an imperative, but it depends mainly on the willingness of dental school faculty to make great changes. My remarks address a system of education of dental professionals in relation to other health professionals whose vision seems at times to have surpassed ours. I advocate for a revitalization of our profession in order to stand at the fore when it comes to ensuring the health and well-being of the public. Thanks to advances in molecular medicine, health care is being transformed from a system of treating disease to one that provides predictive, preemptive, and personalized care. This presentation makes recommendations for rethinking the current system of dental education in order to elevate dentistry to its rightful place as a vibrant health care leader. Dental education needs to be a source of new knowledge, discovery, and innovation to sustain its legacy as a learned profession. Graduates must be lifelong learners who can critically evaluate science and technology for the good of their patients. Future dentists should be providers of primary care, yet data suggest that the organizational structure to support this vision is lacking. The accreditation system, interrelated with licensure and National Boards, needs to set a better floor. While independence is an admirable goal, I see too much variation in the accreditation system. We must overcome fears and politics to upgrade the profession as pharmacy did when it introduced the Pharm.D. degree. With that came a change in the entire system of pharmacy education and clinical practice and recognition of pharmacists as members of an interdisciplinary health care team. Dentistry and dental education are doing a lot that is good, but we must and can do even better if the profession is to thrive as a respected member of the health professions delivering high-quality, evidence-based care to the public. Dental students, faculty, and practitioners must have command

  15. Laser-initiated ordnance for air-to-air missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumpter, David R.

    1993-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas Missile Systems Company (MDMSC) has developed a laser ignition subsystem (LIS) for air-to-air missile applications. The MDMSC subsystem is designed to activate batteries, unlock fins, and sequence propulsion system events. The subsystem includes Pyro Zirconium Pump (PZP) lasers, mechanical Safe & Arm, fiber-optic distribution system, and optically activated pyrotechnic devices (initiators, detonators, and thermal batteries). The LIS design has incorporated testability features for the laser modules, drive electronics, fiber-optics, and pyrotechnics. Several of the LIS have been fabricated and have supported thermal battery testing, integral rocket ramjet testing, and have been integrated into integral rocket ramjet flight test vehicles as part of the flight control subsystem.

  16. MSG Power Subsystem Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacometti, G.; Canard, JP.; Perron, O.

    2011-10-01

    The Meteosat programme has been running for more than twenty years under ESA leadership. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is a series of 4 geostationary satellites developed and procured by the European Space Agency (ESA) on behalf of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). Eumetsat is still operating two of the first generation satellites models named MOP3 and MTP1 which are pointed towards the Indian ocean. The European meteorological service is now enhanced by two spacecrafts of the Second Generation (MSG-1 and MSG-2). They have been launched by Ariane 5 in August 2002 and December 2005 respectively. Thales Alenia Space, Prime Contractor of the program, has developed the MSG spacecraft based on a spin-axis stabilized technology. The Electrical Power Subsystem was subcontracted to Astrium GmbH. The Solar Array is composed of 8 body mounted panels, based on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Panel substrate. The Solar network utilizes 7854 Silicon High Eta cells delivering a beginning of life power of 740W. The 28 volts mainbus is regulated using a series shunt regulating concept (S3R type). Two identical SAFT batteries, built from NiCd cells and offering a 29Ah nameplate capacity are connected to the mainbus through battery discharge and charge regulators. Both Solar Array and batteries have been designed to provide power and energy for a nominal 7 years lifetime. These equipments are continuously monitored and are still operating in excellent condition after more than eight and five years in orbit. This paper will present the major electrical design aspects of the power chain and will describe the main parameters performances, which are analysed during the in-orbit operations. Batteries ageing is detailed thanks to reconditioning processed telemetry while the solar array performances over lifetime use dedicated solar array telemetry.

  17. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  18. Subsystem response review. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R. P.; Campbell, R. D.; Wesley, D. A.; Kamil, H.; Gantayat, A.; Vasudevan, R.

    1981-02-01

    A study was conducted to document the state of the art in seismic qualification of nuclear power plant components and subsystems by analysis and testing and to identify the sources and magnitude of the uncertainties associated with analysis and testing methods. The uncertainties are defined in probabilistic terms for use in probabilistic seismic risk studies. Recommendations are made for the most appropriate subsystem response analysis methods to minimize response uncertainties. Additional studies, to further quantify testing uncertainties, are identified. Although the general effect of non-linearities on subsystem response is discussed, recommendations and conclusions are based principally on linear elastic analysis and testing models.

  19. Development of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    The activities involved in the design, development, and test of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem are described. This subsystem, part of a larger regenerative life support evaluation system, is designed to recover usable water from urine, urinal rinse water, and concentrated shower and laundry brine collected from three space vehicle crewmen for a period of 180 days without resupply. Details of preliminary design and testing as well as component developments are included. Trade studies, considerations leading to concept selections, problems encountered, and test data are also presented. The rework of existing hardware, subsystem development including computer programs, assembly verification, and comprehensive baseline test results are discussed.

  20. A Comprehensive Software Subsystem for Anatomic Pathology and Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, John M.

    1982-01-01

    An anatomic pathology software subsystem was developed on a Medlab/Control Data Laboratory Computer System. Specifications for such a subsystem included: on-line accessioning, word processing capabilities, automatic retrieval of surgical and cytologic history, SNOMED coding, long-term retrieval by SNOMED code, CAP workload recording and billing. This subsystem has been installed and performing relatively error-free for a number of months. The advantages have just begun to be realized: replacment of log books with on-line access, decreased volume of typing with neater and more consistent reports, a daily surgical pathology log containing each active surgical and related history, and a mechanism for SNOMED searching.

  1. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    A three-man wastewater recovery preprototype subsystem using a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump to provide efficient potable water recovery from wastewater on extended duration space flights was designed, fabricated, and tested at one-gravity. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem. The tubular hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts, and provide structural integrity, improving on previous flat sheet membrane designs. A thermoelectric heat pump provides latent energy recovery. Application and integration of these key elements solved problems inherent in all previous reclamation subsystem designs.

  2. Subsystem engineering and development of grid-connected photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, E.L.; Post, H.N.; Key, T.S.

    1982-01-01

    The experience gained in fielding residential and intermediate sized photovoltaic application experiments is summarized. This experience is used to guide the engineering and development of array and power conditioning subsystems for grid-connected photovoltaic systems. A major consideration in this development effort is cost. Through innovative engineering, using a modular building block approach for the array subsystem, it is now possible to construct array fields, in moderate quantities, for about $52/m/sup 2/ excluding the photovoltaic modules. Similarly, results of power conditioning subsystem development indicate a projected cost of about $0.25/W/sub p/ for advanced units with conversion efficiencies in excess of 90%.

  3. Apollo experience report: Command and service module controls and displays subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. B.; Swint, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the command and service module controls and displays subsystem is presented. The subsystem is described, and operational requirements, component history, problems and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations for the subsystem are included.

  4. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power generation/power reactant storage and distribution subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotch, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NAA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Generation (EPG)/Power Reactants Storage and Distribution (PRSD) System Hardware is documented. The EPG/PRSD hardware is required for performing critical functions of cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen storage and distribution to the Fuel Cell Powerplants (FCP) and Atmospheric Revitalization Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS). Specifically, the EPG/PRSD hardware consists of the following: Hydryogen (H2) tanks; Oxygen (O2) tanks; H2 Relief Valve/Filter Packages (HRVFP); O2 Relief Valve/Filter Packages (ORVFP); H2 Valve Modules (HVM); O2 Valve Modules (OVM); and O2 and H2 lines, components, and fittings.

  5. PHASE 3 CONFERENCE OF THE U.S.-GERMANY BILATERAL WORKING GROUP BROWNFIELDS REVITALIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US-Germany Bilateral Working Group began in 1990 between the USEPA and the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research. The Working Group held a series of workshops to identify ways to facilitate revitalization of potential Brownfield Sites. In 2005, two final Conferen...

  6. Revitalizing Critical Discourses in Social Education: Opportunities for a More Complexified (Un)Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Avner

    2013-01-01

    The author seeks to revitalize the interests of social educators in the value of using critical, postmodern discourses for rich comprehension of and productive scholarly research in our field. These discourses (a) challenge existing understanding within social education and the knowledge and knower they help produce; and (b) imagine more complex,…

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT/COMMUNICATION TOOLS FOR REVITALIZATION OF POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED SITES CD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Revitalization of potentially contaminated sites is often at a disadvantage compared to greenfield development. Apart from the lower cost of land in rural areas, redevelopment is very often still seen as a rather complex time- and cost-consuming process. Additionally, the potenti...

  8. Not Just "Situaciones de la Vida": Professionalization and Indigenous Language Revitalization in the Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H.; Swinehart, Karl F.

    2012-01-01

    Within discourses of language endangerment, life stages such as child language acquisition, adolescent language shift, and the death of community elders figure prominently, but what of the role of other, intermediate life stages during adulthood and professional life in the course of language obsolescence or revitalization? Drawing from long-term…

  9. Challenges for the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in the Neighborhood Revitalization Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Universities, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This paper identifies a role for the HBCU in the neighborhood revitalization process. HBCUs have a unique history and mission, which directly lends them to external outreach in their respective communities. This study looks at one such HBCU, Tougaloo College, a small private HBCU in Jackson, Mississippi, and its efforts to provide housing,…

  10. More than Words: Towards a Development-Based Approach to Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Brent; Rohloff, Peter; Henderson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Existing models for language revitalization focus almost exclusively on language learning and use. While recognizing the value of these models, we argue that their effective application is largely limited to situations in which languages have low numbers of speakers. For languages that are rapidly undergoing language shift, but which still…

  11. Learning to Read and Write Cherokee: Toward a Theory of Literacy Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Lizette; Hirata-Edds, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to revitalize the Cherokee language, Cherokee Nation launched an immersion program for preschool and elementary children in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Central to the curriculum is literacy in the Cherokee writing system known as "syllabary". This study focuses on sociocultural and sociolinguistic evidence toward an understanding of the…

  12. SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND REVITALIZATION TOOLS - ELECTRONIC (SMARTE) - 09-05-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Revitalization of sites potentially contaminated with environmentally toxic or hazardous materials (e.g., brownfields) is a global concern requiring a multi-disciplinary approach to mitigate the risks to human health and the environment. Many countries have committed extensive re...

  13. The Role and Impact of Continuing Education on Rural Revitalization: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study that explored the role and impact of continuing education on rural revitalization. A community development approach, academic expertise, and a university's resources were used to assist the citizens of Montmartre, Saskatchewan, to establish Centre 48, an arts and continuing education centre. Courses…

  14. Western Illinois University Curriculum Revitalization Project. Final Report 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Illinois Univ., Macomb.

    The primary purpose of the Curriculum Revitalization Project was to provide assistance to Illinois vocational educators, administrators, regional administrators, and regional delivery system directors in strengthening vocational programs. Ten major accomplishments were achieved: (1) seven regional instructional materials coordinators (IMCs) were…

  15. Revitalizing Politics Now and Then: Howard Zinn on Dissent, Democracy, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of Howard Zinn's intellectual and political ideas. Through the analysis of selections from his immense body of work, several interrelated themes emerge. Drawing more attention to these notions of dissent and democracy is crucial to revitalizing education at all levels and vital to advancing the public discourse…

  16. Speech Community-Based Documentation, Description, and Revitalization: Kari'nja in Konomerume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Racquel-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, I have been working with members of the Kari'nja community of Konomerume, Suriname to document, describe, preserve, and revitalize their heritage language, the Aretyry dialect of Kari'nja (Cariban family). Simultaneously, I have worked to develop, pilot, and articulate a model of field research that depends on participation from speech…

  17. SMARTe: An MCDA Approach To Revitalize Communities And Restore The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools - electronic) is a free, open-source, web-based, decision-support system that helps revitalization stakeholders (communities, developers, regulators, etc.) overcome obstac...

  18. Revitalization of the Shared Commons: Education for Sustainability and Marginalized Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasson, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Education for sustainability provides a vision for revitalizing the environmental commons while preserving cultural traditions and human rights. What happens if the environmental commons is shared by two politically disparate and conflicting cultures? As in many shared common lands, what happens if one culture is dominant and represents a more…

  19. "We Can't Feel Our Language": Making Places in the City for Aboriginal Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloy, Natalie J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores possibilities for extending aboriginal language education opportunities into the urban domain based on qualitative research in Vancouver, British Columbia. The author argues that aboriginal language revitalization efforts have a place in the city, as demonstrated by emerging language ideologies of urban aboriginal people…

  20. Documentation and Revitalization of the Zhuang Language and Culture of Southwestern China through Linguistic Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodomo, Adams

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines innovative strategies, methods, and techniques for the documentation and revitalization of "Zhuang" language and culture through linguistic fieldwork. Zhuang, a Tai-Kadai language spoken mainly in the rural areas of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southwestern China, is the largest minority language in China, with…

  1. Overcoming Textbook Fatigue: 21st Century Tools to Revitalize Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, ReLeah Cossett

    2012-01-01

    Go beyond a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching, and discover how shifting textbooks from "sole source" to just another resource revitalizes your practice, improves student achievement, and meets Common Core State Standards. Veteran teacher and literacy expert ReLeah Cossett Lent explains that how you use textbooks makes a huge difference in…

  2. The Delaware Revitalization Movement of the Early 1760s: A Suggested Reinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the Delaware Indian revitalization movement was a response to the threatening British hegemonic political and trade situation after the French defeat in 1759. Examines the new moral order proclaimed by the Delaware prophets and the movement's primary goals of political and economic independence. Contains 47 references. (SV)

  3. Enhancement of human skin facial revitalization by moringa leaf extract cream

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naveed; Chowdhary, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solar ultraviolet exposure is the main cause of skin damage by initiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to skin collagen imperfection and eventually skin roughness. This can be reduced by proper revitalization of skin enhancing younger and healthier appearance. Aim To evaluate the skin facial revitalization effect of a cream formulation containing the Moringa oleifera leaf extract on humans. Material and methods Active cream containing 3% of the concentrated extract of moringa leaves was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of cream. Base contained no extract. Skin revitalizing parameters, i.e. surface, volume, texture parameters and surface evaluation of the living skin (SELS) were assessed comparatively after application of the base and active cream on human face using Visioscan® VC 98 for a period of 3 months. Results Surface values were increased by the base and decreased by the active cream. Effects produced for the base and active cream were significant and insignificant, respectively, as observed in the case of surface. Unlike the base, the active cream showed significant effects on skin volume, texture parameters (energy, variance and contrast) and SELS, SEr (skin roughness), SEsc (skin scaliness), SEsm (skin smoothness), and SEw (skin wrinkles) parameters. Conclusions The results suggested that moringa cream enhances skin revitalization effect and supports anti-aging skin effects. PMID:25097471

  4. TOOLS FOR OVERCOMING OBSTACLES TO REVITALIZATION: SMARTE AND START-UP

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001, the US-German Bilateral Working Group (BWG) identified more than 40 obstacles to site revitalization which occurred in both countries. From 2001-2005, the BWG developed tools and techniques for overcoming these obstacles. Five joint workshops were held on the following r...

