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Sample records for air sea fluxes

  1. On the Global Oxygen Anomaly and Air-Sea Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hernan E.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2001-01-01

    A new climatology of monthly air-sea oxygen fluxes throughout the ice-free surface global ocean is presented. The climatology is based on weighted linear least squares regressions using heat flux monthly anomalies for spatial and temporal interpolation of historical O2 data. The seasonal oceanic variations show that the tropical belt (20 S - 20 N) is characterized by relatively small air-sea fluxes when compared to the middle to high latitudes (40 deg - 70 deg). The largest and lowest seasonal fluxes occur during summer and winter in both hemispheres. By means of an atmospheric transport model we show that our climatology is in better agreement with the observed amplitude and phasing of the variations in atmospheric O2/N2 ratios because of seasonal air-sea exchanges at baseline stations in the Pacific Ocean than with previous air-sea O2 climatologies. Our study indicates that the component of the air-sea O2 flux that correlates with heat flux dominates the large-scale air-sea O2 exchange on seasonal timescales. The contribution of each major oceanic basin to the atmospheric observations is described. The seasonal net thermal (SNO(sub T)) and biological (SNO(sub B)) outgassing components of the flux are examined in relation to latitudinal bands, basin-wide, and hemispheric contributions. The Southern Hemisphere's SNO(sub B) (approximately 0.26 Pmol) and SNO(sub T) (approximately 0.29 Pmol) values are larger than the Northern Hemisphere's SNO(sub B) (approximately 0.15 Pmol) and SNO(sub T) (approximately 0.16 Pmol) values (1 Pmol = 10(exp 15) mol). We estimate a global extratropical carbon new production during the outgassing season of 3.7 Pg C (1 Pg = 10(exp 15) g), lower than previous estimates with air-sea O2 climatologies.

  2. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  3. Distribution and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide on the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Repina, I. A.; Dudarev, O. V.; Charkin, A. N.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of long-term studies of the dynamics of carbonate parameters and air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes on the Chukchi Sea shelf during the summer. As a result of the interaction of physical and biological factors, the surface waters on the west of Chukchi Sea were undersaturated with carbon dioxide when compared with atmospheric air; the partial pressure of CO2 varied in the range from 134 to 359 μatm. The average value of CO2 flux in the Chukchi Sea per unit area varied in the range from-2.4 to-22.0 mmol /(m2 day), which is significantly higher than the average value of CO2 flux in the World Ocean. It has been estimated that the minimal mass of C absorbed by the surface of Chukchi Sea from the atmosphere during ice-free season is 13 × 1012 g; a great part of this carbon is transported to the deeper layers of sea and isolated from the atmosphere for a long period of time. The studies of the carbonate system of the Chukchi Sea, especially of its western part, will provide some new data on the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Arctic Ocean and their changes. Our analysis can be used for an interpretation of the satellite assessment of CO2 fluxes and dissolved CO2 distribution in the upper layers of the ocean.

  4. Air-sea exchange fluxes of synthetic polycyclic musks in the North Sea and the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Heemken, Olaf; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-08-15

    Synthetic polycyclic musk fragrances Galaxolide (HHCB) and Tonalide (AHTN) were measured simultaneously in air and seawater in the Arctic and the North Sea and in the rural air of northern Germany. Median concentrations of gas-phase HHCB and AHTN were 4 and 18 pg m(-3) in the Arctic, 28 and 18 pg m(-3) in the North Sea, and 71 and 21 pg m(-3) in northern Germany, respectively. Various ratios of HHCB/AHTN implied that HHCB is quickly removed by atmospheric degradation, while AHTN is relatively persistent in the atmosphere. Dissolved concentrations ranged from 12 to 2030 pg L(-1) for HHCB and from below the method detection limit (3 pg L(-1)) to 965 pg L(-1) for AHTN with median values of 59 and 23 pg L(-1), respectively. The medians of volatilization fluxes for HHCB and AHTN were 27.2 and 14.2 ng m(-2) day(-1) and the depositional fluxes were 5.9 and 3.3 ng m(-2) day(-1), respectively, indicating water-to-air volatilization is a significant process to eliminate HHCB and AHTN from the North Sea. In the Arctic, deposition fluxes dominated the air-sea gas exchange of HHCB and AHTN, suggesting atmospheric input controls the levels of HHCB and AHTN in the polar region.

  5. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  6. [Distribution and air-sea fluxes of methane in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea in the spring].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xing-Peng; Zhang, Gui-Ling; Ma, Xiao; Zhang, Guo-Ling; Liu, Su-Mei

    2013-07-01

    A survey was carried out in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea from March 17 to April 06 of 2011. Dissolved CH4 in various depths were measured and sea-to-air fluxes were estimated. Methane concentrations in surface and bottom waters ranged between 2.39-29.67 nmol x L(-1) and 2.63-30.63 nmol x L(-1), respectively. Methane concentrations in bottom waters were slightly higher than those in surface waters, suggesting the existence of methane source in bottom waters or sediments. The horizontal distribution of dissolved CH4 showed a decrease from the river mouth to the open sea, and was influenced by the freshwater discharge and the Kuroshio intrusion. Surface methane saturations ranged from 93%-1 038%. Sea to air CH4 fluxes were (2.85 +/- 5.11) micromol x (m2 x d)(-1) (5.18 +/- 9.99) micromol x (m2 x d)(-1) respectively, calculated using the Liss and Merlivat (LM86), the Wanninkhof (W92) relationships and in situ wind speeds, and estimated emission rates of methane from the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea range from 7.05 x 10(-2) - 12.0 x 10(-2) Tg x a(-1) and 1.17 x 10(-2) - 2.20 x 10(-2) Tg x a(-1), respectively. The Yellow Sea and East China Sea are the net sources of atmospheric methane in the spring.

  7. Air-sea interaction and surface flux in non-equilibrium sea-states

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, G.; Ek, M.; Mahrt, L.

    1994-12-31

    The wind forcing over the ocean determines the air-sea exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum which affect and drive the surface wave dynamics and the mixed layer circulation. In turn, it has been shown that wave dynamics and wave age affect ocean surface roughness and air-sea exchange processes so that the wind flow is not always in equilibrium with the ocean surface waves. This effect of wave spectrum on surface roughness has been discussed by many authors; yet it is rarely, if ever, accounted for in flux parameterization in models of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Proper representation of these effects in both remote sensors` signal to geophysical-parameter models and in physical models of the ocean and the atmosphere on all scales is essential given the increased reliance of ocean monitoring systems on remote sea-surface sensors and the fundamental sensitivity of physical models to surface fluxes. In this paper the authors present a methodology for modeling these effects from data along with some results from data analyses of observations taken in two field experiments.

  8. Simulation-based study of air-sea momentum fluxes nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xuanting; Shen, Lian

    2015-11-01

    Momentum fluxes at sea surface are crucial to air-sea interactions. In nearshore regions, the bathymetry variation has a significant impact on the surface wave field and complicates the momentum fluxes at water surface. In this study, we extend a high order spectral method to address wave-bottom interactions and wave modeling. From the wave simulation data, we use the Hilbert-Huang transform to quantify the properties of the wave spectrum, based on which the wave field is reconstructed for the detailed mechanistic study of wind-wave interactions using large-eddy simulation for the wind field. The roughness of the water surface is quantified using a dynamic model for the effects of subgrid-scale waves. The results show that the waves are sensitive to the water depth variation. Associated with the changes in the wave field, the momentum fluxes at the air-sea interface increase in shallow regions.

  9. Climatic Impacts of a Stochastic Parameterization of Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The atmosphere and ocean are coupled by the exchange of fluxes across the ocean surface. Air-sea fluxes vary partly on scales that are too small and fast to be resolved explicitly in numerical models of weather and climate, making them a candidate for stochastic parameterization. This presentation proposes a nonlinear physical mechanism by which stochastic fluctuations in the air-sea buoyancy flux may modify the mean climate, even though the mean fluctuation is zero. The mechanism relies on a fundamental asymmetry in the physics of the ocean mixed layer: positive surface buoyancy fluctuations cannot undo the vertical mixing caused by negative fluctuations. The mechanism has much in common with Stommel's mixed-layer demon. The presentation demonstrates the mechanism in climate simulations with a comprehensive coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (SINTEX-G). In the SINTEX-G simulations with stochastic air-sea buoyancy fluxes, significant changes are detected in the time-mean oceanic mixed-layer depth, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric Hadley circulation, and net upward water flux at the sea surface. Also, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability is significantly increased. The findings demonstrate that noise-induced drift and noise-enhanced variability, which are familiar concepts from simple climate models, continue to apply in comprehensive climate models with millions of degrees of freedom. The findings also suggest that the lack of representation of sub-grid variability in air-sea fluxes may contribute to some of the biases exhibited by contemporary climate models.

  10. Ocean Winds and Turbulent Air-Sea Fluxes Inferred From Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.; Gille, Sarah T.; Jackson, Daren L.; Roberts, J. Brent; Wick, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-sea turbulent fluxes determine the exchange of momentum, heat, freshwater, and gas between the atmosphere and ocean. These exchange processes are critical to a broad range of research questions spanning length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers and time scales from hours to decades. Examples are discussed (section 2). The estimation of surface turbulent fluxes from satellite is challenging and fraught with considerable errors (section 3); however, recent developments in retrievals (section 3) will greatly reduce these errors. Goals for the future observing system are summarized in section 4. Surface fluxes are defined as the rate per unit area at which something (e.g., momentum, energy, moisture, or CO Z ) is transferred across the air/sea interface. Wind- and buoyancy-driven surface fluxes are called surface turbulent fluxes because the mixing and transport are due to turbulence. Examples of nonturbulent processes are radiative fluxes (e.g., solar radiation) and precipitation (Schmitt et al., 2010). Turbulent fluxes are strongly dependent on wind speed; therefore, observations of wind speed are critical for the calculation of all turbulent surface fluxes. Wind stress, the vertical transport of horizontal momentum, also depends on wind direction. Stress is very important for many ocean processes, including upper ocean currents (Dohan and Maximenko, 2010) and deep ocean currents (Lee et al., 2010). On short time scales, this horizontal transport is usually small compared to surface fluxes. For long-term processes, transport can be very important but again is usually small compared to surface fluxes.

  11. Parameterization of Sea-Spray Impact on Air-Sea Momentum and Heat Fluxes in Hurricane Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jian-Wen; Fairall, Chris; Michelson, Sara; Bianco, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Although it is widely recognized that sea spray under hurricane-strength winds is omnipresent in the marine surface boundary layer (MSBL), how to parameterize the effects of sea spray on the air-sea momentum and heat fluxes at hurricane-strength winds in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models still remains a subject of research. This paper focuses on how the effects of sea spray on the momentum and heat fluxes are parameterized in NWP models using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In this scheme, the effects of sea spray can be considered as an additional modification to the stratification of the near surface profiles of wind, temperature and moisture in the MSBL. The overall impact of sea-spray droplets on the mean profiles of wind, temperature and moisture depends on the wind speed at the level of sea-spray generation (or wave state if available). As the wind speed increases, the droplet size increases, rendering an increase in the spray-mediated total enthalpy flux from the sea to the air and leveling off of the surface drag. When the wind is below 35 ms-1, the droplets are small in size and tend to evaporate substantially and thus cool the spray-filled layer. When the wind is above 50 ms-1, the size of droplets is so big that they do not have enough time to evaporate that much before falling back into the sea. Furthermore, the scheme includes the physics of the suspended sea-spray droplets reducing the buoyancy of the MSBL air, therefore making the surface layer more stable. Results from testing the scheme in a numerical weather prediction model are presented along with a dynamical interpretation of the impact of sea spray on the intensification of tropical cyclones.

  12. Distributions and sea-to-air fluxes of nitrous oxide in the South China Sea and the West Philippines Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsiao-Chun; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Borges, Alberto V.; DelValls, T. Angel; Lai, Chao-Ming; Chen, Ting-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 600 water samples from the South China Sea (SCS) and 250 water samples from the West Philippines Sea (WPS) were collected during seven cruises from August 2003 to July 2007 to determine nitrous oxide (N2O) distributions between the surface and a maximum depth of 4250 m. In the SCS, the average surface N2O concentration exceeded the atmospheric equilibrium concentration (on average 132±23%); however in the WPS, the surface N2O concentration was lower than the atmospheric equilibrium concentration (on average 90±22%). The N2O concentration reached a maximum (~23 nmol L-1) in the WPS at 800-1000 m, and (~28 nmol L-1) at a shallower depth of around 600-800 m in the SCS, owing to vertical mixing and intensive upwelling in the SCS. In the SCS, the surface N2O concentration was 7.59±1.32 nmol L-1 and the calculated sea-to-air flux was 5.5±3.9 μmol m-2 d-1. The surface N2O concentration in the WPS, 5.19±1.26 nmol L-1, was lower than that in the SCS. The WPS is a sink for N2O and the calculated sea-to-air flux was -1.7±3.9 μmol m-2 d-1. The SCS emitted 19.3×106 mol d-1 N2O to the atmosphere and exported 8.5×106 mol d-1 N2O to the WPS during the wet season.

  13. Annual and seasonal fCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Chierici, M.; Counillon, F.; Omar, A.; Nondal, G.; Johannessen, T.; Olsen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Barents Sea is the strongest CO2 sink in the Arctic region, yet estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux in this area show a large span reflecting uncertainty as well as significant variability both seasonally and regionally. Here we use a previously unpublished data set of seawater CO2 fugacity (fCO2), and map these data over the western Barents Sea through multivariable linear regressions with SeaWiFS/MODIS remote sensing and TOPAZ model data fields. We find that two algorithms are necessary in order to cover the full seasonal cycle, mainly because not all proxy variables are available for the entire year, and because variability in fCO2 is driven by different mechanisms in summer and winter. A comprehensive skill assessment indicates that there is a good overall correspondence between observations and predictions. The algorithms are also validated using two independent data sets, with good results. The gridded fCO2 fields reveal tight links between water mass distribution and fCO2 in all months, and particularly in winter. The seasonal cycle show peaks in the total air-sea CO2 influx in May and September, caused by respectively biological drawdown of CO2 and low sea ice concentration leaving a large open water area. For 2007 the annual average air-sea CO2 flux is - 48 ± 5 gC m- 2, which is comparable to previous estimates.

  14. Comparisons of Ship-based Observations of Air-Sea Energy Budgets with Gridded Flux Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Blomquist, B.

    2015-12-01

    Air-surface interactions are characterized directly by the fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture, trace gases, and particles near the interface. In the last 20 years advances in observation technologies have greatly expanded the database of high-quality direct (covariance) turbulent flux and irradiance observations from research vessels. In this paper, we will summarize observations from the NOAA sea-going flux system from participation in various field programs executed since 1999 and discuss comparisons with several gridded flux products. We will focus on comparisons of turbulent heat fluxes and solar and IR radiative fluxes. The comparisons are done for observing programs in the equatorial Pacific and Indian Oceans and SE subtropical Pacific.

  15. Application of the Hilbert-Huang Transform to the Estimation of Air-Sea Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Song, Jinbao; Huang, Yansong; Fan, Conghui

    2013-06-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to analyzing the turbulent time series obtained within the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean. A method based on the HHT is introduced to reduce the influence of non-turbulent motions on the eddy-covariance based flux by removing non-turbulent modes from the time series. The scale dependence of the flux is examined and a gap mode is identified to distinguish between turbulent modes and non-turbulent modes. To examine the effectiveness of this method it is compared with three conventional methods (block average, moving-window average, and multi-resolution decomposition). The data used are from three sonic anemometers installed on a moored buoy at about 6, 4 and 2.7 m height above the sea surface. For each method, along-wind and cross-wind momentum fluxes and sensible heat fluxes at the three heights are calculated. According to the assumption of a constant-flux layer, there should be no significant difference between the fluxes at the three heights. The results show that the fluxes calculated using HHT exhibit a smaller difference and higher correlation than the other methods. These results support the successful application of HHT to the estimation of air-sea turbulent fluxes.

  16. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R. M.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet it remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 PgC yr-1 is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 PgC yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the southern Indian Ocean (18-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), overestimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but overestimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by ocean biogeochemical models (OBGMs) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predicted an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than that found by atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric

  17. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the Southern Indian Ocean (18° S-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1) are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), over estimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by a lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but over estimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by Ocean BioGeochemical Models (OBGM) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predict an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric inversions

  18. Assessing the potential for dimethylsulfide enrichment at the sea surface and its influence on air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Carolyn F.; Harvey, Mike J.; Smith, Murray J.; Bell, Thomas G.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Marriner, Andrew S.; McGregor, John A.; Law, Cliff S.

    2016-09-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) to the atmosphere is generally inferred using water sampled at or below 2 m depth, thereby excluding any concentration anomalies at the air-sea interface. Two independent techniques were used to assess the potential for near-surface DMS enrichment to influence DMS emissions and also identify the factors influencing enrichment. DMS measurements in productive frontal waters over the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, did not identify any significant gradients between 0.01 and 6 m in sub-surface seawater, whereas DMS enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer was variable, with a mean enrichment factor (EF; the concentration ratio between DMS in the sea-surface microlayer and in sub-surface water) of 1.7. Physical and biological factors influenced sea-surface microlayer DMS concentration, with high enrichment (EF > 1.3) only recorded in a dinoflagellate-dominated bloom, and associated with low to medium wind speeds and near-surface temperature gradients. On occasion, high DMS enrichment preceded periods when the air-sea DMS flux, measured by eddy covariance, exceeded the flux calculated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coupled-Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment (COARE) parameterized gas transfer velocities and measured sub-surface seawater DMS concentrations. The results of these two independent approaches suggest that air-sea emissions may be influenced by near-surface DMS production under certain conditions, and highlight the need for further study to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of DMS production in the sea-surface microlayer.

  19. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  20. Regulation of CO2 Air Sea Fluxes by Sediments in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Pätsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nicola; Salt, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    A multi-tracer approach is applied to assess the impact of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) on the acid-base buffering capacity, and overall biogeochemistry, of the North Sea. Analyses of both basin-wide observations in the North Sea and transects through tidal basins at the North-Frisian coastline, reveal that surface distributions of the δ13C signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are predominantly controlled by a balance between biological production and respiration. In particular, variability in metabolic DIC throughout stations in the well-mixed southern North Sea indicates the presence of an external carbon source, which is traced to the European continental coastline using naturally-occurring radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra). 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (AT) compared to the more conventional use of salinity. Coastal inputs of metabolic DIC and AT are calculated on a basin-wide scale, and ratios of these inputs suggest denitrification as a primary metabolic pathway for their formation. The AT input paralleling the metabolic DIC release prevents a significant decline in pH as compared to aerobic (i.e. unbuffered) release of metabolic DIC. Finally, long-term pH trends mimic those of riverine nitrate loading, highlighting the importance of coastal AT production via denitrification in regulating pH in the southern North Sea.

  1. Large Temporal Variations in Air-Sea CO2 Flux off the Coast of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Sabine, C.; Cai, W.; Alin, S.

    2008-12-01

    Though the inner shelf is a small portion of global ocean area, its air-sea CO2 flux is disproportionately high. Due to its tight links with both terrestrial and oceanic systems, the inner shelf is likely to experience significant spatial and temporal variability. We measured the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) continuously from July 2006 to June 2008 on a moored platform in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary on Georgia's inner shelf. The long-term, high temporal resolution data has allowed us to begin to measure interannual variations in CO2 flux along the inner Georgia shelf. From July 2006-June 2007, the inner Georgia shelf was a CO2 sink (-3.26mmol/m2/day), while during following year, the shelf switched to being a source (2.26mmol/m2/day). Choice of wind data (satellite or buoy-derived) significantly alters these estimates of annual fluxes. QuikSCAT satellite wind data indicate a much larger sink (- 6.13mmol/m2/day) during 2006-2007, and a non-existent source (0.02mmol/m2/day) during 2007- 2008. An earlier, high-resolution spatial study from January 2005-May 2006 found that the inner shelf within the South Atlantic Bight may have been a source of 0.65 to 1.20mmol/m2/day, suggesting that the inner shelf may experience dramatic swings in CO2 flux. Though sea-surface temperature (SST) is the largest influence on surface water fCO2, average monthly SST varied little between both years; instead, possible explanations for the large variation in interannual CO2 flux include decreased biological production and increased river flow (and, hence carbon export) during 2007-2008. This is the first evidence of large-scale, annual switches in air-sea CO2 flux within an inner shelf, and it holds significant implications for global estimates of air-sea CO2 flux.

  2. Mechanisms controlling the SST air-sea heat flux feedback and its dependence on spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Ute; Czaja, Arnaud; Marshall, John

    2016-05-01

    The turbulent air-sea heat flux feedback (α , in {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} ) is a major contributor to setting the damping timescale of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. In this study we compare the spatial distribution and magnitude of α in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, as estimated from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The comparison is rationalized in terms of an upper bound on the heat flux feedback, associated with "fast" atmospheric export of temperature and moisture anomalies away from the marine boundary layer, and a lower bound associated with "slow" export. It is found that regions of cold surface waters (≤ 10° C) are best described as approaching the slow export limit. This conclusion is not only valid at the synoptic scale resolved by the reanalysis data, but also on basin scales. In particular, it applies to the heat flux feedback acting as circumpolar SST anomaly scales are approached in the Southern Ocean, with feedbacks of ≤ 10 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . In contrast, the magnitude of the heat flux feedback is close to that expected from the fast export limit over the Gulf Stream and its recirculation with values on the order of ≈40 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . Further analysis suggests that this high value reflects a compensation between a moderate thermodynamic adjustment of the boundary layer, which tends to weaken the heat flux feedback, and an enhancement of the surface winds over warm SST anomalies, which tend to enhance the feedback.

  3. Extreme air-sea surface turbulent fluxes in mid latitudes - estimation, origins and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, Sergey; Natalia, Tilinina

    2014-05-01

    provide locally high winds and air-sea temperature gradients. For this purpose we linked characteristics of cyclone activity over the midlatitudinal oceans with the extreme surface turbulent heat fluxes. Cyclone tracks and parameters of cyclone life cycle (deepening rates, propagation velocities, life time and clustering) were derived from the same reanalyses using state of the art numerical tracking algorithm. The main questions addressed in this study are (i) through which mechanisms extreme surface fluxes are associated with cyclone activity? and (ii) which types of cyclones are responsible for forming extreme turbulent fluxes? Our analysis shows that extreme surface fluxes are typically associated not with cyclones themselves but rather with cyclone-anticyclone interaction zones. This implies that North Atlantic and North Pacific series of intense cyclones do not result in the anomalous surface fluxes. Alternatively, extreme fluxes are most frequently associated with blocking situations, particularly with the intensification of the Siberian and North American Anticyclones providing cold-air outbreaks over WBC regions.

  4. Influence of precipitation on the CO2 air-sea flux, an eddy covariance field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarsky, Alexander; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2016-04-01

    During the SPACES-OASIS cruise (July-August 2015) from Durban, SA to Male, MV direct fluxes of CO2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The cruise covered areas of sources and sinks for atmospheric CO2, where the bulk concentration gradient measurements resembled the Takahashi (2009) climatology. Most of the time, bulk CO2 fluxes (F=k* [cwater-cair]), calculated with the parametrization (k) by Nightingale et al. 2000, were in general agreement with direct EC measurements. However, during heavy rain events, the directly measured CO2 fluxes were 4 times higher than predicted. It has been previously described that rain influences the k parametrization of air-sea gas exchange, but this alone cannot explain the measured discrepancy. There is evidence that freshwater input and a change in the carbonate chemistry causes the water side concentration of ?c=cwater-cair to decrease. Unfortunately this cannot be detected by most bulk measurement systems. Using the flux measurements of an additional gas like DMS, this rain influence can be evaluated as DMS does not react to changes in the carbonate system and has a different solubility. A pending question is if the enhanced flux of CO2 in the ocean is sequestered into the ocean mixed layer and below. This question will be tackled using the GOTM model to understand the implications for the global carbon cycle.

  5. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  6. Sea-air carbon dioxide fluxes along 35°S in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lencina-Avila, J. M.; Ito, R. G.; Garcia, C. A. E.; Tavano, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The oceans play an important role in absorbing a significant fraction of the atmospheric CO2 surplus, but there are still uncertainties concerning several open ocean regions, such as the under-sampled South Atlantic Ocean. This study assessed the net sea-air CO2 fluxes and distribution of sea-surface CO2 fugacity (f C O2sw) along the 35°S latitude in the South Atlantic, during 2011 spring and early summer periods. Underway CO2 molar fraction, temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were taken continuously from South American to South African continental shelves. Values of both satellite and discrete in situ chlorophyll-a concentration along the ship's track were used as ancillary data. Both f C O2sw and difference in sea-air fugacity (ΔfCO2) showed high variability along the cruise track, with higher values found on the continental shelf and slope regions. All ΔfCO2 values were negative, implying that a sinking process was occurring during the cruise period, with an average net CO2 flux of -3.1±2.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 (using Wanninkhof, 1992). Physical variables were the main drivers of f C O2sw variability in South American continental shelf and open ocean regions, while the biological factor dominated the South African continental shelf. Algorithms for estimating fCO2 and temperature-normalized fCO2 were developed and applied separately to the three defined sub-regions: the South American shelf, the open ocean and the South African continental shelf, with the regional temperature-normalized fCO2 models showing better results.

  7. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  8. Oceanic distributions and air-sea fluxes of biogenic halocarbons in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuck, Adele L.; Turner, Suzanne M.; Liss, Peter S.

    2005-10-01

    Surface seawater and atmospheric concentrations of methyl iodide, chloroiodomethane, bromoform, dichlorobromomethane, and chlorodibromethane were measured during three open ocean cruises in the Atlantic and Southern oceans. The measurements spanned a longitudinal range of 115°, between 50°N and 65°S. The saturation anomalies and the instantaneous air-sea fluxes of the gases during one of these cruises (ANT XVIII/1) are presented and discussed. Methyl iodide and chloroiodomethane were highly supersaturated (>1000%) throughout the temperate and tropical regions, with calculated mean fluxes of 15 and 5.5 nmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The oceanic emissions of the brominated compounds were less substantial, and a significant area of the temperate Atlantic Ocean was found to be a sink for bromoform. Correlation analyses have been used to investigate possible controls on the concentrations of these gases. In particular, the relationship of CH3I with sea surface temperature and light is discussed, with the tentative conclusion that this compound may be formed abiotically.

  9. Air-Sea Methane Flux after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, J.; Sweeney, C.; Kiene, R. P.; McGillis, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key questions associated with the Deepwater Horizon's (DWH) oil leak involves understanding how much of its methane is still entrained in deep waters. Analysis of air-sea fluxes reveals a slight decrease in average aqueous CH4 from 3.3 nM in June to 3.1 and 2.8 nM in August and September, respectively. The flux estimate showed higher methane flux to the atmosphere after the blowout was capped (3.8 μmol m-2 d-1 in August) compared to 0.024 μmol m-2 d-1 during the leak. Almost all observations were within the range of historical levels. The exception was one large peak to the southwest of the wellhead, but its contribution to atmospheric methane is found to be insignificant compared to the total amount of methane released by the leak. This result supports findings that DWH methane remained entrained in the deep waters and consequently is available for biological degradation and threatens to deplete oxygen, adding further stress to an area that already suffers from anoxic-induced dead zones.

  10. Distribution and Sea-to-air Flux of Nitrous Oxide in the East China Sea during the Summer of 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Zhang, Guiling; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Li, Jia; Liu, Sumei; Ye, Wangwang; Han, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) at different depths of 73 stations in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and the East China Sea (ECS) were determined from August 4 to 31 of 2013, and the sea-to-air fluxes of N2O were also estimated in this study. N2O concentrations in the surface waters ranged from 6.33 to 44.40 nmol L-1 with an average of (9.27±4.30) nmol L-1 and the values in the bottom waters ranged from 5.19 to 26.98 nmol L-1 with an average of (11.87±3.71) nmol L-1. The concentrations of N2O decreased with distance from the Changjiang Estuary to the open sea. The vertical distributions of N2O indicated great spatial variations. A region of significant bottom-water hypoxia, with oxygen concentration less than 1.5 mg L-1, occurred at the north of the ECS, and increased bottom N2O concentrations was observed. Frequent vertical mixing may enhance the emission of N2O from this hypoxic area. N2O in the surface waters of all stations were over-saturated, and the N2O saturations ranged from 106% to 658%, with an average of (149±62)%. We estimated the sea-to-air fluxes of N2O as (30.6±59.1) μmol m-2 d-1 from the Changjiang Estuary, (9.8±8.8) μmol m-2 d-1 from the coastal and shelf, and (21.0±12.7) μmol m-2 d-1 from the continental slope using the Wanninkhof 1992 equation, (24.9±47.2) μmol m-2 d-1, (8.0±6.7) μmol m-2 d-1 and (16.5±9.6) μmol m-2 d-1 using the Nightingale 2000 equation, respectively. N2O emission from the ECS was estimated to be about (8.2-16.0)×10-2 Tg-N2O yr-1, suggesting that the ECS was a significant net source of atmospheric N2O.

  11. OAFlux Satellite-Based High-Resolution Analysis of Air-Sea Turbulent Heat, Moisture, and Momentum Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lisan

    2016-04-01

    The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has recently developed a new suite of products: the satellite-based high-resolution (HR) air-sea turbulent heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes over the global ocean from 1987 to the present. The OAFlux-HR fluxes are computed from the COARE bulk algorithm using air-sea variables (vector wind, near-surface humidity and temperature, and ocean surface temperature) derived from multiple satellite sensors and multiple missions. The vector wind time series are merged from 14 satellite sensors, including 4 scatterometers and 10 passive microwave radiometers. The near-surface humidity and temperature time series are retrieved from 11 satellite sensors, including 7 microwave imagers and 4 microwave sounders. The endeavor has greatly improved the depiction of the air-sea turbulent exchange on the frontal and meso-scales. The OAFlux-HR turbulent flux products are valuable datasets for a broad range of studies, including the study of the long-term change and variability in the oean-surface forcing functions, quantification of the large-scale budgets of mass, heat, and freshwater, and assessing the role of the ocean in the change and variability of the Earth's climate.

  12. Response of air-sea carbon fluxes and climate to orbital forcing changes in the Community Climate System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, M.; Peacock, S.; Moore, K.; Lindsay, K.

    2010-07-01

    A global general circulation model coupled to an ocean ecosystem model is used to quantify the response of carbon fluxes and climate to changes in orbital forcing. Compared to the present-day simulation, the simulation with the Earth's orbital parameters from 115,000 years ago features significantly cooler northern high latitudes but only moderately cooler southern high latitudes. This asymmetry is explained by a 30% reduction of the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation that is caused by an increased Arctic sea ice export and a resulting freshening of the North Atlantic. The strong northern high-latitude cooling and the direct insolation induced tropical warming lead to global shifts in precipitation and winds to the order of 10%-20%. These climate shifts lead to regional differences in air-sea carbon fluxes of the same order. However, the differences in global net air-sea carbon fluxes are small, which is due to several effects, two of which stand out: first, colder sea surface temperature leads to a more effective solubility pump but also to increased sea ice concentration which blocks air-sea exchange, and second, the weakening of Southern Ocean winds that is predicted by some idealized studies occurs only in part of the basin, and is compensated by stronger winds in other parts.

  13. Contribution of tropical cyclones to the air-sea CO2 flux: A global view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LéVy, M.; Lengaigne, M.; Bopp, L.; Vincent, E. M.; Madec, G.; Ethé, C.; Kumar, D.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.

    2012-06-01

    Previous case studies have illustrated the strong local influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on CO2 air-sea flux ? suggesting that they can significantly contribute to the global ? In this study, we use a state-of-the art global ocean biochemical model driven by TCs wind forcing derived from a historical TCs database, allowing to sample the ? response under 1663 TCs. Our results evidence a very weak contribution of TCs to global ? one or two order of magnitude smaller than previous estimates extrapolated from case studies. This result arises from several competing effects involved in the ? response to TCs, not accounted for in previous studies. While previous estimates have hypothesized the ocean to be systematically oversaturated in CO2 under TCs, our results reveal that a similar proportion of TCs occur over oversaturated regions (i.e. the North Atlantic, Northeast Pacific and the Arabian Sea) and undersaturated regions (i.e. Westernmost North Pacific, South Indian and Pacific Ocean). Consequently, by increasing the gas exchange coefficient, TCs can generate either instantaneous CO2 flux directed from the ocean to the atmosphere (efflux) or the opposite (influx), depending on the CO2 conditions at the time of the TC passage. A large portion of TCs also occurs over regions where the ocean and the atmosphere are in near equilibrium, resulting in very weak instantaneous fluxes. Previous estimates also did not account for any asynchronous effect of TCs on ? during several weeks after the storm, oceanic pCO2 is reduced in response to vertical mixing, which systematically causes an influx anomaly. This implies that, contrary to previous estimates, TCs weakly affect the CO2 efflux when they blow over supersaturated areas because the instantaneous storm wind effect and post-storm mixing effect oppose with each other. In contrast, TCs increase the CO2 influx in undersaturated conditions because the two effects add up. These compensating effects result in a very weak

  14. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Impact of Rain on Regional and Global Sea-Air Fluxes of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, J. D.; Land, P. E.; Woolf, D. K.; Quartly, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    The global oceans are considered a major sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Rain is known to alter the physical and chemical conditions at the sea surface, and thus influence the transfer of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. It can influence gas exchange through enhanced gas transfer velocity, the direct export of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean, by altering the sea skin temperature, and through surface layer dilution. However, to date, very few studies quantifying these effects on global net sea-air fluxes exist. Here, we include terms for the enhanced gas transfer velocity and the direct export of carbon in calculations of the global net sea-air fluxes, using a 7-year time series of monthly global climate quality satellite remote sensing observations, model and in-situ data. The use of a non-linear relationship between the effects of rain and wind significantly reduces the estimated impact of rain-induced surface turbulence on the rate of sea-air gas transfer, when compared to a linear relationship. Nevertheless, globally, the rain enhanced gas transfer and rain induced direct export increase the estimated annual oceanic integrated net sink of CO2 by up to 6%. Regionally, the variations can be larger, with rain increasing the estimated annual net sink in the Pacific Ocean by up to 15% and altering monthly net flux by > ± 50%. Based on these analyses, the impacts of rain should be included in the uncertainty analysis of studies that estimate net sea-air fluxes of CO2 as the rain can have a considerable impact, dependent upon the region and timescale. PMID:27673683

  15. Air-sea CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance in a coastal station in Baja California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, L.; Ocampo-Torres, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of wave-associated parameters controlling turbulent CO2 fluxes through the air-sea water interface is evaluated in a coastal region. The study area, located within the Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México, was found to be a weak sink of CO2 with a mean flux of -1.32 µmol m-2s-1. The low correlation found between flux and wind speed (r = 0.09), suggests that the influence of other forcing mechanisms, besides wind, is important for gas transfer modulation through the sea surface, at least for the conditions found in this study. In addition, the results suggest that for short periods where an intensification of the wave conditions occurs, a CO2 flux response increases the transport of gas to the ocean.

  16. Using an ensemble data set of turbulent air-sea fluxes to evaluate the IPSL climate model in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina; Servonnat, Jerome; Braconnot, Pascale

    2014-05-01

    Low-latitude turbulent ocean-atmosphere fluxes play a major role in the ocean and atmosphere dynamics, heat distribution and availability for meridional transport to higher latitudes, as well as for the global freshwater cycle. Their representation in coupled ocean-atmosphere models is thus of chief importance in climate simulations. Despite numerous reports of important observational uncertainties in large-scale turbulent flux products, only few model flux evaluation studies attempt to quantify and directly consider these uncertainties. To address this problem for large-scale, climatological flux evaluation, we assemble a comprehensive database of 14 climatological surface flux products, including in situ-based, satellite, hybrid and reanalysis data sets. We develop an associated analysis protocol and use it together with this database to offer an observational ensemble approach to model flux evaluation. We use this approach to perform an evaluation of the representation of the intertropical turbulent air-sea fluxes in a suite of CMIP5 historical simulations run with different recent versions of the IPSL model. To enhance model understanding, we consider both coupled and forced atmospheric model configurations. For the same purpose, we not only analyze the surface fluxes, but also their associated meteorological state variables and inter-variable relationships. We identify an important, systematic underestimation of the near-surface wind speed and a significant exaggeration of the sea-air temperature contrast in all the IPSL model versions considered. Furthermore, the coupled model simulations develop important sea surface temperature and associated air humidity bias patterns. Counterintuitively, these biases do not systematically transfer to significant biases in the surface fluxes. This is due to a combination of compensation of effects and the large flux observational spread. Our analyses reveal several inconsistencies in inter-variable relationships between

  17. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  18. CLIVAR-GSOP/GODAE Ocean Synthesis Inter-Comparison of Global Air-Sea Fluxes From Ocean and Coupled Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The GODAE OceanView and CLIVAR-GSOP ocean synthesis program has been assessing the degree of consistency between global air-sea flux data sets obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses (Valdivieso et al., 2014). So far, fifteen global air-sea heat flux products obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses have been examined: seven are from low-resolution ocean reanalyses (BOM PEODAS, ECMWF ORAS4, JMA/MRI MOVEG2, JMA/MRI MOVECORE, Hamburg Univ. GECCO2, JPL ECCOv4, and NCEP GODAS), five are from eddy-permitting ocean reanalyses developed as part of the EU GMES MyOcean program (Mercator GLORYS2v1, Reading Univ. UR025.3, UR025.4, UKMO GloSea5, and CMCC C-GLORS), and the remaining three are couple reanalyses based on coupled climate models (JMA/MRI MOVE-C, GFDL ECDA and NCEP CFSR). The global heat closure in the products over the period 1993-2009 spanned by all data sets is presented in comparison with observational and atmospheric reanalysis estimates. Then, global maps of ensemble spread in the seasonal cycle, and of the Signal to Noise Ratio of interannual flux variability over the 17-yr common period are shown to illustrate the consistency between the products. We have also studied regional variability in the products, particularly at the OceanSITES project locations (such as, for instance, the TAO/TRITON and PIRATA arrays in the Tropical Pacific and Atlantic, respectively). Comparisons are being made with other products such as OAFlux latent and sensible heat fluxes (Yu et al., 2008) combined with ISCCP satellite-based radiation (Zhang et al., 2004), the ship-based NOC2.0 product (Berry and Kent, 2009), the Large and Yeager (2009) hybrid flux dataset CORE.2, and two atmospheric reanalysis products, the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis (referred to as ERAi, Dee et al., 2011) and the NCEP/DOE reanalysis R2 (referred to as NCEP-R2, Kanamitsu et al., 2002). Preliminary comparisons with the observational flux products from OceanSITES are also underway. References Berry, D

  19. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  20. Characterization of Sea-Air Methane Fluxes Around a Seafloor Gas Seep in the Central Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geibel, M. C.; Thornton, B. F.; Prytherch, J.; Brooks, I. M.; Salisbury, D. J.; Tjernstrom, M. K. H.; Semiletov, I. P.; Mörth, C. M.; Humborg, C.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of CH4 released from thawing subsea permafrost on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is unclear. In recent years, interest has focused on the possibility of large emissions of CH4 directly to the atmosphere from this remote area. It is uncertain how high those emissions are and whether they are primarily of biogenic or thermogenic nature, or some combination of sources. The SWERUS-C3 expedition onboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden during July-August 2014 sought to document possible CH4 release from subsea permafrost, and to understand mechanisms and magnitudes of such CH4 being released to the atmosphere. During the first leg of the expedition continuous high-resolution measurements were made to determine the in situ concentrations of CH4 in both the atmosphere and surface water. During SWERUS-C3, several underwater gas flares were found within the ESAS region showing elevated CH4 concentrations collocated in the surface waters. Here we focus on one seep area, a so-called "mega-flare" site, in the central Laptev Sea. Over individual gas flares of this site the surface water concentration of CH4 reached as high as 200ppm. The atmospheric concentrations of CH4 briefly (< 1 s) reached a maximum of ~3.2 ppm. More typical atmospheric values around the seeps were between 1.9-2.0 ppm (background values were approximately 1.88 ppm). However, such peak concentrations in both air and water were highly localized, returning to background levels within a few hundred meters of the source seeps. Together with continuous high-precision eddy-covariance measurements that were made during the SWERUS-C3 expedition, the combined dataset allows an intensive analysis these highly inhomogeneous gas flares. This gives the opportunity to calculate accurate high-resolution CH4 fluxes and thus give a better insight into the current rates of subsea CH4 outgassing reaching the atmosphere.

  1. Dissolved methane concentration profiles and air-sea fluxes from 41°S to 27°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Cheryl A.; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2002-07-01

    Water column samples from a transect cruise from southern Chile through the Panama Canal to the Gulf of Mexico were used to determine dissolved methane depth profiles and air-sea methane fluxes. In the Gulf of Mexico, surface concentrations were approximately 40% supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere, whereas near the equator and in the Peru upwelling region, 10-20% supersaturation generally occurred. These saturation ratios translate into an average flux of methane from the sea surface to the atmosphere of 0.38 μmol m-2 d-1. In addition, water column profiles of dissolved methane indicate that subsurface maxima in dissolved methane concentrations are a consistent feature of the open ocean, except near the equator. At the equator, the subsurface peak at the base of the mixed layer may be bowed down by the Equatorial Undercurrent. The highest methane concentration (12 nM) was observed in the Peru upwelling region.

  2. Variability in surface meteorology and air-sea fluxes due to cumulus convective systems observed during CINDY/DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Satoru; Katsumata, Masaki; Yoneyama, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the variability in surface meteorological parameters and air-sea heat fluxes due to cold pools emanating from cumulus convective systems observed over the tropical Indian Ocean in November 2011. In particular, this study focuses on convective systems that are spatially smaller than mesoscale convective systems in a southeasterly trade wind environment. Composite analyses of convectively active periods show an increase in the sensible heat flux by 15-20 W m-2 that is primarily attributed to an increase in the difference between the surface air temperature and sea surface temperature and an increase in the latent heat flux by 30-70 W m-2 due to enhanced surface wind speeds. A succession of convectively active periods leads to a greater influence than those occurring independently. The direction of the surface wind velocity anomaly due to cold pools tends to be close to that of the environmental wind velocity, resulting in an efficient enhancement of wind speed. This study also demonstrates the close relation between cold pool intensities and convective activity. In particular, two measures of cold pool intensity, a minimum surface air temperature and a maximum amount of surface wind speed enhancement, are correlated with each other and with the convective activity around the observation point measured by radar-estimated rainfall and radar echo coverage.

  3. Distributions and sea-to-air fluxes of chloroform, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea during spring.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Yang, Gui-Peng; Lu, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Hong-Hai

    2013-06-01

    Halocarbons including chloroform (CHCl3), trichloroethylene (C2HCl3), tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4), chlorodibromomethane (CHBr2Cl) and bromoform (CHBr3) were measured in the Yellow Sea (YS) and the East China Sea (ECS) during spring 2011. The influences of chlorophyll a, salinity and nutrients on the distributions of these gases were examined. Elevated levels of these gases in the coastal waters were attributed to anthropogenic inputs and biological release by phytoplankton. The vertical distributions of these gases in the water column were controlled by different source strengths and water masses. Using atmospheric concentrations measured in spring 2012 and seawater concentrations obtained from this study, the sea-to-air fluxes of these gases were estimated. Our results showed that the emissions of C2HCl3, C2Cl4, CHBr2Cl, and CHBr3 from the study area could account for 16.5%, 10.5%, 14.6%, and 3.5% of global oceanic emissions, respectively, indicating that the coastal shelf may contribute significantly to the global oceanic emissions of these gases.

  4. Air-sea fluxes in a climate model using hourly coupling between the atmospheric and the oceanic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fangxing; von Storch, Jin-Song; Hertwig, Eileen

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the changes in the air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water flux caused by increasing the ocean-atmosphere coupling frequency from once per day to once per hour in the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. We diagnose the relative influences of daily averaging and high-frequency feedbacks on the basic statistics of the air-sea fluxes at grid point level and quantify feedback modes responsible for large scale changes in fluxes over the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific. Coupling once per hour instead of once per day reduces the mean of the momentum-flux magnitude by up to 7 % in the tropics and increases it by up to 10 % in the Southern Ocean. These changes result solely from feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean occurring on time scales shorter than 1 day . The variance and extremes of all the fluxes are increased in most parts of the oceans. Exceptions are found for the momentum and fresh water fluxes in the tropics. The increases result mainly from the daily averaging, while the decreases in the tropics are caused by the high-frequency feedbacks. The variance increases are substantial, reaching up to 50 % for the momentum flux, 100 % for the fresh water flux, and a factor of 15 for the net heat flux. These diurnal and intra-diurnal variations account for up to 50-90 % of the total variances and exhibit distinct seasonality. The high-frequency coupling can influence the large-scale feedback modes that lead to large-scale changes in the magnitude of wind stress over the Southern Ocean and Equatorial Pacific. In the Southern Ocean, the dependence of the SST-wind-stress feedback on the mean state of SST, which is colder in the experiment with hourly coupling than in the experiment with daily coupling, leads to an increase of westerlies. In the Equatorial Pacific, Bjerknes feedback in the hourly coupled experiment reveals a diurnal cycle during the El Niño events, with the feedback being stronger in the nighttime than in the daytime and

  5. Reconstruction Of Air-Sea Fluxes And Meridional Transport Rates Of Anthropogenic Carbon With An Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, M.; Joos, F.; Vazquez Rodriguez, M.

    2007-12-01

    Regional air-sea fluxes and meridional transport of anthropogenic carbon are inferred by assimilating anthropogenic carbon concentrations within the ocean from different data-based reconstructions. An inverse, Ensemble Kalman Filter method with the Bern3D ocean model is applied. The Bern3D model (Müller et al., 2006) is a computationally-efficient, 3-dimensional coarse resolution ocean model. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (Evenson, 2003) is suited for the assimilation of spatially and temporally varying data into a range of models, for model tuning or for model initialization. Regional fluxes through the air-sea interface and meridional transport rates in the ocean are determined by minimizing deviations between the distributions of anthropogenic carbon from the GLODAP database (Key et al., 2004) and from the Bern3D ocean model in the Ensemble Kalman Filtering optimzation. The resulting anthropogenic carbon fluxes are in agreement with those from another ocean inversion study using the same GLODAP data (Mikaloff Fletcher et al., 2006). Transport uncertainties are addressed by utilizing different configuration of the Bern3D model. The inferred transport uncertainties are comparable in magnitude to the uncertainties obtained by Mikaloff Fletcher et al. The fields of anthropogenic carbon reconstructed with six different reconstruction methods: CFC-shortcut (Thomas et al., 2001), C-star (Gruber et al. 1996), IPSL (Lo Monaco et al., 2005), PHI-CT (Vazquez Rodriguez et al, submitted), TrOCA (Touratier et al., 2004), and TTD (Waugh et al., 2006) from four sections in the Atlantic are assimilated individually to investigate the influence of data uncertainties on the inferred fluxes. Deviations in the inferred fluxes from the different reconstruction methods are comparable or even larger than uncertainties arising from model transport uncertainties. For example, anthropogenic carbon uptake is more than twice as large for the IPSL reconstruction than for the PHI

  6. Resolving the abundance and air-sea fluxes of airborne microorganisms in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Mayol, Eva; Jiménez, María A; Herndl, Gerhard J; Duarte, Carlos M; Arrieta, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    Airborne transport of microbes may play a central role in microbial dispersal, the maintenance of diversity in aquatic systems and in meteorological processes such as cloud formation. Yet, there is almost no information about the abundance and fate of microbes over the oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth's surface and are the likely source and final destination of a large fraction of airborne microbes. We measured the abundance of microbes in the lower atmosphere over a transect covering 17° of latitude in the North Atlantic Ocean and derived estimates of air-sea exchange of microorganisms from meteorological data. The estimated load of microorganisms in the atmospheric boundary layer ranged between 6 × 10(4) and 1.6 × 10(7) microbes per m(2) of ocean, indicating a very dynamic air-sea exchange with millions of microbes leaving and entering the ocean per m(2) every day. Our results show that about 10% of the microbes detected in the boundary layer were still airborne 4 days later and that they could travel up to 11,000 km before they entered the ocean again. The size of the microbial pool hovering over the North Atlantic indicates that it could play a central role in the maintenance of microbial diversity in the surface ocean and contribute significantly to atmospheric processes.

  7. Resolving the abundance and air-sea fluxes of airborne microorganisms in the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Eva; Jiménez, María A.; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Arrieta, Jesús M.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne transport of microbes may play a central role in microbial dispersal, the maintenance of diversity in aquatic systems and in meteorological processes such as cloud formation. Yet, there is almost no information about the abundance and fate of microbes over the oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth's surface and are the likely source and final destination of a large fraction of airborne microbes. We measured the abundance of microbes in the lower atmosphere over a transect covering 17° of latitude in the North Atlantic Ocean and derived estimates of air-sea exchange of microorganisms from meteorological data. The estimated load of microorganisms in the atmospheric boundary layer ranged between 6 × 104 and 1.6 × 107 microbes per m2 of ocean, indicating a very dynamic air-sea exchange with millions of microbes leaving and entering the ocean per m2 every day. Our results show that about 10% of the microbes detected in the boundary layer were still airborne 4 days later and that they could travel up to 11,000 km before they entered the ocean again. The size of the microbial pool hovering over the North Atlantic indicates that it could play a central role in the maintenance of microbial diversity in the surface ocean and contribute significantly to atmospheric processes. PMID:25400625

  8. Methane distribution and sea-to-air flux in the East China Sea during the summer of 2013: Impact of hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wangwang; Zhang, Guiling; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Huang, Daji; Han, Yu; Wang, Lan; Sun, Mingshuang

    2016-02-01

    We measured dissolved methane (CH4) at different depths and calculated sea-to-air CH4 fluxes at 65 stations in the East China Sea (ECS) from August 4 to 31 of 2013. CH4 concentrations in surface waters ranged from 2.07 to 27.39 nM and concentrations in bottom waters ranged from 1.76 to 31.35 nM. The concentration of CH4 also decreased with distance from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary. Analysis of the depth profiles of CH4 indicated great variations among the different stations due to the influence of different water masses and variations in other factors. A region of significant bottom-water hypoxia, with an oxygen level less than 1.5 mg L-1, occurred at the northern region of the ECS. This hypoxic region also had enhanced CH4 production in the water column and sedimentary release of CH4. CH4 saturations in the surface waters ranged from 113% to 1364%, with an average of 317% (±236). We estimated the sea-to-air CH4 flux as 6.5±7.4 μmol m-2 d-1 using the LM86 equation, and as 11.5±11.9 μmol m-2 d-1 using the W92 equation. The overall estimated CH4 emission rate from the ECS was 6.4×10-2 Tg yr-1. The saturation and sea-to-air flux of CH4 varied significantly among the stations. Taken together, our data suggest that the ECS is a net source of atmospheric CH4.

  9. Model estimating the effect of marginal ice zone processes on the phytoplankton primary production and air-sea flux of CO2 in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Anton; Sein, Dmitry; Ryabchenko, Vladimir; Gorchakov, Victor; Martjyanov, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    This study is aimed to assess the impact of sea ice on the primary production of phytoplankton (PPP) and air-sea CO2 flux in the Barents Sea. To get the estimations, we apply a three-dimensional eco-hydrodynamic model based on the Princeton Ocean Model which includes: 1) a module of sea ice with 7 categories, and 2) the 11-component module of marine pelagic ecosystem developed in the St. Petersburg Branch, Institute of Oceanology. The model is driven by atmospheric forcing, prescribed from the reanalysis NCEP / NCAR, and conditions on the open sea boundary, prescribed from the regional model of the atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-ocean biogeochemistry, developed at Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg. Comparison of the model results for the period 1998-2007 with satellite data showed that the model reproduces the main features of the evolution of the sea surface temperature, seasonal changes in the ice extent, surface chlorophyll "a" concentration and PPP in the Barents Sea. Model estimates of the annual PPP for whole sea, APPmod, appeared in 1.5-2.3 times more than similar estimates, APPdata, from satellite data. The main reasons for this discrepancy are: 1) APPdata refers to the open water, while APPmod, to the whole sea area (under the pack ice and marginal ice zone (MIZ) was produced 16 - 38% of PPP); and 2) values of APPdata are underestimated because of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum. During the period 1998-2007, the modelled maximal (in the seasonal cycle) sea ice area has decreased by 15%. This reduction was accompanied by an increase in annual PPP of the sea at 54 and 63%, based, respectively, on satellite data and the model for the open water. According to model calculations for the whole sea area, the increase is only 19%. Using a simple 7-component model of oceanic carbon cycle incorporated into the above hydrodynamic model, the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and sea has been estimated in different conditions. In the absence of biological

  10. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  11. Air-sea fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory on the south-west coast of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Prytherch, John; Brooks, Ian M.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We present air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), momentum, and sensible heat measured by the eddy covariance method from the recently established Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) on the south-west coast of the United Kingdom. Measurements from the south-westerly direction (open water sector) were made at three different sampling heights (approximately 15, 18, and 27 m above mean sea level, a.m.s.l.), each from a different period during 2014-2015. At sampling heights ≥ 18 m a.m.s.l., measured fluxes of momentum and sensible heat demonstrate reasonable ( ≤ ±20 % in the mean) agreement with transfer rates over the open ocean. This confirms the suitability of PPAO for air-sea exchange measurements in shelf regions. Covariance air-sea CO2 fluxes demonstrate high temporal variability. Air-to-sea transport of CO2 declined from spring to summer in both years, coinciding with the breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful eddy covariance measurements of CH4 emissions from a marine environment. Higher sea-to-air CH4 fluxes were observed during rising tides (20 ± 3; 38 ± 3; 29 ± 6 µmole m-2 d-1 at 15, 18, 27 m a.m.s.l.) than during falling tides (14 ± 2; 22 ± 2; 21 ± 5 µmole m-2 d-1), consistent with an elevated CH4 source from an estuarine outflow driven by local tidal circulation. These fluxes are a few times higher than the predicted CH4 emissions over the open ocean and are significantly lower than estimates from other aquatic CH4 hotspots (e.g. polar regions, freshwater). Finally, we found the detection limit of the air-sea CH4 flux by eddy covariance to be 20 µmole m-2 d-1 over hourly timescales (4 µmole m-2 d-1 over 24 h).

  12. SST, Winds, and Air-Sea Fluxes in the Gulf Stream Region in the First Winter of CLIMODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. A.; Dickinson, S.; Jones, H. R.

    2006-12-01

    The NSF sponsored CLIvar MOde Water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE) focuses on the wintertime processes responsible for the formation and dispersal of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW), the subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic. This region has the largest wintertime loss of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere, made possible by the influx of heat from the Gulf Stream (GS). These fluxes fuel the formation and intensification of storms, as cool, dry continental air encounters the warm boundary current waters. The actual impact of the large transfers of heat on the ocean and on the atmosphere are likely underestimated in weather and climate models, owing to poor observational input and inaccurate boundary layer physics. Several new sources of data are available with which to examine the relationship between the Gulf Stream, air-sea heat fluxes, winds, and storms: wind vector and SST measurements from satellites, as well as in situ measurements, including data from CLIMODE. Improved satellite data includes the ocean vector winds from QuikSCAT, re-processed at a spatial resolution of 12.5km, and microwave SST from AMSR-E. Although the microwave resolution is coarser than for infrared SST, the ability of microwave sensors to see through clouds gives better effective resolution of SST, particularly during storms. Two CLIMODE cruises were conducted in the winter of 2005-2006. During the first cruise in November 2005, SST dropped by about 1.5-2C, leaving SST in the recirculation region at about 22C. By the start of the second cruise in January 2006, SST had fallen to 20C near the GS core, and 19C in the mode water region. By the end of the second cruise 2 weeks later, the region of 20C water had dropped to 19C, suggesting that EDW formation was imminent. SST in the mode water region reached 18C the following week. Maximum wind speeds were distinctly centered on the GS warm core for much of January 2006. Recent studies suggest that the Gulf Stream could affect the storm

  13. Climate simulations with a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Junmei; Gao, Zhiqiu; Lenschow, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (NCAR CAM3) using a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization scheme. The current air-sea turbulent flux scheme in CAM3 consists of three basic bulk flux equations that are solved simultaneously by an iterative computational technique. We recently developed a new turbulent flux parameterization scheme where the Obukhov stability length is parameterized directly by using a bulk Richardson number, an aerodynamic roughness length, and a heat roughness length. Its advantages are that it (1) avoids the iterative process and thus increases the computational efficiency, (2) takes account of the difference between z0m and z0h and allows large z0m/z0h, and (3) preserves the accuracy of iteration. An offline test using Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) data shows that the original scheme overestimates the surface fluxes under very weak winds but the new scheme gives better results. Under identical initial and boundary conditions, the original CAM3 and CAM3 coupled with the new turbulent flux scheme are used to simulate the global distribution of air-sea surface turbulent fluxes, and precipitation. Comparisons of model outputs against the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux), and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) show that: (1) the new scheme produces more realistic surface wind stress in the North Pacific and North Atlantic trade wind belts and wintertime extratropical storm track regions; (2) the latent heat flux in the Northern Hemisphere trade wind zones shows modest improvement in the new scheme, and the latent heat flux bias in the western boundary current region of the Gulf Stream is reduced; and (3) the simulated precipitation in the new scheme is closer to observation in the Asian monsoon

  14. Eddy covariance flux of sulfur dioxide to the sea surface: Air-side resistance to deposition of a highly soluble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Deposition to the sea surface represents a major atmospheric removal mechanism for sulfur dioxide and many other highly soluble products of tropospheric photochemistry. Such gases include nitric acid, ammonia, organic acids, sulfur dioxide, and highly soluble organic compounds such as methanol and acetone. The deposition of highly soluble gases is controlled by turbulent and diffusive transport on the air side of the air/sea interface. In this study, air/sea fluxes of the soluble gas sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), sensible and latent heat, and momentum were measured using eddy covariance. This was a pilot study carried out in April 2014 on Scripps pier in La Jolla, California, that was designed to assess the potential for measuring SO2 fluxes over the ocean. SO2 was detected using chemical ion mass spectrometry in negative ion mode with a sensitivity of roughly 100 Hz/ppt. The ionization scheme involved addition of ozone to a dried air stream and subsequent conversion of SO2 to the SO5 - ion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of seagoing SO2 flux measurements. Such measurements can be used to constrain the depositional velocities of soluble gases and test models for air-side resistance to air/sea gas transfer.

