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Sample records for air shield cyclone

  1. Cyclone: A close air support aircraft for tomorrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George; Croulet, Donald; Dunn, James; Graham, Michael; Ip, Phillip; Low, Scott; Vance, Gregg; Volckaert, Eric

    1991-01-01

    To meet the threat of the battlefield of the future, the U.S. ground forces will require reliable air support. To provide this support, future aircrews demand a versatile close air support aircraft capable of delivering ordinance during the day, night, or in adverse weather with pin-point accuracy. The Cyclone aircraft meets these requirements, packing the 'punch' necessary to clear the way for effective ground operations. Possessing anti-armor, missile, and precision bombing capability, the Cyclone will counter the threat into the 21st Century. Here, it is shown that the Cyclone is a realistic, economical answer to the demand for a capable close air support aircraft.

  2. Divisional Air Defense: The Shield of Blows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-19

    destroy missions. The early tactics used by the Hinds indicated a total lack of respect for the resistance fighters. The aircraft engaged the ground ...AD-A264 505 SDivisional Air Defense: The Shield of Blows DTI ELECTE MAY 19 1993 A Monograph U A by Major Cornell T. McGhee Air Defense Artillery...blank) " 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Monograph 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE "S. FUNDING NUMBERS Divisional Air Defense: The Shield of

  3. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  4. The Impact of Dry Saharan Air on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The controversial role of the dry Saharan Air Layer (SAL) on tropical storm intensification in the Atlantic will be addressed. The SAL has been argued in previous studies to have potential positive influences on storm development, but most recent studies have argued for a strong suppressing influence on storm intensification as a result of dry air, high stability, increased vertical wind shear, and microphysical impacts of dust. Here, we focus on observations of Hurricane Helene (2006), which occurred during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities (NAMMA) experiment. Satellite and airborne observations, combined with global meteorological analyses depict the initial environment of Helene as being dominated by the SAL, although with minimal evidence that the SAL air actually penetrated to the core of the disturbance. Over the next several days, the SAL air quickly moved westward and was gradually replaced by a very dry, dust-free layer associated with subsidence. Despite the wrapping of this very dry air around the storm, Helene intensified steadily to a Category 3 hurricane suggesting that the dry air was unable to significantly slow storm intensification. Several uncertainties remain about the role of the SAL in Helene (and in tropical cyclones in general). To better address these uncertainties, NASA will be conducting a three year airborne campaign called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3). The HS3 objectives are: To obtain critical measurements in the hurricane environment in order to identify the role of key factors such as large-scale wind systems (troughs, jet streams), Saharan air masses, African Easterly Waves and their embedded critical layers (that help to isolate tropical disturbances from hostile environments). To observe and understand the three-dimensional mesoscale and convective-scale internal structures of tropical disturbances and cyclones and their role in intensity change. The mission objectives will be achieved using

  5. High performance cyclone development

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of cold flow experiments at atmospheric conditions of an air-shielded 18 in-dia electrocyclone with a central cusped electrode are reported using fine test dusts of both flyash and nickel powder. These results are found to confirm expectations of enhanced performance, similar to earlier work on a 12 in-dia model. An analysis of the combined inertial-electrostatic force field is also presented which identifies general design goals and scaling laws. From this, it is found that electrostatic enhancement will be particularly beneficial for fine dusts in large cyclones. Recommendations for further improvement in cyclone collection efficiency are proposed.

  6. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Hofmann, P

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005.

  7. The Emerging Shield. The Air Force and the Evolution of Continental Air Defense 1945-1960

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    pp 219-29. 36. Cuthbertson, Canadian Military 24. For the decision to equip the Independence, pp 50-51. Arrow with the most up - todate missile and...of war is not a simple shield, but a shield made up of well-directed blows." Also, after meeting an attack, Clausewitz ad- vocated that a military...Waggonfabrik. The more advanced models, as fast as contemporary pursuit planes, could remain in the air up to 6 hours. Armed with 3 defensive

  8. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-06-16

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone.

  9. Air-sea interactions during tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi, R.; Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V. M.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of air-sea momentum flux during tropical cyclone is one of the most important fields of study in wind - wave modeling and prediction. A number of studies suggested that the Charnock coefficient depends on the sea state. The Charnock coefficient (α) is firstly considered as a constant 0.0144 (Charnock, 1955). Toba et al. (1990) suggested that α increases with the wave age (β) based on the observations of mostly young waves in a wave flume, while Donelan (1990), Johnson et al. (1998), Lange et al. (2004), showed that α decreases with the wave age β. Moon et al. (2004) studied the effect of surface waves on Charnock coefficient under tropical cyclones and pointed out that the Charnock coefficient is mainly determined by two parameters: the wave age and the wind speed. Also there is a strong correlation between drag coefficient (Cd) and wave age (β) for each wind speed. When the wind speed is higher than 30 m/s, Cd will increase with β, otherwise Cd will decrease with increasing β. Amorocho et al. (1980) showed that three regions exist in the development of the wind stress: (i) a lower region in which the wind waves have not begun to break, for which drag coefficient (Cd) is approximately constant; (ii) a transitional region after the onset of breakers, for which Cd varies non-linearly with U10; (iii) a limiting region for which Cd tends again toward a constant value, and corresponds to a condition of breaker saturation. The three regions described above can be classified as 'low roughness', 'transitional', and 'high roughness', respectively. Wavewatch III model was used to study the air sea interaction during tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean. ECMWF winds (2.5° x 2.5°) have been used for forcing the wave model. Air-sea momentum data was obtained by simulating wave fields of tropical cyclones during 1996 in the Indian Ocean. The wave parameters from the model results have been compared with measured buoy data and with merged altimeter data. The

  10. Experimental study on cyclone air gasification of wood powder.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaozeng; Zhao, Yijun; Tian, Hongming; Ling, Feng; Su, Fengming

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, effects of the equivalence ratio (ER) and the secondary air on the gasification system were studied. The results indicate that as the ER varies in the range of 0.20-0.26, the low heating value (LHV) of the producer gas is in the range of 3.64-5.76 MJ/Nm(3), the carbon conversion is 55%-67% and the cold gas efficiency of the gasification system is 33%-47%. In contrast to the gasification without the secondary air, air staged process is a gasification method capable of increasing the LHV of the producer gas from 4.63 to 5.67 MJ/Nm(3), the carbon conversion from 65.5% to 81.2%, and the cold gas efficiency of the gasifier from 42.5% to 56.87%, while the tar content of the producer gas decreases from 13.96 to 5.6g/Nm(3). There exists an optimum ratio of the secondary air.

  11. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality and aerosol formation in the Colorado Front Range during FRAPPÉ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Kennedy T.; Dingle, Justin H.; Bahreini, Roya; Reddy, Patrick J.; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott C.; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Pusede, Sally E.; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Sachse, Glen W.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Walega, James; Weibring, Peter; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Pfister, Gabriele; Flocke, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We present airborne measurements made during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ) project to investigate the impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality in the greater Denver area. Data on trace gases, non-refractory submicron aerosol chemical constituents, and aerosol optical extinction (βext) at λ = 632 nm were evaluated in the presence and absence of the surface mesoscale circulation in three distinct study regions of the Front Range: In-Flow, Northern Front Range, and the Denver metropolitan area. Pronounced increases in mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in the Northern Front Range and the Denver metropolitan area were observed during the cyclone episodes (27-28 July) compared to the non-cyclonic days (26 July, 2-3 August). Organic aerosols dominated the mass concentrations on all evaluated days, with a 45 % increase in organics on cyclone days across all three regions, while the increase during the cyclone episode was up to ˜ 80 % over the Denver metropolitan area. In the most aged air masses (NOx / NOy < 0.5), background organic aerosols over the Denver metropolitan area increased by a factor of ˜ 2.5 due to transport from Northern Front Range. Furthermore, enhanced partitioning of nitric acid to the aerosol phase was observed during the cyclone episodes, mainly due to increased abundance of gas phase ammonia. During the non-cyclone events, βext displayed strong correlations (r = 0.71) with organic and nitrate in the Northern Front Range and only with organics (r = 0.70) in the Denver metropolitan area, while correlation of βext during the cyclone was strongest (r = 0.86) with nitrate over Denver. Mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values in the Denver metropolitan area were similar on cyclone and non-cyclone days despite the dominant influence of different aerosol species on βext. Our analysis showed that the meteorological patterns associated with the Denver Cyclone increased aerosol

  12. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    Air-sea interaction dramatically changes from moderate to very high wind speed conditions (Donelan et al. 2004). Unresolved physics of the air-sea interface are one of the weakest components in tropical cyclone prediction models. Rapid disruption of the air-water interface under very high wind speed conditions was reported in laboratory experiments (Koga 1981) and numerical simulations (Soloviev et al. 2012), which resembled the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at an interface with very large density difference. Kelly (1965) demonstrated that the KH instability at the air-sea interface can develop through parametric amplification of waves. Farrell and Ioannou (2008) showed that gustiness results in the parametric KH instability of the air-sea interface, while the gusts are due to interacting waves and turbulence. The stochastic forcing enters multiplicatively in this theory and produces an exponential wave growth, augmenting the growth from the Miles (1959) theory as the turbulence level increases. Here we complement this concept by adding the effect of the two-phase environment near the mean interface, which introduces additional viscosity in the system (turning it into a rheological system). The two-phase environment includes air-bubbles and re-entering spray (spume), which eliminates a portion of the wind-wave wavenumber spectrum that is responsible for a substantial part of the air sea drag coefficient. The previously developed KH-type interfacial parameterization (Soloviev and Lukas 2010) is unified with two versions of the wave growth model. The unified parameterization in both cases exhibits the increase of the drag coefficient with wind speed until approximately 30 m/s. Above this wind speed threshold, the drag coefficient either nearly levels off or even slightly drops (for the wave growth model that accounts for the shear) and then starts again increasing above approximately 65 m/s wind speed. Remarkably, the unified parameterization reveals a local minimum

  13. Quality control of AIRS total column ozone data within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yin; Zou, Xiaolei

    2016-06-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides infrared radiance observations twice daily, which can be used to retrieve total column ozone with high spatial resolution. However, it was found that almost all of the ozone data within typhoons and hurricanes were flagged to be of bad quality by the AIRS original quality control (QC) scheme. This determination was based on the ratio of total precipitable water (TPW) error divided by TPW value, where TPW was an AIRS retrieval product. It was found that the difficulty in finding total column ozone data that could pass AIRS QC was related to the low TPWemployed in the AIRS QC algorithm. In this paper, a new two-step QC scheme for AIRS total column ozone is developed. A new ratio is defined which replaces the AIRS TPW with the zonal mean TPW retrieved from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit. The first QC step is to remove outliers when the new ratio exceeds 33%. Linear regression models between total column ozone and mean potential vorticity are subsequently developed with daily updates, which are required for future applications of the proposed total ozone QC algorithm to vortex initialization and assimilation of AIRS data. In the second QC step, observations that significantly deviate from the models are further removed using a biweighting algorithm. Numerical results for two typhoon cases and two hurricane cases show that a large amount of good quality AIRS total ozone data is kept within Tropical Cyclones after implementing the proposed QC algorithm.

  14. Experimental study on air-stream gasification of biomass micron fuel (BMF) in a cyclone gasifier.

    PubMed

    Guo, X J; Xiao, B; Zhang, X L; Luo, S Y; He, M Y

    2009-01-01

    Based on biomass micron fuel (BMF) with particle size of less than 250 microm, a cyclone gasifier concept has been considered in our laboratory for biomass gasification. The concept combines and integrates partial oxidation, fast pyrolysis, gasification, and tar cracking, as well as a shift reaction, with the purpose of producing a high quality of gas. In this paper, experiments of BMF air-stream gasification were carried out by the gasifier, with energy for BMF gasification produced by partial combustion of BMF within the gasifier using a hypostoichiometric amount of air. The effects of ER (0.22-0.37) and S/B (0.15-0.59) and biomass particle size on the performances of BMF gasification and the gasification temperature were studied. Under the experimental conditions, the temperature, gas yields, LHV of the gas fuel, carbon conversion efficiency, stream decomposition and gasification efficiency varied in the range of 586-845 degrees C, 1.42-2.21 N m(3)/kg biomass, 3806-4921 kJ/m(3), 54.44%-85.45%, 37.98%-70.72%, and 36.35%-56.55%, respectively. The experimental results showed that the gasification performance was best with ER being 3.7 and S/B being 0.31 and smaller particle, as well as H(2)-content. And the BMF gasification by air and low temperature stream in the cyclone gasifier with the energy self-sufficiency is reliable.

  15. AIRS Impact on the Analysis and Forecast Track of Tropical Cyclone Nargis in a Global Data Assimilation and Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, W.K.; Susskind, J.; Brin, E.; Liu, E.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Rosenburg, R.; Fuentes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Tropical cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean pose serious challenges to operational weather forecasting systems, partly due to their shorter lifespan and more erratic track, compared to those in the Atlantic and the Pacific. Moreover, the automated analyses of cyclones over the northern Indian Ocean, produced by operational global data assimilation systems (DASs), are generally of inferior quality than in other basins. In this work it is shown that the assimilation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature retrievals under partial cloudy conditions can significantly impact the representation of the cyclone Nargis (which caused devastating loss of life in Myanmar in May 2008) in a global DAS. Forecasts produced from these improved analyses by a global model produce substantially smaller track errors. The impact of the assimilation of clear-sky radiances on the same DAS and forecasting system is positive, but smaller than the one obtained by ingestion of AIRS retrievals, possibly due to poorer coverage.

  16. Observed air-sea interactions in tropical cyclone Isaac over Loop Current mesoscale eddy features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, Benjamin; Shay, Lynn K.; Brewster, Jodi K.

    2016-12-01

    Air-sea interactions during the intensification of tropical storm Isaac (2012) into a hurricane, over warm oceanic mesoscale eddy features, are investigated using airborne oceanographic and atmospheric profilers. Understanding these complex interactions is critical to correctly evaluating and predicting storm effects on marine and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, wind-driven mixing and transport of suspended matter throughout the water column, and oceanic feedbacks on storm intensity. Isaac strengthened as it moved over a Loop Current warm-core eddy (WCE) where sea surface warming (positive feedback mechanism) of ∼0.5 °C was measured over a 12-h interval. Enhanced bulk enthalpy fluxes were estimated during this intensification stage due to an increase in moisture disequilibrium between the ocean and atmosphere. These results support the hypothesis that enhanced buoyant forcing from the ocean is an important intensification mechanism in tropical cyclones over warm oceanic mesoscale eddy features. Larger values in equivalent potential temperature (θE = 365   ∘K) were measured inside the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) over the WCE, where the vertical shear in horizontal currents (δV) remained stable and the ensuing cooling vertical mixing was negligible; smaller values in θE (355   ∘K) were measured over an oceanic frontal cyclone, where vertical mixing and upper-ocean cooling were more intense due to instability development in δV . Thus, correctly representing oceanic mesoscale eddy features in coupled numerical models is important to accurately reproduce oceanic responses to tropical cyclone forcing, as well as the contrasting thermodynamic forcing of the HBL that often causes storm intensity fluctuations over these warm oceanic regimes.

  17. A Unified Air-Sea Interface for Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    A Unified Air-Sea Interface for Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones Annual Progress...interaction and its impact on rapid intensity changes in tropical cyclones (TCs), and to develop a physically based and computationally efficient...Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  18. AIRS-observed warm core structures of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Si; Chen, Baiqing; Li, Tim; Wu, Naigeng; Deng, Wenjian

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature profiles during the period 2003-2013 are used to examine the warm core structures and evolution characteristics associated with the formation and development of western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TCs). The warm core with a steady 1.5-K warming in the layer of 500-300 hPa occurs 24 h prior to tropical storm formation. Apparent eye warming extends upward to upper troposphere and downward to near surface after tropical storm formation. TC intensity shows a robust positive correlation with the warm core strength and has a weaker but still significant positive correlation with the warm core height (the weaker correlation is primarily attributed to the scattered warm core heights of weak TCs). Future 24-h intensity change of TCs has little correlation with the warm core height while it has a significant negative correlation with the warm core strength. Weak to moderate warm core at 500-200 hPa may be a necessary but not sufficient initial condition for TC rapid intensification. AIRS-observed warm core structures, in combination with other environmental factors, have the potential to improve the prediction of tropical storm formation and rapid intensification of WNP TCs.

  19. Impacts of Air-Sea Interaction on Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Wang, Bin; Braun, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of hurricane-ocean coupling on intensity and track of tropical cyclones (TCs) is investigated through idealized numerical experiments using a coupled hurricane-ocean model. The focus is placed on how air-sea interaction affects TC tracks and intensity. It is found that the symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) cooling is primarily responsible for the TC weakening in the coupled experiments because the induced asymmetric circulation associated with the asymmetric SST anomalies is weak and shallow. The track difference between the coupled and fixed SST experiments is generally small because of the competing processes. One is associated with the modified TC asymmetries. The asymmetric SST anomalies - weaken the surface fluxes in the rear and enhance the fluxes in the front. As a result, the enhanced diabatic heating is located on the southern side for a westward-moving TC, tending to shift the TC southward. The symmetric SST anomalies weakens the TC intensity and thus the dymmetrization process, leading to more prominent TC asymmetries. The other is associated with the weakening of the beta drift resulting from the weakening of the TC outer strength. In the coupled experiment, the weakening of the beta drift leads to a more northward shift. By adjusting the vortex outer strength of the initial vortices, the beta drift can vary while the effect of air-sea interaction changes little. Two types of track differences simulated in the previous numerical studies are obtained.

  20. Saharan Air and Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Suppression From a Global Modeling Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, W. K. M.; daSilva, A.; Kim, K.-M.

    2007-01-01

    During summer 2006, the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) organized a field campaign in Africa called Special Observation Period (SOP-3), in which scientists in the field were involved in a number of surface network and aircraft measurements. One of the scientific goals of the campaign was to understand the nature and causes for tropical cyclogenesis originating out of African Easterly Waves (AEWs, westward propagating atmospheric disturbances sometimes associated with precursors of hurricanes), and the role that the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, a hot and dry air layer advecting large amounts of dust) can play in the formation or suppression of tropical cyclones. During the NAMMA campaign a high-resolution global model, the NASA GEOS-5, was operationally run by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) in support to the mission. The daily GEOS-5 forecasts were found to be very useful by decision-making scientists in the field as an aid to discriminate between developing and non-developing AEWs and plan the flight tracks. In the post-event analyses which were performed mostly by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres, two events were highlighted: a non-developing AEW which appeared to have been suppressed by Saharan air, compared to a developing AEW which was the precursor of hurricane Helene. Both events were successfully predicted by the GEOS-5 during the real-time forecasts provided in support to the mission. In this work it is found that very steep moisture gradients and a strong thermal dipole, with relatively warm air in the mid-troposphere and cool air below, are associated with SAL in both the GEOS-5 forecasts and the NCEP analyses, even at -great distance- from the Sahara. The presence of these unusual thermodynamic features over the Atlantic Ocean, at several thousands of kilometers from the African coastline, is suggestive that SAL mixing is very minimal and that the model's capability of retaining the different properties

  1. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  2. Mechanisms for secondary eyewall formation, and cold-air damming: Tropical cyclone interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rivera, Jose Manuel

    This dissertation consists of two topics, the mechanisms leading to secondary eyewall formation in tropical cyclones, and effects of tropical cyclone---cold-air interactions on heavy precipitation. The first research topic involves a proposed coupled mechanism for secondary eyewall formation (SEF; initiation of an eyewall replacement cycle), using a WRF-ARW simulation of Hurricane Katrina (2005). The storm underwent a series of structural changes that were deemed necessary for the cycle to begin. These included a significant increase of rainband activity in the SEF region and the eventual vertical coupling of azimuthal-mean updrafts that led to cycle initiation. Increased rainband activity outside the primary eyewall in the hours before was mostly related to an intensifying main feeder band. Close to initiation, an updraft (explained by a pre-existing hypothesis) emerged outside the primary eyewall near the top of the boundary layer (BL). This updraft then intensified and extended both upward and outward, while the storm intensified and approached SEF. Eventually, the updraft coupled with the upward motion associated with rainband-related convection near the SEF radius. Once the alignment occurred, the deep updraft quickly organized to support deep convection that led to SEF within hours of initiation. The coupling of updrafts emanating from the BL with the environmental upward motion associated with the pre-existing rainband activity is proposed to be the key for SEF initiation in this case. The second topic investigates the interactions between an Appalachian cold-air damming event and the near-passage of Tropical Storm Kyle (2002) along the coastal Carolinas, as assessed by using a numerical weather prediction model. While the storm moved along the coastline, it began extra-tropical transition, bringing heavy rains to both the coastal region and inland towards the Piedmont of North Carolina. Our goal is to quantify the effects of both interacting weather systems

  3. Evaluation of physical sampling efficiency for cyclone-based personal bioaerosol samplers in moving air environments.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Chen, Bean T; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-09-01

    The need to determine occupational exposure to bioaerosols has notably increased in the past decade, especially for microbiology-related workplaces and laboratories. Recently, two new cyclone-based personal bioaerosol samplers were developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the USA and the Research Center for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations (RCT & HRB) in Russia to monitor bioaerosol exposure in the workplace. Here, a series of wind tunnel experiments were carried out to evaluate the physical sampling performance of these two samplers in moving air conditions, which could provide information for personal biological monitoring in a moving air environment. The experiments were conducted in a small wind tunnel facility using three wind speeds (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m s(-1)) and three sampling orientations (0°, 90°, and 180°) with respect to the wind direction. Monodispersed particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were employed as the test aerosols. The evaluation of the physical sampling performance was focused on the aspiration efficiency and capture efficiency of the two samplers. The test results showed that the orientation-averaged aspiration efficiencies of the two samplers closely agreed with the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) inhalable convention within the particle sizes used in the evaluation tests, and the effect of the wind speed on the aspiration efficiency was found negligible. The capture efficiencies of these two samplers ranged from 70% to 80%. These data offer important information on the insight into the physical sampling characteristics of the two test samplers.

  4. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  5. Understand cyclone design

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, A.K. )

    1993-12-01

    Cyclones are widely used for the separation and recovery of industrial dusts from air or process gases. Cyclones are the principal type of gas-solids separator using centrifugal force. They are simple to construct, of low cost, and are made from a wide range of materials with an ability to operate at high temperatures and pressure. Cyclones are suitable for separating particles where agglomeration occurs. Pollution and emission regulations have compelled designers to study the efficiency of cyclones. Cyclones offer the least expensive means of dust collection. They give low efficiency for collection of particles smaller than 5 [mu]m. A high efficiency of 98% can be achieved on dusts with particle sizes of 0.1 to 0.2 [mu]m that are highly flocculated. The paper discusses the design procedure and operating parameters.

  6. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Annual Tropical Cyclone Report 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    period of rapid intensification. Tropical Cyclone 04B matured as a relatively small cyclone, its upper-level cirrus cloud shield spanning... defined cirrus outflow streak poleward of the low-level circulation center around 22/00Z. These structural changes are evident in the satellite imagery...erratically based on the upper level cloud patterns and convective maxima. It was not until visible imagery became available, that the two low level

  8. PFB coal fired combined cycle development program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume B. Developmental cyclone evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of cold flow model testing of a conventional reverse-flow cyclone containing several developmental features designed to improve its separative performance. The four advanced features evaluated were: Outlet Scroll Skimming - to remove particles from the high dust concentration region at the periphery of the outlet dust; Base Purge - to reduce reentrainment of dust from the disengagement hopper; Increased Outlet Duct Engagement - to reduce short-circuiting of the inlet dust into the outlet; and Vortex Shield - to stabilize the point of vortex attachment at the cyclone base and thus reduce base pickup. A schematic of the advanced cyclone, showing the various developmental features, is provided. The results of the cold flow experiments showed that substantial improvement (approximately 30% reduction in exhaust emission) could be obtained from outlet skimming or from increased engagement of the exhaust dust. Furthermore, the effects of these features are additive so that about 60% overall reduction in emissions could be achieved by incorporating both of these elements. On the other hand, the vortex shield and the base purge had little effect on the separative performance. Almost all of the experimental results exhibited strong electrostatic influence. At high flowrates, the separative performance of the cyclone decreased as the flowrate was reduced, as expected from cyclone theory. Although the improvements obtained with the developmental cyclone are significant, further improvements appear possible with the Air Shield cyclone and the Electrocyclone. Consequently, subsequent efforts under the CFCC program were focused on these concepts.

  9. Effects of cyclone diameter on performance of 1D3D cyclones: Cut point and slope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are a commonly used air pollution abatement device for separating particulate matter (PM) from air streams in industrial processes. Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the performance of cyclones, as cyclone diameter varies. The objective of this research was to determ...

  10. Effects of cyclone diameter on performance of 1D3D cyclones: Cut point and slope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are a commonly used air pollution abatement device for separating particulate matter (PM) from air streams in industrial processes. Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the cut point of cyclones as cyclone diameter varies. The objective of this research was to determine...

  11. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  12. Improving our Understanding of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones through Knowledge of the Saharan Air Layer: Hope or Hype?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2008-01-01

    /AMSU) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction global analyses are used to characterize the SAL s properties and evolution in relation to developing hurricanes. The results show that storms generally form on the southern side of the jet, where favorable background rotation is high. The jet often helps to form the northern side of the storms and rarely moves over their inner cores, so jet-induced vertical wind shear does not appear to be a negative influence on developing storms. Warm SAL air is confined to regions north of the jet and generally does not impact the tropical cyclone precipitation south of the jet. Of the three proposed negative influences, dry air appears to be the key influence; however, the presence of dry SAL air is not a good indicator of whether a storm will weaken since many examples of intensifying storms surrounded by such dry air can be found. In addition, a global view of relative humidity shows moisture distributions in other ocean basins that are almost identical to the Atlantic. The dry zones correspond to regions of descending air on the eastern and equatorward sides of semi-permanent oceanic high pressure systems. Thus, the dry air over the Atlantic appears to be primarily a product of the large-scale flow, but with enhanced drying at low levels associated with the Sahara. As a result, we conclude that the SAL is not a major negative influence on hurricanes. It is just one of many possible influences and can be both positive and negative.

  13. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  14. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  15. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on Regional Air Quality and Aerosol Formation in the Colorado Front Range during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, K. K. T.; Dingle, J. H.; Bahreini, R.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Montzka, D. D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Colorado Front Range continues to face challenges related to air quality, specifically ozone, and has been classified as a marginal non-attainment area by the U.S EPA. The highly complex topography and meteorology in the Colorado Front Range provide flow patterns that are driven by mountain-valley circulation, resulting in formation of the Denver Cyclone, strongly influencing concentrations of ozone and aerosol particles. However, the impact of the Denver Cyclone on aerosol formation has not been previously explored. In this study, airborne measurements were made during July 16 - August 18, 2014 aboard the NSF C-130 aircraft during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) project. We carried out fast time resolved measurements of ambient aerosol chemical constituents (organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) of non-refractory sub-micrometer particles using an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (mAMS). Pronounced increased mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in two distinct regions in the Front Range were observed during the cyclone episodes, in contrast to the non-cyclonic days. Organics dominated the mass concentrations on all days evaluated. The average mass concentration of organics during a cyclone event was 5.79 ± 1.48 μg·m-3 and were lower during the two non-cyclonic measurement days, 3.09 ± 1.18 μg·m-3. Average sulfate mass concentrations were 1.25 ± 0.41 μg·m-3 vs. 0.58 ± 0.20 μg·m-3 followed by nitrate with an average of 1.66 ± 0.92 μg·m-3 vs. 0.32 ± 0.41 μg·m-3 on cyclone vs. non-cyclonic days, respectively. Correlations between trace gas markers (carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, ammonia, and ethane), meteorological variables (relative humidity, temperature), and the extent of aerosol aging are evaluated and used to assess the Front Range aerosol formation and air quality impacts in the region during these events.

  16. Cyclone Monty

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... traveling inland about 300 kilometers to the south, the cyclonic circulation had decayed considerably, although category 3 force winds ... project:  MISR category:  gallery Storms date:  Feb 29 and Mar 4, 2004 Images:  ...

  17. Dust cyclone technology for gins – A literature review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust cyclone research leading to more efficient designs has helped the cotton ginning industry to comply with increasingly stringent air quality regulations governing fine particulate emissions. Future changes in regulations may require additional improvements in dust cyclone efficacy. This inter-...

  18. Impact of air-sea coupling on the simulation of tropical cyclones in the North Indian Ocean using a simple 3-D ocean model coupled to ARW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Mohan, Greeshma M.; Naidu, C. V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the impact of air-sea coupling on tropical cyclone (TC) predictions is studied using a three-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel (3DPWP) ocean model coupled to the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting in six tropical storms in the North Indian Ocean, representing different intensities, seasonality, and varied oceanic conditions. A set of numerical experiments are conducted for each cyclone using sea surface temperature (SST) boundary conditions derived from Global Forecast System (GFS) SST, NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction SST, and ocean coupling (3DPWP). Significant differences and improvements are found in the predicted intensity and track in the simulations, in which the cyclones' impact on SST is included. It has been found that while the uncoupled model using GFS SST considerably overestimated the intensity as well as produced large track errors, the ocean coupling substantially improved the track and intensity predictions. The improvements with 3DPWP are because of simulating the ocean-atmosphere feedback in terms of deepening of ocean mixed layer, reduction in enthalpy fluxes, and storm-induced SST cooling as seen in observations. The coupled model could simulate the cold wake in SST, asymmetries in the surface winds, enthalpy fluxes, size, and structure of the storm in better agreement with observations than the uncoupled model. The coupled model reduced the track errors by roughly 0.3-39% and intensity errors by 29-47% at 24-96 h predictions by controlling the northward deviation of storms tracks by SST cooling and associated changes in the dynamics. The vorticity changes associated with horizontal advection and stretching terms affect the tracks of the storms in the three simulations.

  19. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F. )

    1993-05-20

    The author describes evidence from three different cloud types observed in the Australian monsoon, continental-maritime convective, maritime convective, and tropical cyclones, which contribute to transport of tropospheric air masses into the lower stratosphere. Measurements were made from ER-2 aircraft flying out of Darwin, Australia, equipped to measure an array of different parameters, including water vapor, temperatures, pressures, radon, etc. Maritime environmental conditions do not produce as much bouyancy for ascending air masses near Darwin, as do continental-maritime conditions when intense solar heating over the arid continental center of Australia heat and drys air masses which flow over the moist surface marine layers and have bouyancy to allow deep penetration into the lower stratosphere. For the tropical cyclones, their large scale, slower ascending air seems to mix into the stratosphere by gravity wave generation, which produces turbulence enough to drive air mass mixing across the inversions which cap these features.

  20. A Study of the Effectiveness of Family Assistance Programs in the Air Force during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliber Associates, Fairfax, VA.

    This report examines both the impact of Operation Desert Shield/Storm on the families of active duty service members who were deployed to the Persian Gulf region, and the effectiveness of the Air Force's family support systems in meeting family and mission needs. The Air Force's Family Matters Office sponsored this study in order to identify the…

  1. Idealised simulations of sting jet cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Laura; Gray, Suzanne; Clark, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. Previous published work on sting jets has been limited to analyses of only a small number of case studies of observed sting jet cyclones, so a study of idealised sting jet cyclones, rather than specific cases, will be useful in determining the important features and mechanisms that lead to sting jets. This work focuses on an idealised simulation of a cyclone with a sting jet using a periodic channel configuration of the idealised nonhydrostatic Met Office Unified Model. The idealised cyclone simulation is based on baroclinic lifecycle simulations run at sufficiently high resolution for a sting jet to be generated. An analysis of the idealised cyclone and a comparison of the idealised cyclone with case studies of observed sting jet cyclones will be presented.

  2. Victory From Above. Air Power Theory and the Conduct of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    views air power as an extension of the fleet and does not want to surrender control of its air assets to a land-based commander. The US Marine Corps...7 Centralized Command and Control ............... 7 Offensive Action Dominates ................... 8 Air Superiority Is the First Objective...36 Command and Control ...... ....................... 37 Air Command Structure ..................... 37 Communications

  3. Cyclone contribution to the Mediterranean Sea water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaounas, E.; Di Luca, A.; Drobinski, P.; Mailler, S.; Arsouze, T.; Bastin, S.; Beranger, K.; Lebeaupin Brossier, C.

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of cyclones to the atmospheric components on the Mediterranean Sea Water Budget, namely the cyclones contribution to precipitation and evaporation over the Mediterranean Sea. Three regional simulations were performed with the WRF model for the period 1989-2008. The model was run (1) as a standalone model, (2) coupled with the oceanic model NEMO-MED12 and (3) forced by the smoothed Sea Surface Temperature (SST) fields from the second simulation. Cyclones were tracked in all simulations, and their contribution to the total rainfall and evaporation was quantified. Results show that cyclones are mainly associated with extreme precipitation, representing more than 50 % of the annual rainfall over the Mediterranean Sea. On the other hand, we found that cyclone-induced evaporation represents only a small fraction of the annual total, except in winter, when the most intense Mediterranean cyclones take place. Despite the significant contribution of cyclones to rainfall, our results show that there is a balance between cyclone-induced rainfall and evaporation, suggesting a weak net impact of cyclones on the Mediterranean Sea water budget. The sensitivity of our results with respect to rapid SST changes during the development of cyclones was also investigated. Both rainfall and evaporation are affected in correlation with the SST response to the atmosphere. In fact, air feedbacks to the Mediterranean Sea during the cyclones occurrence were shown to cool down the SST and consequently to reduce rainfall and evaporation at the proximity of cyclone centers.

  4. A Climatological Study of Hurricane Force Extratropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    8 d. Cloud Formation and Coherent Air Streams ............ 10 2. Explosive Deepening Cyclones “Bomb...eastern side of the surface low due the latent heat release (LHR) during condensation and cloud formation (Martin 2006). According to Martin 9...show that LHR served as an energy source that aids in the intensification of extratropical cyclones. 10 d. Cloud Formation and Coherent Air

  5. Investigation on the Influence of the Column Ozone Anomaly on the Energetics of Tropical Cyclones Over NIO and Related Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Dutta, Debashree

    2014-09-01

    An investigation on the temporal and spatial variation of ozone using the total column ozone (TCO) values during the cyclonic activities over North Indian Ocean (NIO) is carried out during the period from 1997 to 2012. The stepwise variation of TCO during the passage of the tropical cyclones over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea of the NIO is examined. The anomalies in TCO are estimated at each step of the life span of the cyclones starting from the genesis to landfall stages. The result reveals that the TCO values are quite high prior to the formation of the depression over NIO; however, at the stage of cyclogenesis it decreases which, with the increase in the intensity of the cyclones, further decreases and becomes minimum near the coast during the landfall. The maximum negative anomaly in TCO is observed for maximum intensity of the tropical cyclones as well as during the landfall. The result further shows that when the cyclones die out after the landfall the TCO regains the normal value. It is further observed that the reduction in TCO enhances the accumulated cyclone energy over NIO. The result finally shows that, the higher the energy of the cyclones, the lower becomes the stratospheric warming, that is, the higher the stratospheric cooling.

  6. Project AIR FORCE Assessment of Operation Desert Shield. The Buildup of Combat Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    8217 , I~I, ’H I’ I 94 21 DTzc QUAWL 1nfwamD I :1 The research reported here was sponsored by the United States Air Force A %4Qte.- 4 dT under Contract...Defen. .. ISBN: 0-8330-1521-4 RAND is a nonprofit institution that seeks to improve pnhhc policy thiough research and analysis. RAND’s publications do...release; distribution unlimifted iii Preface This monograph is a declassified version of an earlier Project AIR FORCE report, R-4147-AF, desc ibing the

  7. Cyclone reactor

    DOEpatents

    Converse, Alvin O.; Grethlein, Hans E.; Holland, Joseph E.

    1989-04-04

    A system is provided to produce sugars from a liquid-solid mixture containing biomass, and an acid, wherein the mixture is heated to an appropriate temperature to achieve hydrolysis. The liquid-solid mixture is introduced as a stream into the circular-cylindrical chamber of a cyclone reaction vessel and steam is introduced to the vessel to provide the necessary heat for hydrolysis as well as to establish the liquid-solid mixture in a rotary flow field whereby the liquids and solids of the mixture move along spiral paths within the chamber. The liquid-solid mixture may be introduced at the periphery of the chamber to spiral down toward and be discharged at or near the center of the chamber. Because of differing mass, the solid particles in the mixture move radially inward at a different rate than the liquid and that rate is controlled to maximize the hydrolysis of the solids and to minimize the decomposition of sugars, thus formed.

  8. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  9. Balloonlike Shields Against Fast Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of flexible gas-filled or liquid-filled pouches to shield spacecraft against impacts by small meteoroids and orbiting debris traveling at speeds approximately greater than 2 km/s. Shields made in various forms reminiscent of balloons, pillows, air mattresses, or sealed-air-bubble packing material. Serve as lightweight, easily installed alternatives to heavier, rigid shields made of space aluminum sheets custom-designed and attached to spacecraft only with great difficulty and expense.

  10. LCSs in tropical cyclone genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, B.; Montgomery, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic most often occurs at the intersection of the wave trough axis of a westward propagating African easterly wave and the wave critical latitude. Viewed in a moving reference frame with the wave, a cat's eye region of cyclonic recirculation can be seen in streamlines prior to genesis. The cat's eye recirculation region has little strain deformation and its center serves as the focal point for aggregation of convectively generated vertical vorticity. Air inside the cat's eye is repeatedly moistened by convection and is protected from the lateral intrusion of dry air. Since the flow is inherently time-dependent, we contrast the time-dependent structures with Eulerian structures of the wave-relative frame. Time-dependence complicates the kinematic structure of the recirculation region as air masses from the outer environment are allowed to interact with the interior of the cat's eye. LCSs show different boundaries of the cat's eye than the streamlines in the wave-relative frame. These LCSs are particularly important for showing the pathways of air masses that interact with the developing vortex, as moist air promotes development by supporting deep convection, while interaction with dry air impedes development. We primarily use FTLEs to locate the LCSs, and show the role of LCSs in both developing and non-developing storms. In addition, we discuss how the vertical coherence of LCSs is important for resisting the effects of vertical wind shear.

  11. Coal desulfurization by cyclonic whirl

    SciTech Connect

    Jianguo, Y.; Wenjun, Z.; Yuling, W.

    1999-07-01

    The crux of coal desulfurization is how to improve separation efficiency for 3--0.1mm materials. Cyclonic whirl produce centrifugal force and shearing force, heavy medium cyclone uses former, and cyclone flotation column uses both of them. A new system with heavy medium cyclone and cyclone flotation column is provided and testified to be very efficient in commercial desulfurization.