  5. Voice and Biliteracy in Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contentious Educational Practices in Quechua, Guarani, and Maori Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers instances of biliterate educational practice in contexts of indigenous language revitalization involving Quechua in the South American Andes, Guarani in Paraguay, and Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In these indigenous contexts of sociohistorical and sociolinguistic oppression, the implementation of multilingual language…

  6. Revitalizing Educational Counseling: How Career Theory Can Inform a Forgotten Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Robert C.; Bertoch, Sara C.

    2011-01-01

    Educational counseling has declined as a counseling specialization in the United States, although the need for this intervention persists and is being met by other providers. This article illustrates how career theories such as Holland's RIASEC theory can inform a revitalized educational counseling practice in secondary and postsecondary settings.…

  7. East Baltimore Revitalization Project: Opportunities and Challenges in Transforming an Urban Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromwell, Patrice M.; Giloth, Robert P.; Schachtel, Marsha R. B.

    2005-01-01

    The East Baltimore Revitalization Project, a fifteen-year, $800 million redevelopment initiative, seeks to transform a struggling area of the city near Johns Hopkins Hospital. A unique partnership of the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Annie E. Casey Foundation is supporting the City of Baltimore in this…

  8. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - phase 1, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and test of a functional laboratory model ice pack heat sink subsystem are discussed. Operating instructions to include mechanical and electrical schematics, maintenance instructions, and equipment specifications are presented.

  9. Development status of a preprototype water electrolysis subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.; Erickson, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated for NASA's advanced regenerative life support program. A solid polymer is used for the cell electrolyte. The electrolysis module has 12 cells that can generate 5.5 kg/day of oxygen for the metabolic requirements of three crewmembers, for cabin leakage, and for the oxygen and hydrogen required for carbon dioxide collection and reduction processes. The subsystem can be operated at a pressure between 276 and 2760 kN/sq m and in a continuous constant-current, cyclic, or standby mode. A microprocessor is used to aid in operating the subsystem. Sensors and controls provide fault detection and automatic shutdown. The results of development, demonstration, and parametric testing are presented. Modifications to enhance operation in an integrated and manned test are described. Prospective improvements for the electrolysis subsystem are discussed.

  10. MIUS Integration and Subsystem Test (MIST) data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pringle, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    A data system for use in testing integrated subsystems of a modular integrated utility system (MIUS) is presented. The MIUS integration and subsystem test (MIST) data system is reviewed from its conception through its checkout and operation as the controlling portion of the MIST facility. The MIST data system provides a real time monitoring and control function that allows for complete evaluation of the performance of the mechanical and electrical subsystems, as well as controls the operation of the various components of the system. In addition to the aforementioned capabilities, the MIST data system provides computerized control of test operations such that minimum manpower is necessary to set up, operate, and shut down subsystems during test periods.

  11. Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    2000-05-03

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  12. Automated biowaste sampling system, solids subsystem operating model, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Stauffer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The detail design and fabrication of the Solids Subsystem were implemented. The system's capacity for the collection, storage or sampling of feces and vomitus from six subjects was tested and verified.

  13. Development of Pattern Recognition Options for Combining Safeguards Subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Thomas L.; Hamada, Michael S.

    2012-08-24

    This talk reviews project progress in combining process monitoring data and nuclear material accounting data to improve the over nuclear safeguards system. Focus on 2 subsystems: (1) nuclear materials accounting (NMA); and (2) process monitoring (PM).

  14. Subsystem fact sheets for NASA CO2 Project, revision 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lookabaugh, T.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-seven subsystem fact sheets produced by Ball Aerospace Systems Division are presented. Each instrument is summarized with a description; physical characteristics; data; orbit requirements; sensor; implementation schedule; and experience, problems, modifications.

  15. Pilot climate data system: User's guide for charts subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the Pilot Climate Data System's (PCDS) CHARTS Subsystem is described. This facility is an interactive software system for the graphical production and enhancement of text and viewgraph displays.

  16. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-11-03

    This specification revises the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  17. Overview of the OSIRIS-REx Parachute Recovery Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, S.; Rowan, J.; Witkowski, A.

    2014-06-01

    A general overview of the planned Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) parachute recovery subsystem, to include modifications to the Stardust design and design and testing of a new PRS mortar.

  18. Power Subsystem for Extravehicular Activities for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has the responsibility to develop the next generation space suit power subsystem to support the Vision for Space Exploration. Various technology challenges exist in achieving extended duration missions as envisioned for future lunar and Mars mission scenarios. This paper presents an overview of ongoing development efforts undertaken at the Glenn Research Center in support of power subsystem development for future extravehicular activity systems.

  19. Prototype Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem for the RLSE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements for the Bosch carbon dioxide reduction subsystem were established in a study of regenerative life support evaluation experiments. A detailed design is presented including a schematic, components list and characteristics, requirements summaries, and complete definition of life systems' advanced control/monitor instrumentation applied to the Bosch subsystem. Design information needed to proceed with the final design and fabrication of a preprototype system is presented.

  20. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  1. Technology for subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Corey, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    Technologies for different subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities are being developed at the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space. The technologies include concepts for water and nutrient delivery, for nutrient composition control, and for irradiation. Effort is being concentrated on these subsystems because available technologies cannot be effectively utilized for space applications.

  2. STS-2: SAIL non-avionics subsystems math model requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, W. P.; Herold, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Simulation of the STS-2 Shuttle nonavionics subsystems in the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) is necessary for verification of the integrated shuttle avionics system. The math model (simulation) requirements for each of the nonavionics subsystems that interfaces with the Shuttle avionics system is documented and a single source document for controlling approved changes (by the SAIL change control panel) to the math models is provided.

  3. Opto-mechanical subsystem with temperature compensation through isothemal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An opto-mechanical subsystem for supporting a laser structure which minimizes changes in the alignment of the laser optics in response to temperature variations is described. Both optical and mechanical structural components of the system are formed of the same material, preferably beryllium, which is selected for high mechanical strength and good thermal conducting qualities. All mechanical and optical components are mounted and assembled to provide thorough thermal coupling throughout the subsystem to prevent the development of temperature gradients.

  4. An Algorithm for Integrated Subsystem Embodiment and System Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Kemper

    1997-01-01

    Consider the statement,'A system has two coupled subsystems, one of which dominates the design process. Each subsystem consists of discrete and continuous variables, and is solved using sequential analysis and solution.' To address this type of statement in the design of complex systems, three steps are required, namely, the embodiment of the statement in terms of entities on a computer, the mathematical formulation of subsystem models, and the resulting solution and system synthesis. In complex system decomposition, the subsystems are not isolated, self-supporting entities. Information such as constraints, goals, and design variables may be shared between entities. But many times in engineering problems, full communication and cooperation does not exist, information is incomplete, or one subsystem may dominate the design. Additionally, these engineering problems give rise to mathematical models involving nonlinear functions of both discrete and continuous design variables. In this dissertation an algorithm is developed to handle these types of scenarios for the domain-independent integration of subsystem embodiment, coordination, and system synthesis using constructs from Decision-Based Design, Game Theory, and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization. Implementation of the concept in this dissertation involves testing of the hypotheses using example problems and a motivating case study involving the design of a subsonic passenger aircraft.

  5. The Advanced Composition Explorer power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Panneton, P.E.; Tarr, J.E.; Goliaszewski, L.T.

    1998-07-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contract with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has designed and launched the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. ACE is a scientific observatory housing ten instruments, and is located in a halo orbit about the L1 Sun-Earth libration point. ACE is providing real-time solar wind monitoring and data on elemental and isotopic matter of solar and galactic origin. The ACE Electrical Power Subsystem (EPS) is a fault tolerant, solar powered, shunt regulated, direct energy transfer architecture based on the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) EPS. The differences are that MSX used oriented solar arrays with a nickel hydrogen-battery defined bus, while ACE uses fixed solar panels with a regulated bus decoupled from its nickel cadmium (NiCd) battery. Also, magnetometer booms are mounted on two of the four ACE solar panels. The required accuracy of the magnetometers impose severe requirements on the magnetic fields induced by the solar array. Other noteworthy features include a solar cell degradation experiment, in-flight battery reconditioning, a battery requalified to a high vibrational environment, and an adjustable bus voltage setpoint. The four solar panels consist of aluminum honeycomb substrates covered with 15.1% efficient silicon cells. The cells are strung using silver interconnects and are back-wired to reduce magnetic emissions below 0.1nT. Pyrotechnic actuated, spring loaded hinges deploy the panels after spacecraft separation from the Delta II launch vehicle. Solar cell experiments on two of the panels track cell performance degradation at L1, and also distinguish any hydrazine impingement degradation which may be caused by the thrusters. Each solar panel uses a digital shunt box, containing blocking diodes and MOSFETs, for short-circuit control of its 5 solar strings. A power box contains redundant analog MOSFET shunts, the 90% efficient boost regulator, and redundant battery chargers

  6. Integrated System Design for Air Revitalization in Next Generation Crewed Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay; LeVan, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The capabilities of NASA's existing environmental control and life support (ECLS) system designs are inadequate for future human space initiatives that involve long-duration space voyages and interplanetary missions. This paper discusses the concept of an integrated system of CO2 removal and trace contaminant control units that utilizes novel gas separation and purification techniques and optimized thermal and mechanical design, for future spacecraft. The integration process will enhance the overall life and economics of the existing systems by eliminating multiple mechanical devices with moving parts.

  7. The Development of Models for Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologies for Spacecraft Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Through the respiration process, humans consume oxygen (O2) while producing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as byproducts. For long term space exploration, CO2 concentration in the atmosphere must be managed to prevent hypercapnia. Moreover, CO2 can be used as a source of oxygen through chemical reduction serving to minimize the amount of oxygen required at launch. Reduction can be achieved through a number of techniques. NASA is currently exploring the Sabatier reaction, the Bosch reaction, and co- electrolysis of CO2 and H2O for this process. Proof-of-concept experiments and prototype units for all three processes have proven capable of returning useful commodities for space exploration. All three techniques have demonstrated the capacity to reduce CO2 in the laboratory, yet there is interest in understanding how all three techniques would perform at a system level within a spacecraft. Consequently, there is an impetus to develop predictive models for these processes that can be readily rescaled and integrated into larger system models. Such analysis tools provide the ability to evaluate each technique on a comparable basis with respect to processing rates. This manuscript describes the current models for the carbon dioxide reduction processes under parallel developmental efforts. Comparison to experimental data is provided were available for verification purposes.

  8. Round table part 2 : Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for air revitalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    The first metabolic needs in terms of urgency is of course oxygen and in terms of contaminants CO2. Over the years, many studies have been performed to recover oxygen from Co2 our from water. Within this part 2 of the roundtable it is proposed to perform a state te of the art of the main activities in the world and to identify overlap and synergies. Recommendation for potential collaboration or exchanges will be discussed.

  9. The Development of Models for Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologies for Spacecraft Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Through the respiration process, humans consume oxygen (O2) while producing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as byproducts. For long term space exploration, CO2 concentration in the atmosphere must be managed to prevent hypercapnia. Moreover, CO2 can be used as a source of oxygen through chemical reduction serving to minimize the amount of oxygen required at launch. Reduction can be achieved through a number of techniques. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently exploring the Sabatier reaction, the Bosch reaction, and co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O for this process. Proof-of-concept experiments and prototype units for all three processes have proven capable of returning useful commodities for space exploration. While all three techniques have demonstrated the capacity to reduce CO2 in the laboratory, there is interest in understanding how all three techniques would perform at a system-level within a spacecraft. Consequently, there is an impetus to develop predictive models for these processes that can be readily re-scaled and integrated into larger system models. Such analysis tools provide the ability to evaluate each technique on a comparable basis with respect to processing rates. This manuscript describes the current models for the carbon dioxide reduction processes under parallel developmental e orts. Comparison to experimental data is provided were available for veri cation purposes.

