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Sample records for air shock tube

  1. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Joel B.; Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-01

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  2. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Joel B; Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-01

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs. PMID:25832276

  3. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Joel B. Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-15

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  4. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  5. Program and charts for determining shock tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program in FORTRAN 4 language was written to determine shock tube, expansion tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real-air test gas. This program permits, as input data, a number of possible combinations of flow quantities generally measured during a test. The versatility of the program is enhanced by the inclusion of such effects as a standing or totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm, thermochemical-equilibrium flow expansion and frozen flow expansion for the expansion tube and expansion tunnel, attenuation of the flow in traversing the acceleration section of the expansion tube, real air as the acceleration gas, and the effect of wall boundary layer on the acceleration section air flow. Charts which provide a rapid estimation of expansion tube performance prior to a test are included.

  6. Incident shock-wave characteristics in air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium in a shock tube with unheated helium driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Jones, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Incident shock-wave velocities were measured in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube, operated as a shock tube, with air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium as test gases. Unheated helium was used as the driver gas and most data were obtained at pressures of approximately 34 and 54 MN/sq m. A range of pressure ratio across the diaphragm was obtained by varying the quiescent test-gas pressure, for a given driver pressure, from 0.0276 to 34.5 kN/sq m. Single- and double-diaphragm modes of operation were employed and diaphragms of various materials tested. Shock velocity was determined from microwave interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along the driven section (time-of-arrival gages), and to a lesser extent, measured tube-wall pressure. Velocities obtained from these methods are compared and limitations of the methods discussed. The present results are compared with theory and the effects of diaphragm mode (single or double diaphragm), diaphragm material, heating of the driver gas upon pressurization of the driver section, diaphragm opening time, interface mixing, and two-dimensional (nonplanar) flow are discussed.

  7. A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these

  8. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  9. Shock shapes on blunt bodies in hypersonic-hypervelocity helium, air, and CO2 flows, and calibration results in Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Shock shape results for flat-faced cylinders, spheres, and spherically blunted cones in various test gases, along with preliminary results from a calibration study performed in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube are presented. Free-stream velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec are generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Ideal-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, are compared with the measured results. The effect of model diameter is examined to provide insight to the thermochemical state of the flow in the shock layer. The regime for which equilibrium exists in the shock layer for the present air and CO2 test conditions is defined. Test core flow quality, test repeatability, and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  10. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  11. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho

    1993-07-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar{mu}s/cm{sup 2}. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/{mu}s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/{mu}s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/{mu}s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/{mu}s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/{mu}s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  12. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho.

    1993-01-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar[mu]s/cm[sup 2]. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/[mu]s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/[mu]s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/[mu]s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/[mu]s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/[mu]s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  13. Annular arc accelerator shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator shock tube employs a cold gas driver to flow a stream of gas from an expansion section through a high voltage electrode section to a test section, thus driving a shock wave in front of it. A glow discharge detects the shock wave and actuates a trigger generator which in turn fires spark-gap switches to discharge a bank of capacitors across a centered cathode and an annular anode in tandem electrode sections. The initial shock wave passes through the anode section from the cathode section thereby depositing energy into the flow gas without the necessity of any diaphragm opening in the gas flow from the expansion section through the electrode sections.

  14. Evolution of the air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone for different lengths of SF6: shock tube visualizations and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Griffond, Jerome; Souffland, Denis; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a vertical shock tube (based in ISAE DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a thin nitrocellulose membrane maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid (SF6 side) of square mesh spacing hu 1.8 or 12.1 mm is expected to seed perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) while the lower grid with hl 1 mm is needed to prevent the membrane from bulging prior to the shot. The experiments were carried out for different lengths L of SF6 between the initial interface and the shock tube's end plate: 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 cm. The time resolved Schlieren image processing based on space and frequency filtering yields similar evolution for the TMZ thickness. Before reshock, the thickness grows initially fast then slows down and reaches different values (10 to 14 mm) according to L. Soon after reshock, the TMZ thickness growths rate is 21 mm/ms independently of L and hu. Numerical Schlieren images generated from 3D numerical simulations (performed at CEA DAM IDF) are analyzed as the experimental ones for L 15 and 25 cm and for hu 1.8 and 12.1 mm. The very weak experimental dependence on hu is not obtained by simulation as expected from dimensional reasoning. This discrepancy remains paradoxical.

  15. 25. View down launch tube, showing shock absorption system. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. View down launch tube, showing shock absorption system. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Minuteman Missile Launch Facility Trainer T-12, Northeast of Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  16. 48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda bottle liter at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  17. Principles and application of shock-tubes and shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ried, R. C.; Clauss, H. G., Jr.

    1963-01-01

    The principles, theoretical flow equations, calculation techniques, limitations and practical performance characteristics of basic and high performance shock tubes and shock tunnels are presented. Selected operating curves are included.

  18. Condensate Accretion in Shock Tube's Expansion Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem-Denis; DeSilva, Upul P.; Hunte, F.; Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that turbulence and temperature influence the droplet sizes in expansion fan induced condensation by studying the Rayleigh scattering from one port in our shock tube's test section. We have modified our set-up so as to allow, using two ports, the real time measurement of the influence of turbulence and temperature on the rate at which these droplets grow. To do this, we looked at the Rayleigh scattering from two different ports for ten Reynolds numbers at five different temperatures. We modeled the time of flight of droplets, using the equations of one-dimensional gas dynamics and the measured shock wave speed in shock tube's driven section.

  19. Transient hot-film sensor response in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed to determine the response of a hot-film sensor, mounted flush on the side wall of a shock tube, to unsteady flow behind a normal shock wave. The present experiments attempt to isolate the response of the anemometer due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface. The experiments, performed at low supersonic shock speeds in air, are described along with the data acquisition procedure. The change in convective heat transfer is deduced from the data and the results are compared with those from transient boundary layer theory and another set of experimental results. Finally, a transient local heat transfer coefficient is formulated for use as the forcing function in a hot-film sensor instrument model simulation.

  20. The Vetter-Sturtevant Shock Tube Problem in KULL

    SciTech Connect

    Ulitsky, M S

    2005-10-06

    The goal of the EZturb mix model in KULL is to predict the turbulent mixing process as it evolves from Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In this report we focus on an example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (which occurs when a shock hits an interface between fluids of different densities) with the additional complication of reshock. The experiment by Vetter & Sturtevant (VS) [1], involving a Mach 1.50 incident shock striking an air/SF{sub 6} interface, is a good one to model, now that we understand how the model performs for the Benjamin shock tube [2] and a prototypical incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor problem [3]. The x-t diagram for the VS shock tube is quite complicated, since the transmitted shock hits the far wall at {approx}2 millisec, reshocks the mixing zone slightly after 3 millisec (which sets up a release wave that hits the wall at {approx}4 millisec), and then the interface is hit with this expansion wave around 5 millisec. Needless to say, this problem is much more difficult to model than the Bejamin shock tube.

  1. Ten Years of Shock Tube Research at Marseille

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houas, L.

    The invention of the shock tube is attributed to Paul Vieille [1] in the late 19th century. The first simplest shock tube was composed of two chambers separated by a diaphragm.With the pressure increase in the first chamber causing the diaphragm rupture, a shock wave was generated and propagated with a supersonic velocity in the second chamber.

  2. Jet-flow from shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingery, Charles N.; Gion, Edmund J.

    1989-07-01

    This project was designed to map the magnitude and extent of the high velocity jet flow exiting shock tubes. The flow was measured by installing stagnation probes along three blast lines and by supplementing these measurements with calibrated displacement cubes. The side-on and stagnation overpressure versus time were measured, and from that, the side-on and stagnation impulse were calculated. The stagnation impulse showed a large drop in magnitude as the blast line was moved from the zero line to a 1.5 and then to a 3-diameter offset. A helium driver was used in the 2.54-cm-diameter shock tube to simulate an explosion in a storage magazine. Results are presented in the form of stagnation impulse versus distance along the three blast lines. The significance of these findings is that the present quantity-distance criteria for munitions stored in underground magazines are based on side-on peak overpressure, but our results show that the peak stagnation pressure and impulse are much greater. At a distance where 10.3-kPa (1.5 psi) side-on pressure was measured, a 49.6-kPa (7.2 psi) stagnation pressure was measured. At the same distance, a side-on impulse was 12.6 kPa-ms (1.83 psi-ms), while the stagnation impulse was 134 kPa-ms (20.2 psi-ms)--a dramatic difference.

  3. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  4. Numerical study of shock tube flows with homogeneous and heterogeneous condensations in rarefaction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Junji; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2010-08-01

    Shock tubes are devices in which the state of a gas is changed suddenly from one uniform state to another by the passage of shock and expansion waves. In the theory of ideal shock tube flow, it is customarily assumed that the unsteady expansion and shock waves generated by diaphragm rupture are a perfectly centered plane wave. However, such waves are generally not centered, or may not even by plane in practice. In the present research, the time-dependent behavior of homogeneous and heterogeneous condensation of moist air in the shock tube is investigated by using a computational fluid dynamics work. Further, the numerical and experimental studies were carried out in order to investigate the effect of the diaphragm rupture process on the flow characteristics of expansion and shock waves generated near the diaphragm.

  5. A second-generation constrained reaction volume shock tube.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M F; Tulgestke, A M; Davidson, D F; Hanson, R K

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a shock tube that features a sliding gate valve in order to mechanically constrain the reactive test gas mixture to an area close to the shock tube endwall, separating it from a specially formulated non-reactive buffer gas mixture. This second-generation Constrained Reaction Volume (CRV) strategy enables near-constant-pressure shock tube test conditions for reactive experiments behind reflected shocks, thereby enabling improved modeling of the reactive flow field. Here we provide details of the design and operation of the new shock tube. In addition, we detail special buffer gas tailoring procedures, analyze the buffer/test gas interactions that occur on gate valve opening, and outline the size range of fuels that can be studied using the CRV technique in this facility. Finally, we present example low-temperature ignition delay time data to illustrate the CRV shock tube's performance. PMID:24880416

  6. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  7. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test. PMID:21198058

  8. Rupture-disk-less shock-tube with compression tube driven by free piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ogura, E.; Sato, S.; Funabiki, K.

    A new technique is proposed for a shock tube driven by a freely moving piston. In a conventional free-piston-driven shock tube, a rupture disk is employed between the compression tube and the shock generation tube. In the present method, however, the conventional rupture disk is replaced by a newly developed fast action valve which is activated by the compressed gas generated in the compression tube. The present method enables us to generate high Mach number shock waves of arbitrary strength with good reproducibility. The performance of the new method is demonstrated experimentally. This also enables us to be carefree to scattering of fragments of the rupture disk.

  9. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  10. Shock front velocity measurements in a T-tube plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujičić, B.; Ciršan, M.; Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.

    2002-12-01

    In the sense of investigation of T-tube shock front influence to the material surfaces, we analysed dependence of shock front velocity on deposited electric energy in capacitor bank i.e. applied voltage to discharge electrodes. A simple, cheap and reliable method for the shock front velocity determination by using a photomultiplier and oscilloscope is described in this paper.

  11. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent. PMID:27603017

  12. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve. PMID:27250485

  13. Shock tube studies of soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to record the time histories of the major and minor species which appear in the pyrolysis of toluene, benzene, butadiene, allene, and acetylene; to develop a set of reactions that will model the observed profiles over a wide temperature and concentration range; to identify the critical reactions that influence the pre-particle soot formation process. Toluene and benzene were chosen as two key aromatic compounds which are representative of the pyrolytic process. Butadiene, allene, and acetylene were selected to investigate the formation of aromatic compounds from non-cyclic species. The experimental apparatus used for the study consists of a shock tube coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer Spectra are recorded at 30 microsecond intervals for a total observation time of 0.50 - 1.20 milliseconds. Peak heights of the species of interest in the m/e range 12-300 are measured as a function of reaction time. Calibration curves are constructed which aid the conversion of peak heights to concentrations. The mixtures range from 1 percent-6 percent fuel; the balance is neon diluent.

  14. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  15. Kinetic theory and turbulent discontinuities. [shock tube flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; I, L.; Li, Y.; Ramaian, R.; Santigo, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Shock tube discontinuities were used to test and extend a kinetic theory of turbulence. In shock wave and contact surface fluctuations, coherent phenomena were found which provide new support for the microscopic nonempirical approach to turbulent systems, especially those with boundary layer-like instabilities.

  16. Performance and operating characteristics of the arc-driven Langley 6-inch shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Performance characteristics for the arc-driven Langley 6-inch shock tube were determined for driver energies from 0.62 to 5 MJ. Voltage, current and pressure histories of the arc driver were recorded, and driver efficiencies were determined from measured shock velocities. Time-resolved spectra for test gases of air, carbon monoxide, xenon, and a mixture of 80 percent helium and 20 percent hydrogen are presented.

  17. Unsteady turbulent shear flow in shock tube discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Ramaiah, R.; Lin, I.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure-ruptured shock tube and an arc driven shock tube, have been used to study the evolution of turbulent fluctuations at contact surfaces with N2O4-2NO2 mixtures and at ionizing shock fronts in argon. The study has focused on point density diagnostics derived from crossed light beam correlations and electric probes. Turbulent bursts are found for which dynamical and spectral analyses suggest a particle-like evolution of fluctuation segments with a unique and characteristic frequency, independent of flow history and overall flow conditions.

  18. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  19. Research activity at the shock tube facility at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    The real gas phenomena dominate the relaxation process occurring in the flow around hypersonic vehicles. The air flow around these vehicles undergoes vibrational excitation, chemical dissociation, and ionization. These chemical and kinetic phenomena absorb energy, change compressibility, cause temperature to fall, and density to rise. In high-altitude, low density environments, the characteristic thicknesses of the shock layers can be smaller than the relaxation distances required for the gas to attain chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. To determine the effects of chemical nonequilibrium over a realistic hypersonic vehicle, it would be desirable to conduct an experiment in which all aspects of fluid flow are simulated. Such an experiment is extremely difficult to setup. The only practical alternative is to develop a theoretical model of the phenomena and to compute the flow around the vehicle including the chemical nonequilibrium, and compare the results with the experiments conducted in the facilities under conditions where only a portion of the flow phenomena is simulated. Three types of experimental data are needed to assist the aerospace community in this model development process: (1) data which will enhance our phenomenological understanding of the relaxation process, (2) data on rate reactions for the relevant reactions, and (3) data on bulk properties, such as spectral radiation emitted by the gas, for a given set of aerodynamic conditions. NASA Ames is in a process of collecting such data by simulating the required aerothermochemical conditions in an electric arc driven shock tube.

  20. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  1. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.; Carraway, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in a hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  2. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Ortgies, Kelly R.; Gartenberg, Ehud; Carraway, Debra L.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in an hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  3. SHOCKS AND THERMAL CONDUCTION FRONTS IN RETRACTING RECONNECTED FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Longcope, D. W.

    2010-08-01

    We present a model for plasma heating produced by time-dependent, spatially localized reconnection within a flare current sheet separating skewed magnetic fields. The reconnection creates flux tubes of new connectivity which subsequently retract at Alfvenic speeds from the reconnection site. Heating occurs in gas-dynamic shocks (GDSs) which develop inside these tubes. Here we present generalized thin flux tube equations for the dynamics of reconnected flux tubes, including pressure-driven parallel dynamics as well as temperature-dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. The evolution of tubes embedded in a uniform, skewed magnetic field, following reconnection in a patch, is studied through numerical solutions of these equations, for solar coronal conditions. Even though viscosity and thermal conductivity are negligible in the quiet solar corona, the strong GDSs generated by compressing plasma inside reconnected flux tubes generate large velocity and temperature gradients along the tube, rendering the diffusive processes dominant. They determine the thickness of the shock that evolves up to a steady state value, although this condition may not be reached in the short times involved in a flare. For realistic solar coronal parameters, this steady state shock thickness might be as long as the entire flux tube. For strong shocks at low Prandtl numbers, typical of the solar corona, the GDS consists of an isothermal sub-shock where all the compression and cooling occur, preceded by a thermal front where the temperature increases and most of the heating occurs. We estimate the length of each of these sub-regions and the speed of their propagation.

  4. On the possibility of studying the converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a conventional shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Souffland, D.

    2015-02-01

    We propose to experimentally study, in cylindrical geometry, the interaction of an initially perturbed cylindrical gaseous interface with a converging shock wave. This interaction is commonly referred as the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which, in the present case, is in a cylindrical geometry. In order to achieve this goal, we use a conventional shock tube which is adapted to this geometry through a specifically designed convergent test section. Here, the first results are presented for an incident planar shock wave of Mach number 1.15 propagating through an adequately elliptical interface. It curves into a cylindrical transmitted shock wave and then accelerates a second sinusoidally perturbed /air interface. From analyzing schlieren photos and pressure histories, we validate this original approach and exhibit the great potential of this experimental method for studying the RMI induced by focusing shock waves.

  5. Generation of Cylindrical Converging Shock Waves in a Conventional Shock Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Souffland, D.

    For ever two decades, the IUSTI laboratory has been known for its investigations [1] dealing with the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Experiments concerning the RMI have been performed in conventional shock tubes [2, 3, 4, 5]. All these experiments use a planar shock wave to generate the instability as perfectly as possible. However, the RMI also occurs in the spherical case where the convergence effects must be taken into account. As far as we know, no conventional (straight section) shock tube facility has been used to experimentally study the RMI in a spherical geometry.

  6. Controlling blast wave generation in a shock tube for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Wilgeroth, J. M.; Proud, W. G.

    2014-05-01

    The shock tube is a versatile apparatus used in a wide range of scientific research fields. In this case, we are developing a system to use with biological specimens. The process of diaphragm rupture is closely linked to the shock wave generated. Experiments were performed on an air-driven shock tube with Mylar® and aluminium diaphragms of various thicknesses, to control the output. The evolution of shock pressure was measured and the diaphragm rupture process investigated. Single-diaphragm and double-diaphragm configurations were employed, as were open or closed tube configurations. The arrangement was designed to enable high-speed photography and pressure measurements. Overall, results are highly reproducible, and show that the double-diaphragm system enables a more controllable diaphragm burst pressure. The diaphragm burst pressure was linearly related to its thickness within the range studied. The observed relationship between the diaphragm burst pressure and the generated shock pressure presents a noticeable difference compared to the theoretical ideal gas description. Furthermore, the duration of the primary shock decreased proportionally with the length of the high-pressure charging volume. Computational modelling of the diaphragm breakage process was carried out using the ANSYS software package.

  7. Calibration of PCB-132 Sensors in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berridge, Dennis C.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    While PCB-132 sensors have proven useful for measuring second-mode instability waves in many hypersonic wind tunnels, they are currently limited by their calibration. Until now, the factory calibration has been all that was available, which is a single-point calibration at an amplitude three orders of magnitude higher than a second-mode wave. In addition, little information has been available about the frequency response or spatial resolution of the sensors, which is important for measuring high-frequency instability waves. These shortcomings make it difficult to compare measurements at different conditions and between different sensors. If accurate quantitative measurements could be performed, comparisons of the growth and breakdown of instability waves could be made in different facilities, possibly leading to a method of predicting the amplitude at which the waves break down into turbulence, improving transition prediction. A method for calibrating the sensors is proposed using a newly-built shock tube at Purdue University. This shock tube, essentially a half-scale version of the 6-Inch shock tube at the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories at Caltech, has been designed to attain a moderate vacuum in the driven section. Low driven pressures should allow the creation of very weak, yet still relatively thin shock waves. It is expected that static pressure rises within the range of second-mode amplitudes should be possible. The shock tube has been designed to create clean, planar shock waves with a laminar boundary layer to allow for accurate calibrations. Stronger shock waves can be used to identify the frequency response of the sensors out to hundreds of kilohertz.

  8. Improving the Mach number capabilities of arc driven shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J.; I, L.

    1980-01-01

    New systematic trends in one of the performance parameters of pressure loaded arc driven shock tubes have been determined. For a given configuration, the Mach number increases with the cube root of capacitor energy; however, the initial driver gas pressure is relatively unimportant. A qualitative model based on the assumption of Joule-preheating by the arc discharge is discussed.

  9. High-speed spectrograph for shock tube studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Instrument provides information on spatial distribution of electron density of gas flow in high-performance shock tube. System permits measurement of profiles of hydrogen-alpha and -beta lines with enough spectral range to record spectral features from the near ultraviolet to the long-wavelength cutoff of photographic film.

  10. Driver gas flow with fluctuations. [shock tube turbulent bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Jones, W. R.; Santiago, J.

    1980-01-01

    A shock tube's driver gas can apparently provide flow with turbulent bursts. The fluctuations are interpreted using a boundary layer model of contact surface flow and results form a kinetic theory of turbulence. With this, a lower limit of 4 on the ratio of maximum to minimum turbulent intensities in contact surface instabilities has been estimated.

  11. Compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. P.; Gelfand, B. E.; Khomik, S. V.; Agafonov, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The state of the art of the problem of discrepancy between the values measured in shock tubes and calculated for the delay of ignition of hydrogen-containing systems has been analyzed. It is shown that in the low-temperature region the off-design appearance of reaction sites leads to the propagation of a flame in a mixture heated by a reflected shock wave. The parameter of the time of mixture combustion in a deflagration regime has been introduced and the use of it together with the calculated delay in self-ignition for delimitation and classification of thermal and gas-dynamic phenomena on compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes has been suggested.

  12. Propagating Structure Of A Microwave Driven Shock wave Inside A Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Yutaka; Shibata, Teppei; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-06

    The thrust generation process of a microwave rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine, and understanding the interactions between microwave plasma and shock waves is important. Shadowgraph images of the microwave plasma generated in a tube under atmospheric air were taken. The observed plasma and shock wave were propagating one-dimensionally at constant velocity inside the tube. In order to understand the flow field inside the rocket, one-dimensional CFD analysis was conducted. With the change of microwave power density, the structure of the flow field was classified into two regimes: Microwave Supported Combustion (MSC), and Microwave Supported Detonation (MSD). The structure of the MSD was different from the structure of a chemical detonation, which implied the existence of a preheating in front of the shock wave. Furthermore, the flight performance was estimated by calculating the momentum coupling coefficient. It was confirmed that the efficiency was nearly constant in the MSD regime, with the increase of microwave power density.

  13. A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave

  14. A multi-mode shock tube for investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reneer, Dexter V; Hisel, Richard D; Hoffman, Joshua M; Kryscio, Richard J; Lusk, Braden T; Geddes, James W

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components

  15. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J. V.

    1998-03-05

    Following earlier investigations on the dissociation rates of halogen containing molecules, we studied the thermal decompositions of CHCl{sub 3} and CF{sub 3}Br. In addition, we measured the branching ratio and rate constants for the thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}CO. We studied three bimolecular rate processes: H + H{sub 2}CC0, CF{sub 3} + H{sub 2}, and H + CF{sub 3}H. Decomposition studies in reflected shock waves on three reactions were completed using atomic resonance absorption spectroscopic (ARAS) detection and/or the laser schlieren density gradient (LS) method.