  12. Could cyclone performance improve with reduced inlet velocity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly stringent regulations have resulted in more restrictive air permit requirements at the same time that energy costs have risen. Cyclone operating strategies are sought so cotton gins can control particulate emissions using less energy with current cyclone technology. Tests were conducted...

  13. Tropical Cyclone Report, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Office of Naval Research (;rant AN00014-914J1721 STAFF JOINT TYPHOON WARNING CENTER LCDR ANTHONY A. MARTINEZ USN TDO. DEPUTY DIRECTOR LCDR TERESA M...OEJFN TDA. GRAPHICS AGAN ANDRESG.GRANT USN TDA, GRAPHICS UNIVERSITY OF GUAM / JTWC RESEARCH LIAISON DR MARK A. LANDER TROPICAL CYCLONE RESEARCH MR...CHARLES P. GUARD TROPICAL CYCLONE RESEARCH * TRANSFERRED DURING 1993 ** ACTIVE DUTY TRAINING S~ii FOREWORD The Annual Tropical Cyclone Report is past four

  14. Cyclone performance and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.

    1990-09-15

    The objectives of this project are: to characterize the gas flow pattern within cyclones, to revise the theory for cyclone performance on the basis of these findings, and to design and test cyclones whose dimensions have been optimized using revised performance theory. This work is important because its successful completion will aid in the technology for combustion of coal in pressurized, fluidized beds. This quarter, an empirical model for predicting pressure drop across a cyclone was developed through a statistical analysis of pressure drop data for 98 cyclone designs. The model is shown to perform better than the pressure drop models of First (1950), Alexander (1949), Barth (1956), Stairmand (1949), and Shepherd-Lapple (1940). This model is used with the efficiency model of Iozia and Leith (1990) to develop an optimization curve which predicts the minimum pressure drop and the dimension rations of the optimized cyclone for a given aerodynamic cut diameter, d{sub 50}. The effect of variation in cyclone height, cyclone diameter, and flow on the optimization curve is determined. The optimization results are used to develop a design procedure for optimized cyclones. 37 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Cyclone performance and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.

    1989-03-15

    The objectives of this project are: to characterize the gas flow pattern within cyclones, to revise the theory for cyclone performance on the basis of these findings, and to design and test cyclones whose dimensions have been optimized using revised performance theory. This work is important because its successful completion will aid in the technology for combustion of coal in pressurized, fluidized beds. This quarter, we have been hampered somewhat by flow delivery of the bubble generation system and arc lighting system placed on order last fall. This equipment is necessary to map the flow field within cyclones using the techniques described in last quarter's report. Using the bubble generator, we completed this quarter a study of the natural length'' of cyclones of 18 different configurations, each configuration operated at five different gas flows. Results suggest that the equation by Alexander for natural length is incorrect; natural length as measured with the bubble generation system is always below the bottom of the cyclones regardless of the cyclone configuration or gas flow, within the limits of the experimental cyclones tested. This finding is important because natural length is a term in equations used to predict cyclone efficiency. 1 tab.

  16. Cyclone performance by velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are used almost exclusively in the US cotton ginning industry for emission abatement on pneumatic conveying system exhausts because of their high efficiency, and low capital and operating cost.. Cyclone performance is improved by increasing collection effectiveness or decreasing energy cons...

  17. Cyclone performance and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.

    1989-06-15

    The objectives of this project are: to characterize the gas flow pattern within cyclones, to revise the theory for cyclone performance on the basis of these findings, and to design and test cyclones whose dimensions have been optimized using revised performance theory. This work is important because its successful completion will aid in the technology for combustion of coal in pressurized, fluidized beds. We have now received all the equipment necessary for the flow visualization studies described over the last two progress reports. We have begun more detailed studies of the gas flow pattern within cyclones as detailed below. Third, we have begun studies of the effect of particle concentration on cyclone performance. This work is critical to application of our results to commercial operations. 1 fig.

  18. Hydration of the upper troposphere by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Eric A.; Rosenlof, Karen H.

    2007-06-01

    Tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and Pacific ocean basins are found to have a significant impact on the amount of water vapor in the tropical and subtropical upper troposphere. Measurements from AIRS on Aqua and MLS on Aura are used to reveal details of the water vapor and temperature structure of the upper troposphere in the vicinity of tropical cyclones that have been unavailable from previous satellite observations. These measurements show that the most intense tropical cyclones (categories 4 and 5) increase average water vapor mixing ratios between 300 and 150 hPa in a roughly 1500 km2 area around the cyclones by 10-50% over their lifetimes. Category 3 and weaker tropical cyclones hydrate the upper troposphere on average roughly half as effectively as the most intense cyclones. The most intense cyclones also increase average water vapor in the upper troposphere by 2-10% in the entire ocean basin in which they occur. This amount of hydration of the tropical upper troposphere suggests that tropical cyclones play a role in the water vapor budget, and associated climate feedbacks, in a region much larger than the cyclone vicinity.

  19. Cyclone Chris Hits Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This false-color image shows Cyclone Chris shortly after it hit Australia's northwestern coast on February 6, 2002. This scene was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. (Please note that this scene has not been reprojected.) Cyclone Chris is one of the most powerful storms ever to hit Australia. Initially, the storm contained wind gusts of up to 200 km per hour (125 mph), but shortly after making landfall it weakened to a Category 4 storm. Meteorologists expect the cyclone to weaken quickly as it moves further inland.

  20. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  1. Cyclone performance and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.

    1990-06-15

    The objectives of this project are: to characterize the gas flow pattern within cyclones, to revise the theory for cyclone performance on the basis of these findings, and to design and test cyclones whose dimensions have been optimized using revised performance theory. This work is important because its successful completion will aid in the technology for combustion of coal in pressurized, fluidized beds. During the past quarter, we have nearly completed modeling work that employs the flow field measurements made during the past six months. In addition, we have begun final work using the results of this project to develop improved design methods for cyclones. This work involves optimization using the Iozia-Leith efficiency model and the Dirgo pressure drop model. This work will be completed this summer. 9 figs.

  2. Tropical Cyclone Nargis: 2008

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation, developed with the help of NASA's Pleiades supercomputer, illustrates how tropical cyclone Nargis formed in the Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal over several days in late April 2008...

  3. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  4. A comparative study on the genesis of North Indian Ocean tropical cyclone Madi (2013) and Atlantic Ocean tropical cyclone Florence (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasree, V. P. M.; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Bhate, Jyoti N.; Singh, Vikas; Umakanth, U.; Varma, T. Harish

    2016-12-01

    A modeling study has been carried out to understand the similarities and differences in the genesis sequence of a Bay of Bengal tropical cyclone Madi (6-13 December 2013) and the Atlantic Ocean tropical cyclone Florence (3-12 September 2006) on the applicability of hypotheses of the marsupial theory of tropical cyclogenesis. We examined the role of the protective pouch and warm core formation during their genesis and intensification phases. We have chosen tropical cyclone Madi and tropical cyclone Florence for our study specifically due to both of these tropical cyclones originated from westward moving parent disturbance embedded in the intertropical convergence zone. Also, the genesis and intensification of tropical cyclone Florence were accompanied by a series of Saharan dust outbreaks. Our results indicated that the dry air intrusion was not a dominant detrimental factor for the genesis of tropical cyclone Madi and showed rapid intensification within the pouch region. However, in the case of the tropical cyclone Florence, the delay in the intensification as a category 1 tropical cyclone from its tropical depression stage was due to entrainment of the dry air into the core of cyclonic vortex up to 700 hPa from above. The results from this study showed that the wave pouch played a most significant role in the vorticity upscale cascade (First hypothesis) and moisture aggregation (Second hypothesis) in pregenesis period of both the tropical cyclones. It also prevented the lateral dry air intrusion (Second hypothesis) from the Saharan Air Layer during the genesis phase of tropical cyclone Florence.

  5. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  6. Tropical cyclone activity in a warmer climate as simulated by a high-resolution coupled general circulation model: changes in frequency and air-sea interaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio; Navarra, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the possible changes that the greenhouse global warming might generate in the characteristics of the tropical cyclones (TCs). The analysis has been performed using climate scenario simulations carried out with a fully coupled high-resolution global general circulation model (INGV-SXG) with a T106 atmospheric resolution. The capability of the model to reproduce a reasonably realistic TC climatology has been assessed by comparing the model results from a simulation of the XX Century with observations. The model appears to be able to simulate tropical cyclone-like vortices with many features similar to the observed TCs. The simulated TC activity exhibits realistic geographical distribution, seasonal modulation and interannual variability, suggesting that the model is able to reproduce the major basic mechanisms that link the TC occurrence with the large scale circulation. The results from the climate scenarios reveal a substantial general reduction of the TC frequency when the atmospheric CO2 concentration is doubled and quadrupled. The reduction appears particularly evident for the tropical north west Pacific (NWP) and north Atlantic (ATL). In the NWP the weaker TC activity seems to be associated with a reduced amount of convective instabilities. In the ATL region the weaker TC activity seems to be due to both the increased stability of the atmosphere and a stronger vertical wind shear. Despite the generally reduced TC activity, there is evidence of increased rainfall associated with the simulated cyclones. Using the new fully coupled CMCC model (CMCC_MED), with a T159 atmospheric resolution, we found a significant modulation of the Ocean Heat Transport (OHT) induced by the TC activity. Thus the possible changes that greenhouse induced global warming during 21st century might generate in the characteristics of the TC-induced OHT have been analyzed.

  7. The Mesoscale and Microscale Structure and Organization of Clouds and Precipitation in Midlatitude Cyclones. III: Air Motions and Precipitation Growth in a Warm-Frontal Rainband.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houze, Robert A., Jr.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Matejka, Thomas J.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1981-03-01

    Doppler radar data and airborne cloud microphysical measurements obtained in the CYCLES PROJECT indicate that a warm-frontal rainband in an extratropical cyclone was characterized by a precipitation process in which clouds at low levels were enhanced by a mesoscale updraft. Ice particles, apparently formed in shallow convective cells aloft and then drifted downward, undergoing aggregation just above the melting layer. This study demonstrates the crucial role of the low-level mesoscale updraft in condensing a sufficient amount of cloud water for particles to accrete as they fell through the lower portion of the frontal cloud.

  8. Tropical Cyclone Gonu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    You might expect to see a storm with near-perfect symmetry and a well-defined eye hovering over the warm waters of the Caribbean or in the South Pacific, but Tropical Cyclone Gonu showed up in an unusual place. On June 4, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image, Tropical Cyclone Gonu was approaching the northeastern shore of Oman, a region better known for hot desert conditions. Though rare, cyclones like Gonu are not unheard of in the northern Indian Ocean basin. Most cyclones that form in the region form over the Bay of Bengal, east of India. Those that take shape over the Arabian Sea, west of the Indian peninsula, tend to be small and fizzle out before coming ashore. Cyclone Gonu is a rare exception. As of June 4, 2007, the powerful storm had reached a dangerous Category Four status, and it was forecast to graze Oman's northeastern shore, following the Gulf of Oman. According to storm statistics maintained on Unisys Weather, the last storm of this size to form over the Arabian Sea was Cyclone 01A, which tracked northwest along the coast of India between May 21 and May 28, 2001. Unlike Gonu's forecasted track, Cyclone 01A never came ashore. MODIS acquired this photo-like image at 12:00 p.m. local time (9:00 UTC), a few hours after the Joint Typhoon Warning Center estimated Gonu's sustained winds to be over 240 kilometers per hour (145 miles per hour). The satellite image confirms that Gonu was a super-powerful cyclone. The storm has the hallmark tightly wound arms that spiral around a well-defined, circular eye. The eye is surrounded by a clear wall of towering clouds that cast shadows on the surrounding clouds. Called hot towers, these clouds are a sign of the powerful uplift that feeds the storm. The symmetrical spirals, clear eye, and towering clouds are all features regularly seen in satellite images of other particularly powerful cyclones, which are also known as typhoons or hurricanes

  9. Grey swan tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    We define `grey swan’ tropical cyclones as high-impact storms that would not be predicted based on history but may be foreseeable using physical knowledge together with historical data. Here we apply a climatological-hydrodynamic method to estimate grey swan tropical cyclone storm surge threat for three highly vulnerable coastal regions. We identify a potentially large risk in the Persian Gulf, where tropical cyclones have never been recorded, and larger-than-expected threats in Cairns, Australia, and Tampa, Florida. Grey swan tropical cyclones striking Tampa, Cairns and Dubai can generate storm surges of about 6 m, 5.7 m and 4 m, respectively, with estimated annual exceedance probabilities of about 1/10,000. With climate change, these probabilities can increase significantly over the twenty-first century (to 1/3,100-1/1,100 in the middle and 1/2,500-1/700 towards the end of the century for Tampa). Worse grey swan tropical cyclones, inducing surges exceeding 11 m in Tampa and 7 m in Dubai, are also revealed with non-negligible probabilities, especially towards the end of the century.

  10. Drying in cyclones -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Nebra, S.A.; Silva, M.A.; Mujumdar, A.S.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics of vortex (or cyclone) dryers. The focus is on the potential of the cyclone configuration for drying of particulates. A selective review is made of the literature pertains to single phase and gas-particle flow in cyclone geometries. Recent data on drying of particulates in cyclone dryers are summarized. 56 refs.

  11. Next-Generation Tropical Cyclone Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    goal of this project is to develop a robust and hardened high-resolution air- ocean coupled tropical cyclone (TC) data assimilation and prediction...mechanical interchanges with the underlying ocean and land surfaces, shallow and deep atmospheric convection in the convectively unstable tropical...shown to be able to reproduce rapid intensification in case studies involving complex upper tropospheric and oceanic conditions in a carefully

  12. The diagnosis of a preblocking explosively-developing extratropical cyclone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhl, Mary A.; Smith, Phillip J.; Lupo, Anthony R.; Zwack, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the diagnosis of an extratropical cyclone that developed explosively from 18 to 19 January 1979 over the North Atlantic Ocean. The diagnosis applies data obtained from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres FGGE SOP-1 level III-b global analyses on a 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude grid to the extended height tendency and the Zwack-Okossi development equations. The cyclone developed initially in response to cyclonic vorticity advection downstream from an upper air through, warm air advection in a strongly baroclinic region, and latent heat release in the cyclone domain. As development continued, thermal advection and latent heat release increased their role in forcing height falls in the cyclone domain, while the influence of vorticity advection decreased. Finally, development ceased when anticyclonic vorticity advection below 700 mb and adiabatic cooling in the ascending air combined to neutralize the influence of warm air advection and latent heat release.

  13. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  14. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  15. Extratropical Cyclone in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray an occluded extratropical cyclone situated in the Southern Ocean, about 650 kilometers south of the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia. The left-hand image, a true-color view from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera, shows clouds just south of the Yorke Peninsula and the Murray-Darling river basin in Australia. Retrieved cloud-tracked wind velocities are indicated by the superimposed arrows. The image on the right displays cloud-top heights. Areas where cloud heights could not be retrieved are shown in black. Both the wind vectors and the cloud heights were derived using data from multiple MISR cameras within automated computer processing algorithms. The stereoscopic algorithms used to generate these results are still being refined, and future versions of these products may show modest changes. Extratropical cyclones are the dominant weather system at midlatitudes, and the term is used generically for regional low-pressure systems in the mid- to high-latitudes. In the southern hemisphere, cyclonic rotation is clockwise. These storms obtain their energy from temperature differences between air masses on either side of warm and cold fronts, and their characteristic pattern is of warm and cold fronts radiating out from a migrating low pressure center which forms, deepens, and dissipates as the fronts fold and collapse on each other. The center of this cyclone has started to decay, with the band of cloud to the south most likely representing the main front that was originally connected with the cyclonic circulation. These views were acquired on October 11, 2001, and the large view represents an area of about 380 kilometers x 1900 kilometers. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  16. Extratropical Cyclone in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer portray an occluded extratropical cyclone situated in the Southern Ocean, about 650 kilometers south of the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia.

    Parts of the Yorke Peninsula and a portion of the Murray-Darling River basin are visible between the clouds near the top of the left-hand image, a true-color view from MISR's nadir(vertical-viewing) camera. Retrieved cloud-tracked wind velocities are indicated by the superimposed arrows. The image on the right displays cloud-top heights. Areas where cloud heights could not be retrieved are shown in black. Both the wind vectors and the cloud heights were derived using data from multiple MISR cameras within automated computer processing algorithms. The stereoscopic algorithms used to generate these results are still being refined, and future versions of these products may show modest changes.

    Extratropical cyclones are the dominant weather system at midlatitudes, and the term is used generically for region allow-pressure systems in the mid- to high-latitudes. In the southern hemisphere, cyclonic rotation is clockwise. These storms obtain their energy from temperature differences between air masses on either side of warm and cold fronts, and their characteristic pattern is of warm and cold fronts radiating out from a migrating low pressure center which forms, deepens, and dissipates as the fronts fold and collapse on each other. The center of this cyclone has started to decay, with the band of cloud to the south most likely representing the main front that was originally connected with the cyclonic circulation.

    These views were acquired on October 11, 2001 during Terra orbit 9650, and represent an area of about 380 kilometers x 1900 kilometers.

  17. The Life Cycles of Intense Cyclonic and Anticyclonic Circulation Systems Observed over Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a summary of research accomplished over the past four years under the sponsorship of NASA grant #NAG8-915. Building on previously funded NASA grants, this part of the project focused on the following specific goals relative to cyclone/anticyclone systems: the jet streak link between block formation and upstream cyclone activity; the role of northward warm air advection in block formation; the importance of cooperative participation of several forcing mechanisms during explosive cyclone development; and the significance of the vertical distribution of forcing processes during cyclone/anticyclone development.

  18. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2001-09-10

    The fieldwork associated with Task 1 (Baseline Assessment) was completed this quarter. Detailed cyclone inspections completed at all but one plant during maintenance shifts. Analysis of the test samples is also currently underway in Task 4 (Sample Analysis). A Draft Recommendation was prepared for the management at each test site in Task 2 (Circuit Modification). All required procurements were completed. Density tracers were manufactured and tested for quality control purposes. Special sampling tools were also purchased and/or fabricated for each plant site. The preliminary experimental data show that the partitioning performance for all seven HMC circuits was generally good. This was attributed to well-maintained cyclones and good operating practices. However, the density tracers detected that most circuits suffered from poor control of media cutpoint. These problems were attributed to poor x-ray calibration and improper manual density measurements. These conclusions will be validated after the analyses of the composite samples have been completed.

  19. Statistical Aspects of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones: Trends, Natural Variability, and Global Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical aspects of the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones for the interval 1945- 2005 are examined, including the variation of the yearly frequency of occurrence for various subgroups of storms (all tropical cyclones, hurricanes, major hurricanes, U.S. landfalling hurricanes, and category 4/5 hurricanes); the yearly variation of the mean latitude and longitude (genesis location) of all tropical cyclones and hurricanes; and the yearly variation of the mean peak wind speeds, lowest pressures, and durations for all tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and major hurricanes. Also examined is the relationship between inferred trends found in the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclonic activity and natural variability and global warming, the latter described using surface air temperatures from the Armagh Observatory Armagh, Northern Ireland. Lastly, a simple statistical technique is employed to ascertain the expected level of North Atlantic basin tropical cyclonic activity for the upcoming 2007 season.

  20. Tropical Cyclone Report, 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    following: would be unwarranted at lower risk levels. A rule for deciding such actions can be derived on an expected outcome basis (e.g. cost/ benefits ...responsi- Changes to this year’s publication include: raw bility. fix data files usually printed in Annex A, plus the raw warning, forecast and best...for this report; to the Navy represents data obtained by the tropical cyclone Publications and Printing Service Branch Office, satellite surveillance

  1. Tropical Cyclone Report, 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    TAIWAN NAVPGSCOL LIBRARY CITIES SERVICES OIL GAS CORP NAVPOLAROCEANCEN SUITLAND CIUDAD UNIVERSITARIA , MEXICO NAVAL RESEARCH LAB CIVIL DEFENSE, SAIPAN...The system software has been provided An effort is now underway to develop a to OAO Corporation for inclusion in the JTWC series of examples...winds in the range of 34 to speed, typically within one degree of the center of a 63 kt (17 to 32 m/sec) inclusive . tropical cyclone. TROPICAL UPPER

  2. Tropical Cyclone Indlala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On March 14, 2007, storm-weary Madagascar braced for its fourth land-falling tropical cyclone in as many months. Cyclone Indlala was hovering off the island's northeast coast when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this photo-like image at 1:40 p.m. local time (10:40 UTC). Just over a hundred kilometers offshore, the partially cloudy eye at the heart of the storm seems like a vast drain sucking in a disk of swirling clouds. According to reports from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued less than three hours after MODIS captured this image, Indlala had winds of 115 knots (132 miles per hour), with gusts up to 140 knots (161 mph). Wave heights were estimated to be 36 feet. At the time of the report, the storm was predicted to intensify through the subsequent 12-hour period, to turn slightly southwest, and to strike eastern Madagascar as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds up to 125 knots (144 mph), and gusts up to 150 knots (173 mph). According to Reuters AlertNet news service, Madagascar's emergency response resources were taxed to their limit in early March 2007 as a result of extensive flooding in the North, drought and food shortages in the South, and three previous hits from cyclones in the preceding few months: Bondo in December 2006, Clovis in January 2007, and Gamede in February.

  3. 1989 Annual Tropical Cyclone Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    z TYPHOON GAY (32W) The fust tropical cyclone of November turned out to be the worst tropical cyclone to affect the Malay Peninsula in 35 years... Gay developed in the Gulf of Thailand, crossed the Malay Peninsula into the Bay of Bengal and slammed into India with peak sustained winds of 140 kt...70 rn/see). Unique because of its small size, intensity, and point of origin, Gay challenged forecasters by crossing two different tropical cyclone

  4. Aerothermodynamic Testing of Protuberances and Penetrations on the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle Heat Shield in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel program is being conducted in support of an Agency wide effort to develop a replacement for the Space Shuttle and to support the NASA s long-term objective of returning to the moon and then on to Mars. This paper documents experimental measurements made on several scaled ceramic heat transfer models of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle. Global heat transfer images and heat transfer distributions obtained using phosphor thermography were used to infer interference heating on the Crew Exploration Vehicle Cycle 1 heat shield from local protuberances and penetrations for both laminar and turbulent heating conditions. Test parametrics included free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.0x10(exp 6)/ft to 7.25x10(exp 6)/ft in Mach 6 air at a fixed angle-of-attack. Single arrays of discrete boundary layer trips were used to trip the boundary layer approaching the protuberances/penetrations to a turbulent state. Also, the effects of three compression pad diameters, two radial locations of compression pad/tension tie location, compression pad geometry, and rotational position of compression pad/tension tie were examined. The experimental data highlighted in this paper are to be used to validate CFD tools that will be used to generate the flight aerothermodynamic database. Heat transfer measurements will also assist in the determination of the most appropriate engineering methods that will be used to assess local flight environments associated with protuberances/penetrations of the CEV thermal protection system.

  5. Tropical cyclone activity over the Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jessica M.; Subrahmanyam, Bulusu; Nyadjro, Ebenezer S.; Murty, V. S. N.

    2016-08-01

    The Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean (SWTIO) is a key region for air-sea interaction. Tropical cyclones (TCs) regularly form over the SWTIO and subsurface ocean variability influences the cyclogenesis of this region. Tropical cyclone days for this region span from November through April, and peak in January and February during austral summer. Past research provides evidence for more tropical cyclone days over the SWTIO during austral summer (December-June) with a deep thermocline ridge than in austral summer with a shallow thermocline ridge. We have analyzed the Argo temperature data and HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) outputs while focusing on the austral summer of 2012/2013 (a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) year and neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year) when seven named tropical cyclones developed over the SWTIO region. This study reveals that the climatic events like the IOD and ENSO influence the cyclonic activity and number of TC days over the SWTIO. We ascertain that the IOD events have linkages with the Barrier Layer Thickness (BLT) in the SWTIO region through propagating Rossby waves, and further show that the BLT variability influences the cyclonic activity in this region.

  6. A comparison of synoptic-scale development characteristics for over-water and over-land cases of explosive cyclone development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, Anthony R.; Smith, Phillip J.

    1992-01-01

    The Zwack and Okossi (1986) equation is here demonstrated to be an effective tool for the diagnosis of synoptic-scale cyclone development, and is noted to indicate that cyclonic vorticity advection is the most consistent contributor to the explosive development of a given cyclone. Warm air advection and latent heat release also contributed to explosive development in varying degrees. The adiabatic temperature changes forced by vertical motion opposed the development of both over-water and over-land cyclone development.

  7. Conceptual Models of Frontal Cyclones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagleman, Joe R.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion of weather models uses maps to illustrate the differences among three types of frontal cyclones (long wave, short wave, and troughs). Awareness of these cyclones can provide clues to atmospheric conditions which can lead toward accurate weather forecasting. (AM)

  8. Advances in dust cyclone research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust cyclones reduce particulate emissions but their operation consumes electrical energy. Response surface methodology was used to compare two strategies to reduce energy costs without increasing emissions. Cyclones of a standard design (1D3D) were operated singly and in series, as was an ‘Experi...

  9. Atlantic tropical cyclones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Michael E.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Holland, Greg J.; Webster, Peter J.

    Vigorous discussions have taken place recently in Eos [e.g., Mann and Emanuel, 2006; Landsea, 2007] and elsewhere [Emanuel, 2005; Webster et al., 2005; Hoyos et al., 2006; Trenberth and Shea, 2006; Kossin et al., 2007] regarding trends in North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity and their potential connection with anthropogenic climate change. In one study, for example [Landsea, 2007], it is argued that a substantial underestimate of Atlantic tropical cyclone counts in earlier decades arising from insufficient observing systems invalidates the conclusion that trends in TC behavior may be connected to climate change. Here we argue that such connections are in fact robust with respect to uncertainties in earlier observations.Several recent studies have investigated trends in various measures of TC activity. Emanuel [2005] showed that a measure of total power dissipation by TCs (the power dissipation index, or PDI) is highly correlated with August-October sea surface temperatures (SST) over the main development region (MDR) for Atlantic TCs over at least the past half century. Some support for this conclusion was provided by Sriver and Ruber [2006]. Webster et al. [2005] demonstrated a statistically significant increase in recent decades in both the total number of the strongest category cyclones (categories 4 and 5) and the proportion of storms reaching hurricane intensity. Hoyos et al. [2006] showed that these increases were closely tied to warming trends in tropical Atlantic SST, while, for example, the modest decrease in vertical wind shear played a more secondary role. Kossin et al. [2007] called into question some trends in other basins, based on a reanalysis of past TC data, but they found the North Atlantic trends to be robust.

  10. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2002-09-14

    All project activities are now winding down. Follow-up tracer tests were conducted at several of the industrial test sites and analysis of the experimental data is currently underway. All required field work was completed during this quarter. In addition, the heavy medium cyclone simulation and expert system programs are nearly completed and user manuals are being prepared. Administrative activities (e.g., project documents, cost-sharing accounts, etc.) are being reviewed and prepared for final submission to DOE. All project reporting requirements are up to date. All financial expenditures are within approved limits.

  11. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) in the vicinity of extra-tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, Philipp; Skerlak, Bojan; Sprenger, Michael; Wernli, Heini

    2013-04-01

    The exchange of air masses across the tropopause plays an important role for the chemical composition of the stratosphere and troposphere. For instance, the injection of stratospheric air into the troposphere can enhance the ozone concentration significantly in the troposphere, even down to the boundary layer. On the other side, the amount of water vapor can be strongly increased when tropospheric air is transported into the stratosphere. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) occurs in different meteorological environments: e.g., near tropopause-level jet streams due to turbulent mixing, associated with the diabatic decay of upper-level cutoff lows, or in overshooting deep convective systems. In this study the importance of STE is quantified in the vicinity of extratropical cyclones, based upon climatologies of cyclones and STE. Previous studies estimated the effects of STE in the vicinity of cyclones through case studies of single cyclones and extrapolated the results to the global scale. The caveat of this method is the uncertain representativeness of a single cyclone. Therefore, we use in this study 30 years of ERA-Interim data (1979-2011) to count all STE events in the vicinity of cyclones. A Lagrangian approach is used to identify STE events from the stratosphere to the troposphere and vice versa. The tropopause in this study is defined by the 2-pvu isosurface. A sophisticated cyclone identification and tracking tool determines the exact structure of a cyclone at each time step along its lifecycle. Therefore, an STE event can be clearly assigned to a specific cyclone. With this data set we build a climatology of STE events in the vicinity of cyclones and investigate their spatial and temporal distribution on a global scale and also within a cyclone life cycle. This enables us to study if STE events happen in preferred areas of a cyclone and during preferred phases of its lifecycle. Additionally, the climatology allows to determine if the mass flux through

  12. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) in the vicinity of (extra-tropical) cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, P.; Skerlak, B.; Sprenger, M.; Wernli, H.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of air masses across the tropopause plays an important role for the chemical composition of the stratosphere and troposphere. For instance, the injection of stratospheric air into the troposphere can enhance the ozone concentration significantly in the troposphere, even down to the boundary layer. On the other side, the amount of water vapor can be strongly increased when tropospheric air is transported into the stratosphere. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) occurs in different meteorological environments: e.g., near tropopause-level jet streams due to turbulent mixing, associated with the diabatic decay of upper-level cutoff lows, or in overshooting deep convective systems. In this study the importance of STE is quantified in the vicinity of (mainly extratropical) cyclones, based upon climatologies of cyclones and STE. Previous studies estimated the effects of STE in the vicinity of cyclones through case studies of single cyclones and extrapolated the results to the global scale. The caveat of this method is the uncertain representativeness of a single cyclone. Therefore, we use in this study 30 years of ERA-Interim data (1979-2011) to count all STE events in the vicinity of cyclones. A Lagrangian approach is used to identify STE events from the stratosphere to the troposphere and vice versa. The tropopause in this study is defined by the 2-pvu isosurface. A sophisticated cyclone identification and tracking tool determines the exact structure of a cyclone at each time step along its lifecycle. Therefore, an STE event can be clearly assigned to a specific cyclone. With this data set we build a climatology of STE events in the vicinity of cyclones and investigate their spatial and temporal distribution on a global scale and also within a cyclone life cycle. This enables us to study if STE events happen in preferred areas of a cyclone and during preferred phases of its lifecycle. Additionally, the climatology allows to determine if the mass flux

  13. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  15. An Observational Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Recurvature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    SR = Slowly recurving cyclones TC = Tropical Cyclone TUTT = Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough W = West WNW = West-Northwest v Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION...latitude at which the cyclone was located. Observations also showed that not all troughs approaching a cyclone caused recurvature. Mid- latitude troughs ...general synoptic conditions which were favorable for tropical cyclone recurvature. These included: 1. High amplitude troughs extending from the westerlies

  16. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  17. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  18. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  19. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  20. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  1. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  2. A Composite Diagnosis of Synoptic-Scale Extratropical Cyclone Development over the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolfson, Donald M.; Smith, Phillip J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a composite diagnosis of synoptic-scale forcing mechanisms associated with extratropical cyclone evolution. Drawn from 12 cyclone cases that occurred over the continental United States during the cool season months, the diagnosis provides a 'climatology' of development mechanisms for difference categories of cyclone evolution ranging from cyclone weakening through three stages of cyclone intensification. Computational results were obtained using an 'extended' form of the Zwack-Okossi equation applied to routine upper-air and surface data analyzed on a 230 km x 230 km grid. Results show that cyclonic vorticity advection, which maximizes in the upper troposphere, was the primary contributor to cyclone development regardless of the stage of development. A second consistent contributor to development was latent heat release. Horizontal temperature advection, often acknowledged as a development mechanism, was found to contribute to development only during more intense stages. During weakening and weaker development stages, temperature advection opposed development, as the warm-air advection invariably found at upper levels was dominated by cold air advection in the lower half of the troposphere. In the more intense stages, development was moderated by dry-adiabatic cooling associated with the ascending vertical motions.

  3. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  4. A sensitivity study of storm cyclones with a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, K. S.; Tetzlaff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Extra tropical storms caused noticeable damages in the last decades. The evolution of strong cyclones is investigated by simulations with the nonhydrostatic limited area model 'Lokal Modell' (LM) of the German Weather Service (DWD). Which Conditions become important to distinguish an common cyclone from an storm-cyclone? Intense cyclones are mostly characterised by two typical large-scale features: high baroclinicity along the track of the low pressure system and a region of high equivalent potential temperature. For this purpose the observed values of the horizontal temperature gradient and the distribution of air moisture are varied and were used as forcing data, in such a way the development of storms was modified. The forcing data for the LM were generated by the global model of the DWD. Therefore data of real cyclones, such as the low Ginger, which occurred in 2000, were used. As the LM simulates only a limited area, the lateral bounds become problematic because of the manipulated forcing data. A procedure is tested, in order to prevent these problems. In this manner ensembles of storm scenarios were produced. The effects of various conditions were studied. Here in particular the changes in the surface velocity field were of interest. In the case of Ginger, an increase of the temperature gradient about 10 K causes an increasing of the maximum velocity about 3 m/s.

  5. The hurricane-like Mediterranean cyclone of January 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Craig, George; Ballard, Susan

    2000-09-01

    The development of a hurricane-like vortex over the Mediterranean Sea was studied using (mainly) the UK Met. Office Unified Model. The Mediterranean cyclone formed in the morning of 15 January 1995 over the sea between Greece and Sicily. Strong convection was observed prior to its genesis. During the longest part of the cyclone's lifetime, strong surface fluxes and, as a result, deep convection existed in its vicinity. Its track was influenced by the surface fluxes and the flow in the wider region. The forecast of the mesoscale and limited-area models reproduced the general characteristics of the actual system as they appeared at the surface and upper-air charts and at the satellite imagery. The investigation of the cyclone's characteristics gave strong evidence (including an ‘eye’ and a warm core) to support the initial assertion that it was similar to tropical cyclones and some polar lows. Baroclinic instability does not seem particularly important, although the cyclone formed at the edge of a baroclinic zone. A numerical experiment showed the vortex did not develop in the absence of surface heat and moisture fluxes. Another experiment showed that sensible and latent heat fluxes were equally important in its development.

  6. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  7. The impact of limiting ocean roughness on GEOS-5 AGCM tropical cyclone forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molod, Andrea; Suarez, Max; Partyka, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Global climate models have been shown to simulate tropical cyclone-like behavior even at relatively coarse resolution, and recent higher resolution simulations more accurately capture the intensity, structure, and interannual variability. Even the highest resolution global models, however, continue to underestimate the intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. The simulated cyclone intensity has been shown by many studies to be greatly influenced by the fluxes at the air-sea interface. A simple modification has been implemented in the GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) based on existing theory and laboratory experiments, which demonstrated that the ocean roughness does not increase with surface stress beyond some threshold. A series of strong tropical cyclone simulations were performed with the GEOS-5 AGCM to evaluate the impact of imposing a limit on ocean surface roughness at high wind speeds. The results demonstrated clear improvements in cyclone intensity and structure in the simulations with limited ocean roughness.

  8. Monitoring by Control Technique - Cyclone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about cyclone control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  9. Tropical Cyclone Bejisa Near Madagascar

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite flew over Cyclone Bejisa on December 29, 2013 at 1507 UTC. This 3-D animation of TRMM data revealed strong thunderstorms around Bejisa's center were reaching heights above 16....

  10. Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Formation and Structure Change in TCS08

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    define the final extratropical stage of the extratropical transition process (Quinting et al. 2013). In this case, the warm conveyor belt, cold... conveyor belt, and dry air stream were identified in relation to air that originated in the tropical cyclone or air that originated at upper levels and

  11. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad

  12. Tropical and Extratropical Cyclone Damages under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranson, M.; Kousky, C.; Ruth, M.; Jantarasami, L.; Crimmins, A.; Tarquinio, L.

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides the first quantitative synthesis of the rapidly growing literature on future tropical and extratropical cyclone losses under climate change. We estimate a probability distribution for the predicted impact of changes in global surface air temperatures on future storm damages, using an ensemble of 296 estimates of the temperature-damage relationship from twenty studies. Our analysis produces three main empirical results. First, we find strong but not conclusive support for the hypothesis that climate change will cause damages from tropical cyclones and wind storms to increase, with most models (84 and 92 percent, respectively) predicting higher future storm damages due to climate change. Second, there is substantial variation in projected changes in losses across regions. Potential changes in damages are greatest in the North Atlantic basin, where the multi-model average predicts that a 2.5°C increase in global surface air temperature would cause hurricane damages to increase by 62 percent. The ensemble predictions for Western North Pacific tropical cyclones and European wind storms (extratropical cyclones) are approximately one third of that magnitude. Finally, our analysis shows that existing models of storm damages under climate change generate a wide range of predictions, ranging from moderate decreases to very large increases in losses.

  13. Landfall tropical cyclone rainstorms on the north slope of the Dabie Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Lee, C.

    2016-08-01

    The formation and development mechanism of landfall cyclone rainstorms that occur on the north slope of the Dabie Mountains were investigated by the determination of typical occurrences. Interaction between the tropical cyclone and the westerly trough was characterized by the favorable circulation backgrounds of landfall tropical cyclone rainstorms on the north slope of the Dabie Mountains. A conveyor belt was created between the easterly jet flow of the tropical cyclone and the subtropical high pressure of the western equatorial Pacific Ocean and the southerly jet flow of the westerly trough front, creating a huge amount of energy and vapor from the landfall tropical cyclone in the rainstorm area and destabilizing the stratification. These conditions were advantageous to the frontogenesis of a warm front and the development of Mesoscale convective systems (MCS) in the westerly cold air that met the inverted trough located at the northern portion of the tropical cyclone. The existence and development of the mesoscale front area in the ground provide a trigger mechanism for the rainstorm. The MCS occurred and developed in the equivalent potential temperature theta se (θse) frontal zone, which is located between the low pressure area of the typhoon and the cold air, which is located at the rear of the westerly trough. The terrain block slowed or stopped the motion of the low pressure system formed by the landfall tropical cyclone, which was conducive to the enhancement of the rainstorm.

  14. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  15. Cyclones in the thermosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, A.; Wang, W.; Killeen, T.