  15. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve models for the bulk-skin temperature difference to the point where they could accurately and reliably apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. To accomplish this goal, work was conducted in three primary areas. These included production of an archive of available data sets containing measurements of the skin and bulk temperatures and associated environmental conditions, evaluation of existing skin layer models using the compiled data archive, and additional theoretical work on the development of an improved model using the data collected under diverse environmental conditions. In this work we set the basis for a new physical model of renewal type, and propose a parameterization for the temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean in which the effects of thermal buoyancy, wind stress, and microscale breaking are all integrated by means of the appropriate renewal time scales. Ideally, we seek to obtain a model that will accurately apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. A summary of the work in each of these areas is included in this report. A large amount of work was accomplished under the support of this grant. The grant supported the graduate studies of Sandra Castro and the preparation of her thesis which will be completed later this year. This work led to poster presentations at the 1999 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and 2000 IGARSS meeting. Additional work will be presented in a talk at this year's American Meteorological Society Air-Sea Interaction Meeting this May. The grant also supported Sandra Castro during a two week experiment aboard the R/P Flip (led by Dr. Andrew Jessup of the Applied Physics Laboratory) to help obtain additional shared data sets and to provide Sandra with a fundamental understanding of the physical processes needed in the models. In a related area, the funding also partially supported Dr. William Emery and Daniel

  16. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (<80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2 with a mean uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2d-1. We attribute this discrepancy to: (1) elevated PP rates (>600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally <100 mg C m-2d-1, daily PP rates cumulated to a total PP of ~437.6 × 103 t C, which was roughly twice higher than the organic carbon delivery by river inputs (~241.2 × 103 t C). Subsurface PP represented 37.4% of total PP for the

  17. Mercury in the marine boundary layer and seawater of the South China Sea: Concentrations, sea/air flux, and implication for land outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Gan; Xu, Weihai; Li, Xiangdong; Yao, Hen; Liang, Peng; Li, Jun; Sommar, Jonas; Yin, Runsheng; Liu, Na

    2010-03-01

    Using R/V Shiyan 3 as a sampling platform, measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), surface seawater total mercury (THg), methyl mercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) were carried out above and in the South China Sea (SCS). Measurements were collected for 2 weeks (10 to 28 August 2007) during an oceanographic expedition, which circumnavigated the northern SCS from Guangzhou (Canton), Hainan Inland, the Philippines, and back to Guangzhou. GEM concentrations over the northern SCS ranged from 1.04 to 6.75 ng m-3 (mean: 2.62 ng m-3, median: 2.24 ng m-3). The spatial distribution of GEM was characterized by elevated concentrations near the coastal sites adjacent to mainland China and lower concentrations at stations in the open sea. Trajectory analysis revealed that high concentrations of GEM were generally related to air masses from south China and the Indochina peninsula, while lower concentrations of GEM were related to air masses from the open sea area, reflecting great Hg emissions from south China and Indochina peninsula. The mean concentrations of THg, MeHg, and DGM in surface seawater were 1.2 ± 0.3 ng L-1, 0.12 ± 0.05 ng L-1, and 36.5 ± 14.9 pg L-1, respectively. In general, THg and MeHg levels in the northern SCS were higher compared to results reported from most other oceans/seas. Elevated THg levels in the study area were likely attributed to significant Hg delivery from surrounding areas of the SCS primarily via atmospheric deposition and riverine input, whereas other sources like in situ production by various biotic and abiotic processes may be important for MeHg. Average sea/air flux of Hg in the study area was estimated using a gas exchange method (4.5 ± 3.4 ng m-2 h-1). This value was comparable to those from other coastal areas and generally higher than those from open sea environments, which may be attributed to the reemission of Hg previously transported to this area.

  18. Model studies of the flux of CO{sub 2} over the air-sea interface in the Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlson, M.

    1994-12-31

    In the discussion about the green house effect generated by the burning of fossil fuels, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has a key role. A major part of the surplus CO{sub 2} has been suggested, by the scientific community, to be withdrawn from the atmosphere and to be taken up by the growth in continental shelf areas with high primary production, and in terrestrial forests. The exact quantity and reaction ways and mechanisms of those processes are not known today. The Baltic Sea is, for several reasons, a well chosen area to study this phenomenon. It is a shallow continental Mediterranean sea, in this area almost the first measurements of the carbonate system were carried out in the end of the last century. This has resulted in long time series of measurements of the carbonate system available for use in, e.g. modelling work, a working numerical carbonate model.

  19. Reconstruction of super-resolution fields of ocean pCO2 and air-sea fluxes of CO2 from satellite imagery in the Southeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, I.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Yahia, H.; Garbe, C.; Paulmier, A.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of Green House Gases GHGs fluxes at the air-sea interface at high resolution is crucial to accurately quantify the role of the ocean in the absorption and emission of GHGs. In this paper we present a novel method to reconstruct maps of surface ocean partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4 km) using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ocean Colour (OC) data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). Inference of super-resolution of pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes is performed using novel nonlinear signal processing methodologies that prove efficient in the context of oceanography. The theoretical background comes from the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism which unlocks the geometrical determination of cascading properties of physical intensive variables. As a consequence, a multiresolution analysis performed on the signal of the so-called singularity exponents allows the correct and near optimal cross-scale inference of GHGs fluxes, as the inference suits the geometric realization of the cascade. We apply such a methodology to the study offshore of the Benguela area. The inferred representation of oceanic partial pressure of CO2 improves and enhances the description provided by CarbonTracker, capturing the small scale variability. We examine different combinations of Ocean Colour and Sea Surface Temperature products in order to increase the number of valid points and the quality of the inferred pCO2 field. The methodology is validated using in-situ measurements by means of statistical errors. We obtain that mean absolute and relative errors in the inferred values of pCO2 with respect to in-situ measurements are smaller than for CarbonTracker.

  20. CO2 air-sea fluxes across the Portuguese estuaries Tagus and Sado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, G.; Nogueira, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally, estuaries and proximal shelves under the direct influence of river runoff and large inputs of organic matter are mostly heterotrophic and, therefore, act as a carbon source. In this context the CO2 dynamics in Tagus and Sado estuaries (SW Portugal) was studied under two different climate and hydrological situations. These moderately productive mesotidal coastal-plain lagoon-type estuaries, localised in the center of Portugal and distant 30-40 km apart, present quite different freshwater inflows, surface areas and water residence times. A study performed in 2001 revealed that the magnitude of CO2 fluxes in the two estuarine systems varied seasonally. CO2 emissions during the huge rainfall winter were similar in both estuaries, reaching a mean value of ~50 mmol m-2 d-1, while in spring emissions from Sado were ~6 times higher then Tagus ones, attaining a mean value of 62 mmol m-2 d-1. Nevertheless, in both sampling periods, Sado estuary showed, within the upper estuary (salinity

  1. Concentrations, size-distributions and air-to-sea fluxes of bio-active trace elements on the New Jersey coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, T.; Mukherjee, P.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal marine atmosphere adjacent to large urban and industrial centers can be strongly impacted by pollution emissions, resulting in high loading of pollutants in the ambient air. Among airborne substances are certain bioactive trace elements including Cd, Cu, and Zn from a variety of emission sources. High concentrations of these elements in coastal air could not only result in enhanced air-to-sea deposition fluxes to coastal waters, but they could also be transported over the open ocean, affecting the composition of the remote marine atmosphere. In this presentation, we will discuss the concentrations, particle-size distributions of selected trace elements in aerosols and their properties in precipitation observed on the New Jersey coast. The estimates of the air-to-water deposition fluxes of these elements will also be discussed.

  2. Analyzing consistency of interannual variability in air-sea sensible and latent heat fluxes in CMIP5 model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serykh, Ilya; Gulev, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Surface turbulent heat fluxes are critically important in climate model experiments, since they represent a language of communication of the ocean and atmosphere. Interannual variability of surface turbulent heat fluxes is believed to be the major contributor to the changes in the ocean surface heat balance, at least in mid latitudes. Being relatively well assessed and validated in reanalyses, surface turbulent heat fluxes always were of a lesser attention in diagnostics of climate model experiments. We analysed interannual variability of sensible and latent heat fluxes in historical climate simulations with several CMIP5 models. Variability in surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes in model simulations has been analysed during several last decades (from 1950s to 2005) with the emphasis on different scales of variability (short-term, interannual, decadal). At all scales has been found a little consistency between the changes in turbulent surface fluxes diagnosed by reanalyses and blended data sets (OA-FLUX) on one hand and model simulations on the other. Furthermore, some models (e.g. ECHAM, IPSL) surprisingly demonstrate large regions with negative correlations between sensible and latent heat fluxes, which is not the case in observational data sets (reanalyses and OAFLUX). Interestingly, variability in air temperature and surface humidity (which could be potentially considered as the reason for autocorrelation between sensible and latent fluxes) demonstrates consistency with each other at most scales. Further we discuss potential reasons for the discovered phenomenon.

  3. Accounting for observational uncertainties in the evaluation of low latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes simulated in a suite of IPSL model versions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servonnat, Jerome; Braconnot, Pascale; Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent momentum and heat (sensible and latent) fluxes at the air-sea interface are key components of the whole energetic of the Earth's climate and their good representation in climate models is of prime importance. In this work, we use the methodology developed by Braconnot & Frankignoul (1993) to perform a Hotelling T2 test on spatio-temporal fields (annual cycles). This statistic provides a quantitative measure accounting for an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the evaluation of low-latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes in a suite of IPSL model versions. The spread within the observational ensemble of turbulent flux data products assembled by Gainusa-Bogdan et al (submitted) is used as an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the different turbulent fluxes. The methodology holds on a selection of a small number of dominating variability patterns (EOFs) that are common to both the model and the observations for the comparison. Consequently it focuses on the large-scale variability patterns and avoids the possibly noisy smaller scales. The results show that different versions of the IPSL couple model share common large scale model biases, but also that there the skill on sea surface temperature is not necessarily directly related to the skill in the representation of the different turbulent fluxes. Despite the large error bars on the observations the test clearly distinguish the different merits of the different model version. The analyses of the common EOF patterns and related time series provide guidance on the major differences with the observations. This work is a first attempt to use such statistic on the evaluation of the spatio-temporal variability of the turbulent fluxes, accounting for an observational uncertainty, and represents an efficient tool for systematic evaluation of simulated air-seafluxes, considering both the fluxes and the related atmospheric variables. References Braconnot, P., and C. Frankignoul (1993), Testing Model

  4. On the calculation of air-sea fluxes of CO2 in the presence of temperature and salinity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, D. K.; Land, P. E.; Shutler, J. D.; Goddijn-Murphy, L. M.; Donlon, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of vertical temperature and salinity gradients in the upper ocean and the occurrence of variations in temperature and salinity on time scales from hours to many years complicate the calculation of the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) across the sea surface. Temperature and salinity affect the interfacial concentration of aqueous CO2 primarily through their effect on solubility with lesser effects related to saturated vapor pressure and the relationship between fugacity and partial pressure. The effects of temperature and salinity profiles in the water column and changes in the aqueous concentration act primarily through the partitioning of the carbonate system. Climatological calculations of flux require attention to variability in the upper ocean and to the limited validity of assuming "constant chemistry" in transforming measurements to climatological values. Contrary to some recent analysis, it is shown that the effect on CO2 fluxes of a cool skin on the sea surface is large and ubiquitous. An opposing effect on calculated fluxes is related to the occurrence of warm layers near the surface; this effect can be locally large but will usually coincide with periods of low exchange. A salty skin and salinity anomalies in the upper ocean also affect CO2 flux calculations, though these haline effects are generally weaker than the thermal effects.

  5. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover (< 80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2, with an uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean ± standard deviation associated with spatial variability). We attribute this discrepancy to (1) elevated PP rates (> 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally < 100 mg C m-2 d-1 and cumulated to a total PP of ~ 437.6 × 103 t C for the region over a 35-day period. This amount was about twice the

  6. Experimental observations of air-sea parameters and fluxes associated with anomalous event in the Indian Ocean during 1997-1998 El Niño period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. V.; Krishnan, Praveena; Muraleedharan Nair, S.; Kunhikrishnan, P. K.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes the variation of air-sea parameters and fluxes during winter months of 1997 (pre-INDOEX) and 1998 (INDOEX-FFP) using ship-based in situ measurements in the latitude range 15°N to 20°S over the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea. The 1998 cruise period coincided with one of the strongest El Niño events in the decade over the Pacific Ocean. The tropical Indian Ocean underwent a highly anomalous series of events during 1998 with warm sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly over 2 °C during February 1998 and easterly winds associated with the reversed Walker circulation. In situ observations during 1998 cruise period show that the winds in the Indian Ocean region had basically resumed their climatological state as of March 15, 1998 with lesser wind speeds as El Niño waned. However, the sea surface temperatures in Indian Ocean were found to be high even though climatological state had resumed. The present results are the observational evidence to show that the reduced latent heat flux due to low wind speeds could have contributed to the surface warming in the Indian Ocean. The sensible heat and latent heat fluxes are found to be high during anomalous period due to higher sea surface temperature and wind speeds in comparison to the normal period.

  7. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the northwestern European shelf based on voluntary observing ship and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-09-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 data set based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in northwestern European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), wind speed (WND), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 data set (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT and LDEO databases and obtained good agreement between modeled and observed data. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.6 ± 0.3, -0.9 ± 0.3 and -0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the northern Celtic Sea, southern Celtic sea and nWEC, respectively, whereas permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.2 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the sWEC and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over these provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -1.11 ± 0.32 Tg C yr-1 for this part of the northwestern European continental shelf. Our study showed that combining VOS data with satellite observations can be a powerful tool to

  8. An Approach to Minimizing Artifacts Caused by Cross-Sensitivity in the Determination of Air-Sea CO2 Flux Using the Eddy-Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ziqiang; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Zengxiang; Wang, Renlei; Xue, Yuhuan; Yao, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    The air-sea CO2 flux was measured from a research vessel in the North Yellow Sea in October 2007 using an open-path eddy-covariance technique. In 11 out of 64 samples, the normalized spectra of scalars (C}2, water vapour, and temperature) showed similarities. However, in the remaining samples, the normalized CO2 spectra were observed to be greater than those of water vapour and temperature at low frequencies. In this paper, the noise due to cross-sensitivity was identified through a combination of intercomparisons among the normalized spectra of three scalars and additional analyses. Upon examination, the cross-sensitivity noise appeared to be mainly present at frequencies {<}0.8 Hz. Our analysis also suggested that the high-frequency fluctuations of CO2 concentration (frequency {>}0.8 Hz) was probably less affected by the cross-sensitivity. To circumvent the cross-sensitivity issue, the cospectrum in the high-frequency range 0.8-1.5 Hz, instead of the whole range, was used to estimate the CO2 flux by taking the contribution of the high frequency to the CO2 flux to be the same as the contribution to the water vapour flux. The estimated air-sea CO2 flux in the North Yellow Sea was -0.039 ± 0.048 mg m^{-2} s^{-1}, a value comparable to the estimates using the inertial dissipation method and Edson's method (Edson et al., J Geophys Res 116:C00F10, 2011).

  9. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  10. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  11. High resolution measurements of methane and carbon dioxide in surface waters over a natural seep reveal dynamics of dissolved phase air-sea flux.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengran; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Valentine, David L; Mendes, Stephanie D; Kessler, John D

    2014-09-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are sources of methane and carbon dioxide to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. To better constrain these variables in natural environments, we conducted the first high-resolution measurements of sea surface methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in the massive natural seep field near Coal Oil Point (COP), California. The corresponding high resolution fluxes were calculated, and the total dissolved phase air-sea fluxes over the surveyed plume area (∼363 km(2)) were 6.66 × 10(4) to 6.71 × 10(4) mol day(-1) with respect to CH4 and -6.01 × 10(5) to -5.99 × 10(5) mol day(-1) with respect to CO2. The mean and standard deviation of the dissolved phase air-sea fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from the contour gridding analysis were estimated to be 0.18 ± 0.19 and -1.65 ± 1.23 mmol m(-2) day(-1), respectively. This methane flux is consistent with previous, lower-resolution estimates and was used, in part, to conservatively estimate the total area of the dissolved methane plume at 8400 km(2). The influx of carbon dioxide to the surface water refutes the hypothesis that COP seep methane appreciably influences carbon dioxide dynamics. Seeing that the COP seep field is one of the biggest natural seeps, a logical conclusion could be drawn that microbial oxidation of methane from natural seeps is of insufficient magnitude to change the resulting plume area from a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a source.

  12. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North-West European Shelf based on Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 dataset based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the Western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in north-west European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), the gas transfer velocity coefficient (K), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with relative uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 dataset (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish Seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT database and obtained relatively robust results with an average precision of 4 ± 22 μatm in the seasonally stratified nWEC and the southern and northern CS (sCS and nCS), but less promising results in the permanently well-mixed sWEC, IS and Cap Lizard (CL) waters. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.4, -0.9 and -0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the nCS, sCS and nWEC, respectively, whereas, permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the sWEC, CL and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over six provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -0.95 Tg C year-1 for this

  13. Air-sea flux of methane from selected marine hydrate/seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico during HYFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; MacDonald, I.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is one of the most important greenhouse gases, playing a significant role in global climate change and atmospheric chemistry. In spite of tremendous efforts made to constrain the strength of its sources and sinks, large uncertainties remain for some individual sources. Based on the previous observations and modeling studies, the flux of CH4 from marine hydrates and seeps to the atmosphere comprises a significant fraction of the entire methane flux from the global ocean. However, most of the estimates are based on the seafloor methane flux or discrete water column concentrations of methane and the averaged atmospheric methane ratios. In this study, we investigated three marine hydrate/seep sites in northern Gulf of Mexico in July of 2009 during the HYFLUX cruise. Continuous saturation-anomaly (deviation from equilibrium) measurements of methane, ethane and propane were made by alternately sampling the air or the headspace of Weiss-type equilibrator and analyzing it in a GC-FID system. Some 13CH4 measurements were also made continuously using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). During this cruise, the maximum concentrations observed at the 3 marine hydrate/seep sites MC118, GC600, and GC185 were 14.5, 5.1, and 2.2 nmol/L, respectively. The air-sea fluxes, calculated from saturation anomalies, are used to create extremely high resolution flux maps for the three marine hydrate/seeps sites.

  14. Seasonal and interannual variability of sea-air CO2 fluxes in the tropical Atlantic affected by the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Diverrès, Denis; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    CO2 fugacities obtained from a merchant ship sailing from France to French Guyana were used to explore the seasonal and interannual variability of the sea-air CO2 exchange in the western tropical North Atlantic (TNA; 5-14°N, 41-52°W). Two distinct oceanic water masses were identified in the area associated to the main surface currents, i.e., the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Current (NEC). The NBC was characterized by permanent CO2 oversaturation throughout the studied period, contrasting with the seasonal pattern identified in the NEC. The NBC retroflection was the main contributor to the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC), thus spreading into the central TNA, the Amazon River plume, and the CO2-rich waters probably originated from the equatorial upwelling. Strong CO2 undersaturation was associated to the Amazon River plume. Total inorganic carbon drawdown due to biological activity was estimated to be 154 µmol kg-1 within the river plume. As a consequence, the studied area acted as a net sink of atmospheric CO2 (from -72.2 ± 10.2 mmol m-2 month-1 in February to 14.3 ± 4.5 mmol m-2 month-1 in May). This contrasted with the net CO2 efflux estimated by the main global sea-air CO2 flux climatologies. Interannual sea surface temperature changes in the TNA caused by large-scale climatic events could determine the direction and intensity of the sea-air CO2 fluxes in the NEC. Positive temperature anomalies observed in the TNA led to an almost permanent CO2 outgassing in the NEC in 2010.

  15. Assessing the Potential to Derive Air-Sea Freshwater Fluxes from Aquarius-Like Observations of Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhen, Li; Adamec, David

    2009-01-01

    A state-of-the-art numerical model is used to investigate the possibility of determining freshwater flux fields from temporal changes io sea-surface salinity (SSS), a goal of the satellite salinity-measuring mission, Aquarius/SAC-D. Because the estimated advective temporal scale is usually longer than the Aquarius/SAC-D revisit time, the possibility of producing freshwater flux estimates from temporal salinity changes is first examined by using a correlation analysis. For the mean seasonal cycle, the patterns of the correlations between the freshwater fluxes and surface salinity temporal tendencies are mainly zonally oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is also relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude moon tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The complex correlation patterns presented here suggest that a global retrieval of the difference between evaporation and precipitation (E-P) from salinity changes requires more complex techniques than a simple consideration of local balance with surface forcing.

  16. Sea ice pCO2 dynamics and air-ice CO2 fluxes during the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment - Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Tison, J.-L.; Ackley, S. F.; Galley, R. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Miller, L. A.; Delille, B.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal evolution of pCO2 profiles in sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica, in October 2007 shows physical and thermodynamic processes controls the CO2 system in the ice. During the survey, cyclical warming and cooling strongly influenced the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of the ice cover. Two sampling sites with contrasting characteristics of ice and snow thickness were sampled: one had little snow accumulation (from 8 to 25 cm) and larger temperature and salinity variations than the second site, where the snow cover was up to 38 cm thick and therefore better insulated the underlying sea ice. We show that each cooling/warming event was associated with an increase/decrease in the brine salinity, total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2), and in situ brine and bulk ice CO2 partial pressures (pCO2). Thicker snow covers reduced the amplitude of these changes: snow cover influences the sea ice carbonate system by modulating the temperature and therefore the salinity of the sea ice cover. Results indicate that pCO2 was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere both in the in situ bulk ice (from 10 to 193 μatm) and brine (from 65 to 293 μatm), causing the sea ice to act as a sink for atmospheric CO2 (up to 2.9 mmol m-2 d-1), despite supersaturation of the underlying seawater (up to 462 μatm).

  17. Quantifying the air-sea CO2 flux at a time-series in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Nathalie; Veleda, Doris; Araujo, Moacyr; Caniaux, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Hourly fCO2 is recorded at a time-series at the PIRATA buoy located at 6oS 10oW in the eastern tropical Atlantic since June 2006. This site is located south and west of the seasonal Atlantic cold tongue and is affected by its propagation from June to September. Using an alkalinity-salinity relationship determined for the eastern tropical Atlantic and the observed fCO2, pH and the inorganic carbon concentration are calculated. The time-series of fCO2 exhibits strong intraseasonal, seasonal and interannual variability. On seasonal timescales, the variations of fCO2 and pH are mostly controlled by sea surface salinity. At interannual timescales, some important differences appear in 2011-2012: lower fCO2 and fluxes are observed from September to December 2011 and are explained by higher advection of salty waters at the mooring. In early 2012, the anomaly is still present and is associated with lower sea surface temperatures. No significant long-term trend is detected over the period 2006-2013 on CO2 and any other physical parameter. However, as atmospheric fCO2 is increasing over time, the outgassing of CO2 is reduced over the period 2006-2013 as the flux is mainly controlled by the difference of fCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. A longer time-series is required to determine if any significant trend exists in this region.

  18. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  19. Variability of 14C reservoir age and air-sea flux of CO2 in the Peru-Chile upwelling region during the past 12,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Matthieu; Jackson, Donald; Maldonado, Antonio; Chase, Brian M.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of radiocarbon marine reservoir age through time and space limits the accuracy of chronologies in marine paleo-environmental archives. We report here new radiocarbon reservoir ages (ΔR) from the central coast of Chile (~ 32°S) for the Holocene period and compare these values to existing reservoir age reconstructions from southern Peru and northern Chile. Late Holocene ΔR values show little variability from central Chile to Peru. Prior to 6000 cal yr BP, however, ΔR values were markedly increased in southern Peru and northern Chile, while similar or slightly lower-than-modern ΔR values were observed in central Chile. This extended dataset suggests that the early Holocene was characterized by a substantial increase in the latitudinal gradient of marine reservoir age between central and northern Chile. This change in the marine reservoir ages indicates that the early Holocene air-sea flux of CO2 could have been up to five times more intense than in the late Holocene in the Peruvian upwelling, while slightly reduced in central Chile. Our results show that oceanic circulation changes in the Humboldt system during the Holocene have substantially modified the air-sea carbon flux in this region.

  20. Net sea-air CO2 fluxes and modelled pCO2 in the southwestern subtropical Atlantic continental shelf during spring 2010 and summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Rosane Gonçalves; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Tavano, Virginia Maria

    2016-05-01

    Sea-air CO2 fluxes over continental shelves vary substantially in time on both seasonal and sub-seasonal scales, driven primarily by variations in surface pCO2 due to several oceanic mechanisms. Furthermore, coastal zones have not been appropriately considered in global estimates of sea-air CO2 fluxes, despite their importance to ecology and to productivity. In this work, we aimed to improve our understanding of the role played by shelf waters in controlling sea-air CO2 fluxes by investigating the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (21-35°S) region, where physical, chemical and biological measurements were made on board the Brazilian R. V. Cruzeiro do Sul during late spring 2010 and early summer 2011. Features such as discharge from the La Plata River, intrusions of tropical waters on the outer shelf due to meandering and flow instabilities of the Brazil Current, and coastal upwelling in the Santa Marta Grande Cape and São Tomé Cape were detected by both in situ measurements and ocean colour and thermal satellite imagery. Overall, shelf waters in the study area were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with an average of 1.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the late spring and 11.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the early summer cruises. The spatial variability in ocean pCO2 was associated with surface ocean properties (temperature, salinity and chlorophyll-a concentration) in both the slope and shelf waters. Empirical algorithms for predicting temperature-normalized surface ocean pCO2 as a function of surface ocean properties were shown to perform well in both shelf and slope waters, except (a) within cyclonic eddies produced by baroclinic instability of the Brazil Current as detected by satellite SST imagery and (b) in coastal upwelling regions. In these regions, surface ocean pCO2 values were higher as a result of upwelled CO2-enriched subsurface waters. Finally, a pCO2 algorithm based on both sea surface temperature and surface chlorophyll-a was developed that enabled the spatial

  1. Climatological mean and decadal change in surface ocean pCO 2, and net sea-air CO 2 flux over the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Sweeney, Colm; Feely, Richard A.; Chipman, David W.; Hales, Burke; Friederich, Gernot; Chavez, Francisco; Sabine, Christopher; Watson, Andrew; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Schuster, Ute; Metzl, Nicolas; Yoshikawa-Inoue, Hisayuki; Ishii, Masao; Midorikawa, Takashi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Körtzinger, Arne; Steinhoff, Tobias; Hoppema, Mario; Olafsson, Jon; Arnarson, Thorarinn S.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Bellerby, Richard; Wong, C. S.; Delille, Bruno; Bates, N. R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2009-04-01

    A climatological mean distribution for the surface water pCO 2 over the global oceans in non-El Niño conditions has been constructed with spatial resolution of 4° (latitude) ×5° (longitude) for a reference year 2000 based upon about 3 million measurements of surface water pCO 2 obtained from 1970 to 2007. The database used for this study is about 3 times larger than the 0.94 million used for our earlier paper [Takahashi et al., 2002. Global sea-air CO 2 flux based on climatological surface ocean pCO 2, and seasonal biological and temperature effects. Deep-Sea Res. II, 49, 1601-1622]. A time-trend analysis using deseasonalized surface water pCO 2 data in portions of the North Atlantic, North and South Pacific and Southern Oceans (which cover about 27% of the global ocean areas) indicates that the surface water pCO 2 over these oceanic areas has increased on average at a mean rate of 1.5 μatm y -1 with basin-specific rates varying between 1.2±0.5 and 2.1±0.4 μatm y -1. A global ocean database for a single reference year 2000 is assembled using this mean rate for correcting observations made in different years to the reference year. The observations made during El Niño periods in the equatorial Pacific and those made in coastal zones are excluded from the database. Seasonal changes in the surface water pCO 2 and the sea-air pCO 2 difference over four climatic zones in the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans are presented. Over the Southern Ocean seasonal ice zone, the seasonality is complex. Although it cannot be thoroughly documented due to the limited extent of observations, seasonal changes in pCO 2 are approximated by using the data for under-ice waters during austral winter and those for the marginal ice and ice-free zones. The net air-sea CO 2 flux is estimated using the sea-air pCO 2 difference and the air-sea gas transfer rate that is parameterized as a function of (wind speed) 2 with a scaling factor of 0.26. This is estimated by inverting

  2. Influence and impact of the parametrization of the turbulent air-sea fluxes on atmospheric moisture and convection in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Olivier; Braconnot, Pascale; Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina; Hourdin, Frédéric; Marti, Olivier; Pelletier, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The turbulent fluxes across the ocean/atmosphere interface represent one of the principal driving forces of the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and are also responsible for various phenomena like the water supply to the atmospheric column, which itself is extremely important for atmospheric convection. Although the representation of these fluxes has been the subject of major studies, it still remains a very challenging problem. Our aim is to better understand the role of these fluxes in climate change experiments and in the equator-pole redistribution of heat and water by the oceanic and atmospheric circulation. For this, we are developing a methodology starting from idealized 1D experiments and going all the way up to fully coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations of past and future climates. The poster will propose a synthesis of different simulations we have performed with a 1D version of the LMDz atmosphere model towards a first objective of understanding how different parameterizations of the turbulent fluxes affect the moisture content of the atmosphere and the feedback with the atmospheric boundary layer and convection schemes. Air-sea fluxes are not directly resolved by the models because they are subgrid-scale phenomena and are therefore represented by parametrizations. We investigate the differences between several 1D simulations of the TOGA-COARE campaign (1992-1993, Pacific warm pool region), for which 1D boundary conditions and observations are available to test the results of atmospheric models. Each simulation considers a different version of the LMDz model in terms of bulk formula (four) used to compute the turbulent fluxes. We also consider how the representation of gustiness in these parameterizations affects the results. The use of this LMDz test case (very constrained within an idealized framework) allows us to determine how the response of surface fluxes helps to reinforce or damp the atmospheric water vapor content or cloud feedbacks

  3. Two approaches to determining the sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide: Satellite ocean color and a photochemical model with atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.M.; Esaias, W.E. ); Iverson, R.L. )

    1990-11-20

    Two estimates of the ocean-to-atmosphere flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are presented to determine the feasibility of using remotely sensed data to map the marine sources of a photoreactive trace gas. First, an empirical relationship between chlorophyll a and DMS in surface seawater is used with NASA coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data for chlorophyll a pigment to derive a mean DMS flux for a region in the tropical North Atlantic for October 1980. This is compared with the sea-to-air flux derived from a one-dimensional photochemical model that reproduces boundary layer concentrations of O{sub 3}, CO, NO, and hydrocarbon s measured on a cruise at the same location and time (Meteor 56/1). Both evaluations of DMS fluxes are in the range (2-7) {times} 10{sup 9} molecules DMS cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and agree well with fluxes based on the seawater DMS concentration given by Barnard et al. (1982) for the Meteor cruise. The applicability of the results to strategies for satellite remote sensing of the tropospheric sulfur cycle is discussed. For some species (e.g., DMS) surface sensing of sources is feasible, but only in regions and seasons where phytoplankton pigment is a meaningful marker for biogenic emissions. The general applicability of ocean color to DMS determination awaits the development of an algorithm that can extract distributions of DMS emitting species from the optical signal. For other sulfur constituents (e.g., SO{sub 2}, COS) atmospheric measurements are appropriate for determining tropospheric distribution. Wind, moisture, cloud, precipitation, and temperature data are also required for complete characterization of the marine sulfur cycle.

  4. Surface Ocean pCO2 Seasonality and Sea-Air CO2 Flux Estimates for the North American East Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, Sergio; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G., Jr.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Salisbury, Joe; Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Underway and in situ observations of surface ocean pCO2, combined with satellite data, were used to develop pCO2 regional algorithms to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of surface ocean pCO2 and sea-air CO2 flux for five physically and biologically distinct regions of the eastern North American continental shelf: the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), the Gulf of Maine (GoM), Nantucket Shoals and Georges Bank (NS+GB), and the Scotian Shelf (SS). Temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon variability are the most influential factors driving the seasonality of pCO2. Estimates of the sea-air CO2 flux were derived from the available pCO2 data, as well as from the pCO2 reconstructed by the algorithm. Two different gas exchange parameterizations were used. The SS, GB+NS, MAB, and SAB regions are net sinks of atmospheric CO2 while the GoM is a weak source. The estimates vary depending on the use of surface ocean pCO2 from the data or algorithm, as well as with the use of the two different gas exchange parameterizations. Most of the regional estimates are in general agreement with previous studies when the range of uncertainty and interannual variability are taken into account. According to the algorithm, the average annual uptake of atmospheric CO2 by eastern North American continental shelf waters is found to be between 3.4 and 5.4 Tg C/yr (areal average of 0.7 to 1.0 mol CO2 /sq m/yr) over the period 2003-2010.

  5. Effect of gas-transfer velocity parameterization choice on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The oceanic sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important part of the global carbon budget. Understanding uncertainties in the calculation of this net flux into the ocean is crucial for climate research. One of the sources of the uncertainty within this calculation is the parameterization chosen for the CO2 gas-transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software toolbox, called the FluxEngine (Shutler et al., 2016), to estimate the monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes for the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean, including the European Arctic, and for the global ocean using several published quadratic and cubic wind speed parameterizations of the gas-transfer velocity. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic Ocean. This region is a large oceanic sink of CO2, and it is also a region characterized by strong winds, especially in winter but with good in situ data coverage. We show that the uncertainty in the parameterization is smaller in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic than in the global ocean. It is as little as 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, in comparison to 9 % for the global ocean when restricted to parameterizations with quadratic wind dependence. This uncertainty becomes 46, 44, and 65 %, respectively, when all parameterizations are considered. We suggest that this smaller uncertainty (5 and 4 %) is caused by a combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic (> 7 ms-1) and lack of any seasonal changes in the direction of the flux direction within most of the region. We also compare the impact of using two different in situ pCO2 data sets (Takahashi et al. (2009) and Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 and v2.0, for the flux calculation. The annual fluxes using the two data sets differ by 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal fluxes in the Arctic computed from the two data sets disagree with each

  6. Inference of super-resolution ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes from non-linear and multiscale processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Sudre, Joel; Garçon, Veronique; Yahia, Hussein; Dewitte, Boris; Garbe, Christoph; Illig, Séréna; Montes, Ivonne; Dadou, Isabelle; Paulmier, Aurélien; Butz, André

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the role of submesoscale activity is emerging as being more and more important to understand global ocean properties, for instance, for accurately estimating the sources and sinks of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) at the air-sea interface. The scarcity of oceanographic cruises and the lack of available satellite products for GHG concentrations at high resolution prevent from obtaining a global assessment of their spatial variability at small scales. In this work we develop a novel method to reconstruct maps of CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4km) using SST and ocean colour data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). The responsible process for propagating the information between scales is related to cascading properties and multiscale organization, typical of fully developed turbulence. The methodology, based on the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism, makes use, from the knowledge of singularity exponents, of the optimal wavelet for the determination of the energy injection mechanism between scales. We perform a validation analysis of the results of our algorithm using pCO2 ocean data from in-situ measurements in the upwelling region off Namibia.

  7. Intraseasonal variability linked to sampling alias in air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Gregor, Luke; Lévy, Marina; Maenner, Stacy; Sabine, Christopher L.; Swart, Sebastiaan

    2015-10-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) contributes most of the uncertainty in contemporary estimates of the mean annual flux of carbon dioxide CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Attempts to reduce this uncertainty have aimed at resolving the seasonal cycle of the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2). We use hourly CO2 flux and driver observations collected by the combined deployment of ocean gliders to show that resolving the seasonal cycle is not sufficient to reduce the uncertainty of the flux of CO2 to below the threshold required to reveal climatic trends in CO2 fluxes. This was done by iteratively subsampling the hourly CO2 data set at various time intervals. We show that because of storm-linked intraseasonal variability in the spring-late summer, sampling intervals longer than 2 days alias the seasonal mean flux estimate above the required threshold. Moreover, the regional nature and long-term trends in storm characteristics may be an important influence in the future role of the SO in the carbon-climate system.

  8. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate aerosol and its radiative effect on climate to ocean DMS concentration and air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesdal, Jan-Erik; Christian, James R.; Monahan, Adam H.; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a well-known marine trace gas that is emitted from the ocean and subsequently oxidizes to sulfate in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere have direct and indirect effects on the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Thus, as a potential source of sulfate, ocean efflux of DMS needs to be accounted for in climate studies. Seawater concentration of DMS is highly variable in space and time, which in turn leads to high spatial and temporal variability in ocean DMS emissions. Because of sparse sampling (in both space and time), large uncertainties remain regarding ocean DMS concentration. In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global-mean radiative effect of sulfate is approximately linearly proportional to the global-mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation budget. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global-mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on the net radiative effect is larger than that of spatial distribution and is significant at global scale.

  9. Air-Sea CO2 fluxes and NEP changes in a Baja California Coastal Lagoon during the anomalous North Pacific warm condition in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila López, M. D. C.; Martin Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.; Sandoval Gil, J.; Mejía-Trejo, A.; Félix-Bermudez, A.; Pacheco-Ruiz, I.

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the temporal variability of seawater carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in a Baja California Mediterranean-climate coastal lagoon. This study was carried out from Nov-2013 to Nov-2014, a period in which anomalous warm conditions were present in the North Pacific Ocean influenced the local oceanography in the adjacent coastal waters off Baja California. These ocean conditions resulted on a negative anomaly of upwelling index, which led to summer-like season (weak upwelling condition) that could be observed in the response of carbon dynamics and metabolic status in San Quintín Bay. Minor changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration during spring months (~100 µmol kg-1) where observed and were associated to biological processes within the lagoon. High DIC (~2200 µmol kg-1), pCO2 (~800 μatm), and minimum pH (~7.8) values were observed in summer, reflecting the predominance of respiration processes apparently mostly linked to the remineralization of sedimentary organic matter supplied from macroalgal blooms. San Quintín Bay acted as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the study period, with maximum value observed in July (~10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Temporal biomass production of macroalgae contributed to about 50% of total FCO2 estimated in spring-summer seasons, that was a potencial internal source of organic matter to fuel respiration processes in San Quintín Bay. Eelgrass metabolism contributes in a lower degree in total FCO2. During the anomalous ocean conditions in 2014, the lagoon switched seasonally between net heterotrophy and net autotrophy during the study period, where photosynthesis and respiration processes in the lagoon were closer to a balance. Whole-system metabolism and FCO2 clearly indicated the strong dependence of San Quintín Bay on upwelling conditions and benthic metabolism activity, which was mainly controlled by dominant primary producer communities.

  10. Global representation of tropical cyclone-induced ocean thermal changes using Argo data - Part 2: Estimating air-sea heat fluxes and ocean heat content changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Zhu, J.; Sriver, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    We use Argo temperature data to examine changes in ocean heat content (OHC) and air-sea heat fluxes induced by tropical cyclones (TC)s on a global scale. A footprint technique that analyzes the vertical structure of cross-track thermal responses along all storm tracks during the period 2004-2012 is utilized (see part I). We find that TCs are responsible for 1.87 PW (11.05 W m-2 when averaging over the global ocean basin) of heat transfer annually from the global ocean to the atmosphere during storm passage (0-3 days) on a global scale. Of this total, 1.05 ± 0.20 PW (4.80 ± 0.85 W m-2) is caused by Tropical storms/Tropical depressions (TS/TD) and 0.82 ± 0.21 PW (6.25 ± 1.5 W m-2) is caused by hurricanes. Our findings indicate that ocean heat loss by TCs may be a substantial missing piece of the global ocean heat budget. Net changes in OHC after storm passage is estimated by analyzing the temperature anomalies during wake recovery following storm events (4-20 days after storm passage) relative to pre-storm conditions. Results indicate the global ocean experiences a 0.75 ± 0.25 PW (5.98 ± 2.1W m-2) net heat gain annually for hurricanes. In contrast, under TS/TD conditions, ocean experiences 0.41 ± 0.21 PW (1.90 ± 0.96 W m-2) net ocean heat loss, suggesting the overall oceanic thermal response is particularly sensitive to the intensity of the event. The net ocean heat uptake caused by all storms is 0.34 PW.

  11. Nitrous oxide and methane in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters in the Strait of Gibraltar: Air-sea fluxes and inter-basin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, M.; Huertas, I. E.; Flecha, S.; Ríos, A. F.; Pérez, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    The global ocean plays an important role in the overall budget of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), as both gases are produced within the ocean and released to the atmosphere. However, for large parts of the open and coastal oceans there is little or no spatial data coverage for N2O and CH4. Hence, a better assessment of marine emissions estimates is necessary. As a contribution to remedying the scarcity of data on marine regions, N2O and CH4 concentrations have been determined in the Strait of Gibraltar at the ocean Fixed Time series (GIFT). During six cruises performed between July 2011 and November 2014 samples were collected at the surface and various depths in the water column, and subsequently measured using gas chromatography. From this we were able to quantify the temporal variability of the gas air-sea exchange in the area and examine the vertical distribution of N2O and CH4 in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters. Results show that surface Atlantic waters are nearly in equilibrium with the atmosphere whereas deeper Mediterranean waters are oversaturated in N2O, and a gradient that gradually increases with depth was detected in the water column. Temperature was found to be the main factor responsible for the seasonal variability of N2O in the surface layer. Furthermore, although CH4 levels did not reveal any feature clearly associated with the circulation of water masses, vertical distributions showed that higher concentrations are generally observed in the Atlantic layer, and that the deeper Mediterranean waters are considerably undersaturated (by up to 50%). Even though surface waters act as a source of atmospheric N2O during certain periods, on an annual basis the net N2O flux in the Strait of Gibraltar is only 0.35 ± 0.27 μmol m-2 d-1, meaning that these waters are almost in a neutral status with respect to the atmosphere. Seasonally, the region behaves as a slight sink for atmospheric CH4 in winter and as a source in spring and fall. Approximating

  12. Sensitivity analysis of an Ocean Carbon Cycle Model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. The NPZD model is the Hadley Centre Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HadOCC) from the UK Met Office, used in the Hadley Centre Coupled Model 3 (HadCM3) and FAst Met Office and Universities Simulator (FAMOUS) GCMs. Here, HadOCC is coupled to the 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting meteorology to undertake a sensitivity analysis of its twenty biological parameters. Analyses are performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W) to assess variability in parameter sensitivities at different locations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. We perform the analysis using one-at-a-time perturbations and using a statistical emulator, and compare results. The most sensitive parameters are generic to many NPZD ocean ecosystem models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosythesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  13. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  14. Methane fluxes from the sea to the atmosphere across the Siberian shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Brett F.; Geibel, Marc C.; Crill, Patrick M.; Humborg, Christoph; Mörth, Carl-Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The Laptev and East Siberian Seas have been proposed as a substantial source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. During summer 2014, we made unique high-resolution simultaneous measurements of CH4 in the atmosphere above, and surface waters of, the Laptev and East Siberian Seas. Turbulence-driven sea-air fluxes along the ship's track were derived from these observations; an average diffusive flux of 2.99 mg m-2 d-1 was calculated for the Laptev Sea and for the ice-free portions of the western East Siberian Sea, 3.80 mg m-2 d-1. Although seafloor bubble plumes were observed at two locations in the study area, our calculations suggest that regionally, turbulence-driven diffusive flux alone accounts for the observed atmospheric CH4 enhancements, with only a local, limited role for bubble fluxes, in contrast to earlier reports. CH4 in subice seawater in certain areas suggests that a short-lived flux also occurs annually at ice-out.

  15. Carbon Fluxes and Ocean Acidification in the Irminger Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, Daniela; Barkhouse, Ryan; Olafsson, Jon; Olafsdottir, Solveig; Gulev, Sergej; Wallace, Doug

    2016-04-01

    Complex horizontal and vertical circulation in the Irminger and Labrador Seas has the potential to influence global ocean circulation and climate patterns. Deep water formation coupled with strong winds, and high rates of primary productivity in spring and summer result in these regions of the North Atlantic acting as strong sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide. An increase in surface water pCO2 over the past two decades at a rate greater than that of the atmosphere has been observed and indicates a decrease in the air-sea pCO2 difference, the driving force of the air-sea CO2 flux. In response to the increasing pCO2, the surface water pH and the aragonite saturation states (Ωar) show a decreasing trend. Much of the previous work in the region has occurred on a few repeated transects over time, or in specific regions the Irminger basin. There is therefore a need for surveys of carbon parameters with broader horizontal spatial coverage to determine the CO2 fluxes and the effect of ocean acidification (OA) in the Irminger Sea. Here, we estimate surface pCO2 and CO2 fluxes, and Ωar over a large portion of the Irminger Sea and adjacent waters in the summer of 2013. These estimates are based on measurements of total alkalinity (TA) and pH from discrete samples in the upper 100m, collected at 83 stations on two cruises during the International Redfish Survey. The present study is designed to provide a baseline of inorganic carbon parameters for future, long-term study in the region. The large spatial scope of this study, and planned future work, will provide data that will help contextualize measures from repeated transect studies, underway measures, as well as measures from fixed observatories such those deployed by Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).

  16. Thermaikos Gulf Coastal System, NW Aegean Sea: an overview of water/sediment fluxes in relation to air land ocean interactions and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, S. E.; Chronis, G. Th; Collins, M. B.; Lykousis, V.

    2000-04-01

    zone ecosystem. Thus, the construction of dams along the routes of the main rivers has reduced dramatically the water/sediment fluxes; this caused, for example, retreat of the deltaic coastlines and seawater intrusion into the groundwater aquifers. Similarly, pollution and/or eutrophication of the nearshore marine environment have resulted from the inputs of industrial wastes, urban untreated sewage, and agricultural activities on the coastal plains. This effect is demonstrated by high levels of pollutants, nutrients, and by the increased concentrations of non-residual trace-metals within the surficial sediments. Finally, climatic changes associated with a potential rise in sea level (i.e. 30-50 cm) will threaten a substantial part of the low-lying lands of Thermaikos Gulf. Thus, systematic and thorough monitoring is needed in order to protect the coastal ecosystem; this will ensure its sustainable development and successful management, in relation to present and future socio-economic activities and climatic changes.

  17. A study of oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents seas using the gridded Navy Fleet Numerical Oceanography Central surface analysis and the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) IIc cloudiness data bases. Monthly and annual means of net and turbulent heat fluxes are computed for the FGGE year 1979. The FGGE IIb data base consisting of individual observations provides particularly good data coverage in this region for a comparison with the gridded Navy winds and air temperatures. The standard errors of estimate between the Navy and FGGE IIb winds and air temperatures are 3.6 m/s and 2.5 C, respectively. The computations for the latent and sensible heat fluxes are based on bulk formulas with the same constant heat exchange coefficient of 0.0015. The results show extremely strong wintertime heat fluxes in the northern Greenland Sea and especially in the Barents Sea in contrast to previous studies.

  18. Air-sea interactions during strong winter extratropical storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Jill; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.; Bane, John

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution, regional coupled atmosphere–ocean model is used to investigate strong air–sea interactions during a rapidly developing extratropical cyclone (ETC) off the east coast of the USA. In this two-way coupled system, surface momentum and heat fluxes derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting model and sea surface temperature (SST) from the Regional Ocean Modeling System are exchanged via the Model Coupling Toolkit. Comparisons are made between the modeled and observed wind velocity, sea level pressure, 10 m air temperature, and sea surface temperature time series, as well as a comparison between the model and one glider transect. Vertical profiles of modeled air temperature and winds in the marine atmospheric boundary layer and temperature variations in the upper ocean during a 3-day storm period are examined at various cross-shelf transects along the eastern seaboard. It is found that the air–sea interactions near the Gulf Stream are important for generating and sustaining the ETC. In particular, locally enhanced winds over a warm sea (relative to the land temperature) induce large surface heat fluxes which cool the upper ocean by up to 2 °C, mainly during the cold air outbreak period after the storm passage. Detailed heat budget analyses show the ocean-to-atmosphere heat flux dominates the upper ocean heat content variations. Results clearly show that dynamic air–sea interactions affecting momentum and buoyancy flux exchanges in ETCs need to be resolved accurately in a coupled atmosphere–ocean modeling framework.

  19. The air-sea transformation and diapycnal overturning circulation within the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachsen, P. E.; Nøst, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Air-sea flux climatologies and reanalyzes show that the bulk of the oceanic heat and buoyancy loss over the Nordic Seas takes place over interior regions not easily accessible by the time-mean large-scale currents. Eddy transport of heat and buoyancy, from the boundary currents and into the deep basins, is thought to be a key mechanism. Here we use gridded observations, theory and a modern parametrization of eddy transport to quantify the buoyancy budget of this region. The calculations confirm that mean currents are unable to explain the air-sea transformation that takes place over the interior basins of the Nordic Seas and that eddy transport instead dominates. The parametrization of eddy transport also suggests a significant overturning cell between the eastern and western parts of the Nordic Seas. This cell is, however, unaccounted for in the remaining data sets studied here.

  20. Heat flux through sea ice in the western Weddell Sea: Convective and conductive transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, V. I.; Ackley, S. F.

    1996-04-01

    The heat flux through the snow and sea ice cover and at the ice/ocean interface were calculated at five sites in the western Weddell Sea during autumn and early winter 1992. The ocean heat flux averaged 7 ± 2 W/m2 from late February to early June, and average ice/air heat flux in the second-year floes depended on the depth of the snow cover and ranged from 9 to 17 (±0.8) W/m2. In late February, three of the five sites had an ice surface which was depressed below sea level, resulting, at two of the sites, in a partially flooded snow cover and a slush layer at the snow/ice interface. As this slush layer froze to form snow ice, the dense brine which was rejected flowed out through brine drainage channels and was replaced by lower-salinity, nutrient-rich seawater from the ocean upper layer. We estimate that about half of the second-year ice in the region was covered with this slush layer early in the winter. As the slush layer froze, over a 2- to 3-week period, the convection within the ice transported salt from the ice to the upper ocean and increased total heat flux through the overlying ice and snow cover. On an area-wide basis, approximately 10 cm of snow ice growth occurred within second-year pack ice, primarily during a 2- to 3-week period in February and March. This ice growth, near the surface of the ice, provides a salt flux to the upper ocean equivalent to 5 cm of ice growth, despite the thick (about 1 m) ice cover, in addition to the ice growth in the small (area less than 5%), open water regions.

  1. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  2. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  3. Air-Sea Interactions in CLIMODE: In-Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigorre, S.; Weller, R.

    2006-12-01

    The subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic or Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is an important component of the oceanic circulation. Its formation and evolution are linked to fundamental aspects of the oceanic climate. A central formation process involves the subduction of surface water through air-sea interactions. Conditions for this are ideal in the Gulf Stream region when warm water interacts with cold air above, sinks and is trapped in the late winter, thereby ventilating the interior. The study program CLIvar MOde Water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE), sponsored by NSF, is designed to quantify and understand which processes lead to the formation and dissipation of EDW. A key component to this goal is the knowledge of buoyancy fluxes in the region of EDW formation. The Upper Ocean Processes (UOP) group deployed a 3-m discus buoy anchored in the Gulf Stream (64W, 38N) in November 2005. Oceanographic instruments collect data along the mooring line while meteorological and surface sensors are placed on the buoy and collect data every minute. Since the deployment, hourly averages of the meteorological data were transmitted through the Argos satellite system. These data were plugged in the TOGA-COARE bulk algorithm to estimate air-sea fluxes. These preliminary results are presented, while the full dataset will be analyzed after recovery of the buoy in November 2006. Heat fluxes estimates indicate high heat loss events. In December 2005, regular losses larger than 1000W/m2 occurred. These heat loss events are associated with cold air outbreaks. When the air-sea temperature gradient increases, winds also tend to increase indicating a destabilization of the boundary layer and production of turbulence, enhancing further the heat transfer. As the air-sea temperature gradient decreases in the late winter, heat loss also decreases. The SST signal is seen to modulate the heat fluxes on lower frequencies than air temperature changes. This kind of signal tends therefore to be

  4. Combined Satellite - and ULS-Derived Sea-Ice Flux in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Liu, X.; Harms, S.

    2000-01-01

    Several years of daily microwave satellite ice-drift are combined with moored Upward Looking Sonar (ULS) ice-drafts into an ice volume flux record at points along a flux gate across the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.

  5. Carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 flux at a fixed point in a NW Mediterranean Bay, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, E. H.; Mousseau, L.; Passafiume, O.; Drupp, P. S.; Gattuso, J.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the Service d'Observation de la Rade de Villefranche-sur-Mer (SO-RADE) is to study the temporal variability of hydrological conditions as well as the abundance and composition of holo- and meroplankton at a fixed station in the bay of Villefranche-sur-Mer, North West Mediterranean. The weekly data collected at this site, designated as "Point B (43° 41.10'N - 7° 18.94'E), since 1957 are recognized as a long-term time series describing the evolution of the hydrological conditions in a coastal environment. Since 2007, historical measurements of hydrological and biological conditions have been complemented by measurements of the CO2-carbonate system parameters. In this contribution we present CO2-carbonate system parameters and ancillary data for the period 2007-2010. The data are evaluated in the context of the physical and biogeochemical processes that contribute to the fluxes of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. Seasonal cycles of seawater pCO2 are controlled principally by variations in temperature, showing maxima in the summer and minima during the winters. Normalization of pCO2 to the mean seawater temperature (18oC) results in an apparent reversal of the seasonal cycle with maxima observed in the winters and minima in the summers, consistent with a control of pCO2 by primary productivity. Calculations of "instantaneous fluxes" of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere show this area to be primarily a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the summer and a weak sink during the winter and near neutral overall (range: -0.3 to +0.3 mmol CO2 m-2 h-1, average: 0.02 mmol CO2 m-2 h-1). We will also provide projections of errors incurred from the estimation of annualized fluxes of CO2 based on weekly measurements relative to daily and high-frequency (3 h) data such as those obtained at the Hawaii Kilo Nalu coastal time series station, which shows similar behavior to the Point B location despite significant differences in climate and hydrological

  6. Dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, W. J.; Bell, T. G.; Marandino, C.; Saltzman, E. S.; Miller, S. D.; Law, C. S.; Smith, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) fluxes were measured by eddy correlation over the Southern Ocean (Feb/March 2012) aboard the R/V Tangaroa during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator. The study included measurements inside and outside a dinoflagellate bloom of large areal extent, with seawater DMS levels ranging up to 20 nM. Horizontal wind speeds of up to 20 m/sec were encountered. Gas transfer coefficients were calculated from eddy covariance DMS flux measurements and the air-sea concentration gradient. This study represents a significant addition to the limited database of direct gas transfer measurements in the Southern Ocean.

  7. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature.

  8. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Rice, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average alpha-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average gamma-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (alpha-HCH, average 79% saturation; gamma-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for alpha-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of gamma-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  9. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel A.; Bidleman, Terry F.; Rice, Clifford P.

    1991-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for Organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average α-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average γ-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (α-HCH, average 79% saturation; γ-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for α-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of γ-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  10. Phytoplankton carbon fixation gene (RuBisCO) transcripts and air-sea CO2 flux in the Mississippi River plume

    SciTech Connect

    John, David E.; Wang, Zhaohui A.; Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Corredor, Jorge E.; López, José M.; Cabrera, Alvaro; Bronk, Deborah A.; Tabita, F. Robert; Paul, John H.

    2007-08-30

    River plumes deliver large quantities of nutrients to oligotrophic oceans, often resulting in significant CO2 drawdown. To determine the relationship between expression of the major gene in carbon fixation (large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) and CO2 dynamics, we evaluated rbcL mRNA abundance using novel quantitative PCR assays, phytoplankton cell analyses, photophysiological parameters, and pCO2 in and around the Mississippi River plume (MRP) in the Gulf of Mexico. Lower salinity (30–32) stations were dominated by rbcL mRNA concentrations from heterokonts, such as diatoms and pelagophytes, which were at least an order of magnitude greater than haptophytes, alpha-Synechococcus or high-light Prochlorococcus. However, rbcL transcript abundances were similar among these groups at oligotrophic stations (salinity 34–36). Diatom cell counts and heterokont rbcL RNA showed a strong negative correlation to seawater pCO2. While Prochlorococcus cells did not exhibit a large difference between low and high pCO2 water, Prochlorococcus rbcL RNA concentrations had a strong positive correlation to pCO2, suggesting a very low level of RuBisCO RNA transcription among Prochlorococcus in the plume waters, possibly due to their relatively poor carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These results provide molecular evidence that diatom/pelagophyte productivity is largely responsible for the large CO2 drawdown occurring in the MRP, based on the co-occurrence of elevated RuBisCO gene transcript concentrations from this group and reduced seawater pCO2 levels. This may partly be due to efficient CCMs that enable heterokont eukaryotes such as diatoms to continue fixing CO2 in the face of strong CO2 drawdown. Finally, our work represents the first attempt to relate in situ microbial gene expression to contemporaneous CO2 flux

  11. Impacts of Atmospheric Modes of Variability on Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionissios E.

    2014-05-01

    The potential impacts on Red Sea surface heat exchange of various major modes of atmospheric variability are investigated using the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Flux dataset (OAFlux) merged satellite+reanalysis dataset. The mode impacts on surface net heat flux are quantified by calculating the heat flux anomaly that corresponds to a unit positive value of each index for each grid point. The seasonal effects of the atmospheric forcing are investigated considering two and four typical seasons of a calendar year. Considering two seasons, the impacts are strongest during the winter-centered part of the year (October to March) mainly over the northern sub-basin. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic - West Russia Pattern (EAWR), and the Indian Monsoon Index (IMI) have the greatest effects. They generate negative anomalies (by definition additional ocean heat loss) of 7-12 W/m2 in the northern Red Sea basin mean net heat flux for a unit positive value of the mode index. During the summer (April to September), the signal is smaller and the East Atlantic (EA) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) modes have the strongest impact which is now located in the southern Red Sea (sub-basin anomalies of 4 W/m2 for unit positive mode index, negative for EA and positive for MEI). Results obtained by analysis carried out on the traditional four-season basis reveal that indices impact peaks during the typical boreal winter (DJF) with average anomalies of 12-18 W/m2 to be found in the northern part. It is noteworthy that during the winter, the EAWR generates negative anomalies around 30 W/m2 over the most of the central Red Sea. During the spring (MAM), summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) the anomalies are considerably lower, especially during the spring when the mode impacts are negligible. Atmospheric modes have a stronger effect on air-sea heat flux over the northern

  12. Estimating ocean-air heat fluxes during cold air outbreaks by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S. H.; Atlas, D.