  16. Improvement of pump tubes for gas guns and shock tube drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    In a pump tube, a gas is mechanically compressed, producing very high pressures and sound speeds. The intensely heated gas produced in such a tube can be used to drive light gas guns and shock tubes. Three concepts are presented that have the potential to allow substantial reductions in the size and mass of the pump tube to be achieved. The first concept involves the use of one or more diaphragms in the pump tube, thus replacing a single compression process by multiple, successive compressions. The second concept involves a radical reduction in the length-to-diameter ratio of the pump tube and the pump tube piston. The third concept involves shock heating of the working gas by high explosives in a cyclindrical geometry reusable device. Preliminary design analyses are performed on all three concepts and they appear to be quite feasible. Reductions in the length and mass of the pump tube by factors up to about 11 and about 7, respectively, are predicted, relative to a benchmark conventional pump tube.

  17. Development of an annular arc accelerator shock tube driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator (ANAA) shock tube driver has been developed that deposits the energy of an arc discharge into a flowing gas, which then expands and cools without any delay for the opening of a diaphragm. A simplified one-dimensional flow analysis of the ANAA shock tube has been performed, which indicates that shock velocities greater than 40 km/sec may be obtained using a 300-kJ capacitor bank. The ANAA driver consists of a high-pressure driver, an expansion section, and an electrode section. In operation, the cold gas driver is pressurized until the diaphragm bursts, sending a pressure front down the expansion tube to the arc section. When the accelerated flow arrives at the electrode section, a 100-capacitor, 300-kJ capacitor bank is discharged either by breaking an insulating diaphragm between the electrodes or by the triggering of a series of external switches. Shock velocities of 28 km/sec have been obtained, and modifications are described that are expected to improve performance.

  18. Analysis of shock-wave propagation in aqueous foams using shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Del Prete, E.; Haas, J.-F.; Rambert, N.; Counilh, D.; Faure, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports experimental results of planar shock waves interacting with aqueous foams in a horizontal conventional shock tube. Four incident shock wave Mach numbers are considered, ranging from 1.07 to 1.8, with two different foam columns of one meter thickness and expansion ratios of 30 and 80. High-speed flow visualizations are used along with pressure measurements to analyse the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave mitigation in foams. During the shock/foam interaction, a precursor leading pressure jump was identified as the trace of the liquid film destruction stage in the foam fragmentation process. The corresponding pressure threshold is found to be invariant for a given foam. Regarding the mitigation effect, the results show that the speed of the shock is drastically reduced and that wetter is the foam, slower are the transmitted waves. The presence of the foam barrier attenuates the induced pressure impulse behind the transmitted shock, while the driest foam appears to be more effective, as it limits the pressure induced by the reflected shock off the foam front. Finally, it was found that the pressure histories in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained within a cloud of droplets. The observed behavior is attributed to the process of foam fragmentation and to the modification of the flow topology past the shock. These physical phenomena occurring during the shock/foam interaction should be properly accounted for when elaborating new physical models.

  19. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. IV - Critical flows with standing tube shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinos, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    Critical siphon flows in arched, isolated magnetic flux tubes are studied within the thin flux tube approximation, with a view toward applications to intense magnetic flux concentrations in the solar photosphere. The results of calculations of the strength and position of the standing tube shock in the supercritical downstream branch of a critical siphon flow are presented, as are calculations of the flow variables all along the flux tube and the equilibrium path of the flux tube in the surrounding atmosphere. It is suggested that arched magnetic flux tubes, with magnetic field strength increased by a siphon flow, may be associated with some of the intense, discrete magnetic elements observed in the solar photosphere.

  20. Particle seeding flow system for horizontal shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Stephen; Garcia, Nicolas J.; Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2012-08-01

    The Extreme Fluids Team in P-23, Physics Division, studies fluid dynamics at high speeds using high resolution diagnostics. The unsteady forces on a particle driven by a shock wave are not well understood, and they are difficult to model. A horizontal shock tube (HST) is being modified to collect data about the behavior of particles accelerated by shocks. The HST has been used previously for studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), diagnostics that measure density and velocity. The purpose of our project is to design a flow system that will introduce particles into the HST. The requirements for this particle flow system (PFS) are that it be non-intrusive, be able to introduce either solid or liquid particles, have an exhaust capability, not interfere with existing diagnostics, and couple with the existing HST components. In addition, the particles must flow through the tube in a uniform way. We met these design criteria by first drawing the existing shock tube and diagnostics and doing an initial design of the ducts for the PFS. We then estimated the losses through the particle flow system from friction and researched possible fans that could be used to drive the particles. Finally, the most challenging component of the design was the coupling to the HST. If we used large inlets, the shock would lose strength as it passed by the inlet, so we designed a novel coupling inlet and outlet that minimize the losses to the shock wave. Our design was reviewed by the Extreme Fluids Team, and it is now being manufactured and built based upon our technical drawings.

  1. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2008-12-01

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  2. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  3. Experimental study of unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena on shock-tube wall using fast-response temperature-sensitive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental study that used a fast-response temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to investigate the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena occurring on a shock-tube wall. To understand these phenomena in detail, a fast-response TSP with high temperature sensitivity developed for transient temperature measurement was applied to the wall. The shock-tube experiment was carried out under the over-tailored condition, with a pressure ratio of 110 for test gases of air in driver/driven tubes. The following aspects were clarified using the TSP: (a) the TSP could be used to visualize the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena and estimate the quantitative heat flux on the shock-tube wall; (b) an x-t diagram based on the TSP response showed shock-tube wall characteristics that included the incident/reflected shocks, laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition, streaks in the turbulent boundary layer, reflected shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and waves reflected from a contact surface; (c) the TSP graphically showed that a transition front from the plate's leading edge and turbulent spots moved with 80% of the free-stream velocity behind the incident shock. In addition, the TSP could track the growth of the turbulent spots on the wall.

  4. Blast Loading of Epoxy Panels Using a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankow, Mark; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett

    2010-01-01

    The high strain rate mechanical response of thin polymer plates has been studied using a modified shock tube. Diagnostics include the pressure-time history of the incident and reflected pulses and the use of digital image correlation (DIC) techniques to extract the time-history of the out-of-plane displacement distribution. Additionally, finite element models have been developed to understand the plate response and to validate and modify plate material constitutive models that have been proposed.

  5. Test section configuration for aerodynamic testing in shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the test section configuration required to minimize or alleviate interference effects on model flow produced by the presence of test section walls in the aerodynamic testing of two dimensional transonic airfoils in a shock tube. Tests at a nominal Mach number of 0.85 and a chord Reynolds number of 2,000,000 were carried out by means of schlieren photography and pressure measurements for several symmetric airfoil profiles using shock tube test sections with unmodified straight walls, contoured walls, and slotted walls with adjacent chambers. Results were compared with corresponding results from conventional wind tunnel tests of the airfoils. Results for the straight wall tests show major airfoil flow distortions. Results from contoured wall tests and those performed using a slotted wall test section developed in this study exhibit essential agreement with wind tunnel results. The collective results show that test sections for aerodynamic testing can be designed for shock tubes that will alleviate wall interference effects.

  6. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Hanson, R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles.

  7. Attenuation in a shock tube due to unsteady-boundary-layer action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1957-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the attenuation of a shock wave in a shock tube due to the unsteady boundary layer along the shock-tube walls. It is assumed that the boundary layer is thin relative to the tube diameter and induces one-dimensional longitudinal pressure waves whose strength is proportional to the vertical velocity at the edge of the boundary layer. The contributions of the various regions in a shock tube to shock attenuation are indicated. The method is shown to be in reasonably good agreement with existing experimental data.

  8. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  9. Numerical study of shock-induced combustion in methane-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yungster, S.; Rabinowitz, M.J. )

    1993-06-01

    The shock-induced combustion of methane-air mixtures in hypersonic flows is investigated using a new reaction mechanism consisting of 19 reacting species and 52 elementary reactions. This reduced model is derived from a full kinetic mechanism via the Detailed Reduction technique. Zero-dimensional computations of several shock-tube experiments are presented first. The reaction mechanism is then combined with a fully implicit Navier-Stokes CFD code to conduct numerical simulations of two-dimensional and axisymmetric shock-induced combustion experiments of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures at a Mach number of M = 6.61. Applications to the ram accelerator concept are also presented. 19 refs.

  10. Shock Tube Investigation of Quasi-Steady Drag in Shock-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin; Beresh, Steven; Kearney, Sean; Pruett, Brian; Wright, Elton

    2012-11-01

    A reassessment of historical drag coefficient data for spherical particles accelerated in shock-induced flows has motivated new shock tube experiments of particle response to the passage of a normal shock wave. Particle drag coefficients were measured by tracking the trajectories of 1-mm spheres in the flow induced by incident shocks at Mach numbers 1.68, 1.93, and 2.04, over test times of about 0.5 milliseconds. Previous shock tube studies conducted under similar test conditions have concluded that the unsteadiness associated with the accelerating particle resulted in elevated drag coefficients. However, recent theoretical work suggests that such effects should only last for microsecond timescales. Furthermore, low values for the acceleration parameter indicate that unsteadiness should be negligible. Consistent with past experiments, the current data clearly show that as the Mach number increases, the drag coefficient increases substantially. This increase significantly exceeds the drag predicted by incompressible standard drag models, but a recently developed compressible drag correlation returns values quite close to the current measurements. Consistent with recent theoretical work, these observations suggest that elevated particle drag coefficients are a quasi-steady phenomenon attributed to increased compressibility rather than true flow unsteadiness.

  11. Shock tube investigation of quasi-steady drag in shock-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Beresh, Steven J.; Kearney, Sean P.; Pruett, Brian O. M.; Wright, Elton K.

    2012-12-01

    A reassessment of historical drag coefficient data for spherical particles accelerated in shock-induced flows has motivated new shock tube experiments of particle response to the passage of a normal shock wave. Particle drag coefficients were measured by tracking the trajectories of 1-mm spheres in the flow induced by incident shocks at Mach numbers 1.68, 1.93, and 2.04. The necessary data accuracy is obtained by accounting for the shock tube wall boundary layer growth and avoiding interactions between multiple particles. Similar to past experiments, the current data clearly show that as the Mach number increases, the drag coefficient increases substantially. This increase significantly exceeds the drag predicted by incompressible standard drag models, but a recently developed compressible drag correlation returns values quite close to the current measurements. Recent theoretical work and low particle accelerations indicate that unsteadiness should not be expected to contribute to the drag increase over the relatively long time scales of the experiments. These observations suggest that elevated particle drag coefficients are a quasi-steady phenomenon attributed to increased compressibility rather than true flow unsteadiness.

  12. Specific features of modeling of nonequilibrium radiation behind the shock wave in air in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, V. A.; Kireev, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    A physical-chemical model of generation of nonequilibrium molecular radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral range behind the shock wave in air for shock wave velocities from 4.5 to 9.5 km/s is developed. Experimental results obtained in a shock tube in investigations of photoionization of air ahead of the shock wave front are used for verification of the numerical model of VUV radiation in the wavelength range from 85 to 105 nm. Model calculations show that nonequilibrium VUV radiation arises in a very thin high-temperature layer behind the shock wave front and is affected by heavy particles and electrons.

  13. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  14. Development and characterization of an open-ended shock tube for the study of blast mtbi.

    PubMed

    Shah Ms, Alok S; Stemper Phd, Brian D; Pintar Phd, Frank A

    2012-01-01

    Shock tubes can be used to study traumatic brain injuries due to blast waves in a laboratory setting without the use of explosives. A literature review shows that several shock tubes used in these type of studies are large in size and have a high cost of conducting tests and maintaining the device. The purpose of this study was to design and characterize small shock tubes to simulate open field blast waves, which can be used in a laboratory with limited space and has low cost of operation. In addition, the shock tube can be used to induce localized blast in a small region to study the injury mechanisms in the desired region. Furthermore, the animal is placed outside of the shock tube, which provides the ability to expose the animal to a pure primary blast wave. A helium-driven shock tube with driven length of 3.04 m and driver length of 0.30 m was used in the present study. Transducers were placed at multiple locations and distances to characterize the blast wave outside the shock tube. The versatile design of the shock tube can generate a wide range of peak overpressure, rise times and durations. The shock tube was able to generate peak overpressure ranging from 25 kPa to 508 kPa and positive durations ranging from 97 µs to 797 µs. The literature review also showed several studies where the data were collected and analyzed improperly. The under-sampling or improper filtering can significantly affect the data. Additionally, the orientation of the transducer with respect to the shock wave can also affect the recorded peak overpressure. This paper reports various peak overpressures, durations and rise-times that can be developed with a small open-ended shock tube and the methodology to properly collect and analyze blast wave data generated by the shock tube. PMID:22846311

  15. Interaction of a planar shock with a dense field of particles in a multiphase shock tube.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Beresh, Steven Jay; Trott, Wayne Merle; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2010-12-01

    A novel multiphase shock tube has been constructed to test the interaction of a planar shock wave with a dense gas-solid field of particles. The particle field is generated by a gravity-fed method that results in a spanwise curtain of 100-micron particles producing a volume fraction of about 15%. Interactions with incident shock Mach numbers of 1.67 and 1.95 are reported. High-speed schlieren imaging is used to reveal the complex wave structure associated with the interaction. After the impingement of the incident shock, transmitted and reflected shocks are observed, which lead to differences in flow properties across the streamwise dimension of the curtain. Tens of microseconds after the onset of the interaction, the particle field begins to propagate downstream, and disperse. The spread of the particle field, as a function of its position, is seen to be nearly identical for both Mach numbers. Immediately downstream of the curtain, the peak pressures associated with the Mach 1.67 and 1.95 interactions are about 35% and 45% greater than tests without particles, respectively. For both Mach numbers tested, the energy and momentum fluxes in the induced flow far downstream are reduced by about 30-40% by the presence of the particle field.

  16. High-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging of ignition through a shock tube end-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, V. A.; Strand, C. L.; Campbell, M. F.; Tulgestke, A. M.; Miller, V. A.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    A high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging diagnostic was developed to image the structure and homogeneity of combustion events behind reflected shock waves in the Stanford Constrained Reaction Volume Shock Tube. An intensified high-repetition-rate imaging system was used to acquire images of OH* chemiluminescence (near 308 nm) through a fused quartz shock tube end-wall window at 10-33 kHz during the combustion of n-heptane (21 % O2/Ar, φ = 0.5). In general, the imaging technique enabled observation of the main ignition event in the core of the shock tube that corresponded to typical markers of ignition (e.g., pressure rise), as well as localized ignition near the wall that preceded the main core ignition event for some conditions. Case studies were performed to illustrate the utility of this novel imaging diagnostic. First, by comparing localized wall ignition events to the core ignition event, the temperature homogeneity of the post-reflected shock gas near the end-wall was estimated to be within 0.5 % for the test condition presented (T=1159 hbox {K}, P=0.25 hbox {MPa}). Second, the effect of a recession in the shock tube wall, created by an observation window, on the combustion event was visualized. Localized ignition was observed near the window, but this disturbance did not propagate to the core of the shock tube before the main ignition event. Third, the effect of shock tube cleanliness was investigated by conducting tests in which the shock tube was not cleaned for multiple consecutive runs. For tests after no cleaning was performed, ignition events were concentrated in the lower half of the shock tube. In contrast, when the shock tube was cleaned, the ignition event was distributed around the entire circumference of the shock tube; validating the cleaning procedure.

  17. The Autoignition of iso-Cetane: Shock Tube Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Oehlschlaeger, M A; Steinberg, J; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J

    2009-02-25

    Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {Phi} = 0.5 and 1.0 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 953 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements and detailed kinetic mechanism for isocetane presented here are the first of their kind.

  18. High enthalpy, hypervelocity flows of air and argon in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1991-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon and air at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes, and it has been found that this can be avoided by attention to the interaction between the test gas accelerating expansion and the contact surface in the primary shock tube. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure and flat plate heat transfer are reported. An approximate analytical theory has been developed for predicting the velocities achieved in the unsteady expansion of the ionizing or dissociating test gas.

  19. Measurement of the shock front velocity produced in a T-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.; Vujičić, B.; Kobilarov, R.; Savić, I.; Gavanski, L.

    2015-01-15

    A set of shock front velocity measurements is described in this paper. The shock waves were produced in a small electromagnetically driven shock T-tube. Most of the measurements were performed in hydrogen. The shock front velocity measurements in other gases and the velocity of the gas behind the shock front were also analyzed, as well as the velocity dependence on applied input energy. Some measurements with an applied external magnetic field were also performed. The used method of shock front velocity is simple and was shown to be very reliable. Measured values were compared with the calculated ones for the incident and reflected shock waves.

  20. Towards a shock tube method for the dynamic calibration of pressure sensors

    PubMed Central

    Downes, Stephen; Knott, Andy; Robinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In theory, shock tubes provide a pressure change with a very fast rise time and calculable amplitude. This pressure step could provide the basis for the calibration of pressure transducers used in highly dynamic applications. However, conventional metal shock tubes can be expensive, unwieldy and difficult to modify. We describe the development of a 1.4 MPa (maximum pressure) shock tube made from unplasticized polyvinyl chloride pressure tubing which provides a low-cost, light and easily modifiable basis for establishing a method for determining the dynamic characteristics of pressure sensors. PMID:25071242

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  2. Shock-tube pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons - Formation of soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Hsu, J. P.; Miller, D. L.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Soot formation in pyrolysis of chlorinated methanes, their mixtures with methane, and chlorinated ethylenes were studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. An additional single-pulse shock-tube study was conducted for the pyrolysis of methane, methyl chloride, and dichloromethane. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1300-3000 K, pressures of 0.4-3.6 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 1-5 x 10 to the 17th atoms cu cm. The amounts of soot produced in the pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons are larger than that of their nonchlorinated counterparts. The sooting behavior and product distribution can be generally explained in terms of chlorine-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms. The pathway to soot from chlorinated methanes and ethylenes with high H:Cl ratio proceeds via the formation of C2H, C2H2, and C2H3 species. For chlorinated hydrocarbons with low H:Cl ratio, the formation of C2 and its contribution to soot formation at high temperatures becomes significant. There is evidence for the importance of CHCl radical and its reactions in the pyrolysis of dichloromethane.

  3. 46. Communication equipment room, shock isolator air compressor at right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Communication equipment room, shock isolator air compressor at right, looking northeast - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  4. Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research.

    PubMed

    Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M; Meijer, S R; van den Berg, A C; Sibma, P C; van Bree, J L M J; de Vries, D V W M

    2011-01-01

    Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull-brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull-brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid-structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull-brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field. PMID:21960984

  5. Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M.; Meijer, S. R.; van den Berg, A. C.; Sibma, P. C.; van Bree, J. L. M. J.; de Vries, D. V. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull–brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull–brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid–structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull–brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field. PMID:21960984

  6. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. PMID:22559580

  7. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  8. Investigation of heat transfer with film cooling to a flat plate in a shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgelewicz, Scott A.

    1989-12-01

    The heat transfer occurring through turbulent boundary layers in modern gas turbines is not well understood. The heat transferred to a flat plate though a turbulent boundary layer presents many similarities without the complex flow patterns. The gas used in this study was air. The flow behind a passing shock wave in a shock tube was used to simulate the high temperature ratio flows found in gas turbines. Highly responsive heat flux gages were used to measure the temperature history of a flat plate exposed to the flow. High speed digital recorders were used to sample and store the information. Heat transfer rates were determined from temperature history using a computer program and a quadrature method. The temperature history was numerically averaged to filter out noise effects before it was used to calculate the heat flux. It was found that low shock Mach numbers produced measured heat flux rates that were predictable by theory. At higher Mach numbers the rounded leading edge of the plate produced reflections that increased the measured heat flux as the Mach number increased; but theory, dependent on incident shock Mach number, underpredicted these actual values. Film cooling flows were then studied under the same flow conditions. Ratios of heat transfer coefficients with blowing ratios of approximately two to three produced the best agreement with correlations. The effects of free stream turbulence on the heat flux with film cooling were also briefly studied.

  9. The chemical shock tube as a tool for studying high-temperature chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the combustion of hydrocarbons is our primary source of energy today, the chemical reactions, or pathway, by which even the simplest hydro-carbon reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form CO2 and water may not always be known. Furthermore, even when the reaction pathway is known, the reaction rates are always under discussion. The shock tube has been an important and unique tool for building a data base of reaction rates important in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The ability of a shock wave to bring the gas sample to reaction conditions rapidly and homogeneously makes shock-tube studies of reaction kinetics extremely attractive. In addition to the control and uniformity of reaction conditions achieved with shock-wave methods, shock compression can produce gas temperatures far in excess of those in conventional reactors. Argon can be heated to well over 10 000 K, and temperatures around 5000 K are easily obtained with conventional shock-tube techniques. Experiments have proven the validity of shock-wave theory; thus, reaction temperatures and pressures can be calculated from a measurement of the incident shock velocity. A description is given of the chemical shock tube and auxiliary equipment and of two examples of kinetic experiments conducted in a shock tube.

  10. Homogeneous nucleation of ethanol and n-propanol in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, F.

    1982-01-01

    The condensation by homogeneous nucleation of ethanol (200 proof) and of n-propanol (99.98%) carried at small mole fraction in dry air (99.995%) was studied in the unsteady, isentropic expansion of a shock tube. Samples of the vapor at different partial pressures in dry air at room temperature were expanded into the liquid coexistence regime of the condensing species. A Kristler pressure transducer and Rayleigh light scattering were used to measure the pressure in the expansion and the onset of condensation. Condensation was observed at different locations between 0.15 and 1 m upstream of the diaphragm location, which correspond to different cooling rates of of the vapor samples about 50 to 10 C/ms.

  11. Power plant VII - Air-air /tube boiler/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, M.

    An attempt to design a solar thermal electric central receiver power plant in the multi-MW size with acceptable efficiencies using air in the power loop is described. The turbine and generator are placed in the tower to reduce heat losses in the superheated gas, and the depleted gas loop is coupled to a low temperature generator powered by boiling water. The receiver cavity is configured to retain a maximum amount of flux and has brick walls. Nickel alloys are indicated for the air tubes in the receiver, with Inconel 601, Incoloy 800, and Inconel 600 considered acceptable. The gas leaving the chamber will be at 950 C to power a high pressure turbine, followed by entrance into a heat exchanger to boil the water for the low-pressure turbine, and is then discharged. Thermodynamic efficiencies between 13.9-20.3 percent for a 4700 kW plant are considered feasible with the design.

  12. High-Speed OH* Chemiluminescence Imaging of Shock Tube End-Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, V. A.; Miller, V. A.; Strand, C. S.; Tulgestke, A. M.; Campbell, M. F.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a high-speed OH* chemiluminesence imaging diagnostic and a transparent end-wall for the Stanford Aerosol Shock Tube to better understand the structure and homogeneity of the combustion event behind a reflected shock wave. We use an intensified high repetition rate imaging system to acquire images of OH* chemiluminescence (near 308 nm) at 10-33 kHz from n-heptane combustion. Case studies are presented to illustrate the power of this novel imaging diagnostic: first, we infer the temperature homogeneity of the ignition event; then we image the effect of surface imperfections in the wall of the shock tube; lastly, we visualize the effect of particulates in the shock tube and verify the importance of shock tube cleaning routines.