    2003-04-01

    The recovery of the thermosphere and ionosphere from geomagnetic storms is a subject that has not received the attention that it deserves. But, even with the small number of papers that have been published about these conditions, there are apparently conflicting results. Burns et al. (1989) suggested that most recovery was rapid, whereas Fuller-Rowell et al. (1994) found recovery was sufficiently slow that storm effects could be seen a full day after the end of the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. At first sight these two ideas do not seem to be easily reconciled. But, in fact, it is shown here that, while much recovery is fast at solar maximum, large, organized disturbances exist in the thermosphere and ionosphere for a long time. These disturbances, which were first proposed by Banks and Nagy (1974), are mesoscale- to large-scale in size and nature and have some characteristics of tropospheric cyclones. In this work, we discuss the nature of these disturbances, their origin and development and consider the processes that permit their long life. The major conclusions of this work are: 1) After a major geomagnetic storm neutral compositional recovery is rapid over much of the globe; 2) In certain areas, large-to-mesoscale disturbances occur that are both well organized and long lived; 3) The disturbance discussed here was "spun-off" from the dawn convection cell and then briefly formed a secondary horizontal vortex; 4) At times these disturbances are associated with pronounced vertical convection cells.

  16. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  17. Discontinuous Cyclone Movement of Mediterranean cyclones identified through formation analysis of daughter cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziv, Baruch; Saaroni, Hadas; Harpaz, Tzvi

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm developed performs an automated classification methodology for daughter cyclones (DCs) formation, with respect to the thermal field of the parent cyclones (PCs). The classification has been applied to winter Mediterranean Cyclones. The algorithm assigns a DC to one of seven types, according to the following considerations: Has the cyclone formed on a front? Is that a cold, a warm or a quasi-stationary front? Is this front part of the frontal system of the PC or of a non-parental system? If none of the above applies, has the cyclone formed within the warm sector? The measures used are the temperature gradient, temperature advection and temperature Laplacian, computed at the formation location of the DC and the temperature difference between the DC and the PC, each derived from the 850-hPa wind and temperature fields. Out of 4,303 DCs analyzed, 85% were identified to belong to one of the 7 predefined types, implying that 15% cannot be related to either baroclinic or thermal factors. More than half were formed at their PCs' frontal system, third on a non-parental frontal system and only 13% within the warm sector of the PC. Most of the cyclones, formed on the PC's cold front, were found at mountain lee locations, whereas cyclones formed on the warm front were generated mostly over the Aegean and the Adriatic Sea. The new methodology exposed a unique DC formation which is actually a Discontinuous Cyclone Movement (DCM), imposed by an encounter with geographical forcing. This formation was identified in 5.9% of the DC formations and is characterized by the following features: 1) parent-daughter distance (d) <1000 Km, 2) the area enclosed by the inner isobar surrounding both the PC and the DC should be less than 2d, 3) the PC should last no more than 18 hours after the DC has been first detected. DCM events found among DCs formed on warm fronts of PCs, to their east, are suggested as a mechanism which enables the PC to cross topographic barriers

  18. Statistical Aspects of Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin, 1945-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Examined are statistical aspects of the 715 tropical cyclones that formed in the North Atlantic basin during the interval 1945-2010. These 715 tropical cyclones include 306 storms that attained only tropical storm strength, 409 hurricanes, 179 major or intense hurricanes, and 108 storms that struck the US coastline as hurricanes. Comparisons made using 10-year moving average (10-yma) values between tropical cyclone parametric values and surface air and ENSO-related parametric values indicate strong correlations to exist, in particular, against the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) surface air temperature, the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) index, the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) index, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index, in addition to the Oceanic Ni o index (ONI) and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) indices. Also examined are the decadal variations of the tropical cyclone parametric values and a look ahead towards the 2012 hurricane season and beyond.

  19. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow in a Virtual Cyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; O'Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.; Brockmann, J.E.; Grasser, T.W.

    1998-09-01

    An experimental investigation has confirmed the predicted flow pattern in a prototype virtual cyclone, a novel device for nonimpact particle separation proposed by Torcdzynski and Rader (1996, 1997) based solely on computational simulations. The virtual cyclone differs from an ordinary cyclone in that the flow is turned by a virtual wall composed of an eddy rather than by a solid wall. A small-scale version of the computationally simulated geometry has been fabricated out of Lucite. The working fluid is ambient air, which is drawn through the apparatus and flow-metering equipment using a wind-tunnel vacuum source. The flow is seeded with smoke or water droplets produced by a nebulizer so that flow visualization techniques and particle-imaging velocimetry could be applied. Experiments have been performed on this apparatus for flows with Reynolds numbers from 200 up to 40,000 (a Mach number of 0.3). Flow visualization using a laser light sheet passing through the mid-plane of the apparatus verified that the computationally predicted flow is obtained over the entire range of flow rates. The shear layer between the main and recirculating flow is observed to become turbulent around a Reynolds number of 4000. While not changing the flow structure, the turbulent mixing produced by shear-layer roll-up limits particle concentration at the higher flow rates. In order to achieve highly efficient particle separation using a virtual cyclone, turbulence must be suppressed or mitigated. If laminar flow cannot be achieved for macroscopic-scale virtual cyclones, it should be achievable for a small-scale (low Reynolds number) virtual cyclone fabricated using MEMS-related technologies. This approach could lead to a chip-scale particle concentrator.

  20. Training on Eastern Pacific tropical cyclones for Latin American students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, L. M.; Raga, G. B.

    2009-05-01

    Tropical cyclones are one of the most impressive atmospheric phenomena and their development in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins has potential to affect several Latin-American and Caribbean countries, where human resources are limited. As part of an international research project, we are offering short courses based on the current understanding of tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific basin. Our main goal is to train students from higher-education institutions from various countries in Latin America. Key aspects are tropical cyclone formation and evolution, with particular emphasis on their development off the west coast of Mexico. Our approach includes lectures on tropical cyclone climatology and formation, dynamic and thermodynamic models, air-sea interaction and oceanic response, ocean waves and coastal impacts as well as variability and climate-related predictions. In particular, we use a best-track dataset issued by the United States National Hurricane Center and satellite observations to analyze convective patterns for the period 1970-2006. Case studies that resulted in landfall over northwestern Mexico are analyzed in more detail; this includes systems that developed during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 seasons. Additionally, we have organized a human-dimensions symposium to discuss socio-economic issues that are associated with the landfall of tropical cyclones. This includes coastal zone impact and flooding, the link between cyclones and water resources, the flow of weather and climate information from scientists to policy- makers, the role of emergency managers and decision makers, impact over health issues and the viewpoint of the insurance industry.

  1. Enhanced Whipple Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor); Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Robinson, Jennifer R. (Inventor); Nolen, Angela M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact (HVI) Whipple Shield and a method for shielding a wall from penetration by high velocity particle impacts where the Whipple Shield is comprised of spaced apart inner and outer metal sheets or walls with an intermediate cloth barrier arrangement comprised of ceramic cloth and high strength cloth which are interrelated by ballistic formulae.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  3. In-Situ Observations in Tropical Cyclones from Ocean Drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzel, J.; Centurioni, L. R.

    2013-05-01

    Ocean Drifters are cost effective, robust and high-quality instruments currently used to observe important variables in the ocean and atmosphere boundary layers during tropical cyclones. They have been configured to measure sea level atmospheric air pressure, wind velocity, solar insolation, sea surface and sub-surface temperature, ocean mixed-layer currents and three-dimensional ocean velocity (typically in depths of 0-150m). Ocean drifters have been successfully deployed in seven hurricanes (Atlantic Ocean) and in four typhoons (Pacific Ocean). Drifters are air-deployed about 18-24 hours ahead of an approaching tropical cyclone from a C-130J aircraft by the 53rd WRS "Hurricane Hunters" at a spacing of 30-50km in a line perpendicular to the expected storm track. On average, the tropical cyclone center has passed within 20km of the nearest drifter, and as close as 3km. Measurements are taken every 15 minutes and are transmitted via Argos or Iridium satellites in real-time and posted to the Global Telecommunication System of the World Weather Watch. The instrument success rate has been 92% in all previous deployments during tropical cyclone conditions from Cat-1 to Cat-5. The high quality of drifter observations has been validated with co-located measurements from dropwindsondes, nearby ocean profiling floats and satellites. Distinct features of the coupled tropical cyclone atmosphere-ocean system observed by the drifters include: the exponential decrease of sea level pressure towards the minimum at the storm center, the radius of maximum winds and their strength, the cold ocean wake on the right hand side of the storm, the inertial currents in the upper ocean, the downward propagation of inertial waves in the ocean, the relatively fast recovery of the sea surface temperature in the cold wake and the longer endurance of the sub-surface wake. In addition, the drifters have detected the response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the ocean's cold wake by measuring

  4. Winter Eurasian Climate Variability: Role of Cyclone and Anticyclone Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Zhang, X.; Guan, Z.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates variability of extratropical Eurasian cyclone and anticyclone activity by using a modified automated cyclone and anticyclone identification and tracking algorithm. The cyclone and anticyclone activities are quantified by their regionally integrated intensity (CI and ACI) during 1978/79-2011/2012 winter seasons. We found that the time evolutions of the CI and ACI exhibit a general negative correlation of -0.7 between them at a significant level of 99.99%. This anticyclone (cyclone) variability contributes to the substantially large-scale sea level pressure variability over extratropical Eurasian continent, and explains the interannual fluctuation of surface air temperature over mid latitude Eurasia as well as the adjacent continents. The ACI swings from one phase to another, also producing large changes in snow cover extend, snow equivalent water as well as frequency of extreme cold events over the Eurasian continent. The strengthening of anticyclone intensity is preceded by retreated of the October sea-ice extent over Barents-Kara Sea, which associates tightly with an increasing stability at lower troposphere around the Ural Mountains and induces strengthening Eurasian anticyclones activity in the subsequent winter.

  5. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  6. Arabian Sea tropical cyclones intensified by emissions of black carbon and other aerosols.

    PubMed

    Evan, Amato T; Kossin, James P; Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V

    2011-11-02

    Throughout the year, average sea surface temperatures in the Arabian Sea are warm enough to support the development of tropical cyclones, but the atmospheric monsoon circulation and associated strong vertical wind shear limits cyclone development and intensification, only permitting a pre-monsoon and post-monsoon period for cyclogenesis. Thus a recent increase in the intensity of tropical cyclones over the northern Indian Ocean is thought to be related to the weakening of the climatological vertical wind shear. At the same time, anthropogenic emissions of aerosols have increased sixfold since the 1930s, leading to a weakening of the southwesterly lower-level and easterly upper-level winds that define the monsoonal circulation over the Arabian Sea. In principle, this aerosol-driven circulation modification could affect tropical cyclone intensity over the Arabian Sea, but so far no such linkage has been shown. Here we report an increase in the intensity of pre-monsoon Arabian Sea tropical cyclones during the period 1979-2010, and show that this change in storm strength is a consequence of a simultaneous upward trend in anthropogenic black carbon and sulphate emissions. We use a combination of observational, reanalysis and model data to demonstrate that the anomalous circulation, which is radiatively forced by these anthropogenic aerosols, reduces the basin-wide vertical wind shear, creating an environment more favourable for tropical cyclone intensification. Because most Arabian Sea tropical cyclones make landfall, our results suggest an additional impact on human health from regional air pollution.

  7. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  8. RadShield: semiautomated shielding design using a floor plan driven graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzo, Matthew C; Wu, Dee H; Yang, Kai; Rutel, Isaac B

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce and describe the development of RadShield, a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI), which provides a base design that uniquely performs thorough, spatially distributed calculations at many points and reports the maximum air-kerma rate and barrier thickness for each barrier pursuant to NCRP Report 147 methodology. Semiautomated shielding design calculations are validated by two approaches: a geometry-based approach and a manual approach. A series of geometry-based equations were derived giving the maximum air-kerma rate magnitude and location through a first derivative root finding approach. The second approach consisted of comparing RadShield results with those found by manual shielding design by an American Board of Radiology (ABR)-certified medical physicist for two clinical room situations: two adjacent catheterization labs, and a radiographic and fluoroscopic (R&F) exam room. RadShield's efficacy in finding the maximum air-kerma rate was compared against the geometry-based approach and the overall shielding recommendations by RadShield were compared against the medical physicist's shielding results. Percentage errors between the geometry-based approach and RadShield's approach in finding the magnitude and location of the maximum air-kerma rate was within 0.00124% and 14 mm. RadShield's barrier thickness calculations were found to be within 0.156 mm lead (Pb) and 0.150 mm lead (Pb) for the adjacent catheterization labs and R&F room examples, respectively. However, within the R&F room example, differences in locating the most sensitive calculation point on the floor plan for one of the barriers was not considered in the medical physicist's calculation and was revealed by the RadShield calculations. RadShield is shown to accurately find the maximum values of air-kerma rate and barrier thickness using NCRP Report 147 methodology. Visual inspection alone of the 2D X-ray exam distribution by a medical physicist may not

  9. RadShield: semiautomated shielding design using a floor plan driven graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzo, Matthew C; Wu, Dee H; Yang, Kai; Rutel, Isaac B

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to introduce and describe the development of RadShield, a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI), which provides a base design that uniquely performs thorough, spatially distributed calculations at many points and reports the maximum air-kerma rate and barrier thickness for each barrier pursuant to NCRP Report 147 methodology. Semiautomated shielding design calculations are validated by two approaches: a geometry-based approach and a manual approach. A series of geometry-based equations were derived giv-ing the maximum air-kerma rate magnitude and location through a first derivative root finding approach. The second approach consisted of comparing RadShield results with those found by manual shielding design by an American Board of Radiology (ABR)-certified medical physicist for two clinical room situations: two adjacent catheterization labs, and a radiographic and fluoroscopic (R&F) exam room. RadShield's efficacy in finding the maximum air-kerma rate was compared against the geometry-based approach and the overall shielding recommendations by RadShield were compared against the medical physicist's shielding results. Percentage errors between the geometry-based approach and RadShield's approach in finding the magnitude and location of the maximum air-kerma rate was within 0.00124% and 14 mm. RadShield's barrier thickness calculations were found to be within 0.156 mm lead (Pb) and 0.150 mm lead (Pb) for the adjacent catheteriza-tion labs and R&F room examples, respectively. However, within the R&F room example, differences in locating the most sensitive calculation point on the floor plan for one of the barriers was not considered in the medical physicist's calculation and was revealed by the RadShield calculations. RadShield is shown to accurately find the maximum values of air-kerma rate and barrier thickness using NCRP Report 147 methodology. Visual inspection alone of the 2D X-ray exam distribution by a medical physicist may not

  10. Small foamed polystyrene shield protects low-frequency microphones from wind noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedrick, R. N.

    1964-01-01

    A foamed polystyrene noise shield for microphones has been designed in teardrop shape to minimize air turbulence. The shield slips on and off the microphone head easily and is very effective in low-frequency sound intensity measurements.

  11. New trends in the improvement of cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkinzon, I.B.; Zyuba, B.I.

    1984-05-01

    This article examines the possibilities of reducing catalyst attrition and cyclone wall erosion through optimization of the aerodynamic conditions in the cyclone. It is assumed that the disintegration of catalyst particles and erosion of the cyclone walls take place at exactly the same points (e.g. the seats of erosion in the cyclones can serve as natural indicators in determining the zones of catalyst pulverization). In catalytic cracking units, internal cyclones are used as the primary means of cleanup of the gas for process purposes. Cyclones trap out 99.8-99.95% of the catalyst entrained from the fluidized bed by the contact gas. The retrofitting of standard cyclones with chambers for preliminary aerodynamic stabilization of the flow yielded favorable results. The results of erosion tests on type TsN cyclones with and without a stabilization chamber indicate that the proposed stabilization method can give an approximately fivefold reduction of erosion of the cylindrical part of the cyclone. An important advantage of cyclones with added stabilization is the increased efficiency of dust collection. It is concluded that supplementary aerodynamic stabilization of the dust-laded gas flow and reduction of the angle of attack can give substantial improvements in the operating characteristics of cyclones, both cylindrical and spiral-conical.

  12. Mesoscale Processes in Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    available work relates to forecast rules relating the observed effects of external processes on the convective structure (e.g. Merrill 1993). Whilst the...cyclone could not exist without moist convection , we have found that some cloud processes also provide an inhibition to intensification. An example is

  13. Tropical Cyclone Ensemble Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    described above, but using a vertical window of influence of 2.0 times the scale hight . Notice that meaningful vertical correlation is found by LETKF...between the scatterometer observation and many points throughout the troposphere. This suggests that for assimilation near tropical cyclones that have

  14. APR-2 Tropical Cyclone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Second Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in August and September of 2010, collecting a large volume of data in several tropical systems, including Hurricanes Earl and Karl. Additional measurements of tropical cyclone have been made by APR-2 in experiments prior to GRIP (namely, CAMEX-4, NAMMA, TC4); Table 1 lists all the APR-2 tropical cyclone observations. The APR-2 observations consist of the vertical structure of rain reflectivity at 13.4 and 35.6 GHz, and at both co-polarization and crosspolarization, as well as vertical Doppler measurements and crosswind measurements. APR-2 normally flies on the NASA DC-8 aircraft, as in GRIP, collecting data with a downward looking, cross-track scanning geometry. The scan limits are 25 degrees on either side of the aircraft, resulting in a roughly 10-km swath, depending on the aircraft altitude. Details of the APR-2 observation geometry and performance can be found in Sadowy et al. (2003).The multiparameter nature of the APR-2 measurements makes the collection of tropical cyclone measurements valuable for detailed studies of the processes, microphysics and dynamics of tropical cyclones, as well as weaker systems that are associated with tropical cyclone formation. In this paper, we give a brief overview of how the APR-2 data are processed. We also discuss use of the APR-2 cross-track winds to estimate various quantities of interest in in studies of storm intensification. Finally, we show examples of the standard products and derived information.

  15. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  16. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  17. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  18. A diagnosis of the explosive development of two extratropical cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, Anthony R.; Smith, Phillip J.; Zwack, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the 24-h explosive development periods of two extratropical cyclones, the first occurring over the Gulf Stream off the coast of New England from 18 to 19 January 1979 and the second occurring over the southeastern United States from 20 to 21 January 1979. The data used in this study are the First GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Global Experiment (FGGE) level IIIb (SOP I) global analyses on a 4 deg latitude x 5 deg longitude grid. The parameter used to diagnose development is the geostrophic relative vorticity tendency calculated using an extended form of the Zwack-Okossi development equation. This development equation is similar to the Petterssen-Sutcliffe development equation, but is shown to be more complete by explicitly coupling surface development with forcing at all levels above the surface. Cyclonic-vorticity advection, warm-air advection, and latent heat release act to develop the two cyclones, while adiabatic cooling in the ascending air opposes development. Further, vertical profiles of the development quantities for these two cases reveal that vorticity and temperature advection maximize in the 200-300-mb layer, while the latent heat release maximum is typically below 500 mb.

  19. Improving Hiroshima Air-Over-Ground Thermal/Epithermal Activation Calculations Using a MUSH Model to Show the Importance of Local Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V.

    2002-02-14

    Achieving agreement between measured and calculated neutron activation data resulting from Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb detonations has been a major problem since the early 1980's. This has been particularly true for the materials that are activated by thermal and epithermal neutrons. Since thermal and epithermal neutrons are not transported very far from the weapon, the local shielding environment around the measurement location can be very important. A set of calculations incorporating an average density local-environment material (mush) has been made to demonstrate that the local environment plays an important role in the calculation-measurement agreement process. The optimum solution would be to include the local environment in all thermal neutron response calculations.

  20. INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives.

  1. Annual Tropical Cyclone Report 1980

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    overall smoothed track, which may have been followed by Orchid at some level above 700 mb. An analogy which may offer some in- A sight into Orchid’s...020000Z October, however, the disturbance had weakening, rather than by a typical smooth , separated from the inflow into Vernon, and gradual...or smoothed tracks of straight,’recurving, and all other prognostic field at designated levels in 6- cyclones that do not meet the criteria of hour

  2. The Dynamics of Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    include three different representations of cumulus convection . Realistic simulations of hurricanes have been carried out with the model. The model...tropical cyclones. We have completed a study of the convective destabilization by an approaching upper level trough and a joint paper on this topic with a...the study has been accepted for publication (Thorncroft and Jones, 2000). We have prepared a review paper on the role of cumulus convection in

  3. Paradigms for Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Tang and Emanuel 2010 and references), it is imperative to have a firm understanding of the physical processes of intensity change for...defensible when studying the basic physics of tropical cyclone intensification (Nguyen et al. 2008, section 3.2.1), but not, of course, for tropical...They recalled that the premise underlying all physical parameteriszations is that some aspect of the chaotic microscale process is in statistical

  4. Structure of Developing Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the numerical modeling of tropical cyclones. The very high resolution now routinely used in research models allows realistic simulation of eyewall structure and breakdown, vortex Rossby waves, and numerous other processes that were beyond the capability of previous generations of models. At least one aspect of tropical cyclones, however, has not been reproduced in the current generation of models: early development (or lack of development) during tropical depression and early tropical storm stages. During such times, vertical wind shear often plays a critical role. In this presentation, details of the structure of four tropical cyclones at early stages will be given: Claudette (2003), Danny (1997), Gabrielle (2001), and Edouard (2002). The first three contained intense vortices that formed within downshear convection. Deep-layer vertical wind shear ranged from 8-15 m/s in the storms. In Claudette, a hurricane formed that lasted only 6 hours. In Danny and Gabrielle, the downshear vortices became the new storm center. One became a hurricane and one did not. In Edouard, vertical shear was even larger. Convection fluctuated between downshear of the center and over the center, with analogous intensity changes. This behavior is known to forecasters, but the causes of such fluctuations remain uncertain. The evolving structure of these four storms will be shown, with emphasis on the variation of convection, equivalent potential temperature in the lower troposphere, and azimuthal asymmetries of wind and circulation. Contrast will be made between the structure of forming tropical cyclones in nature and those seen in mesoscale numerical models. Some remarks will be given on the key physical processes that must be simulated.

  5. Promoting the confluence of tropical cyclone research.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of biologists to tropical cyclone research may improve by integrating concepts from other disciplines. Employing accumulated cyclone energy into protocols may foster greater integration of ecology and meteorology research. Considering experienced ecosystems as antifragile instead of just resilient may improve cross-referencing among ecological and social scientists. Quantifying ecosystem capital as distinct from ecosystem services may improve integration of tropical cyclone ecology research into the expansive global climate change research community.

  6. Promoting the confluence of tropical cyclone research

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of biologists to tropical cyclone research may improve by integrating concepts from other disciplines. Employing accumulated cyclone energy into protocols may foster greater integration of ecology and meteorology research. Considering experienced ecosystems as antifragile instead of just resilient may improve cross-referencing among ecological and social scientists. Quantifying ecosystem capital as distinct from ecosystem services may improve integration of tropical cyclone ecology research into the expansive global climate change research community. PMID:26480001

  7. Tips for selecting highly efficient cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Amrein, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Cyclone dust collectors have been used--and misused--all over the world for more than 100 years. One reason for the misuse is a common perception among users that all cyclones are created equal--that is, as long as a cyclone resembles a cylinder with an attached cone, it will do its job. However, to maximize separation efficiency in a specific application requires a precise cyclone design, engineered to exact fit many possible variables. A well-designed cyclone, for instance, can achieve efficiencies as high s 99.9+% when operated properly within the envelope of its specifications. Nonetheless, cyclones are often used only as first-stage filters for performing crude separations, with final collections being carried out by more-costly baghouses and scrubbers. Compared with baghouses and scrubbers, cyclones have two important considerations in their favor. One, they are almost invariably safer--in terms of the potential for generating fires and explosions--than fabric filters. Second, cyclones have lower maintenance costs since there are no filter media to replace. The paper discusses the operation, design, and troubleshooting of cyclones.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  9. Shielding for thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    McCall, R C

    1997-01-01

    The problem of calculating the neutron capture gamma-ray dose rate due to thermal neutron capture in a boron or cadmium rectangular shield is considered. An example is given for shielding for a door at the exit of medical accelerator room maze in order to determine the optimum location of lead relative to the borated polyethylene.

  10. TFCX shielding optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Design analyses and tradeoff studies for the bulk shield of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) were performed. Several shielding options were considered to lower the capital cost of the shielding system. Optimization analyses were carried out to reduce the nuclear responses in the TF coils and the dose equivalent in the reactor hall one day after shutdown. Two TFCX designs with different toroidal field (TF) coil configurations were considered during this work. The materials for the shield were selected based upon tradeoff studies and the results from the previous design studies. The main shielding materials are water, concrete, and steel balls (Fe1422 or Nitronic 33). Small amounts of boron carbide and lead are employed to reduce activation, nuclear heating in the TF coils, and dose equivalent after shutdown.

  11. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Simpson, J.

    2002-05-01

    The first measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and around tropical cyclones were made with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometer (Hudson 1989) from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft throughout the 2001 season. Two penetrations of the closed eye of Hurricane Erin off the northeast US coast on Sept. 10 showed concentrations consistently well in excess of 1000 per cubic cm at approximately 1.4% supersaturation. Simultaneous condensation nuclei (CN--total particle) concentrations were consistently well in excess of 2000 per cubic cm throughout these closed eye penetrations. These within eye measurements at 4 km altitude far exceeded CCN and CN measurements just outside of the storm at similar altitudes--300 and 600 per cubic cm respectively. These CCN and CN concentrations within this closed eye were far above concentrations in maritime air masses; they are characteristic of continental or polluted air masses. Although there was a possibility that Saharan dust may have gotten into this storm these sub tenth micrometer particles are much too small and much too numerous to be dust. Such high concentrations may have originated from European air pollution, which may have been transported by similar airflow patterns to those that carry Saharan dust across the Atlantic. These high concentrations may be a manifestation of descending air that brings higher concentrations that are often characteristic of the upper troposphere (Clarke and Kapustin 2002). Later in the month measurements in Humberto showed highly variable CCN and CN concentrations that ranged from less than 5 per cubic cm to more than 1000 per cubic cm over km scale distances within and around the open eye of this tropical storm/hurricane. These very low concentrations suggest strong cloud scavenging. Clarke, A.D. and V.N. Kapustin, J. Atmos. Sci., 59, 363-382, 2002. Hudson, J.G., J. Atmos. & Ocean. Tech., 6, 1055-1065, 1989.

  12. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    The first measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and around tropical cyclones were made with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometer (Hudson 1909) from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft throughout the 2001 season. Two penetrations of the closed eye of Hurricane Erin off the northeast US coast on Sept. 10 showed concentrations consistently well in excess of 1000 per cubic cm at approximately 1.4% supersaturation. Simultaneous condensation nuclei (CN--total particle) concentrations were consistently well in excess of 2000 per cubic cm throughout these closed eye penetrations. These within eye measurements at 4 km altitude for exceeded CCN and CN measurements just outside of the storm at similar altitudes--300 and 600 per cubic cm respectively. These CCN and CN concentrations within this closed eye were far above concentrations in maritime air masses; they are characteristic of continental or polluted air masses. Although there was a possibility that Saharan duct may have gotten into this storm these sub tenth micrometer particles are much too small and much too numerous to be dust. Such high concentrations may have originated from European air pollution, which may have been transported by similar airflow patterns to those that carry Saharan dust across the Atlantic. These high concentrations may be a manifestation of descending air that brings higher concentrations that are often characteristic of the upper troposphere (Clarke and Kapustin 2002). Later in the month measurements in Humberto showed highly variable CCN and CN concentrations that ranged from lots than 5 per cubic cm to more than 1000 per Cubic cm over km scale distances within and around the open eye of this tropical storm/hurricane. These very low concentrations suggest strong cloud scavenging.

  13. Measurement of acoustic shielding by a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic shielding properties of a turbulent jet have been investigated experimentally. The experimental arrangement consisted of an acoustic point source and a turbulent shielding jet. The source and jet parameters investigated include the source frequency, source spectrum, jet velocity, jet heating by simulation and the lateral and longitudinal source positions with respect to the shielding jet. It is found that the maximum sound attenuation provided by the shielding jet depends on the balance between refraction and diffraction. Over the frequency range investigated, the redistribution of sound by the shielding air jet is power conserving. Comparison between measurement and prediction based on an idealized cylindrical uniform jet model indicates that the spreading and decay of the flow field in real jets are important. Comparisons between the present data trends and those reported for jet-by-jet shielding suggest that the major effects observed in the latter are acoustical rather than aerodynamical.

  14. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  15. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  16. Improvement of the AeroClipper system for cyclones monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André; Philippe, Duvel Jean

    2016-07-01

    The AeroClipper developed by the French space agency (Centre National d'Études Spatiales, CNES) is a quasi-lagrangian device drifting with surface wind at about 20-30m above the ocean surface. It is a new and original device for real-time and continuous observation of air-sea surface parameters in open ocean remote regions. This device enables the sampling of the variability of surface parameters in particular under convective systems toward which it is attracted. The AeroClipper is therefore an ideal instrument to monitor Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in which they are likely to converge and provide original observations to evaluate and improve our current understanding and diagnostics of TCs as well as their representation in numerical models. In 2008, the AeroClipper demonstrates its capability to be captured by an Ocean Indian cyclone, as two models have converged, without damages, in the eye of Dora cyclone during the 2008 VASCO campaign. This paper will present the improvements of this balloon system for the international project 'the Year of Maritime Continent'.

  17. Good field practice helps cyclones do job

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.L.

    1982-11-08

    This article examines use of hydrocyclones in mud equipment operations involving desilters, desanders, shale shakers and degassers for unweighted mud. Presents a diagram of ideal equipment placement, a table sizing cyclones considering mud guns, and a graph sizing cyclones to a drilling rig. Suggests checklists for troubleshooting and operation based on hydrocyclone capacity, plugging, head and flow rates, mud weight and viscosity.

  18. Objective identification of cyclones in GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.; Sielmann, F. ); Sausen, R. )

    1993-12-01

    An objective routine for identifying the individual cyclones has been developed. The procedure was designed with the aim to keep the input expenditure low. The method ensures a complete collection of cyclones and an exclusion of short time fluctuations attributed to numerical effects. The cyclones are identified as relative minima of the geopotential height field in 1000 hPa. The initial stages of the cyclones are found by locating relative maxima in the 850-hPa vorticity field. Further on the temporal development of the extrema is taken into consideration. An individual cyclone is regarded only if it exists for at least 24 h and if it attains a mature stage at least once, where a certain margin of the geopotential gradient to the surroundings is exceeded. The identification routine is applied to simulations with the Hamburg general circulation model ECHAM in T21 resolution. Also, cyclone tracks based on ECMWF analyses are evaluated, to which the model results are compared. The effect of different climate conditions, for example, global warming, on cyclone frequency and track location is investigated. It is found that a warmer SST distribution leads to a slight reduction of cyclone frequency in the Southern Hemisphere in fall (March, April, May) and winter (June, July, August); elsewhere the differences are not significant. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. GPM Rain Rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-JAXA's GPM Satellite Close-up of Cyclone Pam's Rainfall NASA-JAXA's GPM core satellite captured rain rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam at 03:51 UTC (2:51 p.m. local time) on March 14, 2015. Heavie...

  20. Predictability of Sheared Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Tao, D.

    2015-12-01

    Predictability of the formation, rapid intensification and eyewall replacement of sheared tropical cyclones (TCs) are explored through a series of convection-permitting ensemble simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with different environmental vertical wind shear, sea-surface temperature (SST), and ambient moisture conditions. It is found that the intrinsic predictability of the RI onset time is more limited with increasing shear magnitude until the shear magnitude is large enough to prevent the TC formation. Based on ensemble sensitivity and correlation analysis, the RI onset timing within one set is largely related to the vortex tilt magnitude, the diabatic heating distribution and the strength of the primary vortex circulation. Systematic differences amongst the ensemble members begin to arise right after the initial burst of moist convection associated with the incipient vortex. This difference from the randomness inherent in moist convection in terms of both location and intensity first changes the TC vortex structure subtly and then leads to the deviations in system scales and eventually in the development (and precession) of the TC. On average, a higher SST has a positive effect on the TC formation and reduces the uncertainty of development under all shear conditions, while a drier environment has a negative impact on the TCs development and either broadens the ensemble spread of RI onset time or prevents the storm from forming when the shear-induced tilt is large. Nevertheless, the uncertainty in environmental shear magnitudes may dominate over the effect of randomness in moist convection in terms of TC formation and predictability. A byproduct of tropical cyclones under vertical wind shear is the secondary eyewall formation (SEF). It is found that the eyewall formation is more often observed in TCs with moderate to high shear, which was inherently more unpredictable. The inward contraction/axisymmeterization of shear

  1. Intensification of the subpolar front in the Sea of Japan during winter cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ning; Iwasaki, Shinsuke; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The response of the subpolar front in the Sea of Japan (also known as the East Sea) to winter cyclones is investigated based on quantitative analyses of gridded and satellite data sets. Cyclone passages affecting the sea are detected using time series of spatially averaged surface turbulent heat fluxes. As the cyclones develop, there are strong cold-air outbreaks that produce twice the normal heat loss over the sea. After removal of sea surface temperature (SST) seasonal trends, we found that cyclone passage (hence, cooling) mainly occurred over 3 days, with maximum SST reduction of -0.4°C. The greatest reduction was found along the subpolar front, where frontal sharpness (i.e., SST gradient) increased by 0.1°C (100 km)-1. Results of a mixed-layer model were consistent with both temperature and frontal sharpness, and localized surface cooling along the subpolar front resulted from both horizontal heat advection and turbulent heat fluxes at the sea surface. Further analyses show that this localized cooling from horizontal heat advection is caused by the cross-frontal Ekman flow (vertically averaged over the mixed layer) and strong northwesterly winds associated with the cold-air outbreak during cyclone passage.

  2. Cyclone Center: Insights on Historical Tropical Cyclones from Citizen Volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, P.; Hennon, C. C.; Knapp, K. R.; Schreck, C. J., III; Stevens, S. E.; Kossin, J. P.; Rennie, J.; Hennon, P. A.; Kruk, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cyclonecenter.org project started in fall 2012 and has been collecting citizen scientist volunteer tropical cyclone intensity estimates ever since. The project is hosted by the Citizen Science Alliance (zooniverse) and the platform is supported by a range of scientists. We have over 30 years of satellite imagery of tropical cyclones but the analysis to date has been done on an ocean-basin by ocean-basin basis and worse still practices have changed over time. We therefore do not, presently, have a homogeneous record relevant for discerning climatic changes. Automated techniques can classify many of the images but have a propensity to be challenged during storm transitions. The problem is fundamentally one where many pairs of eyes are invaluable as there is no substitute for human eyes in discerning patterns. Each image is classified by ten unique users before it is retired. This provides a unique insight into the uncertainty inherent in classification. In the three years of the project much useful data has accrued. This presentation shall highlight some of the results and analyses to date and touch on insights as to what has worked and what perhaps has not worked so well. There are still many images left to complete so its far from too late to jump over to www.cyclonecenter.org and help out.

  3. Water-extended polyester neutron shield for a 252Cf neutron source.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Manzanares-Acuña, E; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Gallego, E; Lorente, A; Donaire, I

    2007-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study to determine the shielding features to neutrons of water-extended polyester was carried out. During calculations, (252)Cf and shielding were modelled and the neutron spectra as well as the H(10) were calculated in four sites. The calculation was extended to include a water shielding, the source in vacuum and in air. Besides neutron shielding characteristics, the Kerma in air due to gammas emitted by (252)Cf and due to capture gamma rays in the shielding were included.

  4. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  5. Reconstruction and use of battery cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, V.D.; Zabrodnii, I.V.; Kolomoiskii, V.G.; Dodik, G.A.; Afanas'ev, O.K.; Gusarov, N.I.; Strakhov, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    The authors discuss a sinter plant where reliable and stable operation of its modernized cyclones has made it possible to improve the performance of the gas-cleaning system as a whole, while increasing the life of the exhauster rotors to one year and improving the performance indices of the sintering machines. The battery cyclones were modernized by replacing the existing elements with consolidated cyclone elements and the elements were provided with four-pipe semihelical swirlers. The elements were made of ordinary steel pipes 530 and 273 mm in diameter. During manufacture and installation of the cyclone elements, special attention was given to the coaxiality of the housings and the outlet pipes of the elements, the hermeticity and density of the welds, the dimensional accuracy of the elements, the perpendicularity of the bearing flange and outlet-pipe axis, and the finish of the inside surfaces of the cyclone elements.

  6. Cyclone oil shale retorting concept. [Use it all retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Harak, A.E.; Little, W.E.; Faulders, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    A new concept for above-ground retorting of oil shale was disclosed by A.E. Harak in US Patent No. 4,340,463, dated July 20, 1982, and assigned to the US Department of Energy. This patent titled System for Utilizing Oil Shale Fines, describes a process wherein oil shale fines of one-half inch diameter and less are pyrolyzed in an entrained-flow reactor using hot gas from a cyclone combustor. Spent shale and supplemental fuel are burned at slagging conditions in this combustor. Because of fines utilization, the designation Use It All Retorting Process (UIARP) has been adopted. A preliminary process engineering design of the UIARP, analytical tests on six samples of raw oil shale, and a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of the process were performed. The results of these investigations are summarized in this report. The patent description is included. It was concluded that such changes as deleting air preheating in the slag quench and replacing the condenser with a quench-oil scrubber are recognized as being essential. The addition of an entrained flow raw shale preheater ahead of the cyclone retort is probably required, but final acceptance is felt to be contingent on some verification that adequate reaction time cannot be obtained with only the cyclone, or possibly some other twin-cyclone configuration. Sufficient raw shale preheating could probably be done more simply in another manner, perhaps in a screw conveyor shale transporting system. Results of the technical and economic evaluations of Jacobs Engineering indicate that further investigation of the UIARP is definitely worthwhile. The projected capital and operating costs are competitive with costs of other processes as long as electric power generation and sales are part of the processing facility.

  7. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  8. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  9. Crash-Resistant Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact-resistant shield designed to consist of aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched between inner and outer aluminum skins. Intended to protect radioisotope thermoelectric generator of spacecraft from impact with ground or water after free fall from upper atmosphere. Designed to absorb impact energy by buckling, while inner and outer skins designed to protect against shrapnel, overpressure, and impact loads. Concept of shield applicable to crashproof compartments for ground vehicles and aircraft.

  10. Axisymmetric structure of the long lasting summer Arctic cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Takuro; Tanaka, H. L.

    2016-09-01

    Arctic cyclones are unique low pressure systems in the Arctic, which are different from the tropical cyclones and the mid-latitude cyclones. The axisymmetric structures of two major Arctic cyclones which appeared in June 2008 and August 2012 are examined based on the cylindrical coordinate system around the Arctic cyclone. The result demonstrates that the Arctic cyclone has a deep barotropic cyclonic circulation, a secondary circulation in the troposphere, a downdraft at the lower stratosphere, a coupling of a warm core at the lower stratosphere and a cold core in the troposphere, and a deep tropopause folding over the cyclone center. The horizontal scale of the Arctic cyclone reaches 5000 km in diameter which is one of the largest cyclones found on the Earth. Note that the cyclone of June 2008 appears showing axisymmetric cyclonic circulations at the surface level. The cyclone of 2012 is characterized by the structure change from the cold core to the warm core at the lower stratosphere, indicating a shift from the ordinary baroclinic cyclone to the typical Arctic cyclone. Although additional studies are needed, a schematic diagram of the Arctic cyclone is proposed in this study.