    1981-01-01

    Nomograms of mean column heating due to surface sensible and latent heat fluxes were developed. Mean sensible heating of the cloud free region is related to the cloud free path (CFP, the distance from the shore to the first cloud formation) and the difference between land air and sea surface temperatures, theta sub 1 and theta sub 0, respectively. Mean latent heating is related to the CFP and the difference between land air and sea surface humidities q sub 1 and q sub 0 respectively. Results are also applicable to any path within the cloud free region. Corresponding heat fluxes may be obtained by multiplying the mean heating by the mean wind speed in the boundary layer. The sensible heating estimated by the present method is found to be in good agreement with that computed from the bulk transfer formula. The sensitivity of the solutions to the variations in the initial coastal soundings and large scale subsidence is also investigated. The results are not sensitive to divergence but are affected by the initial lapse rate of potential temperature; the greater the stability, the smaller the heating, other things being equal. Unless one knows the lapse rate at the shore, this requires another independent measurement. For this purpose the downwind slope of the square of the boundary layer height is used, the mean value of which is also directly proportional to the mean sensible heating. The height of the boundary layer should be measurable by future spaceborn lidar systems.

  13. An active role of extratropical sea surface temperature anomalies in determining anomalous turbulent heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Youichi; Nakamura, Hisashi; Kagimoto, Takashi; Yamane, Shozo

    2003-10-01

    Temporal and spatial structures of turbulent latent and sensible heat flux anomalies are examined in relation to dominant patterns of sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) observed over the North Pacific. Relative importance among observed anomalies in SST, surface air temperature, and wind speed in determining the anomalous turbulent heat fluxes is assessed through linearizing the observed flux anomalies. Over the central basin of the North Pacific, changes in the atmospheric variables, including air temperature and wind speed, are primarily responsible for the generation of local SST variations by changing turbulent heat flux, which supports a conventional view of extratropical air-sea interaction. In the region where ocean dynamics is very important in forming SSTAs, in contrast, SSTAs that have been formed in early winter play the primary role in determining mid- and late-winter turbulent heat flux anomalies, indicative of the SST forcing upon the overlying atmosphere. Specifically, both decadal scale SSTAs in the western Pacific subarctic frontal zone and El Niño related SSTAs south of Japan are found to be engaged actively in such forcing on the atmosphere. The atmospheric response to this forcing appears to include the anomalous storm track activity. The observed atmospheric anomalies, which may be, in part, forced by the preexisting SSTAs in those two regions, act to force SSTAs in other portions of the basin, leading to the time evolution of SSTAs as observed in the course of the winter season.

  14. Vertical material flux under seasonal sea ice in the Okhotsk Sea north of Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwatari, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Kunio; Fukamachi, Yasushi; Nagata, Ryuichi; Koizumi, Tomoyoshi; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Kohata, Kunio

    Downward material fluxes under seasonal sea ice were measured using a time-series sediment trap installed at an offshore site in the Okhotsk Sea north of Hokkaido, Japan, from 13 January to 23 March 2005. The maximum fluxes of lithogenic material (753 mg m -2 day -1) and organic matter (mainly detritus; 333 mg m -2 day -1) were recorded during the period in which sea ice drifted ashore and increased in extent, from 13 January to 9 February. Organic matter as fecal pellets (81-93 mg m -2 day -1) and opal as biosilica (51-67 mg m -2 day -1), representing diatom fluxes, were abundant in sediment trap samples obtained during the period of full sea ice coverage from 10 February to 9 March. Microscopic observations revealed that fecal pellets were largely diatom frustules, suggesting that zooplankton actively grazed on ice algae during the period of full sea ice coverage. During the period of retreating sea ice, from 10 to 23 March, the phytoplankton flux showed a rapid increase (from 9.5 to 22.5 × 10 6 cells m -2 day -1), reflecting their release into the water column as the sea ice melted. Our results demonstrate that the quantity and quality of sinking biogenic and lithogenic materials vary with the seasonal extent of sea ice in mid-winter.

  15. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L.

    2012-04-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial depth of the mixed layer and strength of the stratification level that set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer. For example in oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean (and sea surface temperatures) quickly which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture is available through the sea surface. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions (low vertical shear, anticyclonic circulation aloft), tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina and Rita in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. These effects and possible impact on TC deepening and weakening underscores the necessity of having complete 3-D ocean measurements juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements.

  16. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  17. Recent changes in sea ice area flux through the Beaufort Sea during the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Stephen E. L.; Brady, Michael; Derksen, Chris; Kelly, Richard E. J.

    2016-04-01

    Over the annual cycle, sea ice is sequestered from the Canadian Basin and transported through the Beaufort Sea toward the Chukchi Sea. In recent years, the Beaufort Sea has experienced considerable ice loss during the summer, which may be indicative of recent changes to this process. In order to investigate this, we quantify the sea ice area flux using RADARSAT from 1997 to 2014 at three gates in Beaufort Sea: the Canadian Basin (entrance), mid-Beaufort (midpoint), and Chukchi (exit). There was a mean annual flux of 42 ± 56 × 103 km2 at the Canadian Basin gate, 94 ± 92 × 103 km2 at the mid-Beaufort gate and -83 ± 68 × 103 km2 at the Chukchi gate (positive and negative flux signs correspond to ice inflow and outflow, respectively). The majority of ice transport in Beaufort Sea was found to occur from October to May providing replenishment for ice lost during the summer months. The cross-strait gradient in sea level pressure explains ˜40% of the variance in the ice area flux at the gates. Remarkably, the mean July-October net sea ice area flux at the Chukchi gate decreased by ˜80% from 2008 to 2014 relative to 1997-2007 and became virtually ice-free every year since 2008. This reduction was associated with younger (thinner) ice that was unable to survive the summer melt season when either being sequestered from the Canadian Basin and transported through Beaufort Sea during the melt season (2008-2011) or remaining immobile and present in the vicinity of the Chukchi gate during the melt season (2012-2014).

  18. Turbulent aerosol fluxes over the Arctic Ocean: 2. Wind-driven sources from the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E. D.; Rannik, Ü.; Swietlicki, E.; Leck, C.; Aalto, P. P.; Zhou, J.; Norman, M.

    2001-12-01

    An eddy-covariance flux system was successfully applied over open sea, leads and ice floes during the Arctic Ocean Expedition in July-August 1996. Wind-driven upward aerosol number fluxes were observed over open sea and leads in the pack ice. These particles must originate from droplets ejected into the air at the bursting of small air bubbles at the water surface. The source flux F (in 106 m-2 s-1) had a strong dependency on wind speed, log>(F>)=0.20U¯-1.71 and 0.11U¯-1.93, over the open sea and leads, respectively (where U¯ is the local wind speed at about 10 m height). Over the open sea the wind-driven aerosol source flux consisted of a film drop mode centered at ˜100 nm diameter and a jet drop mode centered at ˜1 μm diameter. Over the leads in the pack ice, a jet drop mode at ˜2 μm diameter dominated. The jet drop mode consisted of sea-salt, but oxalate indicated an organic contribution, and bacterias and other biogenic particles were identified by single particle analysis. Particles with diameters less than -100 nm appear to have contributed to the flux, but their chemical composition is unknown. Whitecaps were probably the bubble source at open sea and on the leads at high wind speed, but a different bubble source is needed in the leads owing to their small fetch. Melting of ice in the leads is probably the best candidate. The flux over the open sea was of such a magnitude that it could give a significant contribution to the condensation nuclei (CCN) population. Although the flux from the leads were roughly an order of magnitude smaller and the leads cover only a small fraction of the pack ice, the local source may till be important for the CCN population in Arctic fogs. The primary marine aerosol source will increase both with increased wind speed and with decreased ice fraction and extent. The local CCN production may therefore increase and influence cloud or fog albedo and lifetime in response to greenhouse warming in the Arctic Ocean region.

  19. Ross sea ice motion, area flux, and deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    kwok, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The sea ice motion, area export, and deformation of the Ross Sea ice cover are examined with satellite passive microwave and RADARSAT observations. The record of high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, from 1998 and 2000, allows the estimation of the variability of ice deformation at the small scale (10 km) and to assess the quality of the longer record of passive microwave ice motion. Daily and subdaily deformation fields and RADARSAT imagery highlight the variability of motion and deformation in the Ross Sea. With the passive microwave ice motion, the area export at a flux gate positioned between Cape Adare and Land Bay is estimated. Between 1992 and 2003, a positive trend can be seen in the winter (March-November) ice area flux that has a mean of 990 x 103 km2 and ranges from a low of 600 x 103 km2 in 1992 to a peak of 1600 x 103 km2 in 2001. In the mean, the southern Ross Sea produces almost twice its own area of sea ice during the winter. Cross-gate sea level pressure (SLP) gradients explain 60% of the variance in the ice area flux. A positive trend in this gradient, from reanalysis products, suggests a 'spinup' of the Ross Sea Gyre over the past 12 yr. In both the NCEP-NCAR and ERA-40 surface pressure fields, longer-term trends in this gradient and mean SLP between 1979 and 2002 are explored along with positive anomalies in the monthly cross-gate SLP gradient associated with the positive phase of the Southern Hemisphere annular mode and the extrapolar Southern Oscillation.

  20. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  1. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  2. Fecal Pellet Flux in the Mesopelagic Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koweek, D.; Shatova, O.; Conte, M. H.; Weber, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Oceanic Flux Program (OFP), located 75km SE of Bermuda, is the longest running sediment trap time-series of its kind, continually collecting deep sea particle flux since 1978. Recent application of digital microphotography to the size-fractionated OFP sediment trap material has generated a wealth of new quantitative visual information on particle flux composition, its changes with depth, and its temporal variability. We examined the fecal pellet flux at 1500m depth using image analysis of digital archives, in conjunction with data on the overlying surface ocean from the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) and the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) programs, to investigate the role of mesoscale physical forcing on mesopelagic particle flux variability. During 2007, a productive cyclonic eddy, a mode water eddy and an anticyclonic eddy passed over the OFP site. Fecal pellet flux was enhanced during passage of both the cyclonic and mode water eddies. Total mass flux (TMF) was also enhanced during the productive cyclonic eddy, but was not influenced by the passage of the mode water eddy. No increase in fecal pellet flux or TMF was apparent during passage of the anticyclonic eddy despite indications of increased zooplankton abundance from ADCP backscatter intensity. Fecal pellet size frequency distributions indicate the presence of two, and sometimes three, distinct size classes. No seasonal trend in mean size of fecal pellets was observed for any size class, implying that the size distribution of the zooplankton populations producing the pellets is relatively constant throughout the year. We also investigated fecal pellet flux changes with depth at 500, 1500 and 3200m. Fecal pellet flux, and the fecal pellet contribution to TMF, were greatest at 500m and decreased with depth. The use of quantitative image analysis holds great potential as a powerful analytical tool in studies of marine particulate flux.

  3. Direct measurements of CO2 flux in the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, Siv K.; McGillis, Wade R.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Fairall, C. W.; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Zappa, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    During summer 2006 eddy correlation CO2 fluxes were measured in the Greenland Sea using a novel system set-up with two shrouded LICOR-7500 detectors. One detector was used exclusively to determine, and allow the removal of, the bias on CO2 fluxes due to sensor motion. A recently published correction method for the CO2-H2O cross-correlation was applied to the data set. We show that even with shrouded sensors the data require significant correction due to this cross-correlation. This correction adjusts the average CO2 flux by an order of magnitude from -6.7 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1 to -0.61 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1, making the corrected fluxes comparable to those calculated using established parameterizations for transfer velocity.

  4. Impacts of air-sea exchange coefficients on snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Yoon; Kwon, Young Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Snowfall over the Korean Peninsula is mainly associated with air mass transformation by the fluxes across the air-sea interface during cold-air outbreaks over the warm Yellow Sea. The heat and momentum exchange coefficients in the surface flux parameterization are key parameters of flux calculations across the air-sea interface. This study investigates the effects of the air-sea exchange coefficients on the simulations of snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two snowfall cases are selected for this study. One is a heavy snowfall event that took place on January 4, 2010, and the other is a light snowfall event that occurred on December 23-24, 2011. Several sensitivity tests are carried out with increased and decreased heat and momentum exchange coefficients. The domain-averaged precipitation is increased (decreased) with increased (decreased) heat exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) surface heat flux leads to more (less) moist conditions in the low level of the atmosphere. On the other hand, the domain-averaged precipitation is decreased (increased) with increased (decreased) momentum exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) momentum coefficient causes reduction (increase) of wind speed and heat flux. The variation of precipitation in the heat exchange coefficient experiments is much larger than that in the momentum exchange coefficient experiments because the change of heat flux has a more direct impact on moisture flux and snowfall amount, while the change of momentum flux has a rather indirect impact via wind speed changes. The low-pressure system is intensified and moves toward North when the heat exchange coefficient is increased because warming and moistening of the lower atmosphere contributes to destabilize the air mass, resulting in the change of precipitation pattern over the Korean Peninsula in the heat exchange coefficient experiments.

  5. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  6. Problems in determining air-surface fluxes for climate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The modelling of global air-surface fluxes for climate studies has many problems. Data are sparse. Classical parameterization formulas have received limited verification over the ocean, the pack ice and in many remote regions with various surface characteristics. Nevertheless, surface layer models and bulk parameterization schemes often are adequate for flux calculations based on mean flow parameters. The real problems then lie in the quality of input data for the flux calculations. In general circulation models (GCMs), the surface winds and temperatures may have large errors. These have been shown to be significant to long-term fluxes.

  7. Temporal and spatial variability of surface fluxes over the ice edge zone in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, B.; Schröder, D.; Launiainen, J.; Vihma, T.; Smedman, A.-S.; Magnusson, M.

    2002-08-01

    Three land-fast ice stations (one of them was the Finnish research ice breaker Aranda) and the German research aircraft Falcon were applied to measure the turbulent and radiation fluxes over the ice edge zone in the northern Baltic Sea during the Baltic Air-Sea-Ice Study (BASIS) field experiment from 16 February to 6 March 1998. The temporal and spatial variability of the surface fluxes is discussed. Synoptic weather systems passed the experimental area in a rapid sequence and dominated the conditions (wind speed, air-surface temperature difference, cloud field) for the variability of the turbulent and radiation fluxes. At the ice stations, the largest upward sensible heat fluxes of about 100 Wm-2 were measured during the passage of a cold front when the air cooled faster (-5 K per hour) than the surface. The largest downward flux of about -200 Wm-2 occurred during warm air advection when the air temperature reached +10°C but the surface temperature remained at 0°C. Spatial variability of fluxes was observed from the small scale (scale of ice floes and open water spots) to the mesoscale (width of the ice edge zone). The degree of spatial variability depends on the synoptic situation: during melting conditions downward heat fluxes were the same over ice and open water, whereas during strong cold-air advection upward heat fluxes differed by more than 100 Wm-2. A remarkable amount of grey ice with intermediate surface temperature was observed. The ice in the Baltic Sea cannot be described by one ice type only.

  8. Internal wave driven shelf edge fluxes in the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jo; Green, Mattias; Stephenson, Gordon; Palmer, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The internal tide and wave field dominate the dynamics of the Celtic Sea in the northeast Atlantic during the summer months. In addition to stimulating a well recognised vertical nutrient flux through shear mixing along the base of the pycnocline, the internal tide is responsible for the horizontal exchange of energy, mass, heat and salt between the deep-ocean and continental shelf. We present results from a 2012 field campaign where a series of moorings were specifically laid out to capture the generation, propagation and dissipation of the internal tide across the shelf break and onto the shelf. Our measurements reveal remarkable variability in water column structure, currents and fluxes owing to the highly corrugated and irregular shelf edge bathymetry. Our calculations are used to estimate the internal tidal contribution to fluxes and exchange for the whole Celtic Sea sector of the NW European Shelf. Understanding and quantifying the different physical exchange processes is essential if these regions are to be adequately accounted for in both physical and ecosystem models of shelf seas.

  9. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  10. The role of bubbles during air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven; Bushinsky, Seth

    2016-06-01

    The potential for using the air-sea exchange rate of oxygen as a tracer for net community biological production in the ocean is greatly enhanced by recent accuracy improvements for in situ measurements of oxygen on unmanned platforms. A limiting factor for determining the exchange process is evaluating the air-sea flux contributed by bubble processes produced by breaking waves, particularly during winter months under high winds. Highly accurate measurements of noble gases (Ne, Ar & Kr) and nitrogen, N2, in seawater are tracers of the importance of bubble process in the surface mixed layer. We use measured distributions of these gases in the ventilated thermocline of the North Pacific and an annual time series of N2 in the surface ocean of the NE Subarctic Pacific to evaluate four different air-water exchange models chosen to represent the range of model interpretation of bubble processes. We find that models must have an explicit bubble mechanism to reproduce concentrations of insoluble atmospheric gases, but there are periods when they all depart from observations. The recent model of Liang et al. (2013) stems from a highly resolved model of bubble plumes and categorizes bubble mechanisms into those that are small enough to collapse and larger ones that exchange gases before they resurface, both of which are necessary to explain the data.

  11. Methods, fluxes and sources of gas phase alkyl nitrates in the coastal air.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Buczyńska, Anna J; Godoi, Ana F L; Favoreto, Rodrigo; Bencs, László; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Grieken, René; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2014-10-01

    The daily and seasonal atmospheric concentrations, deposition fluxes and emission sources of a few C3-C9 gaseous alkyl nitrates (ANs) at the Belgian coast (De Haan) on the Southern North Sea were determined. An adapted sampler design for low- and high-volume air-sampling, optimized sample extraction and clean-up, as well as identification and quantification of ANs in air samples by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry, are reported. The total concentrations of ANs ranged from 0.03 to 85 pptv and consisted primarily of the nitro-butane and nitro-pentane isomers. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated by the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine the influence of main air masses on AN levels in the air. The shorter chain ANs have been the most abundant in the Atlantic/Channel/UK air masses, while longer chain ANs prevailed in continental air. The overall mean N fluxes of the ANs were slightly higher for summer than those for winter-spring, although their contributions to the total nitrogen flux were low. High correlations between AN and HNO₂ levels were observed during winter/spring. During summer, the shorter chain ANs correlated well with precipitation. Source apportionment by means of principal component analysis indicated that most of the gas phase ANs could be attributed to traffic/combustion, secondary photochemical formation and biomass burning, although marine sources may also have been present and a contributing factor. PMID:24952420

  12. Methods, fluxes and sources of gas phase alkyl nitrates in the coastal air.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Buczyńska, Anna J; Godoi, Ana F L; Favoreto, Rodrigo; Bencs, László; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Grieken, René; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2014-10-01

    The daily and seasonal atmospheric concentrations, deposition fluxes and emission sources of a few C3-C9 gaseous alkyl nitrates (ANs) at the Belgian coast (De Haan) on the Southern North Sea were determined. An adapted sampler design for low- and high-volume air-sampling, optimized sample extraction and clean-up, as well as identification and quantification of ANs in air samples by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry, are reported. The total concentrations of ANs ranged from 0.03 to 85 pptv and consisted primarily of the nitro-butane and nitro-pentane isomers. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated by the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine the influence of main air masses on AN levels in the air. The shorter chain ANs have been the most abundant in the Atlantic/Channel/UK air masses, while longer chain ANs prevailed in continental air. The overall mean N fluxes of the ANs were slightly higher for summer than those for winter-spring, although their contributions to the total nitrogen flux were low. High correlations between AN and HNO₂ levels were observed during winter/spring. During summer, the shorter chain ANs correlated well with precipitation. Source apportionment by means of principal component analysis indicated that most of the gas phase ANs could be attributed to traffic/combustion, secondary photochemical formation and biomass burning, although marine sources may also have been present and a contributing factor.

  13. Air-Sea Interactions over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Alejandro; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing, three dimensions, and realistic coastlines. Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions indicated that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality, which limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  14. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  15. Fluxes of clay minerals in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Annette; Wiesner, Martin G.; Liu, Zhifei

    2015-11-01

    In order to assess dominant settling processes that change the composition of the detrital clay fraction during transport from neighboring estuaries to a deep sea basin, we studied relative clay mineral abundances and absolute clay mineral fluxes of clay-sized sinking particulate matter collected by eight sediment trap systems deployed from shallow to deep water depth in the South China Sea. This is the first basin-wide study on recent sedimentation processes in the western Pacific marginal seas. Annual averages of relative clay mineral abundances at the shallow traps are temporally more variable and regionally more diverse, resembling those of surrounding drainage basins. In contrast, higher fluxes of material reach the deeper traps. Their characteristics trend temporally and spatially towards uniformity and are enriched with smectite in the entire deep basin. Sinking particulate matter that reaches the shallow traps spends less time in pelagic transport and is affected by monsoonal current reversals. The enrichment in smectite in the deeper traps is a result of longer duration in transport at low velocities, which may increase the effect of differential settling during transport. The trend is caused by lateral advection driven by the cyclonic deep circulation, and this is considered as the main transport process in the northern and central deep basin. The high fluxes in the south-western deep basin could be the result of laterally advected re-suspended sediments from the neighboring shelves. The effects on the composition of the detrital clay fraction caused by oceanographic control, which indirectly include those by differential settling, mask the climatic signal from surrounding drainage basins in the deep basin sediments. This strongly affects the interpretation of the clay mineralogical record in sediments deposited under recent conditions in the South China Sea deep basin.

  16. [Distribution, flux and biological consumption of carbon monoxide in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in summer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Xu, Guan-Qiu

    2014-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) concentration distribution, sea-to-air flux and microbial consumption rate constant, along with atmospheric CO mixing ratio, were measured in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in summer. Atmospheric CO mixing ratios varied from 68 x 10(-9) -448 x 10(-9), with an average of 117 x 10(-9) (SD = 68 x 10(-9), n = 36). Overall, the concentrations of atmospheric CO displayed a decreasing trend from the coastal stations to the offshore stations. The surface water CO concentrations in the investigated area ranged from 0.23-7.10 nmol x L(-1), with an average of 2.49 nmol x L(-1) (SD = 2.11, n = 36). The surface water CO concentrations were significantly affected by sunlight. Vertical profiles showed that CO concentrations rapidly declined with depth, with the maximum values appearing in the surface water. CO concentrations exhibited obvious diurnal variations in the study area, with the maximum values being 6-40 folds higher than the minimum values. Minimal concentrations of CO all occurred before dawn. However, the maximal concentrations of CO occurred at noon. Marked diurnal variation in the concentrations of CO in the water column indicated that CO was produced primarily by photochemistry. The surface CO concentrations were oversaturated relative to the atmospheric concentrations and the saturation factors ranged from 1.99-99.18, with an average of 29.36 (SD = 24.42, n = 29). The East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea was a net source of atmospheric CO. The sea-to-air fluxes of CO in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea ranged 0.37-44.84 μmol x (m2 x d)(-1), with an average of 12.73 μmol x (m2 x d)(-1) (SD = 11.40, n = 29). In the incubation experiments, CO concentrations decreased exponentially with incubation time and the processes conformed to the first order reaction characteristics. The microbial CO consumption rate constants (K(co)) in the surface water ranged from 0.12 to 1.45 h(-1), with an average of 0.47 h(-1) (SD = 0

  17. [Distribution, flux and biological consumption of carbon monoxide in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in summer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Xu, Guan-Qiu

    2014-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) concentration distribution, sea-to-air flux and microbial consumption rate constant, along with atmospheric CO mixing ratio, were measured in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in summer. Atmospheric CO mixing ratios varied from 68 x 10(-9) -448 x 10(-9), with an average of 117 x 10(-9) (SD = 68 x 10(-9), n = 36). Overall, the concentrations of atmospheric CO displayed a decreasing trend from the coastal stations to the offshore stations. The surface water CO concentrations in the investigated area ranged from 0.23-7.10 nmol x L(-1), with an average of 2.49 nmol x L(-1) (SD = 2.11, n = 36). The surface water CO concentrations were significantly affected by sunlight. Vertical profiles showed that CO concentrations rapidly declined with depth, with the maximum values appearing in the surface water. CO concentrations exhibited obvious diurnal variations in the study area, with the maximum values being 6-40 folds higher than the minimum values. Minimal concentrations of CO all occurred before dawn. However, the maximal concentrations of CO occurred at noon. Marked diurnal variation in the concentrations of CO in the water column indicated that CO was produced primarily by photochemistry. The surface CO concentrations were oversaturated relative to the atmospheric concentrations and the saturation factors ranged from 1.99-99.18, with an average of 29.36 (SD = 24.42, n = 29). The East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea was a net source of atmospheric CO. The sea-to-air fluxes of CO in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea ranged 0.37-44.84 μmol x (m2 x d)(-1), with an average of 12.73 μmol x (m2 x d)(-1) (SD = 11.40, n = 29). In the incubation experiments, CO concentrations decreased exponentially with incubation time and the processes conformed to the first order reaction characteristics. The microbial CO consumption rate constants (K(co)) in the surface water ranged from 0.12 to 1.45 h(-1), with an average of 0.47 h(-1) (SD = 0

  18. Observational Studies of Parameters Influencing Air-sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, U.; Frew, N. M.; Bock, E. J.; Hara, T.; Garbe, C. S.; Jaehne, B.

    A physically-based modeling of the air-sea gas transfer that can be used to predict the gas transfer rates with sufficient accuracy as a function of micrometeorological parameters is still lacking. State of the art are still simple gas transfer rate/wind speed relationships. Previous measurements from Coastal Ocean Experiment in the Atlantic revealed positive correlations between mean square slope, near surface turbulent dis- sipation, and wind stress. It also demonstrated a strong negative correlation between mean square slope and the fluorescence of surface-enriched colored dissolved organic matter. Using heat as a proxy tracer for gases the exchange process at the air/water interface and the micro turbulence at the water surface can be investigated. The anal- ysis of infrared image sequences allow the determination of the net heat flux at the ocean surface, the temperature gradient across the air/sea interface and thus the heat transfer velocity and gas transfer velocity respectively. Laboratory studies were carried out in the new Heidelberg wind-wave facility AELOTRON. Direct measurements of the Schmidt number exponent were done in conjunction with classical mass balance methods to estimate the transfer velocity. The laboratory results allowed to validate the basic assumptions of the so called controlled flux technique by applying differ- ent tracers for the gas exchange in a large Schmidt number regime. Thus a modeling of the Schmidt number exponent is able to fill the gap between laboratory and field measurements field. Both, the results from the laboratory and the field measurements should be able to give a further understanding of the mechanisms controlling the trans- port processes across the aqueous boundary layer and to relate the forcing functions to parameters measured by remote sensing.

  19. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  20. Diagnosing Air-Sea Interactions on Intraseasonal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    What is the role of ocean coupling in the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)? Consensus thinking holds that the essential physics of the MJO involve interactions between convection, atmospheric wave dynamics, and boundary layer and free troposphere moisture. However, many modeling studies demonstrate improved MJO simulation when an atmosphere-only general circulation model (AGCM) is coupled to an ocean model, so feedbacks from the ocean are probably not negligible. Assessing the importance and processes of these feedbacks is challenging for at least two reasons. First, observations of the MJO only sample the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system; there is no "uncoupled" MJO in nature. Second, the practice of analyzing the MJO in uncoupled and coupled GCMs (CGCMs) involves using imperfect tools to study the problem. Although MJO simulation is improving in many models, shortcomings remain in both AGCMs and CGCMs, making it difficult to determine if changes brought about through coupling reflect critical air-sea interactions or are simply part of the collective idiosyncracies of a given model. For the atmosphere, ocean feedbacks from intraseasonal sea surface temperature (SST) variations are communicated through their effects on surface fluxes of heat and moisture. This presentation suggests a set of analysis tools for diagnosing the impact of an interactive ocean on surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, including their mean, variance, spectral characteristics, and phasing with respect to wind, SST, and MJO convection. The diagnostics are demonstrated with application to several CMIP5 models, and reveal a variety of responses to coupled ocean feedbacks.

  1. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  2. In calm seas, precipitation drives air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    In a series of experiments run in what resembles a heavily instrumented fish tank, Harrison et al. investigated the interwoven roles of wind and rain on air-sea gas exchange rates. Working with a 42-meterlong, 1-meter-wide, and 1.25-meter-tall experimental pool, the authors were able to control the wind speed, rainfall rate, water circulation speed, and other parameters, which they used to assess the effect of 24 different wind speed-rainfall rate combinations on the gas exchange rate of sulfur hexafuoride, a greenhouse gas. In trials that lasted up to 3 hours, the authors collected water samples from the tank at regular intervals, tracking the concentration of the dissolved gas.

  3. Trophic pathways and carbon flux patterns in the Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Michael K.; Piepenburg, Dieter; Golikov, Alexander A.; Juterzenka, Karen von; Petryashov, Victor V.; Spindler, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The Laptev Sea is a high-Arctic epicontinental sea north of Siberia (Russia) that is one of the least understood regions of the world’s ocean. It is characterized by a shallow and broad shelf plateau, high influx of river water, sediments and nutrients during summer, long-lasting sea-ice cover from October to May, and the formation of a narrow flaw-lead polynya off the fast-ice edge during winter. Here, we describe results of a German-Russian research project (1993-present), presenting the distribution patterns and dynamics of its marine flora and fauna, as well as pathways and processes of coupling between sea-ice, water-column and sea-floor biota. Three ecological zones are distinguished along a combined east-west and Lena-impact gradient, differing in the composition of pelagic and benthic communities. In general, high Chl a concentrations in the sediments indicate a tight coupling between sympagic and pelagic primary production and nutrient supply to the benthos throughout the entire Laptev Sea. However, there were pronounced regional differences between the ecological zones in magnitude of primary production and trophic dynamics. Primary production during the ice-free summer was highest in the estuarine zone most strongly influenced by the Lena River (210 mg C m -2 day -1). The western and northeastern Laptev Sea yielded 55 and 95 mg C m -2 day -1, respectively. Moreover, the zones differed in the partitioning of carbon flux between zooplankton and benthic food webs. In the Lena zone zooplankton carbon demand was about 31 mg C m -2 day -1 whereas in the western zone it was 21 mg C m -2 day -1 and in the eastern zone 4 mg C m -2 day -1. Total benthic carbon demand was 32 mg C m -2 day -1 for the Lena zone, 56 mg C m -2 day -1 in the western zone and 100 mg C m -2 day -1 in the northeastern zone. A carbon budget constructed for the Laptev Sea indicates that (1) a high proportion of primary production is channelled through the benthic trophic web, bypassing the

  4. On the level of the cosmic ray sea flux

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Aharonian, F. A.; Gabici, S.; Torii, K.; Fukui, Y.; Onishi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawamura, A.

    2009-04-08

    The study of Galactic diffuse {gamma} radiation combined with the knowledge of the distribution of the molecular hydrogen in the Galaxy offers a unique tool to probe the cosmic ray flux in the Galaxy. A methodology to study the level of the cosmic ray 'sea' and to unveil target-accelerator systems in the Galaxy, which makes use of the data from the high resolution survey of the Galactic molecular clouds performed with the NANTEN telescope and of the data from {gamma}-ray instruments, has been developed. Some predictions concerning the level of the cosmic ray 'sea' and the {gamma}-ray emission close to cosmic ray sources for instruments such as Fermi and Cherenkov Telescope Array are presented.

  5. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic time series site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-03-01

    We provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic based on a three year time-series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. We combine the 3He data with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely balance the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also applied the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost three-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003-2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.3 mol m-2 y-1, which is ~ 40% smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference between the time periods, which is barely significant, may be due to a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by decoupling of 3He and nitrate during obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean.

  6. Vertical fluxes of organic contaminants in the Ligurian Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyme, Remi; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Taphanel-Valt, Marie-Helene; Miquel, Juan-Carlos; Lorre, Anne; Marty, Jean-Claude; Mejanelle, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    High resolution temporal series of hydrological and biogeochemical parameters have been monitored throughout the SO-DYFAMED program, aiming at better understanding the response of the ocean to anthropic and climatic disturbance. The present contribution addresses fluxes of organic semi-volatile contaminants and of biogenic lipids associated with marine sinking particles. Sediment trap samples were collected at the DYFAMED station (Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean Sea) from December 2000 to July 2002, at a depth of 200m and 1000m, and with a time step of 2 to 3 weeks. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Non-Aromatic Hydrocarbons (NAHs) were investigated to characterize the levels of contamination and the fluxes of contaminants transferred from the upper marine waters to intermediate waters. Specific lipids of phytoplankton, terrigeneous matter and faecal pellets were also determined, aiming at better understanding biogeochemical processes that may impact on pollutant transfer toward deeper marine horizons. Up to 36 PAHs were identified. The 13 parent compound levels (Σ PAH13) varied from 564 to 4156 ng.g-1, with highest concentrations corresponding to winter months. The molecular profile was dominated by low molecular weight PAHs and higher abundance of alkylated homologues over parent compounds. This characteristic, together with diagnostic molecular ratios attribute the main part of PAHs to a petrogenic origin. Aliphatic hydrocarbons were largely dominated by an UCM (Unresolved Complex Mixture), accounting for ca. 91 % of NAHs, which further confirms the dominant petrogenic origin of hydrocarbons. Fluxes of PAHs13 and NAHs varied from 0.29 to 0.422 and from 0.4 to 19.0 ?g.m2.d-1, respectively. Alike concentrations, PAH fluxes were higher than those reported in other open Mediterranean locations, revealing that the study site is under a stronger anthropogenic influence. Various inputs of contaminants at the study site may be pointed out: riverine inputs

  7. Modes of variability of global sea surface temperature, free atmosphere temperature and oceanic surface energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wenjie; Newell, R.E.; Wu, Zhong-Xiang

    1994-11-01

    Monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST), free air temperature from satellite microwave sounding units (MSU) and oceanic surface energy fluxes are subjected to empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis for a common decade to investigate the physical relationships involved. The first seasonal modes of surface solar energy flux and SST show similar inter-hemispheric patterns with an annual cycle. Solar flux appears to control this pattern of SST. The first seasonal mode of MSU is similar with, additionally, land-sea differences; MSU is apparently partly controlled by absorption of solar near-infrared radiation and partly by sensible heat from from the land surface. The second and third seasonal eigenvector of SST and solar flux exhibit semi-annual oscillations associated with a pattern of cloudiness in the subtropics accompanying the translation of the Hadley cell rising motion between the hemispheres. The second seasonal mode of MSU is dominated by an El Nino Signal. The first nonseasonal EOFs of SST and solar flux exhibit El Nino characteristics with solar pattern being governed by west-to-east translation of a Walker cell type pattern. The first non-seasonal EOF of MSU shows a tropical strip pattern for the El Nino mode, which is well correlated with the latent heat fluxes in the tropical east Pacific but not in the tropical west Pacific. Two possible explanations are: an increase in subsidence throughout the tropical strip driven by extra evaporation in the tropical east Pacific and consequent additional latent heat liberation; a decrease of meridional heat flux out of the tropics. 56 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Ralf; Meier, H E Markus

    2004-06-01

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9 degrees C in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components.

  9. Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Ralf; Meier, H E Markus

    2004-06-01

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9 degrees C in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components. PMID:15264603

  10. Hydrothermal iron flux variability following rapid sea level changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Jennifer L.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; McManus, Jerry F.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2016-04-01

    Sea level changes associated with Pleistocene glacial cycles have been hypothesized to modulate melt production and hydrothermal activity at ocean ridges, yet little is known about fluctuations in hydrothermal circulation on time scales longer than a few millennia. We present a high-resolution record of hydrothermal activity over the past 50 ka using elemental flux data from a new sediment core from the Mir zone of the TAG hydrothermal field at 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mir sediments reveal sixfold to eightfold increases in hydrothermal iron and copper deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by a rapid decline during the sea level rise associated with deglaciation. Our results, along with previous observations from Pacific and Atlantic spreading centers, indicate that rapid sea level changes influence hydrothermal output on mid-ocean ridges. Thus, climate variability may discretize volcanic processing of the solid Earth on millennial time scales and subsequently stimulate variability in biogeochemical interactions with volcanic systems.

  11. A climatology of air-sea interactions at the Mediterranean LION and AZUR buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniaux, Guy; Prieur, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Giordani, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The LION and AZUR buoys (respectively at 42.1°N 4.7°E and 43.4°N 7.8°E) provide an extended data set since respectively 1999 and 2001 to present for studying air-sea interactions in the northwestern Mediterranean basin. The two buoys are located where high wind events occur (resp. north western and north easterly gale winds), that force and condition deep oceanic winter convection in that region. A short-term climatology (resp. 13 and 11 years) of air-sea interactions has been developed, which includes classical meteo-oceanic parameters, but also waves period and significant wave heights and radiative fluxes. Moreover turbulent surface fluxes have been estimated from various bulk parameterizations, in order to estimate uncertainties on fluxes. An important dispersion of turbulent fluxes is found at high wind speeds according to the parameterization used, larger than taking into account the second order effects of cool skin, warm layer and waves. An important annual cycle affects air temperatures (ATs), SSTs and turbulent fluxes at the two buoys. The annual cycle of ATs and SSTs can be well reconstructed from the first two annual harmonics, while for the turbulent heat fluxes the erratic occurrence of high and low flux events, well correlated with high/dry and low windy periods, strongly affect their annual and interannual cycles. The frequency of high surface heat fluxes and high wind stress is found highest during the autumn and winter months, despite the fact that north-westerly gale winds occur all year long at LION buoy. During calm weather period, ATs and SSTs experience an important diurnal cycle (on average 1 and 0.5°C respectively), that affect latent and sensible heat fluxes. Finally, an estimate of the interannual variability of the turbulent fluxes in Autumn and Winter is discussed, in order to characterize their potential role on deep ocean convection.

  12. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  13. To what extent does the salinity flux influence phytoplankton blooms? - Baltic Sea modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszyńska, Agata; Stramska, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    This work is focused on numerical modeling of biological-physical interactions and their influence on phytoplankton production and vertical distribution of biomass and its variability in the surface waters of the Baltic Sea. The area of interest is an inland sea with water salinity much smaller than observed in the global ocean (about one fifth of the open ocean value). Vertical distribution of the salinity has a significant influence on water column density stratification, and therefore influences intensity of mixing and the depth of mixed layer. This, in turn, defines environmental conditions for phytoplankton growth. Vertical distribution of water salinity in the basin is controlled by processes such as evaporation/precipitation, freezing/melting of sea ice and runoff of freshwater from land. There are a lot of different phytoplankton species in the area of the Baltic Sea. Every single one has its own characteristics and is sensitive to distinct complex environmental conditions. Biological-physical interactions controlling these microorganisms' life cycles are multiplicitous and because of their complexity difficult to quantify. The best and probably only way to study presented issue is the usage of numerical modeling tool. The results presented here are based on 1D numerical simulations carried out with Princeton Ocean Model (POM, http://www.ccpo.odu.edu/POMWEB/) merged with the Ecological Regional Ecosystem Model (ERGOM, http://ergom.net/) developed for the Baltic Sea research by German scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde. In model simulations surface salinity flux was determined from the difference between the precipitation and evaporation rate at the air-sea interface. Data for parameterization of atmospheric forcing were defined based on data sets from National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP). We carried out systematic calculations using different values of surface fluxes encompassing the range of

  14. Monsoon-driven vertical fluxes of organic pollutants in the western Arabian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Bayona, J.M.; Ittekkot, V.; Albaiges, J.

    1999-11-15

    A time series of sinking particles from the western Arabian Sea was analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, 4,4{prime}-DDT and 4,4{prime}-DDE, to assess the role of monsoons on their vertical flux in the Indian Ocean. Concurrently, molecular markers such as sterols and linear and branched alkanes were analyzed enabling the characterization of the biogenic sources and biogeochemical processes occurring during the sampling period. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data set of concentrations and fluxes of these compounds confirmed a seasonal variability driven by the SW and NE monsoons. Moreover, the influence of different air masses is evidenced by the occurrence of higher concentrations of DDT, PCBs, and pyrolytic PAHs during the NE monsoon and of fossil hydrocarbons during the SW monsoon. Total annual fluxes to the deep Arabian Sea represent an important removal contribution of persistent organic pollutants, thus not being available for the global distillation process (volatilization and atmospheric transport from low or mid latitudes to cold areas). Therefore, monsoons may play a significant role on the global cycle of organic pollutants.

  15. Air-sea Exchange of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, G. P.; Heil, A.; Kukucka, P.; Meixner, F. X.; Mulder, M. D.; Prybilova, P.; Prokes, R.; Rusina, T. S.; Song, G. Z.; Vrana, B.

    2015-12-01

    The marine atmospheric environment is a receptor for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are advected from sources on land, primary, such as biomass burning by-products (PAHs, dioxins), and secondary, such as volatilization from contaminated soils (PCBs, pesticides). Primary sources do not exist in the marine environment, except for PAHs (ship engines) but following previous atmospheric deposition, the sea surface may turn to a secondary source by reversal of diffusive air-sea mass exchange. No monitoring is in place. We studied the vertical fluxes of a wide range of primary and secondary emitted POPs based on measurements in air and surface seawater at a remote coastal site in the eastern Mediterranean (2012). To this end, silicon rubbers were used as passive water samplers, vertical concentration gradients were determined in air and fluxes were quantified based on Eddy covariance. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and semivolatile PAHs were found close to phase equilibrium, except one PAH, retene, a wood burning tracer, was found seasonally net-volatilisational. Some PCBs, p,p'-DDE, penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCB, HCB) were mostly net-depositional, while PBDEs were net-volatilizational. Fluxes determined at a a remote coastal site ranged -33 - +2.4 µg m-2 d-1 for PAHs and -4.0 - +0.3 µg m-2 d-1for halogenated compounds (< 0 means net-deposition, > 0 means net-volatilization). It is concluded that nowadays in open seas more pollutants are undergoing reversal of the direction of air-sea exchange. Recgional fire activity records in combination with box model simulations suggest that deposition of retene during summer is followed by a reversal of air-sea exchange. The seawater surface as secondary source of pollution should be assessed based on flux measurements across seasons and over longer time periods.

  16. Satellite estimates of ocean-air heat fluxes during cold air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for estimating the heat and moisture fluxes of coastal waters using the cloud free path, the sea surface temperature, and the saturation water vapor mixing ratio is presented. Generalized nomograms for the surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are developed using the Stage and Businger (1981) mixed-layer model. The fluxes are found to be slightly dependent on wind speed. The results are found to be applicable to any path within the cloud-free region, with heat fluxes obtainable by multiplication of the mean heating by the mean wind speed in the boundary layer. Higher stability causes lowered heating. It is shown that the latent heat flux is linear. Applications of the method to lake-effect snowstorms and for verification of boundary-layer models are indicated.

  17. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  18. Eddy correlation measurements of CO{sub 2} flux at the sea surface in ASGASEX

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Anderson, R.J.; Hertzman, O.; Bourque, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Most estimates of CO{sub 2} exchange at the sea surface have been based on tracer experiments with other gases, long-term radiocarbon balances, or laboratory experiments. In the 1993 ASGASEX experiment, the first direct determinations of the CO{sub 2} exchange coefficient at an offshore site have been obtained. A key element of the plan was using redundant sensors and analysis systems so as to be able to test the consistency of the results. The authors have computed eddy fluxes using winds from a sonic anemometer and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O signals from IR sensors. Differences in mean CO{sub 2} between air equilibrated with seawater and ambient air were measured using an equilibrator and a LiCor IR analyzer. Similar measurements were made using a gas chromatograph instead of the IR analyzer.

  19. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  20. Carbon fluxes in the Arabian Sea: Export versus recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixen, Tim; Gaye, Birgit; Ramaswamy, Venkitasubramani

    2016-04-01

    The organic carbon pump strongly influences the exchange of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is known that it responds to global change but the magnitude and the direction of change are still unpredictable. Sediment trap experiments carried out at various sites in the Arabian Sea between 1986 and 1998 have shown differences in the functioning of the organic carbon pump (OCP). An OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton operated in the upwelling region off Oman and during the spring bloom in the northern Arabian Sea. Cyanobacteria capable of fixing nitrogen seem to dominate the phytoplankton community during all other seasons. The export driven by cyanobacteria was much lower than the export driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton. Productivity and nutrient availability seems to be a main factor controlling fluxes during blooms of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The ballast effect caused by inputs of dust into the ocean and its incorporation into sinking particles seems to be the main factor controlling the export during times when cyanobacteria dominate the phytoplankton community. C/N ratios of organic matter exported from blooms dominated by nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are enhanced and, furthermore, indicate a more efficient recycling of nutrients at shallower water depth. This implies that the bacterial-driven OCP operates more in a recycling mode that keeps nutrients closer to the euphotic zone whereas the OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton reduces the recycling of nutrients by exporting them into greater water-depth.

  1. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Soon after its inception, R/P FLIP was used to study the interaction of the atmosphere and ocean due to its unique stability and low flow distortion. A number of campaigns have been conducted to measure the surface fluxes of heat, water vapor and horizontal momentum of the wind with instrumentation as used over land, supported by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation. The size of FLIP allows for simultaneous ocean wave and mixed-layer measurements as well. Air-sea interaction was a prime component of BOMEX in 1968, where FLIP transited the Panama Canal. The methods used were similar to the over-land "Kansas" experiment of AFCRL in 1968. BOMEX was followed by many experiments in the north Pacific off San Diego, northern California, and Hawaii. Diverse results from FLIP include identification of the mechanism that causes erroneous fluctuating temperature measurements in the salt-aerosol-laden marine atmosphere, the role of humidity on optical refractive index fluctuations, and identification of Miles' critical layer in the air flow over waves.

  2. Developments in Airborne Oceanography and Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. K.

    2014-12-01

    , just as aircraft carriers "project force". Now we can measure winds, waves, temperatures, currents, radiative transfer, images and air-sea fluxes from aircraft over the ocean.I will review some of the history of airborne oceanography and present examples of how it can extend our knowledge and understanding of air-sea interaction.

  3. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-09-01

    Significant rates of primary production occur in the oligotrophic ocean, without any measurable nutrients present in the mixed layer, fueling a scientific paradox that has lasted for decades. Here, we provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic. We combine a 3-year time series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely mirror the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also apply the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost 3-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003 to 2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.14 mol m-2 yr-1, which is ~40 % smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference in nitrate flux between the time periods may be signifying a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for the BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by the decoupling of 3He and nitrate during the obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean. The upward nitrate flux is certainly large enough to support observed rates of primary production at BATS and more generally

  4. Using eddy covariance to estimate air-sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  5. An investigation of sea ice motion and fluxes within the Prince Gustaf Adolf Sea, Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canada, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlleben, T.; Howell, S.; Agnew, T.; Komarov, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the sea ice flux events that occurred through the Prince Gustaf Adolf Sea flux gate into the Queen Elizabeth Islands (QEI) over the 2010 season are investigated in detail. In the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, multi-year ice (MYI) exports and in situ summer melt are primarily balanced by MYI influx events into QEI during the brief period each year when ice exchanges freely between the Arctic Ocean and the QEI reservoir. Here, data from two Canadian Ice Service satellite tracking beacons that drifted through the Gustaf flux gate in 2010, along with atmospheric sea level pressure and wind data, are compared to ice drift velocities derived from RADARSAT imagery using a new sea ice tracking system. It is demonstrated in this study that the annual average ice drifts implied by the fluxes reported in previous works underestimate the basic current-driven flow of sea ice across the Prince Gustaf Adolf Sea gate (as determined from Radarsat imagery during periods of no wind). It is further established that ice drifts (and hence ice fluxes) through the Gustaf flux gate vary spatially, with velocities on the eastern side in 2010 being consistently greater than those on the western side by a factor of ~2. These results reveal the potential of using Radarsat-derived ice motion to expand upon and improve the limited data on ocean currents within the Queen Elizabeth Islands, as well as to refine estimates of ice flux magnitudes and spatial patterns in this area.

  6. The sensitivity of latent heat flux to the air humidity approximations used in ocean circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1990-01-01

    In deriving the surface latent heat flux with the bulk formula for the thermal forcing of some ocean circulation models, two approximations are commonly made to bypass the use of atmospheric humidity in the formula. The first assumes a constant relative humidity, and the second supposes that the sea-air humidity difference varies linearly with the saturation humidity at sea surface temperature. Using climatological fields derived from the Marine Deck and long time series from ocean weather stations, the errors introduced by these two assumptions are examined. It is shown that the errors reach above 100 W/sq m over western boundary currents and 50 W/sq m over the tropical ocean. The two approximations also introduce erroneous seasonal and spatial variabilities with magnitudes over 50 percent of the observed variabilities.

  7. Temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange in a low-emission estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Sørensen, Lise Lotte

    2016-07-01

    There is the need for further study of whether global estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange in estuarine systems capture the relevant temporal variability and, as such, the temporal variability of bulk parameterized and directly measured CO2 fluxes was investigated in the Danish estuary, Roskilde Fjord. The air-sea CO2 fluxes showed large temporal variability across seasons and between days and that more than 30% of the net CO2 emission in 2013 was a result of two large fall and winter storms. The diurnal variability of ΔpCO2 was up to 400 during summer changing the estuary from a source to a sink of CO2 within the day. Across seasons the system was suggested to change from a sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring to near neutral during summer and later to a source of atmospheric CO2 during fall. Results indicated that Roskilde Fjord was an annual low-emission estuary, with an estimated bulk parameterized release of 3.9 ± 8.7 mol CO2 m-2 y-1 during 2012-2013. It was suggested that the production-respiration balance leading to the low annual emission in Roskilde Fjord, was caused by the shallow depth, long residence time and high water quality in the estuary. In the data analysis the eddy covariance CO2 flux samples were filtered according to the H2Osbnd CO2 cross-sensitivity assessment suggested by Landwehr et al. (2014). This filtering reduced episodes of contradicting directions between measured and bulk parameterized air-sea CO2 exchanges and changed the net air-sea CO2 exchange from an uptake to a release. The CO2 gas transfer velocity was calculated from directly measured CO2 fluxes and ΔpCO2 and agreed to previous observations and parameterizations.

  8. Replicating the 1970s' Weddell Polynya using a coupled ocean-sea ice model with reanalysis surface flux fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Woo Geun; Lee, Sang-Ki; Gordon, Arnold L.; Liu, Yanyun; Cho, Chang-Bong; Park, Jong Jin

    2015-07-01

    The 1970s' Weddell Polynya is simulated in the framework of a coupled ocean-sea ice model forced by reanalysis surface flux fields. A rapid emergence of strongly negative wind stress curl over the Weddell Sea intensifies the cyclonic Weddell gyre and thus causes the relatively warm and salty Weddell Deep Water (WDW) to upwell, generating an open-ocean polynya by melting sea ice or hindering its formation. Once the polynya occurs in the austral winter, the underlying water column is destabilized due to the combined effect of the high-salinity WDW, a massive cooling at the air-sea interface, and the ensuing brine rejection from newly forming ice, thus inducing open-ocean deep convection. Further analysis shows that the buildup of a large heat reservoir at depth by the mid-1970s was a necessary condition to establish the Weddell Polynya of the 1970s.

  9. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation

  10. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured, as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near-surface part of the atmospheric boundary layer, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea to investigate this assumption. The results are based on a 1.5-year record of quality-controlled eddy-covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be confirmed because flux differences between the two heights are insignificantly small more than 95 % of the time. In contrast, significant differences, which are larger than the measurement error, occur in the CO2 flux about 35 % of the time. Data used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  11. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near surface part of the atmospheric boundary, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The goal of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea due to this assumption. The results are based on an one-and-a-half year record of quality controlled eddy covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be validated because flux gradients between the two heights are more than 95 % of the time insignificantly small. In contrast, significant gradients, which are larger than the measurement error, occur for the CO2 flux in nearly 35 % of the time. Data, used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  12. The water fluxes of the Yellow River to the sea in the past 50 years, in response to climate change and human activities.

    PubMed

    Jiongxin, Xu

    2005-05-01

    Since the 1970s, the water fluxes to the sea of the Yellow River have declined significantly. Based on data of precipitation, air temperature, the measured and "natural" river flow, the water diversion and consumption, and the areas of erosion and sediment control measures over the drainage basin, water fluxes to the sea of the Yellow River are studied in relation with the influences of changing climate and human activities. The Yellow River basin can be divided into different water source areas; multiple regression indicates that the variation in precipitation over different water source areas has different effect on water fluxes to the sea. In the period between 1970 and 1997, averaged air temperature over the whole Yellow River increased by about 1.0 degree C, from 16.5 degrees C to 17.5 degrees C, a factor that is negatively correlated with the water yield of the Yellow River. Water diversion and consumption has sharply increased and resulted in a significant decline in the water fluxes to the sea. Since the 1960s, erosion and sediment control measures have been practiced over the drainage basin. This factor, to a lesser degree, is also responsible for the decrease in water fluxes to the sea. A multiple regression equation has been established to estimate the change in water fluxes to the sea caused by the changes in precipitation, air temperature, water diversion and consumption, erosion, and sediment control measures, indicating that the contribution of water diversion and consumption to the variation in annual water flux to the sea is 41.3%, that of precipitation is 40.8%, that of temperature is 11.4%, and that of erosion and sediment control measures is 6.5%. PMID:15924206

  13. Atlantic Air-Sea Interaction Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodwell, M. J.

    INTRODUCTION DATA AND MODELS THE ANALYSIS METHOD ATMOSPHERIC FORCING OF NORTH ATLANTIC SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES NORTH ATLANTIC SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE FORCING OF THE ATMOSPHERE Observational Evidence Model Results POTENTIAL SEASONAL PREDICTABILITY BASED ON THE ATMOSPHERE GENERAL - CIRCULATION MODEL CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION REFERENCES

  14. Effect of Air-Sea coupling on the Frequency Distribution of Intense Tropical Cyclones over the Northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomomaki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual SST variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling and hence TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  15. Fluxes of carbon and nutrients to the Iceland Sea surface waters and inferred primary productivity and stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeansson, Emil; Bellerby, Richard; Frigstad, Helene; Ólafsdóttir, Sólveig R.; Olafsson, Jón; Skjelvan, Ingunn

    2014-05-01

    Fluxes of carbon and nutrients to the upper 100 m of the Iceland Sea are evaluated. The study utilises hydro-chemical data from the quarterly sampled Iceland Sea time-series station (68.00 ° N, 12.67 ° W), for the years between 1993 and 2006. By comparing data of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and nutrients in the surface layer (upper 100 m), and a sub-surface layer (100-200 m), we calculate monthly deficits in the surface, and use this to deduce the fluxes into and out of the surface layer that affect the deficit: vertical mixing, horizontal advection, air-sea exchange, and biological activity. The deficits show a clear seasonality with a minimum in winter, when the mixed layer is at the deepest, and a maximum in September, when biological uptake has removed much of the nutrients. The annual vertical fluxes of DIC and nitrate amounts to 2.3 and 0.41 mol m-2 yr-1, respectively, the annual air-sea uptake of atmospheric CO2 is 4.4 mol m-2 yr-1, and the net annual flux due to biological activity is calculated to 5.5 mol C m-2 yr-1, and 0.37 mol N m-2 yr-1. We also deduce seasonal NCP by summing up the months with a positive drawdown of DIC, and similar for new production by summing up the months with positive nitrate drawdown. We quantify these to 5.6 mol C m-2 yr-1, and 0.51 mol N m-2 yr-1, which gives a ratio markedly higher than Redfield. Results for phosphate and silicate are also shown and discussed, as are the stoichiometry of the all deduced fluxes.

  16. Sources and fluxes of organic nitrogen in precipitation over the southern East Sea/Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, G.; Kim, G.

    2015-03-01

    We measured total dissolved reactive nitrogen in precipitation samples collected at Uljin, a Korean coastal site upwind of the southern East Sea/Sea of Japan (EJS), selected as a representative study site of atmospheric deposition over the northwestern Pacific margin. NO3- was found to be the most abundant nitrogen species, followed by NH4+ and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Air-mass back-trajectory (AMBT) analysis revealed that a significant fraction of the inorganic nitrogen (NO3- and NH4+) originated from mainland Asia, whereas the DON was primarily derived from Korea. Using varimax-rotated factor analysis in combination with major ions as tracers, agricultural activities in Korea were identified as the primary sources of DON in these samples. In addition, a positive correlation was found at Uljin between the size of organic fraction in total reactive nitrogen and nitrogen to carbon atomic ratio in organic matter. This correlation has also been observed at other locations worldwide, implying the utilization potential of atmospheric organic nitrogen might increase with its proportion in total nitrogen. Combining wet deposition measurements in this study with literature values for dry deposition observed at a remote island in the EJS, the total atmospheric depositional flux of reactive nitrogen was estimated to be 115 mmol N m-2 yr-1 over the southern EJS. Our study sheds new light on the potentially significant contribution to primary productivity of the northwestern Pacific Ocean by atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, especially the organic fraction.

  17. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-20

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  18. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  19. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.; Miller, Scott D.

    2016-07-01

    Direct carbon dioxide flux measurements using eddy covariance from an icebreaker in the high-latitude Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone are reported. Fluxes were combined with the measured water-air carbon dioxide partial pressure difference (ΔpCO2) to compute the air-sea gas transfer velocity (k, normalized to Schmidt number 660). The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm h-1) and the neutral 10 m wind speed (U10n, m s-1), kopen = 0.245 U10n2 + 1.3, in close agreement with decades old tracer-based results and much lower than cubic relationships inferred from previous open ocean eddy covariance studies. In the marginal ice zone, the effective gas transfer velocity decreased in proportion to sea ice cover, in contrast with predictions of enhanced gas exchange in the presence of sea ice. The combined open water and marginal ice zone results affect the calculated magnitude and spatial distribution of Southern Ocean carbon flux.

  20. Air-Sea Exchange Of CO2: A Multi-Technology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengberg, A.; Almroth, E.; Anderson, L.; Hall, P.; Hjalmarsson, S.; Lefevre, D.; Omstedt, A.; Rutgersson, A.; Sahlee, E.; Smedman, A.; Wesslander, K.

    2006-12-01

    We report on experiences and results from a multidisciplinary project in which we try to elucidate the complex processes involved in air-sea exchange of CO2. This study was performed in the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish island Gotland) and combined the following technologies: - Meteorological measurements of wind, turbulence, temperature, humidity, humidity flux, CO2 and CO2 flux at several levels from a fixed observation tower - Hourly PCO2 measurements with a moored automatic instrument - Collection of dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity and turbidity data at different levels in the water column at 1-minute intervals - Daily light (PAR) and primary production measurements obtained with a moored automatic incubator - Daily primary production measurements using manual methods - Use of an acoustic current profiler to collect water column information on currents, turbulence, water level and waves - Repetitive water column profiles, from a ship, of dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, nutrients, alkalinity, pH, PAR, Chlorophyll A, salinity and temperature

  1. Air-sea gas transfer for two gases of different solubility (CO2 and O2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutgersson, A.; Andersson, A.; Sahlée, E.