  13. Rate coefficient for H + O2 + M = HO2 + M evaluated from shock tube measurements of induction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shock tube experiments measured hydrogen-air induction times near the second explosion limit. By matching these experimental results with numerically predicted induction times, the rate coefficient for the reaction H + O2 + M = HO2 + M was evaluated as k-sub 4,N2 = 3.3 (plus or minus .6) x 10 to the 15 cm to the 6th/sq mole/s.

  14. Temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves in air. [radiometric measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, J. B.; Nerem, R. M.; Dann, J. B.; Culp, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometric method for the measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gases has been applied in the study of shock tube generated flows. This method involves making two absolute intensity measurements at identical wavelengths, but for two different pathlengths in the same gas sample. Experimental results are presented for reflected shock waves in air at conditions corresponding to incident shock velocities from 7 to 10 km/s and an initial driven tube pressure of 1 torr. These results indicate that, with this technique, temperature measurements with an accuracy of + or - 5 percent can be carried out. The results also suggest certain facility related problems.

  15. A piston-actuated shock-tube, with laser-Schlieren diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, S. M.; Bauer, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    The essential construction features of a piston actuated shock tube are described, and its advantages relative to the conventional use of diaphragm ruptures for shock initiation are listed. Typical operational parameters are presented to illustrate the levels of reproducibility achieved. Tests with He and N2 drivers into about 99 percent Ar covered shock speeds from 1.539 +/- 0.002-0.8143 +/- 0.002 mm/microsec, corresponding to 2390-847 K incident shock temperatures. Application of this tube for recording postshock front density gradients of the endoergic dissociation of ethane and the exoergic condensation of iron atoms via the laser-Schlieren technique is described.

  16. Shock-tube experiments on the stability of regular reflection in the dual-solution domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Adachi, T.

    2016-05-01

    Regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are theoretically both possible in the dual-solution domain of oblique shock reflection. The physical difference between the two types of reflection is the pressure behind the reflected shock wave: that of MR is lower than that of RR for strong shock reflection. The magnitude relation of these pressures is inverted for weak shock reflection. In the present paper, we performed two kinds of experiment, depending on whether the oblique shock reflection is weak or strong. For strong shock reflection, we decreased the pressure behind the reflected wave of RR using a convex double-wedge. For weak shock reflection, we increased this pressure using a concave double-wedge. Thus, we investigated the stability of RR against pressure disturbances. The results indicate that RR in a shock tube is stable, in the dual-solution domain, for both weak and strong incident shocks.

  17. Explosive shocks in air (2nd edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, G. F.; Graham, K. J.

    After an initial qualitative characterization of the properties of explosions in the atmosphere and their blast and shock propagation effects, attention is given to the underlying quantitative principles of explosive energy release, including the scaling laws for explosions and internal blast effects from confined explosions. The dynamic loads that blast waves impose on representative structures are then characterized, with attention to resulting structural damage. A major feature of the present treatment is the use of the dimensionless Mach number in all shock equations; a further simplification is furnished by first developing mathematical equations for shock in steady flow, and then applying these equations to explosive shock by simple transformation of coordinates.

  18. Numerical simulation of transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Lombard, C. K.; Nagaraj, N.; Bershader, D.

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent upwind high resolution schemes for solving the Euler equations were developed and applied to simulate 1-D and 2-D transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube. Using obstacles of different geometries, a series of calculations were carried out to investigate the transient complex shock-wave diffraction phenomena. Shock-wave and objects interactions with shock Mach-number Ms ranging from 2 to 20 were considered. Comparison with analytical and available experimental results indicate good agreement. Display of detailed flow structures including multiple Mach shocks, slip surfaces, and vortex are also given.

  19. Numerical study of shock-induced combustion in methane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Rabinowitz, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The shock-induced combustion of methane-air mixtures in hypersonic flows is investigated using a new reaction mechanism consisting of 19 reacting species and 52 elementary reactions. This reduced model is derived from a full kinetic mechanism via the Detailed Reduction technique. Zero-dimensional computations of several shock-tube experiments are presented first. The reaction mechanism is then combined with a fully implicit Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to conduct numerical simulations of two-dimensional and axisymmetric shock-induced combustion experiments of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures at a Mach number of M = 6.61. Applications to the ram accelerator concept are also presented.

  20. Numerical study of shock-induced combustion in methane-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yungster, S.; Rabinowitz, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    The shock-induced combustion of methane-air mixtures in hypersonic flows is investigated using a new reaction mechanism consisting of 19 reacting species and 52 elementary reactions. This reduced model is derived from a full kinetic mechanism via the Detailed Reduction technique. Zero-dimensional computations of several shock-tube experiments are presented first. The reaction mechanism is then combined with a fully implicit Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to conduct numerical simulations of two-dimensional and axisymmetric shock-induced combustion experiments of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures at a Mach number of M = 6.61. Applications to the ram accelerator concept are also presented.

  1. Probing combustion chemistry in a miniature shock tube with synchrotron VUV photo ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Patrick T; Troy, Tyler P; Ahmed, Musahid; Tranter, Robert S

    2015-02-17

    Tunable synchrotron-sourced photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOF-MS) is an important technique in combustion chemistry, complementing lab-scale electron impact and laser photoionization studies for a wide variety of reactors, typically at low pressure. For high-temperature and high-pressure chemical kinetics studies, the shock tube is the reactor of choice. Extending the benefits of shock tube/TOF-MS research to include synchrotron sourced PI-TOF-MS required a radical reconception of the shock tube. An automated, miniature, high-repetition-rate shock tube was developed and can be used to study high-pressure reactive systems (T > 600 K, P < 100 bar) behind reflected shock waves. In this paper, we present results of a PI-TOF-MS study at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dimethyl ether pyrolysis (2% CH3OCH3/Ar) was observed behind the reflected shock (1400 < T5 < 1700 K, 3 < P5 < 16 bar) with ionization energies between 10 and 13 eV. Individual experiments have extremely low signal levels. However, product species and radical intermediates are well-resolved when averaging over hundreds of shots, which is ordinarily impractical in conventional shock tube studies. The signal levels attained and data throughput rates with this technique are comparable to those with other synchrotron-based PI-TOF-MS reactors, and it is anticipated that this high pressure technique will greatly complement those lower pressure techniques. PMID:25594229

  2. Numerical investigation of inviscid shock wave dynamics in an expansion tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Kim, Jong-Kwan

    1995-06-01

    Highly complicated shock wave dynamics has been numerically calculated by solving the Euler equations for a circular shock tube suddenly expanded three times of the original tube diameter at x=0. Shock waves of different shock Mach number, M s =1.5 and 2.0, have produced remarkably distinct blast jet structures. A planar shock wave took its final form after the blast by repeated Mach reflections of the blast wave: the first one at the wall and the second one at the central axis. The central Mach disc overtook and merged with the annular Mach stem before the planar shock wave was formed. In contrast to the blast wave which would propagate spherically in an open space, the present blast wave undergoes complex morphological transformation in the restricted flow passage, resulting in an unstable and oscillatory blast jet structure of highly rotational nature. The slipstream tube emanating from the shock tube exit corner decomposed into a chain of small vortex rings that interacted with the barrel shock of the jet, which caused periodic collapse of the jet structure. The finite volume-FCT formulation equipped with the time-dependent h-refinement adaptive unstructured triangular mesh technique in the present paper has contributed to resolution of the intricate physical discontinuities developing in the blast flow fields.

  3. Empirical modeling of soot formation in shock-tube pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for empirical modeling of soot formation during shock-tube pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons is developed. The method is demonstrated using data obtained in pyrolysis of argon-diluted mixtures of toluene behind reflected shock waves. The developed model is in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. Theoretical Considerations of Sidewall Interference Corrections for Transonic Shock Tube Airfoil Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashitani, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Sunahara, Eisaku; Kitano, Hideki

    The effects of the sidewall boundary layers in transonic shock tube airfoil flow were investigated. We attempted to correct the effects of the sidewall boundary layers using the Barnwell-Sewall and Murthy methods for shock tube boundary layers. Petersen’s boundary layer theory, which evaluates the modern wall-skin friction coefficients for shock tubes, was used in this analysis, and the results showed that the Mach number correction ΔM (the difference between the free stream Mach number (hot gas Mach number) and the corrected Mach number) increases as the hot gas Mach number M2 increases under the condition of fixed time for the shock tube. This is caused by the boundary layer development, which grows thicker as the hot gas Mach number increases. Furthermore, when analysis is performed under the condition of constant displacement thickness 2δ*⁄b, the Mach number correction ΔM gradually increases with an increase in the hot gas Mach number. This trend becomes very pronounced with increasing displacement thickness. In addition, after performing a comparison, we found that the correction of the shock wave location is in the direction of the improved agreement with the 2D CFD results when applied to the shock tube experiment.

  6. Laser interferometer/Preston tube skin-friction comparison in shock/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.-S.; Lee, Y.; Settles, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of the accuracy of the 'Preston tube' surface pitot-pressure skin friction measurement method relative to the already proven laser interferometer skin-friction meter in a swept shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction. The Preston tube was used to estimate the total shear-stress distribution in a fin-generated swept shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction. The Keener-Hopkins calibration method using the isentropic relation to calculate the Preston-tube Mach number produces the best results.

  7. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  8. A semi-annular shock tube for studying cylindrically converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Ding, Juchun; Wang, Minghu; Zhai, Zhigang; Si, Ting

    2015-09-01

    A novel semi-annular shock tube is realized by combining the advantageous features of two types of existing facilities for generating cylindrically converging shock waves. A high-speed schlieren photography is used to acquire the variation of shock positions versus the time and the evolution of a single-mode gaseous interface subjected to the cylindrical shock. The first experimental results indicate that the semi-annular configuration brings great convenience for interface formation and flow visualization, and the new facility has great potential for cylindrically converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability studies.

  9. A Newly Developed Large Diameter Diaphragmless Shock Tube for Studies on CO2-N2 Gas-Dynamic Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rêgo, Israel Da Silveira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Miyoshi, Yoriaki; Ando, Taketora; Goto, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Kawasaki, Shoji; TRIAM Exp. Group

    A large diameter diaphragmless shock tube has been recently developed and designed to perform detailed studies of CO2-N2 gas-dynamic laser (GDL). This large diameter diaphragmless shock tube offers various advantages over the conventional shock tubes (diaphragm-type) as longer test times, higher degree of reproducibility of shock-tube data, and especially low-impurity operation condition. The latter advantage is experimentally demonstrated herein, which is very critical issue in the CO2-N2 GDL studies. A supersonic nozzle section was mounted at the end wall of the shock tube and instrumented for simultaneous measurement of laser output power and energy. The GDL action in a CO2-N2 mixture under low impurity condition has been obtained by using the large diameter diaphragmless shock tube for the first time.

  10. Microscopic phenomena and a modern approach to turbulence. [using arc driven shock tubes to support the kinetic theory of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Chen, S.; I, L.; Jones, W.; Ramaiah, R.; Santiago, J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of an arc driven shock tube as a technique in the study of turbulence and evidence to support a kinetic theory of turbulence are described. Topics covered include: (1) reaction rate distortion in turbulent flow; (2) turbulent bursts in a shock tube; (3) driver gas flow with fluctuations; (4) improving the Mach number capabilities of arc driver shock tubes; and (5) resonant absorption in an argon plasma at thermal equilibrium.

  11. AIRS PFM Pulse Tube Cooler System-level Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R.; Johnson, D.; Collins, S.; Green, K.; Wickman, H.

    1998-01-01

    JPL's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument is being built to make precision measurements of air temperature over the surface of the Earth as a function of elevation; the flight instrument is in the final stages of assembly and checkout at this time, and uses a pair of TRW pulse tube cryocoolers operating at 55K to cool its sensitive IR focal plane.

  12. Analysis and Development of a Quick Acting Diaphragm-less Shock Tube Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portaro, Rocco; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2011-11-01

    This work discusses the construction and performance characteristics of a diaphragmless shock tube driver. Shock waves play integral roles in many industrial, medical and scientific environments, consequently it is important to observe the behaviour of these waves and how they interact with their surroundings. The diaphragmless shock tube provides a quick and effective means of producing shock waves in gases. The major advantages compared to conventional diaphragms include, minimal downtime between repeated experiments, opening times comparable to those of conventional diaphragms and infinitely adjustable opening pressure without the use of various diaphragm thicknesses. Moreover, the diaphragmless design also eliminates fragments that are carried downstream of the shock tube once the conventional diaphragm is ruptured. The design utilized in this work is built on that of Downey et al. [M.S. Downey, T.J. Cloete, A.D.B.Yates, Shock Waves 21(4): 315-319, 2011] and is improved in order to obtain faster opening times leading to stronger shock formation. Furthermore in depth numerical analysis using the commercial CFD package Fluent is carried out to validate experimental data for driven pressures and opening times as a function of driver pressure. Supported by Fonds de recherche du Quebec - Nature et technologies.

  13. A study of test section configuration for shock tube testing of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for alleviating wall interference effects in a shock tube test section intended for testing two-dimensional transonic airfoils. The first method involves contouring the test section walls to match approximate streamlines in the flow. Contours are matched to each airfoil tested to produce results close to those obtained in a conventional wind tunnel. Data from a previous study and the present study for two different airfoils demonstrate that useful results are obtained in a shock tube using a test section with contoured walls. The second method involves use of a fixed-geometry slotted-wall test section to provide automatic flow compensation for various airfoils. The slotted-wall test section developed exhibited the desired performance characteristics in the approximate Mach number range 0.82 to 0.89, as evidenced by good agreement obtained between shock tube and wind tunnel results for several airfoil flows.

  14. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  15. Unimolecular Rate Expression for Cyclohexene Decomposition and Its Use in Chemical Thermometry under Shock Tube Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Wing; Rosado-Reyes, Claudette M

    2015-07-16

    The methods used in deriving the rate expressions from comparative rate single-pulse shock tube studies, recent direct shock tube studies, and high-pressure flow experiments bearing on the data for the reverse Diels-Alder decomposition of cyclohexene to form ethylene and 1,3-butadiene are reviewed. This current interest is due to the increasing need for accurate kinetics and physical data (particularly the temperature) for realistic simulations in practical areas such as combustion. The rate constants derived from the direct shock tube studies and high-pressure flow experiments are somewhat larger than those used in comparative rate single-pulse shock tube experiments. For the latter, it is shown that they have been derived from a variety of independent experiments that include rate constants for unimolecular decomposition and isomerization processes that are considered to be well understood. The possibility of non-Arrhenius behavior in the unimolecular rate constants as a consequence of the large range covered in rate constants (as much as 12 orders of magnitude) for the comparative rate experiments has been examined and ruled out as a source of the discrepancy. Our analysis shows that there is the need to consider the possibility of radical-induced decompositions for verifying the correctness of the reaction mechanisms in studying unimolecular reactions. In the case of cyclohexene decomposition, recent experiments demonstrating the presence of residual amounts of H atoms in shock tube experiments suggest that addition to the double bond can also lead to the formation of ethylene and 1,3-butadiene and hence to rate constants larger than the true values. This possibility is even more likely to occur in high-pressure flow experiments. As a result, the internal standard method must be used with care and a radical inhibitor should always be present in sufficiently large quantities to suppress possible chain reactions. The present analysis results have important

  16. Radiative Interaction Between Driver and Driven Gases in an Arc-Driven Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul

    2001-01-01

    An electric-arc driven shock tube was operated with hydrogen as the driven gas and either hydrogen or helium as the driver gas. Electron density was measured behind the primary shock wave spectroscopically from the width of the Beta line of hydrogen. The measured electron density values were many times greater than the values calculated by the Rankine - Hugoniot relations. By accounting for the radiative transfer from the driver gas to the driven gas, the measured electron density values were numerically recreated.

  17. Guderley reflection for higher Mach numbers in a standard shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachucho, A.; Skews, B. W.

    2012-03-01

    An experimental study shows that the Guderley reflection (GR) of shock waves can be produced in a standard shock tube. A new technique was utilised which comprises triple point of a developed weak Mach reflection undergoing a number of reflections off the ceiling and floor of the shock tube before arriving at the test section. Both simple perturbation sources and diverging ramps were used to generate a transverse wave in the tube which then becomes the weak reflected wave of the reflection pattern. Tests were conducted for three ramp angles (10°, 15°, and 20°) and two perturbation sources for a range of Mach numbers (1.10-1.40) and two shock tube expansion chamber lengths (2.0 and 4.0 m). It was found that the length of the Mach stem of the reflection pattern is the overall vertical distance traveled by the triple point. Images with equivalent Mach stem lengths in the order of 2.0 m were produced. All tests showed evidence of the fourth wave of the GR, namely the expansion wave behind the reflected shock wave. A shocklet terminating the expansion wave was also identified in a few cases mainly for incident wave Mach numbers of approximately 1.20.

  18. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  19. The shock tube as a tool for dynamic testing of fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, R.; Clemente, A. R.; Blackwell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Specimens of fabric and Mylar were loaded to failure both statically and dynamically. Static tests were accomplished by pressurizing the specimens and dynamic tests were conducted by firing a shock tube. The results of the study indicate that seam efficiency is degraded by dynamic loads and that a need exists to investigate a seaming procedure which gives an optimum dynamic efficiency. The study also illustrates the lack of correspondence between static and dynamic breaking strengths thereby indicating that fabrics which have dynamic applications should be evaluated using dynamic testing procedures such as the shock tube loading used in the present program.

  20. Application of program LAURA to perfect gas shock tube flows: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitterer, K. F.; Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) was originally developed to solve steady-flow problems. The desire to validate the algorithm with shock tube experimental data motivated the development of a time-accurate version of the LAURA code. The current work presents a test of the Algorithm. Computational results are compared with the exact solution for a simple shock tube case. The parameters examined are Courant number, relaxation sweeps, grid spacing, and the inviscid relaxation factor. The results of the study indicate that LAURA is capable of producing accurate solutions when appropriate values are used for each parameter.

  1. Determination of explosive blast loading equivalencies with an explosively driven shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G; Morris, John S

    2009-01-01

    Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values are then compared for different explosives of interest and to other methods of equivalency determination.

  2. A shock-tube study of radiation behind shock waves in CO2 with application to Venus entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, J. E.; Haggard, K. V.

    1973-01-01

    The arc-driven Langley 6-inch shock tube has been used to produce shock waves in CO2 in the speed range between 9 and 13 km/sec at ambient pressures between 0.1 and 5 torr. These pressures correspond approximately to equivalent Venus altitudes between 100 and 80 km. Radiation intensity profiles behind the shock waves have been observed for several wavelengths at which the important species emit. Observation and analysis of the luminosity profiles in the zone of chemical nonequilibrium have been given particular emphasis. The results of the measurements are employed in the prediction of nonequilibrium radiative heating to a typical blunt-body probe entering the Venus atmosphere on a ballistic trajectory.

  3. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of shock waves emanating from an open-ended rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteeva, E. Yu.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Glazyrin, F. N.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    We examine the dynamics of a high-speed shock-induced flow near the open end of a shock tube using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background oriented schlieren (BOS) methods along with two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. In experiments, planar shock waves (M=1.3 -1.6) are discharged from a rectangular (24 mm × 48 mm ) low-pressure section of a shock tube open to the atmosphere. Due to the rectangular exit geometry, the resulting flow is highly three-dimensional and, thus, more complicated, compared to well-studied circular/axisymmetric geometries. The study focuses on the spatio-temporal flow structure up to 1 ms after the shock wave diffraction. PIV and BOS visualization techniques share the same post-processing principle, and the iterative multi-step cross-correlation algorithm applied in the PIV software is adapted here for the calculation of background pattern displacement on the BOS images. Particular attention is given to the resolution of flow regions where sharp gradients are present, such as a diffracted shock front or embedded shocks. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the problem are also conducted to validate the experimental results and methods and to gain more insight into the three-dimensional flow dynamics. PIV and BOS images are found to be consistent with the corresponding numerical flow visualizations.

  5. Numerical and experimental study of shock waves emanating from an open-ended rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteeva, E. Yu.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Glazyrin, F. N.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of a high-speed shock-induced flow near the open end of a shock tube using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background oriented schlieren (BOS) methods along with two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. In experiments, planar shock waves (M=1.3-1.6) are discharged from a rectangular (24 mm × 48 mm) low-pressure section of a shock tube open to the atmosphere. Due to the rectangular exit geometry, the resulting flow is highly three-dimensional and, thus, more complicated, compared to well-studied circular/axisymmetric geometries. The study focuses on the spatio-temporal flow structure up to 1 ms after the shock wave diffraction. PIV and BOS visualization techniques share the same post-processing principle, and the iterative multi-step cross-correlation algorithm applied in the PIV software is adapted here for the calculation of background pattern displacement on the BOS images. Particular attention is given to the resolution of flow regions where sharp gradients are present, such as a diffracted shock front or embedded shocks. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the problem are also conducted to validate the experimental results and methods and to gain more insight into the three-dimensional flow dynamics. PIV and BOS images are found to be consistent with the corresponding numerical flow visualizations.

  6. Shock tube experiments and numerical simulation of the single-mode, three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. C.; Krivets, V. V.; Greenough, J. A.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2009-11-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to perform experiments in which an interface is formed using opposed flows of air and SF6. A three-dimensional single-mode perturbation is created by the periodic vertical motion of the gases within the shock tube. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is produced by an impulsive acceleration by a weak shock wave (Ms=1.2). Planar laser induced fluorescence produces still images, and planar Mie scattering produces movies of the experiment. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of this experiment utilizing the Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement code, RAPTOR, was also conducted. Good agreement is obtained between experiments and the simulations. However, existing late time models, which have a 1/t dependence, disagree with measurements of the late time instability development. In contrast, both the experiments and simulation suggest a t-0.54 late time dependence for the overall growth rate. Comparisons with individual bubble and spike velocities show the bubbles appear to decay approximately at 1/t and the spikes to decay at a much slower rate of t-0.38.

  7. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  8. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  9. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 times 10 ^{17} and 9 times 10^{17} cm ^{-3}. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  11. Properties of a constricted-tube air-flow levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.; Stephens, W. K.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a constricted-tube gas flow levitator first developed by Berge et al. (1981) have been investigated experimentally in order to predict its behavior in a gravity-free environment and at elevated temperatures. The levitator consists of a constricted (quartz) tube fed at one end by a source of heated air or gas. A spherical sample is positioned by the air stream on the downstream side of the constriction, where it can be melted and resolidified without touching the tube. It is shown experimentally that the kinematic viscosity is the important fluid parameter for operation in thermal equilibrium at high temperatures. If air is heated from room temperature to 1200 C, the kinematic viscosity increases by a factor of 14. To maintain a given value of the Reynolds number, the flow rate would have to be increased by the same factor for a specific geometry of tube and sample. Thus, to maintain stable equilibrium, the flow rate should be increased as the air or other gas is heated. The other stability problem discussed is associated with changes in the shape of a cylindrical sample as it melts.