  11. Cyclone Center: Using Crowdsourcing to Determine Tropical Cyclone Intensity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, C. C.; Knapp, K. R.; Schreck, C. J.; Stevens, S. E.; Kossin, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The strength of tropical cyclones (TCs) is traditionally determined using the sustained maximum wind speed. Because TCs develop and spend most of their lifetime over tropical oceans, it is rare to directly observe a storm well enough to determine its strength accurately. The Dvorak technique was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to address this problem. By determining a number of cloud and structural characteristics from satellite images, a forecaster could now arrive at a reasonable maximum sustained wind without direct observations. However, the Dvorak technique by nature is subjective and it has been shown that trained experts frequently disagree on storm intensities. Furthermore, the application of the rules and constraints of the process has diverged with time across different forecast centers. This has led in several cases to severe disagreements in storm intensities when two or more forecast centers track the same TC. The accumulation of these differences has caused heterogeneous trends in TC intensity to arise at decadal time scales. A global reanalysis of TC intensity is required to resolve these discrepancies, but such an undertaking is unrealistic. Cyclone Center, an Internet crowd sourcing site for TCs, was created to resolve differences in TC intensities and produce a consistent 32-year (1978-2009) record of it. By using a homogeneous satellite dataset (HURSAT) and adapting the Dvorak technique into a set of three or four simple questions, laypersons perform the actions of the expert. User responses are converted into 3-hourly storm intensities. To capitalize on the crowd sourcing approach, at least 10 different users are shown the same image; this allows critical data such as cloud pattern uncertainties and storm metadata (e.g. eye size, center location, cloud pattern) to be collected. Preliminary analyses show that our citizen scientists many times outperform computer classifications in pattern matching and exhibit low bias and mean error when

  12. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and mitigate the risks in Li

  13. Evolution of the Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange And Analysis System (TC-IDEAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turk, J.; Chao, Y.; Haddad, Z.; Hristova-Veleva, S.; Knosp, B.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Li, P.; Licata, S.; Poulsen, W.; Su, H.; Tanelli, S.; Vane, D.; Vu, Q.; Goodman, H. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Conover, H.; Hall, J.; He, Y.; Regner, K.; Knapp, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange and Analysis System (TC-IDEAS) is being jointly developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of NASA's Hurricane Science Research Program. The long-term goal is to create a comprehensive tropical cyclone database of satellite and airborne observations, in-situ measurements and model simulations containing parameters that pertain to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storms; the air-sea interaction processes; and the large-scale environment.

  14. Stable Isotope Anatomy of Tropical Cyclone Ita, North-Eastern Australia, April 2014

    PubMed Central

    Munksgaard, Niels C.; Zwart, Costijn; Kurita, Naoyuki; Bass, Adrian; Nott, Jon; Bird, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    The isotope signatures registered in speleothems during tropical cyclones (TC) provides information about the frequency and intensity of past TCs but the precise relationship between isotopic composition and the meteorology of TCs remain uncertain. Here we present continuous δ18O and δ2H data in rainfall and water vapour, as well as in discrete rainfall samples, during the passage of TC Ita and relate the evolution in isotopic compositions to local and synoptic scale meteorological observations. High-resolution data revealed a close relationship between isotopic compositions and cyclonic features such as spiral rainbands, periods of stratiform rainfall and the arrival of subtropical and tropical air masses with changing oceanic and continental moisture sources. The isotopic compositions in discrete rainfall samples were remarkably constant along the ~450 km overland path of the cyclone when taking into account the direction and distance to the eye of the cyclone at each sampling time. Near simultaneous variations in δ18O and δ2H values in rainfall and vapour and a near-equilibrium rainfall-vapour isotope fractionation indicates strong isotopic exchange between rainfall and surface inflow of vapour during the approach of the cyclone. In contrast, after the passage of spiral rainbands close to the eye of the cyclone, different moisture sources for rainfall and vapour are reflected in diverging d-excess values. High-resolution isotope studies of modern TCs refine the interpretation of stable isotope signatures found in speleothems and other paleo archives and should aim to further investigate the influence of cyclone intensity and longevity on the isotopic composition of associated rainfall. PMID:25742628

  15. Stable isotope anatomy of tropical cyclone Ita, North-Eastern Australia, April 2014.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Zwart, Costijn; Kurita, Naoyuki; Bass, Adrian; Nott, Jon; Bird, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    The isotope signatures registered in speleothems during tropical cyclones (TC) provides information about the frequency and intensity of past TCs but the precise relationship between isotopic composition and the meteorology of TCs remain uncertain. Here we present continuous δ18O and δ2H data in rainfall and water vapour, as well as in discrete rainfall samples, during the passage of TC Ita and relate the evolution in isotopic compositions to local and synoptic scale meteorological observations. High-resolution data revealed a close relationship between isotopic compositions and cyclonic features such as spiral rainbands, periods of stratiform rainfall and the arrival of subtropical and tropical air masses with changing oceanic and continental moisture sources. The isotopic compositions in discrete rainfall samples were remarkably constant along the ~450 km overland path of the cyclone when taking into account the direction and distance to the eye of the cyclone at each sampling time. Near simultaneous variations in δ18O and δ2H values in rainfall and vapour and a near-equilibrium rainfall-vapour isotope fractionation indicates strong isotopic exchange between rainfall and surface inflow of vapour during the approach of the cyclone. In contrast, after the passage of spiral rainbands close to the eye of the cyclone, different moisture sources for rainfall and vapour are reflected in diverging d-excess values. High-resolution isotope studies of modern TCs refine the interpretation of stable isotope signatures found in speleothems and other paleo archives and should aim to further investigate the influence of cyclone intensity and longevity on the isotopic composition of associated rainfall.

  16. On Steady-State Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    mass-weighted RAM and domain-integrated kinetic energy (KE) partitioned between cyclonic KE (cKE) and anticyclonic KE (aKE) and how does the...and (b) the mass-weighted kinetic energy of cyclonic flow (cKE, where v > 0) and anticyclonic flow (aKE, where v < 0) normalized by the initial value...focus the study, we have sought to quantify for the first time the partition between the kinetic energy of the cyclone itself and the upper-level

  17. Coal reburning application on a Cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Maringo, G.J.; Yagiela, A.S.; Newell, R.J.; Farzan, H.

    1994-12-31

    Cyclone reburn involves the injection of a supplemental fuel (natural gas, oil or coal) into the main furnace of a Cyclone-fired boiler to produce locally reducing conditions which convert NO{sub x}, generated in the main combustion zone, to molecular nitrogen, thereby reducing overall NO{sub x} emissions. The world`s only application of the Cyclone reburn technology using pulverized coal as the reburn fuel was installed at Wisconsin Power & Light`s Nelson Dewey Generating Station, Unit 2. The project was selected for demonstration under the US Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, Round II.

  18. Elevated middle and upper troposphere ozone observed downstream of Atlantic tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.; Robjhon, Miliaritiana L.; Reyes, Ashford; Valentine, Adriel; Neves, Luis

    2015-10-01

    During the peak period of hurricane activity in the summer of 2010, vertical profiles of ozone using ozonesondes were taken downstream of tropical cyclones in the Western and Eastern Atlantic Ocean basin at Barbados and Cape Verde. Measurements are taken for tropical cyclones Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Julia and Igor. The measurements show an increase in ozone mixing ratios with air originating from the tropical cyclones at 5-10 km altitude. We suggest that observed lightning activity associated tropical cyclones and the subsequent production of NOX followed by upper level outflow and subsidence ahead of the tropical cyclones and aged continental outflow from West Africa thunderstorms produced observed increases in ozone mixing ratios. Hurricane Danielle showed the largest changes in ozone mixing ratio with values increasing from 25 ppb to 70 ppb between 22 and 25 August in the middle troposphere, near 450 hPa; warming and drying in the middle and lower troposphere. Measurements of ozone mixing ratios in Cape Verde show higher ozone mixing ratios prior to the passage of tropical storm Julia but low ozone mixing ratios and high relative humidity up to 300 hPa when the storm was in close proximity. This is due most likely the vertically transported from the marine boundary layer.

  19. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  20. Shielded, Automated Umbilical Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Daniel R.; Morrill, Brion F.; Jasulaitis, Vytas

    1995-01-01

    Umbilical mechanism automatically connects and disconnects various fluid couplings and/or electrical contacts while shielding mating parts from debris. Reacts mating and demating loads internally, without additional supporting structures. All functions - extension of plug, mating, and movement of debris shields - actuated by single motor. If mechanism jams or fails at any point in sequence, override feature in drive train allows manual operation. Designed for service in outer space, where its shields protect against micrometeoroids, debris, ultraviolet radiation, and atomic oxygen. Used on Earth to connect or disconnect fluid or electrical utilities in harsh environments like those of nuclear powerplants or undersea construction sites, or in presence of radioactive, chemical, or biological hazards, for example.

  1. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  2. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  3. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  4. Space station MMOD shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Nagy, Kornel; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Thomas G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the International Space Station (ISS) micro-meteoroid orbital debris (MMOD) impact shielding including the requirements for protection as well as technical approaches to meeting the requirements. Current activities in providing MMOD protection for ISS are described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Another activity is to observe MMOD impact damage on ISS elements and returned hardware, and to compare the observed damage with predicted damage using Bumper code risk assessment software. A conclusion of this paper is that ISS will be protected adequately from MMOD impact after completing augmentation of ISS shielding for service module, and after improving MMOD protection for Soyuz and Progress vehicles. Another conclusion is that impact damage observed to the ISS mini-pressurized logistics module matches the distribution of impacts predicted by Bumper code.

  5. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  6. Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner's combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Jack in Satellite 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby from NASA's TRMM satellite of Tropical Cyclone Jack on April 21 shows that some of the thunderstorms were shown by TRMM PR were still reaching height of at least 17 km (10.5 miles). ...

  8. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  9. GPM Flyby of Tropical Cyclone Uriah

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Feb. 15, GPM saw rain was falling at a rate of over 127 mm (5 inches) per hour in a band of intense storms south of Tropical Cyclone Uriah's center. Thunderstorms moving around the southwestern ...

  10. Human Influence on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity.We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  11. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Adam H; Camargo, Suzana J; Hall, Timothy M; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K; Wing, Allison A

    2016-07-15

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  12. TRMM Flyby of Tropical Cyclone Narelle

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated, 3-D flyby of Major Cyclone Narelle was created using data on Jan. 11, from NASA's TRMM satellite. Narelle's wind speeds were near 132 mph. A few thunderstorm towers in Narelle's eye ...

  13. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  14. Tropical cyclone Pam field survey in Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Kosciuch, Thomas; Hong, Isabel; Rarai, Allan; Harrison, Morris J.; Jockley, Fred R.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    Severe tropical cyclone Pam (Cat. 5, SSHS) crossed the Vanuatu archipelago with sustained winds of 270 km/h on March 13 and 14, 2015 and made landfall on Erromango. Pam is the most intense tropical cyclone to make landfall on Vanuatu since the advent of satellite imagery based intensity estimates in the 1970s. Pam caused one of the worst natural disaster in Vanuatu's recorded history. Eleven fatalities were directly attributed to cyclone Pam and mostly due to lack of shelter from airborne debris. On March 6 Pam formed east of the Santa Cruz Islands causing coastal inundation on Tuvalu's Vaitupu Island located some 1100 km east of the cyclone center. Pam intensified while tracking southward along Vanuatu severely affecting the Shefa and Tafea Provinces. An international storm surge reconnaissance team was deployed to Vanuatu from June 3 to 17, 2015 to complement earlier local surveys. Cyclone Pam struck a remote island archipelago particularly vulnerable to the combined cyclonic multi-hazards encompassing extreme wind gusts, massive rainfall and coastal flooding due to a combination of storm surge and storm wave impacts. The team surveyed coastal villages on Epi, the Shepherd Islands (Tongoa and Mataso), Efate (including Lelepa), Erromango, and Tanna. The survey spanned 320 km parallel to the cyclone track between Epi and Tanna encompassing more than 45 sites including the hardest hit settlements. Coastal flooding profiles were surveyed from the shoreline to the limit of inundation. Maximum coastal flood elevations and overland flow depths were measured based on water marks on buildings, scars on trees, rafted debris and corroborated with eyewitness accounts. We surveyed 91 high water marks with characteristic coastal flood levels in the 3 to 7 m range and composed of storm surge with superimposed storm waves. Inundation distances were mostly limited to a few hundred meters but reached 800 m on Epi Island. Wrack lines containing pumice perfectly delineated the

  15. Interactions between climate and tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    For the last 50 years, there have been two major thrusts in tropical cyclone research: determining the state of the atmosphere and ocean that is suitable for the formation of tropical storms (the genesis criteria) and short-term forecasting of the track and intensity of storms. Efforts to forecast seasonal storm activity, especially in the North Atlantic Ocean, have been undertaken through empirical means and, more recently, using low-resolution climate models. Climate model results have been exceptionally encouraging suggesting that the tropical cyclogenesis factors are predictable and are part of the large scale tropical circulation. During the last few years, a spate of papers has noted the relationship between changes in sea-surface temperature (SST) and tropical cyclone intensity and frequency. A critical issue is determining to what degree the frequency of hurricanes, as well as their intensity distribution, will change in a warming world. We discuss recent research regarding the interactions of the climate system with tropical cyclones, including the role of climate in determining the genesis of tropical cyclones and the role of tropical cyclones in the heat balance of the planet. Specifically: (i) We re-examine the genesis criteria of tropical cyclones and add two new criteria based on the behavior of waves in a flow varying in longitude and the inertial instability of equatorial flow in a cross-equatorial pressure gradient environment. Tropical cyclones are seen to form where the stretching deformation is negative and where large-scale waves transform into tight smaller and highly energetic scale vortices. We also discuss the tendency for storms to develop and intensify where the near-equatorial flow is inertially unstable. (ii) Tropical cyclones act to cool the tropical oceans by > 1K/year by evaporation of ocean surface water and by entrainment mixing with cooler water from below the mixed layer. We suggest that tropical cyclones are important part of

  16. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  17. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  18. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  19. Idealized simulations of sting jet cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. H.; Gray, S. L.; Clark, P. A.

    2012-04-01

    An idealized modeling study of sting-jet cyclones is presented. Sting jets are descending mesoscale jets that occur in some extratropical cyclones and produce localized regions of strong low-level winds in the frontal fracture region. Moist baroclinic lifecycle (LC1) simulations are performed with modifications to produce cyclones resembling observed sting-jet cyclones. Two jets exist in the control idealized cyclone that descend into the frontal fracture region and result in strong winds near to the top of the boundary layer; one of these satisfies the criteria for a sting jet, the other is associated with the warm front. Sensitivity experiments show that both these jets are robust features. The sting jet strength (measured by maximum low-level wind speed or descent rate) increases with the cyclone growth rate; growth rate increases with increasing basic-state zonal jet maximum or decreasing basic-state tropospheric static stability. The two cyclones with the weakest basic-state static stability have by far the strongest sting jets, with descent rates comparable to those observed. Evaporative cooling contributes up to 20% of the descent rate in these sting jets compared with up to 4% in the other sting jets. Conditional symmetric instability (CSI) release in the cloud head also contributes to the sting jet, although there is less extensive CSI than in observed cases. The robustness of the sting jets suggests that they could occur frequently in cyclones with frontal fracture; however, they are unlikely to be identified unless momentum transport through the boundary layer leads to strong surface wind gusts.

  20. Evaluating the impacts of eastern North Pacific tropical cyclones on North America utilizing remotely-sensed and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kimberly M.

    The eastern North Pacific Ocean has the highest density of tropical cyclone genesis events of any tropical basin in the world, and many of these systems form near land before moving westward. However, despite the level of tropical cyclone activity in this basin, and the proximity of the main genesis region to land, tropical cyclone behavior in the eastern North Pacific has been relatively unexplored. When synoptic conditions are favorable, moisture from northward-moving tropical cyclones can be advected into northern Mexico and the southwestern United States, often leading to the development of summertime thunderstorms during the North American monsoon season. An interaction with a mid-latitude trough produces the most rainfall, and the spatial variability of precipitation is greatly affected by the complex topography of the region. Moisture can be advected from a tropical cyclone around the subtropical ridge in place for much of the eastern North Pacific hurricane season and contribute to precipitation. This ridge, when it extends westward over the Pacific Ocean, can also prevent tropical cyclone moisture from impacting the southwestern United States. Northward-moving tropical cyclones often enter an environment with decreasing sea surface temperatures, increasing vertical wind shear, and meridional air temperature and moisture gradients. These key ingredients for extratropical transition are generally present in the eastern North Pacific, but the subtropical ridge prevents many named systems from moving northward, and only 9% of eastern North Pacific tropical cyclones from 1970 to 2011 complete ET according to cyclone phase space. However, over half of the systems that do not complete ET dissipate as cold core cyclones, a structural change that has yet to be explored in other tropical basins. It is difficult to estimate tropical cyclone intensity in a vast ocean area with few direct measurements available. The deviation angle variance technique, an objective

  1. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  2. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  3. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  4. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  5. Lightweight blast shield

    SciTech Connect

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  6. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  7. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  8. The Morphology of Cyclonic Windstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, Tim

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to help facilitate the correct interpretation and use of model analyses and predictions of windstorms in the extra-tropics, and to show that 'storm detection' does not just depend on the efficacy of the identification/tracking algorithm. Under the auspices of the IMILAST (Intercomparison of MId-LAtitude STorm diagnostics) project, 29 damaging European cyclonic windstorms have been studied in detail, using observational evidence as the main tool. Accordingly a conceptual model of windstorm evolution has been constructed. This usefully has its roots in the evolution one sees on standard synoptic charts, and highlights that three types of damage footprint can be associated. Building on previous work these are referred to as the warm jet, the sting jet and the cold jet footprints. The jet phenomena themselves each relate to the proximity of fronts on the synoptic charts, and accordingly occur in airmasses with different stability characteristics. These characteristics seem to play a large role in determining the magnitude of surface gusts, and how those gusts vary between coastal and inland sites. These aspects will be discussed with examples, showing that one cannot simply characterise or rank cyclones using wind strength on a lower tropospheric level such as 850hPa. A key finding that sets the sting jet apart, and that makes it a particularly dangerous phenomena, is that gust magnitude is relatively unaffected by passage inland, and this seems to relate to the atmosphere in its environment being destabilised from above. For sting jets wind strength may be greatest below 850hPa. Unfortunately neither current generation global re-analyses, nor global climate models seem to be able to simulate sting jets. This is for various reasons, though their low resolution is key. This limitation has been recognised previously, and the standard way to address this has been to use a re-calibration technique. The potential pitfalls of this approach will be

  9. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  10. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  11. Shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P. )

    1994-01-01

    A new analysis for shielding outdoor substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires is proposed. The basic assumption of this proposed method is that any lightning stroke which penetrates the shields will cause damage. The second assumption is that a certain level of risk of failure must be accepted, such as one or two failures per 100 years. The proposed method, using electrogeometric model, was applied to design shield wires for two outdoor substations: (1) 161-kV/69-kV station, and (2) 500-kV/161-kV station. The results of the proposed method were also compared with the shielding data of two other substations.

  12. The Intense Arctic Cyclone of Early August 2012: A Dynamically Driven Cyclogenesis Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosart, L. F.; Turchioe, A.; Adamchcik, E.

    2013-12-01

    warm sector of the developing cyclone over north-central Russia were indicative of the enhanced baroclinicity and instability in the cyclone warm sector and the ability of lower tropospheric warm-air advection to sustain deep ascent in the intensifying cyclone. The relative importance of dynamical versus thermodynamical forcing to the cyclogenesis process as well as the bulk upscale effects of the intense cyclone on the larger scale higher-latitude circulation and the distribution of sea ice will be discussed. A noteworthy aspect of the post-storm polar environment was the upscale growth of a midlevel cyclonic circulation to include most of the Arctic Ocean. The off-pole displacement of this midlevel cyclonic circulation toward northern Canada by mid-August may have contributed to the termination of the 2012 summer-long intensive heat wave over most of the continental United States.

  13. Identification of sting jet extratropical cyclones in ERA-Interim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    Sting jets are transient, highly localized low-level jets that descend from the tip of the cloud head towards the top of the boundary layer in some rapidly deepening Shapiro-Keyser type extratropical cyclones. Sting jets have recently been recognised as clearly different from other air streams, such as the warm and cold conveyor belts, that are also part of the structure of these cyclones. Understanding the dynamics and statistics of sting jets is important due to the potential loss of life and damage to property and infrastructure that can occur as a consequence of the strong winds that sting jets can generate if their momentum is transferred to the surface. However, with very few documented cases, their frequency of occurrence and intensity range are still open questions. One way of tackling this problem is to study available reanalysis datasets. However, these datasets are not expected to explicitly show the occurrence of sting jets due to their coarse resolution. Instead of a direct search for sting jets, a search for sting jet precursors such as regions of high conditional symmetric instability (CSI) at mid-tropospheric levels is proposed in this study. For this purpose, a method based on an appropriate set of diagnostics has been devised to identify regions of CSI potentially associated with sting jets in gridded atmospheric datasets at resolutions including the coarse resolution of currently available reanalyses. The method is tested on some of the well-documented case studies of sting jets. Once its reliability is proven, it is applied to the 50 most intense cyclones in the North Atlantic during the first 10 years (from 1989 to 1998) of the ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim. Around 10% of these cases are found to potentially have sting jets. These results represent a further step towards the construction of the first climatology of sting jets.

  14. Experience with different cyclones in CFBs

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.G.; Brink, K.E.; Kokko, A.

    1998-07-01

    Kvaerner Pulping has been designing, manufacturing and delivering different kinds of CFB boilers since the beginning of the 1980s. This paper gives a historical overview of these first generation CFBs and especially operational experience with them. Due to some specific problems in these first generation CFBs, described in this paper, Kvaerner Pulping was among the pioneers in CFB construction development and was probably the first company to deliver a totally water-cooled CFB construction that also included the cyclone. The goal in construction development has been to improve the reliability of the CFB boiler and at the same time minimizing the required service time. Kvaerner's continuous CFB development has created several constructions with different appearances for different applications. The basic development work has been done on the conventional cyclone type and this it is still the most common cyclone type used in all sizes of applications. CYMIC boiler, and especially its cyclone, is one of the new designs. It is also a totally water-cooled construction and it has some additional benefits which are mainly correlated with the space requirements of boiler placement and simple cyclone construction. CYMIC is very suitable for industrial applications and for cases where utilizes existing boiler houses or parts of them are being utilized. For the increased CFB boiler sizes Kvaerner has developed the ICCL (Integral Cylindrical Cyclone and Loop-seal). Again the installation is totally water-cooled and additional benefits are related to the straight cyclone construction, water-cooled vortex finder the ability to locate a significant proportion of heat surfaces in the loopseal. All the constructional features mentioned above are described in detail in this paper. This present paper gives some idea of how these installations have coped in practice and what aspects need to be developed further.

  15. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  16. Tracking Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones using different algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilinina, Natalia; Rudeva, Irina; Gulev, Sergey; Simmonds, Ian; Keay, Kevin

    2010-05-01

    We attempt to estimate strengths and weaknesses of the two cyclone tracking algorithms - of the University of Melbourne (UM) and of IORAS (SAIL). The UM scheme is using geostrophic vorticity for tracking cyclones and SAIL tracking is based on sea level pressure. Furthermore, there are many other conceptual differences in the algorithm performance. The SAIL scheme was applied to the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis output for the Southern Hemisphere (1948-2009), the period of intercomparison with the results based on UM scheme was 1990-1999. During time period 1990-1999 the UM scheme identifies 45% more cyclones than the SAIL scheme. The UM tracking output consists of all cyclones which are found by the SAIL scheme and also many short-living vortices, which do not have their imprints in the pressure fields. Many of these vortices are not characterized by the minimum central pressure and the closed isobar - the two major characteristics of cyclone - and require the extension of cyclone definition to be considered as cyclones. Spatial distribution of cyclone counts over Southern Hemisphere clearly shows the two main storm tracks: the Southern (close to the Antarctic) represented by deep and moderate cyclones with minimum central pressure typically lower than 965 hPa and the Northern track primarily associated with the shallow cyclones (central pressure is typically higher than 980hPa). Using the time series of the number of cyclones derived from the SAIL tracking we estimated linear trends in the cyclones counts. The number of deep cyclones (<960 hPa) growths during 1948-2009 by 0,8 cyclones per year, while the number of shallow cyclones (>980 hPa) decreases by 1,3 cyclones per year. Changes in a number of deep cyclones are significantly correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index (e.g. 0,57 in the autumn).

  17. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) evaluation of the Cyclone-Z device under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Syria, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    This document announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the Cyclone-Z device under the provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. The evaluation of the Cyclone-Z device was conducted upon receiving an application from the marketer. The device is claimed to improve fuel economy and driveability and to reduce exhaust emissions. EPA fully considered all of the information submitted by the applicant. The evaluation of the Cyclone-Z device was based on that information, EPA's engineering judgement, and its experience with other air bleed devices.

  18. Determination of dosimetric parameters for shielded 153Gd source in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Ghatei, Najmeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Meigooni, Ali S.; Shahraini, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) is a recently developed method for treatment of prostate cancer. In the present study TG-43 dosimetric parameters of a 153Gd source were obtained for use in I-RSBT. Materials and methods A 153Gd source located inside a needle including a Pt shield and an aluminum window was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dosimetric parameters of this source model, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function, with and without the shields were calculated according to the TG-43 report. Results The air kerma strength was found to be 6.71 U for the non-shielded source with 1 GBq activity. This value was found to be 0.04 U and 6.19 U for the Pt shield and Al window cases, respectively. Dose rate constant for the non-shielded source was found to be 1.20 cGy/(hU). However, for a shielded source with Pt and aluminum window, dose rate constants were found to be 0.07 cGy/(hU) and 0.96 cGy/(hU), on the shielded and window sides, respectively. The values of radial dose function and anisotropy function were tabulated for these sources. Additionally, isodose curves were drawn for sources with and without shield, in order to evaluate the effect of shield on dose distribution. Conclusions Existence of the Pt shield may greatly reduce the dose to organs at risk and normal tissues which are located toward the shielded side. The calculated air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data for the 153Gd source for the non-shielded and the shielded sources can be used in the treatment planning system (TPS). PMID:28265239

  19. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  20. Applying Nonlinear Signal Analysis Technologies to Flame Scanner Signals to Improve Staging of Cyclone Boilers for NOx control

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T. J.; Bailey, R. T.; Fuller, T. A.; FINNEY, Charles E A; Daw, C Stuart; Stallings, J.; Himes, R.; Bermke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclone{trademark} boiler owners continue to drive down NO{sub x} emissions by increasingly sophisticated staging and air distribution schemes. For example, Alliant Energy has employed RMT's SmartBurn{reg_sign} technology, and Ameren UE has pioneered neural nets to reduce emissions. Over the last 11 years under sponsorship of EPRI, the team of ORNL and B&W has developed pulverized coal burner diagnostic technology by applying nonlinear signal analysis techniques to flame scanner signals. The team has extended the technology to cyclones to facilitate deeper staging of the cyclones to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Development projects were conducted at the Alliant Energy Edgewater Units 3 and 4, and Ameren UE Sioux Unit 1. Nonlinear analysis statistics were correlated to upsets in cyclone operation resulting from poor air distribution in the burner and barrel. The team demonstrated that the lighter and main flame scanners can be used to independently guide adjustments to the burner and barrel.

  1. Inlet Particle-Sorting Cyclone for the Enhancement of PM2.5 Separation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peng-Bo; Wang, Fei; Yang, Xue-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cui, Xin; Wang, Hua-Lin

    2017-02-07

    Many cities are suffering from severe air pollution from fine particulate matter. Cyclone is an effective separator for particulate pollutant but has low efficiency for those with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5). In this research, four novel inlet particle-sorting cyclones were first developed to enhance the separation of PM2.5. The energy consumption, overall separation efficiency, particle grade efficiency,outlet particle concentration and size distribution were compared with common cyclone (CM-C). It was found that the vertical reverse rotation cyclone (VRR-C), which made the smaller particles enter cyclone from radially outer side and axially lower side at the rectangular inlet, had the best separation performance, especially for PM2.5 separation. The mean diameter of inlet particles was 15.7 μm and the particle concentration was 2000 mg/m(3), the overall separation efficiency of the VRR-C reached 98.3%, which was 6.4% higher than that of CM-C. PM2.5 grade efficiency of the VRR-C exceeded 80%, which was 15∼20% higher than that of CM-C. The PM2.5 content at the VRR-C outlet was 30.8 mg/m(3), while that of CM-C was still 118.4 mg/m(3). The novel inlet particle-sorting cyclone is an effective separation enhancement for PM2.5 source control in the process of industrial production and environment protection.

  2. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  3. Cyclone reduction of taconite. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.R.; Bartlett, R.W.; Abdel-latif, M.A.; Hou, X.; Kumar, P.

    1995-05-01

    A cyclone reactor system for the partial reduction and melting of taconite concentrate fines has been engineered, designed and operated. A non-transferred arc plasma torch was employed as a heat source. Taconite fines, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were fed axially into the reactor, while the plasma gas was introduced tangentially into the cyclone. The average reactor temperature was maintained at above 1400{degrees}C, and reduction experiments were performed under various conditions. The influence of the following parameters on the reduction of taconite was investigated experimentally; carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide inlet feed ratio, carbon monoxide inlet partial pressure, and average reactor temperature. The interactions of the graphite lining with carbon dioxide and taconite were also studied. An attempt was made to characterize the flow behavior of the molten product within the cyclone. The results suggest that the system may approach a plug flow reactor, with little back mixing. Finally, a fundamental mathematical model was developed. The model describes the flow dynamics of gases and solid particles in a cyclone reactor, energy exchange, mass transfer, and the chemical kinetics associated with cyclone smelting of taconite concentrate fines. The influence of the various parameters on the reduction and melting of taconite particles was evaluated theoretically.

  4. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, A.; Bashor, P. G.; Habib, E.; Kasparis, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the raindrop size distribution (RSD) have been collected in tropical cyclones and hurricanes with an impact type disdrometer during the past three Atlantic hurricane seasons. The measurements were taken at Wallops Island, Virginia, Lafayette, Louisiana, and Orlando, Florida. The RSDs from the remnants of tropical cyclones or hurricanes at 40 dBZ agreed well with each other where the mean mass diameter was 1.65-1.7 mm, and the total concentration had a range of 600 to 800 drops/m3. Assuming the normalized gamma size distribution, the shape parameter will be 5-8 to satisfy the observed rain rate of 18-20 mm/hr. If the observations were taken during the extratropical phase of the storm where the tropical cyclone merges with a frontal system, the composite spectra at 40 dBZ include more large drops and less small to mid-size drops, typical for continental thunderstorms. Thus, the mean mass diameter was larger, while total concentration, and rain rate was less in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones.

  5. Citizen scientists analyzing tropical cyclone intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    2012-10-01

    A new crowd sourcing project called CycloneCenter enables the public to analyze historical global tropical cyclone (TC) intensities. The primary goal of CycloneCenter, which launched in mid-September, is to resolve discrepancies in the recent global TC record arising principally from inconsistent development of tropical cyclone intensity data. The historical TC record is composed of data sets called "best tracks," which contain a forecast agency's best assessment of TC tracks and intensities. Best track data have improved in quality since the beginning of the geostationary satellite era in the 1960s (because TCs could no longer disappear from sight). However, a global compilation of best track data (International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS)) has brought to light large interagency differences between some TC best track intensities, even in the recent past [Knapp et al., 2010Knapp et al., 2010]. For example, maximum wind speed estimates for Tropical Cyclone Gay (1989) differed by as much as 70 knots as it was tracked by three different agencies.

  6. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  7. Cyclone disaster vulnerability and response experiences in coastal Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, Edris; Collins, Andrew E

    2010-10-01

    For generations, cyclones and tidal surges have frequently devastated lives and property in coastal and island Bangladesh. This study explores vulnerability to cyclone hazards using first-hand coping recollections from prior to, during and after these events. Qualitative field data suggest that, beyond extreme cyclone forces, localised vulnerability is defined in terms of response processes, infrastructure, socially uneven exposure, settlement development patterns, and livelihoods. Prior to cyclones, religious activities increase and people try to save food and valuable possessions. Those in dispersed settlements who fail to reach cyclone shelters take refuge in thatched-roof houses and big-branch trees. However, women and children are affected more despite the modification of traditional hierarchies during cyclone periods. Instinctive survival strategies and intra-community cooperation improve coping post cyclone. This study recommends that disaster reduction programmes encourage cyclone mitigation while being aware of localised realities, endogenous risk analyses, and coping and adaptation of affected communities (as active survivors rather than helpless victims).

  8. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  9. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  10. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  11. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  12. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    to Congress. Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the...normal peer review process, for grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure R&D activity, if the Secretary... peer review process will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest

  13. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-27

    Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer ...such awards, or to many, will depend on what needs the Secretary deems pressing. Some scientists have expressed concerns that an expedited peer review process...will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest scientific

  14. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  15. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    1 Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones J. Scott Tyo College of Optical Sciences University of Arizona Tucson, AZ...automatic intensity estimator of Tropical Cyclones (TCs) based on satellite infrared (IR) imagery. The proposed methodology analyzes the TC’s structure to...procedure to objectively estimate the intensity of tropical cyclones . The level of axisymmetry of tropical cyclones is quantified by calcualting the

  17. Measuring wind and stress under tropical cyclones with scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Ocean surface stress, the turbulent transport of momentum, is largely derived from wind through a drag coefficient. In tropical cyclones (TC), scatterometers have difficulty in measuring strong wind and there is large uncertainty in the drag coefficient. We postulate that the microwave backscatter from ocean surface roughness, which is in equilibrium with local stress, does not distinguish weather systems. The reduced sensitivity of scatterometer wind retrieval algorithm under the strong wind is an air-sea interaction problem that is caused by a change in the behavior of the drag coefficient and not a sensor problem. Under this assumption, we applied a stress retrieval algorithm developed over a moderate wind range to retrieve stress under the strong winds of TCs. Over a moderate wind range, the abundant wind measurements and more established drag coefficient value allow sufficient stress data to be computed from wind to develop a stress retrieval algorithm for the scatterometer. Using unprecedented large amount of stress retrieved from the scatterometer coincident with strong winds in TC, we showed that the drag coefficient decreases with wind speed at a much steeper rate than previously revealed, for wind speeds over 25 m/s. The result implies that the ocean applies less drag to inhibit TC intensification and the TC causes less ocean mixing and surface cooling than previous studies indicated. With continuous and extensive coverage from constellations of scatterometers for several decades, the impact of tropical cyclones on the ocean and the feedback from the ocean are examined.

  18. The tropical cyclone diurnal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunion, Jason P.

    The research presented in this thesis explores a phenomenon referred to as the tropical cyclone (TC) diurnal cycle (TCDC) and presents satellite, numerical modeling, and observational perspectives pertaining to how it can be monitored, its evolution in time and space, its relevance to TC structure and intensity, and how it manifests in numerical simulations of TCs. Infrared satellite imagery was developed and used to investigate diurnal oscillations in TCs and finds a diurnal pulsing pattern that occurs with notable regularity through a relatively deep layer from the inner core to the surrounding environment. A combination of satellite, numerical model simulations, and aircraft observations found diurnal signals in operationally analyzed radii of 50 kt winds in TCs and in satellite intensity estimates from the Advanced Dvorak Technique and spawned the development of a 24-hr conceptual clock that approximates the temporal and spatial evolution of the TCDC each day. TC diurnal pulses are revealed to significantly impact the thermodynamics and winds in the TC environment and appear as narrow, convectively active rings of high radar reflectivity in NOAA aircraft radar data and are hundreds of kilometers in length. Enhanced nighttime radiational cooling that is particularly favored in the TC outflow layer acts to pre-condition the TC environment in a way that favors triggering of the TCDC and TC diurnal pulses, while in the daytime, the stabilizing effects of shortwave warming begins to suppress TCDC processes in the storm, leading to the culmination of the TCDC each day. Schematics are presented that summarize many of the main findings in this work, including descriptions of the basic state of the TC environment as the TCDC evolves during its early and later stages each day and a TCDC-centric daytime evolution of a TC diurnal pulse, associated squall lines and gust fronts, and radial and vertical winds in the lower and upper levels of the storm. The TCDC represents a

  19. Ensemble Data Assimilation and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    on comparing and coupling the ensemble and variational data assimilation methods for tropical cyclone applications. Mr. Melhauser, who started to work...understanding of tropical cyclone predictability and further developed ensemble-based data assimilation methods for tropical cyclones. Now that we have

  20. Ensemble Data Assimilation and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    comparing and coupling the ensemble and variational data assimilation methods for tropical cyclone applications using past field campaign observations...understanding of tropical cyclone predictability and further developed ensemble-based data assimilation methods for tropical cyclones. Now that we have

  1. Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Rodriguez- Herrera, Matthew E. Kucas, and James W. E. Darlow, “A Web-based Interactive Interface for Researching and Forecasting Tropical Cyclone ...Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones J. Scott Tyo College of Optical Sciences...an objective and automatic intensity estimator of Tropical Cyclones (TCs) based on satellite infrared (IR) imagery. The proposed methodology analyzes

  2. Model finds bigger, stronger tropical cyclones with warming seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the wake of powerful tropical cyclones such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina and Typhoon Haiyan, questions about the likely effect of climate change on tropical cyclone activity are on the public's mind. The interactions between global warming and cyclone activity, however, are complex, with rising sea surface temperatures, changing energy distributions, and altered atmospheric dynamics all having some effect.

  3. Design of Stairmand-type sampling cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.E.; McFarland, A.R. )

    1990-03-01

    An empirical, nondimensional correlation of cut-point Stokes number (Stk0.5) and flow Reynolds number (Re) has been established for small Stairmand-type sampling cyclones. Four cyclones with body diameters of 38, 57, 89, and 140 mm were constructed and tested with monodisperse aerosols over a range of flow rates. The flow rates were chosen to provide preselected increments of particle Froude numbers. These flow rates for the four cyclones spanned the range of 9.4 to 1080 L/min and provided Froude numbers of 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 6.0. The resulting Reynolds numbers (based upon cyclone body diameter and inlet flow rate) covered the range of 2.1 x 10(3) to 6.4 x 10(4). Sizes of monodisperse aerosols used in this study were from 3.0- to 17.4-microns aerodynamic diameter. The graphical correlation between cut-point Stokes number and Reynolds number showed there to be no effect of Froude number (for the range of Froude numbers tested). The data have been fit by a least squares procedure to a quadratic logarithmic function. In addition to development of the empirical correlation, the results of this study also provide data pertinent to the regional deposition of liquid particles within the cyclone and to the transmission of solid particles through the cyclone. The carryover of solid, 19-microns diameter particles is only 0.5% greater than that of liquid particles of the same size.