    2016-05-01

    At the land-based marine measuring site Östergarnsholm in the Baltic Sea, the eddy covariance technique was used to measure air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. High- frequency measurements of oxygen were taken with a Microx TX3 optode using the luminescence lifetime technique. The system gives reasonable oxygen fluxes after the limited frequency response of the sensor was corrected for. For fluxes of carbon dioxide the LICOR-7500 instrument was used. Using flux data to estimate transfer velocities indicates higher transfer velocity for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide for winds above 5 m/s. There are too few data for any extensive conclusions, but a least-square fit of the data gives a cubic wind speed dependence of oxygen corresponding to k 660 = 0.074U 3 10. The more effective transfer for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide above 5 m/s is most likely due to enhanced efficiency of oxygen exchange across the surface. Oxygen has lower solubility compared with carbon dioxide and might be more influenced by near surface processes such as microscale wave breaking or sea spray.

  2. New research initiative on air sea interaction in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Leethorp, A.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.

    1994-12-31

    Recent statistical results have demonstrated that the oceanic environment of Southern Africa plays a important regulating role in the climate of the subcontinent. Statistical teleconnections between oceanic temperature anomalies and precipitation over South Africa`s summer rainfall region have been demonstrated, even to the extent of being partially implicated in catastrophic floods. A research program to investigate the interaction between ocean and atmosphere in those ocean areas that have been identified as crucial to Southern Africa climate and rainfall has just started. The first step of this program was to set up a state of the art air-sea interaction measurement system aboard the antarctic research vessel S.A. Agulhas. The second step of the program was to install low cost automatic air sea interaction measurement systems on three research vessels which will provide an extensive database for air-sea interaction studies.

  3. Assessing Air-Sea Interaction in the Evolving NASA GEOS Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how the climate responds to variations in forcing, one necessary component is to understand the full distribution of variability of exchanges of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean. Surface heat and moisture fluxes are critical to the generation and decay of many coupled air-sea phenomena. These mechanisms operate across a number of scales and contain contributions from interactions between the anomalous (i.e. non-mean), often extreme-valued, flux components. Satellite-derived estimates of the surface turbulent and radiative heat fluxes provide an opportunity to assess results from modeling systems. Evaluation of only time mean and variability statistics, however only provides limited traceability to processes controlling what are often regime-dependent errors. This work will present an approach to evaluate the representation of the turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface in the current and evolving Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model. A temperature and moisture vertical profile-based clustering technique is used to identify robust weather regimes, and subsequently intercompare the turbulent fluxes and near-surface parameters within these regimes in both satellite estimates and GEOS-driven data sets. Both model reanalysis (MERRA) and seasonal-to-interannual coupled GEOS model simulations will be evaluated. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the distribution of the fluxes including extremes, and the representation of near-surface forcing variables directly related to their estimation. Results from these analyses will help identify the existence and source of regime-dependent biases in the GEOS model ocean surface turbulent fluxes. The use of the temperature and moisture profiles for weather-state clustering will be highlighted for its potential broad application to 3-D output typical of model simulations.

  4. The Gas Transfer through Polar Sea ice experiment: Insights into the rates and pathways that determine geochemical fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovely, A.; Loose, B.; Schlosser, P.; McGillis, W.; Zappa, C.; Perovich, D.; Brown, S.; Morell, T.; Hsueh, D.; Friedrich, R.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice is a defining feature of the polar marine environment. It is a critical domain for marine biota and it regulates ocean-atmosphere exchange, including the exchange of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. In this study, we determined the rates and pathways that govern gas transport through a mixed sea ice cover. N2O, SF6, 3He, 4He, and Ne were used as gas tracers of the exchange processes that take place at the ice-water and air-water interfaces in a laboratory sea ice experiment. Observation of the changes in gas concentrations during freezing revealed that He is indeed more soluble in ice than in water; Ne is less soluble in ice, and the larger gases (N2O and SF6) are mostly excluded during the freezing process. Model estimates of gas diffusion through ice were calibrated using measurements of bulk gas content in ice cores, yielding gas transfer velocity through ice (kice) of ˜5 × 10-4 m d-1. In comparison, the effective air-sea gas transfer velocities (keff) ranged up to 0.33 m d-1 providing further evidence that very little mixed-layer ventilation takes place via gas diffusion through columnar sea ice. However, this ventilation is distinct from air-ice gas fluxes driven by sea ice biogeochemistry. The magnitude of keff showed a clear increasing trend with wind speed and current velocity beneath the ice, as well as the combination of the two. This result indicates that gas transfer cannot be uniquely predicted by wind speed alone in the presence of sea ice.

  5. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    fluxes by up to 15%, and, therefore, play important local and regional roles in regulating air-sea interactions.

  6. Air-sea interactions and precipitation over the tropical oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, C.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture, the author principally discusses air-sea exchanges that are relevant to climate and global problems. The processes of interest are those acting over time scales of months to decades, which in some instances are influenced by smaller-time-scale processes, down to the diurnal time scale. The repsective influence of these processes varies with regions, seasons and scales over which they occur and, because these processes are mostly nonlinear, scale interactions can be quite complex. Owing to the breadth of the topic addressed, the discussion is mostly focused on the tropical regions where air-sea interactions and precipitation processes eventually affect the entire globe. This allows a look in more detail at some air-sea processes, such as those associated with the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO). This oscillation, which affects the climate of the entire globe, acts over periods of a year or longer and is caused, primarily, by sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the tropical Pacific. As a result, SST variability is often used as an indicator of coupled ocean-atmosphere low-frequency variability. Global or basin scale processes can uniquely be observed from space-born instruments with the coverage required. Space based techniques have been developed during the last decade which can now be used to illustrate the scientific issues presented and the presentation concludes with an overview of some Earth Observing System (EOS) capabilities for addressing air-sea interactions and hydrology issues.

  7. An analysis of observed large air-sea temperature differences in tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Kepert, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    At high wind speeds over the sea, the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes filled with spray. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to the question of whether the evaporation from these droplets contributes significantly to the total sea-air evaporative flux under such conditions. Direct observations of turbulent fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum over the sea at moderately high wind speeds were taken during HEXOS Main Experiment (HEXMAX). (HEXOS is the Humidity Exchange Over the Sea program.) An analysis of these results shows that the neutral transfer coefficient is nearly constant with wind speed, up to about 18 m/s, albeit with considerable scatter about the mean. Here the author describes a preliminary investigation of the possible effects evaporation of sea spray could have on the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer at high wind speeds. The remainder of the paper consists of a brief discussion of a radiosonde ascent launched from a ship during a tropical cyclone, a description of the turbulent closure model used to investigate the role of the various physical processes, followed by a discussion of the model results and their relationship to the observation.

  8. The Oceanic Flux Program: A three decade time-series of particle flux in the deep Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. C.; Conte, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Oceanic Flux Program (OFP), 75 km SE of Bermuda, is the longest running time-series of its kind. Initiated in 1978, the OFP has produced an unsurpassed, nearly continuous record of temporal variability in deep ocean fluxes, with a >90% temporal coverage at 3200m depth. The OFP, in conjunction with the co-located Bermuda-Atlantic Time Series (BATS) and the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) time-series, has provided key observations enabling detailed assessment of how seasonal and non-seasonal variability in the deep ocean is linked with the overlying physical and biogeochemical environment. This talk will focus on the short-term flux variability that overlies the seasonal flux pattern in the Sargasso Sea, emphasizing episodic extreme flux events. Extreme flux events are responsible for much of the year-to-year variability in mean annual flux and are most often observed during early winter and late spring when surface stratification is weak or transient. In addition to biological phenomena (e.g. salp blooms), passage of productive meso-scale features such as eddies, which alter surface water mixing characteristics and surface export fluxes, may initiate some extreme flux events. Yet other productive eddies show a minimal influence on the deep flux, underscoring the importance of upper ocean ecosystem structure and midwater processes on the coupling between the surface ocean environment and deep fluxes. Using key organic and inorganic tracers, causative processes that influence deep flux generation and the strength of the coupling with the surface ocean environment can be identified.

  9. Assessment of Sea-Air Fluxes of Methane from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf Based on Multi-Year High-Precision Observations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyuk, A.; Semiletov, I. P.; Repina, I.; Chernykh, D.; Kosmach, D.; Shakhova, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    The latitude specific monthly mean (LSMM) methane (CH4) mixing ratio in the Arctic region atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is established at 1.85 ppm (monitoring station at Barrow, Alaska, USA). This LSMM is about 10% higher than in Antarctica and about 5-7% higher than in the mid-latitudes, where the majority of anthropogenic activity occurs. So far, there is no reasonable explanation for the atmospheric CH4 maximum above the Arctic and no models have succeeded in satisfactorily reproducing the inter-polar gradient, due to the assumption that there are no Arctic region CH4 sources sufficient to serve year-round to maintain the existing maximum. The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS), from which extensive CH4 release was recently reported, has never been considered to be an atmospheric source of CH4, because no knowledge existed about this area until very recently. One focus of our multi-year ESAS investigations was to collect a comprehensive data set of continuous ABL CH4 mixing ratio measurements along with continuous measurements of dissolved CH4 in the surface water. When collecting the data set, we aimed to assess CH4 fluxes by using top-down and bottom-up approaches. Achieving representative spatial coverage of the study area with high-resolution, high-accuracy measurements was our priority. We collected data from 2006-2012 with a high-accuracy fast CH4 analyzer; two sonic anemometers measured the 3D wind vector and sonic temperature; a meteorological station measured wind speed and direction, moisture, and temperature; and an open path infrared gas analyzer measured H2O and CO2. Other instruments included a pressure transducer and a motion package that measured 6 components of ship's motion and also acceleration, magnetic field, and position. In 2011 and 2012 we performed such measurements in the outer ESAS seepage area. Data were synchronized in time and space to demonstrate correspondence of increased atmospheric CH4 levels (up to 3.2 ppm) to observed

  10. Sinking particle flux in the sea ice zone of the Amundsen Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minkyoung; Hwang, Jeomshik; Kim, Hyung J.; Kim, Dongseon; Yang, Eun J.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Hyoung, S. La; Lee, Sang H.; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon

    2015-07-01

    We have examined the flux, biogenic composition, and isotopic values of sinking particles collected by a time-series sediment trap deployed in the sea ice zone (SIZ) of the Amundsen Sea from January 2011 for 1 year. The major portion of the particle flux occurred during the austral summer in January and February when sea ice concentration was reduced to <60%. Biogenic components, dominated by opal (~78% of the biogenic components), accounted for over 75% of particle flux during this high-flux period. The dominant source of sinking particles shifted from diatoms to soft-tissued organisms, evidenced by high particulate organic carbon (POC) content (>30%) and a low bio-Si/POC ratio (<0.5) during the austral winter. CaCO3 content and its contribution to total particle flux was low (~6%) throughout the study period. Aged POC likely supplied from sediment resuspension accounted for a considerable fraction only from October to December, which was evidenced by a low radiocarbon content and relatively high (30-50%) content of the non-biogenic components. When compared with POC flux inside the Amundsen Sea polynya obtained by the US Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE), the POC flux integrated over the austral summer in the SIZ was virtually identical, although the maximum POC flux was approximately half that inside the Amundsen Sea polynya. This comparatively high POC flux integrated over the austral summer in the SIZ may be caused by phytoplankton blooms persisting over a longer periods and more efficient export of organic matter potentially owing to the diatom-dominant plankton community. If this observation is a general phenomenon on the Amundsen Shelf, the role of the SIZ, compared with the polynyas, need to be examined more carefully when trying to characterize the POC export in this region.

  11. Gulf of Mexico Air/Sea Interaction: Measurements and Initial Data Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Huang, C. H.; Roberts, P. T.; Bariteau, L.; Fairall, C. W.; Gibson, W.; Ray, A.

    2011-12-01

    Corporate, government, and university researchers collaborated to develop an atmospheric boundary layer environmental observations program on an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The primary goals of this project were to provide data to (1) improve our understanding of boundary layer processes and air-sea interaction over the Gulf of Mexico; (2) improve regional-scale meteorological and air quality modeling; and (3) provide a framework for advanced offshore measurements to support future needs such as emergency response, exploration and lease decisions, wind energy research and development, and meteorological and air quality forecasting. In October 2010, meteorological and oceanographic sensors were deployed for an extended period (approximately 12 months) on a Chevron service platform (ST 52B, 90.5W, 29N) to collect boundary layer and sea surface data sufficient to support these objectives. This project has significant importance given the large industrial presence in the Gulf, sizeable regional population nearby, and the recognized need for precise and timely pollutant forecasts. Observations from this project include surface meteorology; sodar marine boundary layer winds; microwave radiometer profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and liquid water; ceilometer cloud base heights; water temperature and current profiles; sea surface temperature; wave height statistics; downwelling solar and infrared radiation; and air-sea turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. This project resulted in the collection of an unprecedented set of boundary layer measurements over the Gulf of Mexico that capture the range of meteorological and oceanographic interactions and processes that occur over an entire year. This presentation will provide insight into the logistical and scientific issues associated with the deployment and operations of unique measurements in offshore areas and provide results from an initial data analysis of boundary layer processes over the Gulf of

  12. An Examination of the Sea Surface Salinity - Fresh Water Flux Relationship Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Kumar, A.; Xue, Y.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    Relationship between the sea surface salinity (SSS) and the oceanic fresh water flux (E-P) is examined using the SSS retrievals derived from the passive microwave (PMW) observations aboard the SMOS and Aquarius satellites, the CMORPH integrated satellite precipitation estimates (P) and the evaporation data (E) produced by the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) reanalysis. Preprocessing is performed to construct gridded fields of SSS, P, and E on a 1o lat/lon grid over the global oceans and at a 30-min time resolution for a 54-month period from January 2010 to June 2014. Relationships between the SSS observed at a point in time and the P, E, and P-E at the same grid box accumulated over various time periods ending at the SSS observation time are examined. As a first step, we focused our investigation on an oceanic area over the central equatorial Pacific (10oS-10oN; 180o-160oW) where SSS is not influenced by the river runoffs. Our preliminary results show clear linear relationship between the satellite-observed skin SSS and the fresh water flux over the region. The Aquarius observed instantaneous SSS presents a correlation of ~0.4 with the E-P accumulated over the 30-min period of the SSS observations. The correlation between the instantaneous SSS and the E-P drops with the accumulation period for E-P, down to 0.36 for 6-hourly accumulated E-P. The Correlation, however, bounces back and improves with the E-P accumulation period longer than 6 hours, reaching to ~0.7 for an accumulation time period of 30 days. The existence of the minimum correlation between the instantaneous SSS and the E-P accumulation over a 6-hour period suggests the involvement of air-sea interaction and oceanic processes on multiple time scales in the manner E-P influences to the SSS variations. Among the two primary components of the fresh water flux, precipitation dominates the influences on the SSS. Further analysis is under way to repeat the examination for different regions to examine the

  13. Methane flux across the air-water interface - Air velocity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Bartlett, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Methane loss to the atmosphere from flooded wetlands is influenced by the degree of supersaturation and wind stress at the water surface. Measurements in freshwater ponds in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Florida, demonstrated that for the combined variability of CH4 concentrations in surface water and air velocity over the water surface, CH4 flux varied from 0.01 to 1.22 g/sq m/day. The liquid exchange coefficient for a two-layer model of the gas-liquid interface was calculated as 1.7 cm/h for CH4 at air velocity of zero and as 1.1 + 1.2 v to the 1.96th power cm/h for air velocities from 1.4 to 3.5 m/s and water temperatures of 20 C.

  14. Bidirectional air-sea exchange and accumulation of POPs (PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs) in the nocturnal marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Meixner, Franz X.; Vrana, Branislav; Efstathiou, Christos I.; Kohoutek, Jiři; Kukučka, Petr; Mulder, Marie D.; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Rusina, Tatsiana P.; Song, Guo-Zheng; Tsapakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    As a consequence of long-range transported pollution, air-sea exchange can become a major source of persistent organic pollutants in remote marine environments. The vertical gradients in the air were quantified for 14 species, i.e. four parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), three organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and two polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the gas-phase at a remote coastal site in the southern Aegean Sea in summer. Most vertical gradients were positive (Δc/Δz > 0), indicating downward (net depositional) flux. Significant upward (net volatilisational) fluxes were found for three PAHs, mostly during daytime, and for two OCPs, mostly during night-time, as well as for one PCB and one PBDE during part of the measurements. While phenanthrene was deposited, fluoranthene (FLT) and pyrene (PYR) seem to undergo flux oscillation, hereby not following a day-night cycle. Box modelling confirms that volatilisation from the sea surface has significantly contributed to the night-time maxima of OCPs. Fluxes were quantified based on eddy covariance. Deposition fluxes ranged from -28.5 to +1.8 µg m-2 day-1 for PAHs and -3.4 to +0.9 µg m-2 day-1 for halogenated compounds. Dry particle deposition of FLT and PYR did not contribute significantly to the vertical flux.

  15. Sensitivity of a climatologically-driven sea ice model to the ocean heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, C. L.; Good, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Ocean heat flux sensitivity was studied on a numerical model of sea ice covering the Weddell Sea region of the southern ocean. The model is driven by mean monthly climatological atmospheric variables. For each model run, the ocean heat flux is uniform in both space and time. Ocean heat fluxes below 20 W m to the minus 2 power do not provide sufficient energy to allow the ice to melt to its summertime thicknesses and concentrations by the end of the 14 month simulation, whereas ocean heat fluxes of 30 W m to the minus 2 power and above result in too much ice melt, producing the almost total disappearance of ice in the Weddell Sea by the end of the 14 months. These results are dependent on the atmospheric forcing fields.

  16. Heat flux variations over sea ice observed at the coastal area of the Sejong Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Jong; Choi, Tae-Jin; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2013-08-01

    This study presents variations of sensible heat flux and latent heat flux over sea ice observed in 2011 from the 10-m flux tower located at the coast of the Sejong Station on King George Island, Antarctica. A period from July to September was selected as a sea ice period based on daily record of sea state and hourly photos looking at the Marian Cove in front of the Sejong Station. For the sea ice period, mean sensible heat flux is about -11 Wm-2, latent heat flux is about +2 W m-2, net radiation is -12 W m-2, and residual energy is -3 W m-2 with clear diurnal variations. Estimated mean values of surface exchange coefficients for momentum, heat and moisture are 5.15 × 10-3, 1.19 × 10-3, and 1.87 × 10-3, respectively. The observed exchange coefficients of heat shows clear diurnal variations while those of momentum and moisture do not show diurnal variation. The parameterized exchange coefficients of heat and moisture produces heat fluxes which compare well with the observed diurnal variations of heat fluxes.

  17. Assessing benthic oxygen fluxes in oligotrophic deep sea sediments (HAUSGARTEN observatory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donis, Daphne; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Holtappels, Moritz; Felden, Janine; Wenzhoefer, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Benthic oxygen fluxes, an established proxy for total organic carbon mineralization, were investigated in oligotrophic deep sea sediments. We used three different in situ technologies to estimate the benthic oxygen fluxes at an Arctic deep sea site (2500 m depth, HAUSGARTEN observatory) with limiting conditions of low oxygen gradients and fluxes, low turbulence and low particle content in the benthic boundary layer. The resolved eddy covariance turbulent oxygen flux (-0.9±0.2 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared well with simultaneous dissolved oxygen flux measurements carried out with a microprofiler (-1.02±0.3 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1) and total oxygen uptake obtained by benthic chamber incubations (-1.1±0.1 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The agreement between these different techniques revealed that microbial-mediated oxygen consumption was dominant at this site. The average benthic flux equals a carbon mineralization rate of 4.3 g C m-2 yr-1, which exceeds the annual sedimentation of particulate organic matter measured by sediment traps. The present study represents a detailed comparison of different in situ technologies for benthic flux measurements at different spatial scales in oligotrophic deep sea sediments. The use of eddy covariance, so far rarely used for deep sea investigations, is presented in detail.

  18. Air-sea interaction measurements in the west Mediterranean Sea during the Tyrrhenian Eddy Multi-Platform Observations Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schiano, M.E.; Santoleri, R.; Bignami, F.; Leonardi, R.M. ); Marullo, S. ); Boehm, E. )

    1993-02-15

    Measurements of radiative fluxes were carried out in the Tyrrhenian Sea in fall and winter as part of the Tyrrhenian Eddy Multi-Platform Observations Experiment (TEMPO). These measurements have supplied the first experimental radiation data set over this basin. Seasonal variation of the different components of the budget are investigated. Since data collection was carried out in an area in which a quasi-permanent eddy is present, the behavior of the radiation parameters across the frontal zone is analyzed. The most interesting result of the air-sea interaction in proximity of a marine front consists in the covariation of sea surface temperature and downwelling long-wave radiation. Contemporaneous satellite data show a clear correlation between sea surface structure and horizontal distribution of columnar atmospheric water content. Therefore this inhomogeneity clearly is one of the main factors responsible for the variation of the downwelling radiation across the front. A comparison between experimental data and results of some of the most widely used bulk formulae is carried out for both short- and long-wave radiation. The mean differnece between measured and empirical solar radiation values is less than 3%, while in the case of the net long-wave radiation budge, poor agreement is found. Indeed, a 30 W/m[sup 2] bias results from the comparison. This discrepancy is consistent with the imbalance between previous bulk calculations of total heat budget at the surface and corresponding hydrographical observations of heat exchange at Gibraltar. 30 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Sinking Particle Flux in the Sea Ice Zone of the Amundsen Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Hwang, J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, D.; Ducklow, H. W.; Lee, S. H.; Yang, E. J.; Lee, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have examined the flux, compositions of biogenic components, and isotopic values of sinking particles collected by a sediment trap deployed in the sea ice zone (SIZ) of the Amundsen Sea from January 2011 for one year. Major portion of the particle flux occurred during the austral summer in January and February when sea ice concentration was reduced to below 60 %. Biogenic components, dominated by opal, accounted for over 75 % during this high flux period. The dominant source of sinking particles shifted from diatoms to soft-tissued organisms, evidenced by high particulate organic carbon (POC) content (> 30 %) during the polar night. CaCO3 content and its contribution to total particle flux were low throughout the study period. Contribution of aged POC likely supplied from sediment resuspension was considerable only from October to December, evidenced by low radiocarbon content and relatively high (30-50 %) content of the non-biogenic component. When compared to POC flux inside the Amundsen Sea polynya obtained by the US Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE), the POC flux integrated over the austral summer in the SIZ was virtually identical although maximum POC flux was about half that inside the Amundsen Sea polynya. This comparatively high POC flux in the SIZ may be caused by persistence of phytoplankton bloom for longer period and more efficient export of organic matter owing to the diatom-dominant plankton community. If this observation is a general phenomenon on the Amundsen shelf, the role of the SIZ compared to the polynyas need to be examined more carefully when trying to characterize the POC export in this region.

  20. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  1. Salp contributions to vertical carbon flux in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Joshua P.; Steinberg, Deborah K.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a one-dimensional model to estimate salp contributions to vertical carbon flux at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre for a 17-yr period (April 1994 to December 2011). We based the model parameters on published rates of salp physiology and experimentally determined sinking and decomposition rates of salp carcasses. Salp grazing was low during non-bloom conditions, but routinely exceeded 100% of chlorophyll standing stock and primary production during blooms. Fecal pellet production was the largest source of salp carbon flux (78% of total), followed by respiration below 200 m (19%), sinking of carcasses (3%), and DOC excretion below 200 m (<0.1%). Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis, Salpa aspera, Wheelia cylindrica, and Iasis zonaria were the five highest contributors, accounting for 95% of total salp-mediated carbon flux. Seasonally, salp flux was higher during spring-summer than fall-winter, due to seasonal changes in species composition and abundance. Salp carbon export to 200 m was on average 2.3 mg C m-2 d-1 across the entire time series. This is equivalent to 11% of the mean 200 m POC flux measured by sediment traps in the region. During years with significant salp blooms, however, annually-averaged salp carbon export was the equivalent of up to 60% of trap POC flux at 200 m. Salp carbon flux attenuated slowly, and at 3200 m the average modeled carbon from salps was 109% of the POC flux measured in sediment traps at that depth. Migratory and carcass carbon export pathways should also be considered (alongside fecal pellet flux) as facilitating carbon export to sequestration depths in future studies.

  2. Air-sea feedback during coastal upwelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gallacher, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    The basic dynamics of coastal upwelling are well known. Consider a steady, curl-free, alongshore wind blowing down a coastline. This results in an Ekman divergence. If the resulting Ekman transport is offshore, coastal upwelling ensues. When this occurs, a front develops between the cold, upwelled water and the less dense offshore surface water. This front propagates offshore at a rate determined by the Ekman transport. The question is what effect does this front have on the atmosphere, and is there a feedback between the atmosphere and the ocean. The results of the FASINEX study have shown that the atmospheric boundary layer can respond dramatically to changes in the ocean surface temperature, and this may happen on small scales and quite rapidly. The author hypothesizes that an interaction can occur in which the atmospheric surface layer becomes more stable on the upwelling side of the front due the colder sea surface temperature.

  3. Impacts of Air-Sea Interaction on Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Wang, Bin; Braun, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of hurricane-ocean coupling on intensity and track of tropical cyclones (TCs) is investigated through idealized numerical experiments using a coupled hurricane-ocean model. The focus is placed on how air-sea interaction affects TC tracks and intensity. It is found that the symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) cooling is primarily responsible for the TC weakening in the coupled experiments because the induced asymmetric circulation associated with the asymmetric SST anomalies is weak and shallow. The track difference between the coupled and fixed SST experiments is generally small because of the competing processes. One is associated with the modified TC asymmetries. The asymmetric SST anomalies - weaken the surface fluxes in the rear and enhance the fluxes in the front. As a result, the enhanced diabatic heating is located on the southern side for a westward-moving TC, tending to shift the TC southward. The symmetric SST anomalies weakens the TC intensity and thus the dymmetrization process, leading to more prominent TC asymmetries. The other is associated with the weakening of the beta drift resulting from the weakening of the TC outer strength. In the coupled experiment, the weakening of the beta drift leads to a more northward shift. By adjusting the vortex outer strength of the initial vortices, the beta drift can vary while the effect of air-sea interaction changes little. Two types of track differences simulated in the previous numerical studies are obtained.

  4. Measuring and modelling the frictional velocity u*, turbulence and heat fluxes above the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambke, Jens; Bye, John A. T.; Schmidt, Michael; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we analyse the frictional velocity u*, drag coefficient, vertical wind speed and turbulence profiles observed at different met-masts in the German North and Baltic Sea. We present an analysis of different models for the frictional velocity u* in convective, neutral and stable thermal stratification of the atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulent momentum and heat flux measurements performed with ultra-sonic anemometers are compared to profile-derived values and a bulk Richardson number formulation of the atmospheric thermal stability. Modelling: An improved approach to model the vertical wind speed profile is presented and compared against meso-scale model results (WRF, COSMO): Bye-Ekman-Coupling (BEC) describes the flux of momentum from the Ekman layer of the atmosphere through the Prandtl layer down to the air-sea interface by a modified wave boundary layer with enhanced Charnock dynamics (Bye et al. 2010). The BEC model is based on the coupled pair of similarity relations for "aerodynamically rough flow" in both fluids (air and sea). The derived drag law is of Charnock form, almost independent of the wave age and consistent with the transfer of momentum to the wave spectrum - which takes place in the smaller rather than the dominant wavelengths. Measurements: It was found that the frictional velocity u* is considerably smaller than predicted by conventional approaches using the Charnock relation: For wind speeds between 10 m/s and 15 m/s at 40 m height above the sea surface, u*(observed) is 14% smaller than u*(Charnock). Most important, we found unexpected, strong and obviously artificial distortions concerning the three wind speed components in the 10Hz data of the three ultra-sonic anemometers at the offshore met-mast FINO1 at 40 m, 60 m and 80 m height. The pattern of these distortions is independent from different post-processing procedures (planar-fit etc.). We anticipate that these artefacts imply severe problems for the eddy covariance technique

  5. Environmental Drivers of Benthic Flux Variation and Ecosystem Functioning in Salish Sea and Northeast Pacific Sediments.

    PubMed

    Belley, Rénald; Snelgrove, Paul V R; Archambault, Philippe; Juniper, S Kim

    2016-01-01

    The upwelling of deep waters from the oxygen minimum zone in the Northeast Pacific from the continental slope to the shelf and into the Salish Sea during spring and summer offers a unique opportunity to study ecosystem functioning in the form of benthic fluxes along natural gradients. Using the ROV ROPOS we collected sediment cores from 10 sites in May and July 2011, and September 2013 to perform shipboard incubations and flux measurements. Specifically, we measured benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients to evaluate potential environmental drivers of benthic flux variation and ecosystem functioning along natural gradients of temperature and bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations. The range of temperature and dissolved oxygen encountered across our study sites allowed us to apply a suite of multivariate analyses rarely used in flux studies to identify bottom water temperature as the primary environmental driver of benthic flux variation and organic matter remineralization. Redundancy analysis revealed that bottom water characteristics (temperature and dissolved oxygen), quality of organic matter (chl a:phaeo and C:N ratios) and sediment characteristics (mean grain size and porosity) explained 51.5% of benthic flux variation. Multivariate analyses identified significant spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes, demonstrating key differences between the Northeast Pacific and Salish Sea. Moreover, Northeast Pacific slope fluxes were generally lower than shelf fluxes. Spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes in the Salish Sea were driven primarily by differences in temperature and quality of organic matter on the seafloor following phytoplankton blooms. These results demonstrate the utility of multivariate approaches in differentiating among potential drivers of seafloor ecosystem functioning, and indicate that current and future predictive models of organic matter remineralization and ecosystem functioning of soft-muddy shelf and slope seafloor

  6. Environmental Drivers of Benthic Flux Variation and Ecosystem Functioning in Salish Sea and Northeast Pacific Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Rénald; Snelgrove, Paul V. R.; Archambault, Philippe; Juniper, S. Kim

    2016-01-01

    The upwelling of deep waters from the oxygen minimum zone in the Northeast Pacific from the continental slope to the shelf and into the Salish Sea during spring and summer offers a unique opportunity to study ecosystem functioning in the form of benthic fluxes along natural gradients. Using the ROV ROPOS we collected sediment cores from 10 sites in May and July 2011, and September 2013 to perform shipboard incubations and flux measurements. Specifically, we measured benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients to evaluate potential environmental drivers of benthic flux variation and ecosystem functioning along natural gradients of temperature and bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations. The range of temperature and dissolved oxygen encountered across our study sites allowed us to apply a suite of multivariate analyses rarely used in flux studies to identify bottom water temperature as the primary environmental driver of benthic flux variation and organic matter remineralization. Redundancy analysis revealed that bottom water characteristics (temperature and dissolved oxygen), quality of organic matter (chl a:phaeo and C:N ratios) and sediment characteristics (mean grain size and porosity) explained 51.5% of benthic flux variation. Multivariate analyses identified significant spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes, demonstrating key differences between the Northeast Pacific and Salish Sea. Moreover, Northeast Pacific slope fluxes were generally lower than shelf fluxes. Spatial and temporal variation in benthic fluxes in the Salish Sea were driven primarily by differences in temperature and quality of organic matter on the seafloor following phytoplankton blooms. These results demonstrate the utility of multivariate approaches in differentiating among potential drivers of seafloor ecosystem functioning, and indicate that current and future predictive models of organic matter remineralization and ecosystem functioning of soft-muddy shelf and slope seafloor

  7. Evaluation of the swell effect on the air-sea gas transfer in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Air-sea gas transfer processes are one of the most important factors regarding global climate and long-term global climate changes. Despite its importance, there is still a huge uncertainty on how to better parametrize these processes in order to include them on the global climate models. This uncertainty exposes the need to increase our knowledge on gas transfer controlling mechanisms. In the coastal regions, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes, however, there is still a lack of information and the influence of the ocean surface waves on the air-sea interaction and gas flux behavior must be validated. In this study, as part of the "Sea Surface Roughness as Air-Sea Interaction Control" project, we evaluate the effect of the ocean surface waves on the gas exchange in the coastal zone. Direct estimates of the flux of CO2 (FCO2) and water vapor (FH2O) through eddy covariance, were carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 in a coastal station located at the Northwest of Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México. For the same period, ocean surface waves are recorded using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) with a sampling rate of 2 Hz and located at 10 m depth about 350 m away from the tower. We found the study area to be a weak sink of CO2 under moderate wind and wave conditions with a mean flux of -1.32 μmol/m2s. The correlation between the wind speed and FCO2 was found to be weak, suggesting that other physical processes besides wind may be important factors for the gas exchange modulation at coastal waters. The results of the quantile regression analysis computed between FCO2 and (1) wind speed, (2) significant wave height, (3) wave steepness and (4) water temperature, show that the significant wave height is the most correlated parameter with FCO2; Nevertheless, the behavior of their relation varies along the probability distribution of FCO2, with the linear regression

  8. Estimating monthly averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat and momentum are computed from 25 years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly averaged wind speeds, temperatures and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimates of monthly averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly averaged nonneutral values.

  9. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  10. Air-borne sound generated by sea waves.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Karl; Åbom, Mats

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a semi-empiric model and measurements of air-borne sound generated by breaking sea waves. Measurements have been performed at the Baltic Sea. Shores with different slopes and sediment types have been investigated. Results showed that the sound pressure level increased from 60 dB at 0.4 m wave height to 78 dB at 2.0 m wave height. The 1/3 octave spectrum was dependent on the surf type. A scaling model based on the dissipated wave power and a surf similarity parameter is proposed and compared to measurements. The predictions show satisfactory agreement to the measurements.

  11. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange of alongshore waters in summer near Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Hiroki; Oechel, Walter C.

    2014-03-01

    Alongshore water off Barrow, Alaska is a useful area for studying the carbon cycle of the Arctic coastal sea, because the different coastal characteristics extant in the area likely represent much larger regions of the coastal water of the western Arctic Ocean. Especially noteworthy is the inflow shelf water transferred northward by the Arctic Coastal Current into the Chukchi Sea from the North Pacific and turbid water in the Elson Lagoon where a significant amount of coastal erosion has been reported along the extensive coastal line and where a part of the water from the lagoon drains into the Beaufort Sea adjacent to the Chukchi Sea. To investigate spatial and temporal variations of air-sea CO2 flux (CO2 flux) of the alongshore water, partial pressure of CO2 of surface seawater (pCO2sw) was measured in summer, 2007 and 2008, and CO2 flux was directly measured by eddy covariance at a fixed point for the Beaufort Sea in summer 2008. Measured pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was the lowest in the beginning of the measurement season and increased later in the season both in 2007 and 2008. The average CO2 flux estimated based on pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was -0.10 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) using the sign convention of positive fluxes into the atmosphere from the ocean. pCO2sw in the Beaufort Sea and the Elson Lagoon was relatively higher in early summer and decreased in the middle of the summer. The overall average CO2 flux was -0.07 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) for the Beaufort Sea side and -0.03 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.07 s.d.) for the Elson Lagoon respectively, indicating a sink of CO2 despite high carbon inflows from the terrestrial margin into the Elson Lagoon. A strong sink of CO2 was often observed from the Beaufort Sea by eddy covariance in the middle of the summer. This sink activity in the middle summer in the Beaufort Sea and Elson Lagoon was likely due to biological carbon uptake as inferred by low apparent oxygen utilization and high chlorophyll

  13. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  14. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    PubMed Central

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  15. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H; Myers, Paul G; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M R

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  16. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  17. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H; Myers, Paul G; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M R

    2016-01-22

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  18. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  19. Using a video-corer to evaluate hydrocarbon fluxes in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, Y. S.; Huang, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Many natural methane seeps exist in the northern South China Sea. Researchers have often used gravity corers or piston corers to collect sediments and bottom seawater for estimating methane fluxes of these seeps. The actual sampling locations of these corers are difficult to match seeping vents detected by scientific echo sounder because of the difficulty in positioning of these corers when sampling at sea,. Thus, the hydrocarbon fluxes of the seeping vents estimated using these corers might not be representative hydrocarbon fluxes of seeping vents in the northern South China Sea. In this study, we used a real-time video multicorer to collect surface sediments and bottom seawater samples. This real-time multicorer can accurately obtain surface sediments and bottom seawater samples on hydrocarbon seeping vents. To estimate hydrocarbon diffusion fluxes of seeps in the northern South China Sea, we analyzed methane concentrations and carbon isotopes of methane in both porewater and bottom seawater. During the cruises conducted from August to December, 2014, methane fluxes in the study area ranged from 3 to 57000 μmol m-2 d-1 which are significantly higher than previously reported values (~160 μmol m-2 d-1). Besides, we have obtained some samples in the study area using real-time multicorer in 2015. These new results will be presented in the meeting. Overall, the observed result in this study suggests that the in-situ multicorer can be a suitable instrument sampling surface sediments and bottom seawater samples on hydrocarbon seeping vents.

  20. Heat flux variations over sea-ice observed at the coastal area of the Sejong Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Choi, T.; Kim, S.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents variations of sensible heat flux and latent heat flux over sea-ice observed in 2011 from the 10-m flux tower located at the coast of the Sejong Station on King George Island, Antarctica. A period from June to November was divided into three parts: "Freezing", "Frozen", and "Melting" periods based on daily monitoring of sea state and hourly photos looking at the Marian Cove in front of the Sejong Station. The division of periods enabled us to look into the heat flux variations depending on the sea-ice conditions. Over freezing sea surface during the freezing period of late June, daily mean sensible heat flux was -11.9 Wm-2 and daily mean latent heat flux was +16.3 Wm-2. Over the frozen sea-ice, daily mean sensible heat flux was -10.4 Wm-2 while daily mean latent heat flux was +2.4 Wm-2. During the melting period of mid-October to early November, magnitudes of sensible heat flux increased to -14.2 Wm-2 and latent heat flux also increased to +13.5 Wm-2. In short, latent heat flux was usually upward over sea-ice most of the time while sensible heat flux was downward from atmosphere to sea-ice. Magnitudes of the fluxes were small but increased when freezing or melting of sea-ice was occurring. Especially, latent heat flux increased five to six times compared to that of "frozen" period implying that early melting of sea-ice may cause five to six times larger supply of moisture to the atmosphere.

  1. Air-Sea Exchange and Budget of Sulfur and Oxygen-Containing Volatile Organic Compounds in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Omori, Y.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Kameyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    By combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique, in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed and deployed. Starting in 2008, we made in situ observations of air-sea fluxes at 15 locations as well as underway observations of marine air/surface seawater bulk concentrations in the Pacific Ocean, during eight research cruises by R/V Hakuho-Maru. The fluxes of biogenic trace gases, DMS and isoprene, were always positive, with the magnitudes being in accordance with previously reported. In contrast, the fluxes of oxygenated VOCs including acetone and acetaldehyde varied from negative to positive, suggesting that the tropical and subtropical Pacific are a source, while the North Pacific is a sink. A basin-scale budget of VOCs were determined for 4 biogeochemical provinces in the Pacific Ocean, and the role of oceans for VOCs were discussed with respect to physical and biogeochemical processes.

  2. Modeling Biogeochemical-Physical Interactions and Carbon Flux in the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Christian, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An ecosystem-carbon cycle model is used to analyze the biogeochemical-physical interactions and carbon fluxes in the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site for the period of 1992-1998. The model results compare well with observations (most variables are within 8% of observed values). The sea-air flux ranges from -0.32 to -0.50 mol C/sq m/yr, depending upon the gas transfer algorithm used. This estimate is within the range (-0.22 to -0.83 mol C/sq m/yr) of previously reported values which indicates that the BATS region is a weak sink of atmospheric CO2. The overall carbon balance consists of atmospheric CO2 uptake of 0.3 Mol C/sq m/yr, upward dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bottom flux of 1.1 Mol C/sq m/yr, and carbon export of 1.4 mol C/sq m/yr via sedimentation. Upper ocean DIC levels increased between 1992 and 1996 at a rate of approximately 1.2 (micro)mol/kg/yr, consistent with observations. However, this trend was reversed during 1997-1998 to -2.7 (micro)mol/kg/yr in response to hydrographic changes imposed by the El Nino-La Nina transition, which were manifested in the Sargasso Sea by the warmest SST and lowest surface salinity of the period (1992-1998).

  3. Sources and fluxes of atmospheric trace elements to the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Paytan, Adina; Chase, Zanna; Measures, Christopher; Beck, Aaron J.; SañUdo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.; Post, Anton F.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first comprehensive investigation of the concentrations, fluxes and sources of aerosol trace elements over the Gulf of Aqaba. We found that the mean atmospheric concentrations of crustally derived elements such as Al, Fe and Mn (1081, 683, and 16.7 ng m-3) are about 2-3 times higher than those reported for the neighboring Mediterranean area. This is indicative of the dominance of the mineral dust component in aerosols over the Gulf. Anthropogenic impact was lower in comparison to the more heavily populated areas of the Mediterranean. During the majority of time (69%) the air masses over the Gulf originated from Europe or Mediterranean Sea areas delivering anthropogenic components such as Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, and P. Airflows derived from North Africa in contrast contained the highest concentrations of Al, Fe, and Sr but generally lower Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, and P. Relatively high Pb, Ni, and V were found in the local and Arabian airflows suggesting a greater influence of local emission of fuel burning. We used the data and the measured trace metal seawater concentrations to calculate residence times of dissolved trace elements in the upper 50 m surface water of the Gulf (with respect to atmospheric input) and found that the residence times for most elements are in the range of 5-37 years while Cd and V residence times are longer.

  4. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  5. DOGEE-SOLAS: The Role of Surfactants in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.; Nightingale, P.

    2008-12-01

    One of the major aims of DOGEE-SOLAS was to improve our understanding of the role of surfactants in air- sea gas exchange. With this in mind we carried out a number of artificial surfactant releases on a research cruise in the North Atlantic (D320), during June-July of 2007. We used oleyl alcohol, a surrogate for natural surfactants which is relatively cheap and easy to obtain (it is used in the manufacture of cosmetics). The main release overlaid a dual tracer "patch" of SF6 and 3He; our aim was to directly compare values of the gas transfer velocity, kw, estimated within the surfactant covered patch with those estimated quasi- simultaneously in a second, surfactant-free patch about 20km away. A second release in conjunction with colleagues from the University of Hawaii had the aim of measuring DMS fluxes by eddy correlation both inside and outside a surfactant slick, and a third was undertaken in the path of one of two 14m ASIS (Air-Sea Interaction Spar) buoys operated by the University of Miami for direct comparison of surfactant effects on the fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum (eddy correlation) etc. We present here some preliminary findings from the work.

  6. Evolution and fluxes of 137Cs in the Black Sea/Turkish Straits System/North Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfanti, R.; Özsoy, E.; Kaberi, H.; Schirone, A.; Salvi, S.; Conte, F.; Tsabaris, C.; Papucci, C.

    2014-07-01

    The vertical profiles of 137Cs were determined in the North Aegean, Marmara and Black Seas, to assess inventories and fluxes of the radionuclide in these basins. The inventory of 137Cs in the Western Black Sea integrated from the surface down to 400 m water depth is 3.4 ± 0.1 kBq m- 2, which is surprisingly close to the amount determined in 1988, decay corrected to 2007 (2.9 ± 0.1 kBq m- 2). On the other hand, based on the comparison of profiles roughly 20 years apart, it is estimated that about 1 kBq m- 2 has been transferred from above the halocline to depths below the halocline, emphasizing the effective redistribution of tracers within the same period. We estimate that about 12 TBq y- 1 of 137Cs presently leaves the Black Sea with the upper layer flow through the Bosphorus and only 2 TBq y- 1 is returned with the lower layer inflow of Mediterranean water from the Marmara Sea. Accounting for river fluxes, estimated on the order of 2 TBq y- 1 few years after the Chernobyl accident, and possibly decreased by now, we can thus estimate a net rate of loss of about 8-10 TBq y- 1. Investigating the effective redistribution in the upper water column, the supply by the inflowing Mediterranean water alone does not explain the increase of 137Cs concentration and inventory at intermediate depths in the Western Black Sea. The most important mechanism transferring 137Cs and dissolved contaminants from the surface water to the sub-pycnocline layer appears to be the turbulent entrainment of a larger quantity of Black Sea water into the inflowing plume of Mediterranean water through mixing processes on the southwestern shelf and continental slope following its exit from the Bosphorus. This process produces an extra export of some10 TBq y- 1 of 137Cs from the surface to the sub-pycnocline depths of the Black Sea, a quantity comparable in magnitude to the total export out from the basin. It is the entrainment flux resulting from the mixing, and the further advection and

  7. Sea ice-atmospheric interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Key, J.; Maslanik, J.; Schweiger, A.

    1993-01-01

    This is the third annual report on: Sea Ice-Atmosphere Interaction - Application of Multispectral Satellite Data in Polar Surface Energy Flux Estimates. The main emphasis during the past year was on: radiative flux estimates from satellite data; intercomparison of satellite and ground-based cloud amounts; radiative cloud forcing; calibration of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) visible channels and comparison of two satellite derived albedo data sets; and on flux modeling for leads. Major topics covered are arctic clouds and radiation; snow and ice albedo, and leads and modeling.

  8. A conceptual model of ocean freshwater flux derived from sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, V.; Wang, J.; Willis, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    A conceptual model is proposed to express freshwater flux (evaporation minus precipitation) as a function of sea surface salinity (and vice versa). The model is formulated using an idealized one-dimensional diffusion equation for the ocean surface layer. It is shown to provide good agreement with existing freshwater flux estimates and salinity observations. It also has the potential to enhance our capability of monitoring and modeling global freshwater fluxes and salinity as a data retrieval algorithm for remote sensing. The model may improve physical parameterization in coupled ocean-atmosphere models to study the global water cycle.

  9. Recent summer sea ice thickness surveys in Fram Strait and associated ice volume fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpen, T.; Gerdes, R.; Haas, C.; Hendricks, S.; Herber, A.; Selyuzhenok, V.; Smedsrud, L.; Spreen, G.

    2016-03-01

    Fram Strait is the main gateway for sea ice export out of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore observations there give insight into the composition and properties of Arctic sea ice in general and how it varies over time. A data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements collected during summer between 2001 and 2012 is presented here, including long transects well into the southern part of the Transpolar Drift obtained using fixed-wing aircrafts. The primary source of the surveyed sea ice leaving Fram Strait is the Laptev Sea and its age has decreased from 3 to 2 years between 1990 and 2012. The thickness data consistently also show a general thinning of sea ice for the last decade, with a decrease in modal thickness of second year and multiyear ice, and a decrease in mean thickness and fraction of ice thicker than 3 m. Local melting in the strait was investigated in two surveys performed in the downstream direction, showing a decrease in sea ice thickness of 0.19 m degree-1 latitude south of 81° N. Further north variability in ice thickness is more related to differences in age and deformation. The thickness observations were combined with ice area export estimates to calculate summer volume fluxes of sea ice. While satellite data show that monthly ice area export had positive trends since 1980 (10.9 × 103 km2 decade-1), the summer (July and August) ice area export is low with high uncertainties. The average volume export amounts to 16.78 km3. Naturally, the volume flux estimates are limited to the period when airborne thickness surveys are available. Nevertheless, we could show that the combination of satellite data and airborne observations can be used to determine volume fluxes through Fram Strait and as such, can be used to bridge the lack of satellite-based sea ice thickness information in summer.

  10. Predictive methods for estimating pesticide flux to air

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.

    1996-10-01

    Published evaporative flux values for pesticides volatilizing from soil, plants, and water were correlated with compound vapor pressures (VP), modified by compound properties appropriate to the treated matrix (e.g., soil adsorption coefficient [K{sub oc}], water solubility [S{sub w}]). These correlations were formulated as Ln-Ln plots with correlation (r{sup 2}) coefficients in the range 0.93-0.99: (1) Soil surface - Ln flux vs Ln (VP/[K{sub oc} x S{sub w}]); (2) soil incorporation - Ln flux vs Ln [(VP x AR)/(K{sub oc} x S{sub w} x d)] (AR = application rate, d = incorporation depth); (3) plants - Ln flux vs Ln VP; and (4) water - Ln (flux/water conc) vs Ln (VP/Sw). Using estimated flux values from the plant correlation as source terms in the EPA`s SCREEN-2 dispersion model gave downwind concentrations that agreed to within 65-114% with measured concentrations. Further validation using other treated matrices is in progress. These predictive methods for estimating flux, when coupled with downwind dispersion modeling, provide tools for limiting downwind exposures.

  11. On the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the persistence of the Southern Annular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bei; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Nie, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Using the daily atmosphere and ocean reanalysis data, this study highlights the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the variability of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Our analysis shows that the SAM-induced meridional dipolar sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, through surface heat fluxes, can maintain persistent lower tropospheric temperature anomalies, which further results in anomalous eddy momentum forcing enhancing the persistence of the SAM. With the Finite Amplitude Wave Activity diagnosis, we illustrate that response of the eddy momentum forcing to SST anomalies can be attributed to changes in both baroclinic processes as baroclinic eddy generation and barotropic processes as wave breaking thus resultant diffusive eddy mixing, with the former confined at high latitudes and the latter strongest at midlatitudes. Spectral analysis further suggests that the above air-sea interactions are important for bimonthly and longer time scale SAM variations. The dipolar SST pattern may be an indicator for predicting subseasonal and interseasonal variabilities of the SAM.

  12. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas. PMID:27670426

  13. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas.

  14. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  15. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Benthic fluxes and nutrient budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Berelson, W.M.; Hammond, D.E. ); Giordani, P. )

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algai growth. Five stations in the western Adriatic (south of the Po River Delta) were occupied during September, 1988 and benthic flux chambers used to measure nutrient fluxes. These sites included 3 stations previously studied in 1982. Flux measurements of dissolved silica, nitrate, oxygen, ammonia, phosphate, CO[sub 2], alkalinity and radon were made during 24 hour incubations of flux chambers (area covered - 0.07 m[sup 2], volume = [approximately]81) that were continuously stirred and sampled periodically. Nutrient fluxes measured were generally consistent with the fluxes measured previously in June, 1982 except for radon fluxes which were 203 times greater in the earlier field season. There was a general trend in nutrient fluxes to decrease offshore, a pattern probably controlled by the sedimentation patterns because fine grained, organic matter-rich sediment are concentrated in a zone near shore. Average regional fluxes were (in mmol m[sup -2]d[sup -1], negative values indicate flux into sediment): Oxygen (-12), CO[sub 2] (19), Alkalinity (4), Silica (3.3), Ammonia (1.5), Phosphate (0.1) and Nitrate (0.3). The carbon/ammonia flux ratio is about twice the C/N ratio in marine phytoplankton, suggesting that large amounts of denitrification may be occuring in these sediments. Comparisons of benthic fluxes and sediment burial rates indicate that 50-90% of the carbon, silica, phosphorus and nitrogen arriving at the sediment-water interface is recycled before burial. The nutrient input to the water column from NW Adriatic sediments is about equal to the input from coastal rivers.

  16. How storms modify baroclinic energy fluxes in a seasonally stratified shelf sea: inertial-tidal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jo; Stephenson, Gordon, Jr.; Green, Mattias; Inall, Mark; Palmer, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The oceans' rich internal wave field is an essential link in the energy cascade from large to small scale motions and is a major source of energy available for vertical mixing. In shallow shelf seas, vertical mixing across the thermocline maintains elevated summer time production, helping continental shelves to make a disproportionally large contribution to total ocean primary production relative to their surface area. Temperate shelf seas are therefore a significant CO2 sink and a critical link in the ocean-earth-atmosphere system. The two most energetic parts of the global internal wave spectrum are near-inertial waves with frequencies ω ˜f, and the lunar semi-diurnal frequency, M2. Using data from a mooring array, we demonstrate how wind generated near-inertial oscillations can modify baroclinic internal wave energy fluxes in the Celtic Sea, a seasonally stratified shelf. Linear fluxes of baroclinic energy are dominated by the semi-diurnal tide that outside of the complex generation zone drives a modest 28-48 W m-1 directly on-shelf. Given the complex 3-dimensional nature of the generation and propagation however spatial variability is high and net flux vectors may differ by 90° or more within an internal tidal wavelength. Horizontal energy fluxes driven independently by near-inertial motions are an order of magnitude weaker, but non-linear interaction between the vertical shear of inertial-oscillations and the vertical velocity associated with the M2 internal tide is a significant source of energy at the sum of their frequencies (M2+f). The phase relationship between M2 and f determines whether this non-linear interaction constructively enhances or destructively dampens the linear tidal component of the flux, a phasing that introduces a 2-2.3 day counter-clockwise beating to the energy transport. Relative to the M2 contribution, this beating and increase in flux magnitude explains an additional 10% of the variability of the full flux time series. Over

  17. Enhanced nutrient fluxes at the shelf sea seasonal thermocline caused by stratified flow over a bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweddle, Jacqueline F.; Sharples, Jonathan; Palmer, Matthew R.; Davidson, Keith; McNeill, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    Patches of enhanced chlorophyll a (Chl) concentrations within the thermocline were observed over the slopes of several banks in the Celtic Sea. The turbulent mixing of nutrients from the bottom water into the thermocline was found to be greatly enhanced over the slope of a bank (up to 52 mmol nitrate m-2 day-1), compared to over nearby flat seafloor (˜2 mmol nitrate m-2 day-1). This increased nutrient supply, forced by locally generated lee waves and internal mixing, is greater than nitrate supplies to the productive tidal mixing fronts or to the shelf edge. We hypothesize this nutrient flux promotes an increase in phytoplankton growth in the thermocline over and downstream of shelf sea banks, contributing to the horizontal patchiness in the thermocline Chl signal. The persistence of the strong biological response to mixing at the bank, combined with the ubiquity of shelf sea banks, suggests these bathymetric features have wide importance for "new" primary production in shelf seas.

  18. Towards More Realistic Simulation of Air-Sea Interaction over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot; Soto, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing and extended to three dimensions, including the introduction of realistic coastlines. Previous studies of Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions suggested that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality that limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  19. Transpiration's inhibition of air pollution fluxes to substomatal cavities. [PRECP

    SciTech Connect

    Slinn, W.G.N.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents an estimate for the resistance to transport through stomatal openings, accounting for the counterflowing flux of water vapor associated with transpiration. The specific goal of this report is to estimate the influence of transpiration on the stomatal resistance, r/sub sto/; others have estimated the substomatal and mesophyll resistances r/sub ssc/ and r/sub mes/. It might be expected that any influence of the water-vapor flux on pollutant transport would be a maximum at the stomatal opening since, at the constricted area of the stoma, the water flux is a maximum. Transpiration through stomata appears to insigifnicantly inhibit the passage of relatively small molecules (e.g., SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/, PAN, etc.) through the stomata, and therefore, by entering the substomatal cavity, such pollutants have greater potential for threatening plan survival, if their concentrations are excessive. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Seasonality of diffusive exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls and hexachlorobenzene across the air-sea interface of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2008-12-15

    Gaseous and dissolved concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured in the ambient air and water of Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan, from December 2003 to January 2005. During the rainy season (April to September), gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations were low due to both scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds blown from the atmosphere of the South China Sea. In contrast, trace precipitation and prevailing northeasterly winds during the dry season (October to March) resulted in higher gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations. Instantaneous air-water exchange fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB were calculated from 22 pairs of air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. All net fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB in this study are from water to air (net volatilization). The highest net volatile flux observed was +172 ng m(-)(2) day(-1) (dichlorobiphenyls) in December, 2003 due to the high wind speed and high dissolved concentration. The PCB homologues and HCB fluxes were significantly governed by dissolved concentrations in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. For low molecular weight PCBs (LMW PCBs), their fluxes were also significantly correlated with wind speed. The net PCB and HCB fluxes suggest that the annual sums of 69 PCBs and HCB measured in this study were mainly volatile (57.4 x 10(3) and 28.3 x 10(3) ng m(-2) yr(-1), respectively) and estimated yearly, 1.5 kg and 0.76 kg of PCBs and HCB were emitted from the harbor lagoon surface waters to the ambient atmosphere. The average tPCB flux in this study was about one-tenth of tPCB fluxes seen in New York Harbor and in the Delaware River, which are reported to be greatly impacted by PCBs.

  1. Comparison of modelled and observed sea ice fluxes in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huard, D. B.; Tremblay, B.; Lemieux, J.

    2009-12-01

    With the foreseeable increase in the strategic and economic importance of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), a comprehensive picture of sea ice conditions at present and in the future is needed. However, due to the complex topography of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), modelling sea ice fluxes in this area requires considerable spatial resolution. Our group has developed a stand-alone sea ice model based on the viscous-plastic rheology. The model includes both the Arctic Ocean and the CAA at a resolution of 10km, sufficient to resolve most of the channels and straits of the CAA. This study compares simulated fluxes across CAA channels and straits with satellite observations in order to identify potential improvements to the model and forcing fields. In particular, simulations were run with 32km resolution NARR surface winds instead of NCEP geostrophic winds in an attempt to capture wind channeling effects seen in the Eastern Arctic. Results show that fluxes are well simulated in the Western Arctic. In the Queen Elizabeth Islands region however, sea ice moves too freely compared with observations. The biggest challenge seems to be the Eastern Arctic, where the winter outflow of ice from Lancaster Sound towards Baffin Bay is not captured by the model. Potential explanations for the discrepancies are presented.

  2. Tidal elevation, current, and energy flux in the area between the South China Sea and Java Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zexun; Fang, Guohong; Dwi Susanto, R.; Rameyo Adi, Tukul; Fan, Bin; Setiawan, Agus; Li, Shujiang; Wang, Yonggang; Gao, Xiumin

    2016-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) and the Java Sea (JS) are connected through the Karimata Strait, Gaspar Strait, and the southern Natuna Sea, where the tides are often used as open boundary condition for tidal simulation in the SCS or Indonesian seas. Tides, tidal currents, and tidal energy fluxes of the principle constituents K1, O1, Q1, M2, S2, and N2 at five stations in this area have been analyzed using in situ observational data. The results show that the diurnal tides are the dominant constituents in the entire study area. The constituent K1 has the largest amplitude, exceeding 50 cm, whereas the amplitudes of M2 are smaller than 5 cm at all stations. The amplitudes of S2 may exceed M2 in the Karimata and Gaspar straits. Tidal currents are mostly of rectilinear type in this area. The semi-major axes lengths of the diurnal tidal current ellipses are about 10 cm s-1, and those of the semidiurnal tidal currents are smaller than 5 cm s-1. The diurnal tidal energy flows from the SCS to the JS. The semidiurnal tidal energy flows from the SCS to the JS through the Karimata Strait and the eastern part of the southern Natuna Sea but flows in the opposite direction in the Gaspar Strait and the western part of the southern Natuna Sea. Harmonic analysis of sea level and current observation also suggest that the study area is located in the antinodal band of the diurnal tidal waves, and in the nodal band of the semidiurnal tidal waves. Comparisons show that the existing models are basically consistent with the observational results, but further improvements are necessary.