  12. Elastic response of water-filled fiber composite tubes under shock wave loading

    SciTech Connect

    Perotti, Luigi E.; Deiterding, Ralf; Inaba, Kazuaki; Shepherd, Joseph E; Ortiz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the response of fluid-filled filament-wound composite tubes subjected to axial shock wave loading in water. Our study focuses on the fluid structure interaction occurring when the shock wave in the fluid propagates parallel to the axis of the tube, creating pressure waves in the fluid coupled to flexural waves in the shell. The in-house-developed computational scheme couples an Eulerian fluid solver with a Lagrangian shell solver, which includes a new and simple material model to capture the response of fiber composites in finite kinematics. In the experiments and simulations we examine tubes with fiber winding angles equal to 45 and 60 , and we measure the precursor and primary wave speeds, hoop and longitudinal strains, and pressure. The experimental and computational results are in agreement, showing the validity of the computational scheme in complex fluid structure interaction problems involving fiber composite materials subjected to shock waves. The analyses of the measured quantities show the strong coupling of axial and hoop deformations and the significant effect of fiber winding angle on the composite tube response, which differs substantially from that of a metal tube in the same configuration.

  13. Multisorbent tubes for collecting volatile organic compounds in spacecraft air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to "break through" during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular sieve-type sorbents Carboxen 569 and Carbosieve S-III were tested for their ability to quantitatively trap the highly volatile compounds. Breakthrough volumes were determined with the direct method, whereby low ppm levels of methanol or Freon 12 in nitrogen were flowed through the sorbent tubes at 30 mL/min, and breakthrough was detected by gas chromatography. Breakthrough volumes for methanol were about 9 L/g on Carboxen 569 and 11 L/g on Carbosieve S-III; breakthrough volumes for Freon 12 were about 7 L/g on Carboxen 569 and > 26 L/g on Carbosieve S-III. Next, dual-bed tubes containing either Tenax-TA/Carbosieve S-III, Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569, or Carbotrap/Carboxen 569 to a 10-component gas mixture were exposed, in dry and in humidified air (50% relative humidity), and percentage recoveries of each compound were determined. The Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569 combination gave the best overall recoveries (75-114% for the 10 compounds). Acetaldehyde had the lowest recovery (75%) of the 10 compounds, but this value was still an improvement over either the other two sorbent combinations or the original single-sorbent tubes.

  14. Recent developments in shock tube research; Proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., July 16-19, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Griffith, W.

    1973-01-01

    Recent advances in shock tube research are described in papers dealing with the design and performance features of new devices as well as applications in aerodynamic, chemical, and physics experiments. Topics considered include a cryogenic shock tube for studying liquid helium fluid mechanics, studies of shock focusing and nonlinear resonance in shock tubes, applications in gas laser studies, very-low and very-high temperature chemical kinetic measurements, shock tube studies of ionization and recombination phenomena, applications in bioacoustic research, shock-tube simulation studies of sonic booms, and plasma research. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  15. 'GAIM' - Gas-addition, impedance-matched arc driver. [shock tube gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual view for a GAIM energy/driver system to maximize shock-tube performance through efficient interfacing of the energy source with the gas dynamics of the arc driver is presented. Electrical and arc-chamber requirements are evaluated utilizing two new computer codes. One code calculates the shock wave generated for a selected time rate and magnitude of arc-energy input; the other computes the values of external circuit elements required to produce the selected energy input, with the driver represented as the load element of the electrical discharge circuit. Results indicate that the energy-storage capability and the driver arrangement needed to produce the highest shock Mach number can be achieved by means of driver gas addition and by impedance matching (GAIM). Design criteria are presented for arc energy requirements necessary to produce given shock-wave speeds. Shock velocities as high as the 70 km/sec required for simulating Jovian entry now seem possible in shock-tube operation. Practical implementation of a GAIM system is discussed.

  16. Numerical modeling of the shock tube flow fields before and during ignition delay time experiments at practical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamnaouer, Mouna

    An axi-symmetric shock-tube model has been developed to simulate the shock-wave propagation and reflection in both non-reactive and reactive flows. Simulations were performed for the full shock-tube geometry of the high-pressure shock tube facility at Texas A&M University. Computations were carried out in the CFD solver FLUENT based on the finite volume approach and the AUSM+ flux differencing scheme. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm was applied to the time-dependent flow fields to accurately capture and resolve the shock and contact discontinuities as well as the very fine scales associated with the viscous and reactive effects. A conjugate heat transfer model has been incorporated which enhanced the credibility of the simulations. The multi-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations resolved all of the relevant scales, ranging from the size of the system to the reaction zone scale. The robustness of the numerical model and the accuracy of the simulations were assessed through validation with the analytical ideal shock-tube theory and experimental data. The numerical method is first applied to the problem of axi-symmetric inviscid flow then viscous effects are incorporated through viscous modeling. The non-idealities in the shock tube have been investigated and quantified, notably the non-ideal transient behavior in the shock tube nozzle section, heat transfer effects from the hot gas to the shock tube side walls, the reflected shock/boundary layer interactions or what is known as bifurcation, and the contact surface/bifurcation interaction resulting into driver gas contamination. The non-reactive model is shown to be capable of accurately simulating the shock and expansion wave propagations and reflections as well as the flow non-uniformities behind the reflected shock wave. Both the inviscid and the viscous non-reactive models provided a baseline for the combustion model which involves elementary chemical reactions and requires the coupling of the

  17. Numerical simulation of the autoignition of hydrogen-air mixtures behind shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereza, A. M.; Smirnov, V. N.; Vlasov, P. A.; Lyubimov, A. V.; Sokolova, I. L.; Shumova, V. V.; Ziborov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    Problems related to the autoignition of hydrogen-air mixtures are highly important for the operation safety of nuclear reactors and for hydrogen power engineering. In spite of extensive studies in this area, there are still many problems directly concerned with the ignition delay times of H2/O2 mixtures and with the conditions under which these processes occur. This paper deals with the numerical analysis of the data available in the literature on O, H, and OH yields in order to determine the influence of the primary channels of the initiation of H2/Air mixtures. The numerical modeling of the available literature data on the ignition delays of hydrogen-air mixtures made it possible to describe the shock tube measurements of ignition delays within the framework of a unified kinetic mechanism over a temperature range of 930-2500 K at pressures from 0.1 to 8.7 MPa.

  18. a Measurement of the Homogeneous Rate of Thermal Dissociation of Uranium Hexafluoride by Shock Tube Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoles, Stephen Wesley

    1990-01-01

    A determination of the rate of homogeneous thermal dissociation of UF_6 is reported. The high temperature region of a shock tube generated flow was used to dissociate UF_6. Laser -schlieren diagnostic techniques were used to measure post -shock density gradient and shock wave velocity, from which the dissociation rate constant and post-shock conditions were determined. The unimolecular dissociation theory of Rice, Ramsparger, and Kassel was used to model the temperature - and density-dependent rate constants. When extrapolated to the high density limit the dissociation rate constant obtained is:rm k_infty = 3.51times 10^{13}{bf e}^{{-64.6+/-6.3 {kcal over mole}over R_{U}T }}{1over sec}.This result agrees with a reliable theoretical calculation by another investigator, but differs by two orders of magnitude from the only other experimental measurements in the open literature.

  19. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  20. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tranter, Robert S.; Giri, Binod R.; Kiefer, John H.

    2007-03-15

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr.

  1. Modeling wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube using hybrid MD-DSMC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watvisave, D. S.; Puranik, B. P.; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2015-07-01

    Wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube are investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method as well as a hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm. In the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo simulations, the Cercingani-Lampis-Lord model of gas-surface interactions is employed to incorporate the wall effects, and it is shown that the shock attenuation is significantly affected by the choice of the values of tangential momentum accommodation coefficient. A loosely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo approach is then employed to demonstrate incomplete accommodation in micro-scale shock tube flows. This approach uses fixed values of the accommodation coefficients in the gas-surface interaction model, with their values determined from a separate dynamically similar Molecular Dynamics simulation. Finally, a completely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm is used, wherein the bulk of the flow is modeled using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, while the interaction of gas molecules with the shock tube walls is modeled using Molecular Dynamics. The two regions are separate and coupled both ways using buffer zones and a bootstrap coupling algorithm that accounts for the mismatch of the number of molecules in both regions. It is shown that the hybrid method captures the effect of local properties that cannot be captured using a single value of accommodation coefficient for the entire domain.

  2. High Energy Concentration by Spherical Converging Shocks in a Shock Tube with Conically Shaped Test Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apazidis, N.; Kjellander, M.; Tillmark, N.

    Converging shock waves have been extensively investigated during the past several decades. Continuing interest in this research is motivated by the ability to obtain extreme conditions in gas in the focal region. In a pioneering work, Guderley [1], (1942) published a self-similar solution of the amplification of strong converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves close to the center of convergence. Another solution to the problem was presented by Stanyukovich [2], and since then a large number of analytical and numerical studies have been conducted, see e.g. Refs. [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8].

  3. Relaminarization of the boundary layer over a flat plate in shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1986-06-01

    The relaminarization of the boundary layer over a flat plate in the shock tube was investigated by using the partially reflected shock wave technique. The flow Mach number was approximately 0.14, which corresponds to the inleft flow Mach number for the first row of vanes in a gas turbine. The thin film platinum heat gauges were used to measure the heat transfer rate and the Stanton number was calculated from the oscilloscope voltage traces. The Reynolds number was varied by changing the operation pressure of the shock tube and the values varied from 2.3 x 10 to the 4th to 5.3 x 10 to the 5th. For a Reynolds number range of 7 x 10 to the 4th to 3.5 x 10 to the 5th, the relaminarization of the boundary layer was observed. This phenomenon is due to the decay of the turbulence level in the flow as the reflected shock wave moves upstream from the flat plate. As the Reynolds number increased, the relaminarization was delayed and the delay was related to the turbulence generated by the reflected shock wave.

  4. Breakthrough of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin from 600 mg XAD-4 air sampling tubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately measuring air concentrations of agricultural fumigants is important for the regulation of air quality. Understanding the conditions under which sorbent tubes can effectively retain such fumigants during sampling is critical in mitigating chemical breakthrough from the tubes and facilitati...

  5. Shock tube study of ionization rates of NaCl-contaminated argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheneider, C.-P.; Park, C.

    1975-01-01

    Spectrally resolved radiometry and a microwave technique were used to measure the electron density, electron temperature, and concentration, and the concentration of sodium atoms in the weakly ionized region behind a shock wave in an argon shock tube. It is shown that the observed increase in the ionization rate is due to electron detachment of negative chlorine ions produced from sodium chloride vapor contained as an impurity in the argon gas. The observed behavior of the electron temperature in time and the reactions controlled by the electron temperature are analyzed in the light of the impurity reaction scheme.

  6. Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Joseph R.; Keiser, James R; Singbeil, Douglas; Willoughby, Adam W; Longmire, Hu Foster

    2007-04-01

    Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

  7. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  8. Pseudocompressible approximation and statistical turbulence modeling: application to shock tube flows.

    PubMed

    Soulard, Olivier; Griffond, Jérôme; Souffland, Denis

    2012-02-01

    In this work, a pseudocompressible approximation relevant for turbulent mixing flows encountered in shock tubes is derived. The asymptotic analysis used for this purpose puts forward the role played by four dimensionless numbers on the flow compressibility, namely, the turbulent, deformation, stratification, and buoyancy force Mach numbers. The existence of rapid distortion and diffusion-dissipation regimes is also accounted for in the analysis. Some consequences of the derived pseudocompressible approximation on statistical turbulence models are discussed. In particular, the evolutions of the density variance and flux are examined, as well as the turbulent transport of energy. The different aspects of this study are assessed by performing a direct numerical simulation of a shock tube flow configuration. PMID:22463317

  9. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  10. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  11. NASTRAN Analysis Comparison to Shock Tube Tests Used to Simulate Nuclear Overpressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheless, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a study of the effectiveness of the NASTRAN computer code for predicting structural response to nuclear blast overpressures. NASTRAN's effectiveness is determined by comparing results against shock tube tests used to simulate nuclear overpressures. Seven panels of various configurations are compared in this study. Panel deflections are the criteria used to measure NASTRAN's effectiveness. This study is a result of needed improvements in the survivability/vulnerability analyses subjected to nuclear blast.

  12. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  13. Shock tube technique for measuring opacities at high pressures for gaseous-core nuclear rockets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    A new method of opacity determination is described that uses an improved shock tube design and is applicable to measurements of Planck and Rosseland mean opacities in hydrogen or seeded hydrogen at hydrogen partial pressures of 500 atm, at temperatures from 2300 to 8000 K. The selection of seed materials to be added to the gases to make them semiopaque is discussed. Currently favored seeds are silicon and carbon or graphite for reactive seeds, and depleted uranium and tungsten 184 for nonreactive seeds.

  14. Performance Characteristics of Cross-Fin-Tube-Type Heat Exchanger for Air Conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Naoe; Kakiyama, Shiro; Sanuki, Noriyoshi

    The effects of enhanced heat transfer tube with ability to control the heat transfer disturbance by mechanical tube expanding were experimentally investigated on the performance characteristics of air-cooled cross-fin-tube-type heat exchanger for air conditioner. Three kinds of the enhanced heat transfer tube were developed and used in the experiment. The enhanced heat transfer tube was a kind of spirally grooved tube and composed with the fins smaller than those of the conventional spirally grooved tube excepting four fins located in orthogonal position on the tube circumference. The optimum groove number to enhance the performance of heat exchanger was also shown.

  15. Very High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube Studies of Aromatic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Brezinsky, K.

    2006-11-28

    The principal focus of this research program is aimed at understanding the oxidation and pyrolysis chemistry of primary aromatic molecules and radicals with the goal of developing a comprehensive kinetic model at conditions that are relevant to practical combustion devices. A very high pressure single pulse shock tube is used to obtain experimental data over a wide pressure range in the high pressure regime, 5-1000 bars, at pre-flame temperatures for fuel pyrolysis and oxidation over a broad spectrum of equivalence ratios. Stable species sampled from the shock tube are analyzed using standard chromatographic techniques using GC/MS-PDD and GC/TCD-FID. Experimental data from the HPST (stable species profiles) and data from other laboratories (if available) are simulated using kinetic models (if available) to develop a comprehensive model that can describe aromatics oxidation and pyrolysis over a wide range of experimental conditions. The shock tube has been heated (1000C) recently to minimize effects due to condensation of aromatic, polycyclic and other heavy species. Work during this grant period has focused on 7 main areas summarized in the final technical report.

  16. Numerical modeling of an experimental shock tube for traumatic brain injury studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2015-11-01

    Unfortunately, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are encountered commonly by both civilians and military soldiers throughout the world. Over a decade of medical history suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result from exposure to the blast waves created by these explosions, even if the person does not experience any immediate injury or lose consciousness. Medical researchers study the exposure of mice and rats to blast waves created in specially designed shock tubes to understand the effect on brain tissue. A newly developed table-top shock tube with a short driver section has been developed for mice experiments to reduce the time necessary to administer the blast radiation and increase the amount of statistical information available. In this study, numerical simulations of this shock tube are performed to assess how the blast wave takes its shape. The pressure profiles obtained from the numerical results are compared with the pressure histories from the experimental pressure transducers. The results show differences in behavior from what was expected, but the blast wave may still be an effective means of studying TBI.

  17. The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E; W?rmel, J; O?Conaire, M; Simmie, J; Curran, H

    2007-02-09

    Studying the details of hydrocarbon chemistry in an internal combustion engine is not straightforward. A number of factors, including varying conditions of temperature and pressure, complex fluid motions, as well as variation in the composition of gasoline, render a meaningful characterization of the combusting system difficult. Some simplified experimental laboratory devices offer an alternative to complex engine environments: they remove some of the complexities that exist in real engines but retain the ability to work under engine-relevant conditions. The choice of simplified experimental devices is limited by the range of temperature and pressure at which they can operate; only the shock tube and rapid compression machine (RCM) can reach engine-relevant temperatures and pressures quickly enough and yet withstand the high pressures that occur after the ignition event. Both devices, however, suffer a common drawback: the use of inert diluent gases has been shown to affect the measured ignition delay time under some experimental conditions. Interestingly, this effect appears to be opposite in the shock tube and RCM: in the comparative study of the carrier gases argon and nitrogen, argon decreases the ignition delay time in the shock tube, but increases it in the RCM. This observation is investigated in more detail in this study.

  18. Study of laser induced underwater shock waves and cavitation for medical applications: Visualization in a transparent optical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2005-03-01

    For medical application of underwater shock waves (a less-invasive approach), a reliable micro shock wave source is required. The present paper reports progress on the production of underwater micro shock waves by direct irradiation using a laser beam through an optical fiber. The generation and propagation of underwater shock waves from the optical fiber were visualized by quantitative double exposure holographic interferometry and time-resolved high speed shadowgraph methods. For visualization of laser induced shock waves and cavities in a tubular confined space, a transparent tube of 5 mm inner diameter with an aspherically shaped outer wall was designed and constructed.

  19. Depressurization of fine powders in a shock tube and dynamics of fragmented magma in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Barmin, A.; Melnik, O.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2002-11-01

    Samples of fine glass beads (mean grain size equal to 38 and 95 μm) have been depressurized within a vertical shock tube. These short-lived, rapid decompressions resemble discrete, cannon-like vulcanian explosions and produce two-phase flows that are inhomogeneous in density in both vertical and horizontal directions because of the presence of bubble-like heterogeneities. We suggest that also volcanic flows may present similar inhomogeneities in density. In the experimental apparatus the flow velocities increase from approximately 1 to 13 m/s when the pressure drop increases from approximately 200 to 900 mbar. A physical model of the initial velocities of expansions in the shock tube has been applied to a range of volcanic overpressures between 0.1 and 20 MPa, suggesting initial velocities of volcanic flows caused by the removal of a rock plug in volcanic conduits between 25 and 400 m/s. During the experiments at large pressure drops, as the mixture expands and moves up the tube, the flow front becomes highly irregular and bubble-like heterogeneities form. The shape of these bubbles becomes distorted and stretched in the turbulent flow. During the experiments at relatively small pressure drops, the sample oscillates when the particles, after the expansion, flow back and bounce upward again. Jets with diameter smaller than that of the tube are ejected from the oscillating samples generating independent pulses. Large bubble-like heterogeneities whose diameter is a significant fraction of the tube diameter can also discretize the flows. Similar mechanisms in real volcanoes may produce pulse-like ejections of gas-particle mixtures out of the vent.

  20. Operation of the ISL transonic shock tube in a high subsonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, F.; Havermann, M.; Boller, F.; Mangold, P.; Takayama, K.

    The transonic flow regime plays an important role in experimental aerodynamic research. Modern civil aircraft fly up to a Mach number of M ≈ 0.9 in the high subsonic speed regime, as, for example, the Boeing or Airbus passenger aircraft. Nearly sonic Mach numbers are foreseen for innovative airplane concepts like the sonic cruiser by Boeing. In the military domain, guided missiles like the cruise missile also fly in the high subsonic flow regime. For testing purposes, transonic wind tunnels are mainly used for sub- as well as supersonic design applications. These wind tunnels have normally very large dimensions, which makes their operation quite expensive. If only small scale tests are required, a cheap working facility turns out to be more beneficial. For this purpose, a conventional shock tube operated at transonic flow conditions has been put into operation at the ISL. In the transonic flow regime, however, the reduction of the tube cross section by the model can produce severe distortions followed by a choking of the shock tube flow in the test section. Extensive experimental investigations were performed to determine the subsonic choking Mach number as a function of the model size. These results are compared with theoretical estimations and, more in detail, with CFD calculations.

  1. Tables and charts of equilibrium normal shock and shock tube solutions for pure CO2 with velocities to 16 km/second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure CO2, representative of Mars and Venus atmospheres. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 1 to 16 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 Newtons per square meter to 500 kilo Newtons per square meter. The present results are applicable to shock tube flows, and to free-flight conditions for a blunt body at high velocities. Working charts illustrating idealized shock-tube performance with CO2 test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  2. Table and charts of equilibrium normal-shock and shock-tube properties for pure carbon dioxide with velocities from 1 to 16 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure CO2. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity, and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 1 to 16 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 N/sq m to 500 kN/sq m. The present results are applicable to shock tube flows and to freeflight conditions for a blunt body at high velocities. Working charts illustrating idealized shock tube performance with CO2 test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  3. Strategies for obtaining long constant-pressure test times in shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Parise, T.; Tulgestke, A. M.; Spearrin, R. M.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2015-11-01

    Several techniques have been developed for obtaining long, constant-pressure test times in reflected shock wave experiments in a shock tube, including the use of driver inserts, driver gas tailoring, helium gas diaphragm interfaces, driver extensions, and staged driver gas filling. These techniques are detailed here, including discussion on the most recent strategy, staged driver gas filling. Experiments indicate that this staged filling strategy increases available test time by roughly 20 % relative to single-stage filling of tailored driver gas mixtures, while simultaneously reducing the helium required per shock by up to 85 %. This filling scheme involves firstly mixing a tailored helium-nitrogen mixture in the driver section as in conventional driver filling and, secondly, backfilling a low-speed-of-sound gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide from a port close to the end cap of the driver section. Using this staged driver gas filling, in addition to the other techniques listed above, post-reflected shock test times of up to 0.102 s (102 ms) at 524 K and 1.6 atm have been obtained. Spectroscopically based temperature measurements in non-reactive mixtures have confirmed that temperature and pressure conditions remain constant throughout the length of these long test duration trials. Finally, these strategies have been used to measure low-temperature n-heptane ignition delay times.

  4. Shock tube study of ionization rates of NaCl-contaminated argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, K.-P.; Park, C.

    1975-01-01

    Electron density, electron temperature, and concentration of excited sodium atoms are measured in the weakly ionized regime behind a shock wave in impure argon in a shock tube using microwave techniques and spectrally resolved radiometry. Evidence is presented to show that an apparent increase in the rate of ionization is due to electron detachment of negative chlorine ions produced from sodium chloride vapor contained as an impurity. To be consistent with this chemical model, rate coefficients are found in the temperature range between 5500 and 8600 K for the dissociation of NaCl into an ion pair, dissociation of NaCl into a neutral pair, and electron detachment of a negative chlorine ion. Electron temperature is lower than heavy-particle temperature by roughly 1000 K. The electron-argon impact-ionization rate coefficient is a weak function of electron temperature in contradiction to expectation.

  5. Shock tube measurements of the optical absorption of triatomic carbon, C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral absorption of C3 has been measured in a shock tube using a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3300-4300 K and 0.36 to 2.13 atmospheres, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption from C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nanometers. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from 0.12 to 0.06 as a function of temperature.

  6. Evidence for siphon flows with shocks in solar magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenhardt, D.; Solanki, S. K.; Montesinos, B.; Thomas, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    We synthesize profiles of the infrared line Fe I 15648.5 A (g = 3) for a recently developed theoretical model of siphon flows along photospheric magnetic loops. The synthesized line profiles are compared with the observations from which Rueedi et al. (1992) deduced the presence of such flows across the neutral line of an active region plage. This comparison supports the interpretation of Rueedi et al. (1992). It also suggests that the average footpoint separation of the observed loops carrying the siphon flow is 8-15 sec and that the siphon flow experiences a standing tube shock in the downstream leg near the top of the arch.