  4. Magnetic shielding tests for MFTF-B neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.; Fabyan, J.; Wood, R.; Koger, P.

    1983-11-16

    A test program to determine the effectiveness of various magnetic shielding designs for MFTF-B beamlines was established at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The proposed one-tenth-scale shielding-design models were tested in a uniform field produced by a Helmholtz coil pair. A similar technique was used for the MFTF source-injector assemblies, and the model test results were confirmed during the Technology Demonstration in 1982. The results of these tests on shielding designs for MFTF-B had an impact on the beamline design for MFTF-B. The iron-core magnet and finger assembly originally proposed were replaced by a simple, air-core, race-track-coil, bending magnet. Only the source injector needs to be magnetically shielded from the fields of approximately 400 gauss.

  5. Investigation of wing shielding effects on CTOL engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    A full scale engine wing shielding investigation was conducted at the Lewis Research Center using a 97,900-N (22,000 lb) thrust turbofan engine and a simulated wing section sized around a conventional-take-off type four-engine narrow body airplane. Sound data were obtained for the wing placed at seven positions in a plane parallel to the engine axis, and were compared to data obtained without the wing at both take off and approach power. In addition, the engine was operated with and without extensive acoustic treatment, including a sonic inlet in order to evaluate wing shielding effectiveness with a highly suppressed engine. The wing shielding effectiveness was also calibrated using a 3.8 cm diam air nozzle as a second source. Results indicated that even though about 10 dB broad band shielding was achieved, the equivalent flyover noise reduction was less than 3.0 EPNdB for most configurations.

  6. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-04-11

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding.

  7. Axial flow cyclone for segregation and collection of ultrafine particles: theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Du; Chein, Hung Min; Chen, Tzu Ming; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2005-03-01

    In this study, an axial flow cyclone was designed, fabricated, and evaluated at different conditions of air flow rates (Q0) and low-pressure environments (P), especially for the segregation and collection of ultrafine particles. An evaporation/condensation type of aerosol generation system consisting of tube furnace and mixing chamber was employed to produce test aerosols. The test aerosol was then classified by a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and number concentration was measured by a condensation nuclei counter (CNC) and an electrometer upstream and downstream of the cyclone, respectively. The s-shaped curve of the collection efficiency in submicron particle size range was obtained to be similar to the traditional cyclone found in the literatures when the particles were largerthan 40 nm at Q0 = 1.07, 0.455 L(STP)/min, and P = 4.8-500 Torr. The curve was found to be fitted very well by a semiempirical equation described in this paper. For particles smaller than 40 nm, however, the collection efficiency was unusually increased as the particle diameter was decreased due to the fact that the diffusion deposition becomes the dominant collection mechanism in the low-pressure conditions. A model composed of centrifugal force and diffusion deposition is presented and used to fit the experimental data. The cyclone was demonstrated to separate and collect ultrafine particles effectively in the tested vacuum conditions.

  8. A link between high-speed solar wind streams and explosive extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Paul; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Bruntz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    A link between solar wind magnetic sector boundary (heliospheric current sheet) crossings by the Earth and the upper-level tropospheric vorticity was discovered in the 1970s. These results have been later confirmed but the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. Extratropical-cyclone tracks obtained from two meteorological reanalysis datasets are used in superposed epoch analysis of time series of solar wind plasma parameters and green coronal emission line intensity. The time series are keyed to times of maximum growth of explosively developing extratropical cyclones in the winter season. The new statistical evidence corroborates the previously published results (Prikryl et al., 2009). This evidence shows that explosive extratropical cyclones tend to occur after arrivals of solar wind disturbances such as high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes when large amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves couple to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. These MHD waves modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate energy upward and downward from auroral zone through the atmosphere. At the tropospheric level, in spite of significantly reduced amplitudes, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release the moist symmetric instability thus initiating slantwise convection and forming cloud/precipitation bands. The release of latent heat is known to provide energy for rapid development and intensification of extratropical cyclones.

  9. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  10. An Ocean-Based Potential Intensity Index for Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I. I.; Black, P. G.; Price, J. F.; Yang, C.; Chen, S. S.; Chi, N.; Harr, P.; Lien, C.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Wu, C.

    2012-12-01

    Improvement in tropical cyclones' intensity prediction is an important ongoing effort. Cooling of the ocean by storm mixing reduces storm intensity by reducing the air-sea enthalpy flux. Here, we modify the widely used Sea Surface Temperature Potential Intensity (SST_PI) index by including information from the upper subsurface ocean to form a new Ocean Cooling Potential Intensity index, OC_PI. Applied to a 14-year (1998-2011) Western Pacific typhoon archive, the correlation coefficient between the predicted maximum intensity and the observed peak intensity increased from 0.08 to 0.31. For the sub group of slow-moving TCs that has the strongest interaction with subsurface ocean, r2 increases to 0.56. OC_PI thus contributes to the improvement on the existing PI through incorporation of ocean's subsurface information.

  11. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes

    SciTech Connect

    Durney, T.E.; Cook, A.; Ferris, D.D.

    1995-11-01

    This research and development project is one of three seeking to develop advanced, cost-effective, coal cleaning processes to help industry comply with 1990 Clean Air Act Regulations. The specific goal for this project is to develop a cycloning technology that will beneficiate coal to a level approaching 85% pyritic sulfur rejection while retaining 85% of the parent coal`s heating value. A clean coal ash content of less than 6% and a moisture content, for both clean coal and reject, of less than 30% are targeted. The process under development is a physical, gravimetric-based cleaning system that removes ash bearing mineral matter and pyritic sulfur. Since a large portion of the Nation`s coal reserves contain significant amounts of pyrite, physical beneficiation is viewed as a potential near-term, cost effective means of producing an environmentally acceptable fuel.

  12. Watching a disappearing shield

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  13. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  14. Assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiance observations within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidao

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is critical for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena (e.g., convective initiations, and tropical cyclones). As hyperspectral infrared sounders, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) could provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyperspectral radiance data on the study of convective initiations (CI) and the assimilation of AIRS radiance observations within tropical storms. First, the potential capability of hyperspectral infrared measurements (GIFTS) to provide convective precipitation forecasts has been studied and assessed. Using both the observed and the model-predicted profiles as input to the GIFTS radiative transfer model (RTM), it is shown that the simulated GIFTS radiance could capture the high vertical and temporal variability of the real and modeled atmosphere prior to a convective initiation, as well as the differences between observations and model forecasts. This study suggests the potential for hyperspectral infrared radiance data to make an important contribution to the improvement of the forecast skill of convective precipitation. Second, as the first step toward applying AIRS data to tropical cyclone (TC) prediction, a set of dropsonde profiles during Hurricane Rita (2005) is used to simulate AIRS radiance data and to assess the ability of AIRS data in capturing the vertical variability within TCs through one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) twin experiments. The AIRS observation errors and background errors are first estimated. Five sets of 1D-Var twin experiments are then performed using different combinations of AIRS channels. Finally, results from these 1D-Var experiments are analyzed. Major findings are: (1) AIRS radiance data contain useful information about

  15. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  16. Relation between tropical cyclone heat potential and cyclone intensity in the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangir, B.; Swain, D.; Udaya Bhaskar, T. V. S.

    2016-05-01

    Ocean Heat Content (OHC) plays a significant role in modulating the intensity of Tropical Cyclones (TC) in terms of the oceanic energy available to TCs. TC Heat Potential (TCHP), an estimate of OHC, is thus known to be a useful indicator of TC genesis and intensification. In the present study, we analyze the role of TCHP in intensification of TCs in the North Indian Ocean (NIO) through statistical comparisons between TCHP and Cyclone Intensities (CI). A total of 27 TCs (20 in the Bay of Bengal, and 7 in the Arabian Sea) during the period 2005-2012 have been analyzed using TCHP data from Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) model of Indian National Center for Ocean Information Services and cyclone best track data from India Meteorological Department. Out of the 27 cyclones analyzed, 58% (86%) in the Bay (Arabian Sea) have negative correlation and 42% (14%) cyclones have positive correlation between CI and TCHP. On the whole, more than 60% cyclones in the NIO show negative correlations between CI and TCHP. The negative percentage further increases for TCHP leading CI by 24 and 48 hours. Similar trend is also seen with satellite derived TCHP data obtained from National Remote Sensing Center and TC best track data from Joint Typhoon Warming Centre. Hence, it is postulated that TCHP alone need not be the only significant oceanographic parameter, apart from sea surface temperature, responsible for intensification and propagation of TCs in the NIO.

  17. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  18. Reanalyzing Tropical Cyclone Intensities with Citizen Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, C. J.; Hennon, C. C.; Knapp, K.; Stevens, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are among the most destructive weather phenomena. Whenever possible, the intensities of these storms have been determined from in situ data or aircraft reconnaissance. More often, however, they are estimated subjectively from satellite data using the Dvorak technique. Heterogeneities are introduced into the historical record with the evolution of operational procedures, personnel, and observing platforms. In some cases, multiple agencies even arrive at different estimates for the same storm. These uncertainties impede our ability to identify the relationship between tropical cyclone intensities and climate change. NOAA's NCDC has produced a 30-year (1979-2008) homogeneous dataset (HURSAT) of tropical cyclone imagery from geostationary satellites. This dataset has the potential to address some of the uncertainties in the recent tropical cyclone record. However, it would take nearly 40 years for a trained expert, working nonstop, to apply the Dvorak technique to all 200,000 images. Harnessing the power of thousands of Citizen Scientists, the same task can be completed in a matter of months. This presentation will explain how the Dvorak technique was adapted for Citizen Scientists, and how their skill will be evaluated relative to the operational analyses by trained experts.

  19. A Simplified Model of Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    An axisymmetric model of tropical cyclone intensification is presented. The model is based on Salmon's wave-vortex approximation, which can describe flows with high Rossby number and low Froude number. After introducing an additional approximation designed to filter propagating inertia-gravity waves, the problem is reduced to the prediction of potential vorticity (PV) and the inversion of this PV to obtain the balanced wind and mass fields. This PV prediction/inversion problem is solved analytically for two types of forcing: a two-region model in which there is nonzero forcing in the cyclone core and zero forcing in the far-field; a three-region model in which there is non-zero forcing in both the cyclone core and the eyewall, with zero forcing in the far-field. The solutions of the two-region model provide insight into why tropical cyclones can have long incubation times before rapid intensification and how the size of the mature vortex can be influenced by the size of the initial vortex. The solutions of the three-region model provide insight into the formation of hollow PV structures and the inward movement of angular momentum surfaces across the radius of maximum wind.

  20. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  1. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  3. GPS RO sensing of Boundary Layer Height within Southern Ocean Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuddeboom, Alex; McDonald, Adrian; Katurji, Marwan; Morgenstern, Olaf; Harvey, Mike

    2016-04-01

    The COSMIC constellation of GPS RO satellites has been used extensively over the previous few years to generate climatologies of boundary layer height (BLH). These satellites use high precision clocks to measure the time it takes for a signal to be transmitted through the atmosphere. From the time measurements, the angle of refraction of the signal can be calculated and then used in turn to calculate atmospheric refractivity. Boundary layer heights can then be determined by identifying sharp gradients in the refractivity profile. The results of this approach have been compared with radiosonde data and show a high level of agreement. By using this technique, we also generated a BLH climatology which was then used to analyse how the height of the boundary layer varies within the specific meteorological context of Southern Ocean cyclones. Analysis of the BLH behaviour over cyclones was primarily based upon generating cyclone composites. This is done by averaging together measurements in a cyclone relative framework to generate a representative cyclone. This technique allows a direct examination of the mean state, however it is also valuable for further analysis such as splitting the composite into regions and analysing the distribution of values over each of these sub-regions. We also investigated the relationship between boundary layer height and surface variables. There is a particularly strong negative relationship between sea ice concentration and boundary layer height. The reasons for this phenomenon are not entirely clear but appear to be at least partially related to changes in the surface sensible heat flux. The effects of other surface variables such as air temperature, sea surface temperature and wind speeds were relatively minor.

  4. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1996-12-31

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn technology developed by the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be consideredd. The paper will describe B and W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B and W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  5. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1997-07-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn. technology developed by the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be considered. The paper will describe B&W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B&W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  6. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  7. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  8. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  9. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  10. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  11. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  12. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  13. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  14. Southern Hemisphere Cloudiness In Extratropical Cyclones: An Observational Evaluation Of ERA-interim And MERRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, C. M.; Booth, J. F.; Del Genio, A. D.; Posselt, D. J.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    themselves are negligible. A cyclone-centered composite of the lower tropospheric stability index suggests that the areas with maximum cloud bias correspond to areas where cumulus clouds are often present. This is confirmed by a greater occurrence of partly filled pixels in the MODIS retrievals. These results point to possible deficiencies in the shallow convection schemes. Using a cold front detection algorithm, we focus on the region west of the surface cold fronts and examine AIRS temperature profiles, MODIS, MISR and CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud observations and AMSR-E precipitable water. We will discuss the outcome of a preliminary analysis of the multivariate satellite dataset focusing on the relation between atmospheric state and cloud properties in this region.

  15. Can climate models represent the precipitation associated with extratropical cyclones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, Matthew K.; Shaffrey, Len C.; Hodges, Kevin I.; Dacre, Helen F.

    2016-08-01

    Extratropical cyclones produce the majority of precipitation in many regions of the extratropics. This study evaluates the ability of a climate model, HiGEM, to reproduce the precipitation associated with extratropical cyclones. The model is evaluated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis and GPCP dataset. The analysis employs a cyclone centred compositing technique, evaluates composites across a range of geographical areas and cyclone intensities and also investigates the ability of the model to reproduce the climatological distribution of cyclone associated precipitation across the Northern Hemisphere. Using this phenomena centred approach provides an ability to identify the processes which are responsible for climatological biases in the model. Composite precipitation intensities are found to be comparable when all cyclones across the Northern Hemisphere are included. When the cyclones are filtered by region or intensity, differences are found, in particular, HiGEM produces too much precipitation in its most intense cyclones relative to ERA-Interim and GPCP. Biases in the climatological distribution of cyclone associated precipitation are also found, with biases around the storm track regions associated with both the number of cyclones in HiGEM and also their average precipitation intensity. These results have implications for the reliability of future projections of extratropical precipitation from the model.

  16. Case studies of EUV cyclones and their associated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shu-Hong

    2015-09-01

    EUV cyclones are rotating structures in the solar corona, and they are usually rooted in the underlying rotating network magnetic fields in the photosphere. However, their connection with the surrounding magnetic fields remains unknown. Here we report an observational study of four typical cyclones which are rooted in different kinds of magnetic fields. We use Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data to investigate the rotation of EUV features in cyclones and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager data to study the associated magnetic fields. The results show that, (1) an EUV cyclone rooted in a sunspot rotates with the photospheric magnetic field; (2) two EUV cyclones in two faculae of an active region are connected to the same sunspot of the active region but rotate oppositely; (3) an EUV cyclone is rooted in a coronal hole with weak open magnetic fields; (4) a pair of conjugated cyclones is rooted in magnetic fields that have opposite polarity with opposite directions of rotation. The differences in the spatial extent of a cyclone, characteristics of its rotation and underlying fields indicate that cyclones are ubiquitous over the solar atmosphere and that the magnetic structures relevant to the cyclones are more complicated than expected.

  17. Silica heat shield sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbesmeyer, L. H.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of silica heat shield requirements to gap width, tile edge radius, and heat transfer distribution within tile gaps was investigated. A two-dimensional thermal model was modified and used to determine the effect of two dimensional heat transfer distributions at high temperature reusable surface insulation edges on shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) requirements. The sensitivity of TPS requirements to coating thickness, emissivity, substructure thickness, and changes in gap heating for several locations on shuttle was also studied. An inverse solution technique was applied to temperature data obtained in the Ames 20 MW turbulent duct in order to examine the effect of tile edge radius on TPS requirements. The derived heating values were then used to predict TPS requirements. Results show that increasing tile radius reduces TPS requirements.

  18. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  19. Remote, real-time monitoring of cyclones with microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, B. G.; Lee, W. D.; Schwab, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Giving proper care to selecting microseisms from well isolated cyclones, these great oceanic storms can be monitored in real time by seismic recordings at stations 1200-4100 km distant from the cyclone's center. We treat ocean depths of 3.4-5.5 km. For the theoretically-computed microseism, which our procedure compares with the experimental data, we use a Green's-function approach in the frequency domain. Relating recorded displacement F and theoretical Green's function G, We have F(ω,r)=S(ω)G(ω,r) in which our only unknown is the generalized source function S(ω) and r is the distance to the center at any specific time. The basic result of this report is that the form of this function is A SN(ω), where A is a real constant increasing with the strength of the cyclone and SN(ω), is a positive real function of frequency, independent of cyclone-receiver separation and of cyclone strength. That is, for a given ocean basin, and a given receiver-region geology, at our current level of accuracy SN(ω) is the same for all cyclone strengths and cyclone-receiver separations. Using the multimode approach, we've developed the numerical method for computing the Green's function for multilayered oceanic structures. For each of the 4 selected cyclones, the source functions for all locations along the path show a consistency which demonstrates that the recorded microseisms are radiated from the cyclone. The extracted source function exhibits spectra that are characteristic of ocean waves generated by cyclonic winds. With knowledge of distance between the source and receiver, cyclone A is therefore trivial to monitor in real time from remote recordings. At the current time, the cyclone's strength—generalized source function—must be related empirically to the cyclone's maximum wind speed, areal extent, and lateral velocity.

  20. Tropical Cyclone Interactions Within Central American Gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papin, P. P.; Bosart, L. F.; Torn, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Central American gyres (CAGs) are broad (~1000 km diameter) low-level cyclonic circulations that organize over Central America during the tropical cyclone (TC) season. While CAGs have rarely been studied, prior work on similar circulations has been conducted on monsoon depressions (MDs) and monsoon gyres (MGs), which possess spatial scales of 1000 - 2500 km in the west Pacific basin. A key difference between MDs and MGs is related to the organization of vorticity around the low-level circulation. MDs possess a symmetrical vorticity pattern where vorticity accumulates near the circulation center over time, occasionally developing into a large TC. In contrast, MGs possess asymmetrical vorticity, organized in mesovorticies, which rotate cyclonically along the periphery of the MG circulation. Small tropical cyclones (TCs) occasionally develop from these mesovorticies. Interaction and development of TCs within CAGs are also common, as noted by a CAG identified during the 2010 PREDICT field project, which involved the interaction of TC Matthew and the development of TC Nicole within the larger CAG. This project is motivated by the lack of prior research on CAGs, as well as the complex scale interactions that occasionally occur between TCs and CAGs. This presentation focuses on the mutual interaction of vortices embedded in the larger-scale cyclonic flow comprising the CAG circulation. Case studies will be presented using a circulation framework to illustrate the relationship between different scale vorticity elements within the CAG. Some of these case studies resemble a MD-like evolution, where a large TC develops through the accumulation of symmetrical vorticity around the CAG (e.g. TC Opal 1995, TC Frances 1998). Other instances resemble a MG-like evolution, where smaller mesovorticies rotate around a common circulation center (e.g. TC Florence 1988). The circulation analysis framework aids in the diagnosis of interaction between different scale cyclonic vortices, and

  1. Response of Upper Ocean during passage of MALA cyclone utilizing ARGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissa, Naresh Krishna; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Prasad Kumar, B.

    2012-02-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to study the response of the upper ocean atmospheric interactions during the passage of a very severe cyclonic storm (VSCS) ' MALA' formed over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) on 24 April 2006. Deepening of mixed layer depth (MLD), weakening of barrier layer thickness (BLT) associated with a deeper 26 °C isotherm level (D26) is observed after the MALA passage. Tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) and depth averaged temperature ( T) exhibit a good degree of correlation for higher values. The passage of MALA cyclone also resulted in cooling the sea surface temperature (SST) by 4-5 °C. The findings suggest that turbulent and diapycnal mixing are responsible for cooler SSTs. Turbulent air-sea fluxes are analyzed using Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) daily products. During the mature stage of MALA higher latent heat flux (LHF), sensible heat flux (SHF), and enthalpy (LHF + SHF) are observed in the right side of this extreme event.

  2. Gas holdup in cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jiongtian; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Hongxiang; Deng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The present work has been carried out to investigate the effect of process variables on gas holdup and develop an empirical equation and a neural network model for online process control of the gas holdup based on the operating variables. In this study, the effect of process variables (nozzle diameter, circulation pressure, aeration rate, and frother dosage) on gas holdup in a cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column of an air/oily wastewater system was investigated. Gas holdup was estimated using a pressure difference method and an empirical equation was proposed to predict gas holdup. A general regression neural network (GRNN) model was also introduced to predict gas holdup for the cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column. The predictions from the empirical equation and the GRNN are in good agreement with the experiment data for gas holdup, while the GRNN provides higher accuracy and stability compared with that of the empirical equation.

  3. Relationship between acid precipitation and three-dimensional transport associated with synoptic-scale cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Haagenson, P.L.; Lazrus, A.L.; Kuo, Y.H.; Caldwell, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    Field data collected during APEX (Acid Precipitation Experiment) are used in combination with an isentropic trajectory model to analyze the relationship between acid precipitation and three-dimensional transport associated with cyclonic storms. Data are presented which indicate that high acidity in precipitation is often associated with slow transport speed and elevated SO2 concentrations in the dry air feeding into the precipitating regions. Conversely, low acidity is usually related to rapid transit, descending motion, and transport above the atmospheric boundary layer. The results also show that precipitation in the cold sector of a cyclone (in advance of the surface warm front) is often more acidic than that in other sectors of the storm. Four case studies are included to detail some of these meteorological effects. 19 references.

  4. A comparison of observed and numerically predicted eddy kinetic energy budgets for a developing extratropical cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dare, P. M.; Smith, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The eddy kinetic energy budget is calculated for a 48-hour forecast of an intense occluding winter cyclone associated with a strong well-developed jet stream. The model output consists of the initialized (1200 GMT January 9, 1975) and the 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour forecast fields from the Drexel/NCAR Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS) model. The LAMPS forecast compares well with observations for the first 24 hours, but then overdevelops the low-level cyclone while inadequately developing the upper-air wave and jet. Eddy kinetic energy was found to be concentrated in the upper-troposphere with maxima flanking the primary trough. The increases in kinetic energy were found to be due to an excess of the primary source term of kinetic energy content, which is the horizontal flux of eddy kinetic energy over the primary sinks, and the generation and dissipation of eddy kinetic energy.

  5. Winter cyclone frequency and following freshet streamflow formation on the rivers in Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partasenok, Irina S.; Groisman, Pavel Ya; Chekan, Grigoriy S.; Melnik, Viktor I.

    2014-09-01

    We studied long-term fluctuations of streamflow and occurrence of extreme phenomena on the rivers of Belarus during the post-World War II period. It was found that formation of annual runoff within the nation has no constant tendencies and varies from year to year. At the same time, analysis of intra-annual distribution of streamflow reveals significant changes since the 1970s, first of all, increase of winter and decrease of spring streamflow. As a result, the frequency of extreme floods has decreased. These changes in water regime are associated with climatic anomalies (increase of the surface air temperatures) caused by large-scale alterations in atmospheric circulation, specifically in trajectories of cyclones. During the last two decades, the frequency of Atlantic and southern cyclones has changed and caused decreasing of cold season storms and extreme phenomena on the rivers.

  6. Space options for tropical cyclone hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicaire, Isabelle; Nakamura, Ryoko; Arikawa, Yoshihisa; Okada, Kazuyuki; Itahashi, Takamasa; Summerer, Leopold

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates potential space options for mitigating the impact of tropical cyclones on cities and civilians. Ground-based techniques combined with space-based remote sensing instrumentation are presented together with space-borne concepts employing space solar power technology. Two space-borne mitigation options are considered: atmospheric warming based on microwave irradiation and laser-induced cloud seeding based on laser power transfer. Finally technology roadmaps dedicated to the space-borne options are presented, including a detailed discussion on the technological viability and technology readiness level of our proposed systems. Based on these assessments, the space-borne cyclone mitigation options presented in this paper may be established in a quarter of a century.

  7. Submesoscale cyclones in the Agulhas current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, M.; Swart, S.; Gula, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gliders were deployed for the first time in the Agulhas Current region to investigate processes of interactions between western boundary currents and shelf waters. Continuous observations from the gliders in water depths of 100-1000 m and over a period of 1 month provide the first high-resolution observations of the Agulhas Current's inshore front. The observations collected in a nonmeandering Agulhas Current show the presence of submesoscale cyclonic eddies, generated at the inshore boundary of the Agulhas Current. The submesoscale cyclones are often associated with warm water plumes, which extend from their western edge and exhibit strong northeastward currents. These features are a result of shear instabilities and extract their energy from the mean Agulhas Current jet.

  8. Saturated High Permeability Magnetic Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Christian

    2016-05-01

    High permeability magnetic shields can be used in space to mitigate the effect of magnetic sources by several orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, the presence of significant amounts of ferromagnetic material on-board a spacecraft carries, by itself, a certain risk in terms of meeting magnetic cleanliness requirements. One possibility is that the shield is accidentally magnetised irreversibly, either by a strong external field, or mechanical shock. A second possibility is that the shield will acquire an induced moment in the presence of external fields (DC or AC), and could potentially amplify them.Here, we propose the use of high permeability shields which are driven into their fully saturated state - by the source that is being shielded. This approach limits the shielding effect to perhaps one or two orders of magnitude, but is expected to mitigate the above risks substantially. We present extensive numerical simulations describing the design principle behind optimised, fully saturated shields, as well as some results to substantiate the above claims.

  9. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  10. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  11. Associating extreme precipitation events to parent cyclones in gridded data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Ruari; Shaffrey, Len; Gray, Sue

    2015-04-01

    When analysing the relationship of regional precipitation to its parent cyclone, it is insufficient to consider the cyclone's region of influence as a fixed radius from the centre due to the irregular shape of rain bands. A new method is therefore presented which allows the use of objective feature tracking data in the analysis of regional precipitation. Utilising the spatial extent of precipitation in gridded datasets, the most appropriate cyclone(s) may be associated with regional precipitation events. This method is applied in the context of an analysis of the influence of clustering and stalling of extra-tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic on total precipitation accumulations over England and Wales. Cyclone counts and residence times are presented for historical records (ERA-Interim) and future projections (HadGEM2-ES) of extreme (> 98th percentile) precipitation accumulations over England and Wales, for accumulation periods ranging from one day to one month.

  12. Advanced In-Furnace NOx Control for Wall and Cyclone-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Sarv

    2009-02-28

    A NO{sub x} minimization strategy for coal-burning wall-fired and cyclone boilers was developed that included deep air staging, innovative oxygen use, reburning, and advanced combustion control enhancements. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was applied to refine and select the best arrangements. Pilot-scale tests were conducted by firing an eastern high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh No.8 coal at 5 million Btu/hr in a facility that was set up with two-level overfire air (OFA) ports. In the wall-fired mode, pulverized coal was burned in a geometrically scaled down version of the B and W DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} burner. At a fixed overall excess air level of 17%, NO{sub x} emissions with single-level OFA ports were around 0.32 lb/million Btu at 0.80 burner stoichiometry. Two-level OFA operation lowered the NO{sub x} levels to 0.25 lb/million Btu. Oxygen enrichment in the staged burner reduced the NO{sub x} values to 0.21 lb/million Btu. Oxygen enrichment plus reburning and 2-level OFA operation further curbed the NO{sub x} emissions to 0.19 lb/million Btu or by 41% from conventional air-staged operation with single-level OFA ports. In the cyclone firing arrangement, oxygen enrichment of the cyclone combustor enabled high-temperature and deeply staged operation while maintaining good slag tapping. Firing the Pittsburgh No.8 coal in the optimum arrangement generated 112 ppmv NO{sub x} (0.15 lb/million Btu) and 59 ppmv CO. The optimum emissions results represent 88% NO{sub x} reduction from the uncontrolled operation. Levelized costs for additional NO{sub x} removal by various in-furnace control methods in reference wall-fired or cyclone-fired units already equipped with single-level OFA ports were estimated and compared with figures for SCR systems achieving 0.1 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu. Two-level OFA ports could offer the most economical approach for moderate NO{sub x} control, especially for smaller units. O{sub 2} enrichment in combination with 2-level

  13. Internal Influences on Tropical Cyclone Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    scales. This is evident in Fig. 2. Another hypothesis in the top-down category is what we call the “ shower - head” theory by Bister and Emanuel...extra-tropical precursors. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor . Soc. (coming soon). Dickinson, M.J., and J. Molinari, 2002: Mixed Rossby-gravity waves and...1998: The formation of Tropical Cyclones. Meteor . Atmos. Phys. 67, 37—69. Harr, P. A., M. S. Kalafsky and R. L. Elsberry, 1996a: Environmental

  14. Objective classification of historical tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenoweth, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Preinstrumental records of historical tropical cyclone activity require objective methods for accurately categorizing tropical cyclone intensity. Here wind force terms and damage reports from newspaper accounts in the Lesser Antilles and Jamaica for the period 1795-1879 are compared with wind speed estimates calculated from barometric pressure data. A total of 95 separate barometric pressure readings and colocated simultaneous wind force descriptors and wind-induced damage reports are compared. The wind speed estimates from barometric pressure data are taken as the most reliable and serve as a standard to compare against other data. Wind-induced damage reports are used to produce an estimated wind speed range using a modified Fujita scale. Wind force terms are compared with the barometric pressure data to determine if a gale, as used in the contemporary newspapers, is consistent with the modern definition of a gale. Results indicate that the modern definition of a gale (the threshold point separating the classification of a tropical depression from a tropical storm) is equivalent to that in contemporary newspaper accounts. Barometric pressure values are consistent with both reported wind force terms and wind damage on land when the location, speed and direction of movement of the tropical cyclone are determined. Damage reports and derived wind force estimates are consistent with other published results. Biases in ships' logbooks are confirmed and wind force terms of gale strength or greater are identified. These results offer a bridge between the earlier noninstrumental records of tropical cyclones and modern records thereby offering a method of consistently classifying storms in the Caribbean region into tropical depressions, tropical storms, nonmajor and major hurricanes.

  15. Les cyclones tropicaux et le changement climatique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Claude; Royer, Jean-François; Chauvin, Fabrice

    2008-09-01

    Results from observations and modelling studies, a number of which having been used to support the conclusions of the IPCC fourth assessment report, are presented. For the past and present-day (since 1970) periods, the increase of strong cyclonic activity over the North Atlantic Ocean appears to be in good correlation with increasing temperature of the ocean surface. For regions where observational data are of lesser quality, the increasing trend is less clear. In fact, assessing long-term changes is made difficult due to both the multi-decennial natural variability and the lesser coverage of observations before satellites were made available. Indirect observational data, such as those derived from quantitative estimations of damage caused by tropical cyclones, suffer from many artefacts and do not allow the resolving of the issue either. For the future, only numerical three-dimensional climate models can be used. They nevertheless run presently with too-large grid-sizes, so that their results are still not converging. Various simulations lead indeed to different results, and it is very often difficult to find the physical reasons for these differences. One concludes by indicating some ways through which numerical simulations could be improved, leading to a decrease of uncertainties affecting the prediction of cyclonic activity over the next decades.

  16. DETAIL OF CYCLONE CLASSIFIER, WITH MARCY NO. 86 BALL MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CYCLONE CLASSIFIER, WITH MARCY NO. 86 BALL MILL BELOW AND BEHIND IT. STRAIGHT HORIZONTAL PIPE IS SLIME FEED FROM ROD MILL. PIPE OUT TOP OF CYCLONE AND CURVING AT LOWER RIGHT CARRIED FINELY GROUND SLIME TO FLOTATION CONDITIONER TANK. PIPE NOT VISIBLE OUT BOTTOM OF CYCLONE CONVEYED COARSER SLIME TO BALL MILL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  17. Precipitation of suspended particles in wet-film cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Val'dberg, A.Y.; Kirsanova, N.S.

    1986-07-01

    The fact that wet and dry mechanical centrifugal dust collectors operate on the same principle allowed the authors to make the calculations for wet cyclones with an equation similar to one used previously. A figure shows that the efficiency of wet cyclones is much higher (20% higher on the average) than that of dry cyclones under the same operating conditions. This improvement is due to a decrease in the secondary discharge of dust particles from the wet wall of the device.

  18. Incorporation of Tropical Cyclone Avoidance Into Automated Ship Scheduling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    TROPICAL CYCLONE AVOIDANCE INTO AUTOMATED SHIP SCHEDULING by Stephen W. Lantz June 2014 Thesis Advisor: Walter DeGrange Co-Advisor: Eva...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INCORPORATION OF TROPICAL CYCLONE AVOIDANCE INTO AUTOMATED SHIP SCHEDULING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6... cyclones (TCs) frequently disrupt these plans, requiring diversions and inefficient steaming speeds. We evaluate the impact of adding anticipated TC

  19. Evolution of Tropical Cyclone Characteristics and Forecast Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    structure, which is important to understanding the motion of the tropical cyclone, is dependent on the growth, evolution, and decay of mesoscale convective ...MCS structural characteristics such as convective and stratiform cloud amounts, percent coverage, and rain rates. Furthermore, co- located microwave...tropical cyclone features (e.g., convective activity, inner-core structure), midlatitude circulation into which the tropical cyclone is moving, and

  20. The Effect of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Movement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    by Sanders and Burpee (1968), is a one-layer model which uses the barotropic vorticity equation to forecast the vertically averaged vorticity field...of factors which could modify cyclone movement. With the advent of numerical predication methods, it became possible to test these concepts. Numerical...conditions to test the cyclone features, are also presented. Chapter 3 investigates the effects of the physical processes on tropical cyclone movement by

  1. Flexible Cable Providing EMI Shielding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-07

    shielding the electronic 25 equipment by enclosing it in shielded rooms and cabinets, filling 1 any gaps therein with conductive gaskets, and also by...are found in U.S. 15 Patent Nos. 4,948,922 and 4,93 7,128 which disclose conductive 16 elastic gaskets used to fill gaps between openings in shielded...matrix binder which is filled with 5 particles of a high permeability iron-based alloy. The 6 conductive property of the matrix binder provides

  2. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  3. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  4. Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar: lessons for public health preparedness for cyclones.

    PubMed

    Guha-Sapir, Debarati; Vogt, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Recent natural disasters such as the 2004 tsunami, 2008 Sichuan earthquake, and the 2008 Myanmar cyclone have killed more than 100,000 people each. Mortality and morbidity associated with natural disasters are a growing concern, especially because extreme climate events are likely to get increasingly frequent. The authors comment on Cyclone Nargis, claiming an extraordinarily high death toll during its devastating track through the Irrawaddy delta in Myanmar on May 2, 2008 and analyze how and why its mortality pattern differs from other typical postdisaster situations. Underlying factors and preconditions are described and the specificity of the Myanmese context is presented. This leads to lessons how excess mortality can be reduced in future high-ranked cyclones, whose recurrence in this region will only be a matter of time.

  5. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  6. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons producedmore » in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.« less

  7. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  8. Gamma shielding factor for typical houses in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salinas, I C P; Conti, C C; Rochedo, E R R; Lopes, R T

    2006-01-01

    The housing features in a country depend much on its climate. Dwellings in warm countries are much lighter constructions than in cold ones, which will reflect on the amount of shielding against radiation they provide. In addition to that, wealth is another factor that influences the building's finishing. Great effort has been taken to determine parameters to more accurately estimate dose to a population in case of a radioactive or nuclear accident. Nevertheless, most available data are concerned with typical housing in cold climate countries. This study aims to determine shielding factors for typical building materials used in the southeast of Brazil, a warm area, due to radioactive material deposited on the surrounding field, walls and ceiling of the external surfaces. The shielding factors determination was performed by simulation with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo computer code. The air kerma indoors for the 300, 662 and 3000 keV photon energies have been determined for three different housing patterns, ranging from the very simple to a very complex structure. The shielding factor, defined as the ratio of the air kerma indoor to the air kerma in open field, for the most simple house type and 300 keV photon energy was found to be twice of the best finished one for the same energy.

  9. Animation of Flood Potential from Two Australian Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Video Gallery

    Merged precipitation data from NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and other satellites was used to calculate flood potential withrainfall from Tropical Cyclone Lam and Tropical ...

  10. Post Cyclone (PoC): An innovative way to reduce the emission of fines from industrial cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, M.B.; Luning, P.E.; Hoffmann, A.C.; Plomp, A.; Beumer, M.I.L.

    1997-07-01

    A novel approach for reducing the emission of industrial-scale cyclones of particles smaller than 10 {micro}m is presented. Utilizing the strong swirl already present in the vortex finder of a conventional cyclone, the escaped dust from the cyclone is collected in a so-called Post Cyclone (PoC), which is a cylindrical annular shell located on top of the vortex finder. Experiments were conducted in a cyclone larger than the usual laboratory range (diameter = 0.4 m) with different configurations of the PoC and spanning a range of operating conditions. Flow patterns and collection efficiencies for the cyclone and the PoC, both individually and in combination, were calculated and compared with experimental data. Both the experiments and simulations indicate a decrease in emission of particles of 1--3 {micro}m by around 30%, rising with particle size to around 50% for 5 {micro}m particles.

  11. Fine-Scale Comparison of TOMS Total Ozone Data with Model Analysis of an Intense Midwestern Cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Gallus, William A., Jr.; Stanford, John L.; Brown, John M.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution (approx. 40 km) along-track total column ozone data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are compared with a high-resolution mesoscale numerical model analysis of an intense cyclone in the Midwestern United States. Total ozone increased by 100 DU (nearly 38%) as the TOMS instrument passed over the associated tropopause fold region. Complex structure is seen in the meteorological fields and compares well with the total ozone observations. Ozone data support the meteorological analysis showing that stratospheric descent was confined to levels above approx. 600 hPa; significant positive potential vorticity at lower levels is attributable to diabetic processes. Likewise, meteorological fields show that two pronounced ozone streamers extending north and northeastward into Canada at high levels are not bands of stratospheric air feeding into the cyclone; one is a channel of exhaust downstream from the system, and the other apparently previously connected the main cyclonic circulation to a southward intrusion of polar stratospheric air and advected eastward as the cut-off cyclone evolved. Good agreement between small-scale features in the model output and total ozone data underscores the latter's potential usefulness in diagnosing upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric dynamics and kinematics.