  3. Decadal and annual changes in biogenic opal and carbonate fluxes to the deep Sargasso Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deuser, W.G.; Jickells, T.D.; Commeau, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Analyses of samples from a 14-year series of sediment-trap deployments in the deep Sargasso Sea reveal a significant trend in the ratio of the sinking fluxes of biogenic calcium carbonate and silica. Although there are pronounced seasonal cycles for both flux components, the overall opal/CaCO3 ratio changed by 50% from 1978 to 1991 (largely due to a decrease of opal flux), while total flux had no significant trend. These results suggest that plankton communities respond rapidly to subtle climate change, such as is evident in regional variations of wind speed, precipitation, wintertime ventilation and midwater temperatures. If the trends we observe in the makeup of sinking particulate matter occur on a large scale, they may in turn modify climate by modulating ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange and albedo over the ocean.

  4. Air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea, the Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Ci, Zhijia; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei

    2016-06-01

    The air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury (mainly Hg(0)) in the tropical ocean is an important part of the global Hg biogeochemical cycle, but the related investigations are limited. In this study, we simultaneously measured Hg(0) concentrations in surface waters and overlaying air in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea (SCS), Hainan Island, China, for 13 days on January-February 2015. The purpose of this study was to explore the temporal variation of Hg(0) concentrations in air and surface waters, estimate the air-sea Hg(0) flux, and reveal their influencing factors in the tropical coastal environment. The mean concentrations (±SD) of Hg(0) in air and total Hg (THg) in waters were 2.34 ± 0.26 ng m(-3) and 1.40 ± 0.48 ng L(-1), respectively. Both Hg(0) concentrations in waters (53.7 ± 18.8 pg L(-1)) and Hg(0)/THg ratios (3.8 %) in this study were significantly higher than those of the open water of the SCS in winter. Hg(0) in waters usually exhibited a clear diurnal variation with increased concentrations in daytime and decreased concentrations in nighttime, especially in cloudless days with low wind speed. Linear regression analysis suggested that Hg(0) concentrations in waters were positively and significantly correlated to the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (R (2) = 0.42, p < 0.001). Surface waters were always supersaturated with Hg(0) compared to air (the degree of saturation, 2.46 to 13.87), indicating that the surface water was one of the atmospheric Hg(0) sources. The air-sea Hg(0) fluxes were estimated to be 1.73 ± 1.25 ng m(-2) h(-1) with a large range between 0.01 and 6.06 ng m(-2) h(-1). The high variation of Hg(0) fluxes was mainly attributed to the greatly temporal variation of wind speed.

  5. Air-water exchange of brominated anisoles in the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, Terry F; Agosta, Kathleen; Andersson, Agneta; Haglund, Peter; Nygren, Olle; Ripszam, Matyas; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-06-01

    Bromophenols produced by marine algae undergo O-methylation to form bromoanisoles (BAs), which are exchanged between water and air. BAs were determined in surface water of the northern Baltic Sea (Gulf of Bothnia, consisting of Bothnian Bay and Bothnian Sea) during 2011-2013 and on a transect of the entire Baltic in September 2013. The abundance decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TBA)>2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DBA)≫2,6-dibromoanisole (2,6-DBA). Concentrations of 2,4-DBA and 2,4,6-TBA in September were higher in the southern than in the northern Baltic and correlated well with the higher salinity in the south. This suggests south-to-north advection and dilution with fresh riverine water enroute, and/or lower production in the north. The abundance in air over the northern Baltic also decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-TBA>2,4-DBA. However, 2,6-DBA was estimated as a lower limit due to breakthrough from polyurethane foam traps used for sampling. Water/air fugacity ratios ranged from 3.4 to 7.6 for 2,4-DBA and from 18 to 94 for 2,4,6-TBA, indicating net volatilization. Flux estimates using the two-film model suggested that volatilization removes 980-1360 kg of total BAs from Bothnian Bay (38000 km2) between May and September. The release of bromine from outgassing of BAs could be up to 4-6% of bromine fluxes from previously reported volatilization of bromomethanes and bromochloromethanes.

  6. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  7. Sea ice-atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, K.; Schweiger, A.; Maslanik, J.; Key, J.; Weaver, R.; Barry, R.

    1990-01-01

    The application of multi-spectral satellite data to estimate polar surface energy fluxes is addressed. To what accuracy and over which geographic areas large scale energy budgets can be estimated are investigated based upon a combination of available remote sensing and climatological data sets. The general approach was to: (1) formulate parameterization schemes for the appropriate sea ice energy budget terms based upon the remotely sensed and/or in-situ data sets; (2) conduct sensitivity analyses using as input both natural variability (observed data in regional case studies) and theoretical variability based upon energy flux model concepts; (3) assess the applicability of these parameterization schemes to both regional and basin wide energy balance estimates using remote sensing data sets; and (4) assemble multi-spectral, multi-sensor data sets for at least two regions of the Arctic Basin and possibly one region of the Antarctic. The type of data needed for a basin-wide assessment is described and the temporal coverage of these data sets are determined by data availability and need as defined by parameterization scheme. The titles of the subjects are as follows: (1) Heat flux calculations from SSM/I and LANDSAT data in the Bering Sea; (2) Energy flux estimation using passive microwave data; (3) Fetch and stability sensitivity estimates of turbulent heat flux; and (4) Surface temperature algorithm.

  8. A numerical coupled model for studying air-sea-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Le Ngoc

    1995-10-01

    A numerical coupled model of air-sea-wave interaction is developed to study the influence of ocean wind waves on dynamical, turbulent structures of the air-sea system and their impact on coupled modeling. The model equations for both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers include equations for: (1) momentum, (2) a k-ɛ turbulence scheme, and (3) stratification in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The model equations are written in the same form for both the atmosphere and ocean. In this model, wind waves are considered as another source of turbulent energy in the upper layer of the ocean besides turbulent energy from shear production. The dissipation ɛ at the ocean surface is written as a linear combination of terms representing dissipation from mean flow and breaking waves. The ɛ from breaking waves is estimated by using similarity theory and observed data. It is written in terms of wave parameters such as wave phase speed, height, and length, which are then expressed in terms of friction velocity. Numerical experiments are designed for various geostrophic winds, wave heights, and wave ages, to study the influence of waves on the air-sea system. The numerical simulations show that the vertical profiles of ɛ in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers (AOBL) are similar. The magnitudes of ɛ in the oceanic surface zone are much larger than those in the atmospheric surface zone and in the interior of the oceanic boundary layer (OBL). The model predicts ɛ distributions with a surface zone of large dissipation which was not expected from similarity scaling based on observed wind stress and surface buoyancy. The simulations also show that waves have a strong influence on eddy viscosity coefficients (EVC) and momentum fluxes, and have a dominated effect on the component of fluxes in the direction of the wind. The depth of large changes in flux magnitudes and EVC in the ocean can reach to 10-20 m. The simulations of surface drift currents confirm that

  9. A wave roughness Reynolds number parameterization of the sea spray source flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Sarah J.; Brooks, Ian M.; Salisbury, Dominic J.

    2013-08-01

    of the sea spray aerosol source flux are derived as functions of wave roughness Reynolds numbers, RHa and RHw, for particles with radii between 0.176 and 6.61 µm at 80% relative humidity. These source functions account for up to twice the variance in the observations than does wind speed alone. This is the first such direct demonstration of the impact of wave state on the variability of sea spray aerosol production. Global European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational mode fields are used to drive the parameterizations. The source flux from the RH parameterizations varies from approximately 0.1 to 3 (RHa) and 5 (RHw) times that from a wind speed parameterization, derived from the same measurements, where the wave state is substantially underdeveloped or overdeveloped, respectively, compared to the equilibrium wave state at the local wind speed.

  10. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  11. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  12. The Aeroclipper: A new instrument for quasi-Lagrangian measurements at the air-sea interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvel, J. P.; Reverdin, G.; Pichon, T.; Vargas, A.

    The Aeroclipper is a new balloon developed by CNES. The Aeroclipper is a balloon equipped with a cable extended by a guide-rope in contact with the surface of the ocean. The balloon is vertically stabilised at a given height (currently 40 to 60m above the sea surface) and move on quasi-Lagrangian trajectories depending on the surface wind. LMD (Laboratoire de Méteorologie Dynamique), LodyC (Laboratoire d'océanographie physique et de Climatologie) and ENSTA (Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées) developed an instrumentation adapted to this new measurement system. This instrumentation is distributed on one atmospheric gondola and one oceanic gondola. The aim is to measure surface physical parameters (Air and sea surface temperatures, sea surface salinity, wind, pressure and humidity) and to derive turbulent fluxes of moisture, heat and momentum. The Aeroclippers will give legs of the different parameters at a relatively high spatial resolution and thus information on the perturbation of these parameters at mesoscale. A first test of the full system will be performed from Banyuls (France) during spring 2004. The first scientific use of the Aeroclipper is planned in February 2005 in the Indian Ocean South of the Equator in link with the pilot phase of the Vasco (Variability of the Atmosphere at the intra-Seasonal time scale and Coupling with the Ocean) experiment.

  13. Recent summer sea ice thickness surveys in the Fram Strait and associated volume fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpen, T.; Gerdes, R.; Haas, C.; Hendricks, S.; Herber, A.; Selyuzhenok, V.; Smedsrud, L.; Spreen, G.

    2015-09-01

    Fram Strait is the main gateway for sea ice export out of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore observations there give insight into composition and properties of Arctic sea ice in general and how it varies over time. An extensive data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements collected between 2001 and 2012 is presented here, including long transects well into the southern part of the Transpolar Drift obtained using fixed-wing aircrafts. The source area for the surveyed ice is primarily the Laptev Sea, and the estimated age is consistent with a decreased from 3 to 2 years between 1990 and 2012. The data consistently also show a general thinning for the last decade, with a decrease in modal thickness of second year and multiyear ice, and a decrease in mean thickness and fraction of ice thicker than 3 m. Local melting in the strait was investigated in two surveys performed in the downstream direction, showing a decrease of 0.19 m degree-1 latitude south of 81° N probably driven by bottom melting from warm water of Atlantic origin. Further north variability in ice thickness is more related to differences in age and deformation. The thickness observations were combined with ice area export estimates to calculate summer volume fluxes of sea ice. This shows that it is possible to determine volume fluxes through Fram Strait during summer when satellite based sea ice thickness information is missing. While the ice area export based on satellite remote sensing shows positive trends since 2001, the mean fluxes during summer (July and August) are small (18 km3), and long-term trends are uncertain due to the limited surveys available.

  14. A simulation study to identify the sea water depth for the presence of air waves in sea bed logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkarim, Muhammad; Shafie, Afza; Yahya, Noorhana Binti; Razali, Radzuan; Ahmad, Wan Fatimah Wan

    2012-09-01

    Sea Bed Logging (SBL) is an offshore geophysical technique that can give information about resistivity variation beneath the seafloor. This information is crucial in offshore oil and gas exploration. However, data collected through this technique in shallow water at low frequencies is associated with a problem termed "air wave effect". The air wave effect is a phenomena resulting from Electro-Magnetic (EM) waves produced by the antenna (source) which interact with air-sea interface to generate air waves that diffuse from sea surface to the receivers. These air wave signals dominate the receivers at far offsets to the source and consequently, the refracted signal due the target is hardly distinguishable. The refracted signals from the target being masked by the airwaves can make it difficult to identify the hydrocarbon reservoir. The aim of this study is to investigate the sea water depth for the presence of air waves. Synthetic data are generated by simulating SBL environment without Hydro-Carbon (HC) target and varying the sea water depth from 1000m to 100m with the interval of 100m. The simulated distances for the source-receiver separation (offset) are divided into five ranges. The magnitude versus offset plot together with the Friedman and Wilcoxon statistical test are used to analyze the data. Results show that the air waves are present at 400m of sea water depth and below.

  15. Air-sea interaction at the subtropical convergence south of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.; Ballegooyen, R.C. van

    1994-12-31

    The oceanic region south of Africa plays a key role in the control of Southern Africa weather and climate. This is particularly the case for the Subtropical Convergence region, the northern border of the Southern Ocean. An extensive research cruise to investigate this specific front was carried out during June and July 1993. A strong front, the Subtropical Convergence was identified, however its geographic disposition was complicated by the presence of an intense warm eddy detached from the Agulhas current. The warm surface water in the eddy created a strong contrast between it and the overlying atmosphere. Oceanographic measurements (XBT and CTD) were jointly made with radiosonde observations and air-sea interaction measurements. The air-sea interaction measurement system included a Gill sonic anemometer, an Ophir infrared hygrometer, an Eppley pyranometer, an Eppley pyrgeometer and a Vaissala temperature and relative humidity probe. Turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were calculated in real time using the inertial dissipation method and the bulk method. All these measurements allowed a thorough investigation of the net heat loss of the ocean, the deepening of the mixed layer during a severe storm as well as the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and ocean-atmosphere exchanges.

  16. High-resolution simulations of heavy precipitation events: role of the Adriatic SST and air-sea interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davolio, Silvio; Stocchi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Strong Bora and Sirocco winds over the Adriatic Sea favour intense air-sea interactions and are often associated with heavy rainfall that affects the mountainous areas surrounding the basin. A convection-permitting model (MOLOCH) has been implemented at high resolution (2 km) in order to analyse several precipitation events over northern Italy, occurred during different seasons of the year and presenting different rainfall characteristics (stratiform, convective, orographic), and to possibly identify the relevant physical mechanisms involved. With the aim of assessing the impact of the sea surface temperature (SST) and surface fluxes on the intensity and location of the rainfall, sensitivity experiments have been performed taking into account the possible variability of SST analysis for model initialization. The model has been validated and specific diagnostic tools have been developed and applied to evaluate the vertically integrated moisture fluxes feeding the precipitating system or to compute a water balance in the atmosphere over the sea. The results show that the Adriatic Sea plays a role in determining the boundary layer characteristics through exchange of heat and moisture thus modifying the low-level flow dynamics and its interaction with the orography. This in turn impacts on the rainfall. Although the results vary among the analysed events, the precise definition of the SST and its evolution can be relevant for accurate precipitation forecasting.

  17. Distribution and air-sea exchange of mercury (Hg) in polluted marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Bitetto, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Calabrese, S.; Di Stefano, V.; Oliveri, E.; Parello, F.; Mazzola, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is emitted in the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources, these last accounting for one third of the total emissions. Since the pre-industrial age, the atmospheric deposition of mercury have increased notably, while ocean emissions have doubled owing to the re-emission of anthropogenic mercury. Exchange between the atmosphere and ocean plays an important role in cycling and transport of mercury. We present the preliminary results from a study on the distribution and evasion flux of mercury at the atmosphere/sea interface in the Augusta basin (SE Sicily, southern Italy), a semi-enclosed marine area affected by a high degree of contamination (heavy metals and PHA) due to the oil refineries placed inside its commercial harbor. It seems that the intense industrial activity of the past have lead to an high Hg pollution in the bottom sediments of the basin, whose concentrations are far from the background mercury value found in most of the Sicily Strait sediments. The release of mercury into the harbor seawater and its dispersion by diffusion from sediments to the surface, make the Augusta basin a potential supplier of mercury both to the Mediterranean Sea and the atmosphere. Based on these considerations, mercury concentration and flux at the air-sea interface of the Bay have been estimated using a real-time atomic adsorption spectrometer (LUMEX - RA915+) and an home-made accumulation chamber, respectively. Estimated Total Atmospheric Mercury (TGM) concentrations during the cruise on the bay were in the range of 1-3 ng · m-3, with a mean value of about 1.4 ng · m-3. These data well fit with the background Hgatm concentration values detected on the land (1-2 ng · m-3, this work), and, more in general, with the background atmospheric TGM levels found in the North Hemisphere (1.5-1.7 ng · m-3)a. Besides, our measurements are in the range of those reported for other important polluted marine areas. The mercury evasion flux at the air-sea interface

  18. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m−2 d−1 (on average ~321 μmol m−2 d−1) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 106 mol y−1), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters. PMID:27432631

  19. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m‑2 d‑1 (on average ~321 μmol m‑2 d‑1) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 106 mol y‑1), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters.

  20. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m(-2 )d(-1) (on average ~321 μmol m(-2 )d(-1)) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 10(6 )mol y(-1)), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters. PMID:27432631

  1. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m(-2 )d(-1) (on average ~321 μmol m(-2 )d(-1)) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 10(6 )mol y(-1)), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters.

  2. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  3. Particle size distribution and estimated carbon flux across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Sciandra, A.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study large particulate matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of this region. We propose that observed spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and enhanced biological processes mediated by bacteria and zooplankton at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the intermediate nepheloid layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At three stations, the lower oxycline was associated to a deep nepheloid layer, an increase of calculated carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Enhanced bacterial activity and zooplankton feeding in the deep OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. Estimated lower flux attenuation in the upper OMZ and re-aggregation at the lower oxycline suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non OMZ regions.

  4. Natural flux of greenhouse methane from the Timor Sea to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunskill, G. J.; Burns, K. A.; Zagorskis, I.

    2011-06-01

    Methane gas bubbles from the Cornea Seep were sampled at the sea surface in the Timor Sea continental shelf area in June 2005. Total bubble gas flux was 0.076 to 0.76 L m-2 h-1 during the 6 h d-1 periods of low neap tides in June 2005. This bubble gas contained an average of 26 mmol CH4 L-1 and about 0.16 and 0.006 mmol L-1 of ethane and propane. We estimate the daily flux from the sea surface to the atmosphere to be 0.012 to 0.12 mol CH4 m-2 d-1 or 0.13 to 1.3 t CH4 d-1 from an area of about 0.7 km2. This methane flux came from a 500 × 1400 m carbonate pavement dome on the seafloor at 84 m water depth. The seep hard ground was swath mapped, and 3.5 kHz subbottom profile data indicate that the seep dome was strongly reflective with poor penetration into the subsurface, consistent with the presence of a carbonate hard ground. Carbon and deuterium isotope ratios (δ13C = -41 to -42‰, δD = -157 to -158‰) of the seep bubble gas indicate that this methane had a thermogenic origin and was in the same isotopic range as gas within the Late Cretaceous Cornea oil and gas field. We could not detect inputs of fluids containing nutrients or short-lived radium isotopes at this site, commonly associated with other cold seeps. Tens to a hundred of kilometers seaward from the Cornea seep site, water column dissolved methane concentrations in this sector of the Timor Sea shelf and slope were 100-500 times supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere, and thus the water column is expected to be degassing additional methane to the atmosphere. Perhaps there are thousands of other methane seeps (of similar magnitude to the Cornea Seep) on this shelf and slope to account for all the excess dissolved methane (˜86,000 t) measured in the water column. These measured and calculated fluxes provide evidence for the hypothesis that shallow sea seeps may be a significant source of atmospheric methane, in contrast to deep sea vents, where most of the methane is dissolved and oxidized in

  5. Soil air and soil flux measurements of 222Radon and CO2: A soil flux parametrization at Lutjewad (NL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, R. E. M.; Kettner, E.; Palstra, S. W. L.; Hoekman, S.; van der Graaf, E. R.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric 222Radon concentration measurements are used as a valuable transport tracer verifying the transport part of Carbon Cycle and Greenhouse Gas models. The production rate of the radioactive noble gas 222Radon (T1•2 = 3.8 days) by radioactive decay of 226Radium in the soil is constant, the absolute quantity depending on the local soil Radium concentration. The flux of 222Radon to the atmosphere (the soil exhalation, or effective atmospheric production rate), however, is not constant. It strongly depends on soil texture, soil humidity, precipitation and other parameters, but is nearly constant if these parameters stay unchanged. Recently, an effort has been done to predict this flux rate with widely available γ-dosimetry measurements (Szegvary et al., Predicting terrestrial 222Rn-flux using gamma dose rate as a proxy, ACP 7, 2789-2795, 2007), but real 222Radon-flux measurements are sparse. 222Radon undergoes the same transport processes on the way from soil to atmosphere as any other soil-derived (greenhouse) gas. This makes 222Radon an ideal tracer to separate variations in e.g. soil CO2-production from changes in the soil-atmosphere CO2-transport, both being reflected in the total soil-atmosphere CO2-flux. At the atmospheric measurement site Lutjewad in the north of the Netherlands (53N24'18", 6E21'13", www.rug.nl/ees/onderzoek/cio/projecten/atmosphericgases) we started in 2006 with the measurements of the soil 222Radon and CO2 concentration through soil probes as well as the Radon and CO2 soil fluxes by means of an automatic soil chamber. While there are up to eight soil air measurements per day, the soil chamber is automatically closed twice per day. The station is situated directly on the Waddensea dike at an elevation of 1 m a.s.l. on seaclay soil. The groundwater table shows variations between 0.5 m and 2 m below terrain. From our measurements we find that in the dryer summer season, from April to July, the mean 222Radon-flux can be up to 40

  6. Technique for measuring air flow and carbon dioxide flux in large, open-top chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.

    1993-10-01

    Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) are commonly used to evaluate the effect of CO{sub 2},O{sub 3}, and other trace gases on vegetation. This study developed and tested a new technique for measuring forced air flow and net CO{sub 2} flux from OTCs. Experiments were performed with a 4.5-m diam. OTC with a sealed floor and a specialized air delivery system. Air flow through the chamber was computed with the Bernoulli equation using measurements of the pressure differential between the air delivery ducts and the chamber interior. An independent measurement of air flow was made simultaneously to calibrate and verify the accuracy of the Bernoulli relationship. The CO{sub 2} flux density was calculated as the product of chamber air flow and the difference in CO{sub 2} concentration between the air entering and exhausting from the OTC (C{sub in}-C{sub out}). Accuracy was evaluated by releasing CO{sub 2} within the OTC at known rates. Data were collected with OTCs at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} ({approx}700 {mu}mol{sup -1}). Results showed the Bernoulli equation, with a flow coefficient of 0.7, accurately measured air flow in the OTC within {+-}5% regardless of flow rate and air duct geometry. Experiments in ambient OTCs showed CO{sub 2} flux density ({mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}), computed from 2-min averages of air flow and C{sub in} - C{sub out,} was typically within {+-} 10% of actual flux, provided that the exit air velocity at the top of the OTC was greater than 0.6 m s{sup -1}. Obtaining the same accuracy in CO{sub 2}-enriched OTCs required a critical exit velocity near 1.2 m s{sup -1} to minimize the incursion of ambient air and prevent contamination of exit gas sample. When flux data were integrated over time to estimate daily CO{sub 2} flux ({mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), actual and measured values agreed to within {+-}2% for both ambient and CO{sub 2}-enriched chambers, suggesting that accurate measurements of daily net C exchange are possible with this technique.

  7. ASGAMAGE, the Air-Sea Gas Exchange/MAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, Wiebe; Jacobs, Cor; Kohsiek, Wim; Goossens, Guus; van der Horn, Jaap; Sprung, Detlev; Rapsomanikis, Spyros; Kenntner, Thomas; Reiner, Thomas; Bowyer, Peter; Larsen, Søren; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kunz, Gerard; Hall, Alan; Liss, Peter; Malin, Gill; Upstill-Goddard, Rob; Woolf, David; Graham, Angus; Nightingale, Phil; Fairall, Chris; Hare, Jeff; Dissly, Richard; Tans, Pieter; Anderson, Bob; Smith, Stu

    The ASGAMAGE project addressed the problem of the large discrepancy between the chemistry based and micrometeorological methods and aimed to determine any geophysical parameters apart from the wind speed that affect air-sea gas exchange in an effort to reduce the uncertainty in the global carbon balance. Experiments were performed in the spring and fall of 1996 at and near a research platform off the Dutch coast and two surface layer models were developed for the gas exchange process. The results gave a reduction of the difference between the two types of methods from an order of magnitude to a factor of two as well as indications for the causes of the remaining difference.

  8. Air-sea Interaction Influence on the MJO propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, P. W.; Chen, S.; Doyle, J.; Flatau, M. K.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is a multi-scale low frequency mode that influences the intraseasonal variability of weather across the globe. One of the outstanding forecast challenges is the large model errors in the MJO eastward propagation as it transitions from the Indian Ocean to the Maritime Continent. We will discuss the air-sea coupling impact on the MJO propagation using the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) running in an extended forecast mode on the second CINDY/DYNAMO MJO. Preliminary comparison with uncoupled forecast indicates the effect of the full ocean coupling is to damp the westward propagating modes and retrograde the eastward propagating mode. The impacts of these changes are examined through the analysis of the model sensitivity and satellite data.

  9. Satellite observations of air-sea interaction over the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Nonaka, M.; Hafner, J.; Liu, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Satellite microwave measurements are analyzed, revealing robust co-variability in sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed over the Kuroshio and its Extension (KE). Ocean hydrodynamic instabilities cause the KE to meander and result into large SST variations. Increased (reduced) wind speeds are found to be associated with warm (cold) SST anomalies. This positive SST-wind correlation in KE is confirmed by in-situ buoy measurements and is consistent with a vertical shear adjustment mechanism. Namely, an increase in SST reduces the static stability of the near-surface atmosphere, intensifying the vertical turbulence mixing and bringing fast-moving air from aloft to the sea surface. South of Japan, the Kuroshio is known to vary between nearshore and offshore paths. Both paths seem semi-permanent and can persist months to years. As the Kuroshio shifts its path, coherent wind changes are detected. In particular, winds are high south of Tokyo when the Kuroshio takes the nearshore path while they are greatly reduced when this warm current leaves the coast in the offshore path. Further upstream in the East China Sea, on the warmer flank of the Kuroshio Front, there are a zone of high wind speed and a band of raining cloud due to the region's unstable atmospheric stratification near the surface. Surface wind convergence is roughly collocated with the Kuroshio Current. By increasing the baroclinicity and condensational heating, the Kuroshio Front aids the growth of the so-called Taiwan cyclone, an important winter weather phenomenon for Japan. The positive SST-wind correlation over the strong Kuroshio Current and its extension is opposite to the negative one often observed in regions of weak currents such as south of the Aleutian low that is considered to be indicative of atmosphere-to-ocean forcing.

  10. Antarctic Sea ice variations and seasonal air temperature relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherly, John W.; Walsh, John E.; Zwally, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Data through 1987 are used to determine the regional and seasonal dependencies of recent trends of Antarctic temperature and sea ice. Lead-lag relationships involving regional sea ice and air temperature are systematically evaluated, with an eye toward the ice-temperature feedbacks that may influence climatic change. Over the 1958-1087 period the temperature trends are positive in all seasons. For the 15 years (l973-l987) for which ice data are available, the trends are predominantly positive only in winter and summer, and are most strongly positive over the Antarctic Peninsula. The spatially aggregated trend of temperature for this latter period is small but positive, while the corresponding trend of ice coverage is small but negative. Lag correlations between seasonal anomalies of the two variables are generally stronger with ice lagging the summer temperatures and with ice leading the winter temperatures. The implication is that summer temperatures predispose the near-surface waters to above-or below-normal ice coverage in the following fall and winter.

  11. Carbon budgets for three autotrophic Australian estuaries: Implications for global estimates of the coastal air-water CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-03-01

    Estuaries are `hot spots' in the global carbon cycle, yet data on carbon dynamics, in particular air-sea CO2 fluxes, from autotrophic systems are rare. Estuarine carbon budgets were constructed for three geomorphically distinct warm temperate Australian estuaries over an annual cycle. All three estuaries were net autotrophic, with annual net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) ranging from 8 ± 13.4 molC m-2 yr-1 to 10 ± 14 molC m-2 yr-1. There was a net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the estuaries of between 0.4 ± 0.6 molC m-2 yr-1 and 2 ± 0.9 molC m-2 yr-1. Loading of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the estuaries varied markedly within and between the estuaries, and was directly related to freshwater inflow. While NEM was similar in all three estuaries, the ratio of benthic versus pelagic contributions to NEM differed, with NEM dominated by pelagic production in the river dominated system, benthic production dominating in the intermediate estuary, and equal contributions of benthic and pelagic production in the marine dominated lagoon. All three estuaries exported more organic carbon than was imported, fueled by additional organic carbon supplied by NEM. The estuaries essentially acted as bioreactors, transforming DIC to organic carbon. Burial of organic carbon ranged from 1.2 ± 0.3 molC m-2 yr-1 to 4.4 ± 1.2 molC m-2 yr-1 and represented up to half of NEM. The annual net uptake of atmospheric CO2 in these systems, along with previous estimates of the global estuarine CO2flux being based predominantly on heterotrophic, large river dominated estuarine systems, indicates that the global estimate of the estuarine air-water CO2flux may be over-estimated due to the lack of studies from autotrophic marine dominated estuaries.

  12. Tropical Intraseasonal Air-Sea Exchanges during the 1997 Pacific Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Chou, S.-H.; Wang, Zihou

    1999-01-01

    The Madden Julian Oscillations (MJO) and associated westerly wind (WW) events account for much of the tropical intraseasonal variability (TISV). The TISV has been suggested as an important stochastic forcing that may be one of the underlying causes for the observed irregularities of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Recent observational studies and theories of interannual to interdecadal-scale variability suggest that ENSO may arise from different mechanisms depending on the basic states. The Pacific warming event of 1997, being associated with a period of strong MJO and WW events, serves as a natural experiment for studying the possible role of TISV in triggering an ENSO event. We have performed a combined statistical and composite analysis of surface WW events based on the assimilated surface wind and sea level pressure for the period of 1980-1993, the SSM/I wind for the period of 1988-1997, and OLR. Results indicates that extratropical forcing contribute significantly to the evolution of MJO and establishment of WW events over the Pacific warm pool. Following the major WW events, there appeared an eastward extension of equatorial warm SST anomalies from the western Pacific warm pool. Such tropical-extratropical interaction is particularly clear in the winter of 96-97 that leads to the recent warming event in 1997/98. From the above discussion, our current study on this subject is based on the hypothesis that 1) there is an enhanced air-sea interaction associated with TISV and the northerly surges from the extratropics in the initial phase of the 97/98 warming event, and 2) the relevant mechanisms are functions of the basic state of the coupled system (in terms of SST distribution and atmospheric mean circulation) that varies at the interannual and interdecadal time scale. We are analyzing the space-time structure of the northerly surges, their association with air-sea fluxes and upper ocean responses during the period of September 1996 to June 1997. The

  13. GRACE Mass Flux Measurements of Inland and Marginal Seas from Mascons: Analysis and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, B.; Luthcke, S. B.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The latest GRACE time-variable gravity mascon solution from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) applies an optimized set of models and constraints towards the direct measurement of 1-arc-degree global mass flux parameters each month. Separate mascon spatial constraint regions have been defined for the largest inland and marginal seas: Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Red Sea, and Hudson Bay. The mascon estimation approach, when applied with well-designed constraints, minimizes signal leakage across regional boundaries and eliminates the need for post-processing strategies. These post-processing techniques (e.g. smoothed averaging kernels) are necessary for computing regional mass change from the unconstrained spherical harmonics provided by the GRACE project to reduce the effect of noisy high degree and order terms, but introduce signal leakage into and out of the considered region. These mass signals are also difficult to obtain from altimetry measurements due to the comparatively sparse temperature and salinity data in these regions, which is needed to compute and remove the steric component of sea level variations. We provide new GSFC mascon measurements of these inland and marginal seas and compare to results obtained from kernel-averaged spherical harmonic solutions and steric-corrected altimetry measurements. The relative accuracy of the various solutions is determined by incorporating their output into the set of forward models applied in our processing of the GRACE Level-1B data and analyzing the effect on the inter-satellite range-rate residuals, where a reduction in residuals is a direct validation of improved solution quality.

  14. Seasonality in the flux of natural radionuclides and plutonium in the deep Sargasso Sea. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, M.P.; Fleer, A.P.; Deuser, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    A record of radionuclide fluxes at a deep-ocean station near Bermuda (32/sup 0/ 05 min N, 64/sup 0/ 15 min W) was obtained from analysis of a 3-year collection of sediment-trap samples. The trap was placed at a depth of 3200 m, 1000 m above the sea floor, and the samples were recovered at 2-month intervals. Concentrations of U-238, -234, Th-232, -230, -228, Pa-231, Pb-210, Po-210, and Pu-239 and -240 were measured in the trapped material. Most of the radionuclide activity was found in the <37-micron sieved fraction. All radionuclide fluxes showed seasonal variations in phase with the variations in total sediment flux, which had been previously shown to be closely tied to the annual cycle of primary production in the overlying surface water. Seasonal variations are especially noteworthy for Th-230 and Pa-231, considering that most of their production occurs in the water column below the euphotic zone. Evidently the seasonal influence is transmitted downward by the varying particle flux so that radionuclide scavenging rates at depth, as well as at the surface, are affected. It is suggested that this could be brought about by seasonal variations in the flux of marine snow or in the rate of fecal-matter production in the deep-water column. Keywords: Pelagic sedimentation.

  15. Storms modify baroclinic energy fluxes in a seasonally stratified shelf sea: Inertial-tidal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Joanne E.; Stephenson, Gordon R.; Green, J. A. M.; Inall, Mark E.; Palmer, Matthew R.

    2014-10-01

    Observations made near the Celtic Sea shelf edge are used to investigate the interaction between wind-generated near-inertial oscillations and the semidiurnal internal tide. Linear, baroclinic energy fluxes within the near-inertial (f) and semidiurnal (M2) wave bands are calculated from measurements of velocity and density structure at two moorings located 40 km from the internal tidal generation zone. Over the 2 week deployment period, the semidiurnal tide drove 28-48 W m-1 of energy directly on-shelf. Little spring-neap variability could be detected. Horizontal near-inertial energy fluxes were an order of magnitude weaker, but nonlinear interaction between the vertical shear of inertial oscillations and the vertical velocity associated with the semidiurnal internal tide led to a 25-43% increase in positive on-shelf energy flux. The phase relationship between f and M2 determines whether this nonlinear interaction enhances or dampens the linear tidal component of the flux, and introduces a 2 day counter-clockwise beating to the energy transport. Two very clear contrasting regimes of (a) tidally and (b) inertially driven shear and energy flux are captured in the observations.

  16. Variations in productivity and eolian fluxes in the northeastern Arabian Sea during the past 110 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmand, Ali; Marcantonio, Franco; Schulz, Hartmut

    2004-04-01

    High-resolution (one to two samples/ka) radionuclide proxy records from core 93KL in the northeastern Arabian Sea provide evidence for millennial climate variability over the past 110 ka. We interpret 230Th-normalized 232Th fluxes as a proxy for eolian input, and authigenic uranium concentrations as a proxy for past productivity. We attribute orbital and suborbital variations in both proxies to changes in the intensity of the southwest Indian Ocean monsoon. The highest 230Th-normalized 232Th fluxes occur at times that are consistent with the timing of the Younger Dryas, Heinrich events 1-7 and cold Dansgaard-Oeschger stadial events recorded in the GISP2 ice core. Such high dust fluxes may be due to a weakened southwest monsoon in conjunction with strengthened northwesterlies from the Arabian Peninsula and Mesopotamia. Authigenic uranium concentrations, on the other hand, are highest during warm Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadials when the southwest monsoon is intensified relative to the northwesterly winds. Our results also indicate that on orbital timescales maximum average eolian fluxes coincide with the timing of marine isotopic stage (MIS) 2 and 4, while minimum fluxes occur during MIS 1, 3 and 5. Although the forcing mechanism(s) controlling suborbital variabilities in monsoonal intensity is still debated, our findings suggest an atmospheric teleconnection between the low-latitude southwest monsoon and North Atlantic climate.

  17. Episodic particle flux in the deep Sargasso Sea: an organic geochemical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Maureen H.; Weber, J. C.; Ralph, Nathan

    1998-11-01

    Since 1978, the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time-series sediment trap study has continuously measured particle fluxes in the deep Sargasso Sea (31°50'N, 64°10'W). One feature of this 19+ year record has been the episodic occurrence of large, short-lived flux maxima that are not associated with the annual spring bloom. These maxima generally occur during the Dec.-Jan. period, but not necessarily every year. They have also occurred in other seasons. In January 1996, OFP traps located at 3200 and 3400 m depths intercepted a major flux "event" in which there was an abrupt, threefold increase in mass flux at both depths. Mass flux measured at 3200 m during the event (87 mg m -2 d -1) was the highest recorded since biweekly resolved sampling was begun in 1989. Organic biomarker analyses of material collected prior to, and during, this high flux event determined that there was an abrupt change in material composition associated with the sudden flux increase. Prior to the event, cholesterol, a single bacteriaderived C 27 hopanone (22,29,30-tris norhopan-21-one), and saturated and odd/branched fatty acids predominated: these compounds indicated that the sedimenting material was extensively degraded. During the event, organic material was greatly enriched in C 26-C 29 phytosterols, haptophyte algae-derived C 37-C 39 alkenones, labile polyunsaturated acids, degradation products such as steroidal ketones, and also in bacteria-derived compounds such as C 27-C 34 hopanoids and β and ω-1 hydroxy acids. These compounds indicated the organic fraction contained a large amount of relatively fresh phytoplankton-derived debris and tracers of bacterial biomass and metabolism, which suggested that the sinking material was undergoing active bacterial decomposition. Thus, the flux "event" appears to have resulted from a shortlived bloom in the overlying surface waters which, for reasons not currently apparent, was inefficiently remineralized in the upper ocean and rapidly settled to

  18. Occurrence and air/sea-exchange of novel organic pollutants in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, R.; Xie, Z.

    2006-12-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that several classes of chemicals act as biologically relevant signalling substances. Among these chemicals, many, including PCBs, DDT and dioxins, are semi-volatile, persistent, and are capable of long-range atmospheric transport via atmospheric circulation. Some of these compounds, e.g. phthalates and alkylphenols (APs) are still manufactured and consumed worldwide even though there is clear evidence that they are toxic to aquatic organisms and can act as endocrine disruptors. Concentrations of NP, t-OP and NP1EO, DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, and DEHP have been simultaneously determined in the surface sea water and atmosphere of the North Sea. Atmospheric concentrations of NP and t-OP ranged from 7 to 110 pg m - 3, which were one to three orders of magnitude below coastal atmospheric concentrations already reported. NP1EO was detected in both vapor and particle phases, which ranged from 4 to 50 pg m - 3. The concentrations of the phthalates in the atmosphere ranged from below the method detection limit to 3.4 ng m - 3. The concentrations of t-OP, NP, and NP1EO in dissolved phase were 13-300, 90-1400, and 17-1660 pg L - 1. DBP, BBP, and DEHP were determined in the water phase with concentrations ranging from below the method detection limit to 6.6 ng L - 1. This study indicates that atmospheric deposition of APs and phthalates into the North Sea is an important input pathway. The net fluxes indicate that the air sea exchange is significant and, consequently the open ocean and polar areas will be an extensive sink for APs and phthalates.

  19. Particles size distribution and carbon flux across the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Sciandra, A.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study Large Particulate Matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) of this region. We found that spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and zooplankton activity at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while, the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At the lower oxycline, a deep nepheloid layer was associated to an increase of carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Zooplankton feeding on un-mineralized sinking particles in the OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. These results suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non-OMZ regions.

  20. Measurement of air and VOC vapor fluxes during gas-driven soil remediation: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heonki; Kim, Taeyun; Shin, Seungyeop; Annable, Michael D

    2012-09-01

    In this laboratory study, an experimental method was developed for the quantitative analyses of gas fluxes in soil during advective air flow. One-dimensional column and two- and three-dimensional flow chamber models were used in this study. For the air flux measurement, n-octane vapor was used as a tracer, and it was introduced in the air flow entering the physical models. The tracer (n-octane) in the gas effluent from the models was captured for a finite period of time using a pack of activated carbon, which then was analyzed for the mass of n-octane. The air flux was calculated based on the mass of n-octane captured by the activated carbon and the inflow concentration. The measured air fluxes are in good agreement with the actual values for one- and two-dimensional model experiments. Using both the two- and three-dimensional models, the distribution of the air flux at the soil surface was measured. The distribution of the air flux was found to be affected by the depth of the saturated zone. The flux and flux distribution of a volatile contaminant (perchloroethene) was also measured by using the two-dimensional model. Quantitative information of both air and contaminant flux may be very beneficial for analyzing the performance of gas-driven subsurface remediation processes including soil vapor extraction and air sparging.

  1. Wind-mixing by storms modifies baroclinic energy flux on the Celtic Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Gordon, Jr.; Green, Mattias; Hopkins, Joanne; Inall, Mark; Palmer, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The internal tide generated at the continental shelf break transfers energy from the barotropic tide to vertical mixing in shelf seas. In this study, temperature and current measurements from an array of moorings across the Celtic Sea shelf-break, a well-known hot-spot for tidal energy conversion, show the impact of passing summer storms on the baroclinic wave field. Internal waves can propagate over a seabed with a gentle slope, but are reflected when they encounter sufficiently steep bottom topography, with the critical topographic slope above which reflection occurs being determined by the water column stratification. In July 2012, wind-driven vertical mixing during two storms lowered stratification in the upper 50 meters of the water column, and baroclinic energy in the semidiurnal band appeared at the moorings 1-4 days after. The timing of the maximum in the baroclinic energy flux is consistent with the propagation of the semidiurnal internal tide from generation sites at the shelf break to the moorings 40 km away. The ~3 day duration of the peak in M2 baroclinic energy fluxes at the moorings corresponds to the restratification time scale following the first storm. These results indicate that wind-mixing can change a topographic slope from super-critical to subcritical; variations in stratification with timescales of a few days may contribute to the unpredictability of the internal tide in shelf seas.

  2. Impact of wind and waves on suspended particulate matter fluxes in the East Frisian Wadden Sea (southern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettmann, K.; Wolff, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) fluxes and dynamics are investigated in the East-Frisian Wadden Sea using a coupled modelling system based on a hydrodynamical model (the General Estuarine Transport Model GETM), a third-generation wave model (Simulating WAves Nearshore, SWAN) and a SPM module attached to GETM. Based on sedimentological evidence that finer fractions of the sediments are squeezed out of the Wadden Sea, possibly due to the effects of diking and sea level rise, a series of numerical experiments was conducted to understand/discriminate the effects of normal tidal currents, wind-enhanced currents and surface gravity waves under various forcing scenarios. Starting with a simple tidal forcing the scenarios are designed to increase the realism step by step including moderate and strong winds, waves and finally encompass the full effects of one of the strongest storm floods in the last hundred years (Storm 'Britta' in November 2006). The results presented here indicate that moderate weather conditions with winds up to 6 Bft lead to a net import of SPM into the East-Frisian Wadden Sea. Waves do not play a big role during these conditions. Once the system is stirred by stronger winds that lead to storm surges waves have a significant impact on SPM dynamics. Under storm conditions, sediments are eroded in front of the barrier islands by wave action and are transported into the region by the currents. Furthermore, sediment erosion due to waves is significantly enhanced on the tidal flats. The eroded sediments (especially the finer sediment fractions) are transported out of the tidal basin area.

  3. Impact of increasing inflow of warm Atlantic water on the sea-air exchange of carbon dioxide and methane in the Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wâhlström, Iréne; Dieterich, Christian; Pemberton, Per; Meier, H. E. Markus

    2016-07-01

    The Laptev Sea is generally a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide and a source of methane to the atmosphere. We investigate how sensitive the net sea-air exchange of carbon dioxide and methane in the Laptev Sea are to observed changes in the inflow of Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean and in atmospheric conditions occurring after 1990. Using a time-dependent coupled physical-biogeochemical column model, both the physical and biogeochemical effects are investigated in a series of sensitivity experiments. The forcing functions are kept constant at 40 year climatological values except successively selected drivers that vary in time. Their effects are examined by comparing two periods, 1971-1989 and 1991-2009. We find that the flux of carbon dioxide is more sensitive to the increased Atlantic water inflow than the methane exchange. The increased volume transport of water in the Atlantic layer increases the ocean net uptake of carbon dioxide more than the warming of the incoming bottom water as the vertical advection is enhanced in the first case. The methane cycling is mainly affected by the increase in temperature, irrespective of whether the warming originates from the atmosphere or the incoming bottom water, causing increased outgassing to the atmosphere. In summary, our results suggest that the observed changes in the atmosphere and ocean potentially had a substantial impact on carbon dioxide uptake on the Siberian Shelf. However, the results suggest that the impact on the outgassing of methane might have been relatively modest compared to the interannual variability of sea-air fluxes of methane.

  4. Flux and seasonality of planktonic foraminifera in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, R.; Chen, M.; Wang, D.; Chen, Z.; Yan, W.

    2013-12-01

    The modern correlation between planktonic foraminiferal community dynamics and environmental conditions may provide a basis for establishing paleoclimatic proxies. We studied planktic foraminiferal shell fluxes and assemblages in samples collected in a time-series sediment trap deployments in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea (SCS), from June 2009 to August 2011. The general flux shows a unimodal pattern, with high planktonic foraminiferal flux (900-1000 tests m-2 day-1) occurs during the period from late September/October to February, and low flux (200-300 tests m-2 day-1)during the rest period of the year. This flux pattern is contrast to the bimodal pattern of planktonic foraminiferal flux obtained from the central and southern SCS. Ten species, Globigeroides sacculifer, Globigerinoides ruber, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina calida, Globigerinella aequilateralis, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinita glutinata, Orbulina univera and Globorotalia menardii, contributed about 96% of the total flux in each year. Among them, the monsoonal driven seasonality is most prominent for P. obliquiloculata, N. dutertrei and G. bulloides, with more than 70% of their species-specific total fluxes (93% for G. bulloides) occur from late September/October to February. This suggests G. bulloides can be used as a winter proxy-species. On the contrary, Globigeroides conglobatus, mostly appeared during June to August. G. sacculifer, G. ruber and G. aequilateralis generally follow the trend of the total flux of planktonic foraminifer, with about 50-60% of their total fluxes occur from late September/October to February. We also compared the size distribution of the dominant foraminiferal species in the > 250 micrometer fraction and 250-154 micrometer fraction, we found that most shells of G. aequilateralis, O. univera and G. menardii, and G. conglobatus mainly occur in the >250 micrometer fraction, and about 40% of G. sacculifer, 35% of P

  5. The Influence of Tropical Air-Sea Interaction on the Climate Impact of Aerosols: A Hierarchical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W. C.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to investigate the influence of tropical air-sea feedbacks on climate impacts of aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We construct four different models by coupling the atmospheric component of CESM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), to four different ocean models: (i) the Data Ocean Model (DOM; prescribed SST), (i) Slab Ocean Model (SOM; thermodynamic coupling), (iii) Reduced Gravity Ocean Model (RGOM; dynamic coupling), and (iv) the Parallel Ocean Program (POP; full ocean model). These four models represent progressively increasing degree of coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean. The RGOM model, in particular, is tuned to produce a good simulation of ENSO and the associated tropical air-sea interaction, without being impacted by the climate drifts exhibited by fully-coupled GCMs. For each method of coupling, a pair of numerical experiments, including present day (year 2000) and preindustrial (year 1850) sulfate aerosol loading, were carried out. Our results indicate that the inclusion of air-sea interaction has large impacts on the spatial structure of the climate response induced by aerosols. In response to sulfate aerosol forcing, ITCZ shifts southwards as a result of the anomalous clockwise MMC change which transports moisture southwardly across the Equator. We present analyses of the regional response to sulfate aerosol forcing in the equatorial Pacific as well as the zonally-averaged response. The decomposition of the change in the net surface energy flux shows the most dominant terms are net shortwave radiative flux at the surface and latent heat flux. Further analyses show all ocean model simulations simulate a positive change of northward atmospheric energy transport across the Equator in response to the perturbed radiative sulfate forcing. This positive northward atmospheric energy transport change plays a role in compensating partially cooling caused by sulfate aerosols.

  6. Seasonal and annual dynamics of particulate carbon flux in the Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wassmann, P. ); Slagstad, D. )

    1993-08-01

    Mathematical modelling was used to explore the seasonal and annual variability of primary, new and secondary production as well as sedimentation between 72[degrees] and 80[degrees]N in the central Barents Sea during the years 1981 to 1983. 1981 and 1982 were years with extensive ice coverage while 1983 experienced little sea-ice. The phyto-plankton [open quotes]spring[close quotes] bloom started usually in April/May at about 75[degrees]N and was delayed from May/June in the south to August/September in the north as a function of thermal stratification and sea-ice dynamics. The model indicates that several, simultaneous spring bloom events, separated in space, can be found, especially during years with low ice coverage. The annual estimates of primary production, secondary production and sedimentation decreased on average from 73, 7.3 and 48 to 18, 1.8 and 9 gCm[sup [minus]2] year[sup [minus]1] between the southern and the northern part of the Barents Sea respectively. The annual estimates of particular carbon flux were much higher in 1983 compared to 1981-1982, especially in the north where up to 6 times higher rates were calculated for 1983. The number of zooplankton species present in spring in the southern Barents Sea is governed by over-wintering success, but probably also influenced by advection of Atlantic water. The model was run for Atlantic water with 10,000, 3,000 or none copepods per m[sup 2] present in March, indicating that sedimentation can vary between 38 and 61 gCm[sup [minus]2] year[sup [minus]1] due to zooplankton grazing alone. This suggests that the supply of organic carbon to the aphotic zone of the Barents Sea is only partly determined by the strength and duration of phytoplankton blooms, but strongly influenced by zooplankton dynamics. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. An Examination of the Sea Surface Salinity - Fresh Water Flux Relationship Using Satellite Observations from SMOS and Aquarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pingping; Kumar, Arun; Xue, Yan; Liu, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Relationship between the sea surface salinity (SSS) and the oceanic fresh water flux (E-P) is examined using the SSS retrievals derived from the passive microwave (PMW) observations aboard the SMOS and Aquarius satellites, the CMORPH integrated satellite precipitation estimates (P) and the evaporation data (E) produced by the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) reanalysis. Preprocessing is performed to construct gridded fields of SSS, P, and E on a 1o lat/lon grid over the global oceans and at a 30-min time resolution for a 54-month period from January 2010 to June 2014. Relationships between the SSS observed at a point in time and the P, E, and P-E at the same grid box accumulated over various time periods ending at the SSS observation time are examined. As a first step, we focused our investigation on an oceanic area over the central equatorial Pacific (10oS-10oN; 180o-160oW) where SSS is not influenced by the river runoffs. Our preliminary results show clear linear relationship between the satellite-observed skin SSS and the fresh water flux over the region. The Aquarius observed instantaneous SSS presents a correlation of ~0.4 with the E-P accumulated over the 30-min period of the SSS observations. The correlation between the instantaneous SSS and the E-P drops with the accumulation period for E-P, down to 0.36 for 6-hourly accumulated E-P. The Correlation, however, bounces back and improves with the E-P accumulation period longer than 6 hours, reaching to ~0.7 for an accumulation time period of 30 days. The existence of the minimum correlation between the instantaneous SSS and the E-P accumulation over a 6-hour period suggests the involvement of air-sea interaction and oceanic processes on multiple time scales in the manner E-P influences to the SSS variations. Among the two primary components of the fresh water flux, precipitation dominates the influences on the SSS. Further analysis is under way to repeat the examination for different regions to examine the

  8. Subglacial Lake Whillans, West Antarctica; Solute Dynamics and Fluxes to the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, M. L.; Michaud, A. B.; Achberger, A.; Barbante, C.; Christner, B. C.; Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Priscu, J. C.; Purcell, A. M.; van Gelder, W.; Vick-Majors, T.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial Lake Whillans is located beneath the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The lake is situated beneath 800 m of ice and ~ 70 km upstream of the grounding line where Whillans Ice Stream terminates into the Ross Sea. Subglacial Lake Whillans is a shallow lake and a component of a complex subglacial hydrological system that may resemble a large wetland along the Siple Coast of West Antarctica. Subglacial Lake Whillans drains and refills on a sub-decadal time scale discharging water towards the Ross Sea. Water and sediment samples were recovered from the lake, using clean access drilling technologies, in January, 2013. Isotopic analysis of the lake waters indicates basal meltwater from the ice sheet as the dominant water source. Geochemical analysis of the lake water reveals it is freshwater with mineral weathering as a significant solute source, with a minor contribution from sea water likely from relict marine sediments. Subglacial hydrothermal activity upstream may also contribute solutes. Nutrients N and P are present at micromolar concentrations. Sediment porewaters from shallow cores (~ 40 cm depth) of the subglacial lake sediments indicate increasing solute concentration with depth, with up to ~ five times greater solute concentrations than in the lake water. The waters and sediment contain metabolically active organisms which are likely involved in elemental cycling within the lake system. Here we will discuss solute sources to the lake, solute dynamics within the lake waters and sediment, and the fluxes of solute and nutrients to the Ross Sea and their implications for these marine ecosystems.

  9. Estimating monthly-averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum are computed from twenty-five years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly-averaged wind speeds, temperatures, and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly-averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes computed from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimate of monthly-averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly-averaged non-neutral values.

  10. Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Soil Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkebauer, T. J.; Billesbach, D.

    2006-12-01

    We have been monitoring soil surface CO2 fluxes at three AmeriFlux sites in eastern Nebraska for several years. Recently, we have installed soil CO2 sensors at the rainfed soybean site in order to obtain profiles of CO2 concentrations in soil air (to 0.8 m depth). Supporting data include profiles of soil water content and soil temperature, aboveground biomass, leaf area index and precipitation. Soil surface fluxes had been rather small for much of the 2006 growing season (e.g., midday values of about 5 umol/m2/s) due, in large part, to the very dry conditions in eastern Nebraska and the consequent low soil water contents. However, copious rainfall in August raised soil water contents to field capacity throughout the profile. Soil air CO2 concentrations during this period also increased and reached peaks near 10% (at 0.4 and 0.8 m depth). Through analyses of relationships between surface CO2 flux and profiles of soil parameters we seek to identify biophysical factors responsible for controlling surface fluxes as well as to begin to quantify sources and sinks of CO2 within the soil profile (e.g., plant-related production of CO2 due to root exudation and respiration). The influence of precipitation events on CO2 profiles and fluxes is of particular interest.

  11. Iron in the Ross Sea: 1. Impact on CO2 fluxes via variation in phytoplankton functional group and non-Redfield stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2005-03-01

    We present new model results examining nutrient and carbon biogeochemistry within the Ross Sea, focusing on the sensitivity of ecosystem dynamics to taxon-specific nutrient utilization parameters and the impact of alleviating Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth. The coupled ice-atmosphere-ocean ecosystem (CIAO) model of the Ross Sea was modified to include air-sea CO2 exchange and non-Redfield C/N/P uptake ratios of the dominant phytoplankton taxa. Model results show that the Ross Sea was a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2, driven by the high primary productivity prior to the onset of Fe limitation. Taxon-specific C/N/P uptake ratios controlled the relative rate of removal of each macronutrient, while Fe availability constrained the absolute magnitude of utilization. When Redfield C/N/P stoichiometry was applied to both phytoplankton taxa, net primary production (NPP) was overestimated in areas normally dominated by diatoms and underestimated in regions of Phaeocystis antarctica dominance, and macronutrient dynamics were misrepresented. Simulated shifts in phytoplankton taxonomic composition significantly altered uptake of atmospheric CO2 when the phytoplankton were dominated by diatoms (-70%) or P. antarctica (+35%). The ability to bloom later in the season afforded P. antarctica a relatively greater role than diatoms in controlling the air-sea flux of CO2 in the Ross Sea. In response to alleviation of Fe limitation, both total Ross Sea NPP and CO2 uptake increased by 30%. The response of the carbon cycle to Fe fertilization was predicted to be complex, and its magnitude and nature were dictated by patterns of macronutrient utilization.

  12. Downward biogenic fluxes in the SW Black Sea: dynamics of their compositional and temporal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouloubassi, I.; Gogou, A.; Stavrakakis, S.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Grégoire, M.

    2012-04-01

    In the Black Sea, downward fluxes of biogenic elements in the water column were monitored during a 1 yr (2007-2008) sediment trap deployment in the SW basin (at 1000 and 2000 m water depth) aiming at appraising their amplitude, seasonal variability and prime controlling factors, and thus better assessing the biogeochemical functioning of this environment. Particulate organic carbon (POC) and carbonate fluxes display a strong seasonal pattern, with peak values in late autumn (POC) and early summer (carbonates). Mean POC fluxes at 1000 and 2000 m were 11.3 and 6 mg/m2/d, respectively, corresponding to 1.8 and 1 % of the estimated primary production. We used source-specific lipid biomarkers in order to determine the major phytoplankton contributors to the biogenic fluxes, as well as terrestrial organic inputs, and to shed light into the composition and variability of the biological system. These molecular data clearly demonstrate that diatoms (in particular Rhizosolenia species) are foremost drivers of the peak POC flux in late autumn. As expected, diatom productivity is also closely related with the patterns of the export opal fluxes. Furthermore, biomarkers document a major bloom of Emiliania Huxleyi in late spring/early summer, likely sustained by riverine nutrient inputs and/or regenerated nutrients. However, POC export is less strong during the coccolithophorid bloom. In contract, this bloom controls the unique peak value of carbonate flux. Dinoflagellate-specific biomarkers reveal a less prominent seasonal pattern, with higher values in late autumn and summer. In all the aforementioned periods biomarker tracers also evidence that zooplankton (and its fecal pellets) are important constituents of the export POC flux. As for the terrestrial inputs, they are mostly characterized by a high peak in late spring/early summer, when enhanced riverine discharges occur. Our findings demonstrate that the export of biogenic elements is closely linked to the structure of the

  13. [Verification of exhaled air temperature and heat flux in respiratory diseases as useful biomarker].

    PubMed

    Ito, Wataru; Chihara, Junichi

    2008-12-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diffuse panbronchiolitis are syndromes associated with chronic airway inflammation. In the conventional definition of inflammation, local pyrexia at the site of inflammation should be observed. However, there are very few reports that have evaluated the "heat" in inflammatory respiratory diseases. We considered that the evaluation of allergic airway inflammation such as asthma might be possible by measuring the exhaled air temperature, and devised an original device that stabilizes the flow rate, which is a very important factor for the direct measurement of heat. Moreover, an expiratory heat flux meter, which can detect a change in air temperature more precisely and immediately, was also incorporated into our original device. As a result, we succeeded in the measurement and evaluation of the heat flux and air temperature in healthy subjects and asthmatic patients, and, further, the air temperature was straightforwardly evaluated by a portable spirometer including a temperature sensor. These findings suggest that the heat flux and temperature of exhaled air can be used to objectively monitor airway inflammation noninvasively, and assist in the diagnosis/monitoring of inflammatory respiratory diseases, including asthma.