  10. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a dynamic model which can predict the effect of humidity swings on activated carbon adsorption beds used to remove trace contaminants from the atmosphere in spacecraft. Specifically, the model was to be incorporated into a computer simulation to predict contaminant concentrations exiting the bed as a function of time after a humidity swing occurs. Predicted breakthrough curves were to be compared to experimentally measured results. In all respects the research was successful. The two major aspects of this research were the mathematical model and the experiments. Experiments were conducted by Mr. Appel using a fixed-bed apparatus at NASA-Ames Research Center during the summers of 1994 and 1995 and during the first 8 months of 1996. Mr. Appel conducted most of his mathematical modeling work at the University of Virginia. The simulation code was used to predict breakthrough curves using adsorption equilibrium correlations developed previously by M. D. LeVan's research group at the University of Virginia. These predictions were compared with the experimental measurements, and this led to improvements in both the simulation code and the apparatus.

  11. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, N.

    2014-11-01

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  12. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-04-27

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This subsystem specification establishes the interface and performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem. The DST Monitor and Control Subsystem consists of the new and existing equipment that will be used to provide tank farm operators with integrated local monitoring and control of the DST systems to support Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). New equipment will provide automatic control and safety interlocks where required and provide operators with visibility into the status of DST subsystem operations (e.g., DST mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers) and the ability to manually control specified DST functions as necessary. This specification is intended to be the basis for new project/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  13. Preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem. [recovering potable water from wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, G. S.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-person capacity preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem for recovering potable water from wastewater aboard spacecraft was designed, assembled, and tested. The major components of the subsystem are: (1) a distillation unit which includes a compressor, centrifuge, central shaft, and outer shell; (2) a purge pump; (3) a liquids pump; (4) a post-treat cartridge; (5) a recycle/filter tank; (6) an evaporator high liquid level sensor; and (7) the product water conductivity monitor. A computer based control monitor instrumentation carries out operating mode change sequences, monitors and displays subsystem parameters, maintains intramode controls, and stores and displays fault detection information. The mechanical hardware occupies 0.467 m3, requires 171 W of electrical power, and has a dry weight of 143 kg. The subsystem recovers potable water at a rate of 1.59 kg/hr, which is equivalent to a duty cycle of approximately 30% for a crew of three. The product water has no foul taste or odor. Continued development of the subsystem is recommended for reclaiming water for human consumption as well as for flash evaporator heat rejection, urinal flushing, washing, and other on-board water requirements.

  14. The monopropellant hydrazine propulsion subsystem for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter and the Multiprobe spacecraft propulsion subsystems and their performance are presented. Monopropellant hydrazine subsystems on each spacecraft provided the capability to spin up the spacecraft after separation and perform all spin rate, velocity, and attitude changes required by the control subsystem to satisfy mission objectives. The propulsion subsystem provides thrust on demand by supplying anhydrous hydrazine from the propellant tanks through manifolds, filters and valves to the thrust chamber assemblies where the hydrazine is catalytically decomposed and expanded in a conical nozzle. The subsystems consist of seven 1 lbf thrusters for the Orbiter and six 1 lbf thrusters for the multiprobe which are isolated by two latch valves from the two propellant tanks so that two redundant thruster clusters are provided to ensure mission completion in the event of a single point failure. The propellant feed system is of all-welded construction to minimize weight and leakage and titanium is used as the primary material of construction. The multiprobe burned up on entering the Venus atmosphere with enough propellant left for the mission and the Orbiter was inserted into Venus orbit with enough propellant remaining for more than 2 earth years of orbital operations.

  15. GPS as an orbit determination subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessey, Richard; Roberts, Pat; Knight, Robin; Vanvolkinburg, Bart

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers as a primary source of tracking data for low-Earth orbit satellites. GPS data is an alternative to using range, azimuth, elevation, and range-rate (RAER) data from the Air Force Satellite Control Network antennas, the Space Ground Link System (SGLS). This evaluation is applicable to missions such as Skipper, a joint U.S. and Russian atmosphere research mission, that will rely on a GPS receiver as a primary tracking data source. The Detachment 2, Space and Missile Systems Center's Test Support Complex (TSC) conducted the evaluation based on receiver data from the Space Test Experiment Platform Mission O (STEP-O) and Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiments (APEX) satellites. The TSC performed orbit reconstruction and prediction on the STEP-0 and APEX vehicles using GPS receiver navigation solution data, SGLS RAER data, and SGLS anglesonly (azimuth and elevation) data. For the STEP-O case, the navigation solution based orbits proved to be more accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits. For the APEX case, navigation solution based orbits proved to be less accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits for orbit prediction, and results for orbit reconstruction were inconclusive due to the lack of a precise truth orbit. After evaluating several different GPS data processing methods, the TSC concluded that using GPS navigation solution data is a viable alternative to using SGLS RAER data.

  16. On the description of subsystems in relativistic hypersurface Bohmian mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Detlef; Lienert, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A candidate for a realistic relativistic quantum theory is the hypersurface Bohm–Dirac model. Its formulation uses a foliation of space–time into space-like hypersurfaces. In order to apply the theory and to make contact with the usual quantum formalism, one needs a framework for the description of subsystems. The presence of spin together with the foliation renders the subsystem description more complicated than in the non-relativistic case with spin. In this paper, we provide such a framework in terms of an appropriate conditional density matrix and an effective wave function as well as clarify their relation, thereby generalizing previous subsystem descriptions in the non-relativistic case. PMID:25197244

  17. Mathematical modeling of control subsystems for CELSS: Application to diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleh, Ahmad; Nguyen, Thoi K.; Kanevsky, Valery

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic control of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) in a closed space habitat is of critical importance. The development of a practical method of control is also a necessary step for the selection and design of realistic subsystems and processors for a CELSS. Diet is one of the dynamic factors that strongly influences, and is influenced, by the operational states of all major CELSS subsystems. The problems of design and maintenance of a stable diet must be obtained from well characterized expert subsystems. The general description of a mathematical model that forms the basis of an expert control program for a CELSS is described. The formulation is expressed in terms of a complete set of time dependent canonical variables. System representation is dynamic and includes time dependent storage buffers. The details of the algorithm are described. The steady state results of the application of the method for representative diets made from wheat, potato, and soybean are presented.

  18. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zevesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thrustor subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the Space Shuttle/Interim Upper Stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes of an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thrustor gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  19. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - Phase 1, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions are discussed. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  20. An automated environment for multiple spacecraft engineering subsystem mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Hioe, K.; Lai, J.; Imlay, E.; Schwuttke, U.; Hsu, E.; Mikes, S.

    1990-01-01

    Flight operations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are now performed by teams of specialists, each team dedicated to a particular spacecraft. Certain members of each team are responsible for monitoring the performances of their respective spacecraft subsystems. Ground operations, which are very complex, are manual, labor-intensive, slow, and tedious, and therefore costly and inefficient. The challenge of the new decade is to operate a large number of spacecraft simultaneously while sharing limited human and computer resources, without compromising overall reliability. The Engineering Analysis Subsystem Environment (EASE) is an architecture that enables fewer controllers to monitor and control spacecraft engineering subsystems. A prototype of EASE has been installed in the JPL Space Flight Operations Facility for on-line testing. This article describes the underlying concept, development, testing, and benefits of the EASE prototype.

  1. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-03-22

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of waste feed delivery. This subsystem transfers waste between transfer-associated structures (pits) and to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor Facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  2. Subsystem real-time time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Ceresoli, Davide; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-04-01

    We present the extension of Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) to real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (rt-TDDFT). FDE is a DFT-in-DFT embedding method that allows to partition a larger Kohn-Sham system into a set of smaller, coupled Kohn-Sham systems. Additional to the computational advantage, FDE provides physical insight into the properties of embedded systems and the coupling interactions between them. The extension to rt-TDDFT is done straightforwardly by evolving the Kohn-Sham subsystems in time simultaneously, while updating the embedding potential between the systems at every time step. Two main applications are presented: the explicit excitation energy transfer in real time between subsystems is demonstrated for the case of the Na4 cluster and the effect of the embedding on optical spectra of coupled chromophores. In particular, the importance of including the full dynamic response in the embedding potential is demonstrated.

  3. On the description of subsystems in relativistic hypersurface Bohmian mechanics.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Detlef; Lienert, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    A candidate for a realistic relativistic quantum theory is the hypersurface Bohm-Dirac model. Its formulation uses a foliation of space-time into space-like hypersurfaces. In order to apply the theory and to make contact with the usual quantum formalism, one needs a framework for the description of subsystems. The presence of spin together with the foliation renders the subsystem description more complicated than in the non-relativistic case with spin. In this paper, we provide such a framework in terms of an appropriate conditional density matrix and an effective wave function as well as clarify their relation, thereby generalizing previous subsystem descriptions in the non-relativistic case. PMID:25197244

  4. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zavesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thruster subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the space shuttle interim upper stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes or an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thruster gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  5. The complete Heyting algebra of subsystems and contextuality

    SciTech Connect

    Vourdas, A.

    2013-08-15

    The finite set of subsystems of a finite quantum system with variables in Z(n), is studied as a Heyting algebra. The physical meaning of the logical connectives is discussed. It is shown that disjunction of subsystems is more general concept than superposition. Consequently, the quantum probabilities related to commuting projectors in the subsystems, are incompatible with associativity of the join in the Heyting algebra, unless if the variables belong to the same chain. This leads to contextuality, which in the present formalism has as contexts, the chains in the Heyting algebra. Logical Bell inequalities, which contain “Heyting factors,” are discussed. The formalism is also applied to the infinite set of all finite quantum systems, which is appropriately enlarged in order to become a complete Heyting algebra.

  6. Embedded Thermal Control for Subsystems for Next Generation Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. NASA, the Defense Department and commercial interests are actively engaged in developing miniaturized spacecraft systems and scientific instruments to leverage smaller cheaper spacecraft form factors such as CubeSats. This paper outlines research and development efforts among Goddard Space Flight Center personnel and its several partners to develop innovative embedded thermal control subsystems. Embedded thermal control subsystems is a cross cutting enabling technology integrating advanced manufacturing techniques to develop multifunctional intelligent structures to reduce Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) consumption of both the thermal control subsystem and overall spacecraft. Embedded thermal control subsystems permit heat acquisition and rejection at higher temperatures than state of the art systems by employing both advanced heat transfer equipment (integrated heat exchangers) and high heat transfer phenomena. The Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Engineering Branch has active investigations seeking to characterize advanced thermal control systems for near term spacecraft missions. The embedded thermal control subsystem development effort consists of fundamental research as well as development of breadboard and prototype hardware and spaceflight validation efforts. This paper will outline relevant fundamental investigations of micro-scale heat transfer and electrically driven liquid film boiling. The hardware development efforts focus upon silicon based high heat flux applications (electronic chips, power electronics etc.) and multifunctional structures. Flight validation efforts include variable gravity campaigns and a proposed CubeSat based flight demonstration of a breadboard embedded thermal control system. The CubeSat investigation is technology demonstration will characterize in long-term low earth orbit a breadboard embedded thermal subsystem and its individual components to develop

  7. Interface Supports Lightweight Subsystem Routing for Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Block, Gary L.; Ahmad, Mohammad; Whitaker, William D.; Dillon, James W.

    2010-01-01

    A wireless avionics interface exploits the constrained nature of data networks in flight systems to use a lightweight routing method. This simplified routing means that a processor is not required, and the logic can be implemented as an intellectual property (IP) core in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The FPGA can be shared with the flight subsystem application. In addition, the router is aware of redundant subsystems, and can be configured to provide hot standby support as part of the interface. This simplifies implementation of flight applications requiring hot stand - by support. When a valid inbound packet is received from the network, the destination node address is inspected to determine whether the packet is to be processed by this node. Each node has routing tables for the next neighbor node to guide the packet to the destination node. If it is to be processed, the final packet destination is inspected to determine whether the packet is to be forwarded to another node, or routed locally. If the packet is local, it is sent to an Applications Data Interface (ADI), which is attached to a local flight application. Under this scheme, an interface can support many applications in a subsystem supporting a high level of subsystem integration. If the packet is to be forwarded to another node, it is sent to the outbound packet router. The outbound packet router receives packets from an ADI or a packet to be forwarded. It then uses a lookup table to determine the next destination for the packet. Upon detecting a remote subsystem failure, the routing table can be updated to autonomously bypass the failed subsystem.

  8. Virtual Engineering and Science Team - Reusable Autonomy for Spacecraft Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Rilee, Michael L.; Truszkowski, Walt; Thompson, Bryan; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we address the design, development, and evaluation of the Virtual Engineering and Science Team (VEST) tool - a revolutionary way to achieve onboard subsystem/instrument autonomy. VEST directly addresses the technology needed for advanced autonomy enablers for spacecraft subsystems. It will significantly support the efficient and cost effective realization of on-board autonomy and contribute directly to realizing the concept of an intelligent autonomous spacecraft. VEST will support the evolution of a subsystem/instrument model that is probably correct and from that model the automatic generation of the code needed to support the autonomous operation of what was modeled. VEST will directly support the integration of the efforts of engineers, scientists, and software technologists. This integration of efforts will be a significant advancement over the way things are currently accomplished. The model, developed through the use of VEST, will be the basis for the physical construction of the subsystem/instrument and the generated code will support its autonomous operation once in space. The close coupling between the model and the code, in the same tool environment, will help ensure that correct and reliable operational control of the subsystem/instrument is achieved.VEST will provide a thoroughly modern interface that will allow users to easily and intuitively input subsystem/instrument requirements and visually get back the system's reaction to the correctness and compatibility of the inputs as the model evolves. User interface/interaction, logic, theorem proving, rule-based and model-based reasoning, and automatic code generation are some of the basic technologies that will be brought into play in realizing VEST.