  7. Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott L

    2011-01-25

    Blast waves are strong shock waves that result from large power density deposition into a fluid. The rapid energy release of high-explosive (HE) detonation provides sufficiently high power density for blast wave generation. Often it is desirable to quantify the energy released by such an event and to determine that energy relative to other reference explosives to derive an explosive-equivalence value. In this study, we use condensed-phase explosives to drive a blast wave in a shock tube. The explosive material and quantity were varied to produce blast waves of differing strengths. Pressure transducers at varying lengths measured the post-shock pressure, shock-wave arrival time and sidewall impulse associated with each test. Blast-scaling concepts in a one-dimensional geometry were then used to both determine the energy release associated with each test and to verify the scaling of the shock position versus time, overpressure versus distance, and impulse. Most blast scaling measurements to-date have been performed in a three-dimensional geometry such as a blast arena. Testing in a three-dimensional geometry can be challenging, however, as spherical shock-wave symmetry is required for good measurements. Additionally, the spherical wave strength decays rapidly with distance and it can be necessary to utilize larger (several kg) quantities of explosive to prevent significant decay from occurring before an idealized blast wave has formed. Such a mode of testing can be expensive, require large quantities of explosive, and be limited by both atmospheric conditions (such as rain) and by noise complaints from the population density near the test arena. Testing is possible in more compact geometries, however. Non-planar blast waves can be formed into a quasi-planar shape by confining the shock diffraction with the walls of a shock tube. Regardless of the initial form, the wave shape will begin to approximate a planar front after successive wave reflections from the tube

  8. Table and charts of equilibrium normal shock and shock tube properties for pure argon with velocities to 18 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure argon. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular-weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity, and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 2 to 18 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 N/sq m to 500 kN/sq m. Working charts illustrating shock tube performance with argon test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  9. D-0 End Calorimeter Warm Tube/TeV Dry Air Purge

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.R.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-14

    This Engineering Note studies the design of the Dry Air Purge that is going to flow through the Warm Tube of the End Calorimeter of the D-O Calorimeter. The Tev tubes through the E.C. can be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: The Tev tube, the warm (vacuum vessel) tube, 15 layers of superinsulation, the cold (argon vessel) tube, and the Inner Hadronic center support tube. The Dry Air Purge will involve flowing Dry Air through the annular region between the Warm Tube and the Tev Beam Pipe. This air flow is intended to prevent condensation from forming in this region which could turn to ice under cryogenic temperatures. Any ice formed in this gap, could cause serious problems when these tubes are moved. The Air will flow through a Nylon Tube Fitting -1/4-inch I.D. to 1/8-inch male pipe thread (Cole Palmer YB-06465-15) see Drawing MC-295221 (Appendix A). This fitting will be attached to the Nylon 2-inch Tube-Wiper and Seal Assembly which is clamped to the ends of the Warm Tube (Appendix A). This note includes drawings and calculations that explain the setup of the Dry Air Purge and give the required information on the pressure drops through the setup. The Equations and properties used in the calculations were obtained from the Applied Fluid Dynamics Handbook by Robert D. Blevins and Fluid Dynamics Second Edition by Frank M. White.

  10. Development of a novel miniature detonation-driven shock tube assembly that uses in situ generated oxyhydrogen mixture.

    PubMed

    Janardhanraj, S; Jagadeesh, G

    2016-08-01

    A novel concept to generate miniature shockwaves in a safe, repeatable, and controllable manner in laboratory confinements using an in situ oxyhydrogen generator has been proposed and demonstrated. This method proves to be more advantageous than existing methods because there is flexibility to vary strength of the shockwave, there is no need for storage of high pressure gases, and there is minimal waste disposal. The required amount of oxyhydrogen mixture is generated using alkaline electrolysis that produces hydrogen and oxygen gases in stoichiometric quantity. The rate of oxyhydrogen mixture production for the newly designed oxyhydrogen generator is found to be around 8 ml/s experimentally. The oxyhydrogen generator is connected to the driver section of a specially designed 10 mm square miniature shock tube assembly. A numerical code that uses CANTERA software package is used to predict the properties of the driver gas in the miniature shock tube. This prediction along with the 1-D shock tube theory is used to calculate the properties of the generated shockwave and matches reasonably well with the experimentally obtained values for oxyhydrogen mixture fill pressures less than 2.5 bars. The miniature shock tube employs a modified tri-clover clamp assembly to facilitate quick changing of diaphragm and replaces the more cumbersome nut and bolt system of fastening components. The versatile nature of oxyhydrogen detonation-driven miniature shock tube opens up new horizons for shockwave-assisted interdisciplinary applications. PMID:27587167

  11. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared

  12. A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1–3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68–1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is

  13. Evolution of shock waves formed by laser-induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Yu-Tong; Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Feng; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Lin Xiao, Xuan; Liu, Feng; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Jie

    2007-12-01

    The evolution of shock waves produced by 7 ns laser pulses in air is investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph. A nodular structure of the shock wave is observed. It is found that the origin of the structure is the multi-longitudinal-microfocus caused by the astigmatism of the laser beam. The spherical shock waves formed by each microfocus expand gradually and collide with each other, resulting in the nodular structure of the shock wave.

  14. Quantification of non-ideal explosion violence with a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    There is significant interest in quantifying the blast violence associated with various nonideal explosions. Such data is essential to evaluate the damage potential of both explosive cookoff and terrorist explosive scenarios. We present a technique designed to measure the source energy associated with a non-ideal, asymmetrical, and three-dimensional explosion. A tube is used to confine and focus energy from a blast event into a one-dimensional, quasi-planar shock front. During propagation along the length of the tube, the wave is allowed to shocksteepen into a more ideal form. Pressure transducers then measure the shock overpressure as a function of the distance from the source. One-dimensional blast scaling theory allows calculation of the source energy from this data. This small-scale test method addresses cost and noise concerns as well as boosting and symmetry issues associated with large-scale, three-dimensional, blast arena tests. Results from both ideal explosives and non-ideal explosives are discussed.

  15. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  16. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  17. Dissociation of 1,1,1-trifluoroethane behind reflected shock waves :shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometry experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, B. R.; Tranter, R. S.; Chemistry

    2007-01-01

    The dissociation of 1,1,1,-trifluoroethane, a potential non-RRKM reaction, has been studied at 600 and 1200 Torr and high temperatures (1500-1840 K) using a new shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ST/TOF-MS). These data obtained by an independent method are in good agreement with the laser schlieren, LS, experiments of Kiefer et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108, 2443-2450] and extend the range of that experimental dataset. The data have been simulated by both standard RRKM calculations and the non-RRKM model reported by Kiefer et al. but with <{Delta}E{sub down}> = 750 cm{sup -1}. Both the RRKM and non-RRKM calculations provide equally good fits to the ST/TOF-MS data. Neither model simulates the combined ST/TOF-MS and LS datasets particularly well. However, the non-RRKM model predicts a pressure dependency closer to that observed in the experiments than the RRKM model.

  18. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to shock-tube problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1994-01-01

    An Euler solver based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element is in this paper to simulate shock-tube flows involving shock waves, contact discontinuities, expansion waves and their intersections. Seven test problems are considered to examine the capability of this method. The numerical results, when compared with exact solutions and/or numerical solutions by other methods, indicate that the present method can accurately resolve strong shock and contact discontinuities without using any ad hoc techniques which are used only at the neighborhood of a discontinuity.

  19. Shock tube study of the reaction H plus O2 plus Ar yields HO2 plus Ar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Houghton, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Rate coefficient data for the recombination reaction H + 02 + Ar yields H02 + Ar have been determined from studies of lean hydrogen-oxygen mixtures behind incident shock waves over the temperature range of 948 to 1125 K. Hydroxyl radical concentration profiles were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and rate data were obtained through analysis of induction time and exponential growth parameter data. Analysis of the data yielded a rate coefficient which was generally lower than most of the more recent values obtained from shock tube studies. The effect of boundary layer formation on the conditions behind the shock was also examined and found to be negligible.

  20. A comparison between constant volume induction times and results from spatially resolved simulation of ignition behind reflected shocks: implications for shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melguizo-Gavilanes, J.; Bauwens, L.

    2013-05-01

    The induction time measured in shock tube experiments is typically converted into kinetic data assuming that the reaction takes place in a constant volume process, thus neglecting spatial gradients. The actual process of shock ignition is, however, both time- and space-dependent; ignition takes place at a well-defined location, and subsequently a front travels, which may couple with the pressure wave that it created and forms a detonation wave behind the shock that reflects off the wall. To assess how different the actual processes are compared with the constant volume assumption, a numerical study was performed using a simplified three step chain-branching kinetic scheme. To overcome the difficulties that arise when simulating shock-induced ignition due to the initial absence of a domain filled with shocked reactive mixture, the problem is solved in a transformed frame of reference. Furthermore, initial conditions are derived from short-time asymptotics, which resolves the initial singularity. The induction times obtained using the full unsteady formulation with those of the homogeneous explosion are compared for various values of the heat release. Results for the spatially dependent formulation show that the evolution of the post-shock flow is complex, and that it leads to a gradient in induction times, after the passage of the reflected shock. For all cases simulated, thermal explosion initially occurs very close to the wall, and the corresponding induction time is found to be larger than that predicted under the constant volume assumption. As the measurement is made further away however, the actual time interval between passage of the reflected shock, and the specified pressure increase denoting ignition, decreases to a value close to zero, corresponding to that obtained along a Rayleigh line matching that of a steady ZND process (assuming a long enough tube). In situations where the constant volume assumption is expected to be weak, more accurate kinetic data

  1. An Inexpensive and Versatile Version of Kundt's Tube for Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Experiments that measure the speed of sound in air are common in high schools and colleges. In the Kundt's tube experiment, a horizontal air column is adjusted until a resonance mode is achieved for a specific frequency of sound. When this happens, the cork dust in the tube is disturbed at the displacement antinode regions. The location of the…

  2. Shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene - Sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism for soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Gardiner, W. C., Jr.; Stein, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of thermodynamic parameters on the sensitivity of model predictions of soot formation by shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene were assessed analytically. The pyrolysis process was treated as having three components: initiation, the initial pyrolysis stages; cyclization, formation of larger molecules and radicals and small aromatic molecules; and polymerization, further growth of aromatic rings. Rate equations are reviewed for each component. Thermodynamic effects were assessed by varying the C2H-H and C2H3-H bond energies and the Ct-(Ct) group additivity value. Any change in the C2H-H bond energy had a significant impact on the temperature and the maximum amount of the soot yield. The findings underscore the necessity of using accurate thermodynamic data for modeling high-temperature chemical kinetics.

  3. Single-pulse shock tube pyrolysis of toluene and 1,3-butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colket, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the rate limiting chemical mechanisms leading to the formation of soot precursors. A single-pulse shock tube is being used to collect gas samples of stable intermediates and end products of hydrocarbon pyrolysis. These gas samples are analyzed quantitatively using gas chromatography and any mass imbalance is believed to be due to the formation of PAH's and soot. Experimental decomposition rates of the parent hydrocarbon are determined and compared to predictions from the literature. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms describing hydrocarbon pyrolysis are being developed and models of soot formation are being compared with the experimental results. Information developed from these pyrolysis studies will provide the fundamental understanding for modeling subsequent oxidation experiments.

  4. Single pulse shock tube studies on the stability of 1-phenylbutene-2

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.P.; He, Y.Z.; Tsang, W.

    1988-01-01

    1-Phenylbutene-2(1-PHB-2) has been decomposed in single pulse shock tube experiments. Acetylene formation is used as a measure of the rate of cleavage of the benzyl-vinyl C-C bond. The rate expression for this reaction has been found to be k(1-PHB-2 -> benzyl + propenyl)= 2.4 x 10/sup 16/ Exp(-43780/T) /s. The A-factor for this process is unexpectedly large. It may be indicative of a larger than usual combination rate constant for vinyl radicals. Possible sources of experimental errors are considered. Our results are consistent with a bond dissociation energy for the primary vinyl C-H bond in propylene of 475/plus minus/10 kJ/mol.

  5. Shock tube propellant reactions: Ignition of M-9 and catalysis of RDX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A.; Decker, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary results of shock tube experiments to study RDX catalysis are presented. It is shown that using N2 as the test gas (P approximately equal to 90 KPa, T bar approximately equal to 650K), the replacement of RDX powder with NaBH4 (20% by weight) leads to a large increase in the amount of RDX reacting and a small decrease in ignition delays T sub i. It is further shown that higher temperatures due to exothermic pyrolysis reactions of NaBH4 are not responsible for these effects. Replacement of N2 by NO2 (10% by volume) in the environment of RDX powders (T bar approximately equal to 650K, P = 90-400 KPa) leads to an increase in T sub i and T sub i is directly proportional to NO2 pressure. Inhibition appears to be initiated by reactions between NO2 and either RDX or the RDX decomposition products.

  6. Numerical study of the effect of oxygenated blending compounds on soot formation in shock tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, H.; Braun-Unkhoff, M.

    2008-04-15

    This numerical study deals with the influence of blends on the amount of soot formed in shock tubes, which were simulated by assuming a homogeneous plug flow reactor model. For this purpose, first, the reaction model used here was validated against experimental results previously obtained in the literature. Then, the soot volume fractions of various mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-benzene, isobutene-benzene, methanol-benzene, and ethanol-benzene diluted in argon were simulated and compared to the results of benzene-argon pyrolysis at 1721 K and 5.4 MPa. For MTBE, isobutene, methanol, and ethanol, small amounts of additives to benzene-argon mixtures promoted soot formation, for the shock tube model assumed, while higher concentrations of these additives led to smaller soot volume fractions in comparison to pure benzene-argon pyrolysis. The most significant soot promotion effect was found for the additives MTBE and isobutene. The channel for MTBE decomposition producing isobutene and methanol is very effective at temperatures beyond 1200 K. Thus, both MTBE-benzene and isobutene-benzene mixtures diluted in argon showed rather similar behavior in regard to soot formation. Special emphasis was directed toward the causes for the concentration-dependent influence of the blends on the amount of soot formed. Aromatic hydrocarbons and acetylene were identified as key gas-phase species that determine the trends in the formation of soot of various mixtures. From reaction flux analysis for phenanthrene, it was deduced that the combinative routes including phenyl species play a major role in forming PAHs, especially at early reaction times. It is found that the additives play an important role in providing material to grow side chains, such as by reaction channels including phenylacetylene or benzyl, which are confirmed to form aromatic hydrocarbons and thus to influence the amount of soot formed, particularly when the concentrations of the blends are increased

  7. Three-dimensional freezing of flowing water in a tube cooled by air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2015-05-01

    The 3-D freezing of flowing water in a copper tube cooled by air flow is investigated by means of a numerical analysis. The air flows normal to the tube axis. Several parameters as inlet water mean velocity w m , inlet water temperature T iℓ t , air flow temperature T a and air flow velocity u a are selected in the calculations to adapt it to a winter season actually encountered. The numerical results present the development of the ice layer mean thickness and its 3-D morphologies as well as the critical ice layer thickness in the tube choked by the ice layer.

  8. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  9. Current topics in shock waves; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Waves and Shock Tubes, 17th, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, July 17-21, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.W.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on shock waves are presented. The general topics addressed include: shock formation, focusing, and implosion; shock reflection and diffraction; turbulence; laser-produced plasmas and waves; ionization and shock-plasma interaction; chemical kinetics, pyrolysis, and soot formation; experimental facilities, techniques, and applications; ignition of detonation and combustion; particle entrainment and shock propagation through particle suspension; boundary layers and blast simulation; computational methods and numerical simulation.

  10. Using a gel/plastic surrogate to study the biomechanical response of the head under air shock loading: a combined experimental and numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wagner, Christina; Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Jin, Xin; Vandevord, Pamela; Chou, Clifford; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2012-03-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study was conducted to determine a method to elucidate the biomechanical response of a head surrogate physical model under air shock loading. In the physical experiments, a gel-filled egg-shaped skull/brain surrogate was exposed to blast overpressure in a shock tube environment, and static pressures within the shock tube and the surrogate were recorded throughout the event. A numerical model of the shock tube was developed using the Eulerian approach and validated against experimental data. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-structure coupling algorithm was then utilized to simulate the interaction of the shock wave and the head surrogate. After model validation, a comprehensive series of parametric studies was carried out on the egg-shaped surrogate FE model to assess the effect of several key factors, such as the elastic modulus of the shell, bulk modulus of the core, head orientation, and internal sensor location, on pressure and strain responses. Results indicate that increasing the elastic modulus of the shell within the range simulated in this study led to considerable rise of the overpressures. Varying the bulk modulus of the core from 0.5 to 2.0 GPa, the overpressure had an increase of 7.2%. The curvature of the surface facing the shock wave significantly affected both the peak positive and negative pressures. Simulations of the head surrogate with the blunt end facing the advancing shock front had a higher pressure compared to the simulations with the pointed end facing the shock front. The influence of an opening (possibly mimicking anatomical apertures) on the peak pressures was evaluated using a surrogate head with a hole on the shell of the blunt end. It was revealed that the presence of the opening had little influence on the positive pressures but could affect the negative pressure evidently. PMID:21590345

  11. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  12. A Nonlinear Theory for Predicting the Effects of Unsteady Laminar, Turbulent, or Transitional Boundary Layers on the Attenuation of Shock Waves in a Shock Tube with Experimental Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimpi, Robert L.; Cohen, Nathaniel B.

    1961-01-01

    The linearized attenuation theory of NACA Technical Note 3375 is modified in the following manner: (a) an unsteady compressible local skin-friction coefficient is employed rather than the equivalent steady-flow incompressible coefficient; (b) a nonlinear approach is used to permit application of the theory to large attenuations; and (c) transition effects are considered. Curves are presented for predicting attenuation for a shock pressure ratio up to 20 and a range of shock-tube Reynolds numbers. Comparison of theory and experimental data for shock-wave strengths between 1.5 and 10 over a wide range of Reynolds numbers shows good agreement with the nonlinear theory evaluated for a transition Reynolds number of 2.5 X 10(exp 5).

  13. Tables and charts of equilibrium normal shock and shock-tube solutions for helium-hydrogen mixtures with velocities to 70 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves into helium-hydrogen mixtures representative of proposed outer planet atmospheres. The volumetric compositions of these mixtures are 0.35He-0.65H2, 0.20He-0.80H2, and 0.05He-0.95H2. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular-weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity, and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 4 to 70 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 N/sq m to 100 kN/sq m. The present results are applicable to shock-tube flows and to free-flight conditions for a blunt body at high velocities. A working chart illustrating idealized shock-tube performance with a 0.20He-0.80H2 test gas and heated helium driver gas is also presented.

  14. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Hypovolemic shock (caused by too little blood volume) Anaphylactic shock (caused by allergic reaction) Septic shock ( ... as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in ...

  15. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Shock Shock is a serious, often life-threatening medical condition ... of death for critically ill or injured people. Shock results when the body is not getting enough ...

  16. Calculation of safe parameters of air shock waves for underwater explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Smolii, N.I.; Ganopol'skii, M.I.

    1985-07-01

    The paper proposes a functional relationship for the calculation of the pressure at an air shock-wave front in underwater explosions of plaster-blasting charges. The maximum permissible mass of the charge and safe distance for objects can be calculated for an assigned value of the critical pressure at the air shock-wave front. The authors also state that this work was conducted as there are practically no significant results of experimental or theoretical investigations of this problem.

  17. The reaction H2+D2 ⇆ 2HD. A long history of erroneous interpretation of shock tube results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Assa; Bidani, Menashe; Carroll, Harvey F.

    1983-09-01

    An ultraclean 2 in. i.d. single pulse shock tube coupled to an atomic resonance absorption system was constructed in order to determine hydrogen atom concentration by Lyman-α absorption. The tube was baked to 300 °C and pumped down to ˜10-7 Torr. Ultrapure argon could be shock heated to ˜2500 K with no spurious H atom absorption. The system was constructed in order to study the kinetics of chemical reactions which are strongly catalyzed by H atoms, under the conditions where no such atoms are present. Specifically, the role of H atoms in the H2+D2→2HD exchange reaction was studied. Mixtures of hydrogen and deuterium diluted in argon were shock heated to 1375-1760 K; samples were then taken from the tube and analyzed mass spectrometrically for the ratio [HD]/[D2]. 1400 K was the highest temperature at which no spurious H atom absorption was observed in a shocked mixture of 1% H2-1% D2. At 1400 K, under the conditions of no absorption, no, or ≤1%HD conversion was obtained. At higher temperatures Lyman-α absorption was detected and more HD conversion was observed. A comparison between these results and results obtained previously in conventional systems suggests that the high HD conversion observed in the past was caused by hydrogen atoms generated from impurities. The existence of a molecular mechanism in the H2-D2 exchange reaction is highly doubtful.

  18. Experimental and Mathematical Evaluation of Dynamic Behaviour of AN Oil-Air Coupling Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PING, Y.

    2003-11-01

    The physical mechanism of the actual shock absorber with multi-types of damping and non-linear stiffness through coupling the oil, air, rubber and spring by ingenious devices is systematically investigated. The experimental results of the key-model machine in multi-parameter coupling dynamic test show complex non-linearity dynamic characteristics. Based on this, the non-linear dynamic model for the shock absorber is presented by analysing the internal fluid dynamic phenomenon with respect to the shock absorber. Comparisons with experimental data confirm the validity of the model. Using the model, it is possible to evaluate the importance of different factors for designing the shock absorber.

  19. The effect of tracheal tube size on air leak around the cuffs

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Han, Sung-Hee; Park, Seong-Joo; Park, Soo-kyung

    2011-01-01

    Background This randomized single-blinded, cross-over study was done to evaluate the influence of the size of tracheal tubes on air leaks around the cuffs. Methods In a benchtop model, the number of longitudinal folds on the cuffs was evaluated for different sizes of tracheal tubes. In an anesthetized patient study, thirty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were included. After induction of anesthesia, the trachea was intubated with two sizes of tracheal tubes in a random sequence: in men, internal diameter of 7.5 mm and 8.0 mm; in women, internal diameter of 7.0 mm and 7.5 mm. After tracheal intubation with each tube, air leak pressures were evaluated at intracuff pressures of 20, 25 and 30 cmH2O by auscultation. To calculate the tracheal tube resistance (R), an inspiratory pause of 20% was applied and the resulting peak airway pressure (Ppeak), plateau pressure (Ppl) and mean expiratory tidal volume (Flow) were inserted in the formula R = (Ppeak - Ppl)/Flow. Results More longitudinal folds of the tracheal tube cuffs occurred in larger sized tubes compared to the smaller ones in a benchtop model. Air leakage was significantly less for the smaller tracheal tubes than for the larger ones for each gender at intracuff pressures of 20, 25 and 30 cmH2O. Tracheal tube resistances were not significantly altered by the size of tracheal tube. Conclusions The use of a smaller tracheal tube within an acceptable size can reduce air leakage around the cuff without significantly changing the tracheal tube resistance. PMID:21860747

  20. NASA Ames's electric arc-driven shock tube facility and research on nonequilibrium phenomena in low density hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Basic requirements for a ground test facility simulating low density hypersonic flows are discussed. Such facilities should be able to produce shock velocities in the range of 10-17 km/sec in an initial pressure of 0.010 to 0.050 Torr. The facility should be equipped with diagnostics systems to be able to measure the emitted radiation, characteristic temperatures and populations in various energy levels. In the light of these requirements, NASA Ames's electric arc-driven low density shock tube facility is described and available experimental diagnostics systems and computational tools are discussed.