  14. Ammonia Flux at the Air-Water Interface of Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizak, C. A.; Poor, N. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent nitrogen deposition research in the Tampa Bay Estuary indicates that ammonia deposition dominates the total dry nitrogen flux to the bay. Gaseous plus aerosol ammonia contribute approximately 450 tons per year or 60% of the total nitrogen deposition of 760 tons per year to the estuary. Research data also indicate that during the summer months, Tampa Bay may act as a source for atmospheric ammonia as water temperature and ammonium concentrations increase. Ammonia flux estimates will be derived from thirty days of daily summer air and water sampling at the Gandy Bridge air monitoring site located adjacent to Tampa Bay. Ammonia concentrations were measured at two heights with a URG, Inc. dual-pump annular denuder system (ADS), and water grab samples from two depths were analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. Hourly relative humidity, air and water temperature, pH and salinity were recorded at this site, and hourly wind speed and direction were obtained from the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County. Rainwater samples were obtained with a University of Michigan sequential rainwater collector and analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. The direction and magnitude for the ammonia flux will be calculated with a modified NOAA buoy model from measurements of wind speed, air and water temperature, air and water ammonia and ammonium concentrations, relative humidity, water pH and salinity. The results of this research will be used to improve the NOAA Buoy model, and to compare observed with modeled ammonia gradients.

  15. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  16. Improvement of the GEOS-5 AGCM upon Updating the Air-Sea Roughness Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Molod, A.; Oman, L. D.; Song, I.-S.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of an air-sea roughness parameterization over the ocean that more closely matches recent observations of air-sea exchange is examined in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Surface wind biases in the GEOS-5 AGCM are decreased by up to 1.2m/s. The new parameterization also has implications aloft as improvements extend into the stratosphere. Many other GCMs (both for operational weather forecasting and climate) use a similar class of parameterization for their air-sea roughness scheme. We therefore expect that results from GEOS-5 are relevant to other models as well.

  17. The role of sea spray in cleansing air pollution over ocean via cloud processes.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Lahav, Ronen; Khain, Alexander; Pinsky, Mark

    2002-09-01

    Particulate air pollution has been shown to strongly suppress precipitation from convective clouds over land. New observations show that precipitation from similar polluted clouds over oceans is much less affected, because large sea salt nuclei override the precipitation suppression effect of the large number of small pollution nuclei. Raindrops initiated by the sea salt grow by collecting small cloud droplets that form on the pollution particles, thereby cleansing the air. Therefore, sea salt helps cleanse the atmosphere of the air pollution via cloud processes. This implies that over oceans, the climatic aerosol indirect effects are significantly smaller than current estimates.

  18. Improvement of the GEOS-5 AGCM upon updating the air-sea roughness parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Molod, A. M.; Oman, L. D.; Song, I.-S.

    2011-09-01

    The impact of an air-sea roughness parameterization over the ocean that more closely matches recent observations of air-sea exchange is examined in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Surface wind biases in the GEOS-5 AGCM are decreased by up to 1.2m/s. The new parameterization also has implications aloft as improvements extend into the stratosphere. Many other GCMs (both for operational weather forecasting and climate) use a similar class of parameterization for their air-sea roughness scheme. We therefore expect that results from GEOS-5 are relevant to other models as well.

  19. Sediment oxygen consumption and vertical flux of organic matter in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2003-02-01

    Vertical flux of organic matter and rates of sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) were measured in summer 2000 at a muddy sediment site (21 m depth) in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. During the 26-day experimental period (15 July to 9 August), a diatom bloom occurred, lasting for about a week. The vertical flux of organic carbon and chlorophyll a ( FC and Fchl), measured at 12.5 m depth, showed a sharp peak following the development of the bloom. Under these conditions, SOC ranged from 1.4 to 3.0 mmol O 2 m -2 h -1, and it was strongly influenced by the biomass of macrozoobenthos present in the experimental chambers used for SOC measurements. However, macrozoobenthic oxygen consumption made up only 5% of SOC. SOC variations were not coupled with corresponding changes in FC or Fchl. The effects of other factors, such as water temperature, as well as levels of sediment chlorophyll a and bacterial abundance, were minor, presumably because these parameters did not vary strongly during the study period. The average SOC value corrected for macrozoobenthos oxygen consumption (1.8 mmol O 2 m -2 h -1) and converted into the decomposition rate of organic material was nearly balanced with the FC averaged over the experimental period (0.7 C m -2 day -1). This indicates that this muddy sediment area in the Seto Inland Sea plays an important role in the degradation of organic material supplied from the water column.

  20. Temporal variability of vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Lavigne, Héloïse; Migon, Christophe; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Estournel, Claude; Coppola, Laurent; Miquel, Juan-Carlos

    2013-12-01

    The temporal evolution of the vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Ligurian Sea) over the last 20 years reveals a strong interannual variability. Winter convection allows particulate (and dissolved) matter to be vertically exported (“flush-down” effect). The efficiency of this process determines also the concentration of nutrients brought to surface waters and, therefore, the intensity of the subsequent phytoplankton bloom. The sequence “convection-bloom” is the main driving force of vertical export flux in this region. The present work attempts to better identify the parameters that control vertical export flux dynamics by observing a 20 year time-series in relation with the temporal variability of mixed layer depth and surface primary production. The consequences of a more stratified water column in the future on biological productivity and vertical export flux are pointed out. In winter, the cooling of surface water, combined with evaporation, increases its density and determines the vertical convection. This allows for a rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter, yielding high vertical export flux. This “flush-down effect” results from a combination of convection and gravitational flux, since the diving of dense surface waters breaks the stratification of the water column and carries all material (particulate + dissolved) accumulated in the surface layer to depth. The rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter by this “flush-down effect” yields high vertical export fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes may vary according to the amount of atmospheric material accumulated in surface waters during the preceding stratified period. In the present data set, highest vertical export fluxes were observed in 1999, 2003 and 2004. In those years, the MLD was greater (Fig. 2), suggesting a causal relationship between the efficiency of vertical mixing and the subsequent vertical export flux. In spring

  1. Effect of hypoxia on benthic nutrient fluxes in the northwestern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.

    2012-04-01

    The western Black Sea shelf has been affected by eutrophication from the 1960s to the mid 1990s. A combination of increased nutrient loads from the major inflowing rivers Danube, Dniester and Dnepr and favourable climate conditions led to high productivity regimes. As a consequence, increased oxygen consumption due to decomposition of organic matter caused recurrent seasonal bottom water hypoxia for more than 20 years. In addition, recycling of nutrients from organic matter settling to the seafloor along with tight benthic-pelagic coupling represents an important internal source for productivity, hence internally supporting eutrophication. From the 1970s to 1990s, the benthic and pelagic systems deteriorated and ecosystem structure and functioning changed. Following the collapse of the centrally planned economies in the eastern European countries during the 1990s, the riverine nutrient input decreased, and the ecosystem, now slowly responding, shows signs of recovery; e.g. by a decrease in hypoxic events. In this study, benthic nutrient flux data from in-situ and ex-situ experiments during the 1990s on the Danube-influenced north-western Black Sea shelf and data from the 2000s, including the EU-FP7 HYPOX experiments, are analysed to reveal the effect of hypoxia on benthic nutrient fluxes. Mann-Whitney statistical tests have been applied to demonstrate the significance of differences in fluxes due to varying oxygen conditions in the water. During the 1990s experiments, bottom water hypoxia was encountered in all locations, while during the 2000s hypoxia has been met only during summer in the Danube Prodelta area and near the Dniester mouth. Indeed, bottom water oxygen in the 1990s has been statistically significantly lower than in the 2000s while benthic oxygen consumption was higher during eutrophication-induced hypoxia. The benthic nutrient fluxes in the 1990s and the 2000s however do not differ significantly. During hypoxia, despite ceasing eutrophication

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns in oxygen and nutrient fluxes in sediment of German Bight (North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2016-04-01

    The German Bight in the southern North Sea is affected by intensive anthropogenic exploitation. Over a century of intensive use by shipping, fishery, and input by polluted rivers has pushed the coastal ecosystem far from its pristine state. The nutrient load reached a maximum in the early 1990s (Amann et al. 2012), and implementation of environmental protection policies substantially decreased the riverine nutrient load. While the riverine input of pollutants has constantly reduced since then, new forms of sea exploitation emerge. The most noticeable example is the installation of more than 600 wind turbines over the past few years in the German EEZ, and additionally 1,200 are already planned. The impact of these installations on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles is largely unclear. In a series of monitoring cruises we repeatedly sampled the sediment at a set of monitoring stations, which represent all typical habitats of the German Bight. We deployed benthic landers for in-situ chamber incubations and performed ex-situ whole-core incubations to investigate the benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients, and their spatial and temporal variability. Our first results indicate that benthic nutrient recycling is more intense during summer than during winter, which suggests that biological processes contribute substantially to the recycling of nutrients. The fluxes of reactive nitrogen appear lower than observations from 1992 (Lohse et al. 1993), when riverine N loads were at their maximum (Amann et al. 2012). The comparison of our recent measurements with observations from the past decades will enable us to assess the effect of decreasing nutrient discharge into the coastal North Sea. Our results will further set a baseline for elucidating the impact of the massive installation of wind turbines in the near future. This study contributes to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats). References Amann T., A. Weiss, and J. Hartmann (2012): Carbon

  3. Wind farm induced changes in wind speed and surface fluxes over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Fabien; van Lipzig, Nicole; Meyers, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Offshore wind farm deployment in the North Sea is foreseen to expand dramatically in the coming years. The strong expansion of offshore wind parks is likely to affect the regional climatology on the North Sea. We assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation over future wind farms built near the German coast. In order to achieve this, the wind farm parameterisation of Fitch et al. 2012, where wind farms are parameterised as elevated sources of turbulent kinetic energy and sinks of momentum ( Blahak et al 2010 and Fitch et al 2012) is implemented in COSMO-CLM at a 1.5 km resolution. As a first step, COSMO-CLM's ability to reproduce wind profiles over the North Sea is evaluated using wind speed data from the FINO1 meteorological mast, toghether with QuikScat scatterometer data, for a time period of 2000-2008. Subsequently, the impact of windfarms on the regional climate over a period of ten years (1999-2008) is assessed. A large scale wind farm can create wakes which depending on the wind direction could affect the power production of a neighbouring farm. Furthermore, wind farms decelerate the flow and create a vertical circulation in the inflow region. As a result, changes in vertical fluxes of moisture are observed. This leads to enhanced low level cloud cover which may trigger changes in precipitation.

  4. An improved whitecap timescale for sea spray aerosol production flux modeling using the discrete whitecap method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Adrian H.

    2013-09-01

    The discrete whitecap method (DWM) to model the sea spray aerosol (SSA) production flux explicitly requires a whitecap timescale, which up to now has only considered a whitecap decay timescale, τdecay. A reevaluation of the DWM suggests that the whitecap timescale should account for the total whitecap lifetime (τwcap), which consists of both the formation timescale (τform) and the decay timescale (timescale definitions are given in the text). Here values of τform for 552 oceanic whitecaps measured at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory on the east coast of the USA are presented, and added to the corresponding values of τdecay to form 552 whitecap timescales. For the majority of whitecaps, τform makes up about 20-25% of τwcap, but this can be as large as 70% depending on the value of τdecay. Furthermore, an area-weighted mean whitecap timescale for use in the DWM (τDWM) is defined that encompasses the variable nature of individual whitecap lifetimes within a given time period, and is calculated to be 5.3 s for this entire data set. This value is combined with previously published whitecap coverage parameterizations and estimates of SSA particle production per whitecap area to form a size-resolved SSA production flux parameterization (dF(r80)/dlog10r80). This parameterization yields integrated sea-salt mass fluxes that are largely within the range of uncertainty of recent measurements over the size range 0.029 µm < r80 < 0.580 µm. Physical factors controlling whitecap lifetime such as bubble plume lifetime and surfactant stabilization are discussed in the context of SSA production from whitecaps.

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls in sediments of the Yellow Sea: distribution, source identification and flux estimation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyong; Li, Yanxia; Li, Xianguo; Zhang, Dahai; Li, Mengfang

    2013-11-15

    Although there is no direct major riverine input, a large quantity of waste produced in mainland China and Korea is transported continuously to the Yellow Sea (YS) through atmospheric deposition, currents and tides; therefore, the environment is distinctly influenced by man-made pollution. This study focuses on the associated pollutant transport mechanisms and fluxes by sampling polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs (Σ24PCB) in YS sediments ranged between 99 pg/g and 3.13 ng/g of dry sediment (with a mean value of 715 pg/g). PCBs produced unintentionally by industrial and other processes appeared to be the major source of PCBs in the sediments, accounting for 60.5%. Industrially synthesized PCBs with 3Cl and 5Cl accounted for 15.5% and 24.0%, respectively. PCBs were mainly from atmospheric deposition (84.5%), followed by continental runoff (15.5%). The average atmospheric deposition flux of technical PCBs was 789 ng/(m(2)a) and flux of surface runoff was 2.27 ng/L. PMID:24075617

  6. Present-day fluxes of coccolithophores and diatoms in the pelagic Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, Elisa; Maffioli, Paola; Corselli, Cesare; De Lange, Gert J.

    2014-04-01

    Biogenic fluxes from two sediment traps in the Ionian sea (35°13‧N, 21°30‧E) at 500 and 2800 m water depth are discussed in relation with the main oceanographic and external forcing and compared with previous data from a nearby location. This study is part of a multi-year sediment trap deployment, aimed at assessing seasonality and interannual variability of biogenic and abiogenic fluxes. Here, we focus on fluxes related to two main phytoplankton groups: coccolithophores and diatoms. At our mooring site, high-coccolithophore and low-diatom fluxes confirm the oligotrophic character of the pelagic eastern Mediterranean year-round. Coccolithophore assemblages are dominated by the cosmopolitan species Emiliania huxleyi, followed by the deep-dwelling Florisphaera profunda and by several minor species. Diatom assemblages are dominated by Thalassionema bacillare and Nitzschia interruptestriata, with ~ 100 common and minor species. Overall, the combined flux pattern of coccolithophores and diatoms shows a clear seasonality throughout the study period, which can be related to changing oceanographic conditions and a different depth of production within the photic zone. Worth to note is the extremely high abundance, with respect to previous pelagic records, of species indicative of an intense deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), which could indicate a shoaling of the nutricline. This feature can be related to the variability that affects surface hydrography and the deep water masses. Additionally, the occurrence of neritic, benthic and brackish to fresh-water diatom species, mainly in the deeper trap, could be linked to either lateral transport within the water column or the atmospheric input of Saharan dust, which is known to be common over the eastern Mediterranean especially during spring time. Finally, correlation of the flux pattern at different depths allowed sinking speeds for total and biogenic particles to be calculated, which ranged from 70 to > 200 m day- 1. Three

  7. A study of the evolution of the surface heat flux off the southeast coast of the United States during a cold air outbreak using satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Dunn, J. W.; Crissman, Bobby W.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to the contribution of the marine boundary layer to storm development via a study of the evolution of the spatial distribution of the heat flux during a cold-air outburst (CAO) which occurred during the GALE Field Program period in a 550,000-sq-km area off the southeast coast of the United States. The study focuses on a CAO that occurred in the period February 24-26, 1986. During the CAO, the area averaged total surface heat flux ranged from 190 W/sq m to 1114 W/sq m. The high value was characterized by a lower average surface air and dew-point temperatures and a higher average surface wind speed. In general, the surface heat flux increased as the sea-surface temperatures on the continental shelf increased. It reached the maximum over the Gulf Stream, and then decreased over the eastern portions of the Gulf Stream and over the Sargasso Sea. The configuration conforms with some of the earlier findings of Bane and Osgoode (1989) and Blanton et al. (1989).

  8. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the brine volume fraction. We differentiate micro bubbles (Ø < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 mm < Ø < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  9. Transition from downward to upward air-sea momentum transfer in swell-dominated light wind condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Högström, Ulf; Rutgersson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric and surface wave data from two oceanic experiments carried out on FLIP and ASIS platforms are analysed in order to identify swell-related effects on the momentum exchange during low wind speed conditions. The RED experiment was carried out on board an R/P Floating Instrument Platform, FLIP, anchored north east of the Hawaiian island Oahu with sonic anemometers at four levels: 5.1 m, 6.9 m, 9.9 m and 13.8 m respectively. The meteorological conditions were characterized by north- easterly trade wind and with swell present during most of the time. During swell the momentum flux was directed downwards meaning a positive contribution to the stress. The FETCH experiment was carried out in the Gulf of Lion in the north-western Mediterranean Sea. On the ASIS (air-sea interaction spar) buoy a sonic anemometer was mounted at 7 m above the mean surface level. During strong swell conditions the momentum flux was directed upwards meaning a negative contribution to the stress in this case. The downward momentum flux is shown to be a function of the orbital circulation while the upward momentum flux is a function of wave height. The dividing wind speed is found to be 3.5 m/s Conclusion: Wind speed > 3.5 m/s creates waves (ripples) and thus roughness. Combination of orbital motion and asymmetric structure of ripples lead to flow perturbation and downward transport of negative momentum. With low wind speed (no ripples but viscosity) circulations will form above the crest and the trough with opposite direction which will cause a pressure drop in the vertical direction and an upward momentum transport from the water to the air.

  10. Particle fluxes, benthic processes and the palaeoenvironmental record in the Northern Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudsey, Carol J.; King, Penny

    1997-11-01

    At the northern edge of the Weddell Gyre, Antarctica, fine-grained sediments accumulate beneath eastward-flowing Weddell Sea Bottom Water. We report on sediment trap material and core tops from four sites, with relevant water-column data. In this cold, low-productivity oceanographic setting it is the processes in the benthic nepheloid layer (resuspension, transport, winnowing of fines) and in the upper few cm of sediment (bioturbation, dissolution of biogenic silica and carbonate, degradation of organic matter) that dominate the palaeoenvironmental record. Biogenic productivity is low and seasonal because of sea-ice cover; terrigenous sediment is supplied by resuspension of Weddell Sea slope and rise sediments and by ice-rafting. The benthic nepheloid layer is up to 150 m thick, with particulate matter concentrations of up to 0.51 mg/l. Sediment traps moored for 2 years 827 m above the seabed collected mainly biogenic opal with well-preserved and diverse diatoms and radiolarians. Traps 21 m above the seabed recorded additional high fluxes of terrigenous silt and clay. Core tops are terrigenous with very little organic matter or opal except at the northernmost site and a very restricted diatom assemblage. Core tops consist of silty clay or sandy silty clay, depending on current regime; the proportion of fine sand is related to the annual frequency of high ( > 15 cm/sec) current speeds at each site. AMS 14C dates on organic carbon in sediment traps are 965±50 and 1895±55 radiocarbon years, reflecting the high reservoir age of Southern Ocean surface waters. Core top ages of particulate organic carbon are 10500 and 13000 calendar years B.P. These high ages are related to the glacial-age source of resuspended slope and rise sediments. Cores from this area contain a textural record of Weddell Sea Bottom Water flow, but only fragmentary data on palaeo-surface conditions.

  11. Dynamics and impacts of eddy-driven air-sea interaction in a regional air-sea coupled model for the US West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H.; Miller, A. J.; Norris, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The US West Coast coastal oceans feature energetic mesoscale eddies. The associated sea surface temperature (SST) and surface current modify the wind stress, leading to significant dynamic feedback on to the air-sea coupled system. Dynamics of the interaction and impacts on the regional coastal climate are however not well understood; this is an important research question for regional modeling studies for the coastal climate. A high-resolution (7km) SCOAR regional air-sea coupled climate model is used to investigate this question by implementing a novel model coupling technique that separates spatial scale of air-sea interaction. It allows the large-scale coupling effect to be preserved while suppressing the eddy-driven coupling via interactive spatial smoothing of SST and surface current. When the eddy-induced surface current is allowed to modify the wind stress, the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) is reduced by 42%, and this is primarily due to enhanced surface eddy drag. In contrast, the eddy-induced SST-wind coupling has little impact on the EKE. Eddies also modify the Ekman pumping; the resultant Ekman pumping velocity due to surface current attenuates the amplitude of eddies while the SST-induced Ekman pumping affects the propagation of eddies. Rectified change in time-mean SST is determined by the altered offshore temperature advection by the mean and eddy currents, but the magnitude of the mean SST change is greater with the eddy-induced current effect. The subsequent influence on the downstream winter rainfall variability on the US West Coast is stronger with the eddy-induced SST effect because of the proximity of SST anomalies to the coasts. The strong dynamical response in the coastal climate system to the eddy-driven air-sea interaction suggests that the fine-scale air-sea coupling should be better represented in the regional climate modeling studies for the coastal environments and the marine weather.

  12. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the role of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-08-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted between 28 and 50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap data set from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depths below 100 m, where they represented up to 25 % of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily

  13. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the Malina experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted for 28-50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap dataset from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depth where they represented up to 25% of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily the result of a

  14. Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidirectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  15. "Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidrectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  16. Sources and fluxes of organic nitrogen in precipitation over the southern East/Japan Sea: potential impacts on marine productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, G.; Kim, G.

    2014-12-01

    We measured total dissolved reactive nitrogen in precipitation samples collected at Uljin, a Korean coastal site upwind of the southern East/Japan Sea (EJS), selected as a representative study site of atmospheric deposition over the northwestern Pacific margin. NO3- was found to be the most abundant nitrogen species, followed by NH4+ and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Air mass back trajectory analysis revealed that a significant fraction of the inorganic nitrogen (NO3- and NH4+) originated from mainland Asia, whereas the DON was primarily derived from Korea. Using varimax-rotated factor analysis in combination with major ions as tracers, agricultural activities in Korea were identified as the primary sources of DON in these samples. In addition, a positive correlation was found at Uljin between the size of organic fraction in total reactive nitrogen and nitrogen to carbon atomic ratio in organic matter. This correlation has also been observed at other locations worldwide, implying the utilization potential of atmospheric organic nitrogen might increase with its proportion in total nitrogen. Combining wet deposition measurements in this study with literature values for dry deposition observed at a remote island in the EJS, the total atmospheric depositional flux of reactive nitrogen was estimated to be 115 mmol N m-2 yr-1 over the southern EJS. Our study sheds new light on the potentially significant contribution to primary productivity of the northwestern Pacific Ocean by atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, especially the organic fraction.

  17. Low benthic respiration and nutrient flux at the highly productive Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Han; Choi, Ayeon; Jin Yang, Eun; Lee, SangHoon; Hyun, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated rates of total oxygen uptake (TOU) sulfate reduction (SRR), and benthic nutrient flux (BNF) in sediments of polynya (730-825 m water depth), ice shelf (1064 m water depth), and marginal sea-ice zone (530 m water depth) to evaluate the role of benthic mineralization in degrading organic material produced by primary production in the Amundsen Sea polynya (ASP), Antarctica. Despite high primary production (110 mmol C m-2 d-1) in the water column, benthic carbon mineralization in the ASP (average, 2.1±0.3 mmol C m-2 d-1) was strikingly lower than in other less productive polar regions, accounting for only 1.9% of primary production. Low sediment accumulation rates (0.18-0.20 cm yr-1) and sinking fluxes of organic matter likely caused the low oxygen consumption rates (2.44-3.11 mmol m-2 d-1) and low effluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (0.12-0.13 mmol m-2 d-1) and phosphate (0.017-0.018 mmol m-2 d-1) in the ASP. Carbon oxidation by sulfate reduction (0.11-0.19 mmol C m-2 d-1) comprised only 10% of total benthic mineralization, indicating that anaerobic C oxidation plays a minor role in total C oxidation. Our results, including low sediment accumulation rates and benthic metabolic rates, suggest that most organic carbon produced by Phaeocystis blooms would be respired to CO2 in the water column, and thus the organic carbon reaching the sediment is not adequate to stimulate benthic metabolism in the ASP.

  18. Riverine nutrients fluxes to the North Sea and harmful algal blooms, what changed since 1984 ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passy, Paul; Gypens, Nathalie; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette; Thieu, Vincent; Rousseau, Véronique; Callens, Julie; Parent, Jean-Yves; Lancelot, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Nutrients fluxes delivered to the coastal zones reflect human activities taking place within watersheds. Silica (Si) fluxes mainly originate from soils and rocks weathering, so they are few impacted by human activities. On the contrary, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes are dramatically impacted by human activities. N originates from urban waste water but mainly from agricultural activities. P originates mostly from urban and industrial waste waters. The enrichment of the hydrosystems in N and P leads to an imbalance between N and P in one hand and Si in the other hand. This imbalance leads to harmful algal blooms, which are damaging aquatic ecosystems, fishing activities and touristic activities. In 1992, the OSPAR convention was signed by 15 European States and targets to decrease the N and P fluxes delivered to the European coastal zones by 50 % with respect to the reference year of 1985. Focusing on the Seine, Somme and Scheldt watersheds (France and Belgium) and the adjacent coastal zone of the North Sea, we developed a retrospective modelling from 1984 to 2007 calculating nutrients fluxes from watersheds and Phaeocystis blooms occurring in the coastal zone. We coupled the biogeochemical deterministic model Seneque/Riverstrahler depicting processes occurring within hydrological networks with the marine model MIRO simulating Phaeocystis blooms in the coastal zone. The evolution of N and P fluxes were highly dissimilar. Indeed, P mainly originates from point sources. Thereby the banishment of P from the washing powders during the nineties, the development of sewage and the improvement of WWTP in terms of waste water treatment lead to a decrease of P fluxes delivered to the coastal zone. This decrease can be observed for the three watersheds. The P OSPAR objective is achieved since the middle of the 2000's years. On the other side, N, mostly originating from agricultural diffuse sources, did not decrease over the period. The fluxes even increased at the

  19. Re-examining the roles of surface heat flux and latent heat release in a "hurricane-like" polar low over the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Zahn, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale cyclones that occur at high latitudes in both hemispheres during winter. Their sometimes evidently convective nature, fueled by strong surface fluxes and with cloud-free centers, have led to some polar lows being referred to as "arctic hurricanes." Idealized studies have shown that intensification by hurricane development mechanisms is theoretically possible in polar winter atmospheres, but the lack of observations and realistic simulations of actual polar lows have made it difficult to ascertain if this occurs in reality. Here the roles of surface heat fluxes and latent heat release in the development of a Barents Sea polar low, which in its cloud structures showed some similarities to hurricanes, are studied with an ensemble of sensitivity experiments, where latent heating and/or surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat were switched off before the polar low peaked in intensity. To ensure that the polar lows in the sensitivity runs did not track too far away from the actual environmental conditions, a technique known as spectral nudging was applied. This was shown to be crucial for enabling comparisons between the different model runs. The results presented here show that (1) no intensification occurred during the mature, postbaroclinic stage of the simulated polar low; (2) surface heat fluxes, i.e., air-sea interaction, were crucial processes both in order to attain the polar low's peak intensity during the baroclinic stage and to maintain its strength in the mature stage; and (3) latent heat release played a less important role than surface fluxes in both stages.

  20. Bayesian Hierarchical Air-Sea Interaction Modeling: Application to the Labrador Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niiler, Pearn P.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives are to: 1) Organize data from 26 MINIMET drifters in the Labrador Sea, including sensor calibration and error checking of ARGOS transmissions. 2) Produce wind direction, barometer, and sea surface temperature time series. In addition, provide data from historical file of 150 SHARP drifters in the Labrador Sea. 3) Work with data interpretation and data-modeling assimilation issues.

  1. The transfer of trace constituents across the air-sea interface

    SciTech Connect

    Businger, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The study of the transfer of properties, and especially the transfer of trace constituents, has received considerable attention from the scientific community during the last 20 years or so. The author will highlight some relevant topics which include: the role of the molecular sublayer near the interface; the transfer of momentum from the atmosphere to the ocean; the energy budget of the sea surface and the cool skin; bubbles, sea spray, and whitecap coverage; the measurement of fluxes; and a global perspective.

  2. Thermocline mixing and vertical oxygen fluxes in the stratified central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Lorenzo; Dengler, Marcus; Schmidt, Mark; Sommer, Stefan; Linke, Peter; McGinnis, Daniel F.

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, the central North Sea has been experiencing a general trend of decreasing dissolved oxygen (O2) levels during summer. To understand potential causes driving lower O2, we investigated a 3-day period of summertime turbulence and O2 dynamics in the thermocline and bottom boundary layer (BBL). The study focuses on coupling biogeochemical with physical transport processes to identify key drivers of the O2 and organic carbon turnover within the BBL. Combining our flux observations with an analytical process-oriented approach, we resolve drivers that ultimately contribute to determining the BBL O2 levels. We report substantial turbulent O2 fluxes from the thermocline into the otherwise isolated bottom water attributed to the presence of a baroclinic near-inertial wave. This contribution to the local bottom water O2 and carbon budgets has been largely overlooked and is shown to play a role in promoting high carbon turnover in the bottom water while simultaneously maintaining high O2 concentrations. This process may become suppressed with warming climate and stronger stratification, conditions which could promote migrating algal species that potentially shift the O2 production zone higher up within the thermocline.

  3. Sea ice-atmosphere interaction. Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Key, Jeff; Maslanik, Jim; Haefliger, Marcel; Fowler, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    Satellite data for the estimation of radiative and turbulent heat fluxes is becoming an increasingly important tool in large-scale studies of climate. One parameter needed in the estimation of these fluxes is surface temperature. To our knowledge, little effort has been directed to the retrieval of the sea ice surface temperature (IST) in the Arctic, an area where the first effects of a changing climate are expected to be seen. The reason is not one of methodology, but rather our limited knowledge of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol profiles, the microphysical properties of polar clouds, and the spectral characteristics of the wide variety of surface types found there. We have developed a means to correct for the atmospheric attenuation of satellite-measured clear sky brightness temperatures used in the retrieval of ice surface temperature from the split-window thermal channels of the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensors on-board three of the NOAA series satellites. These corrections are specified for three different 'seasons' and as a function of satellite viewing angle, and are expected to be applicable to the perennial ice pack in the central Arctic Basin.

  4. Correlations Between Sea-Surface Salinity Tendencies and Freshwater Fluxes in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David

    2007-01-01

    Temporal changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) from 21 years of a high resolution model integration of the Pacific Ocean are correlated with the freshwater flux that was used to force the integration. The correlations are calculated on a 1 x10 grid, and on a monthly scale to assess the possibility of deducing evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) fields from the salinity measurements to be taken by the upcoming Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Correlations between the monthly mean E-P fields and monthly mean SSS temporal tendencies are mainly zonally-oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude storm tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The response of the model's surface salinity to surface forcing is very complex, and retrievals of freshwater fluxes from SSS measurements alone will require consideration of other processes, including horizontal advection and vertical mixing, rather than a simple balance between the two.

  5. Sea-air of CO2 in the North Pacific using shipboard and satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Mark P.; Samuels, Geoffrey; Olson, Donald B.; Fine, Rana A.; Takahashi, Taro

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to produce high-resolution maps of pCO2 in surface water for the North Pacific using satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data and statistical relationships between measured pCO2 and temperature. In the subtropical North Pacific the pCO in seawater is controlled primarily by temperature. Accordingly, pCO2 values that are calculated from the satellite SST data have good agreement with the measured values (rms deviation of +/- microatm). In the northwestern subpolar region the pCO2 is controlled not only by temperature, but also by significant seasonal changes in the total CO2 concentration, which are caused by seasonal changes in primary production, mixing with subsurface waters and sea-air exchange. Consequently, the parameterization of oceanic p CO2 based on SST data alone is not totally successful in the northwestern region (rms deviation of +/- 40 microatm). The use of additional satellite products, such as wind and ocean color data, as planned for a future study, is considered necessary to account for the pCO2 variability caused by seasonal changes in the total CO2 concentration. The net CO2 flux for the area of the North Pacific included in this study (north of 10 deg N) has been calculated using the monthly pCO2 distributions computed, and monthly wind speeds from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The region is found to be a net source to the atmosphere of 1.9 x 10(exp 12) to 5.8 x 10(exp 12) moles of CO2 per year (or 0.02-0.07 Gt C/yr), most of the outflux occurring in the subtropics.

  6. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes.

  7. Resolving the diurnal cycle in satellite derived sea surface temperatures and its significance on surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Marine surface heat fluxes across the globe need to be resolved on a smaller time scale in order to determine how changes in their diurnal cycle contribute to surface turbulent fluxes. In order to do this, the sea surface temperatures used to calculate the fluxes also need to accurately represent diurnal changes. Since most satellite derived sea surface temperature products are time-averaged and smoothed so that intradiurnal variations are neglected, and insitu measurements are scarce in global spatial coverage, modeling of the diurnal cycle of SSTs becomes necessary. A bulk flux model, POSH (Gentemann et al. 2009), will be used to calculate a global field of diurnally varying sea surface temperatures (dSSTs) over the course of 2 months in two different annual seasons, winter and summer. As the model produces a dSST field, surface turbulent heat fluxes are calculated using the Bourassa (2006) flux model. In order to compute fluxes, bulk atmospheric variables are taken from the MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis dataset. Sea surface temperatures are obtained from the AVHRR-only Reynolds Daily OI Sea Surface Temperature product (Reynolds et al. 2007). The Reynolds SST is bias-corrected relative to a 7-day in-situ SST so therefore it does not resolve the diurnal cycle itself. The Reynolds SST product will serve as a foundation temperature, or the temperature that is independent from the effects of diurnal heating (Donolan et al. 2007), of which the amplitude of the diurnal heating will be added to. Finally, 2-monthly average differences in dSSTs versus Daily OI SSTs and uncertainties in the biases will be compared. From these statistics, climactic and modeling significance of the inclusion of diurnal heating can be evaluated. We find that latent heat fluxes in the tropics are increased by roughly 10 Wm-2 when the diurnal variability is considered (Fig. 1). This change in flux decreases poleward. The tropical changes are

  8. Carbon fluxes and export in the northern and middle Atlantic Sea measured with drifting sediment traps

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel, J-C; Fowler, S; Hamilton, T; Heilmann, J P; LaRosa, J; Carroll, M

    2000-07-26

    In July 1993 and June 1995 drifting sediment traps were deployed near the Po outflow, in the coastal zone and in the Jabuka Pit in order to obtain quantitative information on the vertical flux of particulate material and export of organic carbon in the Northern and Middle Adriatic Sea. During these periods and in July 1994, the standing stock of carbon and nitrogen in the water column were also estimated. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations were higher in the north with a mean of 266 {micro}g C l{sup -1} in surface waters as compared to 92 {micro}g C l{sup -1} in Middle Adriatic; maximum concentrations were associated to the less-saline surface-subsurface waters in the north and to the chlorophyll a maximum in the Middle Adriatic. Organic carbon flux was roughly five times higher near the Po than in the more oligotrophic waters of the central region, with overall values (0.8 to 11.5 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) being low compared to the open Northwestern Mediterranean. Comparison with primary production measurements yielded estimates of carbon export (f-ratio) of 4.7 and 3.4% in the Po and Pit stations, respectively, in 1993 and of 1.6 and 3.6% in the central part of the Adriatic in 1995. These consistently low values suggest enhanced carbon recycling in the upper water column, even in regions characterized by different production and organic flux regimes. Zooplankton fecal pellets were important conveyors of organic carbon in this region; particularly those produced by fishes in the North and coastal sites.

  9. Radionuclide fluxes in the Arabian Sea: the role of particle composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, J. C.; Fietzke, J.; Mangini, A.; Stoffers, P.; Rixen, T.; Gaye-Haake, B.; Blanz, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sirocko, F.; Schulz, H.; Ittekkot, V.

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the influence of the composition of the vertical particle flux on the removal of particle reactive natural radionuclides ( 230Th and 231Pa) from the water column to the sediments. Radionuclide concentrations determined in sediment traps moored in the western, central and eastern Arabian Sea were related to the major components (carbonate, particulate organic matter (POC), opal, lithogenic material) of the particle flux. These data were combined with sediment trap data previously published from the Southern Ocean, Equatorial Pacific and North Atlantic [Z. Chase, R.F. Anderson, M.Q. Fleisher, P.W. Kubik, The influence of particle composition and particle flux on scavenging of Th, Pa and Be in the ocean, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 204 (2002) 215-229; J.C. Scholten, F. Fietzke, S. Vogler, M. Rutgers van der Loeff, A. Mangini, W. Koeve, J. Waniek, P. Stoffers, A. Antia, J. Kuss, Trapping efficiencies of sediment traps from the deep eastern North Atlantic: The 230Th calibration, Deep Sea Research II 48 (2001) 2383-2408]. The correlations observed between the particle-dissolved distribution coefficients ( Kd) of 230Th and 231Pa and the concentrations of the particle types depend on the sediment trap data set used. This result suggests that scavenging affinities of the nuclides differ between oceanic regions. Several factors ( Kd values, reactive surface areas of particles, inter-correlations in closed data set) can, however, influence the observed relationships and thus hamper the interpretation of these correlation coefficients as a measure of relative scavenging affinities of the nuclides to the particle types investigated. The mean fractionation factor ( F(Pa/Th)= Kd(Pa)/ Kd(Th)) from the Equatorial Pacific ( F=0.11±0.03) is similar to that from the North Atlantic ( F(Pa/Th)=0.077±0.026), and both are lower than the factors from the Arabian Sea ( F(Pa/Th)=0.35±0.12) and from the Southern Ocean ( F(Pa/Th)=0.87±0.4). For opal concentrations exceeding

  10. A study of the Merritt Island, Florida sea breeze flow regimes and their effect on surface heat and moisture fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubes, M. T.; Cooper, H. J.; Smith, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected during the Convective and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment were analyzed as part of an investigation of the sea breeze in the vicinity of Merritt Island, Florida. Analysis of near-surface divergence fields shows that the classical 24-hour oscillation in divergence over the island due to the direct sea breeze circulation is frequently disrupted and exhibits two distinct modes: the classical sea breeze pattern and deviations from that pattern. A comparison of clear day surface energy fluxes with fluxes on other days indicates that changes in magnitudes were dominated by the presence or absence of clouds. Non-classical sea breeze days tended to lose more available energy in the morning than classical sea breeze days due to earlier development of small cumulus over the island. A composite storm of surface winds, surface energy fluxes, rainfall, and satellite visible data was constructed. A spectral transmittance over the visible wavelengths for the cloud cover resulting from the composite storm was calculated. It is shown that pre-storm transmittances of 0.8 fall to values near 0.1 as the downdraft moves directly over the site. It is also found that under post-composite storm conditions of continuous clear sky days, 3.5 days are required to evaporate back into the atmosphere the latent heat energy lost to the surface by rainfall.

  11. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  12. Extreme subseasonal tropical air-sea interactions and their relation to ocean thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with extreme, rapid timescale tropical air-sea interactions and the influence of large-scale oceanic conditions on these interactions. The focus is on two types of extreme events: equatorial Indian Ocean cooling events and tropical cyclones. Cooling events occur on timescales of a few days to several weeks, in which atmospheric forcing causes Sea Surface Temperature (SST) cooling in the range of 1--5K, in both observational and coupled climate models. Cooling events are driven by changes in air-sea enthalpy fluxes and Ekman upwelling. Because the cooling due to Ekman upwelling depends on thermocline depth, large-scale oceanic conditions influence SST cooling. La Nina and negative Indian Ocean Dipole conditions are conducive to a shallower southwest equatorial thermocline, resulting in greater intraseasonal SST cooling during these interannual events; El Nino and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions lead to a deeper thermocline and reduced SST cooling. Results indicate that cooling events are related to the eastward propagation of convective patterns that resemble the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For tropical cyclones, the response of intensity to cyclone-induced SST cooling was explored over 10-years of observational data. For slow moving (V/ f < 100km) tropical cyclones, it was found that the SST cooling response increases along with storm intensity from category 0--2 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. However, from category 2--5 the magnitude of SST cooling decreases. This result confirms model predictions indicating a prominent role for oceanic feedback controlling tropical cyclone intensity. Thus, only storms that develop in regions containing deep mixed layer and thermocline can achieve high intensity, and entrainment cooling is weaker for these storms. The SST-intensity response in observations was compared to the GFDL Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM) for the periods 2005 and 2006--2009. The GHM was modified in 2006 to include a

  13. A 400-year record of black carbon flux in the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea and its implication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xu, Liqiang; Sun, Liguang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Yuhong; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yi; Luo, Yuhan; Huang, Jing

    2011-10-01

    We reconstructed the first long-term (∼ 400 years) records of black carbon (BC) deposition flux from three ornithogenic sediment profiles, which were collected from three remote, isolated islets of the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea. The significant correlations between black carbon, organic matter and excess (210)Pb suggested that black carbon was mainly derived from atmospheric deposition, and further enriched by plant-derived organic matter in sediments. During the past 400 years, the BC flux remained relatively low before the onset of 20th century; it started to increase from approximately 1900 AD, and peaked around the 1970s. In the recent 30 years, the BC flux seemed to display decreasing trend, very likely due to the change of energy structure and development of pollution control techniques. In comparison with marginal sea regions that are greatly impacted by anthropogenic activities, these pristine Xisha islands were not significantly influenced by black carbon of anthropogenic origin.

  14. Sensitivity of contemporary sea level trends in a global ocean state estimate to effects of geothermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Heimbach, Patrick; Ponte, Rui M.; Forget, Gaël

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal fluxes constitute a sizable fraction of the present-day Earth net radiative imbalance and corresponding ocean heat uptake. Model simulations of contemporary sea level that impose a geothermal flux boundary condition are becoming increasingly common. To quantify the impact of geothermal fluxes on model estimates of contemporary (1993-2010) sea level changes, two ocean circulation model experiments are compared. The two simulations are based on a global ocean state estimate, produced by the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) consortium, and differ only with regard to whether geothermal forcing is applied as a boundary condition. Geothermal forcing raises the global-mean sea level trend by 0.11 mm yr-1 in the perturbation experiment by suppressing a cooling trend present in the baseline solution below 2000 m. The imposed forcing also affects regional sea level trends. The Southern Ocean is particularly sensitive. In this region, anomalous heat redistribution due to geothermal fluxes results in steric height trends of up to ± 1 mm yr-1 in the perturbation experiment relative to the baseline simulation. Analysis of a passive tracer experiment suggests that the geothermal input itself is transported by horizontal diffusion, resulting in more thermal expansion over deeper ocean basins. Thermal expansion in the perturbation simulation gives rise to bottom pressure increase over shallower regions and decrease over deeper areas relative to the baseline run, consistent with mass redistribution expected for deep ocean warming. These results elucidate the influence of geothermal fluxes on sea level rise and global heat budgets in model simulations of contemporary ocean circulation and climate.

  15. Distribution of organochlorine pesticides in the northern South China Sea: implications for land outflow and air-sea exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Hairong; Li, Xiangdong; Xu, Weihai; Jones, Kevin C

    2007-06-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is surrounded by developing countries in Southeast Asia, where persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), are still used legally or illegally, and are of concern. Yet little is known about the distribution of OCPs in the water and atmosphere over SCS, as well as their air-sea equilibrium status and time trends. In this study, ship-board air samples and surface seawater collected in the northern SCS between September 6 and 22, 2005 were analyzed for selected OCPs. The measured OCP concentrations in the atmosphere over the northern SCS were influenced by proximity to source regions and air mass origins. The highest atmospheric OCP concentrations were found at sampling sites adjacent to continental South China. OCPs in surface seawater showed significant spatial variations, with the highest concentration observed in a water sample from off Vietnam. The coastal currents were suggested to play a key role in the delivery of waterborne OCPs in the northern SCS. Time trend, land outflow, and air-sea exchange of selected OCPs in the SCS were investigated, by comparison of this dataset with historical data.

  16. Heat flux: thermohydraulic investigation of solar air heaters used in agro-industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati Aidinlou, H.; Nikbakht, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    A new design of solar air heater simulator is presented to comply with the extensive applications inagro-industry. A wise installation of increased heat transfer surface area provided uniform and efficient heat diffusion over the duct. Nusselt number and friction factor have been investigated based on the constant roughness parameters such as relative roughness height (e/D), relative roughness pitch (P/e), angle of attack (α) and aspect ratio with Reynolds numbers ranging from 5000 to 19,000 in the fully developed region. Heat fluxes of 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 were provided. The enhancement in friction factor is observed to be 3.1656, 3.47 and 3.0856 times, and for the Nusselt number either, augmentation is calculated to be 1.4437, 1.4963 and 1.535 times, respectively, over the smooth duct for 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 heat fluxes. Thermohydraulic performance is plotted versus the Reynolds number based on the aforementioned roughness parameters at varying heat fluxes. The results show up that thermohydraulic performance is found to be maximum for 1000 Wm-2 at the average Reynolds number of 5151. Based on the results, we can verify that the introduced solar simulator can help analyzing and developing solar collector installations at the simulated heat fluxes.

  17. Separating the influence of projected changes in air temperature and wind on patterns of sea level change and ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.; Yang, Duo; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2015-08-01

    We present ocean model sensitivity experiments aimed at separating the influence of the projected changes in the "thermal" (near-surface air temperature) and "wind" (near-surface winds) forcing on the patterns of sea level and ocean heat content. In the North Atlantic, the distribution of sea level change is more due to the "thermal" forcing, whereas it is more due to the "wind" forcing in the North Pacific; in the Southern Ocean, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing have a comparable influence. In the ocean adjacent to Antarctica the "thermal" forcing leads to an inflow of warmer waters on the continental shelves, which is somewhat attenuated by the "wind" forcing. The structure of the vertically integrated heat uptake is set by different processes at low and high latitudes: at low latitudes it is dominated by the heat transport convergence, whereas at high latitudes it represents a small residual of changes in the surface flux and advection of heat. The structure of the horizontally integrated heat content tendency is set by the increase of downward heat flux by the mean circulation and comparable decrease of upward heat flux by the subgrid-scale processes; the upward eddy heat flux decreases and increases by almost the same magnitude in response to, respectively, the "thermal" and "wind" forcing. Regionally, the surface heat loss and deep convection weaken in the Labrador Sea, but intensify in the Greenland Sea in the region of sea ice retreat. The enhanced heat flux anomaly in the subpolar Atlantic is mainly caused by the "thermal" forcing.

  18. Diode laser-based air mass flux sensor for subsonic aeropropulsion inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael F.; Kessler, William J.; Allen, Mark G.

    1996-08-01

    An optical air mass flux sensor based on a compact, room-temperature diode laser in a fiber-coupled delivery system has been tested on a full-scale gas turbine engine. The sensor is based on simultaneous measurements of O 2 density and Doppler-shifted velocity along a line of sight across the inlet duct. Extensive tests spanning engine power levels from idle to full afterburner demonstrate accuracy and precision of the order of 1 2 of full scale in density, velocity, and mass flux. The precision-limited velocity at atmospheric pressure was as low as 40 cm s. Multiple data-reduction procedures are quantitatively compared to suggest optimal strategies for flight sensor packages.

  19. A semianalytical algorithm for quantitatively estimating sediment and atmospheric deposition flux from MODIS-derived sea ice albedo in the Bohai Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhantang; Hu, Shuibo; Wang, Guifen; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Yuezhong; Cao, Wenxi; Lu, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of particulate matter [PM) concentration in sea ice using remote sensing data is helpful for studies of sediment transport and atmospheric dust deposition flux. In this study, the difference between the measured dirty and estimated clean albedo of sea ice was calculated and a relationship between the albedo difference and PM concentration was found using field and laboratory measurements. A semianalytical algorithm for estimating PM concentration in sea ice was established. The algorithm was then applied to MODIS data over the Bohai Sea, China. Comparisons between MODIS derived and in situ measured PM concentration showed good agreement, with a mean absolute percentage difference of 31.2%. From 2005 to 2010, the MODIS-derived annual average PM concentration was approximately 0.025 g/L at the beginning of January. After a month of atmospheric dust deposition, it increased to 0.038 g/L. Atmospheric dust deposition flux was estimated to be 2.50 t/km2/month, similar to 2.20 t/km2/month reported in a previous study. The result was compared with on-site measurements at a nearby ground station. The ground station was close to industrial and residential areas, where larger dust depositions occurred than in the sea, but although there were discrepancies between the absolute magnitudes of the two data sets, they demonstrated similar trends.

  20. Subseafloor to Sea-Air Interface Characterization of Methane Dynamics in the northern US Atlantic Margin Seep Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Kluesner, J.; Danforth, W. W.; Casso, M.; Pohlman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the discovery of hundreds of northern US Atlantic margin (USAM) cold seeps in 2012 and 2013, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has undertaken intensive studies of the along-margin gas hydrate/free gas distribution, the plumbing systems sustaining seeps, seafloor gas emissions, and sea-air methane flux. Interest in the USAM is motivated both by climate change (i.e., documented ocean warming may contribute to seepage) and energy resource (i.e., the amount of gas-in-place in hydrates on the USAM is about the same as that in the northern Gulf of Mexico) issues. USGS-led field efforts have included an April 2015 study to acquire high-resolution multichannel seismic data, coincident split-beam water column methane plume imaging data, and real-time sea-air methane flux measurements between Wilmington and Norfolk Canyons and a September 2015 cruise (with OSU, UCLA, and Geomar) to collect piston cores, multicores, heat flow data, subbottom imagery, CTDs, and coincident water column imagery from Block Canyon to the Currituck Slide. In April 2015, we discovered methane seeps not included in the previously-published database, but found that some known seeps were not active. New high-resolution multi-channel seismic data revealed clear differences between the deep gas distribution in mid-Atlantic upper slope zones that are replete with (up to 240 sites) and lacking in seeps. Based on sea-air flux measurements, even shallow-water outer shelf (~125 m water depth) seeps and a 900-m-high methane plume originating on the mid-slope do not contribute methane to the atmosphere. Using thermistors placed on piston core outriggers, we will in September 2015 acquire thermal data to identify zones of high fluid advection and to constrain background geotherms in areas where heat flow has never been measured. During that same cruise, we will collect a series of piston cores across the no-hydrate/hydrate transition on the upper slope to constrain fluid and gas dynamics in this zone.

  1. Air-sea interaction and formation of the Asian summer monsoon onset vortex over the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoxiong; Guan, Yue; Liu, Yimin; Yan, Jinghui; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-01-01

    In spring over the southern Bay of Bengal (BOB), a vortex commonly develops, followed by the Asian summer monsoon onset. An analysis of relevant data and a case study reveals that the BOB monsoon onset vortex is formed as a consequence of air-sea interaction over BOB, which is modulated by Tibetan Plateau forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast over the South Asian area during the spring season. Tibetan Plateau forcing in spring generates a prevailing cold northwesterly over India in the lower troposphere. Strong surface sensible heating is then released, forming a prominent surface cyclone with a strong southwesterly along the coastal ocean in northwestern BOB. This southwesterly induces a local offshore current and upwelling, resulting in cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The southwesterly, together with the near-equatorial westerly, also results in a surface anticyclone with descending air over most of BOB and a cyclone with ascending air over the southern part of BOB. In the eastern part of central BOB, where sky is clear, surface wind is weak, and ocean mixed layer is shallow, intense solar radiation and low energy loss due to weak surface latent and sensible heat fluxes act onto a thin ocean layer, resulting in the development of a unique BOB warm pool in spring. Near the surface, water vapor is transferred from northern BOB and other regions to southeastern BOB, where surface sensible heating is relatively high. The atmospheric available potential energy is generated and converted to kinetic energy, thereby resulting in vortex formation. The vortex then intensifies and moves northward, where SST is higher and surface sensible heating is stronger. Meanwhile, the zonal-mean kinetic energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy in the area east of the vortex, and the vortex turns eastward. Eventually, southwesterly sweeps over eastern BOB and merges with the subtropical westerly, leading to the onset of the Asian summer monsoon.

  2. Comparison of CO2 Dynamics and Air-Sea Exchange in Contrasting Tropical Reef Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Shamberger, K. E.; Musielewicz, S. B.; Maenner-Jones, S.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiyear high temporal resolution CO2 records in three differing coral reef settings were obtained using buoys deployed in coastal waters of Oahu since June 2008. The buoys are located on the barrier reef of Kaneohe Bay and offshore of Honolulu, on the south shore of Oahu. Annualized CO2 air-sea fluxes at the three buoys ranged from +0.05 mol C/m2/yr offshore Honolulu on a fringing reef well mixed with the open ocean to -1.12 mol C/m2/yr on a barrier reef flat in Kaneohe Bay (positive values represent CO2 sinks from the atmosphere and negative values represent sources). These fluxes compare well to those estimated from previous studies in Kaneohe Bay as well as in other tropical reef environments. pCO2 measurements, made every 3 hours, at each location show strong temporal cycles on multiple time scales ranging from diel to seasonal at each buoy and an anticorrelation with pO2. These records, when combined with those of a prior buoy deployment in southern Kaneohe Bay and several synoptic studies, allow us to examine how the principal biological cycles of productivity/respiration and calcification/carbonate dissolution are influenced by changing water column properties, physical processes (e.g. residence time) and atmospheric conditions and how these processes ultimately impact the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere on hourly to interannual cycles. The data clearly demonstrate the need for high frequency pCO2 data to characterize completely and accurately short-term local changes in the CO2-carbonic acid system parameters and how these changes overprint the longer scale process of ocean acidification as a result of invasion of CO2 into the ocean due to emissions of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere. Since many coral reef ecosystems are still sources of CO2 to the atmosphere because of positive net ecosystem calcification, and in some instances net heterotrophy, such data are even more critical in terms of assessing future changes in the direction

  3. Influence of sea-air interface on upward laser beam propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian-hua; He, Yan; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Chen, Wei-biao

    2013-08-01

    The roughness of sea surface affects the optical property of the exiting upward laser, which constrains the application of the LIDAR and Laser Communication in ocean. The paper designs one pool test to study the influence of sea-air interfaces and develops a corresponding geometric optical model. It analyzes the optical property of the upward laser through the sea-air interface systematic. Results show that the roughness of wavy sea surface will affect beam spreading, pointing and scintillation when transmitting through the boundary. Further, experiment results in one water tank with man-made wave show that the incident angle and divergence angle are very important to the upward laser on the real-time and statistics change. Selecting one appropriate incident angle and divergence angle will get one stabilized performance, which is useful to the laser practical application on the marine areas.

  4. Heat flux measurements in stagnation point methane/air flames with thermographic phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed; Staude, Susanne; Bergmann, Ulf; Atakan, Burak

    2010-10-01

    Light-induced phosphorescence from thermographic phosphors was used to study the wall temperatures and heat fluxes from nearly one-dimensional flat premixed flames. The investigated flames were stoichiometric, lean and rich laminar methane/air flames with equivalence ratios of φ = 1, φ = 0.75 and φ = 1.25 at ambient pressure. The flames were burning in a stagnation point arrangement against a water-cooled plate. The central part of this plate was an alumina ceramic plate coated from both sides with chromium-doped alumina (ruby) and excited with a Nd:YAG laser or a green light-emitting diode (LED) array to measure the wall temperature from both sides and thus the heat flux rate from the flame. The outlet velocity of the gases was varied from 0.1 to 1.2 m/s. The burner to plate distance (H) ranged from 0.5 to 2 times the burner exit diameter ( d = 30 mm). The measured heat flux rates indicate the change of the flame stabilization mechanism from a burner stabilized to a stagnation plate stabilized flame. The results were compared to modeling results of a one-dimensional stagnation point flow, with a detailed reaction mechanism. In order to prove the model, gas phase temperatures were measured by OH-LIF for a stoichiometric stagnation point flame. It turns out that the flame stabilization mechanism and with it the heat fluxes change from low to high mass fluxes. This geometry may be well suited for further studies of the elementary flame wall interaction.

  5. Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights Atsushi Tsuda Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo In the western Pacific (WESTPAC) region, dust originating from Asian and Australian arid regions to the North and South Pacific, biomass burning emissions from the Southeast Asia to sub-tropical Pacific, and other anthropogenic substances are transported regionally and globally to affect cloud and rainfall patterns, air quality, and radiative budgets downwind. Deposition of these compounds into the Asian marginal seas and onto the Pacific Ocean influence surface primary productivity and species composition. In the WESTPAC region, subarctic, subtropical oceans and marginal seas are located relatively narrow latitudinal range and these areas are influenced by the dust and anthropogenic inputs. Moreover, anthropogenic emission areas are located between the arid region and the oceans. The W-PASS (Western Pacific Air-Sea interaction Study) project has been funded for 5 years as a part of SOLAS-Japan activity in the summer of 2006. We aim to resolve air-sea interaction through field observation studies mainly using research vessels and island observatories over the western Pacific. We have carried out 5 cruises to the western North Pacific focusing on air-sea interactions. Also, an intensive marine atmospheric observation including direct atmospheric deposition measurement was accomplished by a dozen W-PASS research groups at the NIES Atmospheric and Aerosol Monitoring Station of Cape Hedo in the northernmost tip of the Okinawa main Island facing the East China Sea in the spring 2008. A few weak Kosa (dust) events, anthropogenic air outflows, typical local air and occupation of marine background air were identified during the campaign period. The W-PASS has four research groups mainly focusing on VOC emissions, air-sea gas exchange processes, biogeochemical responses to dust depositions and its modeling. We also

  6. Decadal trends in air-sea CO2 exchange in the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2016-05-01

    Highly productive Antarctic shelf systems, like the Ross Sea, play important roles in regional carbon budgets, but the drivers of local variations are poorly quantified. We assess the variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle using a regional physical-biogeochemical model. Regionally, total partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increases are largely controlled by the biological pump and broadly similar to those in the offshore Southern Ocean. However, this masks substantial local variability within the Ross Sea, where interannual fluctuations in total pCO2 are driven by the biological pump and alkalinity, whereas those for anthropogenic pCO2 are related to physical processes. Overall, the high degree of spatial variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle causes extremes in aragonite saturation that can be as large as long-term trends. Therefore, Antarctic shelf polynya systems like the Ross Sea will be strongly affected by local processes in addition to larger-scale phenomena.