  9. Language revitalization in Native North America--issues of intellectual property rights and intellectual sovereignty.

    PubMed

    Tatsch, Sheri

    2004-01-01

    Language revitalization, oral tradition and epistemology are expressions of Native peoples intellectual sovereignty, and thus the foundation for indigenous intellectual property rights. As the people of California move towards language and cultural revitalization the question arises: What constitutes or constructs the definitions of intellectual property and how can appropriation of indigenous knowledge be protected? Looking at the issues faced by the California's indigenous populace and by implication, other indigenous peoples in the United States, this essay examines how protection may be afforded under the United Nations definition of 'heritage'. Given that the holding safe of a 'culture' or 'heritage' is inclusive of language, and thus has been determined to be a human right. PMID:15156749

  10. Business case study Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 3: Revitalization

    SciTech Connect

    KPMG PEAT MARWICK

    1999-01-08

    It is the conclusion of this study that Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) will gain dramatically from revitalization of Technical Area 3 (TA-3) by providing a premiere facility for the US National Laboratory system, the Laboratory will be able to recruit and retain the best available expertise to help fulfill its mission, and plan for the future mission of LANL. The costs of TA-3 revitalization have been estimated at $200 million, however utilizing alternative construction and financing, commercial construction can dramatically reduce these costs and Third Party financing can reduce the overall estimated costs by nearly 50%. In addition, the costs of construction can be captured through savings in staff efficiency, energy efficiency, and reduced maintenance costs of the now aging infrastructure.

  11. Novel Design Aspects of the Space Technology 5 Mechanical Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter; McGill, William

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes several novel design elements of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft mechanical subsystem. The spacecraft structure itself takes a significant step in integrating electronics into the primary structure. The deployment system restrains the spacecraft during launch and imparts a predetermined spin rate upon release from its secondary payload accommodations. The deployable instrument boom incorporates some traditional as well as new techniques for lightweight and stiffness. Analysis and test techniques used to validate these technologies are described. Numerous design choices were necessitated due to the compact spacecraft size and strict mechanical subsystem requirements.

  12. Solar electric propulsion/instrument/subsystems interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Cole, R. K.; Kemp, R. F.; Hall, D. F.; Shelton, H.

    1973-01-01

    The interactive effects between a solar electric propulsion system and an electrically propelled scientific spacecraft were examined. The operation of the ion thrusters may impact upon the acquisition and interpretation of data by the science payload of the spacecraft. The effluents from the operation of the electric propulsion unit may also impact upon the operation of the various subsystems of the vehicle. Specific interactive effects were isolated where meaningful levels of interaction may occur. The level of impact upon elements of the science payload and other affected subsystems is examined, and avenues for the reduction or elimination of impact are defined.

  13. Statistical error model for a solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem statistical error model was developed as a tool for investigating the effects of thrust subsystem parameter uncertainties on navigation accuracy. The model is currently being used to evaluate the impact of electric engine parameter uncertainties on navigation system performance for a baseline mission to Encke's Comet in the 1980s. The data given represent the next generation in statistical error modeling for low-thrust applications. Principal improvements include the representation of thrust uncertainties and random process modeling in terms of random parametric variations in the thrust vector process for a multi-engine configuration.

  14. Apollo experience report: Lunar module landing gear subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    The development of the lunar module landing gear subsystem through the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission is presented. The landing gear design evolved from the design requirement, which had to satisfy the structural, mechanical, and landing performance constraints of the vehicle. Extensive analyses and tests were undertaken to verify the design adequacy. Techniques of the landing performance analysis served as a primary tool in developing the subsystem hardware and in determining the adequacy of the landing gear for toppling stability and energy absorption. The successful Apollo 11 lunar landing mission provided the first opportunity for a complete flight test of the landing gear under both natural and induced environments.

  15. Apollo experience report: Crew provisions and equipment subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, F.

    1972-01-01

    A description of the construction and use of crew provisions and equipment subsystem items for the Apollo Program is presented. The subsystem is composed principally of survival equipment, bioinstrumentation devices, medical components and accessories, water- and waste-management equipment, personal-hygiene articles, docking aids, flight garments (excluding the pressure garment assembly), and various other crew-related accessories. Particular attention is given to items and assemblies that presented design, development, or performance problems: the crew optical alinement sight system, the metering water dispenser, and the waste-management system. Changes made in design and materials to improve the fire safety of the hardware are discussed.

  16. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  17. The general rescue subsystem-adaptation and structure at sea

    SciTech Connect

    Skyttner, L.

    1992-12-31

    The existence of a general rescue subsystem in higher organisms, as part of the GLS theory and the GAS syndrome, is asserted. Working principle for the system and its existence throughout higher system levels are presented. Among important processes demonstrated are the adaptation of the system to special threats at sea and the storage of the system knowledge and organization in the sea-safety convention. Recursiveness of the rescue subsystem within all higher system levels was found to be a basic requisite for individual survival, especially at sea. Finally, the most serious threat to lives on board ships at sea, was found to be system morality failures. 12 refs.

  18. Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Six tasks are described reflecting subsystem hardware and software modifications and test evaluation of a TIMES wastewater recovery subsystem. The overall results are illustrated in a figure which shows the water production rate, the specific energy corrected to 26.5 VDC, and the product water conductivity at various points in the testing. Four tasks are described reflecting studies performed to develop a preliminary design concept for a next generation TIMES. The overall results of the study are the completion of major design analyses and preliminary configuration layout drawings.

  19. Galileo attitude and articulation control subsystem closed loop testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lembeck, M. F.; Pignatano, N. D.

    1983-01-01

    In order to ensure the reliable operation of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) which will guide the Galileo spacecraft on its two and one-half year journey to Jupiter, the AACS is being rigorously tested. The primary objectives of the test program are the verification of the AACS's form, fit, and function, especially with regard to subsystem external interfaces and the functional operation of the flight software. Attention is presently given to the Galileo Closed Loop Test System, which simulates the dynamic and 'visual' flight environment for AACS components in the laboratory.

  20. Design evolution of the orbiter reaction control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeber, R. J.; Karakulko, W.; Belvins, D.; Hohmann, C.; Henderson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The challenges of space shuttle orbiter reaction control subsystem development began with selection of the propellant for the subsystem. Various concepts were evaluated before the current Earth storable, bipropellant combination was selected. Once that task was accomplished, additional challenges of designing the system to satisfy the wide range of requirements dictated by operating environments, reusability, and long life were met. Verification of system adequacy was achieved by means of a combination of analysis and test. The studies, the design efforts, and the test and analysis techniques employed in meeting the challenges are described.

  1. Development of a nitrogen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D., III; Schubert, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    An eight-stage nitrogen generation module was developed. The design integrated a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four palladium/silver hydrogen separator stages. Alternating ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages are used to remove hydrogen and ammonia formed in the dissociation of hydrazine which results in negligible ammonia and hydrogen concentrations in the product nitrogen stream. An engineering breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was also developed. It was developed as an integratable subsystem for a central spacecraft air revitalization system. The subsystem consists of the hydrazine storage and feed mechanism, the nitrogen generation module, the peripheral mechanical and electrical components required to control and monitor subsystem performance, and the instrumentation required to interface with other subsystems of an air revitalization system. The breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was integrated and tested with a one-person capacity experimental air revitalization system. The integration, checkout and testing was successfully accomplished.

  2. LAVA Subsystem Integration and Testing for the RESOLVE Payload of the Resource Prospector Mission: Mass Spectrometers and Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Mary R.; Stewart, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload is part of Resource Prospector (RP) along with a rover and a lander that are expected to launch in 2020. RP will identify volatile elements that may be combined and collected to be used for fuel, air, and water in order to enable deeper space exploration. The Resource Prospector mission is a key part of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). The demand for this method of utilizing resources at the site of exploration is increasing due to the cost of resupply missions and deep space exploration goals. The RESOLVE payload includes the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. The main instrument used to identify the volatiles evolved from the lunar regolith is the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS). LAVA analyzes the volatiles emitted from the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) Subsystem. The objective of OVEN is to obtain, weigh, heat and transfer evolved gases to LAVA through the connection between the two subsystems called the LOVEN line. This paper highlights the work completed during a ten week internship that involved the integration, testing, data analysis, and procedure documentation of two candidate mass spectrometers for the LAVA subsystem in order to aid in determining which model to use for flight. Additionally, the examination of data from the integrated Resource Prospector '15 (RP' 15) field test will be presented in order to characterize the amount of water detected from water doped regolith samples.

  3. A prototype to automate the video subsystem routing for the video distribution subsystem of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, Jessie M. Bethly

    1993-01-01

    The Video Distribution Subsystem (VDS) for Space Station Freedom provides onboard video communications. The VDS includes three major functions: external video switching; internal video switching; and sync and control generation. The Video Subsystem Routing (VSR) is a part of the VDS Manager Computer Software Configuration Item (VSM/CSCI). The VSM/CSCI is the software which controls and monitors the VDS equipment. VSR activates, terminates, and modifies video services in response to Tier-1 commands to connect video sources to video destinations. VSR selects connection paths based on availability of resources and updates the video routing lookup tables. This project involves investigating the current methodology to automate the Video Subsystem Routing and developing and testing a prototype as 'proof of concept' for designers.

  4. Efficient Low-Lift Cooling with Radiant Distribution, Thermal Storage and Variable-Speed Chiller Controls Part I: Component and Subsystem Models

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Peter; Jiang, Wei; Winiarski, David W.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Norford, L. K.; Willingham, ryan

    2009-03-31

    this paper develops component and subsystem models used to evaluat4e the performance of a low-lift cooling system with an air-colled chiller optimized for variable-speed and low-pressure-ratio operation, a hydronic radient distribution system, variable-speed transport miotor controls, and peak-shifting controls.

  5. Emerging Network Storage Management Standards for Intelligent Data Storage Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices and subsystems that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks and techniques and metadata to verify stored data on optical tapes developed by the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) Optical Tape Committee.

  6. Double Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-04-27

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem is intended to support Waste Feed Delivery. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem specification describes the relationship of this system with the DST System, describes the functions that must be performed by the system, and establishes the performance requirements to be applied to the design of the system. It also provides references for the requisite codes and standards. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem will treat the waste for a more favorable waste transfer. This will be accomplished by diluting the waste, dissolving the soluble portion of the waste, and flushing waste residuals from the transfer line. The Diluent and Flush Subsystem will consist of the following: The Diluent and Flush Station(s) where chemicals will be off-loaded, temporarily stored, mixed as necessary, heated, and metered to the delivery system; and A piping delivery system to deliver the chemicals to the appropriate valve or pump pit Associated support structures. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  7. Cascade Distillation Subsystem Development: Progress Toward a Distillation Comparison Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, M. R.; Lubman, A.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS), utilizes an innovative and efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage subsystem unit has been designed, built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing. A major test objective of the project is to demonstrate the advancement of the CDS technology from the breadboard level to a subsystem level unit. An initial round of CDS performance testing was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2008. Based on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project distillation comparison test expected to begin in early 2009. As part of the project objectives planned for FY09, the system will be reconfigured to support the ELS comparison test. The CDS will then be challenged with a series of human-gene-rated waste streams representative of those anticipated for a lunar outpost. This paper provides a description of the CDS technology, a status of the current project activities, and data on the system s performance to date.

  8. Reception-Conversion Subsystem (RXCV) for microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    As part of a program to demonstrate the feasibility of power transmission from space, an approximately 25 sq m Reception-Conversion Subsystem was designed and tested. The device collects high power microwave energy, converts it into dc, and dissipates it in an instrumented demonstration load.

  9. ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR AFTERTREATMENT SUB-SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, B; Fan, A; Goney, K; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z; Sisken, K; Zhang, H

    2003-08-24

    The stringent emissions standards of 2007 and beyond require complex engine, aftertreatment and vehicle systems with a high degree of sub-system interaction and flexible control solutions. This necessitates a system-based approach to technology development, in addition to individual sub-system optimization. Analytical tools can provide an effective means to evaluate and develop such complex technology interactions as well as understand phenomena that is either too expensive or impossible to study with conventional experimental means. The analytical effort can also guide experimental development and thus lead to efficient utilization of available experimental resources.A suite of analytical models has been developed to represent PM and NOx aftertreatment sub-systems. These models range from computationally inexpensive zero-dimensional models for real-time control applications to CFD-based, multi-dimensional models with detailed temporal and spatial resolution. Such models in conjunction with well established engine modeling tools such as engine cycle simulation, engine controls modeling, CFD models of non-combusting and combusting flow, and vehicle models provide a comprehensive analytical toolbox for complete engine, aftertreatment and vehicle sub-systems development and system integration applications. However, the fidelity of aftertreatment models and application going forward is limited by the lack of fundamental kinetic data.

  10. Mark 4A DSN receiver-exciter and transmitter subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, M. R.

    1986-05-01

    The present configuration of the Mark 4A DSN Receiver-Exciter and Transmitter Subsystems is described. Functional requirements and key characteristics are given to show the differences in the capabilities required by the Networks Consolidation task for combined High Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Network tracking support.

  11. Mark 4A DSN receiver-exciter and transmitter subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The present configuration of the Mark 4A DSN Receiver-Exciter and Transmitter Subsystems is described. Functional requirements and key characteristics are given to show the differences in the capabilities required by the Networks Consolidation task for combined High Earth Orbiter and Deep Space Network tracking support.

  12. Command module/service module reaction control subsystem assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weary, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed review of component failure histories, qualification adequacy, manufacturing flow, checkout requirements and flow, ground support equipment interfaces, subsystem interface verification, protective devices, and component design did not reveal major weaknesses in the command service module (CSM) reaction control system (RCS). No changes to the CSM RCS were recommended. The assessment reaffirmed the adequacy of the CSM RCS for future Apollo missions.