  1. Numerical study of the transient flow in the driven tube and the nozzle section of a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarcik-Polsky, Susan; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    The initial flow in a shock tunnel was examined numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A finite-volume total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme was used to calculate the transient flow in a shock tunnel. Both viscous and inviscid, chemically nonreacting flows were studied. The study consisted of two parts, the first dealt with the transient flow in the driven-tube/nozzle interface region (inviscid calculations). The effects of varying the geometry in this region was examined. The second part of the study examined the transient flow in the nozzle (viscous calculations). The results were compared to experimental data.

  2. Predictive value of low tube voltage and dual-energy CT for successful shock wave lithotripsy: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Largo, Remo; Stolzmann, Paul; Fankhauser, Christian D; Poyet, Cédric; Wolfsgruber, Pirmin; Sulser, Tullio; Alkadhi, Hatem; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the capabilities of low tube voltage computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) for predicting successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) of urinary stones in vitro. A total of 33 urinary calculi (six different chemical compositions; mean size 6 ± 3 mm) were scanned using a dual-source CT machine with single- (120 kVp) and dual-energy settings (80/150, 100/150 Sn kVp) resulting in six different datasets. The attenuation (Hounsfield Units) of calculi was measured on single-energy CT images and the dual-energy indices (DEIs) were calculated from DECT acquisitions. Calculi underwent SWL and the number of shock waves for successful disintegration was recorded. The prediction of required shock waves regarding stone attenuation/DEI was calculated using regression analysis (adjusted for stone size and composition) and the correlation between CT attenuation/DEI and the number of shock waves was assessed for all datasets. The median number of shock waves for successful stone disintegration was 72 (interquartile range 30-361). CT attenuation/DEI of stones was a significant, independent predictor (P < 0.01) for the number of required shock waves with the best prediction at 80 kVp (β estimate 0.576) (P < 0.05). Correlation coefficients between attenuation/DEI and the number of required shock waves ranged between ρ = 0.31 and 0.68 showing the best correlation at 80 kVp (P < 0.001). The attenuation of urinary stones at low tube voltage CT is the best predictor for successful stone disintegration, being independent of stone composition and size. DECT shows no added value for predicting the success of SWL. PMID:26391614

  3. Dispersion of a liquid drop under the effect of an air shock wave with an intensity of 0.2-42 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevmerzhitsky, N. V.; Sotskov, E. A.; Sen'kovsky, E. D.; Lyapebi, E.; Nikulin, A. A.; Krivonos, O. L.; Abakumov, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our experiments on the study of the dispersion of a liquid drop (Ø=2 mm, tributyl phosphate) under the influence of an air shock wave (SW) with an intensity of 0.2-42 atm. The experiments were performed using an air shock tube. The SW was created by exploding a C2H2+2.5O2 mixture, compressed air or compressed helium. Recording of the dispersion process was performed by using high-speed macro- and microfilming (the Schlieren method and traditional filming). Macrofilming allowed us to register an integral picture of the process of drop dispersion and to determine the time of drop evaporation. Microfilming allowed us to resolve fragments of the liquid with sizes >=2 μm and to obtain the distribution of the spectrum of drop fragments, which is necessary for calibrating the analytical models.

  4. Shock tube investigation of dynamic response of pressure transducers for validation of rotor performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    For some time now, NASA has had a program under way to aid in the validation of rotor performance and acoustics codes associated with the UH-60 rotary-wing aircraft; and to correlate results of such studies with those obtained from investigations of other selected aircraft rotor performance. A central feature of these studies concerns the dynamic measurement of surface pressure at various locations up to frequencies of 25 KHz. For this purpose, fast-response gauges of the Kulite type are employed. The latter need to be buried in the rotor; they record surface pressures which are transmitted by a pipette connected to the gauge. The other end of the pipette is cut flush with the surface. In certain locations, the pipette configuration includes a rather sharp right-angle bend. The natural question has arisen in this connection: In what way are the pipettes modifying the signals received at the rotor surface and subsequently transmitted to the sensitive Kulite transducer element. The basic details and results of the program performed and recently completed in the High Pressure Shock Tube Laboratory of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University are given.

  5. A relativistic smoothed particle hydrodynamics method tested with the shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Patrick J.

    1991-12-01

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is applied to an ADM 3 + 1 formulation of the equations for relativistic fluid flow. In particular the one-dimensional shock tube is addressed. Three codes are described. The first is a straightforward extension of classic SPH, while the other two are modifications which allow for time-dependent smoothing lengths. The first of these modifications approximates the internal energy density, while the second approximates the total energy density. Two smoothing forms are tested: an artificial viscosity and the direct method of A.J. Baker [Finite Element Computation Fluid Mechanics (Hemisphere, New York, 1983)]. The results indicate that the classic SPH code with particle-particle based artificial viscosity is reasonably accurate and very consistent. It gives quite sharp edges and flat plateaus, but the velocity plateau is significantly overestimated, and an oscillation can appear in the rarefaction wave. The modified versions with Baker smoothing procedure better results for moderate initial conditions, but begin to show spikes when the initial density jump is large. Generally the results are comparable to simple finite element and finite difference methods.

  6. A Shock Tube and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Oxidation of 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    PubMed Central

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300 – 1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102 (52) (1998) 10655-10670] Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model experiment deviations of at most a factor of two, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species. PMID:23327724

  7. The dissociation of diacetyl : a shock-tube and theoretical study.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Jasper, A. W.; Kiefer, J. H.; Tranter, R. S.

    2009-07-01

    The dissociation of diacetyl dilute in krypton has been studied in a shock tube using laser schlieren densitometry at 1200-1800 K and reaction pressures of 55 {+-} 2, 120 {+-} 3, and 225 {+-} 5 Torr. The experimentally determined rate coefficients show falloff and an ab initio/Master Equation/VRC-TST analysis was used to determine pressure-dependent rate coefficient expressions that are in good agreement with the experimental data. From the theoretical calculations k{sub {infinity}} (T) = 5.029 x 10{sup 19} (T/298 K){sup -3.40} exp(-37665/T) s{sup -1} for 300 < T < 2000 K. The laser schlieren profiles were simulated using a model for methyl recombination with appropriate additions for diacetyl. From the simulations rate coefficients were determined for CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 3} = C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CH{sub 3} + C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 2} = CH{sub 3}CO + CH{sub 2}CO + CH{sub 4} (k(T) = 2.818T{sup 4.00} exp(-5737/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Excellent agreement is found between the simulations and experimental profiles, and Troe type parameters have been calculated for the dissociation of diacetyl and the recombination of methyl radicals.

  8. Shock tube ignition of ethanol, isobutene and MTBE: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Dunphy, M.P.; Simmie, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry); Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. )

    1991-11-22

    The ignition of ethanol, isobutene and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been studied experimentally in a shock tube and computationally with a detailed chemical kinetic model. Experimental results, consisting of ignition delay measurements, were obtained for a range of fuel/oxygen mixtures diluted in Argon, with temperatures varying over a range of 1100--1900 K. The numerical model consisted of a detailed kinetic reaction mechanism with more than 400 elementary reactions, chosen to describe reactions of each fuel and the smaller hydrocarbon and other species produced during their oxidation. The overall agreement between experimental and computed results was excellent, particularly for mixtures with greater than 0.3% fuel. The greatest sensitivity in the computed results was found to falloff parameters in the dissociation reactions of isobutene, ethane, methane, and ethyl and vinyl radicals, to the C{sub 3}H{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 5} reaction submechanisms in the model, and to the reactions in the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Co submechanism.

  9. The effect of diluent gases on ignition delay times in the shock tube and in the rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect

    Wuermel, J.; Silke, E.J.; Curran, H.J.; O Conaire, M.S.; Simmie, J.M.

    2007-10-15

    The diluent gas used in the preparation of test fuel/oxygen mixtures is inert and does not take part in the chemical reaction. However, it does have an effect on the measured ignition delay time both in rapid compression machines and in shock tubes - argon decelerates ignition in the RCM, but accelerates it in the shock tube under some conditions. This opposite effect is due to the times scales involved in these experimental devices. Typical ignition delay times in the RCM are in the region of 1-200 ms, while those in the shock tube are much shorter (10-1000 {mu}s). Comparative RCM experiments and simulations for helium, argon, xenon, and nitrogen have shown extreme heat loss in the postcompression period, particularly for helium. Autoignition measurements of 2,3-dimethylpentane have highlighted a direct dependency of ignition delay time on the type of diluent used, where longer ignition delay time were recorded with argon. This increased ignition delay time is due to the extreme cooling of argon in the postcompression period. This observation was strengthened by comparative experiments with helium and argon, where the diluent effect was even stronger for helium, caused by its higher thermal conductivity. In the shock tube, the diluent effect is opposite to that in the RCM. For dilute mixtures of isooctane, calculations have predicted that mixtures with argon will ignite faster than those with nitrogen, based on the relative heat capacities of the two diluent gases. Overall, we conclude that the choice of diluent gases in experimental devices must be made with care, as ignition delay times can depend strongly on the type of diluent gas used. (author)

  10. Assessment of Blasting Performance Using Electronic Vis-à-Vis Shock Tube Detonators in Strong Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Suresh Kumar; Rai, Piyush

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation of the shock tube and electronic detonating systems practised in bench blasting. The blast trials were conducted on overburden rocks of Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss formations in one of the largest metalliferous mine of India. The study revealed that the choice of detonating system was crucial in deciding the fragment size and its distribution within the blasted muck-piles. The fragment size and its distribution affected the digging rate of excavators. Also, the shape of the blasted muck-pile was found to be related to the degree of fragmentation. From the present work, it may be inferred that in electronic detonation system, timely release of explosive energy resulted in better overall blasting performance. Hence, the precision in delay time must be considered in designing blast rounds in such overburden rock formations. State-of-art image analysis, GPS based muck-pile profile plotting techniques were rigorously used in the investigation. The study revealed that a mean fragment size (K50) value for shock tube detonated blasts (0.55-0.59 m) was higher than that of electronically detonated blasts (0.43-0.45 m). The digging rate of designated shovels (34 m3) with electronically detonated blasts was consistently more than 5000 t/h, which was almost 13 % higher in comparison to shock tube detonated blasts. Furthermore, favourable muck-pile shapes were witnessed in electronically detonated blasts from the observations made on the dozer performance.

  11. A shock-tube determination of the SiO /A 1 Pi - X 1 Sigma +/ transition moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Arnold, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    The sum of the squares of the electronic transition moments for the A 1 Pi - X 1 Sigma + band system of SiO has been determined from absorption measurements conducted in the reflected-shock region of a shock tube. The test gas was produced by shock-heating a mixture of N2O, SiCl4, and Ar, and the spectra were recorded photographically in the 260-290-nm wavelength range. The values of the sum as a function of internuclear distance between 2.8 and 3.3 Bohr were determined by comparing the measured absorption spectrum with that produced by a line-by-line synthetic-spectrum calculation which accounted for instrumental broadening. The value of the sum so deduced at an internuclear distance of 3.0 Bohr was 1.0 + or - 0.3 atomic units.

  12. A shock-tube measurement of the SiO/E 1 Sigma + - X 1 Sigma +/ transition moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    The sum of the squares of the electronic transition moments for the (E 1 Sigma +) - (X 1 Sigma +) band system of SiO has been determined from absorption measurements conducted in the reflected-shock region of a shock tube. The test gas produced by shock-heating a mixture of SiCl4, N2O, and Ar, and the spectra were recorded photographically in the 150-230-nm wavelength range. The values of the sum of the squares were determined by comparing the measured absorption spectra with those produced by a line-by-line synthetic spectrum calculation. The value so deduced at an r-centroid value of 3.0 bohr was 0.86 + or - 0.10 atomic unit.

  13. Self-ignition of S.I. engine model fuels: A shock tube investigation at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fieweger, K.; Blumenthal, R.; Adomeit, G.

    1997-06-01

    The self-ignition of several spark-ignition (SI) engine fuels (iso-octane, methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether and three different mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane), mixed with air, was investigated experimentally under relevant engine conditions by the shock tube technique. Typical modes of the self-ignition process were registered cinematographically. For temperatures relevant to piston engine combustion, the self-ignition process always starts as an inhomogeneous, deflagrative mild ignition. This instant is defined by the ignition delay time, {tau}{sub defl}. The deflagration process in most cases is followed by a secondary explosion (DDT). This transition defines a second ignition delay time, {tau}{sub DDT}, which is a suitable approximation for the chemical ignition delay time, if the change of the thermodynamic conditions of the unburned test gas due to deflagration is taken into account. For iso-octane at p = 40 bar, a NTC (negative temperature coefficient), behavior connected with a two step (cool flame) self-ignition at low temperatures was observed. This process was very pronounced for rich and less pronounced for stoichiometric mixtures. The results of the {tau}{sub DDT} delays of the stoichiometric mixtures were shortened by the primary deflagration process in the temperature range between 800 and 1,000 K. Various mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane were investigated. The results show a strong influence of the n-heptane fraction in the mixture, both on the ignition delay time and on the mode of self-ignition. The self-ignition of methanol and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) is characterized by a very pronounced initial deflagration. For temperatures below 900 K (methanol: 800 K), no secondary explosion occurs. Taking into account the pressure increase due to deflagration, the measured delays {tau}{sub DDT} of the secondary explosion are shortened by up to one order of magnitude.

  14. Trapping Efficiency of 1,3-Dichloropropene Isomers by XAD-4 Sorbent Tubes for Air Sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission monitoring is necessary to evaluate the impact of air pollutants such as soil fumigants on the environment. Quantifying fumigant emissions often involves the use of air sampling tubes filled with sorbents to trap fumigants. 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) are being increas...

  15. An Inexpensive and Versatile Version of Kundt's Tube for Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Experiments that measure the speed of sound in air are common in high schools and colleges. In the Kundt's tube experiment, a horizontal air column is adjusted until a resonance mode is achieved for a specific frequency of sound. When this happens, the cork dust in the tube is disturbed at the displacement antinode regions. The location of the displacement antinodes enables the measurement of the wavelength of the sound that is being used. This paper describes a design that uses a speaker instead of the traditional aluminum rod as the sound source. This allows the use of multiple sound frequencies that yield a much more accurate speed of sound in air.

  16. A shock tube laser schlieren study of methyl acetate dissociation in the fall-off regime.

    PubMed

    Annesley, Christopher J; Franklin Goldsmith, C; Tranter, Robert S

    2014-04-28

    The pyrolysis of methyl acetate, 2% and 4% dilute in krypton, was investigated in a diaphragmless shock tube (DFST) using laser schlieren densitometry (LS). Experiments were performed at 122 ± 3 and 63 ± 2 Torr over the temperature range of 1492-2266 K. Master equation models for the four main dissociation paths of methyl acetate based on a prior study by Peukert et al. [S. Peukert, R. Sivaramakrishnan, M. Su and J. Michael, Combust. Flame, 2012, 159, 2312-2323] were refined and formed the basis for simulating the LS experiments. The density gradient profiles from the LS experiments indicate that the initial dissociation proceeds predominantly by breakage of the C-O bond leading ultimately to two methyl radicals and CO2, accounting for 83-88% of the methyl acetate loss over this temperature range. Rate coefficients for dissociation of methyl acetate were satisfactorily simulated with a master equation model, with modelled rate coefficients of k120 Torr = 9.06 × 10(81) × T(-19.07) × exp(-61 600K/T) s(-1), k60 Torr = 3.71 × 10(82) × T(-19.34) × exp(-61 200K/T) s(-1), and of k∞ = 1.97 × 10(30) × T(-3.80) × exp(-47 900K/T) s(-1) for the major channel, based on fitting to 120 Torr and 60 Torr data taken in this study. The model also captures the pressure dependency of methyl acetate dissociation and resolves an earlier discrepancy concerning the mechanism of dissociation of methyl acetate. PMID:24608752

  17. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  18. Comparative Shock-Tube Study of Autoignition and Plasma-Assisted Ignition of C2-Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, Ilya; Kindysheva, Svetlana; Plastinin, Eugeny; Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of pulsed picosecond and nanosecond discharge development in liquid water, ethanol and hexane Using a shock tube with a discharge cell, ignition delay time was measured in a lean (φ = 0.5) C2H6:O2:Ar mixture and in lean (φ = 0.5) and stoichiometric C2H4:O2:Ar mixtures with a high-voltage nanosecond discharge and without it. The measured results were compared with the measurements made previously with the same setup for C2H6-, C2H5OH- and C2H2-containing mixtures. It was shown that the effect of plasma on ignition is almost the same for C2H6, C2H4 and C2H5OH. The reduction in time is smaller for C2H2, the fuel that is well ignited even without the discharge. Autoignition delay time was independent of the stoichiometric ratio for C2H6 and C2H4, whereas this time in stoichiometric C2H2- and C2H5OH-containing mixtures was noticeably shorter than that in the lean mixtures. Ignition after the discharge was not affected by a change in the stoichiometric ratio for C2H2 and C2H4, whereas the plasma-assisted ignition delay time for C2H6 and C2H5OH decreased as the equivalence ratio changed from 1 to 0.5. Ignition delay time was calculated in C2-hydrocarbon-containing mixtures under study by simulating separately discharge and ignition processes. Good agreement was obtained between new measurements and calculated ignition delay times.

  19. Experimental study of soot formation from a diesel fuel surrogate in a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Olivier; Djebaili-Chaumeix, Nabiha; Paillard, Claude-Etienne; Douce, Francoise

    2009-08-15

    The soot tendency (soot induction delay time and soot yield) of a diesel fuel surrogate and of the hydrocarbons that constitute this mixture was studied in a heated shock tube. The surrogate is composed of three hydrocarbons representative of major chemical families of diesel fuels (39% n-propylcyclohexane, 28% n-butylbenzene, and 33% 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane in mass proportion). Experiments were carried out for highly diluted mixtures in argon; in the case of pyrolysis and at two equivalence ratios: 18 and 5. The pressure range was relatively high (1090-1870 kPa) and the carbon atom concentration was kept constant at around 2 x 10{sup +18} atoms cm{sup -3}. The effects of the nature of the hydrocarbon, the oxygen addition, and the temperature on the soot induction delay time and soot yield were investigated. A second growth stage of the soot volume fraction was observed. The influence of several parameters on the existence and/or on the amplitude of this second growth seems to indicate the chemical nature of this phenomenon. Results for the soot tendency show that the soot induction delay time and soot yield depend strongly on the structure of the hydrocarbon and on the concentration of oxygen. The study of the diesel surrogate shows that the soot inception process does not depend on synergistic effects between hydrocarbons but seems to be initiated by the constituent of the surrogate that produces soot fastest, while other constituents were consumed later during the soot growth. (author)

  20. A comparison of measured and predicted test flow in an expansion tube with air and oxygen test gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaggard, K. V.; Goad, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of temperature, density, pitot pressure, and wall pressure in both air and O2 test gases were obtained in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. These tests show nonequilibrium chemical and vibrational relaxation significantly affect the test-flow condition. The use of an electromagnetic device to preopen the secondary diaphragm before the arrival of the primary shock wave resulted in an improvement in the agreement between the measured pitot pressure and the value inferred from measured density and interface velocity. Boundary-layer splitter plates used to reduce the wall boundary layer show that this disagreement in the measured and inferred pitot pressures is not a result of boundary-layer effects.

  1. Experimental Demonstration of the Use of a N2O/N2 Mixture in the Driven Tube of a Reflected Shock Tunnel in Order to Increase Test Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Wilson, Gregory J.; Sussman, Myles A.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out into the replacement of air in the driven tube of a reflected shock tunnel by an N2O/N2 mixture in order to increase the test time. The incident shock velocities were between 2 and 3 km/sec. Test times were estimated from light emission histories in the driven tube (at distance of L/D = 46.5 from the main diaphragm) and in the nozzle at an area ratio of 27.9 and from pressure histories just upstream of the nozzle entrance (at L/D = 54). The test times estimated from the light emission histories in the driven tube showed that consistent increases of 60-100% were obtained upon substituting N2O/N2 for air in the driven tube. These increases were in very good agreement with theoretical estimates. The test times estimated from the light emission histories in the nozzle or pressure histories at the nozzle inlet showed significant improvements with N2O/N2 only for cases where the facility was operated at substantially overtailored conditions. It is believed that this is due to the greater stability of the driver-driven interface at overtailored operating conditions. At overtailored operating conditions, test times increases of 60-100% with N2O/N2 were observed with all three diagnostic techniques. These increases were in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates.

  2. Uncertainty Analysis of Air Radiation for Lunar Return Shock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    By leveraging a new uncertainty markup technique, two risk analysis methods are used to compute the uncertainty of lunar-return shock layer radiation predicted by the High temperature Aerothermodynamic Radiation Algorithm (HARA). The effects of epistemic uncertainty, or uncertainty due to a lack of knowledge, is considered for the following modeling parameters: atomic line oscillator strengths, atomic line Stark broadening widths, atomic photoionization cross sections, negative ion photodetachment cross sections, molecular bands oscillator strengths, and electron impact excitation rates. First, a simplified shock layer problem consisting of two constant-property equilibrium layers is considered. The results of this simplified problem show that the atomic nitrogen oscillator strengths and Stark broadening widths in both the vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectral regions, along with the negative ion continuum, are the dominant uncertainty contributors. Next, three variable property stagnation-line shock layer cases are analyzed: a typical lunar return case and two Fire II cases. For the near-equilibrium lunar return and Fire 1643-second cases, the resulting uncertainties are very similar to the simplified case. Conversely, the relatively nonequilibrium 1636-second case shows significantly larger influence from electron impact excitation rates of both atoms and molecules. For all cases, the total uncertainty in radiative heat flux to the wall due to epistemic uncertainty in modeling parameters is 30% as opposed to the erroneously-small uncertainty levels (plus or minus 6%) found when treating model parameter uncertainties as aleatory (due to chance) instead of epistemic (due to lack of knowledge).

  3. Turbulence in the air tubes of radiators for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes an investigation of the characteristics of flow in the air passages of aircraft radiators. The work was done by the National Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  4. CO concentration and temperature measurements in a shock tube for Martian mixtures by coupling OES and TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Yu, X. L.; Li, F.; Zhang, S. H.; Xin, J. G.; Chang, X. Y.

    2013-03-01

    CO concentration and gas temperature distribution are diagnosed behind a strong shock wave simulating the Martian atmosphere entry processes by coupling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The strong shock wave (6.31 ± 0.11 km/s) is established in a shock tube driven by combustion of hydrogen and oxygen. Temperature of the shock-heated gas is inferred through a precise analysis of the high temporal and spatial resolution experimental spectral of CN violet system ( B 2 Σ + →X 2 Σ +, Δ v = 0 sequence) using OES. A CO absorption line near 2,335.778 nm is utilized for detecting the CO concentration using scanned-wavelength direct absorption mode with 50 kHz repetition rate. Combined with temperature results from OES, CO concentration in the thermal equilibrium region is derived. The current experimental results are complementary for determining an accurate rate coefficient of CO2 dissociation and validation relevant chemical kinetics models in Mars atmosphere entry processes.