  7. Thermocline mixing and vertical oxygen fluxes in the stratified central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, L.; Dengler, M.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Linke, P.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2015-07-01

    In recent decades, the central North Sea has been experiencing a general trend of decreasing dissolved oxygen (O2) levels during summer. To understand the potential causes driving lower O2, we investigated summertime turbulence and O2 dynamics in the thermocline and bottom boundary layer (BBL). The study focuses on coupling biogeochemical processes with physical transport processes to identify key drivers of the O2 and organic carbon turnover within the BBL. Combining our flux observations with an analytical process-oriented approach, we resolve the key drivers that ultimately determine the BBL O2 levels. We report substantial tidally-driven turbulent O2 fluxes from the thermocline into the otherwise isolated bottom water. This contribution to the local bottom water O2 and carbon budgets has been largely overlooked and might be a central factor maintaining relatively high O2 levels in the bottom water throughout the stratification period. With the current climate warming projections, we propose that higher water temperature and reduced turbulence could favour migrating algal species that could out-compete other species for light and nutrients, and shift the oxygen production zone higher up within the thermocline while maintaining similar organic carbon export to the bottom water. Due to the substantially lower turbulence levels in the central region of the thermocline as compared to the higher turbulence observed at the thermocline-BBL interface, such a shift in the production layer could lead to further isolation of the bottom water and promote the seasonal occurrence of lower O2 concentrations.

  8. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  9. Climatology and Real-Data Simulations of Snow Bands over the English Channel and Irish Sea during Cold-Air Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Vaughan, G.; Schultz, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    During the winters of 2009—2010 and 2010—2011, anti-cyclonic blocking over the north Atlantic led to cold, dry air being advected over the UK from the north and east, generating widespread snow depths not seen since the early 1980s. The societal and economical impacts of this snow were severe and diverse, including those on transport, industry, commerce, emergency services, and retail. The most distinctive precipitation features during these winters formed over the English Channel and Irish Sea, where convection frequently organised into bands, as diagnosed from Met Office NIMROD precipitation radar images, forming along the major axis of each body of water (hereafter, sea) when the boundary-layer flow was roughly parallel to each of those axes (hereafter, along-sea). In this study, we address the atmospheric conditions, diagnosed from soundings from suitable locations, at times when bands were observed and at times that they were not, during the cold-air outbreaks in these winters. We find that, for both seas, a band was present the majority of times that the 850-hPa flow was along-sea. We subsequently find that, of these times of along-sea flow, for both seas, 850-hPa wind speed and surface-to-850-hPa temperature difference were significantly greater when bands were present than when they were not. Real-data simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are then presented for a typical band over each sea and the model is found to be accurate in reproducing the structures observed on radar. Output from control runs for each band is compared to that in which topography, surface heat fluxes, and land-sea borders are each removed in turn in order to investigate how the low-level flow evolves to generate the observed bands.

  10. Coupled Air-Sea Observations and Modeling for Better Understanding Tropical Cyclone Prediction and Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    A systematic observational and modeling study is conducted to better understand the physical processes controlling air-sea interaction and their impact on tropical cyclone (TC) prediction and predictability using a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system developed at the University of Miami and observations from field campaigns. We have developed a unified air-sea interface module that couples multiple atmosphere, wave, and ocean models using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). It is a physically based and computationally efficient coupling system that is flexible to use in a multi-model system and portable for transition to the next generation research and operational coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-land models. This standardized coupling framework allows researchers to develop and test air-sea coupling parameterizations and coupled data assimilation, and to better facilitate research-to-operation activities. It also allows for ensemble forecasts that can be used for coupled atmosphere-ocean data assimilation and assessment of uncertainties in coupled model predictions. The coupled modeling system has been evaluated using the coupled air-sea observations (e.g., GPS dropsondes and AXBTs, ocean drifters and floats) collected in recent field campaigns in the Gulf of Mexico and TCs in the Atlantic and Pacific basins. This talk will provide 1) an overview of the unified air-sea interface model, 2) fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model predictions of TCs and evaluation with coupled air-sea observations, and 3) results from high-resolution (1.3 km grid resolution) ensemble experiments using a stochastic kinetic energy backscatter (SKEB) perturbation method to assess the predictability and uncertainty in TC predictions.

  11. Balloons and Bottles: Activities on Air-Sea Heat Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphree, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to demonstrate how heating and cooling an air mass affects its temperature, volume, density, and pressure. Illustrates how thermal energy can cause atmospheric motion such as expansion, contraction, and winds. (Author/WRM)

  12. Controls, budgets and variability of riverine sediment fluxes to the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadaoui, Mahrez; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Bourrin, François; Raimbault, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigates the spatio-temporal variability of riverine sediment fluxes to the Gulf of Lions, one of the most extensive shelf regions in the Mediterranean Sea. Small coastal rivers compete here with the Rhone River, nowadays the largest Mediterranean river in terms of water discharge. Our scientific objectives were to investigate the major controls of riverine sediment yields (SY) in this area and to quantify the role of the small coastal rivers, largely ignored in previous studies, in the total sediment budgets. Another objective concerned the source identification of the Rhone sediments with regard to the major tributary contributions, and to test whether the sediment fluxes are in equilibrium in the basin. For the calculation of representative long-term fluxes, we used a Simplified Rating Curve Approach (SiRCA) which could be validated by high resolution monitoring and existing literature data. An overall of 13 drainage basins could be distinguished, covering about 86% of the study area (6 coastal rivers, the Rhone River, and 6 of its tributaries). Representative SY range from 19 to 151 t km-2 yr-1 in the investigated drainage basins. Despite their smaller basin areas and more torrential discharge regimes, SY of the coastal rivers were generally lower compared to SY of the Rhone River and its tributaries. Confrontation with the lithological, morphological and hydroclimatic basin characteristics indicate that lithology exerts the dominant control on SY in the study region. In particular, the existence of erodible sedimentary rocks in the headwater regions yields high SY. Peak values of 135 and 151 t km-2 yr-1 were observed for the Isere and Durance tributaries of the Rhone River, where badlands exist. The coastal rivers contribute on average only to slightly more than 5% of the long-term sediment inputs to the Gulf of Lions. During individual years however, their contribution can strongly increase (up to 27% in 2011). Their contribution is

  13. Connections Between the Spring Breakup of the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, Stationary Waves, and Air-sea Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke David; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Hurwitz, Margaret H.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust connection between the drag on surface-layer winds and the stratospheric circulation is demonstrated in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). Specifically, an updated parameterization of roughness at the air-sea interface, in which surface roughness is increased for moderate wind speeds (4ms to 20ms), leads to a decrease in model biases in Southern Hemispheric ozone, polar cap temperature, stationary wave heat flux, and springtime vortex breakup. A dynamical mechanism is proposed whereby increased surface roughness leads to improved stationary waves. Increased surface roughness leads to anomalous eddy momentum flux convergence primarily in the Indian Ocean sector (where eddies are strongest climatologically) in September and October. The localization of the eddy momentum flux convergence anomaly in the Indian Ocean sector leads to a zonally asymmetric reduction in zonal wind and, by geostrophy, to a wavenumber-1 stationary wave pattern. This tropospheric stationary wave pattern leads to enhanced upwards wave activity entering the stratosphere. The net effect is an improved Southern Hemisphere vortex: the vortex breaks up earlier in spring (i.e., the spring late-breakup bias is partially ameliorated) yet is no weaker in mid-winter. More than half of the stratospheric biases appear to be related to the surface wind speed biases. As many other chemistry climate models use a similar scheme for their surface layer momentum exchange and have similar biases in the stratosphere, we expect that results from GEOSCCM may be relevant for other climate models.

  14. Climate modulated erosion and sediment flux control offshore crustal structure at South China Sea continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, P. D.; Brune, S.; Quinteros, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rifted continental lithosphere subsides as a consequence of combined crustal thinning and mantle lithosphere cooling yet basins on some continental margins experience anomalous subsidence events that postdate active extension. Deep basins on the northern margin of the South China Sea, notably the Baiyun Sag, show basement subsidence accelerating after ~21 Ma, postdating extension by several million years. Similar subsidence events are seen after 5 Ma in the Song Hong Basin and after 11 Ma in the Qiongdongnan Basin. We combine geophysical observations and numerical forward modeling to show that loading of the offshore basins by increased sediment flux caused by faster onshore erosion following Early Miocene monsoon intensification is a viable trigger for ductile flow after the cessation of active extension. Loading works in conjunction with onshore uplift to drive flow of the lower crust away from the rift axis. As well as sediment supply rates distribution patterns and drainage capture can be significant in controlling crustal flow and thinning. This illustrates that offshore basin dynamics at continental margins with weak crust can be controlled by onshore surface processes in a newly recognized form of climate-tectonic coupling.

  15. Surface-air mercury fluxes across Western North America: A synthesis of spatial trends and controlling variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckley, Chris S.; Tate, Michael T.; Lin, Che-Jen; Gustin, Mae S.; Dent, Stephen; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Lutz, Michelle A; Wickland, Kimberly; Wang, Bronwen; Gray, John E.; Edwards, Grant; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) emission and deposition can occur to and from soils, and are an important component of the global atmospheric Hg budget. This paper focuses on synthesizing existing surface-air Hg flux data collected throughout the Western North American region and is part of a series of geographically focused Hg synthesis projects. A database of existing Hg flux data collected using the dynamic flux chamber (DFC) approach from almost a thousand locations was created for the Western North America region. Statistical analysis was performed on the data to identify the important variables controlling Hg fluxes and to allow spatiotemporal scaling. The results indicated that most of the variability in soil-air Hg fluxes could be explained by variations in soil-Hg concentrations, solar radiation, and soil moisture. This analysis also identified that variations in DFC methodological approaches were detectable among the field studies, with the chamber material and sampling flushing flow rate influencing the magnitude of calculated emissions. The spatiotemporal scaling of soil-air Hg fluxes identified that the largest emissions occurred from irrigated agricultural landscapes in California. Vegetation was shown to have a large impact on surface-air Hg fluxes due to both a reduction in solar radiation reaching the soil as well as from direct uptake of Hg in foliage. Despite high soil Hg emissions from some forested and other heavily vegetated regions, the net ecosystem flux (soil flux + vegetation uptake) was low. Conversely, sparsely vegetated regions showed larger net ecosystem emissions, which were similar in magnitude to atmospheric Hg deposition (except for the Mediterranean California region where soil emissions were higher). The net ecosystem flux results highlight the important role of landscape characteristics in effecting the balance between Hg sequestration and (re-)emission to the atmosphere.

  16. On the Potential Impact of Daytime Surface Sensible Heat Flux on the Dissipation of Martian Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Arritt, R. W.; Tillman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Martian daytime soil surface temperature is governed primarily by the net irradiance balance and surface soil heat flux. Thus the outbreak of a cold air mass generates increased sensible heat flux that is conducive to daytime dissipation of the cold air mass thermal characteristics. Conceptual and scaling evaluations of this dissipation are provided while comparison is made with similar situations on Earth. It is estimated that sensible heat flux contribution to the dissipation of the original thermal structure of the cold air could be three times larger than the corresponding situation on Earth. Illustrative numerical model simulations provide scaling of the potential impact on the dissipation of cold air masses for various combinations of background wind speed and latitudes.

  17. Experimental sea slicks: Their practical applications and utilization for basic studies of air-sea interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Garrett, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Practical applications of organic surface films added to the sea surface date back to ancient times. Aristotle, Plutarch, and Pliny the Elder describe the seaman's practice of calming waves in a storm by pouring oil onto the sea [Scott, 1977]. It was also noted that divers released oil beneath the water surface so that it could rise and spread over the sea surface, thereby suppressing the irritating flicker associated with the passage of light through a rippled surface. From a scientific point of view, Benjamin Franklin was the first to perform experiments with oils on natural waters. His experiment with a `teaspoonful of oil' on Clapham pond in 1773 inspired many investigators to consider sea surface phenomena or to conduct experiments with oil films. This early research has been reviewed by Giles [1969], Giles and Forrester [1970], and Scott [1977]. Franklin's studies with experimental slicks can be regarded as the beginning of surface film chemistry. His speculations on the wave damping influence of oil induced him to perform the first qualitative experiment with artificial sea slicks at Portsmouth (England) in October of 1773. Although the sea was calmed and very few white caps appeared in the oil-covered area, the swell continued through the oiled area to Franklin's great disappointment.

  18. Large particle flux of 239+240Pu on the continental margin of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Aono, Tatsuo

    2002-03-15

    Settling particles were collected from three locations in the East China Sea continental margin and analyzed for 239+240Pu. Two types of sediment traps were used, cylindrical traps and conical time-series traps. Surface sediment samples collected from five locations were also analyzed for 239+240Pu. Data from cylindrical traps showed there was a clear tendency for total mass fluxes to increase with depth at all three stations, and there was an especially large increase near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in settling particles increased with depth from 1.76 mBq/g at 97-m depth to 3.0 mBq/g at 120-m depth and ranged from approximately 3 to 4 mBq/g at depths greater than 120 m. 239+240Pu concentrations collected in the near-bottom traps were approximately two times higher than those in the underlying surface sediments. Like total mass fluxes there was a clear tendency for 239+240Pu fluxes to increase with depth at every station, and the highest 239+240Pu fluxes were observed near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in the time-series traps had little variation throughout the sampling period, though the total mass fluxes showed a large variation. A high variability of 239+240Pu fluxes occurred in very short period of time (1/2 day). The large fluxes of 239+240Pu might be attributed to episodic lateral transport of particles that flow down the continental slope with the nepheloid layer which was considered to be significant for 239+240Pu transport on the continental slope in the East China Sea.

  19. A multi-model ensemble view of winter heat flux dynamics and the dipole mode in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Giovanni; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Cabos, William

    2016-04-01

    Changes in surface heat fluxes affect several climate processes controlling the Mediterranean climate. These include the winter formation of deep waters, which is the primary driver of the Mediterranean Sea overturning circulation. Previous studies that characterize the spatial and temporal variability of surface heat flux anomalies over the basin reveal the existence of two statistically dominant patterns of variability: a monopole of uniform sign and an east-west dipole of opposite signs. In this work, we use the 12 regional climate model ensemble from the EU-FP6 ENSEMBLES project to diagnose the large-scale atmospheric processes that control the variability of heat fluxes over the Mediterranean Sea from interannual to decadal timescales (here defined as timescales > 6 year). Our findings suggest that while the monopole structure captures variability in the winter-to-winter domain-average net heat flux, the dipole pattern tracks changes in the Mediterranean climate that are connected to the East Atlantic/Western Russia (EA/WR) atmospheric teleconnection pattern. Furthermore, while the monopole exhibits significant differences in the spatial structure across the multi-model ensemble, the dipole pattern is very robust and more clearly identifiable in the anomaly maps of individual years. A heat budget analysis of the dipole pattern reveals that changes in winds associated with the EA/WR pattern exert dominant control through both a direct effect on the latent heat flux (i.e., wind speed) and an indirect effect through specific humidity (e.g., wind advection). A simple reconstruction of the heat flux variability over the deep-water formation regions of the Gulf of Lion and the Aegean Sea reveals that the combination of the monopole and dipole time series explains over 90 % of the heat flux variance in these regions. Given the important role that surface heat flux anomalies play in deep-water formation and the regional climate, improving our knowledge on the dynamics

  20. Spatial and seasonal variability of the air-sea equilibration timescale of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel; Ito, Takamitsu; Takano, Yohei; Hsu, Wei-Ching

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere tends to bring near-surface waters toward equilibrium by reducing the partial pressure gradient across the air-water interface. However, the equilibration process is not instantaneous; in general there is a lag between forcing and response. The timescale of air-sea equilibration depends on several factors involving the depth of the mixed layer, temperature, salinity, wind speed, and carbonate chemistry. In this work, we use a suite of observational datasets to generate climatological and seasonal composite maps of the air-sea equilibration timescale. The relaxation timescale exhibits considerable spatial and seasonal variations, which are largely set by changes in mixed layer depth and wind speed. The net effect is dominated by the mixed layer depth; the gas exchange velocity and carbonate chemistry parameters only provide partial compensation. Broadly speaking, the adjustment timescale tends to increase with latitude. We compare the observationally-derived air-sea gas exchange timescale with a model-derived surface residence time and a data-derived horizontal transport timescale, which allows us to define two non-dimensional metrics of gas exchange efficiency. These parameters highlight the Southern Ocean, equatorial Pacific, and North Atlantic as regions of inefficient air-sea equilibration where carbon anomalies are likely to form and persist. The efficiency parameters presented here can serve as simple tools for understanding regional air-sea disequilibrium in both observations and models. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License together with an author copyright. This license does not conflict with the regulations of the Crown Copyright.

  1. Impacts of South East Biomass Burning on local air quality in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai-man Yeung, Irene; Fat Lam, Yun; Eniolu Morakinyo, Tobi

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of carbon monoxide and particulate matter, which is not only contribute to the local air pollution, but also regional air pollution. This study investigated the impacts of biomass burning emissions from Southeast Asia (SEA) as well as its contribution to the local air pollution in East and South China Sea, including Hong Kong and Taiwan. Three years (2012 - 2014) of the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian-Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) with particles dispersion analyses using NCEP (Final) Operational Global Analysis data (FNL) data (2012 - 2014) were analyzed to track down all possible long-range transport from SEA with a sinking motion that worsened the surface air quality (tropospheric downwash from the free troposphere). The major sources of SEA biomass burning emissions were first identified using high fire emissions from the Global Fire Emission Database (GFED), followed by the HYSPLIT backward trajectory dispersion modeling analysis. The analyses were compared with the local observation data from Tai Mo Shan (1,000 msl) and Tap Mun (60 msl) in Hong Kong, as well as the data from Lulin mountain (2,600 msl) in Taiwan, to assess the possible impacts of SEA biomass burning on local air quality. The correlation between long-range transport events from the particles dispersion results and locally observed air quality data indicated that the background concentrations of ozone, PM2.5 and PM10 at the surface stations were enhanced by 12 μg/m3, 4 μg/m3 and 7 μg/m3, respectively, while the long-range transport contributed to enhancements of 4 μg/m3, 4 μg/m3 and 8 μg/m3 for O3, PM2.5 and PM10, respectively at the lower free atmosphere.

  2. Laboratory modeling of air-sea interaction under severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vasiliy, Kazakov; Nicolay, Bogatov; Olga, Ermakova; Mikhail, Salin; Daniil, Sergeev; Maxim, Vdovin

    2010-05-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested by Emanuel (1995) on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field (Powell, Vickery, Reinhold, 2003, French et al, 2007, Black, et al, 2007) and laboratory (Donelan et al, 2004) experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed by Kudryavtsev & Makin (2007) and Kukulka,Hara Belcher (2007), the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange (Andreas, 2004; Makin, 2005; Kudryavtsev, 2006). The main objective of this work is investigation of factors determining momentum exchange under high wind speeds basing on the laboratory experiment in a well controlled environment. The experiments were carried out in the Thermo-Stratified WInd-WAve Tank (TSWIWAT) of the Institute of Applied Physics. The parameters of the facility are as follows: airflow 0 - 25 m/s (equivalent 10-m neutral wind speed U10 up to 60 m/s), dimensions 10m x 0.4m x 0.7 m, temperature stratification of the water layer. Simultaneous measurements of the airflow velocity profiles and wind waves were carried out in the wide range of wind velocities. Airflow

  3. BOREAS AFM-2 King Air 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for a large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns. The data were collected by the University of Wyoming King Air in 1994 BOREAS IFCs 1-3. Most of these data were collected at 60-70 m above ground level, but a significant number of passes were also flown at various levels in the planetary boundary layer, up to about the inversion height. This documentation concerns only the data from the straight and level passes that are presented as original (over the NSA and SSA) and moving window values (over the Transect). Another archive of King Air data is also available, containing data from all the soundings flown by the King Air 1994 IFCs 1-3. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. Occurrence and air-sea exchange of phthalates in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Lohmann, Rainer; Caba, Armando; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Air and seawater samples were taken simultaneously to investigate the distribution and air-sea gas exchange of phthalates in the Arctic onboard the German Research Ship FS Polarstern. Samples were collected on expeditions ARK XX1&2 from the North Sea to the high Arctic (60 degrees N-85 degrees N) in the summer of 2004. The concentration of sigma6 phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-i-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)) ranged from 30 to 5030 pg L(-1) in the aqueous dissolved phase and from 1110 to 3090 pg m(-3) in the atmospheric gas phase. A decreasing latitudinal trend was present in the seawater and to a lesser degree in the atmosphere from the Norwegian coast to the high Arctic. Overall, deposition dominated the air-sea gas exchange for DEHP, while volatilization from seawater took place in the near-coast environment. The estimated net gas deposition of DEHP was 5, 30, and 190 t year(-1) for the Norwegian Sea, the Greenland Sea, and the Arctic, respectively. This suggests that atmospheric transport and deposition of phthalates is a significant process for their occurrence in the remote Atlantic and Arctic Ocean.

  5. Preliminary studies on methane flux from the ornithogenic soils on Xi-sha atoll, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ren-bin; Sun, Li-guang; Zhao, San-ping; Xie, Zhou-qing; Liu, Xiao-dong; Yin, Xue-bin

    2005-01-01

    Methane flux from the ornithogenic soils was preliminarily measured by closed chamber method on Xi-sha atoll, South China Sea during March 10 to April 11, 2003 for the first time. The CH4 flux ranged from -4226.7 microg/(m2 x h) to 226.3 microg/(m2 x h) at the observation sites on Dong Island. High atmospheric CH4 consumption was observed from the ornithogenic soils on sunny days. CH4 uptake rates showed the highest value after the midday and they had a strong positive correlation with soil temperatures. Under the same weather conditions, the CH4 fluxes were also observed from the intact and disturbed soils on Yongxing Island. Results showed that the intact soils with natural vegetation also showed high atmospheric CH4 consumption and the average flux was -141.8 microg/(m2 x h). However, disturbed soils via anthropogenic reclamation showed CH4 emissions and the average flux was 441.7 microg/(m2 x h). Therefore land use changes may have an important effect on the CH4 fluxes from the tropical ornithogenic soils. In addition, different observation sites show a high spatial variation in CH4 fluxes. The wetland in salt marsh showed the CH4 emission on Dong Island, and the dry soil sites all showed high atmospheric CH4 consumption, suggesting that CH4 fluxes were predominantly controlled by soil water regime. The effects of soil chemical properties on CH4 fluxes were also analyzed and discussed in this paper.

  6. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  7. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions,...

  8. Impact of autumn SST in the Japan Sea on winter rainfall and air temperature in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Sun, Jilin; Wu, Dexing; Yi, Li; Wei, Dongni

    2015-08-01

    We studied the impact of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) in the Japan Sea and the sea area east of Japan on the winter rainfall and air temperature in Northeast (NE) China using the singular value decomposition (SVD) and empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The monthly-mean rainfall data observed at 160 stations in China, monthly-mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research and monthly-mean air temperature from the NCEP reanalysis during 1960-2011 were used. Correlation analysis indicates that the SSTAs in the Japan Sea in September may last for three or four months and are an important index for forecasting the winter rainfall and air temperature in NE China. Positive SSTAs in the central Japan Sea and in the sea area east of Tokyo correspond to positive rainfall anomaly and negative air temperature anomaly in NE China. With the rise of SST in the Japan Sea, a weak cyclone appears over the Japan Sea. The northeasterly wind transports water vapor from the Okhotsk to NE China, resulting in more rainfall and lower air temperature. Negative SSTA years are accompanied by warmer air temperature and less snow in NE China. The 1000 hPa geopotential height anomaly and wind anomaly fields are simulated by IAP-9L model, which supports the analysis results.

  9. Air-sea exchange of dimethylsulfide in the Southern Ocean: Measurements from SO GasEx compared to temperate and tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Archer, S. D.; Huebert, B. J.

    2011-04-01

    In the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx), we measured an atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentration of 118 ± 54 pptv (1σ), a DMS sea-to-air flux of 2.9 ± 2.1 μmol m-2 d-1 by eddy covariance, and a seawater DMS concentration of 1.6 ± 0.7 nM. Dividing flux by the concurrent air-sea concentration difference yields the transfer velocity of DMS (kDMS). The kDMS in the Southern Ocean was significantly lower than previous measurements in the equatorial east Pacific, Sargasso Sea, northeast Atlantic, and southeast Pacific. Normalizing kDMS for the temperature dependence in waterside diffusivity and solubility results in better agreement among various field studies and suggests that the low kDMS in the Southern Ocean is primarily due to colder temperatures. The higher solubility of DMS at a lower temperature results in greater airside control and less transfer of the gas by bubbles formed from breaking waves. The final normalized DMS transfer velocity is similar to k of less soluble gases such as carbon dioxide in low-to-moderate winds; in high winds, DMS transfer velocity is significantly lower because of the reduced bubble-mediated transfer.

  10. Calculation of nonequilibrium hydrogen-air reactions with implicit flux vector splitting method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Ho; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods, fully- and loosely-coupled, are developed to incorporate nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry into the fluid dynamic implicit flux vector splitting code (F3D). The new code (F3D/Chem) is validated against other existing codes for two cases: nozzle expansion, and shock-induced combustion around a blunt body. The shock-induced combustion case is compared also with an experimental data. The reaction rate constants are varied in an effort to reproduce the experimental data. The fully- and loosely-coupled methods are found to yield comparable results, but the computation time is shorter using the loosely-coupled method. The present method is found to reproduce results obtained using different existing codes. The experimental data was not reproduced with any selected rate coefficients set.

  11. Amelioration of the reactive nitrogen flux calculation by a day/night separation in weekly mean air concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Ono, Keisuke; Tokida, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2013-11-01

    The low time resolution of air concentration data of atmospheric deposition in regional monitoring networks makes it difficult to estimate fluxes between the land and the atmosphere. The present study was an evaluation of the effects of day/night separation for a low time resolution of air concentration measurements (i.e., weekly mean) for the estimation of reactive nitrogen fluxes. The target chemical species included reactive nitrogen primarily ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid gas (HNO3) and secondarily nitrous acid gas, particulate ammonium, and particulate nitrate in addition to sulfur dioxide (SO2) as a reference. Monitoring was conducted for one year at a single-crop rice paddy field in central Japan. The study period was divided into the cropping and fallow seasons, which were characterized by rice plants or a drained bare soil surface, respectively. The filter-pack method was applied to measure the weekly mean air concentrations with day/night separation for the target species at two heights (6 and 2 m above the ground surface). Both an inferential and a gradient method were applied to calculate the deposition and exchange fluxes, respectively. The day/night separation in a weekly sampling protocol, on average, reduced the underestimation of HNO3 fluxes for the inferential method by 15.2% ± 6.8% and 8.2% ± 6.1% in the cropping and fallow seasons, respectively, and reduced the overestimation of NH3 fluxes for the gradient method by 121% ± 128% in the cropping season. The fluxes calculated using the inferential method agreed relatively well with those calculated using the gradient method for HNO3 and SO2. The use of single-height measurements for air concentrations with day/night separation and flux calculations using the inferential method are recommended as an appropriate way to enhance the quality in calculated fluxes while simultaneously suppress the increase in labor cost.

  12. Scattering properties of a stratified air/snow/sea ice medium. Small slope approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusséaux, Richard; Afifi, Saddek; Dechambre, Monique

    2016-11-01

    The sea-ice thickness, a key parameter in Arctic studies, is derived from radar altimeter height measurements of the freeboard, taking into account not only snow load, but also the penetration depth of the electromagnetic waves inside the snow-this is the not generally the case. Within the framework of the small slope approximation method, we study in Ku-band (f = 13 GHz, λ = 2.31 cm in the air) the electromagnetic signature of an air/snow/sea ice rough layered medium. The snow is inhomogeneous and is represented as a stack of several layers with different relative permittivities. We show that the electromagnetic response is very sensitive to the isotropy factor of the air/snow interface and to the cross-correlation parameters of interfaces. xml:lang="fr"

  13. Particle Fluxes in the Marginal Seas of Antarctica: A 20-year Synthesis in Honor of Jack Dymond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, R. B.; Langone, L.

    2004-12-01

    One of Jack Dymond's long-standing scientific passions was the study of particles moving through the ocean water column. Jack's pioneering work in this area in the 1970's and generous mentoring of others throughout his career lead directly to the first authors involvement in sediment trap studies. Here we present a synthesis of 20 years of particle flux studies in coastal Antarctic (including the work of Collier and Dymond et al.) and highlight some of the important features and unresolved issues related to integrating particle trap interceptor data with other measures of production, transport, and deposition. The first sediment trap arrays were deployed on the Antarctic shelf in 1981 and 1982 in the Antarctic Peninsula. Simple instruments were also deployed in 1984 and 1986 in the Ross Sea. Since then, several nations (US, Italy, New Zealand) have recovered time series sediment trap data on moorings in both of these areas. This current synthesis makes use of data from approximately 22 sites, the majority of which are in the Ross Sea, and includes about 900 discrete samples of particles in vertical transit through the water column. We now have many complete time series that extend through the winter, allowing several important generalizations to be made. For example, annual particle-mediated organic C fluxes to below 200 meters in the Ross Sea average 4.4±3.3 g C m-2 yr-1. These values are significantly less than export fluxes calculated using short-term surface water mass balance approaches or Th isotope techniques yet are higher than seabed sediment accumulation rates. Intriguingly, seasonal seabed arrival rates of organic C estimated from in-situ summertime benthic respirometry studies yield C flux values similar in magnitude to those from sediment traps deployed at the same time, lending strong support to trap data. The cause of current disagreements between various methods of flux estimation may in fact not be solved until process studies are accomplished

  14. On the use of a coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model during an extreme cold air outbreak over the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchi, Antonio; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Falco, Pier Paolo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bergamasco, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Carniel, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    An intense cold air outbreak affected the northern Adriatic Sea during winter 2012, determining an exceptional persistence of northeasterly Bora wind over the basin, which lasted for about 3 weeks. The cold air coming from the Balkans produced icing in the Venice lagoon and very intense snowfall in the Apennines Mountains and even near the coasts. In order to understand the importance and role of air-sea interactions for the evolution of the atmospheric fields, simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model encompassing the whole period have been performed using sea surface temperature (SST) fields with an increasing level of complexity. Starting from a large-scale static sea temperature, the SST in the initial and boundary conditions has been progressively made more realistic. First, a more refined field, retrieved from a satellite radiometer was used; then, the same field was updated every 6 h. Next, the effect of including a simplified 1D ocean model reproducing the Oceanic Mixed Layer (OML) evolution has been tested. Finally, the potential improvements coming from a coupled description of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-waves interactions have been explored within the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. Results highlight that the energy exchange between air and sea does not significantly impact the atmospheric fields, in particular 10 m wind and 2 m temperature, also because of the geography of the basin and the predominance of synoptic-scale flow in intense events of Bora, in the northern Adriatic. However, when sensible and latent heat fluxes, which are dependent on atmospheric and oceanic variables, are analyzed, the more realistic representation of SST drastically improves the model performances.

  15. Air-sea interaction with SSM/I and altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A number of important developments in satellite remote sensing techniques have occurred recently which offer the possibility of studying over vast areas of the ocean the temporally evolving energy exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere. Commencing in spring of 1985, passive and active microwave sensors that can provide valuable data for scientific utilization will start to become operational on Department of Defense (DOD) missions. The passive microwave radiometer can be used to estimate surface wind speed, total air column humidity, and rain rate. The active radar, or altimeter, senses surface gravity wave height and surface wind speed.

  16. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea: causes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, Rune G.

    2016-08-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations in the sea-ice cover, which then cause massive changes in the ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Here we describe the mechanism driving surface temperatures and heat fluxes in the Barents Sea based primarily on analyzes of one global coupled climate model. It is found that the ocean drives the low-frequency changes in surface temperature, whereas the atmosphere compensates the oceanic transport anomalies. The seasonal dependence and the role of individual components of the ocean-atmosphere energy budget are analyzed in detail, showing that seasonally-varying climate mechanisms play an important role. Herein, sea ice is governing the seasonal response, by acting as a lid that opens and closes during warm and cold periods, respectively, thereby modulating the surface heat fluxes.

  17. A method for detecting rapid mass flux of small glaciers using local sea level variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Davis, James L.

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the global reservoir of small (or mountain) glaciers is presently experiencing an accelerated phase of net melting, perhaps linked to climatic warming. We argue that relative sea level and sea surface fingerprints local to such events provide a potentially powerful, integrated diagnostic for the mass imbalance. For example, we demonstrate, using an inference of glacier mass balance near Alaska over the last 50 years, that the present-day relative sea level fall at nearby sites can reach amplitudes that are ∼2 orders of magnitude greater than the ongoing eustatic sea level rise associated with the melting. The peak sea surface subsidence is a factor of ∼15 greater than the eustatic amplitude. We find that the predicted present-day sea surface change arising from the 50-year loading history is sensitive only to the ongoing rate of accelerated melting. In contrast, the present-day relative sea level fingerprint becomes increasingly sensitive to the ‘history’ of the recent loading when the viscosity of the asthenosphere adopted in the prediction is progressively reduced below 1020 Pa s. Specifically, the relative sea level fingerprint becomes more localized, and reaches higher amplitudes, close to the glacier system as viscous effects become active. Our results have application in efforts to constrain small glacier mass balance using tide gauge records of relative sea level change or satellite-derived constraints on sea surface (geoid) rates.

  18. Seasonal variations in concentrations, distributions, and air-soil exchange fluxes of dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yajun; Nie, Zhiqiang; He, Jie; Die, Qingqi; Fang, Yanyan; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yufei; Gao, Xingbao; Huang, Qifei

    2016-02-01

    Dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCB) concentrations in ambient air and soil in Shanghai, China, were measured to allow seasonal and spatial differences in the dl-PCB concentrations, profiles, distributions, fugacity fractions, and air-soil fluxes to be determined. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) DL-PCB concentrations in the air were higher in summer (mean 9.46 fg m(-3), range 1.32-26.3 fg m(-3)) than in winter (mean 4.57 fg m(-3), range 1.55-10.9 fg m(-3)). The DL-PCB concentrations in air were different in different areas, and the concentrations decreased in the order industrial areas > commercial and residential areas > suburban areas > rural area. The mean DL-PCB concentration in soil was 0.25 pg TEQ g(-1) dry weight (dw) and the range was 0.05-0.90 pg TEQ g(-1) dw. The highest DL-PCB concentration in soil was found in a sample from a commercial/residential area. The DL-PCB fluxes were negative (-216 pg m(-2) h(-1) in summer and -41.1 pg m(-2) h(-1) in winter), and the fugacity fractions were below 0.5, indicating that dl-PCBs in Shanghai are deposited from the air to the soil in all seasons. The net fluxes were higher in summer than in winter, and the deposition fluxes were higher in industrial areas than in other areas in both summer and winter.

  19. Turbulent Fluxes and Pollutant Mixing during Wintertime Air Pollution Episodes in Complex Terrain.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Heather A; Sriramasamudram, Jai K; Pardyjak, Eric R; Whiteman, C David

    2015-11-17

    Cold air pools (CAPs) are stagnant stable air masses that form in valleys and basins in the winter. Low wintertime insolation limits convective mixing, such that pollutant concentrations can build up within the CAP when pollutant sources are present. In the western United States, wintertime CAPs often persist for days or weeks. Atmospheric models do not adequately capture the strength and evolution of CAPs. This is in part due to the limited availability of data quantifying the local turbulence during the formation, maintenance, and destruction of persistent CAPs. This paper presents observational data to quantify the turbulent mixing during two CAP episodes in Utah's Salt Lake Valley during February of 2004. Particulate matter (PM) concentration data and turbulence measurements for CAP and non-CAP time periods indicate that two distinct types of mixing scenarios occur depending on whether the CAP is dry or cloudy. Where cloudy, CAPs have enhanced vertical mixing due to top-down convection from the cloud layer. A comparison between the heat and momentum fluxes during 5 days of a dry CAP episode in February to those of an equivalent 5 day time period in March with no CAP indicates that the average turbulent kinetic energy during the CAP was suppressed by approximately 80%.

  20. Air-sea interaction in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Steranka, J.; Holub, R. J.; Hansen, J.; Godshall, F. A.; Prabhakara, C.

    1972-01-01

    Charts of 3-month sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean were produced for the period 1949 to 1970. The anomalies along the United States and South American west coasts and in the eastern tropical Pacific appeared to be oscillating in phase during this period. Similarly, the satellite-derived cloudiness for each of four quadrants of the Pacific Ocean (130 deg E to 100 deg W, 30 deg N to 25 deg S) appeared to be oscillating in phase. In addition, a global tropical cloudiness oscillation from 30 deg N to 30 deg S was noted from 1965 to 1970, by using monthly satellite television nephanalyses. The SST anomalies were found to have a good degree of correlation both positive and negative with the following monthly geophysical parameters: (1) satellite-derived cloudiness, (2) strength of the North and South Pacific semipermanent anticyclones, (3) tropical Pacific island rainfall, and (4) Darwin surface pressure. Several strong direct local and crossequatorial relationships were noted. In particular, the high degree of correlation between the tropical island rainfall and the SST anomalies (r = +0.93) permitted the derivation of SST's for the tropical Pacific back to 1905. The close occurrence of cold tropical SST and North Pacific 700-mb positive height anomalies with central United States drought conditions was noted.

  1. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  2. High wind speed measurements of dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer by eddy correlation in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.; Slawksy, L.; Stacy, B.; Callaghan, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulphide (DMS) fluxes and gas transfer coefficients (kDMS) were measured by eddy correlation over the western North Atlantic Ocean during June/July 2011 aboard the R/V Knorr. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship's underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator and API-CIMS. The cruise included regions of high biological productivity, wind speeds from 0-18 m/sec and whitecap areas of 0-5%. Four stations were occupied during the cruise for periods of 24-36 hours. In general, the stations exhibited a linear relationship between kDMS and wind speed, although there were significant variations in the slope of this relationship. One of the stations showed kDMS increasing with wind speed to 10 m/sec and then levelling off at higher wind speeds. The data from this cruise suggest that gas transfer can vary substantially due to parameters other than wind speed, most likely sea state and surfactants.

  3. A method of exploration of the atmosphere of Titan. [hot air balloon heated by solar radiation or planetary thermal flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamont, J.

    1978-01-01

    A hot-air balloon, with the air heated by natural sources, is described. Buoyancy is accomplished by either solar heating or by utilizing the IR thermal flux of the planet to heat the gas in the balloon. Altitude control is provided by a valve which is opened and closed by a barometer. The balloon is made of an organic material which has to absorb radiant energy and to emit as little as possible.

  4. Intense air-sea exchange and heavy rainfall: impact of the northern Adriatic SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchi, P.; Davolio, S.

    2016-02-01

    Over the northern Adriatic basin, intense air-sea interactions are often associated with heavy precipitation over the mountainous areas surrounding the basin. In this study, a high-resolution mesoscale model is employed to simulate three severe weather events and to evaluate the effect of the sea surface temperature on the intensity and location of heavy rainfall. The sensitivity tests show that the impact of SST varies among the events and it mainly involves the modification of the PBL characteristics and thus the flow dynamics and its interaction with the orography.

  5. VARIATIONS OF THE MUON FLUX AT SEA LEVEL ASSOCIATED WITH INTERPLANETARY ICMEs AND COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Augusto, C. R. A.; Kopenkin, V.; Navia, C. E.; Tsui, K. H.; Shigueoka, H.; Fauth, A. C.; Kemp, E.; Manganote, E. J. T.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Miranda, P.; Ticona, R.; Velarde, A.

    2012-11-10

    We present the results of an ongoing survey on the association between the muon flux variation at ground level (3 m above sea level) registered by the Tupi telescopes (Niteri-Brazil, 22.{sup 0}9S, 43.{sup 0}2W, 3 m) and the Earth-directed transient disturbances in the interplanetary medium propagating from the Sun (such as coronal mass ejections (CME), and corotating interaction regions (CIRs)). Their location inside the South Atlantic Anomaly region enables the muon telescopes to achieve a low rigidity of response to primary and secondary charged particles. The present study is primarily based on experimental events obtained by the Tupi telescopes in the period from 2010 August to 2011 December. This time period corresponds to the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The Tupi events are studied in correlation with data obtained by space-borne detectors (SOHO, ACE, GOES). Identification of interplanetary structures and associated solar activity was based on the nomenclature and definitions given by the satellite observations, including an incomplete list of possible interplanetary shocks observed by the CELIAS/MTOF Proton Monitor on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Among 29 experimental events reported in the present analysis, there are 15 possibly associated with the CMEs and sheaths, and 3 events with the CIRs (forward or reverse shocks); the origin of the remaining 11 events has not been determined by the satellite detectors. We compare the observed time (delayed or anticipated) of the muon excess (positive or negative) signal on Earth (the Tupi telescopes) with the trigger time of the interplanetary disturbances registered by the satellites located at Lagrange point L1 (SOHO and ACE). The temporal correlation of the observed ground-based events with solar transient events detected by spacecraft suggests a real physical connection between them. We found that the majority of observed events detected by the Tupi experiment were delayed in

  6. Vertical turbulent iron flux sustains the Green Belt along the shelf break in the southeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yasuda, I.; Kuma, K.; Nishioka, J.

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of vertical turbulent iron flux on the summertime biological productivity in the Bering Sea Green Belt (GB), we conducted the concurrent observations of dissolved iron (D-Fe) and turbulence in the Bering Sea for the first time. We show that the GB can be sustained by iron supply from iron-rich, subsurface thick layer distributed along the southeastern shelf break where the GB is located, via strong turbulent vertical mixing. The flux ratio of D-Fe and nitrate was within the range of the N/Fe uptake ratio by GB phytoplankton, suggesting this flux of nutrients can sustain GB productivity. We also analyzed historical hydrographic data and suggest the thick subsurface layer along the GB is formed by the mixing of relatively warm water with some iron from the Aleutian Passes and iron-rich outer-shelf cold water in which the D-Fe derived from seafloor sediment is suspended due to strong vertical mixing.

  7. pCO2 distribution and CO2 flux on the inner continental shelf of the East China Sea during summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Baoxiao; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang; Yuan, Huamao; Li, Ning; Ma, Qingxia

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of pH, total alkalinity (TA), partial pressure of CO2 ( pCO2) and air-sea CO2 flux ( FCO2) were conducted for the inner continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) during August 2011. Variations in pCO2 distribution and FCO2 magnitude during the construction of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003-2009), and the potential effects of the TGD on the air-sea CO2 exchange were examined. Results showed that the ECS acts as an overall CO2 sink during summer, with pCO2 ranging from 107 to 585 μatm and an average FCO2 of -6.39 mmol/(m2 ·d). Low pCO2 (<350 μatm) levels were observed at the central shelf (28°-32°N, 123°-125.5°E) where most CO2-absorption occurred. High pCO2 (>420 μatm) levels were found in the Changjiang estuary and Hangzhou Bay which acted as the main CO2 source. A negative relationship between pCO2 and salinity ( R 2=0.722 0) in the estuary zone indicated the predominant effect of the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) on the seawater CO2 system, whereas a positive relationship ( R 2=0.744 8) in the offshore zone revealed the influence of the Taiwan Current Warm Water (TCWW). Together with the historical data, our results indicated that the CO2 sink has shown a shift southwest while FCO2 exhibited dramatic fluctuation during the construction of the TGD, which is located in the middle reaches of the Changjiang. These variations probably reflect fluctuation in the Changjiang runoff, nutrient import, phytoplankton productivity, and sediment input, which are likely to have been caused by the operations of the TGD. Nevertheless, the potential influence of the TGD on the CO2 flux in the ECS is worthy of further study.

  8. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    Air-sea interaction dramatically changes from moderate to very high wind speed conditions (Donelan et al. 2004). Unresolved physics of the air-sea interface are one of the weakest components in tropical cyclone prediction models. Rapid disruption of the air-water interface under very high wind speed conditions was reported in laboratory experiments (Koga 1981) and numerical simulations (Soloviev et al. 2012), which resembled the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at an interface with very large density difference. Kelly (1965) demonstrated that the KH instability at the air-sea interface can develop through parametric amplification of waves. Farrell and Ioannou (2008) showed that gustiness results in the parametric KH instability of the air-sea interface, while the gusts are due to interacting waves and turbulence. The stochastic forcing enters multiplicatively in this theory and produces an exponential wave growth, augmenting the growth from the Miles (1959) theory as the turbulence level increases. Here we complement this concept by adding the effect of the two-phase environment near the mean interface, which introduces additional viscosity in the system (turning it into a rheological system). The two-phase environment includes air-bubbles and re-entering spray (spume), which eliminates a portion of the wind-wave wavenumber spectrum that is responsible for a substantial part of the air sea drag coefficient. The previously developed KH-type interfacial parameterization (Soloviev and Lukas 2010) is unified with two versions of the wave growth model. The unified parameterization in both cases exhibits the increase of the drag coefficient with wind speed until approximately 30 m/s. Above this wind speed threshold, the drag coefficient either nearly levels off or even slightly drops (for the wave growth model that accounts for the shear) and then starts again increasing above approximately 65 m/s wind speed. Remarkably, the unified parameterization reveals a local minimum

  9. Preliminary study of osmotic membrane bioreactor: effects of draw solution on water flux and air scouring on fouling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Kekre, Kiran A; Oo, Maung H; Tao, Guihe; Lay, Chee L; Lew, Cheun H; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary study on a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was explored. Objective of this study was to investigate the effects of draw solution on membrane flux and air scouring at the feed side on fouling tendency in a pilot OMBR system composing the anoxic/aerobic and forward osmosis (FO) processes. Domestic sewage was the raw feed, FO membrane from HTI and NaCl/MgSO4 draw solutions were used in the experiments. Fluxes of 3 l/m2/h (LMH) and 7.2 LMH were achieved at osmotic pressure of 5 and 22.4 atm, respectively. No significant flux decline was observed at 3 LMH over 190 h and at 7.2 LMH over 150 h when air scouring was provided at the feed side of the membrane. However, without air scouring, the flux at 22.4 atm osmotic pressure declined by 30% after 195 h and then levelled off. The potential advantages of the fouling reversibility with air scouring under the operating conditions of the pilot OMBR and better water quality in OMBR over the conventional MBR were preliminarily demonstrated.

  10. Preliminary study of osmotic membrane bioreactor: effects of draw solution on water flux and air scouring on fouling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Kekre, Kiran A; Oo, Maung H; Tao, Guihe; Lay, Chee L; Lew, Cheun H; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary study on a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was explored. Objective of this study was to investigate the effects of draw solution on membrane flux and air scouring at the feed side on fouling tendency in a pilot OMBR system composing the anoxic/aerobic and forward osmosis (FO) processes. Domestic sewage was the raw feed, FO membrane from HTI and NaCl/MgSO4 draw solutions were used in the experiments. Fluxes of 3 l/m2/h (LMH) and 7.2 LMH were achieved at osmotic pressure of 5 and 22.4 atm, respectively. No significant flux decline was observed at 3 LMH over 190 h and at 7.2 LMH over 150 h when air scouring was provided at the feed side of the membrane. However, without air scouring, the flux at 22.4 atm osmotic pressure declined by 30% after 195 h and then levelled off. The potential advantages of the fouling reversibility with air scouring under the operating conditions of the pilot OMBR and better water quality in OMBR over the conventional MBR were preliminarily demonstrated. PMID:20861550

  11. Size distribution of oceanic air bubbles entrained in sea-water by wave-breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, F.; Avellan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The size of oceanic air bubbles produced by whitecaps and wave-breaking is determined. The production of liquid aerosols at the sea surface is predicted. These liquid aerosols are at the origin of most of the particulate materials exchanged between the ocean and the atmosphere. A prototype was designed and built using an optical technique based on the principle of light scattering at an angle of ninety degrees from the incident light beam. The output voltage is a direct function of the bubble diameter. Calibration of the probe was carried out within a range of 300 microns to 1.2 mm. Bubbles produced by wave-breaking in a large air-sea interaction simulating facility. Experimental results are given in the form of size spectrum.

  12. Numerical simulation of changes in tropical cyclone intensity using a coupled air-sea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yihong; Wu, Rongsheng; Yu, Runling; Liang, Xudong

    2013-10-01

    A coupled air-sea model for tropical cyclones (TCs) is constructed by coupling the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model (MM5) with the Princeton Ocean Model. Four numerical simulations of tropical cyclone development have been conducted using different configurations of the coupled model on the f-plane. When coupled processes are excluded, a weak initial vortex spins up into a mature symmetric TC that strongly resembles those observed and simulated in prior research. The coupled model reproduces the reduction in sea temperature induced by the TC reasonably well, as well as changes in the minimum central pressure of the TC that result from negative atmosphere-ocean feedbacks. Asymmetric structures are successfully simulated under conditions of uniform environmental flow. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is suitable for simulating air-sea interactions under TC conditions. The effects of the ocean on the track of the TC and changes in its intensity under uniform environmental flow are also investigated. TC intensity responds nonlinearly to sea surface temperature (SST). The TC intensification rate becomes smaller once the SST exceeds a certain threshold. Oceanic stratification also influences TC intensity, with stronger stratification responsible for a larger decrease in intensity. The value of oceanic enthalpy is small when the ocean is weakly stratified and large when the ocean is strongly stratified, demonstrating that the oceanic influence on TC intensity results not only from SST distributions but also from stratification. Air-sea interaction has only a slight influence on TC movement in this model.

  13. Bora event variability and the role of air-sea feedback

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pullen, J.; Doyle, J.D.; Haack, T.; Dorman, C.; Signell, R.P.; Lee, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    A two-way interacting high resolution numerical simulation of the Adriatic Sea using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and Coupled Ocean/ Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS??) was conducted to improve forecast momentum and heat flux fields, and to evaluate surface flux field differences for two consecutive bora events during February 2003. (COAMPS?? is a registered trademark of the Naval Research Laboratory.) The strength, mean positions and extensions of the bora jets, and the atmospheric conditions driving them varied considerably between the two events. Bora 1 had 62% stronger heat flux and 51% larger momentum flux than bora 2. The latter displayed much greater diurnal variability characterized by inertial oscillations and the early morning strengthening of a west Adriatic barrier jet, beneath which a stronger west Adriatic ocean current developed. Elsewhere, surface ocean current differences between the two events were directly related to differences in wind stress curl generated by the position and strength of the individual bora jets. The mean heat flux bias was reduced by 72%, and heat flux RMSE reduced by 30% on average at four instrumented over-water sites in the two-way coupled simulation relative to the uncoupled control. Largest reductions in wind stress were found in the bora jets, while the biggest reductions in heat flux were found along the north and west coasts of the Adriatic. In bora 2, SST gradients impacted the wind stress curl along the north and west coasts, and in bora 1 wind stress curl was sensitive to the Istrian front position and strength. The two-way coupled simulation produced diminished surface current speeds of ???12% over the northern Adriatic during both bora compared with a one-way coupled simulation. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Small Autonomous Air/Sea System Concepts for Coast Guard Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of small autonomous air/sea system concepts are outlined in this paper that support and enhance U.S. Coast Guard missions. These concepts draw significantly upon technology investments made by NASA in the area of uninhabited aerial vehicles and robotic/intelligent systems. Such concepts should be considered notional elements of a greater as-yet-not-defined robotic system-of-systems designed to enable unparalleled maritime safety and security.

  15. Heat fluxes and roll circulations over the western Gulf Stream during an intense cold-air outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Ferguson, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence and heat fluxes in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) for three aircraft stacks near the western Gulf Stream front, observed during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) January 28, 1986 cold-air outbreak, has been studied using mixed-layer scaling. The GOES image and stability parameter indicates that these three stacks were in the roll vortex regime. The turbulence structure in the MABL is studied for this case, as well as the significance of roll vortices to heat fluxes. The roll circulations are shown to contribute significantly to the sensible (temperature) and latent heat (moisture) fluxes with importance increasing upward. The results suggest that the entrainment at the MABL top might affect the the budgets of temperature and humidity fluxes in the lower MABL, but not in the unstable surface layer.

  16. A Numerical Study of Tropical Sea-Air Interactions Using a Cloud Resolving Model Coupled with an Ocean Mixed-Layer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Johnson, Dan; Simpson, Joanne; Li, Xiaofan; Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Coupling a cloud resolving model (CRM) with an ocean mixed layer (OML) model can provide a powerful tool for better understanding impacts of atmospheric precipitation on sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity. The objective of this study is twofold. First, by using the three dimensional (3-D) CRM-simulated (the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE) diabatic source terms, radiation (longwave and shortwave), surface fluxes (sensible and latent heat, and wind stress), and precipitation as input for the OML model, the respective impact of individual component on upper ocean heat and salt budgets are investigated. Secondly, a two-way air-sea interaction between tropical atmospheric climates (involving atmospheric radiative-convective processes) and upper ocean boundary layer is also examined using a coupled two dimensional (2-D) GCE and OML model. Results presented here, however, only involve the first aspect. Complete results will be presented at the conference.

  17. Direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Hamish A.; MacKellar, Mellissa C.; Gray, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over coral reefs has relied on microscale measurements of pCO2 gradients across the air-sea interfacial boundary; shipboard measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over adjacent ocean inferred to represent over reef processes or ecosystem productivity modeling. Here we present by way of case study the first direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef made using the eddy covariance method. Research was conducted during the summer monsoon over a lagoonal platform reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Results show the reef flat to be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of similar magnitude as coastal lakes, while adjacent shallow and deep lagoons were net sinks as was the surrounding ocean. This heterogeneity in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere confirms need for spatially representative direct measurements of CO2 over coral reefs to accurately quantify their role in atmospheric carbon budgets.

  18. Alpine lee cyclogenesis influence on air-sea heat exchanges and marine atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics over the western Mediterranean during a Tramontane/Mistral event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, Cyrille

    2003-02-01

    Data from a recent field campaign are used to analyze the nonstationary aspects of air-sea heat exchanges and marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) thermodynamics over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) in connection with synoptic forcing. The data set includes measurements made from a wide range of platforms (sea-borne, airborne, and space-borne) as well as three-dimensional atmospheric modeling. The analysis focuses on the 24 March 1998 Tramontane/Mistral event. It is shown that the nonstationary nature of the wind regime over the GoL was controlled by the multistage evolution of an Alpine lee cyclone over the Tyrrhenian Sea (between Sardinia and continental Italy). In the early stage (low at 1014 hPa) the Tramontane flow prevailed over the GoL. As the low deepened (1010 hPa), the prevailing wind regime shifted to a well-established Mistral that peaked around 1200 UTC. In the afternoon the Mistral was progressively disrupted by a strengthening outflow coming from the Ligurian Sea in response to the deepening low over the Tyrrhenian Sea (1008 hPa) and the channelling induced by the presence of the Apennine range (Italy) and the Alps. In the evening the Mistral was again well established over the GoL as the depression continued to deepen (1002 hPa) but moved to the southeast, reducing the influence of outflow from the Ligurian Sea on the flow over the GoL. The air-sea heat exchanges and the structure of the MABL over the GoL were observed to differ significantly between the established Mistral period and the disrupted Mistral period. In the latter period, surface latent and sensible heat fluxes were reduced by a factor of 2, on average. During that latter period, air-sea moisture exchanges were mainly driven by dynamics, whereas during the former period, both winds and vertical moisture gradients controlled moisture exchanges. The MABL was shallower during the latter period (0.7 km instead of 1.2 km) because of reduced surface turbulent heat fluxes and increased wind shear

  19. Impacts of air-sea interactions on regional air quality predictions using WRF/Chem v3.6.1 coupled with ROMS v3.7: southeastern US example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; He, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Air-sea interactions have significant impacts on coastal convection and surface fluxes exchange, which are important for the spatial and vertical distributions of air pollutants that affect public health, particularly in densely populated coastal areas. To understand the impacts of air-sea interactions on coastal air quality predictions, sensitivity simulations with different cumulus parameterization schemes and atmosphere-ocean coupling are conducted in this work over southeastern US in July 2010 using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem). The results show that different cumulus parameterization schemes can result in an 85 m difference in the domain averaged planetary boundary layer height (PBLH), and 4.8 mm difference in the domain averaged daily precipitation. Comparing to WRF/Chem without air-sea interactions, WRF/Chem with a 1-D ocean mixed layer model (WRF/Chem-OML) and WRF/Chem coupled with a 3-D Regional Ocean Modeling System (WRF/Chem-ROMS) predict the domain averaged changes in the sea surface temperature of 0.1 and 1.0 °C, respectively. The simulated differences in the surface concentrations of ozone (O3) and PM2.5 between WRF/Chem-ROMS and WRF/Chem can be as large as 17.3 ppb and 7.9 μg m-3, respectively. The largest changes simulated from WRF/Chem-ROMS in surface concentrations of O3 and particulate matter with diameter less than and equal to 2.5 μm (PM2.5) occur not only along coast and remote ocean, but also over some inland areas. Extensive validations against observations, show that WRF/Chem-ROMS improves the predictions of most cloud and radiative variables, and surface concentrations of some chemical species such as sulfur dioxide, nitric acid, maximum 1 h and 8 h O3, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and particulate matter with diameter less than and equal to 10 μm (PM10). This illustrates the benefits and needs of using coupled atmospheric-ocean model with advanced model representations of air-sea interactions for

  20. Assessment of 137Cs and 90Sr Fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, Gennady; Usiagina, Irina; Kasatkina, Nadezhda; Ilin, Gennadii

    2014-05-01

    On the basis of published and own data the annual balance of radionuclide income/outcome was assessed for 137Cs and 90Sr in the Barents Sea for the period from 1950s to the presnt. The scheme of the isotope balance calculation in the Barents Sea included the following processes:atmospheric fallout; river run-off; liquid radioactive wastes releases, income from the Norwegian and the White Seas; outflow to the adjacent areas through the Novaya Zemlya straits and the transects Svalbard-Franz Josef Land and Franz Josef Land-Novaya Zemlya; radioactive decay. According to the multiyear dynamics, the inflow of 137Cs and 90Sr to the Barents Sea was significantly preconditioned by currents from the Norwegian Sea. Three peaks of 137Cs and 90Sr isotope concentrations were registered for the surface waters on the western border of the Barents Sea. The first one was observed in the mid-1960s and was conditioned by testing of nuclear weapons. The increase of isotope concentrations in 1975 and 1980 was preconditioned by the discharge of atomic waste by the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant. Nowadays, after the sewage disposal plant was built, the annual discharge of nuclear waste from Sellafield plant is low. The Norwegian Sea was a major source of 137Cs and 90Sr isotope income into the Barents Sea for the period of 1960-2014. Currently, the transborder transfer of 90Sr and 137Cs from the Norwegian Sea into the Barents Sea constitutes about 99% of income for each element. Atmospheric precipitation had a major impact in the 1950-1960s after the testing of the nuclear weapons, and in 1986 after the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. In 1963, the atmospheric precipitation of 137Cs reached 1050 TBq; and that of 90Sr, 630 TBq. In 1986, a significant amount of 137Cs inflow (up to 1010 TBq/year) was registered. The 137Cs isotope income exceeded the 90Sr income in the 1960s-1980s, and equal amounts penetrated into the Barents Sea from the Norwegian Sea in the 1990s. Before

  1. A controlling role for the air-sea interface in the chemical processing of reactive nitrogen in the coastal marine boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michelle J; Farmer, Delphine K; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-03-18

    The lifetime of reactive nitrogen and the production rate of reactive halogens in the marine boundary layer are strongly impacted by reactions occurring at aqueous interfaces. Despite the potential importance of the air-sea interface in serving as a reactive surface, few direct field observations are available to assess its impact on reactive nitrogen deposition and halogen activation. Here, we present direct measurements of the vertical fluxes of the reactant-product pair N2O5 and ClNO2 to assess the role of the ocean surface in the exchange of reactive nitrogen and halogens. We measure nocturnal N2O5 exchange velocities (Vex = -1.66 ± 0.60 cm s(-1)) that are limited by atmospheric transport of N2O5 to the air-sea interface. Surprisingly, vertical fluxes of ClNO2, the product of N2O5 reactive uptake to concentrated chloride containing surfaces, display net deposition, suggesting that elevated ClNO2 mixing ratios found in the marine boundary layer are sustained primarily by N2O5 reactions with aerosol particles. Comparison of measured deposition rates and in situ observations of N2O5 reactive uptake to aerosol particles indicates that N2O5 deposition to the ocean surface accounts for between 26% and 42% of the total loss rate. The combination of large Vex, N2O5 and net deposition of ClNO2 acts to limit NOx recycling rates and the production of Cl atoms by shortening the nocturnal lifetime of N2O5. These results indicate that air-sea exchange processes account for as much as 15% of nocturnal NOx removal in polluted coastal regions and can serve to reduce ClNO2 concentrations at sunrise by over 20%. PMID:24591613

  2. A controlling role for the air-sea interface in the chemical processing of reactive nitrogen in the coastal marine boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michelle J; Farmer, Delphine K; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-03-18

    The lifetime of reactive nitrogen and the production rate of reactive halogens in the marine boundary layer are strongly impacted by reactions occurring at aqueous interfaces. Despite the potential importance of the air-sea interface in serving as a reactive surface, few direct field observations are available to assess its impact on reactive nitrogen deposition and halogen activation. Here, we present direct measurements of the vertical fluxes of the reactant-product pair N2O5 and ClNO2 to assess the role of the ocean surface in the exchange of reactive nitrogen and halogens. We measure nocturnal N2O5 exchange velocities (Vex = -1.66 ± 0.60 cm s(-1)) that are limited by atmospheric transport of N2O5 to the air-sea interface. Surprisingly, vertical fluxes of ClNO2, the product of N2O5 reactive uptake to concentrated chloride containing surfaces, display net deposition, suggesting that elevated ClNO2 mixing ratios found in the marine boundary layer are sustained primarily by N2O5 reactions with aerosol particles. Comparison of measured deposition rates and in situ observations of N2O5 reactive uptake to aerosol particles indicates that N2O5 deposition to the ocean surface accounts for between 26% and 42% of the total loss rate. The combination of large Vex, N2O5 and net deposition of ClNO2 acts to limit NOx recycling rates and the production of Cl atoms by shortening the nocturnal lifetime of N2O5. These results indicate that air-sea exchange processes account for as much as 15% of nocturnal NOx removal in polluted coastal regions and can serve to reduce ClNO2 concentrations at sunrise by over 20%.