  13. Image Processing In Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R.; Ansari, Homayoon; Chen, Chien-Chung; Russell, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    Conceptual design of image-processing circuitry developed for proposed tracking apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem For Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). In proposed system, desired frame rate achieved by "windowed" readout scheme in which only pixels containing and surrounding two spots read out and others skipped without being read. Image data processed rapidly and efficiently to achieve high frequency response.

  14. Apollo experience report: Lunar module display and control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar module display and control subsystem equipment is described with emphasis on major problems and their solutions. Included in the discussion of each item is a description of what the item does and how the item is constructed. The development, hardware history, and testing for each item are also presented.

  15. Long Duration Space Missions: Human Subsystem Risks and Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Criag E.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the human health and performance risks associated with long duration space flight beyond low earth orbit. The contents include: 1) Human Research Program; 2) Human Subsystem Risks; 3) Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT) Architecture Elements; 4) Potentially Unacceptable Risks -1; 5) Potentially Unacceptable Risks-2; and 6) Major Mission Drivers of Risk.

  16. Subsystems in Nearby Solar-type Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Hartung, Markus; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2010-08-01

    We conducted a deep survey of resolved subsystems among wide binaries with solar-type components within 67 pc of the Sun. Images of 61 stars in the K and H bands were obtained with the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager adaptive-optics instrument on the 8 m Gemini-South telescope. Our maximum detectable magnitude difference is about 5 mag and 7.8 mag at 0farcs15 and 0farcs9 separations, respectively. This enables a complete census of subsystems with stellar companions in the projected separation range from 5 to 100 AU. Out of seven such companions found in our sample, only one was previously known. We determine that the fraction of subsystems with projected separations above 5 AU is 0.12 ± 0.04 and that the distribution of their mass ratio is flat, with a power-law index of 0.2 ± 0.5. Comparing this with the properties of closer spectroscopic subsystems (separations below 1 AU), it appears that the mass-ratio distribution does not depend on the separation. The frequency of subsystems in the separation ranges below 1 AU and between 5 and 100 AU is similar, about 0.15. Unbiased statistics of multiplicity higher than 2, advanced by this work, provide constraints on star formation theory. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory (Program ID GS-2009B-Q-49), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  17. Research and implementation of comprehensive situation sub-system in simulation platform of multiple UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Siliang; Huang, Siniu; Chen, Zongji

    2006-11-01

    Cooperative formation flight of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) becomes an attractive research field in recent years. The Simulation Platform of Multiple UAVs is a distributed interactive simulation environment based on High Level Architecture (HLA), which provides a universal simulation platform for the research of multiple UAVs, such as cooperative control, formation flight, mission planning, etc. The platform is composed of several nodes: Mission Control Station (MCS), Formation Control Unit (FCU), UAV Platform, Comprehensive Situation Display, 3-Dimension Display and Simulation Management. As an integral part of the simulation platform, the comprehensive situation sub-system monitors the geography environment and the situation of entities in the simulation. The sub-system is integrated into several nodes of the simulation platform: MCS, FCU and 2-Dimention Situation Display, etc. Considering generalized method and component-based rule, we design and implement comprehensive situation sub-system as well as supporting tool kits. It includes digital map walkthrough environment, map editor with Digital Elevation Model (DEM), bitmap creator, network communication module, situation display module and scenario editor module. Digital map walkthrough environment is a Geographic Information System (GIS) with specific functions, including multiple windows display, map walkthrough and data management. Map editor and bitmap creator create different type of digital map, which is suited for demands of the simulation, and generate terrain data for the UAVs to execute route planning based on DEM. Situation display module displays the situation information of entities in the simulation dynamically and timely. The system is developed without commercial GIS components, and integrated into the environment smoothly.

  18. Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed during Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica E.; Stathopoulos, Elaine T.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that the respiratory and laryngeal speech subsystems would respond to an air pressure bleed, but these responses have not been empirically studied. The present study examined the nature of the responses of the respiratory and laryngeal subsystems to an air pressure bleed in order to provide information relevant to the…

  19. Atmosphere revitalization for manned spacecraft - An assessment of technology readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samonski, F. H., Jr.; Neel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The level of proficiency attained by the most effective physical and chemical regenerative processes capable of providing a habitable atmospheric environment in a spacecraft is assessed. It is shown that both the Sabatier and Bosh reactions are in a mature stage of technological readiness and can effectively reduce the carbon dioxide in a spacecraft. An electrochemical method for concentrating CO2 from an air environment offers promise to approach low levels of pCO2 control. Technological advances in the fields of solid polymer electrolytes and oxygen evolution electrocatalysts have led to a water electrolysis system that can maintain efficient performance for several years. Nitrogen supply and control of the composition of the spacecraft atmosphere is effectively provided by the circulating electrolyte technique.

  20. NASA/Air Force Cost Model: NAFCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Sharon D.; Hamcher, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM) is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects and is primarily used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels.

  1. Development of a preprototype sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1980-01-01

    A preoprototype Sabatier CO2 Reduction Subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical (equivalent to 5 persons steady state). The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  2. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Lynn, Sean R.; Veres, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). Detailed analyses were performed using three- dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off- design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component acro/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  3. SOFIA tracking subsystem: results of assembly, operation, and calibration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias; Schmolke, Juergen; Lattner, Klaus; Levin, Torsten; Erhard, Markus

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA airborne telescope has a Tracking Subsystem for stellar acquisition, tracking, and pointing. The system has three high-performance imagers: the boresighted wide field (6 degrees FOV) and fine field imagers (70 arcminutes FOV), and the main-telescope-optics sharing focal plane imager (8 arcminutes FOV). The imagers are controlled by 3 CCD head controllers, an overall imager controller, and a tracker controller providing the tracking error signals from the objects observed by the imagers. There have been several test steps in the assembly, integration, and verification of the Tracking Subsystem. The paper presents the fully integrated system as actually built, the results of the thermal-vacuum and vibration tests of the fine field imager, the tested operational/functional S/W performance, as well as the results of the geometric and radiometric calibrations of the imagers.

  4. OAO-3 end of mission power subsystem evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasevoli, M.

    1982-01-01

    End of mission tests were performed on the OAO-3 power subsystem in three component areas: solar array, nickel-cadmium batteries and the On-Board Processor (OBP) power boost operation. Solar array evaluation consisted of analyzing array performance characteristics and comparing them to earlier flight data. Measured solar array degradation of 14.1 to 17.7% after 8 1/3 years is in good agreement with theortical radiation damage losses. Battery discharge characteristics were compared to results of laboratory life cycle tests performed on similar cells. Comparison of cell voltage profils reveals close correlation and confirms the validity of real time life cycle simulation. The successful operation of the system in the OBP/power boost regulation mode demonstrates the excellent life, reliability and greater system utilization of power subsystems using maximum power trackers.

  5. Automated monitor and control for deep space network subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, P.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of automating monitor and control loops for Deep Space Network (DSN) subsystems is considered and an overview of currently available automation techniques is given. The use of standard numerical models, knowledge-based systems, and neural networks is considered. It is argued that none of these techniques alone possess sufficient generality to deal with the demands imposed by the DSN environment. However, it is shown that schemes that integrate the better aspects of each approach and are referenced to a formal system model show considerable promise, although such an integrated technology is not yet available for implementation. Frequent reference is made to the receiver subsystem since this work was largely motivated by experience in developing an automated monitor and control loop for the advanced receiver.

  6. Development of an advanced Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Cusick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting (less than 5 minutes) reactor utlizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a simple, passively controlled reactor design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with process flows equivalent to a crew size of up to five persons. The subsystem requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation.

  7. Development of a preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical. The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. Subsystem performance was proven by parametric testing and endurance testing over a wide range of crew sizes and metabolic loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  8. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Lynn, Sean R.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off-design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component aero/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  9. Pyrotechnic Actuator for Retracting Tubes Between MSL Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallon, John C.; Webster, Richard G.; Patterson, Keith D.; Orzewalla, Matthew A.; Roberts, Eric T.; Tuszynski, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus, denoted the "retractuator" (a contraction of "retracting actuator"), was designed to help ensure clean separation between the cruise stage and the entry-vehicle subsystem of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The retractuator or an equivalent mechanism is needed because of tubes that (1) transport a heat-transfer fluid between the stages during flight and (2) are cut immediately prior to separation of the stages retractuator. The role of the retractuator is to retract the tubes, after they are cut and before separation of the subsystem, so that cut ends of the tubes do not damage thermal-protection coats on the entry vehicle and do not contribute to uncertainty of drag and consequent uncertainty in separation velocity.

  10. Design and Analysis of a Hyperspectral Microwave Receiver Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hancock, T.; Leslie, R.; Osaretin, I.; Shields, M.; Racette, P.; Hillard, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral microwave (HM) sounding has been proposed to achieve unprecedented performance. HM operation is achieved using multiple banks of RF spectrometers with large aggregate bandwidth. A principal challenge is Size/Weight/Power scaling. Objectives of this work: 1) Demonstrate ultra-compact (100 cm3) 52-channel IF processor (enabler); 2) Demonstrate a hyperspectral microwave receiver subsystem; and 3) Deliver a flight-ready system to validate HM sounding.

  11. Space shuttle program solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The recovery of the Solid Rocket Boosters presented a major challenge. The SRB represents the largest payload ever recovered and presents the added complication that it is continually emitting hot gases and burning particles of insulation and other debris. Some items, such as portions of the nozzle, are large enough to burn through the nylon parachute material. The SRB Decelerator Subsystem program was highly successful in that no SRB has been lost as a result of inadequate performance of the DSS.

  12. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. A.

    1994-11-01

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  14. TRIGA: Telecommunications Protocol Processing Subsystem Using Reconfigurable Interoperable Gate Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Pingree, Paula J.; Torgerson, J. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    We present the Telecommunications protocol processing subsystem using Reconfigurable Interoperable Gate Arrays (TRIGA), a novel approach that unifies fault tolerance, error correction coding and interplanetary communication protocol off-loading to implement CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Datalink layers. The new reconfigurable architecture offers more than one order of magnitude throughput increase while reducing footprint requirements in memory, command and data handling processor utilization, communication system interconnects and power consumption.

  15. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  16. Photovoltaic subsystem optimization and design tradeoff study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, W.J.

    1982-03-01

    Tradeoffs and subsystem choices are examined in photovoltaic array subfield design, power-conditioning sizing and selection, roof- and ground-mounted structure installation, energy loss, operating voltage, power conditioning cost, and subfield size. Line- and self-commutated power conditioning options are analyzed to determine the most cost-effective technology in the megawatt power range. Methods for reducing field installation of flat panels and roof mounting of intermediate load centers are discussed, including the cost of retrofit installations.

  17. Development of Testing Station for Prototype Rover Thermal Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, Kaitlin

    2010-01-01

    In order to successfully and efficiently explore the moon or other planets, a vehicle must be built to assist astronauts as they travel across the surface. One concept created to meet this need is NASA's Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV, a small pressurized cabin integrated onto a 12-wheeled chassis, can support two astronauts up to 14 days. Engineers are currently developing the second generation of the SEV, with the goal of being faster, more robust, and able to carry a heavier payload. In order to function properly, the rover must dissipate heat produced during operation and maintain an appropriate temperature profile inside the rover. If these activities do not occur, components of the rover will start to break down, eventually leading to the failure of the rover. On the rover, these requirements are the responsibility of the thermal subsystem. My project for the summer was to design and build a testing station to facilitate the design and testing of the new thermal subsystem. As the rover develops, initial low fidelity parts can be interchanged for the high fidelity parts used on the rover. Based on a schematic of the proposed thermal system, I sized and selected parts for each of the components in the thermal subsystem. For the components in the system that produced heat but had not yet been finalized or fabricated, I used power resistors to model their load patterns. I also selected all of the fittings to put the system together and a mounting platform to support the testing station. Finally, I implemented sensors at various points in the system to measure the temperature, pressure, and flow rate, and a data acquisition system to collect this information. In the future, the information from these sensors will be used to study the behavior of the subsystem under different conditions and select the best part for the rover.

  18. Evolution of the 1-mlb mercury ion thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Banks, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The developmental history, performance, and major lifetests of each component of the present 1-mlb (4.5 mN) thruster system are traced over the past 10 years. The 1-mlb thruster subsystem consists of an 8 cm diameter ion thruster mounted on 2 axis gimbals, a mercury propellant tank, a power electronics unit, a controller/digital interface unit, and necessary electrical harnesses plus propellant tankage and feed lines.

  19. Earth-to-orbit propulsion turbomachinery subsystem: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.; Garcia, R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The objectives are: (1) to develop the technology related to the turbomachinery systems of high performance rocket engines, which focuses on advanced design methodologies and concepts, develops high performance turbomachinery data bases, and validates turbomachinery design tools; and (2) specific turbomachinery subsystems and disciplines, which focus on turbine stages, pump stages, bearings, deals, structural dynamics, complex flow paths, materials, manufacturability, producibility, and inspectability, rotordynamics, and fatigue/fracture/life.

  20. Thermal performance evaluation of the infrared telescope dewar subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal performance evaluations (TPE) were conducted with the superfluid helium dewar of the Infrared Telescope (IRT) experiment from November 1981 to August 1982. Test included measuring key operating parameters, simulating operations with an attached instrument cryostat and validating servicing, operating and safety procedures. Test activities and results are summarized. All objectives are satisfied except for those involving transfer of low pressure liquid helium (LHe) from a supply dewar into the dewar subsystem.