  5. Hook-method measurements of gf-values for ultraviolet Fe I and Fe II lines on a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, M. C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Transition probabilities for 14 lines of Fe II and 12 lines of Fe I in the wavelength region 2560-2737 A were measured by use of a shock tube and the hook method. Absolute oscillator strengths for resonance lines of Fe I reported by Banfield and Huber were used to determine the number density of neutral iron in the shock-heated gas. With the assumption of thermal equilibrium, the density of singly ionized iron atoms in this gas was then computed from the measured temperature and pressure with the aid of the Saha equation. Our results on the 12 strongest of the 13 lines belonging to the first ultraviolet multiplet of Fe II indicate that the multiplet f-value is larger by a factor of 2 than that derived from lifetime measurements by Assousa and Smith.

  6. Systemic Air Embolism Associated with Pleural Pigtail Chest Tube Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Alkhankan, Emad; Nusair, Ahmad; Mazagri, Rida

    2016-01-01

    Pleural pigtail catheter placement is associated with many complications including pneumothorax, hemorrhage, and chest pain. Air embolism is a known but rare complication of pleural pigtail catheter insertion and has a high risk of occurrence with positive pressure ventilation. In this case report, we present a 50-year-old male with bilateral pneumonia who developed a pneumothorax while on mechanical ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure mode. During the placement of the pleural pigtail catheter to correct the pneumothorax, the patient developed a sudden left sided body weakness and became unresponsive. An air embolism was identified in the right main cerebral artery, which was fatal.

  7. The flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST): a Ludwieg tube facility for wave propagation measurements in high-temperature vapours of organic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, T.; Gallo, M.; Casati, E.; Nannan, N. R.; Zamfirescu, C.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the commissioning of the flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST), a novel Ludwieg tube-type facility designed and built at Delft University of Technology, together with the results of preliminary experiments. The FAST is conceived to measure the velocity of waves propagating in dense vapours of organic fluids, in the so-called non-ideal compressible fluid dynamics (NICFD) regime, and can operate at pressures and temperatures as high as 21 bar and 400°C, respectively. The set-up is equipped with a special fast-opening valve, separating the high-pressure charge tube from the low-pressure plenum. When the valve is opened, a wave propagates into the charge tube. The wave speed is measured using a time-of-flight technique employing four pressure transducers placed at known distances from each other. The first tests led to the following results: (1) the leakage rate of 5 × {10}^{-4} {mbar l s^{-1}} for subatmospheric and 5 × {10}^{-2} {mbar l s^{-1}} for a superatmospheric pressure is compatible with the purpose of the conceived experiments, (2) the process start-up time of the valve has been found to be between 2.1 and 9.0 ms, (3) preliminary rarefaction wave experiments in the dense vapour of siloxane {D}_6 (dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane, an organic fluid) were successfully accomplished up to temperatures of 300°C, and (4) a method for the estimation of the speed of sound from wave propagation experiments is proposed. Results are found to be within 2.1 % of accurate model predictions for various gases. The method is then applied to estimate the speed of sound of {D}_6 in the NICFD regime.

  8. Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters in equilibrium air including attached-shock solutions for surfaces at angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Souders, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters for air in thermochemical equilibrium are tabulated as a function of shock angle for altitudes ranging from 15.24 km to 91.44 km in increments of 7.62 km at selected hypersonic speeds. Post-shock parameters tabulated include flow-deflection angle, velocity, Mach number, compressibility factor, isentropic exponent, viscosity, Reynolds number, entropy difference, and static pressure, temperature, density, and enthalpy ratios across the shock. A procedure is presented for obtaining oblique-shock flow properties in equilibrium air on surfaces at various angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral by use of the two-dimensional tabulations. Plots of the flow parameters against flow-deflection angle are presented at altitudes of 30.48, 60.96, and 91.44 km for various stream velocities.

  9. Characterization of a High Temporal Resolution TDLAS System for Measurements in a Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F.; O'Byrne, Sean; Kleine, H.; Weigand, B.

    Transient heating and pressurization of a gas by shock waves can be useful for a variety of purposes, particularly for configurations involving shock wave focussing. Unless the geometry is particularly simple, the time history of temperature can be difficult to predict accurately. Hence, a non-intrusive measurement technique with high temporal resolution is required to record the time history of the very rapidly changing temperature of a shock-heated flow. One promising measurement techniques for these high-speed flows is Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS)

  10. Plasticizers, antioxidants, and other contaminants found in air delivered by PVC tubing used in respiratory therapy.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sandra S; Shaw, Brenda R; Wu, Alan H B

    2003-06-01

    Of the many compounds that leach from respiratory therapy tubing into air passing through it, we selected five compounds to analyze. The five compounds are known to be potentially carcinogenic, toxic or known to induce estrogenic activity. Parts-per-million and parts-per-billion concentrations of these species were found in the air passing through the tubing: the plasticizers di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-ethyl phthalate (DEP), the antioxidants butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT) and p-nonylphenol (p-NP), and the contaminant (from commercial preparation of DEHP) 2-ethylhexanol (2-EH). These levels are high enough to cause some concern about exposure for patients who use oxygen on a long-term basis, those sensitive or allergic to these species, or those with asthma. A method was developed for analysis of solid tubing samples, showing great variability in concentrations of small, volatile molecules from sample to sample. A method was also developed for pre-concentration of small molecules onto Tenax adsorbants from air passing through the tubing. Both solid samples and adsorbant loaded with analyte were analyzed by direct dynamic thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). This study does not imply that adverse reactions by patients to chemical compounds leaching from respiratory medical tubing will occur but that further investigation is warranted. PMID:12833390

  11. Schlieren imaging of loud sounds and weak shock waves in air near the limit of visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael John; Settles, Gary S.; Madalis, Matthew J.

    2010-02-01

    A large schlieren system with exceptional sensitivity and a high-speed digital camera are used to visualize loud sounds and a variety of common phenomena that produce weak shock waves in the atmosphere. Frame rates varied from 10,000 to 30,000 frames/s with microsecond frame exposures. Sound waves become visible to this instrumentation at frequencies above 10 kHz and sound pressure levels in the 110 dB (6.3 Pa) range and above. The density gradient produced by a weak shock wave is examined and found to depend upon the profile and thickness of the shock as well as the density difference across it. Schlieren visualizations of weak shock waves from common phenomena include loud trumpet notes, various impact phenomena that compress a bubble of air, bursting a toy balloon, popping a champagne cork, snapping a wooden stick, and snapping a wet towel. The balloon burst, snapping a ruler on a table, and snapping the towel and a leather belt all produced readily visible shock-wave phenomena. In contrast, clapping the hands, snapping the stick, and the champagne cork all produced wave trains that were near the weak limit of visibility. Overall, with sensitive optics and a modern high-speed camera, many nonlinear acoustic phenomena in the air can be observed and studied.

  12. Evaluation of Length-of-Stain Gas Indicator Tubes for Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaubert, Earl C.; And Others

    Techniques for detection and measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in air are of interest and utility in many aspects of automotive safety. CO concentrations may range from less than 100 parts per million (ppm), or 0.01 percent, to about 10 percent by volume. Gas indicator tubes have been used for many years primarily as detectors of hazardous gases…

  13. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J.V.

    2009-05-15

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length {proportional_to}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=(1.90{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1705{+-}56 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=(1.86{+-}0.24) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1513{+-}123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=(2.02{+-}0.19) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1799{+-}96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=(2.55{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1824{+-}114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779}exp(97 K/T)cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=3.169 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.679}exp(119 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148}exp(536 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325}exp(602 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three

  14. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-05-01

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length 4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm3 molecule-1 s-1, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = (1.90 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1705 {+-} 156 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = (1.86 {+-} 0.24) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1513 {+-} 123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = (2.02 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1799 {+-} 96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = (2.55 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1824 {+-} 114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = 1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779} exp(97 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = 3.169 x 10{sup -16} T{sup 1.679} exp(119 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = 6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148} exp(536 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = 2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325} exp(602 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the

  15. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  16. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  17. Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane behind the Reflected Shock Waves in a Single Pulse Shock Tube (SPST) and Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parandaman, A.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Thermal reactions of Tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon were studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube (SPST) over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K and pressures varied between 10.6 and 22.8 atm. The stable products resulting from the decomposition of TMS were identified and quantified using gas chromatography and also verified with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The major reaction products are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4). The minor reaction products are ethane (C2H6) and propylene (C3H6). The initiation of mechanism in the decomposition of TMS takes plays via the Si-C bond scission by ejecting the methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The measured temperature dependent rate coefficient for the total decomposition of TMS was to be ktotal = 1.66 ×1015 exp (-64.46/RT) s-1 and for the formation of CH4 reaction channel was to be k = 2.20 × 1014 exp (-60.15/RT) s-1, where the activation energies are given in kcal mol-1. A kinetic scheme containing 17 species and 28 elementary reactions was used for the simulation using chemical kinetic simulator over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K. The agreement between the experimental and simulated results was satisfactory.

  18. Heating rate measurements over 30 deg and 40 deg (half angle) blunt cones in air and helium in the Langley expansion tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. M.

    1980-01-01

    Convective heat transfer measurements, made on the conical portion of spherically blunted cones (30 deg and 40 deg half angle) in an expansion tube are discussed. The test gases used were helium and air; flow velocities were about 6.8 km/sec for helium and about 5.1 km/sec for air. The measured heating rates are compared with calculated results using a viscous shock layer computer code. For air, various techniques to determine flow velocity yielded identical results, but for helium, the flow velocity varied by as much as eight percent depending on which technique was used. The measured heating rates are in satisfactory agreement with calculation for helium, assuming the lower flow velocity, the measurements are significantly greater than theory and the discrepancy increased with increasing distance along the cone.

  19. Development of an FE model of the rat head subjected to air shock loading.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Mao, Haojie; Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Wagner, Christina; Chou, Clifford; Jin, Xin; Bir, Cynthia; Vandevord, Pamela; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2010-11-01

    As early as the 1950's, Gurdjian and colleagues (Gurdjian et al. 1955) observed that brain injuries could occur by direct pressure loading without any global head accelerations. This pressure-induced injury mechanism was "forgotten" for some time and is being rekindled due to the many mild traumatic brain injuries attributed to blast overpressure. The aim of the current study was to develop a finite element (FE) model to predict the biomechanical response of rat brain under a shock tube environment. The rat head model, including more than 530,000 hexahedral elements with a typical element size of 100 to 300 microns was developed based on a previous rat brain model for simulating a blunt controlled cortical impact. An FE model, which represents gas flow in a 0.305-m diameter shock tube, was formulated to provide input (incident) blast overpressures to the rat model. It used an Eulerian approach and the predicted pressures were verified with experimental data. These two models were integrated and an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-structure coupling algorithm was then utilized to simulate the interaction of the shock wave with the rat head. The FE model-predicted pressure-time histories at the cortex and in the lateral ventricle were in reasonable agreement with those obtained experimentally. Further examination of the FE model predictions revealed that pressure amplification, caused by shock wave reflection at the interface of the materials with distinct wave impedances, was found in the skull. The overpressures in the anterior and posterior regions were 50% higher than those at the vertex and central regions, indicating a higher possibility of injuries in the coup and contrecoup sites. At an incident pressure of 85 kPa, the shear stress and principal strain in the brain remained at a low level, implying that they are not the main mechanism causing injury in the current scenario. PMID:21512910

  20. Absolute measurement of the photoionization cross section of atomic hydrogen with a shock tube for the extreme ultraviolet. [for astrophysical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palenius, H. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports an experiment which is part of a program to measure the absolute values of the atomic photoionization cross sections of astrophysically abundant elements, particularly in stars and planetary atmospheres. An aerodynamic pressure-driven shock tube constructed from stainless steel with a quadratic cross section was used to measure the photoionization cross section of H I at 19 wavelength points from 910 to 609 A with experimental uncertainties between 7 and 20%. The shock tube was used to produce fully dissociated hydrogen and neon mixtures for the photoabsorption measurements.

  1. Effects of fin pattern on the air side heat transfer coefficient in plate finned tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, D.T.; Fagan, T.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of air velocity, heat exchanger geometry and fin pattern on air side heat transfer in plate finned tube heat exchangers were investigated experimentally using a single fin passage model. The geometric parameters considered included tube diameter, transverse tube spacing, longitudinal tube spacing, number of tube rows and fin spacing. The effects of fin pattern depth and number of fin patterns per longitudinal tube row were investigated for a pattern consisting of corrugations of triangular cross section transverse to the direction of air flow. The heat transfer data were correlated in terms of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient (Nussult number) based on the arithmetic mean temperature difference Nu/sub a/ and the Graetz number Gz, a dimensionless measure of the level of flow development.

  2. Shock-tube thermochemistry tables for high-temperature gases. Volume 5: Carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menard, W. A.; Horton, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties and species concentrations for carbon dioxide are tabulated for moving, standing, and reflected shock waves. Initial pressures range from 6.665 to 6665 N/sq m (0.05 to 50.0 torr), and temperatures from 2,000 to over 80,000K. In this study, 20 molecular and atomic species were considered.

  3. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlík, Jan; Dlouhý, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures of steam with added air were carried out to find the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the air concentration in the steam mixture. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical formulas describing the cases. The theoretical determination of the HTC is based on the Nusselt model of steam condensation on a vertical wall, where the analogy of heat and mass transfer is used to take into account the behaviour of air in a steam mixture during the condensation process. The resulting dependencies obtained from the experiments and obtained from the theoretical model have similar results. The significant decrease in the condensation HTC, which begins at very low air concentrations in a steam mixture, was confirmed.

  4. Computed Tomography Artifact Created by Air in the X-ray Tube Oil.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Wayne R; Markovic, Michael A; Short, James H; Vera, Chido D

    2016-01-01

    A subtle artifact of patchy hypodensities in computed tomography images of the head mimicked acute or subacute cerebral infarct. The cause of the artifact was air in the oil of the x-ray tube. The artifact manifested only when the acquisition parameters included a rotation time of 0.5 second and a gantry tilt angle of 11 to 20 degrees. Routine quality control testing did not detect nonuniformities in the water phantom. PMID:26466108

  5. Biophysical analysis of bacterial and viral systems. A shock tube study of bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/nanosims investigation of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Sean Damien

    2013-05-01

    The work presented herein is concerned with the development of biophysical methodology designed to address pertinent questions regarding the behavior and structure of select pathogenic agents. Two distinct studies are documented: a shock tube analysis of endospore-laden bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/NanoSIMS study of the structure of vaccinia virus.

  6. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy. PMID:25441032

  7. Shock wave development in couple stress fluid-filled thin elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesanya, Samuel O.; Eslami, Mostafa; Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Biswas, Anjan

    2015-06-01

    This paper looks at the propagation of nonlinear waves through a fluid-filled elastic tube. Viscosity of fluid is taken into account. Using the reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear evolution equation (NLEE) is obtained and the exact travelling wave solution of the equation is obtained using the tanh method. The result shows that blood hyper-viscosity has a significant effect on the propagation of flow and pressure pulse waves.

  8. Effects of fin pattern on the air-side heat transfer coefficient in plate finned-tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, D.T.; Fagan, T.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of air velocity, heat exchanger geometry, and fin patternation on air-side heat transfer in plate finned tube heat exchangers were investigated experimentally using a single-fin passage model. The geometric parameters considered included tube diameter, transverse tube spacing, longitudinal tube spacing, number of tube rows, and fin spacing. The effects of fin pattern depth and number of fin patterns per longitudinal tube row were investigated for a pattern consisting of corrugations of triangular cross-section transverse to the direction of airflow. The heat transfer data were correlated in terms of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient (Nusselt number) based on the arithmetic mean temperature difference, Nu/sub a/, and the Graetz number, Gz, a dimensionless measure of the level of flow development.

  9. Small-scale materials blast testing using gram-range explosives and air-shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

    2006-11-01

    Many material properties are unknown under the high strain rates of shock wave impulse from an explosion in air. Actual blast testing is required for this, but full-scale explosive tests are expensive and dangerous, and yield limited data. Here we explore the possibility that gram-range explosive charges can be used for such testing in an ordinary laboratory setting. The explosion is characterized by high-speed digital shadowgraphy and piezoelectric pressure records of shock speed and overpressure duration. These data yield an explosive impulse describing the strength of shock loading at various standoff distances from a material sample (typically 25cm diameter). Simultaneously, twin high-speed digital cameras and surface tracking software provide material displacement and strain rate data during the test. In principle, these data and the measured shock loading provide a means to find dynamic material properties by an inverse computational approach. A scaling analysis also relates the gram-range blast test to a large-scale blast from the same or a different explosive.

  10. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A. III

    1997-01-01

    A broad-based set of measurements has begun on high density turbulent plasma processes. This includes determinations of new plasma physics and the initiation of work on new diagnostics for collisional plasmas as follows: (1) A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. (2) Point fluorescence emissions and averaged spectral line evolutions in turbulent plasmas produced in both the primary and the reflected shock wave flows exhibit ergodicity in the standard turbulence parameters. The data show first evidence of a reverse energy cascade in the collisional turbulent plasma. This suggests that the fully turbulent environment can be described using a stationary state formulation. In these same data, the author finds compelling evidence for a turbulent Stark effect on neutral emission lines in these data which is associated with evidence of large coherent structures and dominant modes in the Fourier analyses of the fluctuations in the optical spectra. (3) A neutral beam generator has been assembled by coupling a Colutron Ion Gun to a charge exchange chamber. Beam-target collisions where the target species is neutral and the beam is either singly charged or neutral have been performed using argon as the working gas. Spectral analysis of the emission shows specific radiative transitions characteristic of both Ar I and Ar II, indicating that some ionization of the target gas results. Gas and plasma parameters such as density, pressure, temperature and flow velocity and their fluctuations can now be followed in real time by spectroscopic analysis of carefully chosen radiative emissions.

  11. Diagnosis of iso-octane combustion in a shock tube by emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changhua; Tang, Hongchang; Zhang, Chuanzhao; Zhao, Yan; Li, Ping; Li, Xiangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-Visible emission from iso-octane combustion was measured behind reflected shock waves. OH∗, CH∗ and C2∗ were recorded as the major intermediate species. When the equivalence ratio increases, the emission intensity ratio of OH∗/CH∗ decreases and that of C2∗/OH∗ increases. Rotational and vibrational temperatures were determined by comparing the measured emission spectra with the simulated ones of CH∗ and C2∗. The rotational temperatures are in good agreement with the calculated adiabatic flame temperatures and the vibrational temperatures are significantly higher. Furthermore, ignition delay times were obtained to provide a database for the validation of the kinetic mechanism.

  12. Three dimensional simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in shock-tube experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J

    2010-01-01

    In the large eddy simulation (LES) approach large-scale energy-containing structures are resolved, smaller (presumably) more isotropic structures are filtered out, and unresolved subgrid effects are modeled. Extensive recent work has demonstrated that predictive simulations of turbulent velocity fields are possible based on subgrid scale modeling implicitly provided by a class of high-resolution finite-volume algorithms. This strategy is called implicit LES. The extension of the approach to the substantially more difficult problem of material mixing IS addressed, and progress in representative shock-driven turbulent mixing studies is reported.

  13. Computer program to solve two-dimensional shock-wave interference problems with an equilibrium chemically reacting air model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1990-01-01

    The computer program EASI, an acronym for Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, was developed to calculate the inviscid flowfield, the maximum surface pressure, and the maximum heat flux produced by six shock wave interference patterns on a 2-D, cylindrical configuration. Thermodynamic properties of the inviscid flowfield are determined using either an 11-specie, 7-reaction equilibrium chemically reacting air model or a calorically perfect air model. The inviscid flowfield is solved using the integral form of the conservation equations. Surface heating calculations at the impingement point for the equilibrium chemically reacting air model use variable transport properties and specific heat. However, for the calorically perfect air model, heating rate calculations use a constant Prandtl number. Sample calculations of the six shock wave interference patterns, a listing of the computer program, and flowcharts of the programming logic are included.

  14. Relationship among shock-wave velocity, particle velocity, and adiabatic exponent for dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In H.; Hong, Sang H.; Jhung, Kyu S.; Oh, Ki-Hwan; Yoon, Yo K.

    1991-07-01

    Using the results of the detailed numerical calculations, it is shown that the relationship between the shock-wave velocity U sub s and the particle velocity U sub p for shock-compressed dry air can be represented accurately by the linear relation U sub s = a(P0) + b(P0)U sub p in a wide range of U sub p (U sub p = 2 to 9 ) km/s and initial pressure P0 = 10 to the -6th to 1 atm, where a and b are given by the cubic polynomials of log10P0. Based on the linear U sub s - U sub p relation, an analytic expression has been obtained for the adiabatic exponent gamma as a function of particle velocity.

  15. Design and fabrication of dielectric diaphragm pressure sensors for applications to shock wave measurement in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, W.; Djakov, V.; Barton, J. S.; Watson, S.; MacPherson, W. N.; Stevenson, J. T. M.; Dunare, C. C.

    2007-07-01

    Optical fibre pressure sensors have potential performance advantages over electrical sensors in measuring rapid transients such as shock waves from explosive blasts. We report the development of micromachined optical fibre Fabry-Pérot pressure sensors using a silicon dioxide or nitride diaphragm and detail the fabrication stages of the sensor body and diaphragm. The planar technology used is based on silicon deep etching and direct fusion bonding of silicon wafers. Test results for both types of diaphragm are presented. Sensors with rise times better than 3 µs, range 0.1 to 1 MPa and resolution ~500 Pa have been demonstrated in explosives trials. Despite the difference in the sign of stress for the two diaphragm types, both demonstrated excellent high-speed response to explosively generated air shocks.

  16. Hypersonic shock-induced combustion in a hydrogen-air system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, J.K.; Tiwari, S.N.; Singh, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to investigate the shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixture. The calculations have been carried out for Mach 5.11 and 6.46. The Mach 5.11 case was found to be unsteady with periodic oscillations. The frequency of oscillations was calculated and was found to be in good agreement with the experimentally observed frequency. The Mach 6.46 case was found to be of a very high frequency and very low-amplitude phenomena. Thus it can be considered as macroscopically stable. This supports the existing view that it is possible to stabilize the shock-induced combustion phenomena with sufficient level of overdrive. 16 refs.