  3. [Upward and regeneration fluxes of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus in the deep-water areas of the Black-Sea].

    PubMed

    Krivenko, O V; Parkhomenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Upward and regeneration fluxes of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorusin the euphotic zone of the Black Sea deep waters were estimated using data from long-term observations of nitrate and phosphate vertical distribution and modeling of plankton month- and area-averaged nutrients excretion. The upward fluxes were calculated using monthly average nitrate and phosphate concentrations and their gradients beneath the euphotic layer assuming that the vertical transport rates are controlled by the density gradient at the upper layer of the main pycnocline throughout the year. According to the calculations, the nutrient input into the euphotic layer due to physical processes changes gradually throughout the year from minimum values in July-August (0.1-0.3 mg-atN x m(-2) x day(-1) and 0.02-0.04 mg-atP x m(-2) x day(-1)) up to maximum ones in February-March (1.2-1.8 mg-atN x m(-2) x day(-1) and 0.2-0.3 mg-atP x m(-2) x day(-1)), contrary to the seasonal dynamics of the regeneration flux rates. In summer, plankton regeneration rates increase nearly five-fold as compared to the winter months. The contribution of the upward flux to the total nutrient euphotic zone input was calculated and designated as F(N)(F(P))-ratio along the lines with the f-ratio and e-ratio that reflect the ratio of "new" production and particle export to primary production, respectively. The monthly means vary for F(N) from 5 to 50% and for F(P) from 10 to 70% throughout the year in the same manner as the upward flux. Relationships between the monthly mean values of F(N,P) and vertically integrated nitrate and phosphate concentrations, chlorophyll "a", phytoplankton biomass, and primary production in the euphotic zone were established. The obtained relationships correspond to the general relationships between primary production, "new" production and the sinking flux of particles known for the Ocean. Potential values of "new", regenerated, and total production of phytoplankton in the deep-water areas of the

  4. Pore-water distribution and quantification of diffusive benthic fluxes of silicic acid, nitrate and phosphate in surface sediments of the deep Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandel, Sibylle; Rickert, Dirk; Schlüter, Michael; Wallmann, Klaus

    Benthic fluxes and pore-water compositions of silicic acid, nitrate and phosphate were investigated for surface sediments of the abyssal Arabian Sea during four cruises (1995-1998). Five sites located in the northern (NAST), western (WAST), central (CAST), eastern (EAST), and southern (SAST) Arabian Sea were revisited during intermonsoonal periods after the NE- and SW-Monsoon. At these sites, benthic fluxes of remineralized nutrients from the sediment to the bottom water of 36-106, 102-350 and 4-16 mmol m -2 yr -1 were measured for nitrate, silicic acid and phosphate, respectively. The benthic fluxes and pore-water compositions showed a distinct regional pattern. Highest fluxes were observed in the western and northern region of the Arabian Sea, whereas decreasing fluxes were derived towards the southeast. At WAST, the general temporal pattern of primary production, related to the NE- and SW-Monsoon, is reflected by benthic fluxes. In contrast, at sites NAST, SAST, CAST, and EAST a temporal pattern of fluxes in response to the monsoon is not obvious. Our results reveal a clear coupling between the general regional pattern of production in surface waters and the response of the benthic environment, as indicated by the flux of remineralized nutrients, though a spatially differing degree of decoupling during transport and remineralization of particulate organic matter and biogenic opal was observed. This has to be taken into account regarding budget calculations and paleoceanographic topics.

  5. Sea ice - atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, A.; Maslanik, J.; Key, J.; Haefliger, M.; Weaver, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the past six months, work has continued on energy flux sensitivity studies, ice surface temperature retrievals, corrections to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) thermal infrared data, modelling of cloud fraction retrievals, and radiation climatologies. We tentatively conclude that the SSM/I may not provide accurate enough estimates of ice concentration and type to improve our shorter term energy flux estimates. SSM/I derived parameters may still be applicable in longer term climatological flux characterizations. We hold promise for a system coupling observation to a ice deformation model. Such a model may provide information on ice distribution which can be used in energy flux calculations. Considerable variation was found in modelled energy flux estimates when bulk transfer coefficients are modulated by lead fetch. It is still unclear what the optimum formulation is and this will be the subject of further work. Data sets for ice surface temperature retrievals were assembled and preliminary data analysis was started. Finally, construction of a conceptual framework for further modelling of the Arctic radiation flux climatology was started.

  6. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  7. Base flow and stormwater net fluxes of carbon and trace metals to the Mediterranean sea by an urbanized small river.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, R; Lucas, Y; Merdy, P; Raynaud, M

    2012-12-15

    Base flow and storm flow events from a small, urbanized Mediterranean river located in the South of France were studied to evaluate net fluxes from the continent to the coastal sea water. Considered variables were: pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature, dissolved O(2), SPM (Suspended Particulate Matter), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon), Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the dissolved fraction and POC (Particulate Organic Carbon), Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the particulate fraction. If rainfall intensity and antecedent rainfall history were sufficient to explain many observed variations, the patterns of particles and solutes transport greatly varied from one storm event to another. SPM, POC, particulate Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb had similar behavior characterized by an immediate increase at the beginning of the storm flow and the highest values at the first high discharge peak. Among dissolved species, Cl(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) had a behavior very similar one to the other. They exhibited high concentrations and enrichment factors at the beginning of the storm flow, due to fast leaching of highly labile species. Their concentrations decreased during posterior discharge peaks but positive enrichment factors indicated permanent sources for these ions. DOC, K(+) and NO(3)(-) had different behaviors which indicated sources positively correlated with rainfall intensity. A 3D-fluorescence study showed that the humified organic matter contribution to DOC increased during storm flow. Relationships between DOC and dissolved Cu and Pb indicated differences in organic-matter binding properties between dry and humid periods. Storm flow were responsible for more than 90% of the annual output to the sea of SPM, POC and particulate Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb and more than 70% for dissolved Pb, Cd, NO(3)(-) and DOC. For the other dissolved species, outputs were balanced between base flow and storm flow. Contrary to what

  8. Spatial Variability in Ozone and CO2 Flux during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almand-Hunter, B.; Piedrahita, R.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Walker, J. T.; Hannigan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality problems persist in the Northern Front-Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado despite efforts to reduce emissions, and summertime ozone concentrations frequently exceed the NAAQS. Atmospheric modeling in the NFRMA is challenging due to the complex topography of the area, as well as diversity of pollutant sources (urban NOx and VOCs, power plants, oil and gas, agricultural emissions, biogenic emissions, and wildfires). An improved understanding of the local atmospheric chemistry will enable researchers to advance atmospheric models, which will subsequently be used to develop and test more effective air quality management strategies. The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) investigates this problem through detailed examination of atmospheric chemistry in the NFRMA. Our project specifically explores the spatial variability in ozone (O3) concentration and dry deposition within the FRAPPE study area. One source of uncertainty in atmospheric models is O3 flux, which varies spatially due to local meteorology and variation in ambient concentration and deposition velocity. Model grid cells typically range in size from 10-100 km and 100-500 km, for regional and global models, respectively, and accurate representations of an entire grid cell cannot always be achieved. Large spatial variability within a model grid cell can lead to poor estimates of trace-gas flux and concentration. Our research addresses this issue by measuring spatial variability in O3 flux using low-cost dry-deposition flux chambers. We are measuring O3 and CO2 flux with 5 low-cost flux chambers and one eddy-covariance tower. The eddy-covariance tower is located at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. All 5 chambers are within a 8.3 x 6 km square, with one chamber collocated with the eddy-covariance tower, and the other 4 chambers at distances of 0.33, 1.14, 3.22, and 7.55 km from the tower. The largest distance between any two chambers is 8.5 km. All

  9. A comparison of airborne eddy correlation and bulk aerodynamic methods for ocean-air turbulent fluxes during cold-air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    The viscous interfacial-sublayer model of Liu et al. (1979) is used to derive four bulk schemes (LKB, FG, D, and DB), with the flux-profile relationships of Lie et al., Francey and Garratt (1981), Dyer (1974), and Dyer and Bradley (1982). These schemes, with stability-dependent transfer coefficients, are tested against the eddy-correlation fluxes measured at the 50-m flight level above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold-air outbreaks. The bulk fluxes of momentum (tau), sensible heat (H), and latent heat (E) are found to increase with various von Karman constants. The dependence of transfer coefficients on wind speeds and roughness lengths is discussed. The transfer coefficients for tau and E agree excellently between LKB and FG. The ratio of the coefficent for H of LKB to that of FG, increasing with decreasing stability, is very sensitive to stability at low winds, but approaches the neutral value of 1.25 at high winds.

  10. Distribution and air-sea exchange of current-use pesticides (CUPs) from East Asia to the high Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guangcai; Xie, Zhiyong; Cai, Minghong; Möller, Axel; Sturm, Renate; Tang, Jianhui; Zhang, Gan; He, Jianfeng; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Surface seawater and marine boundary layer air samples were collected on the ice-breaker R/V Xuelong (Snow Dragon) from the East China Sea to the high Arctic (33.23-84.5° N) in July to September 2010 and have been analyzed for six current-use pesticides (CUPs): trifluralin, endosulfan, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, and dicofol. In all oceanic air samples, the six CUPs were detected, showing highest level (>100 pg/m(3)) in the Sea of Japan. Gaseous CUPs basically decreased from East Asia (between 36.6 and 45.1° N) toward Bering and Chukchi Seas. The dissolved CUPs in ocean water ranged widely from air. Trifluralin in seawater was relatively high in the Sea of Japan (35.2° N) and evenly distributed between 36.9 and 72.5° N, but it remained below the detection limit at the highest northern latitudes in Chukchi Sea. In contrast with other CUPs, concentrations of chlorothalonil and dacthal were more abundant in Chukchi Sea and in East Asia. The air-sea gas exchange of CUPs was generally dominated by net deposition. Latitudinal trends of fugacity ratios of α-endosulfan, chlorothalonil, and dacthal showed stronger deposition of these compounds in East Asia than in Chukchi Sea, while trifluralin showed stronger deposition in Chukchi Sea (-455 ± 245 pg/m(2)/day) than in the North Pacific (-241 ± 158 pg/m(2)/day). Air-sea gas exchange of chlorpyrifos varied from net volatilizaiton in East Asia (<40° N) to equilibrium or net deposition in the North Pacific and the Arctic.

  11. Carbon dioxide production in surface sediments of temporarily anoxic basins (Baltic Sea) and resulting sediment-water interface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Winde, V.; Lenz, C.; Dellwig, O.; Leipe, T.; Segl, M.; Struck, U.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter is mineralized in marine sediments by microbial activity using predominantly oxygen, sulfate, and metal oxides as electron acceptors. Modern euxinic basins as found in the Baltic Sea or the Black Sea are of particular importance because they may serve as type systems for anoxia in Earth's history. We present here results from biogeochemical investigations carried out in the Baltic deeps (Gotland Basin, Landsort Deep) during the first scientific cruise of RV M.S. MERIAN in 2006, additionally during RV Prof. Penck cruises in 2006 and 2007. Short sediment cores were obtained with a multi-corer and analyzed for particulate and dissolved main, minor and trace elements, pH, DIC, methane alkalinity, besides the stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Microsensors were applied to analyze steep gradients of oxygen, sulphide and sulphate. Pore water profiles are evaluated in terms of process rates and associated element fluxes using the PROFILE software (Berg et al., 1998, L&O). Gross and net anaerobic mineralization rates were additionally obtained from core incubations with 35S. Steep gradients in DIC are associated with a strong enrichment of the light stable isotope resulting in the Gotland basin from oxidized OM. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface are compared with literature data and show for the Baltic Sea a dependence from bottom water redox conditions, and sediment compositions and formation conditions (e.g., accumulation rates). DIC in the anoxic part of the water column in the Landsort Deep and the Gotland Deep show relatively similar isotope values, close to the bottom water value, but steep gradients towards heavier values above the pelagic redoxcline. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by Leibniz IO Warnemünde, DFG (Cruise RV MSM MERIAN 01), and MPG. Thanks to B. Schneider and F. Pollehne stimulating discussions, and S. Lage and A. Schipper for technical support.

  12. US Navy Submarine Sea Trial of the NASA Air Quality Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Wallace, William T.; Manney, Joshua A.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    For the past four years, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) has been the operational instrument for measuring trace volatile organic compounds on the International Space Station (ISS). The key components of the AQM are the inlet preconcentrator, the gas chromatograph (GC), and the differential mobility spectrometer. Most importantly, the AQM operates at atmospheric pressure and uses air as the GC carrier gas, which translates into a small reliable instrument. Onboard ISS there are two AQMs, with different GC columns that detect and quantify 22 compounds. The AQM data contributes valuable information to the assessment of air quality aboard ISS for each crew increment. The U.S. Navy is looking to update its submarine air monitoring suite of instruments, and the success of the AQM on ISS has led to a jointly planned submarine sea trial of a NASA AQM. In addition to the AQM, the Navy is also interested in the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), which was successfully flown on ISS as a technology demonstration to measure major constituent gases (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ammonia). A separate paper will present the MGM sea trial results. A prototype AQM, which is virtually identical to the operational AQM, has been readied for the sea trial. Only one AQM will be deployed during the sea trial, but it is sufficient to detect the compounds of interest to the Navy for the purposes of this trial. A significant benefit of the AQM is that runs can be scripted for pre-determined intervals and no crew intervention is required. The data from the sea trial will be compared to archival samples collected prior to and during the trial period. This paper will give a brief overview of the AQM technology and protocols for the submarine trial. After a quick review of the AQM preparation, the main focus of the paper will be on the results of the submarine trial. Of particular interest will be the comparison of the contaminants found in the ISS and submarine atmospheres, as both represent

  13. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows Hurricane Frances as captured by instruments onboard two different satellites: the AIRS infrared instrument onboard Aqua, and the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT. Both are JPL-managed instruments. AIRS data are used to create global three-dimensional maps of temperature, humidity and clouds, while scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction over the ocean.

    The red vectors in the image show Frances' surface winds as measured by SeaWinds on QuikSCAT. The background colors show the temperature of clouds and surface as viewed in the infrared by AIRS, with cooler areas pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red. The color scale on the right gives the temperatures in degrees Kelvin. (The top of the scale, 320 degrees Kelvin, corresponds to 117 degrees Fahrenheit, and the bottom, 180 degrees K is -135 degrees F.) The powerful circulation of this storm is evident from the combined data as well as the development of a clearly-defined central 'eye'. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the light blue areas reveal the cold clouds tops associated with strong thunderstorms embedded within the storm. In cloud-free areas the infrared signal comes from Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures.

    The power of the SeaWinds scatterometer data set lies in its ability to generate global maps of wind speed and direction, giving us a snapshot of how the atmosphere is circulating. Weather prediction centers, including the Tropical Prediction Center - a branch of NOAA that monitors the creation of ocean-born storms, use scatterometer data to help it 'see' where these storms are brewing so that warnings can be issued and the storms, with often erratic motions, can be tracked.

    While the SeaWinds instrument isn't designed to gather hurricane data, having difficulty seeing the surface in heavy rain, it's data can be used in combination with other data sets to give us an insight into these storms. In

  14. Dynamics of Arctic sea ice discussed at workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James; Ukita, Jinro

    Sea ice is an interesting geophysical material: it behaves as a large-scale hardening plastic. Consider the impact of the sea-ice covers mechanical behavior on the energy and momentum exchange within the complex atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Sea ice acts as an insulator between the relatively warm ocean water and the cold polar atmosphere. Sea ice cover interacts with the atmosphere by regulating air-sea fluxes, changing surface albedo, and influencing the long-wave radiative balance.

  15. Effects of acute fresh water exposure on water flux rates and osmotic responses in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Patterson, R. M.; Wade, C. E.; Byers, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    Water flux rates and osmotic responses of Kemp's Ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi) acutely exposed to fresh water were quantified. Salt-water adapted turtles were exposed to fresh water for 4 d before being returned to salt water. During the initial salt water phase, absolute and relative water flux rates were 1.2+/-0.1 l d(-1) and 123.0+/-6.8 ml kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. When turtles were exposed to fresh water, rates increased by approximately 30%. Upon return to salt water, rates decreased to original levels. Plasma osmolality, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) decreased during exposure to fresh water, and subsequently increased during the return to salt water. The Na(+):K(+) ratio was elevated during the fresh water phase and subsequently decreased upon return to salt water. Aldosterone and corticosterone were not altered during exposure to fresh water. Elevated water flux rates during fresh water exposure reflected an increase in water consumption, resulting in a decrease in ionic and osmotic concentrations. The lack of a change in adrenocorticoids to acute fresh water exposure suggests that adrenal responsiveness to an hypo-osmotic environment may be delayed in marine turtles when compared to marine mammals.

  16. Diagenesis and benthic fluxes of nutrients and metals during experimentally induced anoxia in the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koron, N.; Ogrinc, N.; Metzger, E.; Riedel, B.; Faganeli, J.

    2013-07-01

    Sequential nutrient regeneration and organic matter (OM) degradation in surface sediments of the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea) were examined using in situ benthic chambers under normoxic, anoxic and reoxic conditions. Intensive NH4+ and PO4- anoxic regeneration was subsequently slower in prolonged anoxia. NH4+ production was probably also a consequence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to NH4+. The presence of anammox and laterally pumping of oxygenated water by benthic infauna explained the presence of NO3- in anoxia. Anoxic phases were characterized by enhanced dissolution of Sibiog, decreasing pore water Ca and Mg concentrations indicating carbonate precipitation and higher Fe and Mn concentrations as a result of reduction/respiration. Reoxygenation was characterized by enhanced bioturbation. Nitrification caused NH4+ decrease and P precipitated quickly as carbonate fluorapatite and FePO4. In addition adsorption of P onto Fe-hydroxides could also occur since Fe (and Mn) reoxidized quickly. Increased Ca levels suggested enhanced carbonate dissolution. Diffusive fluxes at the sediment-water interface (SWI), calculated from pore water modelling using diffusion-reaction model, revealed high anoxic NH4+ effluxes and Ca (and Mg) influxes. PO4- fluxes were very low and high NH4+/PO4- flux ratios in anoxic and reoxic phases suggested an excess of benthic inorganic N. Nutrient budgets at the SWI showed intensive anoxic recycling of inorganic N but low P and Si cycling in all redox phases.

  17. Effects of acute fresh water exposure on water flux rates and osmotic responses in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Patterson, R M; Wade, C E; Byers, F M

    2000-09-01

    Water flux rates and osmotic responses of Kemp's Ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempi) acutely exposed to fresh water were quantified. Salt-water adapted turtles were exposed to fresh water for 4 d before being returned to salt water. During the initial salt water phase, absolute and relative water flux rates were 1.2+/-0.1 l d(-1) and 123.0+/-6.8 ml kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. When turtles were exposed to fresh water, rates increased by approximately 30%. Upon return to salt water, rates decreased to original levels. Plasma osmolality, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) decreased during exposure to fresh water, and subsequently increased during the return to salt water. The Na(+):K(+) ratio was elevated during the fresh water phase and subsequently decreased upon return to salt water. Aldosterone and corticosterone were not altered during exposure to fresh water. Elevated water flux rates during fresh water exposure reflected an increase in water consumption, resulting in a decrease in ionic and osmotic concentrations. The lack of a change in adrenocorticoids to acute fresh water exposure suggests that adrenal responsiveness to an hypo-osmotic environment may be delayed in marine turtles when compared to marine mammals.

  18. Inverse modeling of Asian (222)Rn flux using surface air (222)Rn concentration.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2010-11-01

    When used with an atmospheric transport model, the (222)Rn flux distribution estimated in our previous study using soil transport theory caused underestimation of atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations as compared with measurements in East Asia. In this study, we applied a Bayesian synthesis inverse method to produce revised estimates of the annual (222)Rn flux density in Asia by using atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at seven sites in East Asia. The Bayesian synthesis inverse method requires a prior estimate of the flux distribution and its uncertainties. The atmospheric transport model MM5/HIRAT and our previous estimate of the (222)Rn flux distribution as the prior value were used to generate new flux estimates for the eastern half of the Eurasian continent dividing into 10 regions. The (222)Rn flux densities estimated using the Bayesian inversion technique were generally higher than the prior flux densities. The area-weighted average (222)Rn flux density for Asia was estimated to be 33.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1), which is substantially higher than the prior value (16.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). The estimated (222)Rn flux densities decrease with increasing latitude as follows: Southeast Asia (36.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)); East Asia (28.6 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) including China, Korean Peninsula and Japan; and Siberia (14.1 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). Increase of the newly estimated fluxes in Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia from the prior ones contributed most significantly to improved agreement of the model-calculated concentrations with the atmospheric measurements. The sensitivity analysis of prior flux errors and effects of locally exhaled (222)Rn showed that the estimated fluxes in Northern and Central China, Korea, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia were robust, but that in Central Asia had a large uncertainty.

  19. Sediment flux history of Pearl River mouth basin, North margin of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.

    2004-12-01

    This work estimates the solid sediment flux in Pearl River mouth basin from Cenozoic (42Ma). The estimates were derived from isopach maps, seismic reflection profiles and drill holes. Average solid sediment fluxes were calculated for six epochs approximately corresponding to geological periods: Eocene-Lower Oligocene (42-29.3), Upper Oligocene (29.3-23.8), Lower Miocene (23.8-16.4), Middle Miocene (16.4-11.2), Upper Miocene (11.2-5.32), and Pliocene-Pleistocene (5.32-0). The total sediment flux from 42 Ma is 392071.3 km3 and 0.89 km of erosion formed from the onshore drainage basin area. The average erosion rate is 22 m/ Ma. The sediment flux curve shows 3 episodes massive increase in sediment supply, i.e. Upper Oligocene, Middle Miocene and Pliocene-Pleistocene. The first increase related to the break up activity and is the product of elevated rift shoulder. The other two increase peak link to the changing of climate.

  20. Observed screen (air) and GCM surface/screen temperatures: Implications for outgoing longwave fluxes at the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    There is direct evidence that excess net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces (of about 11-17 W m{sup -2} (20%-27%) on an annual basis) is not only due to overestimates in annual incoming shortwave fluxes of 9-18 W m{sup -2} (6%-9%), but also to underestimates in outgoing longwave fluxes. THe bias in the outgoing longwave flux is deduced from a comparison of screen-air temperature observations, available as a global climatology of mean monthly values, and model-calculated surface and screen-air temperatures. An underestimate in the screen temperature computed in general circulation models over continents, of about 3 K on an annual basis, implies an underestimate in the outgoing longwave flux, averaged in six models under study, of 11-15 W m{sup -2} (3%-4%). For a set of 22 inland stations studied previously, the residual bias on an annual basis (the residual is the net radiation minus incoming shortwave plus outgoing longwave) varies between 18 and -23 W m{sup -2} for the models considered. Additional biases in one or both of the reflected shortwave and incoming longwave components cannot be ruled out. 13 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Physical and chemical processes of air masses in the Aegean Sea during Etesians: Aegean-GAME airborne campaign.

    PubMed

    Tombrou, M; Bossioli, E; Kalogiros, J; Allan, J D; Bacak, A; Biskos, G; Coe, H; Dandou, A; Kouvarakis, G; Mihalopoulos, N; Percival, C J; Protonotariou, A P; Szabó-Takács, B

    2015-02-15

    High-resolution measurements of gas and aerosols' chemical composition along with meteorological and turbulence parameters were performed over the Aegean Sea (AS) during an Etesian outbreak in the framework of the Aegean-GAME airborne campaign. This study focuses on two distinct Etesian patterns, with similarities inside the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) and differences at higher levels. Under long-range transport and subsidence the pollution load is enhanced (by 17% for CO, 11% for O3, 28% for sulfate, 62% for organic mass, 47% for elemental carbon), compared to the pattern with a weaker synoptic system. Sea surface temperature (SST) was a critical parameter for the MABL structure, turbulent fluxes and pollutants' distribution at lower levels. The MABL height was below 500 m asl over the eastern AS (favoring higher accumulation), and deeper over the western AS. The most abundant components of total PM1 were sulfate (40-50%) and organics (30-45%). Higher average concentrations measured over the eastern AS (131 ± 76 ppbv for CO, 62.5 ± 4.1 ppbv for O3, 5.0 ± 1.1 μg m(-3) for sulfate, 4.7 ± 0.9 μg m(-3) for organic mass and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg m(-3) for elemental carbon). Under the weaker synoptic system, cleaner but more acidic air masses prevailed over the eastern part, while distinct aerosol layers of different signature were observed over the western part. The Aitken and accumulation modes contributed equally during the long-range transport, while the Aitken modes dominated during local or medium range transport. PMID:25460953

  2. Using Sea Level to Probe Linkages Between Heat Transport Convergence, Heat Storage Rate, and Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L.; Kelly, K. A.; Booth, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Annual mean surface heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in midlatitudes are maximum in the Gulf Stream and that surface flux is driven by geostrophic heat transport convergence. Evidence is mounting that on interannual times scales, the surface flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region is controlled by the amount of heat that is stored in the region and that the heat storage rate is in turn controlled by geostrophic heat transport convergence. In addition, variations in meridional heat transport have been linked to the meridional overturning circulation just to the south of the Gulf Stream at the RAPID/MOCHA array at 26.5N, suggesting that changes in the meridional overturning circulation might be linked to surface heat exchange in the Gulf Stream. The twenty-year record of satellite sea level (SSH) along with high quality surface heat fluxes allow a detailed evaluation of the interaction between stored oceanic heat in this region and surface heat fluxes on interannual times scales. Using gridded sea level from AVISO as a proxy for upper ocean heat content along with surface turbulent heat flux from OAFlux, we evaluate the lagged correlations between interannual surface turbulent heat fluxes and SSH variability. Previous work has shown that where advection is small lagged correlations between SST (sea surface temperature) and surface turbulent heat flux are generally antisymmetric about zero lag with negative correlations when SST leads and positive correlations when SST lags. This indicates that surface heat fluxes force SST anomalies that at later times are damped by surface fluxes. In contrast, the lagged correlation between SSH anomalies and the turbulent flux of heat in the Gulf Stream region show a distinctly asymmetric relationship about zero-lag. The correlations are negative when SSH leads but are not significant when SSH lags indicating the dominant role in heat transport convergence in driving heat content changes, and that the heat content

  3. Soil-Air Mercury Flux near a Large Industrial Emission Source before and after Closure (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada).

    PubMed

    Eckley, Chris S; Blanchard, Pierrette; McLennan, Daniel; Mintz, Rachel; Sekela, Mark

    2015-08-18

    Prior to its closure, the base-metal smelter in Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada was one of the North America's largest mercury (Hg) emission sources. Our project objective was to understand the exchange of Hg between the soil and the air before and after the smelter closure. Field and laboratory Hg flux measurements were conducted to identify the controlling variables and used for spatial and temporal scaling. Study results showed that deposition from the smelter resulted in the surrounding soil being enriched in Hg (up to 99 μg g(-1)) as well as other metals. During the period of smelter operation, air concentrations were elevated (30 ± 19 ng m(-3)), and the soil was a net Hg sink (daily flux: -3.8 ng m(-2) h(-1)). Following the smelter closure, air Hg(0) concentrations were reduced, and the soils had large emissions (daily flux: 108 ng m(-2) h(-1)). The annual scaling of soil Hg emissions following the smelter closure indicated that the landscape impacted by smelter deposition emitted or re-emitted almost 100 kg per year. Elevated soil Hg concentrations and emissions are predicted to continue for hundreds of years before background concentrations are re-established. Overall, the results indicate that legacy Hg deposition will continue to cycle in the environment long after point-source reductions.

  4. Benthic nutrient fluxes in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea) with particular focus on microbial mat ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noffke, A.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Hall, P. O. J.; Pfannkuche, O.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic fluxes and water column distributions of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and total dissolved phosphate (PO43 -) were measured in situ at 7 sites across a redox gradient from oxic to anoxic bottom waters in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea). The study area was divided into the oxic zone (60 to ca. 80 m water depth, O2 > 30 μM), the hypoxic transition zone (HTZ, ca. 80 to 120 m, O2 < 30 μM) and the deep anoxic and sulfidic basin (> ca. 120 m). Sediments in the HTZ were covered by mats of vacuolated sulfur bacteria. Ammonium (NH4+) fluxes in the deep basin and the HTZ were elevated at 0.6 mmol m- 2 d- 1 and 1 mmol m- 2 d- 1, respectively. Nitrate (NO3-) fluxes were directed into the sediment at all stations in the HTZ and were zero in the deep basin. PO43 - release was highest in the HTZ at 0.23 mmol m- 2 d- 1, with a further release of 0.2 mmol m- 2 d- 1 in the deep basin. Up-scaling the benthic fluxes to the Baltic Proper equals 109 kt yr- 1 of PO43 - and 266 kt yr- 1 of DIN. This is eight- and two-fold higher than the total external load of P (14 kt yr- 1) and DIN (140 kt yr- 1) in 2006 (HELCOM 2009b). The HTZ makes an important contribution to the internal nutrient loading in the Baltic Proper, releasing 70% of P (76 kt yr- 1) and 75% of DIN (200 kt yr- 1) despite covering only 51% of area.

  5. Modeling the impact of wind and waves on suspended particulate matter fluxes in the East Frisian Wadden Sea (southern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettmann, Karsten A.; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf; Badewien, Thomas H.

    2009-04-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) fluxes and dynamics are investigated in the East Frisian Wadden Sea using a coupled modeling system based on a hydrodynamical model [the General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM)], a third-generation wave model [Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)], and a SPM module attached to GETM. Sedimentological observations document that, over longer time periods, finer sediment fractions disappear from the Wadden Sea Region. In order to understand this phenomenon, a series of numerical scenarios were formulated to discriminate possible influences such as tidal currents, wind-enhanced currents, and wind-generated surface waves. Starting with a simple tidal forcing, the considered scenarios are designed to increase the realism step by step to include moderate and strong winds and waves and, finally, to encompass the full effects of one of the strongest storm surges affecting the region in the last hundred years (Storm Britta in November 2006). The results presented here indicate that moderate weather conditions with wind speeds up to 7.5 m/s and small waves lead to a net import of SPM into the East Frisian Wadden Sea. Waves play only a negligible role during these conditions. However, for stronger wind conditions with speeds above 13 m/s, wind-generated surface waves have a significant impact on SPM dynamics. Under storm conditions, the numerical results demonstrate that sediments are eroded in front of the barrier islands by enhanced wave action and are transported into the back-barrier basins by the currents. Furthermore, sediment erosion due to waves is significantly enhanced on the tidal flats. Finally, fine sediments are flushed out of the tidal basins due to the combined effect of strong erosion by wind-generated waves and a longer residence time in the water column because of their smaller settling velocities compared to coarser sediments.

  6. Flux, Budget and Sources of Black Carbon (BC) in the Continental Shelf of the Bohai and Yellow Seas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Chen, Y.; Tian, C.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass has received increasing attention due to their potential importance in a wide range of biogeochemical processes. China has been generally considered as the world's largest BC emitter. Due to a combination of the prevailing East Asia monsoon and large amounts of riverine outflow, BC released from China can be transported to the adjacent continental shelf seas, the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS). Based on measurements of BC in 191 surface sediments, 36 riverine water, and 2 seawater samples, as well as the reported BC data set of the aerosol samples in the Bohai Rim, the concentration, flux, and budget of BC in the BS and YS were investigated. The spatial distribution of the BC concentration in surface sediments was largely influenced by the regional hydrodynamic conditions, with high values mainly occurring in the central mud areas. The BC burial flux in the BS and YS ranged from 4 to 1100 μg/cm2/yr, and averaged 166 ± 200 μg/cm2/yr. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux in the entire BS and YS was ~325 Gg/yr. The BC budget calculated in the BS showed that atmospheric deposition and riverine discharge played comparable importance in delivering BC to the BS, and sequestration to bottom sediments was the major BC output pattern, accounting for ~88% of the total input BC. Besides, we attempted to apportion the BC sources in the BS and YS surface sediments using PAHs (organic molecular proxies cogenerated with BC) and BC as an input data to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model. Results showed that ~83% of the sediment BC was attributed to the combustion of fossil fuels, and the remaining ~17% was from biomass burning. Due to the differences in their production mechanisms and therefore physicochemical properties, the above distinction and quantification would help us better understand their different environmental behaviors in the complex continental shelf

  7. Warm-air advection, air mass transformation and fog causes rapid ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, Michael; Shupe, Matthew D.; Brooks, Ian M.; Persson, P. Ola G.; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic J.; Sedlar, Joseph; Achtert, Peggy; Brooks, Barbara J.; Johnston, Paul E.; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Wolfe, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Direct observations during intense warm-air advection over the East Siberian Sea reveal a period of rapid sea-ice melt. A semistationary, high-pressure system north of the Bering Strait forced northward advection of warm, moist air from the continent. Air-mass transformation over melting sea ice formed a strong, surface-based temperature inversion in which dense fog formed. This induced a positive net longwave radiation at the surface while reducing net solar radiation only marginally; the inversion also resulted in downward turbulent heat flux. The sum of these processes enhanced the surface energy flux by an average of ~15 W m-2 for a week. Satellite images before and after the episode show sea-ice concentrations decreasing from > 90% to ~50% over a large area affected by the air-mass transformation. We argue that this rapid melt was triggered by the increased heat flux from the atmosphere due to the warm-air advection.

  8. The composition and flux of water-soluble organic nitrogen and carbon in the marine aerosol of a remote island over the southern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, W.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 194 aerosol samples, collected coarse and fine particles by using a dichotomous sampler from September 2009 to September 2010 at a remote island (Pengchiayu) on the southern East China Sea, for water-soluble major ions, inorganic nitrogen, and high/low organic nitrogen and carbon. To investigate the possible sources of WSON and WSOC, an Ultrafiltration method was used to separate WSON and WSOC into high (HMW; >1kDa) and low (LMW; <1kDa) molecular weight categories. In addition, 4-d back trajectories of air masses arriving daily at the sampling site were calculated to determine the potential aerosol source regions. In this study, the sources of WSON and WSOC were identified by indicator ions (Na+, nss-SO42-, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+), and the fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were calculated by a dual mode model. The obtained concentrations of major ions indicate that a continental source was dominant from January to May and from November to December, a local source derived from Taiwan Island from June and July, and an oceanic source during August. The measured atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen and carbon species show clear seasonal variations and correspond to the different sources and weather conditions. The results indicate that HMW/ LMW of organic nitrogen and carbon contributed 63%/37% and 29%/71%, respectively, to the total dissolved organic species concentration. The results of a factor analysis of combined major ions and organic nitrogen and carbon indicate that biomass burning, crustal sources, and marine sources are the three major controlling factors. The annual fluxes of HMW/ LMW organic nitrogen and carbon were estimated to be 7.61/12.0 and 29.6/12.7 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively.

  9. Measurement of integrated flux of cosmic ray muons at sea level using the INO-ICAL prototype detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, S.; Acharya, B.S.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N.K.; Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B. E-mail: acharya@tifr.res.in E-mail: nkm@tifr.res.in E-mail: bsn@tifr.res.in

    2012-07-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to set-up a magnetized Iron-CALorimeter (ICAL) to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with precise measurements of oscillations parameters. The ICAL uses 50 kton iron as target mass and about 28800 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) of 2 m × 2 m in area as active detector elements. As part of its R and D program, a prototype detector stack comprising 12 layers of RPCs of 1 m × 1 m in area has been set-up at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) to study the detector parameters using cosmic ray muons. We present here a study of muon flux measurement at sea level and lower latitude. (Site latitude: 18°54'N, longitude: 72°48'E.)

  10. Food for the deep sea: utilization, dispersal, and flux of nekton falls at the Santa catalina basin floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Craig R.

    1985-04-01

    The role of large food falls in the ecology of deep-sea benthos has been the topic of much speculation and little direct study. The submersible Alvin and free vehicles were used to assess experimentally the fate and flux of nekton falls at a depth of 1310 m in the Santa Catalina Basin. Parcels of dead fish (1 to 40 kg) placed on the basin floor rapidly attracted large aggregations of fish and invertebrate scavengers, which consumed the bulk of the carrion within hours to days. The most strongly attracted megafaunal scavenger was the ophiuroid Ophiophthalmus normani, the dominant megabenthic species in the background epifaunal assemblage. O. normani attained densities of 700 m -2 in aggregations containing thousands of individuals, and remained at elevated abundance around baitfalls for weeks. Six other megafaunal species also appeared to feed directly on carrion, including two of the next ten most abundant megabenthic organisms. Several of these species exhibited roosting behavior near baitfalls; this is probably an adaptation for exploiting rich but unpredictable food resources. Scavengers consumed bait parcels so rapidly and then dispersed so broadly that energy from nekton falls apparently reaches infaunal benthos only in very attenuated form, yielding at most minor community enhancement. Necrophagy was not the sole cause of megafaunal attraction to bait parcels; there is evidence that three predacious species were drawn to high concentrations of their ophiuroid prey. Benthic standing-crop and turnover-rate estimates for nekton falls suggest that perhaps 11% of benthic community respiratory requirements are met by nekton carcasses reaching the basin floor; the flux of energy to the deep sea through such fall events thus merits further study. These energy bonanzas occur frequently enough that O. normani, and other common necrophages, are likely to encounter at least one nekton fall per year. Such windfalls thus could influence the life histories of several

  11. Decline of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Arctic atmosphere and reversal of air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Jantunen, L. M.; Falconer, R. L.; Barrie, L. A.; Fellin, P.

    1995-02-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are the most abundant organochlorine pesticides in the arctic atmosphere and ocean surface water. A compilation of measurements made between 1979-93 from stations in the Canadian and Norwegian Arctic and from cruises in the Bering and Chukchi seas indicates that atmospheric concentrations of α-HCH have declined significantly (p < 0.01), with a time for 50% decrease of about 4 y in summer-fall and 6 y in winter-spring. The 1992-93 levels of about 100 pg m-3 are 2-4 fold lower than values in the mid-1980s. The trend in γ-HCH is less pronounced, but a decrease is also suggested from measurements in the Canadian Arctic and the Bering-Chukchi seas. HCHs in ocean surface water have remained relatively constant since the early 1980s. The decline in atmospheric α-HCH has reversed the net direction of air-sea gas exchange to the point where some northern waters are now sources of the pesticide to the atmosphere instead of sinks.

  12. Cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel: effects of wind on snow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, Hannu

    2015-08-01

    Wintertime cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel or a long lake can become destructive if the related bands of heavy snowfall hit onto land. The forcing for such bands is studied with a 2D numerical model set across an east-west sea channel at 60oN (`Gulf of Finland'), varying the basic geostrophic wind V g. Without any V g opposite coastal land breezes emerge with convergence. This results in a quasi-steady rising motion w max ~ 7.5 cm/s at 600 m in the middle of the gulf, which can force a snow band. During weak V g, the rising motion is reduced but least so for winds from 60o to 80o (~ENE), when modest alongshore bands could exist near the downstream (Estonian) coast. During V g of 4-6 m/s from any direction, the land breezes and rising motions are reduced more effectively, so snow bands are not expected during moderate basic flow. In contrast, during a strong V g of 20-25 m/s from 110o to 120o (~ESE) the land breeze perturbations are intense with w max up to 15-18 cm/s. The induced alongshore bands of heavy snowfall are located in these cases at the sea but quite close to the downstream (Finnish) coast. They can suddenly make a landfall if the basic wind turns clockwise.

  13. Characterization of air contaminants formed by the interaction of lava and sea water.

    PubMed

    Kullman, G J; Jones, W G; Cornwell, R J; Parker, J E

    1994-05-01

    We made environmental measurements to characterize contaminants generated when basaltic lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano enters sea water. This interaction of lava with sea water produces large clouds of mist (LAZE). Island winds occasionally directed the LAZE toward the adjacent village of Kalapana and the Hawaii Volcanos National Park, creating health concerns. Environmental samples were taken to measure airborne concentrations of respirable dust, crystalline silica and other mineral compounds, fibers, trace metals, inorganic acids, and organic and inorganic gases. The LAZE contained quantifiable concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF); HCl was predominant. HCl and HF concentrations were highest in dense plumes of LAZE near the sea. The HCl concentration at this sampling location averaged 7.1 ppm; this exceeds the current occupational exposure ceiling of 5 ppm. HF was detected in nearly half the samples, but all concentrations were <1 ppm Sulfur dioxide was detected in one of four short-term indicator tube samples at approximately 1.5 ppm. Airborne particulates were composed largely of chloride salts (predominantly sodium chloride). Crystalline silica concentrations were below detectable limits, less than approximately 0.03 mg/m3 of air. Settled dust samples showed a predominance of glass flakes and glass fibers. Airborne fibers were detected at quantifiable levels in 1 of 11 samples. These fibers were composed largely of hydrated calcium sulfate. These findings suggest that individuals should avoid concentrated plumes of LAZE near its origin to prevent over exposure to inorganic acids, specifically HCl.

  14. Characterization of air contaminants formed by the interaction of lava and sea water.

    PubMed

    Kullman, G J; Jones, W G; Cornwell, R J; Parker, J E

    1994-05-01

    We made environmental measurements to characterize contaminants generated when basaltic lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano enters sea water. This interaction of lava with sea water produces large clouds of mist (LAZE). Island winds occasionally directed the LAZE toward the adjacent village of Kalapana and the Hawaii Volcanos National Park, creating health concerns. Environmental samples were taken to measure airborne concentrations of respirable dust, crystalline silica and other mineral compounds, fibers, trace metals, inorganic acids, and organic and inorganic gases. The LAZE contained quantifiable concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF); HCl was predominant. HCl and HF concentrations were highest in dense plumes of LAZE near the sea. The HCl concentration at this sampling location averaged 7.1 ppm; this exceeds the current occupational exposure ceiling of 5 ppm. HF was detected in nearly half the samples, but all concentrations were <1 ppm Sulfur dioxide was detected in one of four short-term indicator tube samples at approximately 1.5 ppm. Airborne particulates were composed largely of chloride salts (predominantly sodium chloride). Crystalline silica concentrations were below detectable limits, less than approximately 0.03 mg/m3 of air. Settled dust samples showed a predominance of glass flakes and glass fibers. Airborne fibers were detected at quantifiable levels in 1 of 11 samples. These fibers were composed largely of hydrated calcium sulfate. These findings suggest that individuals should avoid concentrated plumes of LAZE near its origin to prevent over exposure to inorganic acids, specifically HCl. PMID:8593853

  15. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  16. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  17. Compact optical system for imaging underwater and through the air/sea interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, Derek; Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan

    2012-06-01

    Typical line-of-sight (LOS)/monostatic optical imaging systems include a laser source and receiver that are co-located on the same platform. The performance of such systems is deteriorated in turbid ocean water due to the large amount of light that is scattered on the path to and from an object of interest. Imagery collected with the LOS/monostatic system through the air/sea interface is also distorted due to wave focusing/defocusing effects. The approach of this project is to investigate an alternate, non-line-of-sight (NLOS)/bistatic approach that offers some advantages over these traditional LOS/monostatic imaging techniques. In this NLOS system the laser and receiver are located on separate platforms with the laser located closer to the object of interest. As the laser sequentially scans the underwater object, a time-varying intensity signal corresponding to reflectivity changes in the object is detected by the distant receiver. A modulated laser illuminator is used to communicate information about the scan to the distant receiver so it can recreate the image with the collected scattered light. This NLOS/bistatic configuration also enables one to view an underwater target through the air-sea interface (transmitter below the surface and receiver above the surface) without the distortions experienced with the LOS/monostatic sensor. In this paper, we will review the results of recent laboratory water tank experiments where an underwater object was imaged with the receiver both below and above the sea surface.

  18. PAH and PCB in the Baltic -- A budget approach including fluxes, occurrence and concentration variability in air, suspended and settling particulates in water, surface sediments and river water

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bandh, C.; Ishaq, R.; Naef, C.; Pettersen, H.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In order to study the fate and occurrence of two groups of hydrophobic compounds in the Baltic aquatic environment a large number of samples were collected from the southern Baltic proper to the northern Bothnian Bay for the analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The following sample matrices were collected; bottom surface sediments (0--1 cm, collected with gravity corer), settling particulate matter (collected with sediment traps), open water samples and over water samples (suspended particulates and dissolved fraction sampled by filtration) and air samples (aerosols and vapor phase sampled by filtration). All samples (except over water and air) were collected at open sea in the Baltic. The analyses results have been used to make a model approach on the whole Baltic and to elucidate different aspects of the behavior of PAHs and PCBs in the Baltic, such as the occurrence of the compounds in water and sediment, the total content as well as the concentration variabilities over such a large geographical area, Further, the data on settling particulate matter as well as the air concentration data were used to estimate the total fluxes of PAHs and PCBs to the bottoms of the Baltic and t o the total water area of the Baltic, respectively. Further, data on the PAH and PCB content in river water from four major rivers provides rough estimates of the riverine input to the Baltic. The dynamics of PAHs and PCBs within the water mass have also been studied in terms of settling velocities and residence times in the water mass for these type of compounds in the open Baltic.

  19. [Comparative study on water-air CO2, CH4 flux in two tributaries in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Bai, Lei; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Jiang, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is a huge reservoir under the subtropical climate condition. It shows great spatio-temporal heterogeneity on biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the TGR's aquatic ecosystem. 1 a field monitoring on water-air CO2 and CH4 fluxes was conducted from June, 2010 to May, 2011 in Longxi River and Pengxi River, the 2 typical tributaries in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Comparative study showed that annual CO2 diffusive fluxes in the Longxi River and Pengxi River were (7.30 +/- 1.89) mmol x (m2 x h)(-1) and (0.71 +/- 0.46) mmol x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively, and the CH4 diffusive fluxes were (0.11 +/- 0.095) mmol x (m2 x h)(-1) and (0.007 4 +/- 0.001 7) mmol x (m2 x h)(-1). Higher intensities and seasonal variance of CO2 and CH4 fluxes were observed in Longxi River compared to those in Pengxi River. Through a comparative analysis of the environmental and watershed parameters in both rivers, it was found that the unstable hydraulic conditions and habitat of Longxi River prohibited the growth of phytoplankton, reducing its capability of carbon assimilation. The higher pollution load in the basin and the higher organic matters and total nitrogen in the impounding soil of Longxi River also resulted in the higher level of greenhouse gas fluxes compared to those in the Pengxi River. More studies shall be conducted to elucidate the variance of CH4 flux and its controlling factors in both rivers.

  20. Eddy-Covariance methane flux studies in the Russian Arctic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyuk, Anatoly; Semiletov, Igor

    2010-05-01

    The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is a unique area of the World Ocean. First, being the largest and shallowest shelf area of the World Ocean with a mean depth of 48 m (Laptev), 58 m (East-Siberian), and 80 m (Chukchi) and corresponding areas of 498×103 km2, 987×103 km2, and 620×103 km2, respectively, the ESAS represents about 47% of the whole area of the Arctic shelves which is about 50% of the total area of the Arctic Ocean. Second, it is shallow, representing a short conduit for seabed CH4 to the atmosphere. Data from more than 5000 water samples collected between 2003-2009 showed the ESAS as a strong CH4 source into the atmosphere (Shakhova et al 2009, 2007). It is also proved by the helicopter survey (Salyuk et al., 2009). Here we present some results of eddy-covariance (EC) CH4 flux study performed in 2007 and 2008. The measurements were done using a flux package that consists of: high-resolution fast methane analyzer (DLT-100; response time:

  1. Hurricane Isabel, AIRS Infrared and SeaWinds Scatterometer Data Combined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    These two images show Hurricane Isabel as viewed by AIRS and each of the two SeaWinds scatterometers on the ADEOS-2 and QuikScat satellites, all JPL-managed experiments. AIRS data are used to create global three-dimensional maps of temperature, humidity and clouds, while scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction.

    Figure 1 shows Isabel on September 13, 2003, when it was a Category 5 storm threatening the Caribbean and southern United States. At the time Isabel was the strongest Atlantic storm since hurricane Mitch killed thousands in central America in 1997. The red vectors in the image show Isabel's surface winds as measured by SeaWinds on ADEOS-2, and the background colors show the temperature of clouds and surface, as viewed in the infrared by AIRS. The hurricane's powerful swirling winds are apparent. These winds circle the hurricane's eye, seen as the red dot near the middle top of the image. Light blue areas shows adjacent cold clouds tops associated with strong thunderstorms embedded within the storm.

    Figure 2 shows Isabel as it approached landfall on the outer banks of North Carolina on September 18. The hurricane weakened in the five days since the earlier image was observed, as indicated by a less clearly defined eye. Nevertheless, it was still a powerful storm. The winds blowing onshore north of the eye knocked over trees, blew roofs off buildings, and drove large waves that breached the coastal barrier islands in many places. Water, transportation and power are still not fully restored to many of the areas in the image. The winds apparently blowing away from the eye of the storm are an artifact of one of the hurricane's other destructive phenomena: rain. The darkest blue clouds observed by AIRS show the most intense thunderstorms, and hence the heaviest rains. Hard rain fools the the SeaWinds on Quik

  2. Study of air-sea interaction processes over the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal using satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, N.; Simon, B.; Pandey, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to study the latitudinal and seasonal variation of latent heat fluxes (LHF) and associated atmospheric and oceanic parameters over the Arabian Sea (AS) and the Bay of Bengal (BB) for the year 1988. A significant latitudinal variation is observed in LHF for most of the months over the AS and the BB, while other oceanic and atmospheric parameters are characterized by a strong latitudinal variation in nonmonsoon months. Seasonal variations in LHF are more significant at higher latitudes compared to lower latitudes over the AS and the BB. The effect of coastal upwelling near the Somali coast decreases LHF, while surface winds near the Indian coast during monsoon months increases LHF. A comparative study over the AS and the BB demonstrates higher PW and SST over the BB than over the AS. LHF is found to be greater over the AS than over the BB for nonmonsoon months. Correlation analysis indicates that LHF is found to be highly correlated with DQ (difference between the humidity at the surface and humidity near the surface) over the AS and weakly correlated over the BB during nonmonsoon months. Throughout the year, DQ is found to be a dominant factor for LHF over the AS. However, WS exercised better control over the BB in generating LHF. SST and PW are found to be highly correlated with each other over the AS (r = 0.87) and the BB (r = 0.75) for nonmonsoon months. The correlation becomes weakly negative over the AS (r = 0.15) and weak over the BB (r = 0.26) during monsoon months. Precipitable water is found to have a high correlation with WS over the AS (r = 0.72). This unique feature is revealed by SSM/I data and has not been reported earlier due to paucity of data over this region.

  3. Downward fluxes of elemental carbon, metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in settling particles from the deep Ionian Sea (NESTOR site), Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosi, C.; Parinos, C.; Gogou, A.; Kokotos, A.; Stavrakakis, S.; Lykousis, V.; Hatzianestis, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2013-07-01

    To assess sources and major processes controlling the vertical transport of both anthropogenic and natural chemical species in a deep basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (SE Ionian Sea, Nestor site), we performed chemical characterization (elemental carbon, major and trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of marine sinking particles. Sediment traps were deployed at five successive depths, 700, 1200, 2000, 3200 and 4300 m from the sea surface from May 2007 to October 2008. Fluxes of all measured chemical species, attributed to both natural and anthropogenic sources, exhibited minimum values from January to March 2008 and maximum from April to September 2008. Crustal matter flux from atmospheric inputs - either "freshly" deposited or stored in the surface layers - plays an important role in the temporal variability of particulate marine matter fluxes along with particulate organic carbon export, imposing ballast effects. Tracers (elemental carbon, retene) of the devastating forest fires that occurred in August 2007 in southern Greece were detected in sediment trap material from all depths with a delay of 15 days at 4300 m, indicating a rapid and well-coupled transport of sinking particulate material between the sea-surface and deep layers of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. This is in accordance with an evident covariance between certain compounds, suggesting common sources and/or transport mechanisms to depth. Lateral inputs of pollutants at the deepest trap (4300 m) are probably of importance, related to the periodic influence of deep Adriatic water at the study site.

  4. Downward fluxes of elemental carbon, metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in settling particles from the deep Ionian Sea (NESTOR site), Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosi, C.; Parinos, C.; Gogou, A.; Kokotos, A.; Stavrakakis, S.; Lykousis, V.; Hatzianestis, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2012-12-01

    To assess sources and major processes controlling vertical transport of both anthropogenic and natural chemical species in deep basins of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (SE Ionian Sea, Nestor site), we performed chemical characterization (elemental carbon, major and trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of marine sinking particles. Sediment traps were deployed at five successive depths, 700 m, 1200 m, 2000 m, 3200 m and 4300 m from the sea surface, during the period of May 2007 to October 2008. Fluxes of all measured species exhibited minimum values from January to March 2008 and maximum from April to September 2008, with an evident covariance revealing a common and rapid vertical transport mechanism from 700 m down to 4300 m depth. Crustal matter flux from atmospheric deposition plays an important role in the temporal variability of particulate matter with significant contribution from biogenic constituents namely the seasonal succession in the export of planktonic biomass, expressed by particulate organic carbon (POC), carbonates and biogenic Si fluxes (Stavrakakis et al., 2012). Tracers (elemental carbon, retene) of the devastating forest fires occurred in August 2007 in southern Greece, were detected at sediment trap material in all depths with a delay of 15 days at 4300 m, indicating a rapid and well-coupled transport of sinking particulate material between the sea-surface and deep layers of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Lateral inputs of pollutants at the deepest trap (4300 m) are probably of importance, due to the influence of deep Adriatic water at the study site.

  5. Microwave and Electro-optical Transmission Experiments in the air-sea Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    2002-12-01

    , deployment, operation, and recovery of R/P FLIP. These problems ranged from the U.S.N.S. Sioux cutting a mooring line, which delayed deployment by more than 4 days, nearly loosing Tommy during the first attempt at deployment, inadequate air conditioning in the lab spaces, causing at least one instrument to temporarily fail, and problems associated with too many people and too many sensors on board. These issues will be discussed and recommendations will be made to improve future microwave and electro-optical experiments at sea.

  6. From pores to eddies - linking diffusion-based evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces with a turbulent air boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, E.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaporation affects hydration and energy balance of terrestrial surfaces. Evaporation rates exhibit complex dynamics reflecting interactions between external conditions and internal transport properties of a the drying porous surface Motivated by recent progress in estimating evaporative fluxes from isolated pores across laminar air sublayer, we seek to expand the description and quantify evaporation across a turbulent boundary layer. We adopt concepts from surface renewal (SR) theory focusing on turbulent exchange with individual eddies and linking eddies surface footprint and their local boundary layer over patches of a drying surface. The model resolves diffusive exchange during limited residence time and integrates fluxes over the entire surface to quantify mean evaporative fluxes from drying surfaces into turbulent airflows accounting for subsurface internal transport processes and diffusive exchanges. Input parameters and model evaluation would be based on data from spatially and temporally resolved Infrared (IR) thermography of drying surfaces under prescribe turbulent regimes conducted in a wind-tunnel experiment. The study provides basic ingredients and building blocks essential for upscaling the results to estimation of evaporative fluxes at the field and landscape scales. Keywords: Evaporation; Turbulent Coupling; Surface Renewal; Infrared Imaging.