  1. Subsystem real-time time dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Alisa; Ceresoli, Davide; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-04-21

    We present the extension of Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) to real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (rt-TDDFT). FDE is a DFT-in-DFT embedding method that allows to partition a larger Kohn-Sham system into a set of smaller, coupled Kohn-Sham systems. Additional to the computational advantage, FDE provides physical insight into the properties of embedded systems and the coupling interactions between them. The extension to rt-TDDFT is done straightforwardly by evolving the Kohn-Sham subsystems in time simultaneously, while updating the embedding potential between the systems at every time step. Two main applications are presented: the explicit excitation energy transfer in real time between subsystems is demonstrated for the case of the Na4 cluster and the effect of the embedding on optical spectra of coupled chromophores. In particular, the importance of including the full dynamic response in the embedding potential is demonstrated. PMID:25903875

  2. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-03-22

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). The DST Transfer Valving Subsystem routes waste and other media (e.g., diluent, flush water, filtered raw water) among DSTs and from the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility, where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  3. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  4. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  5. Space Shuttle Orbiter audio subsystem. [to communication and tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    The selection of the audio multiplex control configuration for the Space Shuttle Orbiter audio subsystem is discussed and special attention is given to the evaluation criteria of cost, weight and complexity. The specifications and design of the subsystem are described and detail is given to configurations of the audio terminal and audio central control unit (ATU, ACCU). The audio input from the ACCU, at a signal level of -12.2 to 14.8 dBV, nominal range, at 1 kHz, was found to have balanced source impedance and a balanced local impedance of 6000 + or - 600 ohms at 1 kHz, dc isolated. The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) electroacoustic test laboratory, an audio engineering facility consisting of a collection of acoustic test chambers, analyzed problems of speaker and headset performance, multiplexed control data coupled with audio channels, and the Orbiter cabin acoustic effects on the operational performance of voice communications. This system allows technical management and project engineering to address key constraining issues, such as identifying design deficiencies of the headset interface unit and the assessment of the Orbiter cabin performance of voice communications, which affect the subsystem development.

  6. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  7. System integration of marketable subsystems. [for residential solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: systems integration of marketable subsystems; development, design, and building of site data acquisition subsystems; development and operation of the central data processing system; operation of the MSFC Solar Test Facility; and systems analysis.

  8. Recommendations of OSTA Flight Technology Improvement Workshop-Power Subsystems panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slifer, L. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The recommendations of the power subsystems panel are discussed; The thrust is directed at radiometric problems. Areas that need development are defined for both spacecraft power subsystems and power supplies for experiments and instruments.

  9. National Ingition Facility subsystem design requirements optical mounts SSDR 1.4.4

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.

    1996-10-06

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for NIF Beam Transport Optomechanical Subsystems. optomechanical Subsystems includes the mounts for the beam transport mirrors, LMl - LM8, the polarizer mount, and the spatial filter lens mounts.

  10. Leveraging the nation's anti-bioterrorism investments: foundation efforts to ensure a revitalized public health system.

    PubMed

    Hearne, Shelley A; Segal, Laura M

    2003-01-01

    The emerging potential threats of bioterrorism combined with critical existing epidemics facing the United States call for immediate and urgent attention to the U.S. public health system. The foundation world is helping to answer that call and is sounding the alarm that our health defenses must be able to do "double duty" to protect us from the full spectrum of modern health threats. This Special Report presents a selective sample of recent and ongoing grant activities designed to revitalize and modernize the public health infrastructure, which is vital to protecting the nation's health and ensuring its safety. PMID:12889772

  11. MSFC hot air collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, K.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the hot air collector is given that includes a history of development, a history of the materials development, and a program summary. The major portion of the solar energy system cost is the collector. Since the collector is the heart of the system and the most costly subsystem, reducing the cost of producing collectors in large quantities is a major goal. This solar collector is designed to heat air and/or water cheaply and efficiently through the use of solar energy.

  12. On DESTINY Science Instrument Electrical and Electronics Subsystem Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod R.

    2009-01-01

    Future space missions are going to require large focal planes with many sensing arrays and hundreds of millions of pixels all read out at high data rates'' . This will place unique demands on the electrical and electronics (EE) subsystem design and it will be critically important to have high technology readiness level (TRL) EE concepts ready to support such missions. One such omission is the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) charged with making precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe to reveal vital clues about the nature of dark energy - a hypothetical form of energy that permeates all of space and tends to increase the rate of the expansion. One of three JDEM concept studies - the Dark Energy Space Telescope (DESTINY) was conducted in 2008 at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland. This paper presents the EE subsystem framework, which evolved from the DESTINY science instrument study. It describes the main challenges and implementation concepts related to the design of an EE subsystem featuring multiple focal planes populated with dozens of large arrays and millions of pixels. The focal planes are passively cooled to cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K). The sensor mosaic is controlled by a large number of Readout Integrated Circuits and Application Specific Integrated Circuits - the ROICs/ASICs in near proximity to their sensor focal planes. The ASICs, in turn, are serviced by a set of "warm" EE subsystem boxes performing Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital signal processing (DSP) computations of complex algorithms, such as sampling-up-the-ramp algorithm (SUTR), over large volumes of fast data streams. The SUTR boxes are supported by the Instrument Control/Command and Data Handling box (ICDH Primary and Backup boxes) for lossless data compression, command and low volume telemetry handling, power conversion and for communications with the spacecraft. The paper outlines how the JDEM DESTINY concept

  13. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  14. Combining and connecting linear, multi-input, multi-output subsystem models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    The mathematical background for combining and connecting linear, multi-input, multi-output subsystem models into an overall system model is provided. Several examples of subsystem configurations are examined in detail. A description of a MATRIX (sub x) command file to aid in the process of combining and connecting these subsystem models is contained.

  15. Computer simulation of thermal and fluid systems for MIUS integration and subsystems test /MIST/ laboratory. [Modular Integrated Utility System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Liu, D. K.; Nunnery, W. J., Jr.; Brandli, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the SINDA (systems improved numerical differencing analyzer) computer program to simulate the operation of the NASA/JSC MIUS integration and subsystems test (MIST) laboratory. The MIST laboratory is designed to test the integration capability of the following subsystems of a modular integrated utility system (MIUS): (1) electric power generation, (2) space heating and cooling, (3) solid waste disposal, (4) potable water supply, and (5) waste water treatment. The SINDA/MIST computer model is designed to simulate the response of these subsystems to externally impressed loads. The computer model determines the amount of recovered waste heat from the prime mover exhaust, water jacket and oil/aftercooler and from the incinerator. This recovered waste heat is used in the model to heat potable water, for space heating, absorption air conditioning, waste water sterilization, and to provide for thermal storage. The details of the thermal and fluid simulation of MIST including the system configuration, modes of operation modeled, SINDA model characteristics and the results of several analyses are described.

  16. Community Revitalization by Geotourism: Tourism Study with Geoscience in Wakayama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakakushi, T.; Hisatomi, K.; Konomatsu, M.; Furukubo, A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents our community-revitalization project in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. Wakayama Prefecture is the southwestern part of the Kii Peninsula. The Kii Peninsula, especially its southern part, has many geoscientifically important natural heritages such as the volcano-plutonic complex including well exposed ring dyke in the Kumano region. Those geoheritages have been considered just as on-site educational tools, and not received enough attentions as contents for geotours. UNESCO defines that a Geopark is a geographical area where geological heritage sites are part of a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development. UNESCO also describes that it is necessary to also include and highlight sites of ecological, archaeological, historical and cultural value within each Geopark. In many societies, natural, cultural and social history are inextricably linked and cannot be separated. We plan to have the region registered as a geopark by Japan (or Global) Geopark Network. In the context of community-revitalization, a "regional brand" has drawn attention for its potential to attract tourists. A Geopark may contribute to establish a regional brand.

  17. Revitalization of the shared commons: education for sustainability and marginalized cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasson, George E.

    2010-06-01

    Education for sustainability provides a vision for revitalizing the environmental commons while preserving cultural traditions and human rights. What happens if the environmental commons is shared by two politically disparate and conflicting cultures? As in many shared common lands, what happens if one culture is dominant and represents a more affluent society with more resources and educational opportunities? In the case of the Tal and Alkaher study (Cult Stud Sci Edu, 2009), asymmetric power differences between the dominant Israeli society and the minority Arab population yielded different environmental narratives and perceptions of students involved in learning about a mediated conflict in national park land. Similarly, marginalized indigenous cultures in Malawi, Africa share common lands with the dominant European landowners but have distinctly different environmental narratives. Although indigenous ways of living with nature contribute to the sustainability of the environment and culture, African funds of knowledge are conspicuously absent from the Eurocentric school science curriculum. In contrast, examples of experiential learning and recent curriculum development efforts in sustainability science in Malawi are inclusive of indigenous knowledge and practices and are essential for revitalizing the shared commons.

  18. Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Yan; Garces, Luis Jose

    2008-06-24

    Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

  19. Autonomous navigation - The ARMMS concept. [Autonomous Redundancy and Maintenance Management Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, L. J.; Jones, J. B.; Mease, K. D.; Kwok, J. H.; Goltz, G. L.; Kechichian, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual design is outlined for the navigation subsystem of the Autonomous Redundancy and Maintenance Management Subsystem (ARMMS). The principal function of this navigation subsystem is to maintain the spacecraft over a specified equatorial longitude to within + or - 3 deg. In addition, the navigation subsystem must detect and correct internal faults. It comprises elements for a navigation executive and for orbit determination, trajectory, maneuver planning, and maneuver command. Each of these elements is described. The navigation subsystem is to be used in the DSCS III spacecraft.

  20. RF communications subsystem for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Artis, David; Baker, Ben; Stilwell, Robert; Wallis, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, currently in Phase B, is a two-spacecraft, Earth-orbiting mission, which will launch in 2012. The spacecraft's S-band radio frequency (RF) telecommunications subsystem has three primary functions: provide spacecraft command capability, provide spacecraft telemetry and science data return, and provide accurate Doppler data for navigation. The primary communications link to the ground is via the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory's (JHU/APL) 18 m dish, with secondary links to the NASA 13 m Ground Network and the Tracking and Data Relay Spacecraft System (TDRSS) in single-access mode. The on-board RF subsystem features the APL-built coherent transceiver and in-house builds of a solid-state power amplifier and conical bifilar helix broad-beam antennas. The coherent transceiver provides coherency digitally, and controls the downlink data rate and encoding within its field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The transceiver also provides a critical command decoder (CCD) function, which is used to protect against box-level upsets in the C&DH subsystem. Because RBSP is a spin-stabilized mission, the antennas must be symmetric about the spin axis. Two broad-beam antennas point along both ends of the spin axis, providing communication coverage from boresight to 70°. An RF splitter excites both antennas; therefore, the mission is designed such that no communications are required close to 90° from the spin axis due to the interferometer effect from the two antennas. To maximize the total downlink volume from the spacecraft, the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) has been baselined for the RBSP mission. During real-time ground contacts with the APL ground station, downlinked files are checked for errors. Handshaking between flight and ground CFDP software results in requests to retransmit only the file fragments lost due to dropouts. This allows minimization of RF link margins, thereby maximizing data rate and

  1. Flow Analysis of a Gas Turbine Low- Pressure Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is coordinating a project to numerically simulate aerodynamic flow in the complete low-pressure subsystem (LPS) of a gas turbine engine. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow equations through all components within the low-pressure subsystem as well as the external flow around the engine nacelle. The Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Code (ADPAC), which is being developed jointly by Allison Engine Company and NASA, is the Navier-Stokes flow code being used for LPS simulation. The majority of the LPS project is being done under a NASA Lewis contract with Allison. Other contributors to the project are NYMA and the University of Toledo. For this project, the Energy Efficient Engine designed by GE Aircraft Engines is being modeled. This engine includes a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system. An inlet, a fan, a booster stage, a bypass duct, a lobed mixer, a low-pressure turbine, and a jet nozzle comprise the low-pressure subsystem within this engine. The tightly coupled flow analysis evaluates aerodynamic interactions between all components of the LPS. The high-pressure core engine of this engine is simulated with a one-dimensional thermodynamic cycle code in order to provide boundary conditions to the detailed LPS model. This core engine consists of a high-pressure compressor, a combustor, and a high-pressure turbine. The three-dimensional LPS flow model is coupled to the one-dimensional core engine model to provide a "hybrid" flow model of the complete gas turbine Energy Efficient Engine. The resulting hybrid engine model evaluates the detailed interaction between the LPS components at design and off-design engine operating conditions while considering the lumped-parameter performance of the core engine.

  2. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements laser {ampersand} target area building (LTAB) SSDR 1.2.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-08-19

    This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB), including those that house and support the operation of high-energy laser equipment and the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the facility. This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the LTAB: Building structural systems for the Target Bay, Switchyards, Diagnostic Building, Decontamination Area, Laser Bays, Capacitor Bays and Operations Support Area, and the necessary space associated with building-support equipment; Architectural building features associated with housing the space and with the operational cleanliness of the functional operation of the facilities; Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facilities; Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants, plus stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater; Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facilities and their contents; Material handling systems for transporting personnel and heavy materials within the building areas; Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling and other service to experimental laser equipment and components; Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service and standby power to building and experimental equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities; Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Detailed requirements for building subsystems that are not addressed in this document (such as specific sizes, locations, or capacities) are included in detail-level NIP Project Interface Control Documents (ICDS).

  3. Characterization of Subsystems for a WB-003 Single Stage Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacConochie, Ian O.; Lepsch, Roger A., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Subsystems for an all oxygen-hydrogen-single-stage shuttle are characterized for a vehicle designated WB-003. Features of the vehicle include all-electric actuation, fiber optics for information circuitry, fuel cells for power generation, and extensive use of composites for structure. The vehicle is sized for the delivery of a 25,000 lb. payload to a space station orbit without crew. When crew are being delivered, they are carried in a module in the payload bay with escape and manual override capabilities. The underlying reason for undertaking this task is to provide a framework for the study of the operations costs of the newer shuttles.