  12. Impact of atmospheric and oceanic conditions on the frequency and genesis location of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific in 2004 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pan; Zhu, Jiang; Zhong, Zhong; Qi, Linlin; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the impact of atmospheric and oceanic conditions during May-August of 2004 and 2010 on the frequency and genesis location of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific. Using the WRF model, four numerical experiments were carried out based on different atmospheric conditions and SST forcing. The numerical experiments indicated that changes in atmospheric and oceanic conditions greatly affect tropical cyclone activity, and the roles of atmospheric conditions are slightly greater than oceanic conditions. Specifically, the total number of tropical cyclones was found to be mostly affected by atmospheric conditions, while the distribution of tropical cyclone genesis locations was mainly related to oceanic conditions, especially the distribution of SST. In 2010, a warmer SST occurred west of 140°E, with a colder SST east of 140°E. On the one hand, the easterly flow was enhanced through the effect of the increase in the zonal SST gradient. The strengthened easterly flow led to an anomalous boundary layer divergence over the region to the east of 140°E, which suppressed the formation of tropical cyclones over this region. On the other hand, the colder SST over the region to the east of 140°E led to a colder low-level air temperature, which resulted in decreased CAPE and static instability energy. The decrease in thermodynamic energy restricted the generation of tropical cyclones over the same region.

  13. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  14. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  15. Heat Shield Flank Close Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features an up-close view of the flank piece of the rover's broken heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact. Overall, engineers were interested in evaluating the performance of the heat shield's thermal protection system.

    This is the the panormamic camera team's best current attempt at generating a 'true color' view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 3:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 331 (Dec. 28, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  16. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  17. Infrasonic Influences of Tornados and Cyclonic Weather Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Tessa

    2014-03-01

    Infrasound waves travel through the air at approximately 340 m/s at sea level, while experiencing low levels of friction, allowing the waves to travel over larger distances. When seismic waves travel through unconsolidated soil, the waves slow down to approximately 340 m/s. Because the speeds of waves in the air and ground are similar, a more effective transfer of energy from the atmosphere to the ground can occur. Large ring lasers can be utilized for detecting sources of infrasound traveling through the ground by measuring anomalies in the frequency difference between their two counter-rotating beams. Sources of infrasound include tornados and other cyclonic weather systems. The way systems create waves that transfer to the ground is unknown and will be continued in further research; this research has focused on attempting to isolate the time that the ring laser detected anomalies in order to investigate if these anomalies may be contributed to isolatable weather systems. Furthermore, this research analyzed the frequencies detected in each of the anomalies and compared the frequencies with various characteristics of each weather system, such as tornado width, wind speeds, and system development. This research may be beneficial for monitoring gravity waves and weather systems.

  18. The inner core thermodynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2016-10-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the inner-core dynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL), our knowledge of the inner-core thermodynamics of the TCBL remains limited. In this study, the inner-core budgets of potential temperature (θ), specific humidity ( q), and reversible equivalent potential temperature (θ _e) are examined using a high-resolution multilevel boundary layer model. The potential temperature budgets show that the heat energy is dominated by latent heat release in the eyewall, evaporative cooling along the outer edge of the eyewall, and upward surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the underlying warm ocean. It is shown that the vertical θ advection overcompensates the sum of radial advective warming from the boundary layer outflow jet and latent heating for the development of cooling in the eyewall within the TCBL. The moisture budgets show the dominant upward transport of moisture in the eyewall updrafts, partly by the boundary-layer outflow jet from the bottom eye region, so that the eyewall remains nearly saturated. The θ _e budgets reveal that the TCBL is maintained thermodynamically by the upward surface flux of higher-θ _e air from the underlying warm ocean, the radial transport of low-θ _e air from the outer regions of the TCBL, and the dry adiabatic cooling associated by eyewall updrafts. These results underscore the significance of vertical motion and the location of the boundary layer outflow jet in maintaining the inner core thermal structure of the TCBL.

  19. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  20. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  1. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  2. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  3. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baechler, S; Bochud, F O; Verellen, D; Moeckli, R

    2007-08-21

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  4. Improved water-cooled cyclone constructions in CFBs

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.G.; Luomaharju, T.; Kokko, A.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of CFB boilers has advanced in comparison with early designs. One improvement has been the use of water or steam cooled cyclones, which allows the use of thin refractories and minimizes maintenance needs. Cooled cyclones are also tolerant of wide load variations when the main fuel is biologically based, and coal or some other fuel is used as a back-up. With uncooled cyclones, load changes with high volatile fuels can mean significant temperature transients in the refractory, due to post-combustion phenomena in the cyclone. Kvaerner's development of water-cooled cyclones for CFBs began in the early 1980s. The first boiler with this design was delivered in 1985 in Sweden. Since then, Kvaerner Pulping has delivered over twenty units with cooled cyclones, in capacity ranging from small units up to 400 MW{sub th}. Among these units, Kvaerner has developed unconventional solutions for CFBs, in order to simplify the constructions and to increase the reliability for different applications. The first of them was CYMIC{reg{underscore}sign}, which has its water-cooled cyclone built inside the boiler furnace. There are two commercial CYMIC boilers in operation and one in project stages. The largest CYMIC in operation is a 185 MW{sub th} industrial boiler burning various fuels. For even larger scale units Kvaerner developed the Integrated Cylindrical Cyclone and Loopseal (ICCL) assembly. One of these installations is in operation in USA, having steaming capacity of over 500 t/h. The design bases of these new solutions are quite different in comparison with conventional cyclones. Therefore, an important part of the development has been cold model testing and mathematical modeling of the cyclones. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in water-cooled cyclone construction. The new solutions, their full-scale experience, and a comparison of the actual experience with the preliminary modeling work are introduced.

  5. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  6. Shift of extreme spring streamflow on the Belorussian rivers and its association with changes of cyclonic activity over Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partasenok, Irina; Chekan, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    The intra-annual distribution of precipitation is the most variable component of the water resources of Belarus. This distribution is controlled by extratropical cyclones from the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean that bring most of precipitation to the nation. That's why the aim of our study was to quantify major characteristics of these cyclones and to estimate effects of their passing through the Belorussian territory on regional water budget including floods and low water conditions. We documented the long-term fluctuations of streamflow and occurrence of extreme phenomena on the rivers of Belarus during the post-World War II period. It was established that annual water budget of the nation vary from year to year without systematic tendencies. At the same time, analysis of intra-annual distribution of streamflow reveals significant changes since the 1970s: increase of winter and decrease of spring runoff. As a result, the frequency of extreme spring floods has decreased. These changes in water regime are associated with climatic anomalies caused by large-scale alterations in atmospheric circulation, specifically in trajectories of cyclones. As a manifestation of these circulation changes, we observe increase of the surface air temperatures, more frequent cold season thaws, redistribution of seasonal precipitation totals, and decrease of the fraction of frozen precipitation in the shoulder seasons. Analysis of cyclonic activity over Belarus during the past 60 years in the cold season (December through February) shows the largest number of cyclones in 1950-1970. During this period, the largest number of spring floods caused by snowmelt on the rivers of Belarus was reported. Since 1970, we observe a decrease in the total number of cyclones but also an increasing strength (deepening) of the remaining cyclones in the cold season. That has led to some precipitation increase. During the last four decades, more frequent zonal air movement in the atmosphere and

  7. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired cyclonic combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J. ); Coppin, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    A gas-fired cyclonic combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications that require ultra-low pollutant emissions. High-lean premixed combustion with a flame stabilizer is adopted to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling, a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NO{sub x} emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NO{sub x} emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO{sub 2} were less than 40% of the total NO{sub x} emissions -- lower than the level of NO{sub 2} emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Impacts of tropical cyclones on Fiji and Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Prakash, Bipendra; Atalifo, Terry; Waqaicelua, Alipate; Seuseu, Sunny; Ausetalia Titimaea, Mulipola

    2013-04-01

    Weather and climate hazards have significant impacts on Pacific Island Countries. Costs of hazards such as tropical cyclones can be astronomical making enormous negative economic impacts on developing countries. We highlight examples of extreme weather events which have occurred in Fiji and Samoa in the last few decades and have caused major economic and social disruption in the countries. Destructive winds and torrential rain associated with tropical cyclones can bring the most damaging weather conditions to the region causing economic and social hardship, affecting agricultural productivity, infrastructure and economic development which can persist for many years after the initial impact. Analysing historical data, we describe the impacts of tropical cyclones Bebe and Kina on Fiji. Cyclone Bebe (October 1972) affected the whole Fiji especially the Yasawa Islands, Viti Levu and Kadavu where hurricane force winds have been recorded. Nineteen deaths were reported and damage costs caused by cyclone Bebe were estimated as exceeding F20 million (F 1972). Tropical cyclone Kina passed between Fiji's two main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and directly over Levuka on the night of 2 January 1993 with hurricane force winds causing extensive damage. Twenty three deaths have been reported making Kina one of the deadliest hurricanes in Fiji's recent history. Severe flooding on Viti Levu, combined with high tide and heavy seas led to destruction of the Sigatoka and Ba bridges, as well as almost complete loss of crops in Sigatoka and Navua deltas. Overall, damage caused by cyclone Kina was estimated as F170 million. In Samoa, we describe devastation to the country caused by tropical cyclones Ofa (February 1990) and Val (December 1991) which were considered to be the worst cyclones to affect the Samoan islands since the 1889 Apia cyclone. In Samoa, seven people were killed due to cyclone Ofa, thousands of people were left homeless and entire villages were destroyed. Damage

  9. Resistojet Thruster Shield Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    used in this evaluation, rotary pitot probe, rotary liquid -nitrogen-cooled quartz crystal micro- balance and an ion gage pressure probe. 20...multipropellant resistojet using hydrogen , helium, methane, water, nitrogen, air, argon and carbon dioxide, has been determined in Ref. 1 from thrust... Chirivella , J. E., IIMass Flux Measurements and Correlations in The Backflow Region of a Nozzle Plume,1I AIAA Paper No. 73-731, Presented at

  10. An analysis of the characteristics of extratropical cyclone Klaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómara, Iñigo; Rodriguez-Puebla, Concepcion; Yague, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Klaus was a very destructive extratropical cyclone that affected the south-west of Europe from the 23rd to the 25th of January 2009. In particular, it impacted over northern Spain, southern France and Italy where losses totalled billions of Euros and the death toll was 31. The extreme strength of the wind gusts generated by the storm was the main reason for the damage caused. Klaus had the properties of a cyclonic "bomb", and a brief meteorological description of the windstorm will be presented based on surface and upper-air reanalysis data. The analysis procedure has been based on earlier research carried out in this field by J. R. Gyakum (1980), Lance F. Bosart (1984) and J.R. Reed (1986). Klaus was formed under very favourable growing conditions in the North Atlantic ocean: a high atmospheric baroclinicity level due to high temperature and absolute humidity horizontal gradients and strong upper-air winds. In addition, the surface low that started as a stationary front interacted with a mobile upper trough that was located at an altitude of 9000 m near the surface low on the 23rd of January. A strong polar jet stream region above the surface incipient low was also located in the same region of the storm's growth, around 40W-42.5N. After its formation and interaction with the mobile upper-trough, Klaus moved very fast eastwards until it reached land in France on the 24th. We will discuss some social and economic impacts of the storm and the intervention of governments and weather services before, during and after the windstorm. References Gyakum, J. R. and F. Sanders, 1980: Synoptic-Dynamic Climatology of the "bomb". Monthly Weather Review, 108, 1589-1606. Bosart, L. F. and S.C. Lin, 1984: A diagnostic analysis of the Presidents' Day Storm of February 1979. Monthly Weather Review, 112, 2148-2177. Reed, J. R. and M. D. Albright, 1986: A case study of explosive cyclogenesis in the eastern Pacific. Monthly Weather Review, 114, 2297-2319.

  11. Ocean barrier layers' effect on tropical cyclone intensification.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R; Leung, L Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  12. Novel cyclone empirical pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  13. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  14. A new classification scheme of European cyclone tracks with relevance to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstätter, M.; Chimani, B.; Lexer, A.; Blöschl, G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a new classification scheme of atmospheric cyclone tracks over Europe. The cyclones are classified into nine types, based on the geographic regions, the cyclones traverse before entering central Europe. The method is applied to ERA-40 data for 1961-2002, considering all significant cyclones above a relative vorticity threshold. About 120 and 80 cyclone tracks per year are identified at sea level pressure and 700 hPa geopotential height, respectively. About 25% are Atlantic type cyclones, 25% emerge directly over central Europe, and another 25% originate from the lee of the Alps. The other types are less frequent (Mediterranean 12%, Polar 7%, Continental 2%, and Vb 4%). The track types show distinct characteristics in terms of cyclone intensity and cyclone life stage when entering central Europe. Cyclones of type Vb are, on average, the most intense cyclones over central Europe and even more intense than Atlantic cyclones in summer, pointing to their potential for generating extreme precipitation. The identified cyclones account for 46%-76% of long-term precipitation in a focus region in central Europe. Precipitation differs significantly between cyclones, with Atlantic and Vb cyclones producing the highest and Continental and Polar cyclones producing the lowest long-term precipitation totals. The contributions of cyclone types to total precipitation show distinct spatial patterns within central Europe. The new cyclone type catalog will be useful for identifying the relevance of specific track types for precipitation extremes in central Europe and analyze their temporal behavior in the context of climate change.

  15. Lessons learnt from tropical cyclone losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honegger, Caspar; Wüest, Marc; Zimmerli, Peter; Schoeck, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Swiss Re has a long history in developing natural catastrophe loss models. The tropical cyclone USA and China model are examples for event-based models in their second generation. Both are based on basin-wide probabilistic track sets and calculate explicitly the losses from the sub-perils wind and storm surge in an insurance portfolio. Based on these models, we present two cases studies. China: a view on recent typhoon loss history Over the last 20 years only very few major tropical cyclones have caused severe insurance losses in the Pearl River Delta region and Shanghai, the two main exposure clusters along China's southeast coast. Several storms have made landfall in China every year but most struck areas with relatively low insured values. With this study, we make the point that typhoon landfalls in China have a strong hit-or-miss character and available insured loss experience is too short to form a representative view of risk. Historical storm tracks and a simple loss model applied to a market portfolio - all from publicly available data - are sufficient to illustrate this. An event-based probabilistic model is necessary for a reliable judgement of the typhoon risk in China. New York: current and future tropical cyclone risk In the aftermath of hurricane Sandy 2012, Swiss Re supported the City of New York in identifying ways to significantly improve the resilience to severe weather and climate change. Swiss Re provided a quantitative assessment of potential climate related risks facing the city as well as measures that could reduce those impacts.

  16. Tropical Cyclone Monty Strikes Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) acquired these natural color images and cloud top height measurements for Monty before and after the storm made landfall over the remote Pilbara region of Western Australia, on February 29 and March 2, 2004 (shown as the left and right-hand image sets, respectively). On February 29, Monty was upgraded to category 4 cyclone status. After traveling inland about 300 kilometers to the south, the cyclonic circulation had decayed considerably, although category 3 force winds were reported on the ground. Some parts of the drought-affected Pilbara region received more than 300 millimeters of rainfall, and serious and extensive flooding has occurred.

    The natural color images cover much of the same area, although the right-hand panels are offset slightly to the east. Automated stereoscopic processing of data from multiple MISR cameras was utilized to produce the cloud-top height fields. The distinctive spatial patterns of the clouds provide the necessary contrast to enable automated feature matching between images acquired at different view angles. The height retrievals are at this stage uncorrected for the effects of the high winds associated with cyclone rotation. Areas where heights could not be retrieved are shown in dark gray.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 22335 and 22364. The panels cover an area of about 380 kilometers x 985 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 105 to 111 within World Reference System-2 paths 115 and 113.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the

  17. A Classification of Mediterranean Cyclones Based on Global Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, Oreste; Atlas, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea region is dominated by baroclinic and orographic cyclogenesis. However, previous work has demonstrated the existence of rare but intense subsynoptic-scale cyclones displaying remarkable similarities to tropical cyclones and polar lows, including, but not limited to, an eye-like feature in the satellite imagery. The terms polar low and tropical cyclone have been often used interchangeably when referring to small-scale, convective Mediterranean vortices and no definitive statement has been made so far on their nature, be it sub-tropical or polar. Moreover, most of the classifications of Mediterranean cyclones have neglected the small-scale convective vortices, focusing only on the larger-scale and far more common baroclinic cyclones. A classification of all Mediterranean cyclones based on operational global analyses is proposed The classification is based on normalized horizontal shear, vertical shear, scale, low versus mid-level vorticity, low-level temperature gradients, and sea surface temperatures. In the classification system there is a continuum of possible events, according to the increasing role of barotropic instability and decreasing role of baroclinic instability. One of the main results is that the Mediterranean tropical cyclone-like vortices and the Mediterranean polar lows appear to be different types of events, in spite of the apparent similarity of their satellite imagery. A consistent terminology is adopted, stating that tropical cyclone- like vortices are the less baroclinic of all, followed by polar lows, cold small-scale cyclones and finally baroclinic lee cyclones. This classification is based on all the cyclones which occurred in a four-year period (between 1996 and 1999). Four cyclones, selected among all the ones which developed during this time-frame, are analyzed. Particularly, the classification allows to discriminate between two cyclones (occurred in October 1996 and in March 1999) which both display a very well

  18. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  19. Tropical cyclone intensity change. A quantitative forecasting scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dropco, K. M.; Gray, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    One to two day future tropical cyclone intensity change from both a composite and an individual case point-of-view are discussed. Tropical cyclones occurring in the Gulf of Mexico during the period 1957-1977 form the primary data source. Weather charts of the NW Atlantic were initially examined, but few differences were found between intensifying and non-intensifying cyclones. A rawinsonde composite analysis detected composite differences in the 200 mb height fields, the 850 mb temperature fields, the 200 mb zonal wind and the vertical shears of the zonal wind. The individual cyclones which make up the composite study were then separately examined using this composite case knowledge. Similar parameter differences were found in a majority of individual cases. A cyclone intensity change forecast scheme was tested against independent storm cases. Correct predictions of intensification or non-intensification could be made approximately 75% of the time.

  20. Extreme Arctic cyclones in CMIP5 historical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrus, Stephen J.

    2013-12-01

    attention is being paid to extreme weather, including recent high-profile events involving very destructive cyclones. In summer 2012, a historically powerful cyclone traversed the Arctic, a region experiencing rapid warming and dramatic loss of ice and snow cover. This study addresses whether such powerful storms are an emerging expression of anthropogenic climate change by investigating simulated extreme Arctic cyclones during the historical period (1850-2005) among global climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) archive. These general circulation models are able to simulate extreme pressures associated with strong polar storms without a significant dependence on model resolution. The models display realism by generating extreme Arctic storms primarily around subpolar cyclone regions (Aleutian and Icelandic) and preferentially during winter. Simulated secular trends in Arctic mean sea level pressure and extreme cyclones are equivocal; both indicate increasing storminess in some regions, but the magnitude of changes to date are modest compared with future projections.

  1. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Increased occurrence of more intense tropical storms intruding further poleward has been foreshadowed as one of the potential consequences of global warming. This scenario is based almost entirely on the general circulation model predictions of warmer sea surface temperature (SST) with increasing levels of atmospheric CO[sub 2] and some theories of tropical cyclone intensification that support the notion of more intense systems with warmer SST. Whether storms are able to achieve this theoretically determined more intense state depends on whether the temperature of the underlying water is the dominant factor in tropical cyclone intensification. An examination of the historical data record in a number of ocean basins is used to identify the relative importance of SST in the tropical cyclone intensification process. The results reveal that SST alone is an inadequate predictor of tropical cyclone intensity. Other factors known to affect tropical cyclone frequency and intensity are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Supplementing Oscat winds with Saral Altika observations for cyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niharika, K.; Usha Sundari, H. S. V.; Prasad, A. V. V.; Kumari, E. V. S. Sita; Dadhwal, V. K.; Ali, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of life cycle of cyclone is very critical to the disaster management practices. Since the cyclones originate over the oceans where in situ observations are limited, we have to resort to the remote sensing techniques. Both optical and microwave sensors help studying the cyclones. While scatterometer provide wind vectors, altimeters can give only wind speed. In this paper we present how altimeter measurements can supplement the scatterometer observations in determining the radius of maximum winds (RMW). Sustained maximum winds, indicator for the intensity of the cyclone, are within the eye wall of a cyclone at a distance of RMW. This parameter is also useful in predicting right time of the storm surge. In this paper we used the wind speed estimations from AltiKa, an altimeter operating at Ka band.

  3. The effect of Gulf Stream-induced baroclinicity on US East Coast winter cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Cione, J.J.; Raman, S.; Pietrafesa, L.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Midlatitude cyclones develop off the Carolinas during winters and move north producing gale-force winds, ice, and heavy snow. It is believed that boundary-layer and air-sea interaction processes are very important during the development stages of these East Coast storms. The marine boundary layer (MBL) off the mid-Atlantic coastline is highly baroclinic due to the proximity of the Gulf Stream just offshore. Typical horizontal distances between the Wilmington coastline and the western edge of the Gulf Stream vary between 90 and 250 km annually, and this distance can deviate by over 30 km within a single week. While similar weekly Gulf Stream position standard deviations also exist at Cape Hatteras, the average annual distance to the Gulf Stream frontal zone is much smaller off Cape Hatteras, normally ranging between 30 and 100 km. This research investigates the low-level baroclinic conditions present prior to observed storm events. The examination of nine years of data on the Gulf Stream position and East Coast winter storms seems to indicate that the degree of low-level baroclinicity and modification existing prior to a cyclonic event may significantly affect the rate of cyclonic deepening off the mid-Atlantic coastline. Statistical analyses linking the observed surface-pressure decrease with both the Gulf Stream frontal location and the prestorm coastal baroclinic conditions are presented. These results quantitatively indicate that Gulf Stream-induced wintertime baroclinicity may significantly affect the regional intensification of East Coast winter cyclones. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. An exemplary case of a bromine explosion event linked to cyclone development in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Kaleschke, L.; Strong, K.; Theys, N.; Weber, M.; Zhao, X.; Zien, A.

    2016-02-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by GOME-2 on board the MetOp-A satellite over Arctic sea ice in polar spring. These plumes are often transported by high-latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. However, only few studies have focused on the role of polar weather systems in the development, duration and transport of tropospheric BrO plumes during bromine explosion events. The latter are caused by an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction associated with tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine-covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, a case study investigating a comma-shaped BrO plume which developed over the Beaufort Sea and was observed by GOME-2 for several days is presented. By making combined use of satellite data and numerical models, it is shown that the occurrence of the plume was closely linked to frontal lifting in a polar cyclone and that it most likely resided in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. In contrast to previous case studies, we demonstrate that the dry conveyor belt, a potentially bromine-rich stratospheric air stream which can complicate interpretation of satellite retrieved tropospheric BrO, is spatially separated from the observed BrO plume. It is concluded that weather conditions associated with the polar cyclone favoured the bromine activation cycle and blowing snow production, which may have acted as a bromine source during the bromine explosion event.

  5. An exemplary case of a bromine explosion event linked to cyclone development in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Kaleschke, L.; Strong, K.; Theys, N.; Weber, M.; Zhao, X.; Zien, A.

    2015-09-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by GOME-2 on board the MetOp-A satellite over Arctic sea ice in polar spring. These plumes are often transported by high latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. However, only few studies have focused on the role of polar weather systems in the development, duration and transport of tropospheric BrO plumes during bromine explosion events. The latter are caused by an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction associated with tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, a case study investigating a comma-shaped BrO plume which developed over the Beaufort Sea and was observed by GOME-2 for several days is presented. By making combined use of satellite data and numerical models, it is shown that the occurrence of the plume was closely linked to frontal lifting in a polar cyclone and that it most likely resided in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. In contrast to previous case studies, we demonstrate that the dry conveyor belt, a potentially bromine-rich stratospheric air stream which can complicate interpretation of satellite retrieved tropospheric BrO, is spatially separated from the observed BrO plume. It is concluded that weather conditions associated with the polar cyclone favored the bromine activation cycle and blowing snow production, which may have acted as a bromine source during the bromine explosion event.

  6. Permit Shields and NSR

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  7. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  8. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  9. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  10. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  11. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  12. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  13. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  14. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Models to the Surface Drag Coefficient in Different Boundary-Layer Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    No. N0001411Wx20095 from the U.S. Office of Naval Research and NSF AGS- 0733380 and NSF AGS-0851077, NOAAs Hurricane Research Division and NASA...Black PG D’Asoro EA Drennan WM French JR Niller PP Sanford TB Terril EJ Walsh EJ Zhang JA 2007 Air- sea exchange in hurricanes. Synthesis of...mechanism for tropical cyclone intensification. J. Atmos. Sci., 53, 3528-3540. Drennan WM Zhang JA French JR McCormick C Black PB. 2007 Turbulent

  15. Tropical Cyclones in Simulations of the Middle Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korty, R. L.; Zamora, R. A.; Camargo, S. J.; Toomey, M.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental conditions that support and sustain tropical cyclones are affected by the amount of solar radiation incident on the tropics, which varies on millennial timescales owing to orbital variations. During the middle Holocene, higher amounts of summer solar radiation 6000 years ago (6ka) increased thermal stability and pools of hot, dry air in the tropical troposphere, rendering the thermodynamic environment less favorable than in modern times. (The opposite response is seen in the Southern Hemisphere, where January-March anomalies yield more conducive conditions 6ka there than today.) Here we compare these changes in environmental conditions to tropical storms simulated by two distinct methods as well as to available geologic evidence from the middle Holocene. We find that storms directly spawned by global climate models respond to the changes as the thermodynamic environment predicts: a reduction 6ka in Northern Hemisphere, with an increase 6ka in the Southern Hemisphere. We derive an empirical genesis index that identifies the best fit between environmental conditions and the response in genesis. We also compare the results to storms generated using the statistical downscaling method pioneered by Emanuel. Here too the events similarly respond to the changes in the environmental conditions, but the amplitude of the changes is smaller than seen in the global climate models. We discuss some possible reasons for the differences as well as their implications for studies applying these methods to 21st century climate.

  16. Impact of environmental moisture on tropical cyclone intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Su, H.; Fovell, R. G.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Wang, Z.; Kahn, B. H.

    2015-06-01

    The impacts of environmental moisture on the intensification of a tropical cyclone (TC) are investigated in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with a focus on the azimuthal asymmetry of the moisture impacts. A series of sensitivity experiments with varying moisture perturbations in the environment are conducted and the Marsupial Paradigm framework is employed to understand the different moisture impacts. We find that modification of environmental moisture has insignificant impacts on the storm in this case unless it leads to convective activity in the environment, which deforms the quasi-Lagrangian boundary of the storm. By facilitating convection and precipitation outside the storm, enhanced environmental moisture ahead of the northwestward-moving storm induces a dry air intrusion to the inner core and limits TC intensification. However, increased moisture in the rear quadrants favors intensification by providing more moisture to the inner core and promoting storm symmetry, with primary contributions coming from moisture increase in the boundary layer. The different impacts of environmental moisture on TC intensification are governed by the relative locations of moisture perturbations and their interactions with the storm Lagrangian structure.

  17. Impact of environmental moisture on tropical cyclone intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Su, H.; Fovell, R. G.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Wang, Z.; Kahn, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of environmental moisture on the intensification of a tropical cyclone (TC) are investigated in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with a focus on the azimuthal asymmetry of the moisture impacts relative to the storm path. A series of sensitivity experiments with varying moisture perturbations in the environment are conducted and the Marsupial Paradigm framework is employed to understand the different moisture impacts. We find that modification of environmental moisture has insignificant impacts on the storm in this case unless it leads to convective activity that deforms the quasi-Lagrangian boundary of the storm and changes the moisture transport into the storm. By facilitating convection and precipitation outside the storm, enhanced environmental moisture ahead of the northwestward-moving storm induces a dry air intrusion to the inner core and limits TC intensification. In contrast, increased moisture in the rear quadrants favors intensification by providing more moisture to the inner core and promoting storm symmetry, with primary contributions coming from moisture increase in the boundary layer. The different impacts of environmental moisture on TC intensification are governed by the relative locations of moisture perturbations and their interactions with the storm Lagrangian structure.

  18. Shielding conditions of local cavity for underwater arc spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Koga, H.

    1996-12-01

    Arc spot welding to join lapped plates is an effective maintenance operation for emergent recovering technique of defects under water. The welding operation is easy and effective except for an excessive amount of weld metal for deep penetration. A special nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding was designed to maintain this defect. A large amount of swirl shielding gas flow is adopted to discharge the excessive weld metal and to reduce digging action of weld pool. An additional high speed air jet is supplied to reinforce these effects. Almost flat weld bead is obtained by using of this nozzle. The effect of swirl shielding flow and additional air jet on the pressure is studied. When an excessive axial gas flow is used, a pressure at the weld pool becomes high enough to press down the weld surface below original surface level of base plate, and some molten metal is splashed out. Then, it is difficult to get a sound weld geometry. A swirl gas flow is tried to reduce the static pressure on the weld pool. The pressure on the weld pool by the swirl flow becomes much lower compared to the case by axial flow. When the swirl flow is used, a flat bead can be obtained. But some molten metal which is blown out by the swirl gas is resolidified at the edge of the nozzle. The additional high speed air jet is required to blow out the splashed metal from the nozzle completely. It has a suction effect itself. The pressure on the weld pool is also decreased. But the interaction between the swirl flow and the additional jet shows a complicated manner. This paper discusses the interaction between main shielding gas flow and the additional air jet to guarantee the good shielding condition for underwater use.

  19. Temporal clustering of tropical cyclones and its ecosystem impacts.

    PubMed

    Mumby, Peter J; Vitolo, Renato; Stephenson, David B

    2011-10-25

    Tropical cyclones have massive economic, social, and ecological impacts, and models of their occurrence influence many planning activities from setting insurance premiums to conservation planning. Most impact models allow for geographically varying cyclone rates but assume that individual storm events occur randomly with constant rate in time. This study analyzes the statistical properties of Atlantic tropical cyclones and shows that local cyclone counts vary in time, with periods of elevated activity followed by relative quiescence. Such temporal clustering is particularly strong in the Caribbean Sea, along the coasts of Belize, Honduras, Costa Rica, Jamaica, the southwest of Haiti, and in the main hurricane development region in the North Atlantic between Africa and the Caribbean. Failing to recognize this natural nonstationarity in cyclone rates can give inaccurate impact predictions. We demonstrate this by exploring cyclone impacts on coral reefs. For a given cyclone rate, we find that clustered events have a less detrimental impact than independent random events. Predictions using a standard random hurricane model were overly pessimistic, predicting reef degradation more than a decade earlier than that expected under clustered disturbance. The presence of clustering allows coral reefs more time to recover to healthier states, but the impacts of clustering will vary from one ecosystem to another.

  20. Scaling parameters for PFBC cyclone separator system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, A.; Romeo, L.M.; Cortes, C.

    1999-07-01

    Laboratory-scale cold flow models have been used extensively to study the behavior of many installations. In particular, fluidized bed cold flow models have allowed developing the knowledge of fluidized bed hydrodynamics. In order for the results of the research to be relevant to commercial power plants, cold flow models must be properly scaled. Many efforts have been made to understand the performance of fluidized beds, but up to now no attention has been paid in developing the knowledge of cyclone separator systems. CIRCE has worked on the development of scaling parameters to enable laboratory-scale equipment operating at room temperature to simulate the performance of cyclone separator systems. This paper presents the simplified scaling parameters and experimental comparison of a cyclone separator system and a cold flow model constructed and based on those parameters. The cold flow model has been used to establish the validity of the scaling laws for cyclone separator systems and permits detailed room temperature studies (determining the filtration effects of varying operating parameters and cyclone design) to be performed in a rapid and cost effective manner. This valuable and reliable design tool will contribute to a more rapid and concise understanding of hot gas filtration systems based on cyclones. The study of the behavior of the cold flow model, including observation and measurements of flow patterns in cyclones and diplegs will allow characterizing the performance of the full-scale ash removal system, establishing safe limits of operation and testing design improvements.

  1. Damaging sediment density flows triggered by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Ed L.; Talling, Peter J.; Carter, Lionel; Clare, Michael A.; Hunt, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The global network of subsea fibre-optic cables plays a critical role in the world economy and is considered as strategic infrastructure for many nations. Sediment density flows have caused significant disruption to this network in the recent past. These cable breaks represent the only means to actively monitor such flows over large oceanic regions. Here, we use a global cable break database to analyse tropical cyclone triggering of sediment density flows worldwide over 25 yrs. Cable breaking sediment density flows are triggered in nearly all areas exposed to tropical cyclones but most occur in the NW Pacific. They are triggered by one of three sets of mechanisms. Tropical cyclones directly trigger flows, synchronous to their passage, as a consequence of storm waves, currents and surges. Cyclones also trigger flows indirectly, with near-synchronous timing to their passage, as a consequence of peak flood discharges. Last, cyclones trigger flows after a delay of days as a consequence of the failure of large volumes of rapidly deposited sediment. No clear relationship emerges between tropical cyclone activity (i.e. track, frequency and intensity) and the number of sediment density flows triggered. This is a consequence of the short period of observation. However, expansion of the cable network and predicted changes to cyclone activity in specific regions increases the likelihood of increasing numbers of damaging flows.

  2. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Kossin, James P; Jagger, Thomas H

    2008-09-04

    Atlantic tropical cyclones are getting stronger on average, with a 30-year trend that has been related to an increase in ocean temperatures over the Atlantic Ocean and elsewhere. Over the rest of the tropics, however, possible trends in tropical cyclone intensity are less obvious, owing to the unreliability and incompleteness of the observational record and to a restricted focus, in previous trend analyses, on changes in average intensity. Here we overcome these two limitations by examining trends in the upper quantiles of per-cyclone maximum wind speeds (that is, the maximum intensities that cyclones achieve during their lifetimes), estimated from homogeneous data derived from an archive of satellite records. We find significant upward trends for wind speed quantiles above the 70th percentile, with trends as high as 0.3 +/- 0.09 m s(-1) yr(-1) (s.e.) for the strongest cyclones. We note separate upward trends in the estimated lifetime-maximum wind speeds of the very strongest tropical cyclones (99th percentile) over each ocean basin, with the largest increase at this quantile occurring over the North Atlantic, although not all basins show statistically significant increases. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the hypothesis that as the seas warm, the ocean has more energy to convert to tropical cyclone wind.

  3. Temporal clustering of tropical cyclones and its ecosystem impacts

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Peter J.; Vitolo, Renato; Stephenson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical cyclones have massive economic, social, and ecological impacts, and models of their occurrence influence many planning activities from setting insurance premiums to conservation planning. Most impact models allow for geographically varying cyclone rates but assume that individual storm events occur randomly with constant rate in time. This study analyzes the statistical properties of Atlantic tropical cyclones and shows that local cyclone counts vary in time, with periods of elevated activity followed by relative quiescence. Such temporal clustering is particularly strong in the Caribbean Sea, along the coasts of Belize, Honduras, Costa Rica, Jamaica, the southwest of Haiti, and in the main hurricane development region in the North Atlantic between Africa and the Caribbean. Failing to recognize this natural nonstationarity in cyclone rates can give inaccurate impact predictions. We demonstrate this by exploring cyclone impacts on coral reefs. For a given cyclone rate, we find that clustered events have a less detrimental impact than independent random events. Predictions using a standard random hurricane model were overly pessimistic, predicting reef degradation more than a decade earlier than that expected under clustered disturbance. The presence of clustering allows coral reefs more time to recover to healthier states, but the impacts of clustering will vary from one ecosystem to another. PMID:22006300

  4. Tropical Cyclone Signatures in Atmospheric Convective Available Potential Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studholme, Joshua; Gulev, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones play an important role in the climate system providing transports of energy and water vapor, forcing the ocean, and also affecting mid-latitude circulation phenomena. Tropical cyclone tracks experience strong interannual variability and in addition, longer term trend-like changes in all ocean basins. Analysis of recent historical data reveal a poleward shift in the locations of tropical cyclone tracks in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (Kossin et al. 2014, Nature, 509, 349-352). The physical consequences of these alterations are largely unconstrained. For example, the increasing encroachment of tropical cyclone activity into the extra-tropical environment presents a novel and still poorly understood paradigm for tropical-extratropical interactions. In this respect, the role that the atmospheric convective available potential energy (CAPE) plays in the dynamics of tropical cyclones is highly interesting. The two characteristic global-scale spatial patterns in CAPE are identified using EOF analysis. The first pattern shows an abundance of CAPE in the centre of the Pacific and corresponds to the El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second one is capturing positive CAPE anomalies in the oceanic tropics and negative anomalies over equatorial Africa. Associated with these buoyancy patterns, alterations in tropical cyclone activity occur in all basins forming both zonal and meridional patterns. Atmospheric buoyancy is the trigger for deep convection, and subsequently cyclone genesis. This is the mechanism of impact upon location at the start of cyclone tracks. It is found to have less impact upon where cyclones subsequently move, whether or not they undergo extratropical transition and when and where they experience lysis. It is shown that CAPE plays a critical role in the general circulation in the tropics which in turn is the larger steering context for embedded systems within the Walker and Hadley cells. So this lack of `latter life' impact

  5. Multiple Satellite Observations of Cloud Cover in Extratropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Booth, James F.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Using cloud observations from NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, and CloudSat-CALIPSO, composites of cloud fraction in southern and northern hemisphere extratropical cyclones are obtained for cold and warm seasons between 2006 and 2010, to assess differences between these three data sets, and between summer and winter cyclones. In both hemispheres and seasons, over the open ocean, the cyclone-centered cloud fraction composites agree within 5% across the three data sets, but behind the cold fronts, or over sea ice and land, the differences are much larger. To supplement the data set comparison and learn more about the cyclones, we also examine the differences in cloud fraction between cold and warm season for each data set. The difference in cloud fraction between cold and warm season southern hemisphere cyclones is small for all three data sets, but of the same order of magnitude as the differences between the data sets. The cold-warm season contrast in northern hemisphere cyclone cloud fractions is similar for all three data sets: in the warm sector, the cold season cloud fractions are lower close to the low, but larger on the equator edge than their warm season counterparts. This seasonal contrast in cloud fraction within the cyclones warm sector seems to be related to the seasonal differences in moisture flux within the cyclones. Our analysis suggests that the three different data sets can all be used confidently when studying the warm sector and warm frontal zone of extratropical cyclones but caution should be exerted when studying clouds in the cold sector.