  4. An inverter/controller subsystem optimized for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, R. L.; Osullivan, G.; Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of solar array dc power to ac power stimulated the specification, design, and simulation testing of an inverter/controller subsystem tailored to the photovoltaic power source characteristics. Optimization of the inverter/controller design is discussed as part of an overall photovoltaic power system designed for maximum energy extraction from the solar array. The special design requirements for the inverter/ controller include: a power system controller (PSC) to control continuously the solar array operating point at the maximum power level based on variable solar insolation and cell temperatures; and an inverter designed for high efficiency at rated load and low losses at light loadings to conserve energy.

  5. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  6. Inflight performance of the Viking visual imaging subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaasen, K. P.; Thorpe, T. E.; Morabito, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    Photography from the Viking Orbiter Visual Imaging Subsystem, taken while enroute to and in orbit about Mars, has been analyzed to determine the performance of the cameras. The cameras have remained in good focus. Random and coherent noise levels in flight were the same as measured prior to launch. A recalibration of each instrument allows photometric measurements to accuracies of less than 3% for relative measurements and 9% for absolute measurements. Geometric distortion remained close to the preflight levels of 4 pixels rms and 11 pixels maximum.

  7. Electric and hybrid vehicles environmental control subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental control subsystem (ECS) in the passenger compartment of electric and hybrid vehicles is studied. Various methods of obtaining the desired temperature control for the battery pack is also studied. The functional requirements of ECS equipment is defined. Following categorization by methodology, technology availability and risk, all viable ECS concepts are evaluated. Each is assessed independently for benefits versus risk, as well as for its feasibility to short, intermediate and long term product development. Selection of the preferred concept is made against these requirements, as well as the study's major goal of providing safe, highly efficient and thermally confortable ECS equipment.

  8. Revalidation of the Huygens Descent Control Sub-System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens probe, part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, is designed to investigate the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The passage of the probe through the atmosphere is controlled by the Descent Control Sub-System (DCSS), which consists of three parachutes and associated mechanisms. The Cassini / Huygens mission was launched in October 1997 and was designed during the early 1990's. During the time since the design and launch, analysis capabilities have improved significantly, knowledge of the Titan environment has improved and the baseline mission has been modified. Consequently, a study was performed to revalidate the DCSS design against the current predictions.

  9. Addendum: Development of a preprototype times wastewater recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the second generation operational improvements and the TIMES (Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem) 2 study are covered. Areas covered in the second generation operational improvements are improved temperature control, water quality improvements, subsytem operational improvements, solid handling improvements, wastewater pretreatment optimization, and membrane rejuvenation concepts. The task for the TIMES 2 study are thermoelectric regenerator improvement, recycle loop pH operational criteria, recycle loop component optimization, and hollow fiber membrane evaporator improvement. Results are presented and conclusions are drawn from both studies.

  10. Use of STS subsystems and components for MMSE, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Multiuse mission support equipment (MMSE) is flight/ground equipment for the shuttle era which is used in conjunction with more than one mission payload. Initial verification of STS subsystem's applicability to MMSE is provided along with the cost savings potential and programmatic data needed for further program planning decisions. Some 70 MMSE requirements were found to be potentially satisfied by STS equipment, and and 6 items of particular interest were chosen for special emphasis. All were found to be feasible and beneficial. Program cost savings through their use are estimated to be substantial. Further study is recommended to identify additional MMSE requirements and hardware.

  11. A shuttle radar microwave subsystem for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Microwave subsystem considerations are discussed as a design example for a radar for earth resources applications to be used in conjunction with the shuttle spacelab. This system with a multiplicity of frequencies and polarizations - L-band (25-cm wavelength), S-band (10-cm wavelength), and X-band (3.2-cm wavelength) at two orthogonal linear polarizations - was tentatively selected. The space shuttle vehicle constrains the antenna to approximately 8 m in length and 3 m in width. The frequencies and antenna size comprise the major constraints on the system described, and determine the sensor altitude, coverage, and major hardware parameters.

  12. Automation study for space station subsystems and mission ground support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An automation concept for the autonomous operation of space station subsystems, i.e., electric power, thermal control, and communications and tracking are discussed. To assure that functions essential for autonomous operations are not neglected, an operations function (systems monitoring and control) is included in the discussion. It is recommended that automated speech recognition and synthesis be considered a basic mode of man/machine interaction for space station command and control, and that the data management system (DMS) and other systems on the space station be designed to accommodate fully automated fault detection, isolation, and recovery within the system monitoring function of the DMS.

  13. The sensing and perception subsystem of the NASA research telerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, B.; Gennery, D. B.; Bon, B.; Litwin, T.

    1987-01-01

    A useful space telerobot for on-orbit assembly, maintenance, and repair tasks must have a sensing and perception subsystem which can provide the locations, orientations, and velocities of all relevant objects in the work environment. This function must be accomplished with sufficient speed and accuracy to permit effective grappling and manipulation. Appropriate symbolic names must be attached to each object for use by higher-level planning algorithms. Sensor data and inferences must be presented to the remote human operator in a way that is both comprehensible in ensuring safe autonomous operation and useful for direct teleoperation. Research at JPL toward these objectives is described.

  14. Space Shuttle reaction control subsystem propellant tank masked screen test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    During final development testing of the Space Shuttle Reaction Control Subsystem propellant tanks, a problem with pressure transients in the system was uncovered. Due to the nature of the tanks, performance tests to determine the impact of the transients on the expulsion efficiency of the tanks could not directly simulate the actual conditions which would be present in a low-gravity environment. However, by masking or covering various segments of the propellant acquisition device, a good simulation of a low-gravity environment was achieved in ground testing.

  15. A cost effective data management subsystem for the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, J. A.; Patterson, T. D.; Cole, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper outlines the approach used in developing DMS (Data Management Subsystem) alternatives for the LST (Large Space Telescope) and in selecting the concept considered to be the most cost effective means of implementing the LST DMS requirements. Two candidate DMS concepts are discussed: a functionally integrated and a functionally separated one. For the single vehicle LST program, separation of the DMS functions best provides high reliability, operations flexibility, minimal interface complexity, and the least complex software development and verification task. The use of available hardware and NASA standard components is stressed.

  16. Data Management Applications for the Service Preparation Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Ivy P.; Chang, George W.; Bui, Tung; Allen, Christopher; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie C.; Bui, Bach X.; Gutheinz, Sandy C.; Kim, Rachel Y.; Zendejas, Silvino C.; Yu, Dan; Kim, Richard M.; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    These software applications provide intuitive User Interfaces (UIs) with a consistent look and feel for interaction with, and control of, the Service Preparation Subsystem (SPS). The elements of the UIs described here are the File Manager, Mission Manager, and Log Monitor applications. All UIs provide access to add/delete/update data entities in a complex database schema without requiring technical expertise on the part of the end users. These applications allow for safe, validated, catalogued input of data. Also, the software has been designed in multiple, coherent layers to promote ease of code maintenance and reuse in addition to reducing testing and accelerating maturity.

  17. Language Revitalization and the Normalization of Basque: A Study of Teacher Perceptions and Expectations in the Basque Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Concepción; Etxeberria, Feli; Intxausti, Nahia

    2015-01-01

    In the Basque Country, Northern Spain, Basque (Euskera) and Spanish are official languages. In recent decades, Basque language revitalization and the efforts to make this an unmarked language (normalization) have co-existed with the rapid increase in immigration from outside the Basque region, and most recently from outside Spain. Given the…

  18. USE OF INTEGRATED PLANNING TOOLS FOR REVITALIZATION: SMARTE (U.S.) AND START-UP PLAN (GERMANY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001, the US-German Bilateral Working Group (BWG) identified more than 40 obstacles to site revitalization which occurred in both countries. From 2001-2005, the BWG developed tools and techniques for overcoming these obstacles. Five joint workshops were held on the following r...

  19. 5 CFR 842.107 - Employees covered under the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government Improvement Act...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employees covered under the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government Improvement Act of 1997. 842.107 Section 842.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC...

  20. Urban, Suburban, and Rural Contexts of School Districts and Neighborhood Revitalization Strategies: Rediscovering Equity in Education Policy and Urban Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Robert Mark

    2014-01-01

    This article revisits the debate about school reform and homeownership-based strategies for neighborhood revitalization. It is based on an analysis of school districts in New York State using data from the American Community Survey (ACS) and the New York State Education Department (NYSED). Findings indicate that the relationship between schools…

  1. SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND REVITALIZATION TOOLS-ELECTRONIC (SMARTE): OVERVIEW AND DEMONSTRATION FOR FINAL PHASE 3 CONFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. contingent of the U.S.-German Bilateral Working Group is developing Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools-electronic (SMARTe). SMARTe is a web-based, decision support system designed to assist stakeholders in developing and evaluating alternative reu...

  2. Re-Branding Urban Schools: Urban Revitalization, Social Status, and Marketing Public Schools to the Upper Middle Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cucchiara, Maia

    2008-01-01

    This article examines an effort to use urban schools to promote the revitalization of a large northeastern city in the United States. In order to attract and retain professional families to a regenerated central city, downtown schools are re-branded and promoted to such families as suitable for their children. The article draws on interviews and…

  3. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-28

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT. PMID:27036438

  4. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT-D multispectral scanner subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L. (Principal Investigator); Barker, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Relative spectral response data for the multispectral scanner subsystems (MSS) to be flown on LANDSAT-D and LANDSAT-D backup, the protoflight and flight models, respectively, are presented and compared to similar data for the Landsat 1,2, and 3 subsystems. Channel-bychannel (six channels per band) outputs for soil and soybean targets were simulated and compared within each band and between scanners. The two LANDSAT-D scanners proved to be nearly identical in mean spectral response, but they exhibited some differences from the previous MSS's. Principal differences between the spectral responses of the D-scanners and previous scanners were: (1) a mean upper-band edge in the green band of 606 nm compared to previous means of 593 to 598 nm; (2) an average upper-band edge of 697 nm in the red band compared to previous averages of 701 to 710 nm; and (3) an average bandpass for the first near-IR band of 702-814 nm compared to a range of 693-793 to 697-802 nm for previous scanners. These differences caused the simulated D-scanner outputs to be 3 to 10 percent lower in the red band and 3 to 11 percent higher in the first near-IR band than previous scanners for the soybeans target. Otherwise, outputs from soil and soybean targets were only slightly affected. The D-scanners were generally more uniform from channel to channel within bands than previous scanners.

  5. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the instrumentation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Instrumentation Subsystem are documented. The Instrumentation Subsystem (SS) consists of transducers, signal conditioning equipment, pulse code modulation (PCM) encoding equipment, tape recorders, frequency division multiplexers, and timing equipment. For this analysis, the SS is broken into two major groupings: Operational Instrumentation (OI) equipment and Modular Auxiliary Data System (MADS) equipment. The OI equipment is required to acquire, condition, scale, digitize, interleave/multiplex, format, and distribute operational Orbiter and payload data and voice for display, recording, telemetry, and checkout. It also must provide accurate timing for time critical functions for crew and payload specialist use. The MADS provides additional instrumentation to measure and record selected pressure, temperature, strain, vibration, and event data for post-flight playback and analysis. MADS data is used to assess vehicle responses to the flight environment and to permit correlation of such data from flight to flight. The IOA analysis utilized available SS hardware drawings and schematics for identifying hardware assemblies and components and their interfaces. Criticality for each item was assigned on the basis of the worst-case effect of the failure modes identified.

  6. Orbits of Subsystems in Four Hierarchical Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    Seven spectroscopic orbits in nearby solar-type multiple stars are presented. The primary of the chromospherically active star HIP 9642 is a 4.8 day double-lined pair; the outer 420 year visual orbit is updated, but remains poorly constrained. HIP 12780 is a quadruple system consisting of the resolved 6.7 year pair FIN 379 Aa,Ab, for which the combined orbit, masses, and orbital parallax are determined here, and the single-lined binary Ba,Bb with a period of 27.8 days. HIP 28790 is a young quintuple system composed of two close binaries, Aa,Ab and Ba,Bb, with periods of 221 and 13 days, respectively, and a single distant component C. Its subsystem Ba,Bb is peculiar, having a spectroscopic mass ratio of 0.89 but a magnitude difference of ˜2.2 mag. HIP 64478 also contains five stars: the A-component is a 29 year visual pair with a previously known 4 day twin subsystem, while the B-component is a contact binary with a period of 5.8 hr, seen nearly pole-on.

  7. Optimisation study of a vehicle bumper subsystem with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, L.; Moens, D.; Donders, S.; Vandepitte, D.

    2012-10-01

    This paper deals with the design and optimisation for crashworthiness of a vehicle bumper subsystem, which is a key scenario for vehicle component design. The automotive manufacturers and suppliers have to find optimal design solutions for such subsystems that comply with the conflicting requirements of the regulatory bodies regarding functional performance (safety and repairability) and regarding the environmental impact (mass). For the bumper design challenge, an integrated methodology for multi-attribute design engineering of mechanical structures is set up. The integrated process captures the various tasks that are usually performed manually, this way facilitating the automated design iterations for optimisation. Subsequently, an optimisation process is applied that takes the effect of parametric uncertainties into account, such that the system level of failure possibility is acceptable. This optimisation process is referred to as possibility-based design optimisation and integrates the fuzzy FE analysis applied for the uncertainty treatment in crash simulations. This process is the counterpart of the reliability-based design optimisation used in a probabilistic context with statistically defined parameters (variabilities).