  6. Extra-tropical Cyclones and Windstorms in Seasonal Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Befort, Daniel J.; Weisheimer, Antje; Knight, Jeff; Thornton, Hazel; Roberts, Julia; Hermanson, Leon

    2015-04-01

    Severe damages and large insured losses over Europe related to natural phenomena are mostly caused by extra-tropical cyclones and their related windstorm fields. Thus, an adequate representation of these events in seasonal prediction systems and reliable forecasts up to a season in advance would be of high value for society and economy. In this study, state-of-the-art seasonal forecast prediction systems are analysed (ECMWF, UK Met Office) regarding the general climatological representation and the seasonal prediction of extra-tropical cyclones and windstorms during the core winter season (DJF) with a lead time of up to four months. Two different algorithms are used to identify cyclones and windstorm events in these datasets. Firstly, we apply a cyclone identification and tracking algorithm based on the Laplacian of MSLP and secondly, we use an objective wind field tracking algorithm to identify and track continuous areas of extreme high wind speeds (cf. Leckebusch et al., 2008), which can be related to extra-tropical winter cyclones. Thus, for the first time, we can analyse the forecast of severe wind events near to the surface caused by extra-tropical cyclones. First results suggest a successful validation of the spatial climatological distributions of wind storm and cyclone occurrence in the seasonal forecast systems in comparison with reanalysis data (ECMWF-ERA40 & ERAInterim) in general. However, large biases are found for some areas. The skill of the seasonal forecast systems in simulating the year-to-year variability of the frequency of severe windstorm events and cyclones is investigated using the ranked probability skill score. Positive skill is found over large parts of the Northern Hemisphere as well as for the most intense extra-tropical cyclones and its related wind fields.

  7. Sea ice trends and cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Jack; McDonald, Adrian; Rack, Wolfgang; Dale, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Significant trends in the extent of Southern Hemisphere sea ice have been noted over the course of the satellite record, with highly variable trends between different seasons and regions. In this presentation, we describe efforts to assess the impact of cyclones on these trends. Employing a maximum cross-correlation method, we derive Southern Ocean ice-motion vectors from daily gridded SSMI 85.5 GHz brightness temperatures. We then derive a sea ice budget from the NASA-Team 25 km square daily sea ice concentrations. The budget quantifies the total daily change in sea ice area, and includes terms representing the effects of ice advection and divergence. A residual term represents the processes of rafting, ridging, freezing and thawing. We employ a cyclone tracking algorithm developed at the University of Canterbury to determine the timing, location, size and strength of Southern Hemisphere cyclones from mean sea-level pressure fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis. We then form composites of the of sea ice budget below the location of cyclones. Unsurprisingly, we find that clockwise atmospheric flow around Southern Hemisphere cyclones exerts a strong influence on the movement of sea ice, an effect which is visible in the advection and divergence terms. Further, we assess the climatological importance of cyclones by comparing seasons of sea ice advance for periods with varying numbers of cyclones. This analysis is performed independently for each sea ice concentration pixel, thus affording us insight into the geographical importance of storm systems. We find that Southern Hemisphere sea ice extent is highly sensitive to the presence of cyclones in the periphery of the pack in the advance season. Notably, the sensitivity is particularly high in the northern Ross Sea, an area with a marked positive trend in sea ice extent. We discuss whether trends in cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean may have contributed to sea ice extent trends in this region.

  8. Interdecadal variation of Korea affecting tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seon; Cha, Yu-Mi; Kang, Sung-Dae; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed a time series of average central pressure of tropical cyclone (TC) that affected Korea in summer season from 1965 to 2012. To determine whether climate regime shift exists in this time series, statistical change-point analysis was applied to this time series. The result showed that significant climate regime shift existed in 1989, that is, TC intensity from 1965 to 1988 (6588) was weaker than that from 1989 to 2012 (8912). Therefore, an average difference between former and latter periods was analyzed to study large-scale environments, which caused such difference. While TC genesis frequency showed a tendency that TCs in the 6588 period were originated from the northwest quadrant in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, TCs in the 8912 period were originated from the southeast quadrant. Thus, it was judged that TCs in the 6588 were generated at a higher latitude followed by moving to Korea, so their strength was weaker than those of TCs of 8912 due to lack of time to acquire sufficient energy from the sea. For TC passage frequency, TCs in the 6588 period showed a tendency to move a short distance from the sea far away from the southeast in Japan to the sea far away from the northeast in Japan or toward the East China Sea. On the other hand, TCs in the 8912 period moved a longer distance from the sea far away from the Philippines via Japan to the eastern sea of Kamchatka Peninsular or toward the east region in China. As such, an average difference of intensity between the former period and the latter period over the 500-hPa streamline was analyzed to determine why the intensity of TCs in the 6588 period was weaker than that of TCs in the 8912 period. As a result, anomalous cold northerlies from anomalous cyclones based on the northern territory of Japan were predominant, while these anomalous flows were originated from the tropical and subtropical western Pacific followed by moving to Korea, thereby affecting the weakening of the TC

  9. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  10. Rotary stripper for shielded and unshielded FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.; Chambers, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Rotary stripper removes narrow strips of insulation and shielding to any desired depth. Unshielded cables are stripped on both sides with one stroke, shielded cables are stripped in steps of different depths.

  11. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOEpatents

    Bench, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

  12. Plasma-cyclone technology for firing solid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Yu. E.; Messerle, V. E.; Karpenko, E. I.; Basargin, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    A new coal combustion technology is described, which involves preparation of fuel for combustion by subjecting it to electrothermochemical treatment followed by vortex firing of pulverized-coal fuel in a cyclone chamber with removing the molten mineral part of the fuel. A procedure for stepped calculation of the plasma-cyclone process is presented, which includes stage-wise determination of gas flow state parameters, mineral part of fuel, and geometrical characteristics of the chamber. The results of experimental investigations confirming the main theoretical statements are given. The solid fuel plasma-cyclone combustion technology application field including power-generating and power-processing areas is defined.

  13. Coastal flooding by tropical cyclones and sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Jonathan D; Irish, Jennifer L; Camargo, Suzana J

    2013-12-05

    The future impacts of climate change on landfalling tropical cyclones are unclear. Regardless of this uncertainty, flooding by tropical cyclones will increase as a result of accelerated sea-level rise. Under similar rates of rapid sea-level rise during the early Holocene epoch most low-lying sedimentary coastlines were generally much less resilient to storm impacts. Society must learn to live with a rapidly evolving shoreline that is increasingly prone to flooding from tropical cyclones. These impacts can be mitigated partly with adaptive strategies, which include careful stewardship of sediments and reductions in human-induced land subsidence.

  14. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOEpatents

    Bench, T.R.

    1998-04-28

    A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

  15. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    A compact cyclone filter train is described for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separators and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

  16. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel.

  17. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, R.S.

    1992-12-08

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel. 9 figs.

  18. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  19. Projecting global tropical cyclone economic damages with validation of tropical cyclone economic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Y.; Iwasaki, A.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) sometimes cause serious damages to human society and thus possible changes of TC properties in the future have been concerned. In fact, the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) mentions likely increasing in intensity and rain rate of TCs. In addition, future change of socioeconomic condition (e.g. population growth) might worsen TC impacts in the future. Thereby, in this study, we developed regression models to estimate economic damages by TCs (hereafter TC damage model), and employed those models to project TC economic damages under several future climate and socioeconomic scenarios. We developed the TC damage models for each of 4 regions; western North Pacific, North American, North Indian, and Southern Hemisphere. The inputs for TC damage model are tropical cyclone central pressure, populations in the area exposed by tropical cyclone wind, and GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita. The TC damage models we firstly developed tended to overestimate very low damages and also underestimate very high damages. Thereby we modified structure of TC damage models to improve model performance, and then executed extensive validation of the model. The modified model presented better performance in estimating very low and high TC damages. After the modification and validation of the model, we determined the structure of TC damage models and projected TC economic damages. The result indicated increase in TC economic damage in global scale, while TC economic damage against world GDP would decrease in the future, which result is consistent with previous study.

  20. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

  1. Tank Car Head Shield Fatigue Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    shields and to record measurements which reflect the dynamic response of the head shield (and its attachments) and then to devise a method for...areas were instrumented for measuring strains. Other positions were also instrumented to obtain a breader understanding of the response of the shield ...center sill of four feet six inches, measured in a straight line between extreme edges; (ii) A minimum width at the top of shield of nine feet

  2. Analysis and Evaluation of Suppressive Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    resistance of the shield to fragment penetration, and 7. attenuation of thermal effects by the shield . Other aspects of the design include problems of entry...propellant, 2. methods to predict the thermal environment outside of a suppressive shield , 3. comparisons between measured and predicted pressures... SHIELDS by P. A. Co- x P. S. Westine CD J. J. Kulesz L.LJ E. D. Espurza c-.- January 1978 SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Post Office Drawer 28510, 6220

  3. An analysis of consensus and disagreement among different cyclone tracking methods on the climatology of cyclones in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Piero; Trigo, Isabel F.; Gil, Victoria; Liberato, Margarida M. L.; Nissen, Katrin M.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Raible, Christof C.; Reale, Marco; Tanzarella, Annalisa; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Ulbrich, Sven; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Small but intense features and frequent cyclogenesis characterize the Mediterranean storm track (a well-defined branch of the North Hemisphere storm track) and pose a challenge for cyclone detection and tracking methods. Because of this, the analysis of the climatology of cyclones in the Mediterranean region is an ideal case study for investigating consensus and disagreement among methods. To identify robust features and sources of disagreement is important for giving the correct weight to the results of several studies that considered trends and future change of cyclone number and intensity in the Mediterranean region. In this study a set of 14 cyclone detection and tracking methods has been used and applied to the ERA-Interim dataset for the period 1979-2008. Results show large differences in actual cyclone numbers among different methods, but a substantial consensus on location, annual cycle and trends of cyclone tracks. In general, methods agree on cyclogenesis areas, such as the north-western Mediterranean, North Africa, north shore of the Levantine basin, as well as the seasonality of their maxima. Disagreement among methods is largest when counting weak and slow cyclones. It is substantially reduced if cyclone numbers are transformed to a dimensionless index, which helps to focus on sign and significance of trends by separating information on time behaviours and spatial structures from the differences of mean values and interannual variances. Results show significant negative trends in spring and positive trends in summer, which compensate each other at annual scale, so that there is no significant long-term trend in total cyclone numbers in the Mediterranean basin in the 1979-2008 period.

  4. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  9. WAVS radiation shielding references and assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Adam

    2015-10-07

    At ITER, the confluence of a high radiation environment and the requirement for high performance imaging for plasma and plasma-facing surface diagnosis will necessitate extensive application of radiation shielding. Recommended here is a dual-layer shield design composed of lead for gamma attenuation, surrounded by a fire-resistant polyehtylene doped with a thermal neutron absorber for neutron shielding.

  10. Tropical cyclone recurvature: An intrinsic property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kelvin T. F.; Chan, Johnny C. L.

    2016-08-01

    The typical track of a tropical cyclone (TC) in the Northern Hemisphere is an initial northwestward movement followed by an eventual turning toward the east. Such turning is referred to as recurvature and often explained by the change of the environmental flow that steers the TC. Here we show that even in the absence of background flow, a TC initiated at a high enough latitude can recurve itself. Differential horizontal advection of the planetary vorticity by the TC circulation at different vertical levels leads to the development of vertical wind shear, upper tropospheric anticyclone, and asymmetric distribution of convection. The flow associated with the upper tropospheric anticyclone on the equatorward side of the TC and the diabatic heating associated with the asymmetric convection combine to cause the TC to recurve. Such knowledge, an intrinsic recurvature property of the TC is important in forecasting the TC track when the environmental flow is weak.

  11. Tropical cyclone intensities from satellite microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Kidder, S. Q.

    1980-01-01

    Radial profiles of mean 1000 mb to 250 mb temperature from the Nimbus 6 scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) were constructed around eight intensifying tropical storms in the western Pacific. Seven storms showed distinct inward temperature gradients required for intensification; the eighth displayed no inward gradient and was decaying 24 hours later. The possibility that satellite data might be used to forecast tropical cyclone turning motion was investigated using estimates obtained from Nimbus 6 SCAMS data tapes of the mean 1000 mb to 250 mb temperature field around eleven tropical storms in 1975. Analysis of these data show that for turning storms, in all but one case, the turn was signaled 24 hours in advance by a significant temperature gradient perpendicular to the storm's path, at a distance of 9 deg to 13 deg in front of the storm. A thresholding technique was applied to the North Central U.S. during the summer to estimate precipitation frequency. except

  12. Statistical Aspects of North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) is part 2 of a two-part study of the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones that occurred during the weather satellite era, 1960-2013. In particular, this TP examines the inferred statistical relationships between 25 tropical cyclone parameters and 9 specific climate-related factors, including the (1) Oceanic Niño Index (ONI), (2) Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), (3) Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index, (4) Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index, (5) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), (6) NAO index of the Climate Research Unit (CRU), (7) Armagh surface air temperature (ASAT), (8) Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index (GLOTI), and (9) Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) index. Part 1 of this two-part study examined the statistical aspects of the 25 tropical cyclone parameters (e.g., frequencies, peak wind speed (PWS), accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), etc.) and provided the results of statistical testing (i.e., runs-testing, the t-statistic for independent samples, and Poisson distributions). Also, the study gave predictions for the frequencies of the number of tropical cyclones (NTC), number of hurricanes (NH), number of major hurricanes (NMH), and number of United States land-falling hurricanes (NUSLFH) expected for the 2014 season, based on the statistics of the overall interval 1960-2013, the subinterval 1995-2013, and whether the year 2014 would be either an El Niño year (ENY) or a non-El Niño year (NENY).

  13. Hurricane Force Winds in Explosive Maritime Extratropical Cyclones: A Modeling and Observational Study of Their Evolution and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Benjamin Scott

    Extratropical cyclones can be as powerful as tropical cyclones with winds reaching 33 m s-1 or even stronger. They can also be very large in scale, and impact life and property on the oceans as well as over the land if the storms make a landfall. Two conceptual models exist that attempt to explain how the extreme winds in the bent-back frontal zone of these cyclones occur. The first is a jet associated with the cold conveyor belt and the second is through a phenomenon known as a sting jet. Some of the objectives this thesis will address are: (1) The role of gradient wind is during the life-cycle of the cyclone, (2) how model results compare to actual observations, and (3) if the sting jet or cold conveyor belt jet are the only causes for high winds within the bent-back frontal zone, among others. This thesis will examine two case studies of extreme, extratropical cyclones that occurred over the North Atlantic Ocean. Extensive observations including dropsondes, Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) measurements from a NOAA WP-3D aircraft and satellite scatterometer measurements are used to compare with modeled results of the two case studies. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model Version 3.4.1 and the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) NMM-B Launcher are used to model the two case studies and for high resolution and sensitivity testing. Trajectories calculated by the Read/Interpolate/Plot program and cross sections are additional tools used in the study. Some of the major conclusions included identifying sting jets in each storm but they were found not to be the major cause of the highest winds within the bent-back frontal zone. A secondary stream of air that accelerates from the west of the rapidly intensifying cyclone into a low-level jet located within a larger pressure gradient force and thermal gradient was found to be the major source of the high winds. It is suggested that the findings and conclusions based on the results of this

  14. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  15. Shielding techniques tackle EMI excesses. V - EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P.

    1982-10-01

    The utilization of shielding gaskets in EMI design is presented in terms of seam design, gasket design, groove design, and fastener spacing. The main function of seam design is to minimize the coupling efficiency of a seam, and for effective shielding, seam design should include mating surfaces which are as flat as possible, and a flange width at least five times the maximum anticipated separation between mating surfaces. Seam surface contact with a gasket should be firm, continuous, and uniform. Gasket height, closure pressure, and compression set as a function of the applied pressure parameters are determined using compression/deflection curves. Environmental seal requirements are given and the most common materials used are neoprene, silicone, butadiene-acrylonitrile, and natural rubber. Groove design is also discussed, considering gasket heights and cross-sectional areas. Finally, fastener spacing is considered, by examining deflection as a percentage of gasket height.

  16. Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner`s combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

  17. NASA Sees Heavy Rain in Arabian Sea Tropical Cyclone

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 29, GPM showed Tropical Cyclone 02A had a few powerful convective thunderstorms southwest of the center of circulation were dropping rain at the extreme rate of over 209 mm (8.2 inches) per...

  18. Trends in Northern Hemisphere surface cyclone frequency and intensity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.; Serreze, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    One of the hypothesized effects of global warming from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases is a change in the frequency and/or intensity of extratropical cyclones. In this study, winter frequencies and intensities of extratropical cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1959-97 are examined to determine if identifiable trends are occurring. Results indicate a statistically significant decrease in midlatitude cyclone frequency and a significant increase in high-latitude cyclone frequency. In addition, storm intensity has increased in both the high and midlatitudes. The changes in storm frequency correlate with changes in winter Northern Hemisphere temperature and support hypotheses that global warming may result in a northward shift of storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Rainfall Totals from the Tropical Cyclones Passing Over Philippines

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rainfall totals from the TRMM satellite of all tropical cyclones that passed through the Philippines from January through November 11, 2013. Red indicated areas where rainfall totals were greater t...

  20. Coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO sub x control demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    It is the objective of the Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NO{sub x} Control Project to fully establish that the cola reburning clean coal technology offers cost-effective alternatives to cyclone operating electric utilities for overall oxides of nitrogen control. The project will evaluate the applicability of the reburning technology for reducing NO{sub x} emissions in full scale cyclone-fired boilers which use coal as a primary fuel. The performance goals while burning coal are: (1) Greater than 50 percent reduction in NO{sub x} emissions, as referenced to the uncontrolled (baseline) conditions at full load. (2) No serious impact on cyclone combustor operation, boiler efficiency or boiler fireside performance (corrosion and deposition), or boiler ash removal system performance.

  1. TRMM Sees Rainfall Totals from Tropical Cyclone Guito

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of rainfall gathered from February 11-19, 2014 by NASA's TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Guito produced as much as 16.9 inches/430 mm of rainfall in the center of the M...

  2. Tropical Cyclone Mahasen Rain Moving Into Bay Of Bengal

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis shows the rainfall that occurred with Tropical Cyclone Mahasen during the week of May 6 through 13, 2013 as it moved through the Bay of Beng...

  3. NASA Sees Heavy Rainfall, Hot Towers in Tropical Cyclone Nathan

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite showed that the heaviest rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Nathan on March 18 at 0758 UTC (3:58 a.m. EDT) was falling at a rat...

  4. GPM Satellite Flyby of Tropical Cyclone 03S

    NASA Video Gallery

    On January 25 at 6:51 p.m. EST (2351 UTC) the GPM satellite found rainfall rates in some of the bands of thunderstorms around the developing tropical cyclone were falling at a rate of almost 83 mm ...

  5. GPM Sees Heavy Rain in Tropical Cyclone Yvette

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Dec. 19, the GPM core satellite found Tropical Cyclone 02S was dropping rain at a rate of over 127 mm (5 inches) per hour in this area of intense convective showers where cloud tops reached alti...

  6. Tropical cyclone motion and recurvature in TCM-90. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Rawinsonde and satellite data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Motion (TCM90) experiment, which was conducted during the summer of 1990 in the Western North pacific, is used to examine tropical cyclone steering motion and recurvature. TCM-90 composite results are compared with those found in a composite study using twenty-one years (1957-77) of Western North Pacific rawinsonde data during the same August-September period and also for all months during this same 21-year period. Both data sets indicate that the composite deep-layer-mean (850-300 mb) winds 5-7 deg from the cyclone center provide an important component of the steering flow for tropical cyclones. However, despite the rawinsonde data enhancements of the TCM-90 experiment, data limitations prevented an accurate observation of steering flow conditions at individual time periods or for the average of only 5-10 time periods when composited together.

  7. GPM Satellite Sees Heavy Rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Carlos

    NASA Video Gallery

    The GPM core observatory satellite flew above tropical cyclone Carlos on February 7, 2017 at 1056 UTC and measured a few downpours in the bands west of the Carlos' center of circulation dropping ra...

  8. Application of ``water only`` cyclone in Slovak steam coal preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Jakabsky, S.; Lovas, M.; Hredzak, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper deals with the possibilities of water only cyclone application in steam coal preparation with the aim to decrease the ash content in coal and to increase the coal heating value. The steam coal of the three Slovak coal localities from the Upper Nitra Basin was subjected to separation in a hydrocyclone without using a heavy medium. The influence of pressure and solid particle concentration is described. The steam coal preparation scheme proposal including the water only cyclones is also introduced.

  9. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    of the current generation of global climate models (GCMs) to simulate extreme Arctic cyclones and identify changes in the characteristics of these...2011). 5. The CCSM4 simulations show an interesting shift in the location of extreme Arctic cyclones as a function of greenhouse warming (Figure 1...preferred track over the North Atlantic-Barents Sea. However, this change is not effected by the modest greenhouse warming between 1850-2000, when

  10. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    cyclones and identify changes in the characteristics of these storms caused by greenhouse -forced climate change to present. OBJECTIVES These goals...How well do state-of-the-art GCMs simulate them? (3) Are extreme Arctic cyclones already showing a response to greenhouse forcing? APPROACH These...study used 14 GCMs with widely varying horizontal and vertical resolutions and physics packages. These simulations were compared with an atmospheric

  11. Comparative efficiency testing for a newly designed cyclone type sediment trap for wind erosion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, M.; Erpul, G.; Uzun, O.; Gabriels, D.

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of eolian sediment transport still remains one of the biggest challenges in eolian research. This paper presents the experimental results on the trap efficiency of a newly designed cyclone-type trap (BEST) and Wilson and Cook trap (WAC) under various wind speeds in the Eremology Wind Tunnel Facility at Gent University, Belgium. The performance of the two traps were tested for four different sediment sizes (< 100, 100-200, 200-300 and 300-500 μm) and under four free-flow wind speeds (12, 13, 14, and 15 m s- 1). The test results showed that the efficiency of the BEST was higher than that of the WAC, and the efficiencies of BEST and WAC varied between 75 and 100% and 12 and 52%, respectively. In addition, the coefficient of variation (CV) indicated that the variability in the efficiency of the BEST was lower with wind speed and particle size. These higher and more consistent efficiencies of the BEST were chiefly attributed to its cyclone design, which provided: i) separation of particles from air (particle settling) by means of the accelerated gravitational force achieved by a rapid air rotation, ii) the reduced stagnation pressure at the catcher inlet by gradually increasing the outlet velocity, and iii) the reduced turbulence within its body by a regular circulating path.

  12. Extratropical cyclone classification and its use in climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Extratropical cyclones have long been known to be important for midlatitude weather. It is therefore important that our current state-of-the-art climate models are able to realistically represent these features, in order that we can have confidence in how they are projected to change in a warming climate. Despite the observation that these cyclones are extremely variable in their structure and features, there have, over the years, been numerous attempts to classify or group them. Such classifications can provide insight into the different cloud structures, airflows, and dynamical forcing mechanisms within the different cyclone types. This review collects and details as many classification techniques as possible, and may therefore act as a reference guide to classifications. These classifications offer the opportunity to improve the way extratropical cyclone evaluation in climate models is currently done by giving more insight into the dynamical and physical processes that occur in climate models (rather than just evaluating the mean state over a broad region as is often done). Examples of where these ideas have been used, or could be used, are reviewed. Finally, the potential impacts of future climate changes on extratropical cyclones are detailed. The ways in which the classification techniques could improve our understanding of future changes in extratropical cyclones and their impacts are given.

  13. Close interactions between the Antarctic cyclone budget and large-scale atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uotila, Petteri; Vihma, Timo; Tsukernik, Maria

    2013-06-01

    the first time, we quantify relationships between the Southern Ocean cyclones and large-scale atmospheric variability indices: the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Zonal Wave 3 (ZW3) pattern, and the semiannual oscillation (SAO). Using the ERA-Interim 1979-2011 results, we identify cyclones south of 40°S and calculate monthly sectoral cyclone budgets of the Southern Ocean, defined as cyclogenesis minus cyclolysis plus net movement of cyclones into each sector. The SAM index has a strong connection with cyclones across all sectors. Positive SAM values are related to decreased eastward and increased southward movement of cyclones, resulting in higher cyclone densities along the Antarctic coast. The ENSO index shows strong associations with the cyclone behavior in the Amundsen-Ross Seas, whereas other regions are less sensitive to it. The ZW3 index has a stronger association with the meridional movement of cyclones than other indices.

  14. US INTOR radiation-shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The US analysis for the INTOR radiation-shield design focused on three areas. First, a careful optimization process for the inboard shield composition and material arrangement within the allowable radial shield thickness was performed to minimize the radiation effects in the toroidal field (TF) coils. The TF coils are designed to last the lifetime of the reactor without change in performance. Second, the outboard bulk shield composition and material arrangement were optimized to achieve a dose equivalent outside the bulk shield of less than or equal to 2.5 mrem/h within one day after shutdown to permit personnel access to the reactor hall. Third, the penetration shields were designed to satisfy the same requirements as the outboard bulk shield.

  15. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  16. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  17. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  18. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  19. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  20. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  1. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  2. Convection in tropical cyclones associated with vapor volume reduction - a new concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardhekar, D.

    2010-09-01

    Low pressure zone formation due to convection in a tropical cyclone is associated by a newly discovered phenomenon. The explanation is based on Avogadro's law. According to the law 18 grams (molecular weight expressed in grams) of water when evaporated occupies 22.414 litres of vapor at standard temperature and pressure (STP). Therefore, 1.0 gram of water in the vapor form will occupy 1.245 litres. That is, 1245 ml volume of vapor at STP when condensed will form 1.0 ml volume of water. Due to the phase change that is from water vapor to liquid water, huge reduction in volume occurs. The process of condensation of vapor into liquid water from the vapor component of the vapor-rich air is continuously taking place in a tropical cyclone particularly in the eye wall on a very large scale. The condensed water precipitates as rain or forms clouds. Each ml of the rain leaves behind a vacant space equal to 1245 ml forming a low-pressure zone and consequently a pressure gradient force is formed. Therefore, when there are continuous heavy rains in the eye wall, the magnitude of the low pressure zone and the pressure gradient force forming continuously in the condensation regions of the eye wall is gigantic. At the same time the latent heat released in the condensation process is absorbed by the remaining air component, it becomes warmer and buoyant, therefore ascends and ultimately escapes from the top of the cyclone as the outflow, again forming a low pressure zone. Thus, continuous condensation and continuous ascent and escape of warm air from the top together form a continuous pressure gradient and the vapour-rich air is continuously sucked up from below, that is from above the sea surface in the region of the eye wall due to the continuously forming pressure gradient force maintaining the near sea surface convergence of the vapour rich air. The value 1245 changes with change in temperature and pressure, but it does not affect the presented concept. The formation of the

  3. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; ...

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But thismore » is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.« less

  4. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  5. Variant for estimating the activity of tropical cyclone groups in the world ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshevich, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    It is especially important to know the character and the intensity level of tropical cyclone (TC) activity when the system for estimating the cyclonic danger and risk is formed. During seasons of increased cyclonic activity, when several TCs are simultaneously active, the total energy effect of the cyclone group joint action is not estimated numerically. Cyclonic activity is as a rule characterized by the number of TCs that occur in the considered zone. A variant of the criterion, according to which relative cyclonic activity is estimated, is presented.

  6. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  7. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. LS-DYNA® was used to predict the thickness of the composite shield required to prevent blade penetration. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test LS-DYNA predictions. This paper documents the analysis conducted to predict the required thickness of a composite shield, the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  8. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  9. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  10. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  11. Analysis of CAPE in Intensifying Tropical Cyclones Simulated by CM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Marguerite; Frisius, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The transition of a tropical storm to a full blown hurricane (Typhoon) during intensification can be a source of great debate among many well respected scientists. As a result there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding of intensification. The present study aims to lessen some of the confusion by addressing the role of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in cyclogenesis. Previous work by others fail to include this due to assumptions that allow the intensification to occur under different conditions. A series of sensitivity tests were conducted using an idealised set up in the cloud resolving non-hydrostatic model CM1. A base state provided by a Dunion sounding was used with the vortex being initialised using the Rotunno and Emanuel's scheme and the Morrison double-moment cloud microphysical scheme was adopted. All experiments employed a 2km grid spacing with 600 grid points in the horizontal and 500m grid spacing with 59 grid points in the vertical. Two sets of sensitivity tests were done where the distribution of CAPE was investigated. In the first group the base state temperature was perturbed such that the atmosphere cooled and warmed at 0.5K/km and 1K/km in the vertical direction. In the second group the value for the exchange coefficient for enthalpy was increased and decreased by a factor of 2 and 4 for both cases. Since we are only interested in the rate of intensification most results were taken at the time when the rate of intensification was the highest. In the temperature perturbation experiments warming the atmosphere creates less than ideal conditions for cyclogenesis which results in no hurricane developing when the air was warmed by 1K/km and a very weak tropical cyclone developing when the air was warmed by 0.5K/km. As a result of this there is very little CAPE present in both cases. In contrast, cooling the air provides better conditions for cyclogenesis. The amount of CAPE is much greater when the air was cooled by 0.5K/km but the

  12. Extreme winter cyclones and the extinction of a reindeer population (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. E.; Klein, D. R.; Shulski, M.

    2009-12-01

    While strong cyclones are not unusual are not unusual in the subpolar North Pacific storm track, an exceptional series of storm events in early 1964 decimated the reindeer population of St. Matthew Island in the central Bering Sea. This case illustrates how severe winter storms can lead to species extinction when overpopulated species are restricted to islands or fractured habitats where dispersal is not an option. The strongest storm occurred in early February when a surface low pressure system that originated over the warm waters offshore of Japan tracked eastward from the warm waters offshore of Japan. The intensification of the low then accelerated as the storm approached the Aleutians, where the central pressure decreased to 957 hPa, a pressure typical of Category 3 hurricanes. The track and intensity of the low were such that St. Matthew Island was in the storm’s northwest quadrant during the peak-intensity phase. The pressure difference between the intense cyclone and the Siberian high exceeded 100 hPa -- a pressure difference between these two locations that was the largest in the entire 60-year period of the NCEP reanalysis. This record pressure difference led to extremely strong northerly winds that brought bitterly cold arctic air over St. Matthew Island, which was in the storm’s northwest quadrant. The wind chill temperature dropped to -50°C and remained colder than -40°C almost continuously for a full week. In this presentation, we examine the storm’s evolution and place the winter of early 1964 into the context of the historical cyclone climatological of the North Pacific.

  13. Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

    2006-06-30

    A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

  14. Impact of cyclone Nilam on tropical lower atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay Kumar, P.; Dutta, Gopa; Ratnam, M. V.; Krishna, E.; Bapiraju, B.; Rao, B. Venkateswara; Mohammad, Salauddin

    2016-08-01

    A deep depression formed over the Bay of Bengal on 28 October 2012, and developed into a cyclonic storm. After landfall near the south coast of Chennai, cyclone Nilam moved north-northwestwards. Coordinated experiments were conducted from the Indian stations of Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) and Hyderabad (17.4°N, 78.5°E) to study the modification of gravity-wave activity and turbulence by cyclone Nilam, using GPS radiosonde and mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data. The horizontal velocities underwent large changes during the closest approach of the storm to the experimental sites. Hodograph analysis revealed that inertia gravity waves (IGWs) associated with the cyclone changed their directions from northeast (control time) to northwest following the path of the cyclone. The momentum flux of IGWs and short-period gravity waves (1-8 h) enhanced prior to, and during, the passage of the storm (±0.05 m2 s-2 and ±0.3 m2 s-2, respectively), compared to the flux after its passage. The corresponding body forces underwent similar changes, with values ranging between ±2-4 m s-1 d-1 and ±12-15 m s-1 d-1. The turbulence refractivity structure constant ( C n 2 ) showed large values below 10 km before the passage of the cyclone when humidity in the region was very high. Turbulence and humidity reduced during the passage of the storm when a turbulent layer at ~17 km became more intense. Turbulence in the lower troposphere and near the tropopause became weak after the passage of the cyclone.

  15. Tropical cyclones in reanalysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluates and compares tropical cyclones (TCs) in state-of-the-art reanalysis data sets including the following: the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55), Japanese 25-year Reanalysis, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis-40, Interim Reanalysis, National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, and NASA's Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA). Most of the reanalyses reproduce a reasonable global spatial distribution of observed TCs and temporal interannual variation of total TC frequency. Of the six reanalysis data sets, JRA-55 appears to be the best in terms of the following: the highest skill for spatial and temporal distribution of TC frequency of occurrence, highest TC hitting rate, lower false alarm rate, reasonable TC structure in terms of the relationship between maximum surface wind speed and sea level pressure, and higher correlation coefficients for interannual variations of TC frequency. These results also suggest that the finest-resolution reanalysis data sets, like MERRA, are not always the best in terms of TC climatology.

  16. Observed strong currents under global tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Tseng, Ruo-Shan; Chu, Peter C.; Chen, Jau-Ming; Centurioni, Luca R.

    2016-07-01

    Global data from drifters of the Surface Velocity Program (Niiler, 2001) and tropical cyclones (TCs) from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and National Hurricane Center were analyzed to demonstrate strong ocean currents and their characteristics under various storm intensities in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). Mean TC's translation speed (Uh) is faster in the NH (~ 4.7 m s- 1) than in the SH (~ 4.0 m s- 1), owing to the fact that TCs are more intense in the NH than in the SH. The rightward (leftward) bias of ocean mixed-layer (OML) velocity occurs in the NH (SH). As a result of this slower Uh and thus a smaller Froude number in the SH, the flow patterns in the SH under the same intensity levels of TCs are more symmetric relative to the TC center and the OML velocities are stronger. This study provides the first characterization of the near-surface OML velocity response to all recorded TCs in the SH from direct velocity measurements.

  17. Diurnal Variations of Clouds in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiaoyan; Ruan, Zhenxin

    2016-04-01

    Using 14 years (2000-2013) of pixel-resolution infrared (IR) brightness temperature data and best track data, this study estimates the diurnal variations of convective systems in tropical cyclones (TCs) in the western North Pacific. The very cold cloud cover (IR brightness temperatures < 208 K) of TCs reaches a maximum areal extent in the early morning (0000-0300 LST) and then decreases after the sunrise. The decrease of very cold cloud cover is followed by an increase of cloud cover between 208 K and 240 K with a maximum areal extent in the afternoon (1500-1800 LST). TC IR cloud top temperatures < 240 K have minimum values in the morning (0300-0600 LST) , while TC IR cloud top temperatures > 240 K have mean minimum values in the afternoon (1500-1800 LST). The out-of-phase relation between different cloud conditions with IR cloud top temperatures < 240 K and IR cloud top temperatures > 240 K lead to radius-averaged IR temperature show two minima within a day. Different diurnal evolution under different cloud conditions suggests that TC convective systems are better described in terms of both areal extent and cloud-top temperature. The maximum cloud cover with IR cloud top temperatures colder than 208 K in the morning and the maximum cloud cover with IR cloud top temperatures between 208 K and 240 K in the afternoon suggest that two different mechanisms might be involved with the diurnal variations of these two types of TC cloud conditions.

  18. Topographic Rossby Waves Generated by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Morey, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    Analytical and numerical studies suggest that given appropriate slope, the ocean responds to a tropical storm with low-frequency motions trapped over a continental slope, the Coastal Trapped Waves. The presented study is focused on Topographic Rossby Waves (TRW), sub-inertial oscillations propagating over a sloping bottom. Generation and propagation of TRW under barotropic (Continental Shelf Waves or Shelf Waves) and baroclinic (Bottom Trapped Waves) approximations are discussed. A real-case model study of a storm surge in Apalachee Bay, northeastern Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Dennis (July, 2005) is presented to demonstrate the role of the shelf waves in coastal inundation. The presentation also discusses excitation of baroclinic bottom-intensified wave motions on the continental slope by a tropical cyclone. An idealized model experiment demonstrates that a continental shelf that (1) responds to a storm as a baroclinic ocean and (2) has a slope steep enough to dominate the planetary β-effect (but small enough to prevent internal Kelvin-type modes) can support baroclinic topographic waves.

  19. Contrasting tropical cyclone and non-tropical cyclone related rainfall drop size distribution at Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Anil; Walsh, Kevin J. E.

    2016-11-01

    In this study the rainfall drop size distribution (DSD) during the passage of seven tropical cyclones (TCs) over Darwin is compared and contrasted with that associated with non-tropical cyclone (non-TC) events, using the impact disdrometer data at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) site. The disparity of the DSD with respect to rainfall types (between TC and non-TC conditions) and distance from TC centre is also examined. It is shown that TC DSDs are statistically different from the non-TC DSDs, the former encompassing a larger concentration of small to moderate drop sizes. The TC mass-weighted mean diameter (Dm) is lower than the non-TC values at all rain rates and also for the different precipitation types (convective, transition and stratiform). The TC DSD varies with distance from the TC centre, as rainfall near the TC centre (< 60 km) comprises of relatively smaller drops which are strongly evident at small to moderate rain rates (< 30 mm h- 1). Such variations in the DSD have implications for the parameters used in the algorithm that converts radar reflectivity to rainfall rate in TCs, as well as for the analytical expressions used in describing the observed DSD employed in cloud modelling parameterizations.

  20. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  1. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although impending Arctic climate change is widely recognized, a wild card in its expression is how extreme weather events in this region will respond to greenhouse warming. Intense polar cyclones represent one type of high-latitude phenomena falling into this category, including very deep synoptic-scale cyclones and mesoscale polar lows. These systems inflict damage through high winds, heavy precipitation, and wave action along coastlines, and their impact is expected to expand in the future, when reduced sea ice cover allows enhanced wave energy. The loss of a buffering ice pack could greatly increase the rate of coastal erosion, which has already been increasing in the Arctic. These and related threats may amplify if extreme Arctic cyclones become more frequent and/or intense in a warming climate with much more open water to fuel them. This possibility has merit on the basis of GCM experiments, which project that greenhouse forcing causes lower mean sea level pressure (SLP) in the Arctic and a strengthening of the deepest storms over boreal high latitudes. In this study, the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate model output is used to investigate the following questions: (1) What are the spatial and seasonal characteristics of extreme Arctic cyclones? (2) How well do GCMs simulate these phenomena? (3) Are Arctic cyclones already showing the expected response to greenhouse warming in climate models? To address these questions, a retrospective analysis is conducted of the transient 20th century simulations among the CMIP5 GCMs (spanning years 1850-2005). The results demonstrate that GCMs are able to reasonably represent extreme Arctic cyclones and that the simulated characteristics do not depend significantly on model resolution. Consistent with observational evidence, climate models generate these storms primarily during winter and within the climatological Aleutian and Icelandic Low regions. Occasionally the cyclones remain very intense

  2. Investigation of Shielded and Unshielded Cables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-11

    increase the yield strength of cables. Table 2 lists the required and measured strengths of the test cables. Both shielded and unshielded Size 2 cables do...selected for evaluation, five shielded and five unshielded, and were examined, dissected and the internal components measured . A list of the cables and...components were measured following the testing parameters shown in Table 17. All complete cables, cables less jacket and cables less jacket and shield

  3. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  4. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  5. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  6. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  7. Risk factors for mortality in the Bangladesh cyclone of 1991.