  8. Satellite Power System (SPS) microwave subsystem impacts and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The impacts and benefits to society of the microwave subsystem resulting from the developing, construction and operating of a space solar power to earth, electric power delivery system are presented and discussed. The primary benefit (usable energy) is conveyed mainly in the fundamental frequency portion of the RF radiation beam that is intercepted and converted to electric power output. The small fraction of the microwave and other electromagnetic energy that does not end up in the electric utility grid, yields most of the subsystem impacts. The impacts range from harmonics and noise radiated by the transmitting antenna, through potential interference with ionospheric communications and navigation caused by the power beam heating the ionosphere, to the potential large land area requirements for the rectennas and low level microwave radiation around the rectennas. Additional benefits range from a very low level of waste heat liberated and lack of atmospheric emissions including noise while operating to having no residual ionizing radiation from the rectenna when it is deactivated.

  9. Extraction of climate subsystems on the basis of MSSA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loskutov, Evgeny; Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Feigin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that empirical modeling of Earth's climate system is ambitious, but very difficult task by virtue of system's complexity and spatial distribution of data. One of the ways to reduce data complexity is distinguishing a set of principal spatio-temporal patterns that evolve with essentially different time scales. In the report we discuss the new method for construction such patterns which allows to extract leading climate subsystems underlying the observed variability. The first stage of method is based on MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) which is used for expanding space-distributed time series into the basis of spatio-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (ST-EOF) taking into account time-lag correlations between spatially separated grid points. At the second stage we merge obtained principal components into the groups related to different climate subsystems. The method is applied to decomposition of the Earth's climate system on the basis of 156 years time series of SST anomalies distributed over the Globe. For statistically correct exclusion of slow processes (trends) from data, we use large-scale ST-EOFs reconstructed from long time series of GSM simulations.

  10. Visuospatial deficits in schizophrenia: central executive and memory subsystems impairments.

    PubMed

    Leiderman, Eduardo A; Strejilevich, Sergio A

    2004-06-01

    Object and spatial visual working memory are impaired in schizophrenic patients. It is not clear if the impairments reside in each memory subsystem alone or also in the central executive component that coordinates these processes. In order to elucidate which memory component is impaired, we developed a paradigm with single spatial and object working memory tasks and dual ones with two different delays (5 and 30 s). Fifteen schizophrenic patients and 14 control subjects performed these tests. Schizophrenic patients had a poorer performance compared to normal controls in all tasks and in all time delays. Both schizophrenics and controls performed significantly worse in the object task than in the spatial task. The performance was even worse in the dual task compared to the singles ones in schizophrenic patients but not in controls. These data suggest that visuospatial performance deficits in schizophrenia are due to both visuospatial memory subsystems impairments and central executive ones. The pattern of deficits observed points to a codification or evocation deficit and not to a maintenance one. PMID:15099604

  11. Evaluation of cryogenic power conditioning subsystems for electric propulsion spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Das, R.S.L.; Krauthamer, S.; Frisbee, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    The power requirement of vehicles designed to transport cargo supporting a piloted expedition to Mars is in the range of megawatts. Therefore, it is imperative that the megawatt-class power processing unit designed for high-power nuclear electric propulsion vehicles using turboalternators and advanced magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters should be such that the overall system efficiency is as high as possible with minimum system specific mass. This paper examines the use of cryogenic power conditioning subsystems to achieve that goal since they have very high efficiency. However, in the past, cryogenic power conditioning subsystems have shown complexity of design and implementation and were costly and somewhat uncertain. With recent advances in materials, devices used in power conversion and cooling methods, further improvements in efficiency and specific mass are realizable. Cryogenically cooled MOSFETs and MCTs are considered for power conversion and two configurations have been examined. It is found that a system efficiency of 92.67% and specific mass of 9.99 kg/kW{sub e} can be realized using MOSFET-based cryogenic power conditioning systems for electric propulsion spacecraft using MPD thrusters. With cryogenically cooled MCTs, the specific mass decreases to 9.77 kg/kW{sub e}, but the efficiency also decreases to 90.94%.

  12. ARES I Upper Stage Subsystems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Senick, Paul F.; Tolbert, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    From 2005 through early 2011, NASA conducted concept definition, design, and development of the Ares I launch vehicle. The Ares I was conceived to serve as a crew launch vehicle for beyond-low-Earth-orbit human space exploration missions as part of the Constellation Program Architecture. The vehicle was configured with a single shuttle-derived solid rocket booster first stage and a new liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen upper stage, propelled by a single, newly developed J-2X engine. The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle was to be mated to the forward end of the Ares I upper stage through an interface with fairings and a payload adapter. The vehicle design passed a Preliminary Design Review in August 2008, and was nearing the Critical Design Review when efforts were concluded as a result of the Constellation Program s cancellation. At NASA Glenn Research Center, four subsystems were developed for the Ares I upper stage. These were thrust vector control (TVC) for the J-2X, electrical power system (EPS), purge and hazardous gas (P&HG), and development flight instrumentation (DFI). The teams working each of these subsystems achieved 80 percent or greater design completion and extensive development testing. These efforts were extremely successful representing state-of-the-art technology and hardware advances necessary to achieve Ares I reliability, safety, availability, and performance requirements. This paper documents the designs, development test activity, and results.

  13. Orbits of Subsystems in Four Hierarchical Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    Seven spectroscopic orbits in nearby solar-type multiple stars are presented. The primary of the chromospherically active star HIP 9642 is a 4.8 day double-lined pair; the outer 420 year visual orbit is updated, but remains poorly constrained. HIP 12780 is a quadruple system consisting of the resolved 6.7 year pair FIN 379 Aa,Ab, for which the combined orbit, masses, and orbital parallax are determined here, and the single-lined binary Ba,Bb with a period of 27.8 days. HIP 28790 is a young quintuple system composed of two close binaries, Aa,Ab and Ba,Bb, with periods of 221 and 13 days, respectively, and a single distant component C. Its subsystem Ba,Bb is peculiar, having a spectroscopic mass ratio of 0.89 but a magnitude difference of ∼2.2 mag. HIP 64478 also contains five stars: the A-component is a 29 year visual pair with a previously known 4 day twin subsystem, while the B-component is a contact binary with a period of 5.8 hr, seen nearly pole-on.

  14. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT.

  15. The Integrated Solar Upper Stage engine ground demonstration power management and distribution subsystem design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Kimnach, Greg L.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL), and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) in a joint effort are developing technologies for a solar bimodal system. A solar bimodal system combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A spacecraft Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) bimodal system combines orbital transfer propulsion, electric power generation, and on-board propulsion into one overall system. A key benefit of such integrated system is the augmentation of payload to spacecraft mass ratio thus resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. The NASA/PL/DSWA ISUS program is concentrating efforts on a near-term ground test demonstration of the bimodal concept. A successful ground demonstration of the ISUS various technologies will enable a full system flight demonstration of the bimodal concept. NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland Ohio will be the site for the engine ground demonstrator (EGD). The ISUS bimodal system uses solar concentrators to focus solar energy into an integrated receiver, absorber, and converter (RAC) power plant. The power plant main body is a graphite blackbody that stores thermal energy within a cavity in its main core. During the propulsion phase of the bimodal system a propellant flows into the graphite main core and is distributed uniformly through axial flow channels in the heated cavity. The blackbody core heats the propellant that is then discharged into an output tube thus creating thrust. An array of thermionic generators encircles the graphite core cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions during the power generation phase. The power management and distribution subsystem's main functions are to condition raw electrical power generated by the RAC power plant and deliver it to the spacecraft payloads. This paper

  16. The development of the intrinsic functional connectivity of default network subsystems from age 3 to 5.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yaqiong; Zhai, Hongchang; Friederici, Angela D; Jia, Fucang

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, research on human functional brain imaging using resting-state fMRI techniques has been increasingly prevalent. The term "default mode" was proposed to describe a baseline or default state of the brain during rest. Recent studies suggested that the default mode network (DMN) is comprised of two functionally distinct subsystems: a dorsal-medial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) subsystem involved in self-oriented cognition (i.e., theory of mind) and a medial temporal lobe (MTL) subsystem engaged in memory and scene construction; both subsystems interact with the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) as the core regions of DMN. The present study explored the development of DMN core regions and these two subsystems in both hemispheres from 3- to 5-year-old children. The analysis of the intrinsic activity showed strong developmental changes in both subsystems, and significant changes were specifically found in MTL subsystem, but not in DMPFC subsystem, implying distinct developmental trajectories for DMN subsystems. We found stronger interactions between the DMPFC and MTL subsystems in 5-year-olds, particularly in the left subsystems that support the development of environmental adaptation and relatively complex mental activities. These results also indicate that there is stronger right hemispheric lateralization at age 3, which then changes as bilateral development gradually increases through to age 5, suggesting in turn the hemispheric dominance in DMN subsystems changing with age. The present results provide primary evidence for the development of DMN subsystems in early life, which might be closely related to the development of social cognition in childhood. PMID:25759285

  17. Subsystem Quantum Mechanics and its Applications to Crystalline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Pengfei

    This thesis reports results of the author's investigations along the theme that both dynamic and static properties of molecules and solids can be expressed in terms of their parts from theoretical and applied aspects. Specifically, the following four main results are obtained: (1) A topological analysis of the charge density in crystals has been developed. This is an extension of the theory of molecular structure to crystalline systems. Relationships between the bulk properties of a crystal and its topological structure have been established. A comparison of the topological properties of molecules and crystals have been made. (2) The theory of atoms in molecules has been extended to a crystal and yields a variational definition of a Wigner-Seitz cell. This definition maximizes the relation of the cell to the physical form exhibited by the charge density and the derived structure factors that account, in a natural way, for the observed intensities of scattered electrons and X-rays. It has been demonstrated that the theory of atoms in molecules and crystals can provide a way to model the behaviour of solids. This is done through the use of the fact that atomic properties are often transferable from one system to another. (3) The subsystem variational principle has been reformulated in terms of quantum field theoretical language and the subsystem Feynman path integrals of electrons have been obtained using the coherent representation. This part contributes to the foundation of the theory of atoms in molecules and crystals. (4) Both dynamic and static quantum mechanical subspace techniques have been extensively investigated. A new variational method has been derived for embedding one system in another using the R-matrix formalism within the density functional approach. A formal subspace perturbation scheme has been proposed. These methods aim to obtain the charge distribution of a subsystem starting from known reference systems. Before I came here I was confused about

  18. The global reorganization and revitalization of the asbestos industry, 1970-2007.

    PubMed

    Rice, James

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this essay is to highlight the global reorganization of the asbestos industry over the period 1970-2007. Descriptive analysis illustrates that asbestos consumption in the industrialized countries declined precipitously over this period, in juxtaposition to a notable increase in consumption in the developing countries. In 2007, asbestos consumption in the developing countries was more than two million metric tons but negligible elsewhere in the world economy. The author argues that as asbestos increasingly became the focus of government oversight in the industrialized countries, continued capital accumulation efforts necessitated displacement of risk to the developing countries. The global revitalization of asbestos production and consumption over the period 1970-2007 presents numerous challenges in terms of occupational and environmental health hazards in the developing countries. It has the potential, moreover, to prefigure a significant expansion of asbestos-related disease into the 21st century, absent a global ban on asbestos use. PMID:21563623

  19. Revitalizing sociology: urban life and mental illness between history and the present.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Des; Rose, Nikolas; Singh, Ilina

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a re-thinking of the relationship between sociology and the biological sciences. Tracing lines of connection between the history of sociology and the contemporary landscape of biology, the paper argues for a reconfiguration of this relationship beyond popular rhetorics of 'biologization' or 'medicalization'. At the heart of the paper is a claim that, today, there are some potent new frames for re-imagining the traffic between sociological and biological research - even for 'revitalizing' the sociological enterprise as such. The paper threads this argument through one empirical case: the relationship between urban life and mental illness. In its first section, it shows how this relationship enlivened both early psychiatric epidemiology, and some forms of the new discipline of sociology; it then traces the historical division of these sciences, as the sociological investment in psychiatric questions waned, and 'the social' become marginalized within an increasingly 'biological' psychiatry. In its third section, however, the paper shows how this relationship has lately been revivified, but now by a nuanced epigenetic and neurobiological attention to the links between mental health and urban life. What role can sociology play here? In its final section, the paper shows how this older sociology, with its lively interest in the psychiatric and neurobiological vicissitudes of urban social life, can be our guide in helping to identify intersections between sociological and biological attention. With a new century now underway, the paper concludes by suggesting that the relationship between urban life and mental illness may prove a core testing-ground for a 'revitalized' sociology. PMID:26898388

  20. A model of the mechanisms of language extinction and revitalization strategies to save endangered languages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Valijärvi, Riitta-Liisa; Goldstein, Richard A

    2010-02-01

    Why and how have languages died out? We have devised a mathematical model to help us understand how languages go extinct. We use the model to ask whether language extinction can be prevented in the future and why it may have occurred in the past. A growing number of mathematical models of language dynamics have been developed to study the conditions for language coexistence and death, yet their phenomenological approach compromises their ability to influence language revitalization policy. In contrast, here we model the mechanisms underlying language competition and look at how these mechanisms are influenced by specific language revitalization interventions, namely, private interventions to raise the status of the language and thus promote language learning at home, public interventions to increase the use of the minority language, and explicit teaching of the minority language in schools. Our model reveals that it is possible to preserve a minority language but that continued long-term interventions will likely be necessary. We identify the parameters that determine which interventions work best under certain linguistic and societal circumstances. In this way the efficacy of interventions of various types can be identified and predicted. Although there are qualitative arguments for these parameter values (e.g., the responsiveness of children to learning a language as a function of the proportion of conversations heard in that language, the relative importance of conversations heard in the family and elsewhere, and the amplification of spoken to heard conversations of the high-status language because of the media), extensive quantitative data are lacking in this field. We propose a way to measure these parameters, allowing our model, as well as others models in the field, to be validated. PMID:20504171