    PubMed

    Bern, C; Sniezek, J; Mathbor, G M; Siddiqi, M S; Ronsmans, C; Chowdhury, A M; Choudhury, A E; Islam, K; Bennish, M; Noji, E

    1993-01-01

    Cyclones continue to pose a dangerous threat to the coastal populations of Bangladesh, despite improvements in disaster control procedures. After 138,000 persons died in the April 1991 cyclone, we carried out a rapid epidemiological assessment to determine factors associated with cyclone-related mortality and to identify prevention strategies. A nonrandom survey of 45 housing clusters comprising 1123 persons showed that mortality was greatest among under-10-year-olds (26%) and women older than 40 years (31%). Nearly 22% of persons who did not reach a concrete or brick structure died, whereas all persons who sought refuge in such structures survived. Future cyclone-associated mortality in Bangladesh could be prevented by more effective warnings leading to an earlier response, better access to designated cyclone shelters, and improved preparedness in high-risk communities. In particular, deaths among women and under-10-year-olds could be reduced by ensuring that they are given special attention by families, neighbours, local authorities, and especially those in charge of early warnings and emergency evacuation.

  8. Opposed-flow virtual cyclone for particle concentration

    DOEpatents

    Rader, Daniel J.; Torczynski, John R.

    2000-12-05

    An opposed-flow virtual cyclone for aerosol collation which can accurately collect, classify, and concentrate (enrich) particles in a specific size range. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone is a variation on the virtual cyclone and has its inherent advantages (no-impact particle separation in a simple geometry), while providing a more robust design for concentrating particles in a flow-through type system. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone consists of two geometrically similar virtual cyclones arranged such that their inlet jets are inwardly directed and symmetrically opposed relative to a plane of symmetry located between the two inlet slits. A top plate bounds both jets on the "top" side of the inlets, while the other or lower wall curves "down" and away from each inlet jet. Each inlet jet will follow the adjacent lower wall as it turns away, and that particles will be transferred away from the wall and towards the symmetry plane by centrifugal action. After turning, the two jets merge smoothly along the symmetry line and flow parallel to it through the throat. Particles are transferred from the main flows, across a dividing streamline, and into a central recirculating region, where particle concentrations become greatly increased relative to the main stream.

  9. Nipple Shields: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nipple shields have become commonplace in the United States for a wide range of breastfeeding problems. This article is a summary of the current literature describing the evidence for nipple shield use. The authors reviewed all available articles on nipple shields and selected 13 studies for inclusion. The studies were organized into three categories: physiologic responses, premature infants, and mothers' experiences. This review concludes that current published research does not provide evidence for safety or effectiveness of contemporary nipple shield use. PMID:20807104

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  11. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  12. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  13. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  14. A Simple Theoretical Model for the Mean Rainfall Field of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langousis, A.; Veneziano, D.

    2006-12-01

    We develop a simple model for the mean rainfall intensity profile in tropical cyclones (TCs) before landfall. The model assumes that rainfall is caused primarily by condensation of the humid outflow at the top of the TC boundary layer. This upward-directed flux originates from convergence of the horizontal winds in the boundary layer. The model combines Holland's (1980) representation of the tangential wind speed in the main vortex, an Ekman-type solution for the horizontal and vertical wind profiles inside the TC boundary layer, and moist air thermodynamics to estimate how the mean rainrate i depends on radial distance r from the low pressure center and azimuth b relative to the direction of motion. We start by studying the axisymmetric component i(r), which is also the mean rainrate profile for zero translational velocity. i(r) depends on the maximum pressure deficit DP (or the maximum tangential wind speed Vmax), Holland's B parameter, the radius of maximum winds Rwind, and the depth-averaged temperature in the boundary layer T. The mean rainrate is zero for r = 0, increases to a maximum imax at a distance Rrain somewhat larger than Rwind, and then decays to zero in an almost exponential way. More intense cyclones tend to have lower Rrain and higher imax. The difference Rrain-Rwind is higher for tangential wind profiles that are more picked around Rwind. Such wind profiles are generally associated with more intense cyclones and higher B values. When cyclones in the Northern hemisphere move, the mean rainrate intensifies in the north-east quadrant relative to the direction of motion and de-intesifies in the south-west quadrant. These azimuthal effects are stronger for faster-moving storms. For preliminary validation, we compare model estimates of i(r) under representative parameters with ensemble averages from 548 CAT12 and 212 CAT35 TCs extracted from the TRMM dataset (Lonfat et al., Mon. Wea. Rev. 132 (2004): 1645-1660). The model reproduces very well the shape

  15. Global Tropical Moisture Exports and their Influence on Extratropical Cyclone Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Wernli, H.; Gläser, G.

    2012-04-01

    Many case studies have shown that heavy precipitation events and rapid cyclogenesis in the extratropics can be fuelled by moist and warm tropical air masses. Often the tropical moisture export (TME) occurs through a longitudinally confined region in the subtropics. Here a climatology of TMEs to both hemispheres is constructed on the basis of seven-day forward trajectories, which were started daily from the tropical lower troposphere and which were required to reach a water vapour flux of at least 100 g kg-1 m s-1 somewhere poleward of 35 degrees. For this analysis 6-hourly European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim re-analysis data have been used for the 32-year period 1979-2010. A comparison with a TME climatology based upon the older ERA-40 re-analysis shows little sensitivity. The results are then related to the deepening of objectively identified (extratropical) cyclones in both hemispheres. On average TME trajectories move upwards and eastwards on their way across the subtropics in both hemispheres and are associated with both moisture and meridional-wind anomalies. TME shows four main regions of activity in both hemispheres: In the northern hemisphere these are the eastern Pacific ("Pineapple Express" region) with a marked activity maximum in boreal winter, the West Pacific with maximum activity in summer and autumn associated with the Asian monsoon, the narrow Great Plains region with a maximum in spring and summer associated with the North American monsoon and the western Atlantic or Gulf Stream region with a rather flat seasonal cycle. In the southern hemisphere activity peaks over the central and eastern Pacific, eastern South America and the adjacent Atlantic, the western Indian Ocean, and western Australia. Southern hemisphere TME activity peaks in boreal winter, particularly over the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, which suggests a significant influence of northern hemispheric Rossby wave energy propagation across the equator

  16. Heater effects on cyclone performance for the separation of solids from high temperature and pressure effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Laspidou, C.S.; Lawler, D.F.; Gloyna, E.F.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-11-01

    A 25.4-mm diameter hydrocyclone with an underflow receiver was evaluated for its ability to achieve separation of fine particles from water at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to supercritical oxidation. Temperature was varied from 25 C to 340 C, while pressure was maintained at 27.6 MPa. The particles studied were {alpha}-alumina. Particle-removal efficiency was affected by the separation capabilities of the hydrocyclone, deposition on the heater surface, and flocculation of the particles. Particle-size distributions and suspended solids analyses confirmed that cyclone, separation efficiency was controlled by the (density{sub particle}--density{sub water})/viscosity{sub water} ratio. Because this ratio is sensitive to temperature, especially in the neighborhood of the supercritical point, separation efficiencies sharply increased with temperature. Contrary to traditional air cyclone theory, removal efficiency was inversely correlated to flow rate. This result was caused by particle deposition and particle flocculation in the heater. Low flow rates increased heater detention times and, thus, opportunities for flocculation and particle deposition. Therefore, the performance of a hydrocyclone used in conjunction with supercritical oxidation depends on phenomena occurring in the heater and the hydrocyclone.

  17. An Estimate of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for the 2010 Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Estimates are presented for the tropical cyclone activity expected for the 2010 North Atlantic basin hurricane season. It is anticipated that the 2010 season will be more active than the 2009 season, reflecting increased frequencies more akin to that of the current more active phase that has been in vogue since 1995. Averages (+/- 1 sd) during the current more active phase are 14.5+/-4.7, 7.8+/-3.2, 3.7+/-1.8, and 2+/- 2, respectively, for the number of tropical cyclones (NTC), the number of hurricanes (NH), the number of major hurricanes (NMH), and the number of United States (U.S.) land-falling hurricanes (NUSLFH). Based on the "usual" behavior of the 10-yma parametric first differences, one expects NTC = 19+/-2, NH = 14+/-2, NMH = 7+/-2, and NUSLFH = 4+/-2 for the 2010 hurricane season; however, based on the "best guess" 10-yma values of surface-air temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) and the Oceanic Nino Index, one expects NTC > or equals 16, NH > or equals 14, NMH > or equals 7, and NUSLFH > or equals 6.

  18. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Spinup Time to the Initial Entropy Deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Corbosiero, K. L.; Rios-Berrios, R.; Alland, J.; Berman, J.

    2014-12-01

    The development timescale of a tropical cyclone from genesis to the start of rapid intensification in an axisymmetric model is hypothesized to be a function of the initial entropy deficit. We run a set of idealized simulations in which the initial entropy deficit between the boundary layer and free troposphere varies from 0 to 100 J kg-1 K-1. The development timescale is measured by changes in the integrated kinetic energy of the low-level vortex. This timescale is inversely related to the mean mass flux during the tropical cyclone gestation period. The mean mass flux, in turn, is a function of the statistics of convective updrafts and downdrafts. Contour frequency by altitude diagrams show that entrainment of dry air into updrafts is predominately responsible for differences in the mass flux between the experiments, while downdrafts play a secondary role. Analyses of the potential and kinetic energy budgets indicate less efficient conversion of available potential energy to kinetic energy in the experiments with higher entropy deficits. Entrainment leads to the loss of buoyancy and the destruction of available potential energy. In the presence of strong downdrafts, there can even be a reversal of the conversion term. Weaker and more radially confined radial inflow results in less convergence of angular momentum in the experiments with higher entropy deficits. The result is a slower vortex spinup and a reduction in steady-state vortex size, despite similar steady-state maximum intensities among the experiments.

  19. Drivers of δ2H variations in an idealized extratropical cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dütsch, Marina; Pfahl, Stephan; Wernli, Heini

    2016-05-01

    Numerical model simulations of stable water isotopes help to improve our understanding of the complex processes driving isotopic variability in atmospheric moisture. We use the isotope-enabled Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling (COSMO) model to study the governing mechanisms of δ2H variations in an idealized extratropical cyclone. A set of experiments with differing initial conditions of δ2H in vapor and partly deactivated isotopic fractionation allows us to quantify the relative roles of cloud fractionation and vertical and horizontal advection for the simulated δ2H signals associated with the cyclone and fronts. Horizontal transport determines the large-scale pattern of δ2H in both vapor and precipitation, while fractionation and vertical transport are more important on a smaller scale, near the fronts. During the passage of the cold front fractionation leads to a V-shaped trend of δ2H in precipitation and vapor, which is, for vapor, superimposed on a gradual decrease caused by the arrival of colder air masses.

  20. Observational-numerical Study of Maritime Extratropical Cyclones Using FGGE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wash, C. H.; Elsberry, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The accomplishments, current research, and future plans of a study investigating the development, maturation, and decay of maritime extratropical cyclones are reported. Three cases of explosive cyclogenesis during the first GARP global experiment (FGGE) DOP-1 were studied diagnostically using storm-following budgets derived from the ECMWF and GLAS level III-b analyses. Mass, vorticity and angular momentum budgets for the moving storm environment were computed for each case. Key results from these studies include: (1) demonstration that the FGGE analyses can be used to explore oceanic circulations; (2) isolation of the role of upper level jet streaks in the initiation of the explosive period in all three cases; and (3) illustration of the lower tropospheric destabilization during each rapid deepening period, which is primarily due to sensible heating of the cold air by the warmer ocean surface. The physics package of the Navy global forecast model was successfully utilized in a semi-prognostic mode to estimate diabatic components of oceanic cyclone systems. Fields of sensible and latent heat fluxes, radiational heating and inferred cloud structures were also computed.

  1. Pyrolysis of ramie residue: kinetic study and fuel gas produced in a cyclone furnace.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Leguan; He, Piwen; Yan, Feng; Xiao, Bo; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Yanli; Guo, Dabin

    2011-02-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of ramie residue (RR) and the characteristics of fuel gas produced in a cyclone furnace were studied. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at heating rates of 5-20°C/min. The results showed that RR mainly decomposed between 250 and 390°C, and the apparent activation energy ranged from 200 to 258 kJ/mol. In the cyclone furnace, fast pyrolysis, partial combustion and gasification occurred almost simultaneously, and the thermal energy was supplied by partial combustion of RR powder at the hypo stoichiometric amount of air. Higher effect of equivalence ratio (ER) led to higher reaction temperature and fewer contents of tar and char, but too high ER lowered fuel gas content and degraded fuel gas quality. Over the ranges of the experimental conditions, the gas yield varied between 1.07 and 2.08 N m(3)/kg and the LHV was between 3350 and 4798 kJ/Nm(3).

  2. The Use of Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Moltham, A. L.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of non-convective winds associated with passing extratropical cyclones and the formation of the sting jet in North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe has been gaining interest. Sting jet research has been limited to North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe because it is known to occur in Shapiro-Keyser cyclones and theory suggests it does not occur in Norwegian type cyclones. The global distribution of sting jet cyclones is unknown and questions remain as to whether cyclones with Shapiro-Keyser characteristics that impact the United States develop features similar to the sting jet. Therefore unique National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) products were used to analyze an event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) ozone data were used in conjunction with NASA's global Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis and higher-resolution regional 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) data to analyze the role of stratospheric air in producing high winds. The RGB Air Mass imagery and a new AIRS ozone anomaly product were used to confirm the presence of stratospheric air. Plan view and cross sectional plots of wind, potential vorticity, relative humidity, omega, and frontogenesis were used to analyze the relationship between stratospheric air and high surface winds during the event. Additionally, the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to plot trajectories to determine the role of the conveyor belts in producing the high winds. Analyses of new satellite products, such as the RGB Air Mass imagery, show the utility of future GOES-R products in forecasting non-convective wind events.

  3. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  4. Impact of SST resolution on cyclone activity over the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.; Kawamura, R.

    2012-12-01

    The impact of high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) data on the winter time cyclone activity around Japan is investigated using a WRF model with a horizontal resolution of 20 km. A fine scale SST and a smoothed one of that SST are used as the lower boundary condition in the experiments. Generally, a fine scale SST is warmer in the south of the Polar Front over the Japan Sea, the Kuroshio/Oyashio extension, and the coastal regions around Japan comparing with the smoothed SST because the former resolves the small scale features in the SST related to ocean currents. In comparison, the smoothed SST weakened the simulated cyclones passing over the Kuroshio near the Ryukyu Islands. This may be due to the weaker surface baroclinicity associated with the smoothed SST. The similar features are found around the Polar Front over the Japan Sea. The results imply a potential impact of SST gradients on cyclone activity.

  5. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  6. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  7. Revisiting the steering principal of tropical cyclone motion in a numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liguang; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-12-01

    The steering principle of tropical cyclone motion has been applied to tropical cyclone forecasting and research for nearly 100 years. Two fundamental questions remain unanswered. One is why the steering flow plays a dominant role in tropical cyclone motion, and the other is when tropical cyclone motion deviates considerably from the steering. A high-resolution numerical experiment was conducted with the tropical cyclone in a typical large-scale monsoon trough over the western North Pacific. The simulated tropical cyclone experiences two eyewall replacement processes. Based on the potential vorticity tendency (PVT) diagnostics, this study demonstrates that the conventional steering, which is calculated over a certain radius from the tropical cyclone center in the horizontal and a deep pressure layer in the vertical, plays a dominant role in tropical cyclone motion since the contributions from other processes are largely cancelled out due to the coherent structure of tropical cyclone circulation. Resulting from the asymmetric dynamics of the tropical cyclone inner core, the trochoidal motion around the mean tropical cyclone track cannot be accounted for by the conventional steering. The instantaneous tropical cyclone motion can considerably deviate from the conventional steering that approximately accounts for the combined effect of the contribution of the advection of the symmetric potential vorticity component by the asymmetric flow and the contribution from the advection of the wave-number-one potential vorticity component by the symmetric flow.

  8. Demonstration of coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO{sub x} control. Appendix, Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Based on the industry need for a pilot-scale cyclone boiler simulator, Babcock Wilcox (B&W) designed, fabricated, and installed such a facility at its Alliance Research Center (ARC) in 1985. The project involved conversion of an existing pulverized coal-fired facility to be cyclone-firing capable. Additionally, convective section tube banks were installed in the upper furnace in order to simulate a typical boiler convection pass. The small boiler simulator (SBS) is designed to simulate most fireside aspects of full-size utility boilers such as combustion and flue gas emissions characteristics, fireside deposition, etc. Prior to the design of the pilot-scale cyclone boiler simulator, the various cyclone boiler types were reviewed in order to identify the inherent cyclone boiler design characteristics which are applicable to the majority of these boilers. The cyclone boiler characteristics that were reviewed include NO{sub x} emissions, furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) carbon loss, and total furnace residence time. Previous pilot-scale cyclone-fired furnace experience identified the following concerns: (1) Operability of a small cyclone furnace (e.g., continuous slag tapping capability). (2) The optimum cyclone(s) configuration for the pilot-scale unit. (3) Compatibility of NO{sub x} levels, carbon burnout, cyclone ash carryover to the convection pass, cyclone temperature, furnace residence time, and FEGT.

  9. On the Relationship between Tropical Moisture Exports and Extratropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter; Wernli, Heini; Gläser, Gregor; Boleti, Eirini; Joos, Hanna; Binder, Hanin

    2016-04-01

    Tropical moisture export (TME) events are an important element of the global circulation and contribute significantly to regional precipitation. They are defined here on the basis of trajectories starting in the tropical troposphere and reaching a water vapor flux of at least 100 g kg-1 m s-1 poleward of 35° latitude. TME frequency shows four marked occurrence maxima in both hemispheres with varying seasonal cycles. In some cases TMEs can be linked to similar phenomena of atmospheric flow such as Warm Conveyor Belts (WCBs) or Atmospheric Rivers (ARs). For example, 90% of all ARs affecting the US West Coast during December-May are connected to TME events, but the tropical moisture source is less important during the more active AR season June-November. In addition to these climatological TME characteristics we discuss two aspects of their relationship to extratropical cyclones: Case studies indicate that (i) cyclones traveling along the southern fringes of the midlatitude storm track can instigate the export of tropical moisture ahead of their cold fronts, and (ii) the tropical moisture can fuel latent heat release in the cyclone and therefore contribute to its intensification. A long-term statistical analysis of passages of TME trajectories through areas with closed isobars surrounding active cyclones in the northern hemisphere reveals a surprisingly small number of encounters, particularly in winter. The majority of hits occur south of 40°N and there is no statistically significant relationship with cyclone intensification. The results suggest that TMEs often pass relatively far from cyclone centers where vertical motions tend to be moderate. This prevents an early rainout of the tropical moisture and allows the export into higher latitudes. For the same reasons we expect TMEs to "avoid" WCBs with roots at low latitudes. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that most TME maxima are located along the western flanks of subtropical high-pressure systems.

  10. On the Relationship between Tropical Moisture Exports and Extratropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Wernli, H.; Gläser, G.; Boleti, E.; Joos, H.; Binder, H.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical moisture export (TME) events are an important element of the global circulation and contribute significantly to regional precipitation. They are defined here on the basis of trajectories starting in the tropical troposphere and reaching a water vapor flux of at least 100 g kg-1 m s-1 poleward of 35° latitude. TME frequency shows four marked occurrence maxima in both hemispheres with varying seasonal cycles. In some cases TMEs can be linked to similar phenomena of atmospheric flow such as Warm Conveyor Belts (WCBs) or Atmospheric Rivers (ARs). For example, 90% of all ARs affecting the US West Coast during December-May are connected to TME events, but the tropical moisture source is less important during the more active AR season June-November. In addition to these climatological TME characteristics we discuss two aspects of their relationship to extratropical cyclones: Case studies indicate that (i) cyclones traveling along the southern fringes of the midlatitude storm track can instigate the export of tropical moisture ahead of their cold fronts, and (ii) the tropical moisture can fuel latent heat release in the cyclone and therefore contribute to its intensification. A long-term statistical analysis of passages of TME trajectories through areas with closed isobars surrounding active cyclones in the northern hemisphere reveals a surprisingly small number of encounters, particularly in winter. The majority of hits occur south of 40°N and there is no statistically significant relationship with cyclone intensification. The results suggest that TMEs often pass relatively far from cyclone centers where vertical motions tend to be moderate. This prevents an early rainout of the tropical moisture and allows the export into higher latitudes. For the same reasons we expect TMEs to "avoid" WCBs with roots at low latitudes. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that most TME maxima are located along the western flanks of subtropical high-pressure systems.

  11. Integral cylindrical cyclone and loopseal assembly for CFB combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.G.; Wu, S.; Sinn, B.T.; Lato, K.

    1995-12-31

    The cyclone solids separator has been one of the main features characteristically associated with many Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor designs. Most designs incorporating the cyclone coflector also include a pressure sealing device through which the solids collected by the cyclone are returned to the combustor. The cyclone and the loopseal have typically been two separate components, and various designs have arisen for each component comprising refractory, water-cooled, or steam cooled equipment. The two obvious advantages of the use of water-cooled or steam-, cooled equipment are the reduction of refractory requirements and the conversion of these components into boiler-useful devices. The creation of these devices from tube and header assemblies has followed more-or-less artful paths, the directions of which have generally been based upon the goal of maintaining the specific geometric forms that had previously been used for CFB cyclones and loopseals. The assembly described in this paper was instead developed based upon the goals of (a) ease of manufacturing, (b) elimination of problematic components, (c) maximizing the boiler-usefulness of the surfaces created, and (d) adding potential process benefits. The resulting embodiment of these goals was a cylindrical vessel in which the upper portion forms the solids separator and the lower section is divided into chambers to form the loopseal. This report describes the details of the Integral Cylindrical Cyclone and Loopseal (ICCL), and also describes its performance as demonstrated in a CFB cold flow model incorporating the new apparatus. The commercial application of the ICCL in a 1.2 MM lb steam/hr CFB boiler as well as its potential application in reheat CFB units are also discussed.

  12. Tropical Cyclone Prediction Using COAMPS-TC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    stronger due, in part, to the contribution by the translation speed of the storm. It should be noted that the differences in the enthalpy fluxes in...momentum and enthalpy fluxes through increased mass loading, air flow stratification, and evaporation and/or condensation. BOUNDARY L AYER AND AIR- SEA...at high wind speeds, is clearly apparent in Figure 1c,d, which compares the enthalpy flux from the standard Charnock Cd with that from the

  13. Long-term dynamics of atmospheric circulation over Siberia and its relationship with air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podnebesnykh, N. V.; Ippolitov, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study is the investigation of cyclone characteristics variability in the region bounded by the coordinates 50°-70° N, 60°-110° W which includes Western Siberia and the part of Eastern Siberia for the time interval 1976-2006, as well as the establishment of statistical relationships between the temperature conditions and the atmospheric circulation. For the dynamics of the climatic characteristics of cyclones and anticyclones over Siberia surface synoptic maps were used, and to study the trends of air temperature daily data from 169 ground-based meteorological stations and posts located in the study area were analyzed. During the period of the modern warming the territory of Siberia was characterized by rapidly temperature increase: average annual value was 0.36°C/10 years, and average monthly value was 0.83°C/10 years. The positive trend of temperature increasing is shown for all months except November. The total number of cyclones over the territory of under study for the period of 1976-2006 has decreased at a rate of 1.4 cyclone/10 years. For further analysis all cyclones were divided into three groups, according to their directions: north, west and south. It was found the number of south and west cyclones decreased, whole the number of cyclone from north directions increased. Such multidirectional dynamics of cyclones from different directions can be associated with the processes of strengthening and weakening of the Polar and Arctic fronts in the Atlantic sector of the Northern Hemisphere. Among characteristics of vortex activity the pressure in the centers of cyclones and anticyclones has the greatest influence on the air temperature and the total number of cyclones has the smallest. Multiple regression models have shown that in different months of a year the circulation can describe from 54% to 82% of temperature variability.

  14. Effects of Cumulus Convection on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Effects Of Cumulus Convection On Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones M.K. Yau and R. R. Rogers Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences McGill...N00014-96-1-0746 LONG-TERM GOAL Our long term goal is to contribute to our understanding of the physics and dynamics of marine convection and mesoscale...00-00-1999 to 00-00-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects Of Cumulus Convection On Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  15. Cyclone Nargis and Burma’s Constitutional Referendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-09

    emerge in the aftermath of the cyclone’s flooding.10 CRS-3 11 Mark Kinver, “ Mangrove Loss ‘Left Burma Exposed,’” BBC News, May 6, 2006 12 “ Mangrove ...the cyclone was worsened by the removal of mangrove forests in the past along Burma’s coastal areas.11 In Burma, mangrove forests have been destroyed...coastal mangrove forests saved many lives when the 2004 tsunami struck.12 Based on the research in Sri Lanka, some experts maintain that Cyclone

  16. Tropical cyclone Pam coastal impact survey in Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H. M.; Pilarczyk, J.; Kosciuch, T. J.; Hong, I.; Rarai, A.; Harrison, M. J.; Jockley, F. R.; Horton, B.

    2015-12-01

    Severe tropical cyclone Pam (Cat. 5, SSHS) crossed the Vanuatu archipelago with sustained winds of 270 km/h on March 13 and 14, 2015 and made landfall on Erromango. Pam caused the worst natural disaster in Vanuatu's recorded history since severe tropical cyclone Uma in 1987. Eleven fatalities were directly attributed to cyclone Pam and mostly due to lack of shelter from airborne debris. On March 6 Pam formed east of the Santa Cruz Islands and intensified while tracking southward along Vanuatu severely affecting the Shefa and Tafea Provinces. An international storm surge reconnaissance team was deployed to Vanuatu from June 3 to 17, 2015 to complement earlier local surveys. Cyclone Pam struck a remote island archipelago particularly vulnerable to the combined cyclonic multi-hazards encompassing extreme wind gusts, massive rainfall and coastal flooding due to a combination of storm surge and storm wave impacts. The team surveyed coastal villages on Epi, the Shepherd Islands (Tongoa and Mataso), Efate (including Lelepa), Erromango, and Tanna. The survey spanned 320 km parallel to the cyclone track between Epi and Tanna encompassing more than 45 sites including the hardest hit settlements. Coastal flooding profiles were surveyed from the shoreline to the limit of inundation. Maximum coastal flood elevations and overland flow depths were measured based on water marks on buildings, scars on trees, rafted debris and corroborated with eyewitness accounts. We surveyed 91 high water marks with characteristic coastal flood levels in the 3 to 7 m range and composed of storm surge with superimposed storm waves. Inundation distances were mostly limited to a few hundred meters. Coral boulders of more than 1 m diameter were measured on Erromango and sediment samples were collected at key sites across the archipelago. Infrastructure damage on traditional and modern structures was assessed. Eyewitnesses were interviewed at most sites to document the chronology of the wind and

  17. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  18. The two-fold sea surface temperature change associated with interannual cyclone activities in the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.

    2013-05-01

    Concurrent with most large El Nino events, cold Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are observed over the western Pacific region. Composite of 14 El Nino events during 1955-2003 reveals that there are two stage development of sea surface temperature cooling during the El Nino year: the first peak of cooling appears in August-September of Nino(0) year, while the second peak in January-February of Nino(1) year. A few findings suggested that the local air-sea interaction feedback is potent in this region (Wang et al., 2001; Hsu et al., 2001). It is proposed that the increase in evaporation cooling associated with the presence of the anomalous atmospheric anticyclone during the El Nino winter leads to cold sea surface temperature anomalies in the Philippine Sea, in turn the oceanic anomalies feedback on the overlying atmospheric circulation. The wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback (Xie and Philander, 1994) seems to be the major mechanism for the sea surface temperature cooling during the second peak when the atmospheric anticyclone anomaly straddling the Philippine Sea and South China Sea appears, causing warming(cooling) in the South China Sea(Philippine Sea) (Wang et al., 2003). However, the formation of the cooling in August and September (the first cooling peak) is not clear. The impact of cyclone activities on the regional sea surface temperature change during the first peak is investigated. The time scale of the sea surface temperature restoring time following tropical cyclones is approximately 30-35 days for a tropical storm to 50-60 days for a category 3-5 hurricane, with significant storm-specific and basin-specific variability (Hart et al., 2007). It is also known that there is a tendency in El Niño years toward tropical cyclones that are both more intense and longer-lived than in La Niña years (Carmargo et al., 2004). The long-lasting of cyclones' self-induced ocean cooling would reflect onto the monthly average; in a sense that for the

  19. The Role of Interacting Cyclones in Modifying Tropical Cyclone Landfall Threat: Fujiwhara vs. enhanced Beta drift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The recent impacts of tropical cyclones (TCs) Irene and Sandy have brought to the forefront the question of the true return period of landfalls in that region. Given the relatively short period of record of observations, those seeking robust return estimates often generate stochastic event sets. While the details of methods for generating those sets are generally not published (with an exception being Emanuel 2006), presentations have suggested that each member (TC event) of a stochastic set does not impact other TC members. Such an approach has the benefit of relative simplicity as well as rapidity of production, as each TC member can be produced without concern about simultaneous TCs in the basin. Given most real-world TCs are separated by several days or more, and distances of 2000km or more, this approach is seemingly well-founded for the majority of TC climatology. Yet, there have been many examples of TC-TC Fujiwhara interaction across the globe. While the interaction is much more common in the western Pacific, it is not unheard of in the Atlantic - with Connie and Diane in 1955 as two examples of such interaction but largely away from land. Further, the northeast U.S. coast can be threatened through such TC-TC interactions. The historic 1893 New York City Hurricane took an unusual NNW track (and landfall location) possibly as a consequence of interaction with one if not two additional nearby TCs. Numerical model (WRF) simulations of this case revealed exceptional difficulty in track prediction, illustrating further the complexity of the interaction. Interaction is not necessarily limited to another TC. Occasionally, a TC will interact with an occluded cold-core cyclone, which can then take the TC on a highly unusual track. Such interactions by their nature occur most often early or late in the TC season. Examples of TC-nonTC interaction include the 1938 New England Hurricane, Hurricane Hazel from 1950, and most recently, Hurricane Sandy, all of which had

  20. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.25 Shielding. (a) The radiation dose rate in areas that are normally occupied...

  1. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  2. Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson J. W. (Editor); Miller, J. (Editor); Konradi, A. (Editor); Cucinotta, F. A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A group of twenty-nine scientists and engineers convened a 'Workshop on Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration' at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The provision of shielding for a Mars mission or a Lunar base from the hazards of space radiations is a critical technology since astronaut radiation safety depends on it and shielding safety factors to control risk uncertainty appear to be great. The purpose of the workshop was to define requirements for the development and evaluation of high performance shield materials and designs and to develop ideas regarding approaches to radiation shielding. The workshop was organized to review the recent experience on shielding strategies gained in studies of the 'Space Exploration Initiative (SEI),' to review the current knowledge base for making shield assessment, to examine a basis for new shielding strategies, and to recommend a strategy for developing the required technologies for a return to the moon or for Mars exploration. The uniqueness of the current workshop arises from the expected long duration of the missions without the protective cover of the geomagnetic field in which the usually small and even neglected effects of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can no longer be ignored. It is the peculiarity of these radiations for which the inter-action physics and biological action are yet to be fully understood.

  3. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-10-23

    Preliminary radiation shielding specifications are presented here for the 3 GeV BOOMERANG Australian synchrotron light source project. At this time the bulk shield walls for the storage ring and injection system (100 MeV Linac and 3 GeV Booster) are considered for siting purposes.

  4. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  5. New shielding materials for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Minoru; Tokiya, Yuji; Uenishi, Jun; Sunaoka, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    Since lead has recently been recognized as a source of environmental pollution, we have investigated new electron shielding materials that do not contain lead. We compared the shielding thicknesses of a hard plate and a sheet composed of the new materials with that of lead for electron beams. The shielding thickness was evaluated as the thickness required for shielding primary electrons. The comparison revealed the shielding ability of the hard plate and sheet is approximately equivalent to 1.0 and 0.9 times that of lead, respectively. The thickness (in millimeters) required for shielding by the hard-plate, as well as the thickness of lead, is related to approximately half of the electron-beam energy (in MeV). The shielding ability of the sheet is also equivalent to that of Lipowitz alloy. Moreover these materials are environmentally friendly, and can be easily customized into arbitrary shapes. Therefore they can be used as lead substitutes for shielding against electron beams.

  6. Shielding for beta-gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J J

    1993-06-01

    The build-up factor, B, for lead was expressed as a polynominal cubic function of the relaxation length, mu x, and incorporated in a "general beta-gamma shielding equation." A computer program was written to determine shielding thickness for polyenergetic beta-gamma sources without resorting to the conventional "add-one-HVL" method.

  7. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  8. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  9. Contributions of Tropical Cyclones to the North Atlantic Climatological Rainfall as Observed from Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Edward B.; Adler, Robert F.; Pierce, Harold F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The tropical cyclone rainfall climatology study that was performed for the North Pacific was extended to the North Atlantic. Similar to the North Pacific tropical cyclone study, mean monthly rainfall within 444 km of the center of the North Atlantic tropical cyclones (i.e., that reached storm stage and greater) was estimated from passive microwave satellite observations during, an eleven year period. These satellite-observed rainfall estimates were used to assess the impact of tropical cyclone rainfall in altering the geographical, seasonal, and inter-annual distribution of the North Atlantic total rainfall during, June-November when tropical cyclones were most abundant. The main results from this study indicate: 1) that tropical cyclones contribute, respectively, 4%, 3%, and 4% to the western, eastern, and entire North Atlantic; 2) similar to that observed in the North Pacific, the maximum in North Atlantic tropical cyclone rainfall is approximately 5 - 10 deg poleward (depending on longitude) of the maximum non-tropical cyclone rainfall; 3) tropical cyclones contribute regionally a maximum of 30% of the total rainfall 'northeast of Puerto Rico, within a region near 15 deg N 55 deg W, and off the west coast of Africa; 4) there is no lag between the months with maximum tropical cyclone rainfall and non-tropical cyclone rainfall in the western North Atlantic, while in the eastern North Atlantic, maximum tropical cyclone rainfall precedes maximum non-tropical cyclone rainfall; 5) like the North Pacific, North Atlantic tropical cyclones Of hurricane intensity generate the greatest amount of rainfall in the higher latitudes; and 6) warm ENSO events inhibit tropical cyclone rainfall.

  10. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  11. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  12. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  13. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  14. Hypervelocity impact on shielded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1993-01-01

    A ballistic limit equation for hypervelocity impact on thin plates is derived analytically. This equation applies to cases of impulsive impact on a plate that is protected by a multi-shock shield, and it is valid in the range of velocity above 6 km/s. Experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on square aluminum plates. Comparing the center deflections of these plates with the theoretical deflections of a rigid-plastic plate subjected to a blast load, one determines the dynamic yield strength of the plate material. The analysis is based on a theory for the expansion of the fragmented projectile and on a simple failure criterion. Curves are presented for the critical projectile radius versus the projectile velocity, and for the critical plate thickness versus the velocity. These curves are in good agreement with curves that have been generated empirically.

  15. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  16. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  17. Demagnetization of magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Knappe-Grueneberg, S.; Stollfuss, D.; Burghoff, M.

    2007-03-15

    Magnetically shielded rooms for specific high resolution physiological measurements exploiting the magnetic field, e.g., of the brain (dc-magnetoencephalograpy), low-field NMR, or magnetic marker monitoring, need to be reproducibly demagnetized to achieve reliable measurement conditions. We propose a theoretical, experimental, and instrumental base whereupon the parameters which affect the quality of the demagnetization process are described and how they have to be handled. It is demonstrated how conventional demagnetization equipment could be improved to achieve reproducible conditions. The interrelations between the residual field and the variability at the end of the demagnetization process are explained on the basis of the physics of ferromagnetism and our theoretical predictions are evaluated experimentally.

  18. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  19. Contribution of tropical cyclones to global rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouakhi, Abdou; Villarini, Gabriele; Vecchi, Gabriel; Smith, James

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall associated with tropical cyclones (TCs) can have both devastating and beneficial impacts in different parts of the world. In this work, daily precipitation and historical six-hour best track TC datasets are used to quantify the contribution of TCs to global rainfall. We select 18607 rain gauge stations with at least 25 complete (at least 330 measurements per year) years between 1970 and 2014. We consider rainfall associated with TCs if the center of circulation of the storm passed within a given distance from the rain gauge and within a given time window. Spatial and temporal sensitivity analyses are performed with varying time windows (same day, ±1 day) and buffer radii (400 km and 500 km) around each rain gauge. Results highlight regional differences in TC-induced rainfall. The highest TC-induced precipitation totals (400 to 600+ mm/year) are prevalent along eastern Asia, western and northeastern Australia, and in the western Pacific islands. Stations along the southeast of the U.S. coast and surrounding the Gulf of Mexico receive up to 200 mm/year of TC rainfall. The highest annual fractional contributions of TCs to total rainfall (from 35 to 50%) are recorded in stations located in northwestern Australia, southeastern China, the northern Philippines and the southern Mexico peninsula. Seasonally, the highest proportions (40 to 50%) are recorded along eastern Australia and Mauritius in winter, and in eastern Asia and Mexico in summer and autumn. Analyses of the relative contribution of TCs to extreme rainfall using annual maximum (AM) and peaks-over-threshold (POT) approaches indicate notable differences among regions. The highest TC-AM rainfall proportions (45 to 60%) are found in stations located in Japan, eastern China, the Philippines, eastern and western Australia. Substantial contributions (25 to 40% of extreme rainfall) are also recorded in stations located along the U.S. East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mexico peninsula. We find similar

  20. A statistical analysis of the association between tropical cyclone intensity change and tornado frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Todd W.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical cyclones often produce tornadoes that have the potential to compound the injury and fatality counts and the economic losses associated with tropical cyclones. These tornadoes do not occur uniformly through time or across space. Multiple statistical methods were used in this study to analyze the association between tropical cyclone intensity change and tornado frequency. Results indicate that there is an association between the two and that tropical cyclones tend to produce more tornadoes when they are weakening, but the association is weak. Tropical cyclones can also produce a substantial number of tornadoes when they are relatively stable or strengthening.