  17. Novel device (AirWave) to assess endotracheal tube migration: A pilot study☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Nacheli, Gustavo Cumbo; Sharma, Manish; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gupta, Amit; Guzman, Jorge A.; Tonelli, Adriano R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about endotracheal tube (ETT) migration during routine care among critically ill patients. AirWave is a novel device that uses sonar waves to measure ETT migration and obstructions in real time. The aim of the present study is to assess the accuracy of the AirWave to evaluate ETT migration. In addition, we determined the degree of variation in ETT position and tested whether more pronounced migration occurs in specific clinical scenarios. Methods After institutional review board approval, we included mechanically ventilated patients from February 2012 to May 2012. A chest radiography (CXR) was obtained at baseline and 24 hours when clinically indicated. The ETT distance at the lips was recorded at baseline and every 4 hours. The AirWave system continuously recorded ETT position changes from baseline, and luminal obstructions. Results A total of 42 patients (age: 61 [SD ± 13] years, men: 52%) were recruited. A total of 19 patients had measurements of ETT migration at 24 hours by the 3 methodologies used in this study. The mean (SD) of the ETT migration at 24 hours was +0.04 (1.2), −0.42 (0.7) and +0.34 (1.81) cm when measured by portable CXR, ETT distance at the teeth and AirWave device, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis of tube migration at 24 hours comparing the AirWave with CXR readings showed a bias of 0.1 cm with 95% limit of agreement of −3.8 and +4.3 cm. Comparison of tube migration at 24 hours determined by AirWave with ETT distance at the lips revealed a bias of −0.4 with 95% limit of agreement −3.7 to +3 cm, similar to the values observed between CXR and ETT distance at the lips (bias of −0.3 cm, 95% limit of agreement of −3.4 to +2.8 cm). Factors associated with ETT migration at 24 hours were ETT size and initial measurement from ETT tip to carina by portable CXR. AirWave detected in eight patients some degree of ETT obstruction (30% ± 9.6%) that resolved with prompt ETT catheter suction. Conclusions The Air

  18. DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2007-04-30

    Equations describing the hoop stresses in a pipe due to water hammer have been presented in the literature in a series of papers, and this paper discusses the complete derivation of the pertinent equation. The derivation considers the pipe wall response to a water hammer induced shock wave moving along the inner wall of the pipe. Factors such as fluid properties, pipe wall materials, pipe dimensions, and damping are considered. These factors are combined to present a single, albeit rather complicated, equation to describe the pipe wall vibrations and hoop stresses as a function of time. This equation is also compared to another theoretical prediction for hoop stresses, which is also derived herein. Specifically, the two theories predict different maximum stresses, and the differences between these predictions are graphically displayed.

  19. Soot formation in shock-tube pyrolysis and oxidation of vinylacetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Yuan, T.; Ramachandra, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    Soot formation in vinylacetylene, and vinylacetylene-oxygen argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser beam. The experiments were performed at temperatures of 1600-2500 K, pressures of 2.08-3.09 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of (1.99-2.05) x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. The experimental results obtained in pyrolysis of vinylacetylene are similar to those of acetylene, both in the order of magnitude of the soot yield and the shape of its temperature dependence. The addition of oxygen to vinylacetylene shifts the soot bell to lower temperature and, distinct from all other hydrocarbons studied in this laboratory, accelerates the production of soot with reaction time. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of possible chemical reaction.

  20. Thermal Decomposition of NCN: Shock-Tube Study, Quantum Chemical Calculations, and Master-Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anna; González-García, Núria; Lendvay, György; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of cyanonitrene, NCN, was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1790-2960 K at pressures near 1 and 4 bar. Highly diluted mixtures of NCN3 in argon were shock-heated to produce NCN, and concentration-time profiles of C atoms as reaction product were monitored with atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at 156.1 nm. Calibration was performed with methane pyrolysis experiments. Rate coefficients for the reaction (3)NCN + M → (3)C + N2 + M (R1) were determined from the initial slopes of the C atom concentration-time profiles. Reaction R1 was found to be in the low-pressure regime at the conditions of the experiments. The temperature dependence of the bimolecular rate coefficient can be expressed with the following Arrhenius equation: k1(bim) = (4.2 ± 2.1) × 10(14) exp[-242.3 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficients were analyzed by using a master equation with specific rate coefficients from RRKM theory. The necessary molecular data and energies were calculated with quantum chemical methods up to the CCSD(T)/CBS//CCSD/cc-pVTZ level of theory. From the topography of the potential energy surface, it follows that reaction R1 proceeds via isomerization of NCN to CNN and subsequent C-N bond fission along a collinear reaction coordinate without a tight transition state. The calculations reproduce the magnitude and temperature dependence of the rate coefficient and confirm that reaction R1 is in the low-pressure regime under our experimental conditions. PMID:25853321

  1. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  2. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Compton, S; Walton, O R; Shingleton, N; Kane, J O; Holtmeier, G; Loey, H; Mirkarimi, P B; Dunlop, W H; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes. PMID:25273784

  3. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  4. Cracking and Corrosion of Composite Tubes in Black Liquor Recovery Boiler Primary Air Ports

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R.; Singbeil, Douglas L.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Kish, Joseph R.; Yuan, Jerry; Frederick, Laurie A.; Choudhury, Kimberly A.; Gorog, J. Peter; Jetté, Francois R.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Singh, Prett M.; Maziasz, Phillip J.

    2006-10-01

    Black liquor recovery boilers are an essential part of kraft mills. Their design and operating procedures have changed over time with the goal of providing improved boiler performance. These performance improvements are frequently associated with an increase in heat flux and/or operating temperature with a subsequent increase in the demand on structural materials associated with operation at higher temperatures and/or in more corrosive environments. Improvements in structural materials have therefore been required. In most cases the alternate materials have provided acceptable solutions. However, in some cases the alternate materials have solved the original problem but introduced new issues. This report addresses the performance of materials in the tubes forming primary air port openings and, particularly, the problems associated with use of stainless steel clad carbon steel tubes and the solutions that have been identified.

  5. Effect on a shock wave boundary layer interaction of air jet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souverein, L. J.; Debiève, J.-F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous Air Jet Vortex Generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5° , a Mach number Me = 2.3, and a momentum thickness based Reynolds number of 5,000. Considered are the effects of the AJVGs on the upstream boundary layer flow topology and on the spatial and dynamical characteristics of the interaction. To this aim, Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry has been employed, in addition to hot-wire anemometry (HWA) for the investigation of the dynamical characteristics of the reflected shock. It is shown that the AJVGs significantly modify the three-dimensionality of the upstream boundary layer. Overall, the AJVGs cause a reduction of the separation bubble length and height. In addition, the energetic frequency range of the reflected shock is increased by approximately 50%, which is in qualitative agreement with the smaller separation bubble size.

  6. Numerical study of shock-wave/boundary layer interactions in premixed hydrogen-air hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye

    1990-01-01

    A computational study of shock wave/boundary layer interactions involving premixed combustible gases, and the resulting combustion processes is presented. The analysis is carried out using a new fully implicit, total variation diminishing (TVD) code developed for solving the fully coupled Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and species continuity equations in an efficient manner. To accelerate the convergence of the basic iterative procedure, this code is combined with vector extrapolation methods. The chemical nonequilibrium processes are simulated by means of a finite-rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion. Several validation test cases are presented and the results compared with experimental data or with other computational results. The code is then applied to study shock wave/boundary layer interactions in a ram accelerator configuration. Results indicate a new combustion mechanism in which a shock wave induces combustion in the boundary layer, which then propagates outwards and downstream. At higher Mach numbers, spontaneous ignition in part of the boundary layer is observed, which eventually extends along the entire boundary layer at still higher values of the Mach number.

  7. Kinetics of 1-hexene oxidation in a JSR and a shock tube: Experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Yahyaoui, M.; Djebaili-Chaumeix, N.; Dagaut, P.; Paillard, C.-E.; Gail, S.

    2006-10-15

    1-Hexene ignition delay times were measured behind reflected shock waves for 0.1% fuel diluted in Ar between 1270 and 1700 K, at pressures between 0.2 and 1 MPa. 1-C{sub 6}H{sub 12} ignition delay times were measured by following OH chemiluminescence emission. 1-Hexene oxidation has been investigated in the jet-stirred reactor (JSR) between 750 and 1200 K, at a pressure of 1 MPa, and 0.1% of fuel diluted in N{sub 2}. In both experimental studies, three equivalence ratios, 0.5, 1, and 1.5, were investigated. Molecular species concentration profiles were obtained by sonic probe sampling and GC analyses during 1-hexene oxidation in JSR. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, 1-C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, and 1,3-C{sub 4}H{sub 6} were the major products of 1-C{sub 6}H{sub 12} oxidation. All the experimental data have been compared to those calculated using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. (author)

  8. A shock tube study of the branching ratios of propene + OH reaction.

    PubMed

    Badra, Jihad; Khaled, Fethi; Giri, Binod Raj; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-28

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of the OH radical with propene (C3H6) and five deuterated isotopes, propene-1-D1 (CDHCHCH3), propene-1,1-D2 (CD2CHCH3), propene-1,1,2-D3 (CD2CDCH3), propene-3,3,3-D3 (CH2CHCD3), and propene-D6 (C3D6), were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 818-1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring the OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. Kinetic isotope effects in the measured rate coefficients are discussed and rationalized for the site-specific H-abstraction by the OH radical. The first experimental measurements for the branching ratio of the title reaction are reported and compared with transition state theory calculations. The allylic H-atom abstraction of propene by OH radicals was found to be the most dominant reaction pathway followed by propen-1-yl and propen-2-yl channels over the entire temperature range of this study. The derived Arrhenius expressions for various site-specific rate coefficients over 818-1442 K are (the subscript in the rate coefficient identifies the position of H or D atom according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes): PMID:25493300

  9. Experimental study of lean flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures in tubes of different diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshin, Y.L.; Goey, L.P.H. de

    2010-04-15

    Lean limit flames in methane/hydrogen/air mixtures propagating in tubes of internal diameters (ID) of 6.0, 8.9, 12.3, 18.4, 25.2, 35.0, and 50.2 mm have been experimentally studied. The flames propagated upward from the open bottom end of the tube to the closed upper end. The content of hydrogen in the fuel gas has been varied in the range 0-40 mol%. Lean flammability limits have been determined; flame shapes recorded and the visible speed of flame propagation measured. Most of the observed limit flames in tubes with diameters in the range of 8.9-18.4 mm had enclosed shape, and could be characterized as distorted or spherical flame balls. The tendency was observed for mixtures with higher hydrogen content to form smaller size, more uniform flame balls in a wider range of tube diameters. At hydrogen content of 20% or more in the fuel gas, limit flames in largest diameters (35.0 mm and 50.2 mm ID) tubes had small, compared to the tube diameter, size and were ''lens''-shaped. ''Regular'' open-front lean limit flames were observed only for the smallest diameters (6.0 mm and 8.9 mm) and largest diameters (35.0 and 50.2 mm ID), and only for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures, except for 6 mm ID tube in which all limit flames had open front. In all experiments, except for the lean limit flames in methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures in the 8.9 mm ID tube, and all limit flames in 6.0 mm ID tube, visible flame speeds very weakly depended on the hydrogen content in the fuel gas and were close to- or below the theoretical estimate of the speed of a rising hot bubble. This observation suggests that the buoyancy is the major factor which determines the visible flame speed for studied limit flames, except that last mentioned. A decrease of the lean flammability limit value with decreasing the tube diameter was observed for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures for tubes having internal diameters in the range

  10. Performance of the AIRS Pulse Tube Coolers and Instrument—A First Year in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R. G.; Rodriguez, J. I.

    2004-06-01

    Launched on NASA's Aqua platform on May 4, 2002, JPL's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument has completed a successful first year in space and captured a number of important lessons. AIRS is designed to make precision measurements of air temperature over the surface of the Earth and uses a redundant pair of TRW 55 K pulse tube cryocoolers to cool its sensitive IR focal plane. Soon after the instrument went cold, contamination of cryogenic surfaces led to increased cooler loads and the need for decontamination cycles. In addition, single event transients occurred while passing through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) necessitating corrective actions. In November 2002 the fundamental operating strategy of the AIRS instrument was changed from the original strategy of running a single cooler and having the second cooler as a non-operating backup. Instead, based on a new system-level reliability analysis, both coolers began operation simultaneously. This change resolved the contamination and SAA driven interruptions and has enabled unprecedented levels of continuous science measurements. A review of the AIRS instrument cryogenic performance over the past year is presented including its contamination buildup and interrupt history. The reliability analysis conducted to justify two-cooler operation is also reviewed.

  11. A Shock-Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Ehson F; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-06-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700-1230 K and 1.2-9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 μm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH(1.2-1.6 bar) = (9.14 ± 2.17) × 10(-13) exp(-(1265 ± 190)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); kCO+OH(4.3-5.1 bar) = (8.70 ± 0.84) × 10(-13) exp(-(1156 ± 83)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and kCO+OH(9.6-9.8 bar) = (7.48 ± 1.92) × 10(-13) exp(-(929 ± 192)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2006, 38, 57]. PMID:27182716

  12. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R

    2008-01-01

    Background The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. Methods An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC) for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. Results For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for more than fifty years is

  13. Hydrocode simulations of air and water shocks for facility vulnerability assessments.

    PubMed

    Clutter, J Keith; Stahl, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Hydrocodes are widely used in the study of explosive systems but their use in routine facility vulnerability assessments has been limited due to the computational resources typically required. These requirements are due to the fact that the majority of hydrocodes have been developed primarily for the simulation of weapon-scale phenomena. It is not practical to use these same numerical frameworks on the large domains found in facility vulnerability studies. Here, a hydrocode formulated specifically for facility vulnerability assessments is reviewed. Techniques used to accurately represent the explosive source while maintaining computational efficiency are described. Submodels for addressing other issues found in typical terrorist attack scenarios are presented. In terrorist attack scenarios, loads produced by shocks play an important role in vulnerability. Due to the difference in the material properties of water and air and interface phenomena, there exists significant contrast in wave propagation phenomena in these two medium. These physical variations also require special attention be paid to the mathematical and numerical models used in the hydrocodes. Simulations for a variety of air and water shock scenarios are presented to validate the computational models used in the hydrocode and highlight the phenomenological issues. PMID:14693434

  14. Rate constant for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-06

    High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants.

  15. Numerical analysis of gas and micro-particle interactions in a hand-held shock-tube device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kendall, M A F

    2006-12-01

    A unique hand-held gene gun is employed for ballistically delivering biomolecules to key cells in the skin and mucosa in the treatment of the major diseases. One of these types of devices, called the Contoured Shock Tube (CST), delivers powdered micro-particles to the skin with a narrow and highly controllable velocity distribution and a nominally uniform spatial distribution. In this paper, we apply a numerical approach to gain new insights in to the behavior of the CST prototype device. The drag correlations proposed by Henderson (1976), Igra and Takayama (1993) and Kurian and Das (1997) were applied to predict the micro-particle transport in a numerically simulated gas flow. Simulated pressure histories agree well with the corresponding static and Pitot pressure measurements, validating the CFD approach. The calculated velocity distributions show a good agreement, with the best prediction from Igra & Takayama correlation (maximum discrepancy of 5%). Key features of the gas dynamics and gas-particle interaction are discussed. Statistic analyses show a tight free-jet particle velocity distribution is achieved (570 +/- 14.7 m/s) for polystyrene particles (39 +/- 1 microm), representative of a drug payload. PMID:16917664

  16. Effect of attack and cone angels on air flow characteristics for staggered wing shaped tubes bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed E.; Ibrahiem, Emad Z.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2014-12-01

    An experimental and numerical study has been conducted to clarify fluid flow characteristics and pressure drop distributions of a cross-flow heat exchanger employing staggered wing-shaped tubes at different angels of attack. The water-side Rew and the air-side Rea were at 5 × 102 and at from 1.8 × 103 to 9.7 × 103, respectively. Three cases of the tubes arrangements with various angles of attack, row angles of attack and 90° cone angles were employed at the considered Rea range. Correlation of pressure drop coefficient Pdc in terms of Rea, design parameters for the studied cases were presented. The flow pattern around the staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle were predicted using the commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Results indicated that the values of Pdc increased with the angle of attack from 0° to 45°, while the opposite was true for angles of attack from 135° to 180°. The values of Pdc for the arrangements of (θ1,2,3 = 45°), (θ1 = 45°, θ2 = 0°, θ3 = 45°), and (θ1,2,3 = 0°) were lower than those for the arrangement of (ϕ1 = ϕ2 = ϕ3 = 90°) by about 33, 53, and 91 %, respectively. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those obtained by similar previous studies showed good agreements.

  17. Measured and predicted shock shapes for AFE configuration at Mach 6 in air and in CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.; Franks, Alan M.

    1988-01-01

    Shock shapes and stand-off distances were obtained for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment configuration from Mach 6 tests in air and in CF4. Results were plotted for an angle-of attack range from -10 to 10 degrees and comparisons were made at selected angles with inviscid-flow predictions. Tests were performed in the Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20 inch Mach 6 Tunnel (air) at unit free-stream Reynolds numbers (N sub Re, infinity) of 2 million/ft and 0.6 million/ft and in the LaRC Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel at N sub Re, infinity = 0.5 million/ft and 0.3 million/ft. Within the range of these tests, N sub Re, infinity did not affect the shock shape or stand off distance, and the predictions were in good agreement with the measurements. The shock stand-off distance in CF4 was approximately half of that in air. This effect resulted from the differences in density ratio across the normal shock, which was approximately 12 in CF4 and 5 in air. In both test gases, the shock lay progressively closer to the body as angle of attack decreased.

  18. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürrstein, Steffen H.; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-01

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  19. A shock tube with a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer for investigations of complex reaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duerrstein, Steffen H.; Aghsaee, Mohammad; Jerig, Ludger; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof

    2011-08-15

    A conventional membrane-type stainless steel shock tube has been coupled to a high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRR-TOF-MS) to be used to study complex reaction systems such as the formation of pollutants in combustion processes or formation of nanoparticles from metal containing organic compounds. Opposed to other TOF-MS shock tubes, our instrument is equipped with a modular sampling unit that allows to sample with or without a skimmer. The skimmer unit can be mounted or removed in less than 10 min. Thus, it is possible to adjust the sampling procedure, namely, the mass flux into the ionization chamber of the HRR-TOF-MS, to the experimental situation imposed by species-specific ionization cross sections and vapor pressures. The whole sampling section was optimized with respect to a minimal distance between the nozzle tip inside the shock tube and the ion source inside the TOF-MS. The design of the apparatus is presented and the influence of the skimmer on the measured spectra is demonstrated by comparing data from both operation modes for conditions typical for chemical kinetics experiments. The well-studied thermal decomposition of acetylene has been used as a test system to validate the new setup against kinetics mechanisms reported in literature.

  20. Molecular gas dynamics applied to phase change processes at a vapor-liquid interface: shock-tube experiment and MGD computation for methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Iwanami, K.; Ichijo, M.

    This paper deals with a molecular gas-dynamics method applied to the accurate determination of the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor. The method consisted of an experiment using a shock tube and computations using a molecular gas-dynamics equation. The experiments were performed in such situations where the shift from a vapor-liquid equilibrium state to a nonequilibrium one is realized by a shock wave in a scale of molecular mean free time of vapor molecules. The temporal evolution in thickness of a liquid film formed on the shock-tube endwall behind a reflected shock wave is measured by an optical interferometer. By comparing the measured liquid-film thickness with numerical solutions for a polyatomic version of the Gaussian-BGK model of the Boltzmann equation, the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is accurately determined in vapor-liquid nonequilibrium states. As a result, it is clear that the condensation coefficient is just unity very near to an equilibrium state, but is smaller far from the equilibrium state.

  1. Vertical laryngeal position and oral pressure variations during resonance tube phonation in water and in air. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wistbacka, Greta; Sundberg, Johan; Simberg, Susanna

    2016-10-01

    Resonance tube phonation in water (RTPW) is commonly used in voice therapy, particularly in Finland and Sweden. The method is believed to induce a lowering of the vertical laryngeal position (VLP) in phonation as well as variations of the oral pressure, possibly inducing a massage effect. This pilot study presents an attempt to measure VLP and oral pressure in two subjects during RTPW and during phonation with the free tube end in air. VLP is recorded by means of a dual-channel electroglottograph. RTPW was found to lower VLP in the subjects, while it increased during phonation with the tube end in air. RTPW caused an oral pressure modulation with a bubble frequency of 14-22 Hz, depending mainly on the depth of the tube end under the water surface. The results indicate that RTPW lowers the VLP instantly and creates oral pressure variations. PMID:26033381

  2. A shock tube and theory study of the dissociation of acetone and subsequent recombination of methyl radicals.

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Kiefer, J. H.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of llinois at Chicago

    2009-01-01

    The dissociation of acetone: CH{sub 3}C{double_bond}OCH{sub 3} {yields} CH{sub 3}C{double_bond}O + CH{sub 3}, quickly followed by CH{sub 3}CO {yields} CH{sub 3} + CO, has been examined with Laser-Schlieren measurements in incident shock waves over 32-717 Torr and 1429-1936 K using 5% acetone dilute in krypton. A few very low pressure experiments ({approx}10 Torr) were used in a marginal effort to resolve the extremely fast vibrational relaxation of this molecule. This effort was partly motivated as a test for molecular, 'roaming methyl' reactions, and also as a source of methyl radicals to test the application of a recent high-temperature mechanism for ethane decomposition [J.H. Kiefer, S. Santhanam, N.K. Srinivasan, R.S. Tranter, S.J. Klippenstein, M.A. Oehlschlaeger, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005) 1129-1135] on the reverse methyl combination. The gradient profiles show strong initial positive gradients and following negative values fully consistent with methyl radical formation and its following recombination. Thus C-C fission is certainly a large part of the process and molecular channels cannot be responsible for more than 30% of the dissociation. Rates obtained for the C-C fission show strong falloff well fit by variable reaction coordinate transition state theory when combined with a master equation. The calculated barrier is 82.8 kcal/mol, the fitted <{Delta}E>{sub down} = 400 (T/298) cm{sup -1}, similar to what was found in a recent study of C-C fission in acetaldehyde, and the extrapolated k{sub {infinity}} = 10{sup 25.86} T{sup -2.72} exp(?87.7 (kcal/mol)/RT), which agrees with the literature rate for CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}CO. Large negative (exothermic) gradients appearing late from methyl combination are accurately fit in both time of onset and magnitude by the earlier ethane dissociation mechanism. The measured dissociation rates are in close accord with one earlier shock-tube study [K. Sato, Y. Hidaka, Combust. Flame 122 (2000) 291-311], but show much

  3. Effects of Tube Diameter and Tubeside Fin Geometry on the Heat Transfer Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. S.; Honda, Hiroshi

    A theoretical study has been made on the effects of tube diameter and tubeside fin geometry on the heat transfer performance of air-cooled condensers. Extensive numerical calculations of overall heat transfer from refrigerant R410A flowing inside a horizontal microfin tube to ambient air were conducted for a typical operating condition of the air-cooled condenser. The tubeside heat transfer coefficient was calculated by applying a modified stratified flow model developed by Wang et al.8). The numerical results show that the effects of tube diameter, fin height, fin number and helix angle of groove are significant, whereas those of the width of flat portion at the fin tip, the radius of round corner at the fin tip and the fin half tip angle are small.

  4. Underwater Shock Response of Air-Backed Thin Aluminum Alloy Plates: An Experimental and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Studies on dynamic response of structures subjected to underwater explosion shock loading are of interest to ship designers. Understanding the deformation and failure mechanism of simple structures plays an important role in designing of a reliable structure under this kind of loading. The objective of this combined experimental and numerical study is to analyze the deformation and failure characteristics of 5A06 aluminum alloy plates under underwater shock loading. Some non-explosive underwater blast loading experiments were carried out on air backed circular plates of 2 mm thickness. The deformation history of the clamped circular plate was recorded using a high speed camera and the deflections of specimens at different radii were measured in order to identify deformation and failure modes. In the finite element simulations, the strength model of 5A06 aluminum alloy is considered using the slightly modified Johnson-cook mode to describe structure deformation. Good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental results is found. Detailed computational results of each scenario are offered to understand the deformation and failure mechanism. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.:11072072).

  5. Underwater shock response of air-backed thin aluminum alloy plates: An experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Studies on dynamic response of structures subjected to underwater explosion shock loading are of interest to ship designers. Understanding the deformation and failure mechanism of simple structures plays an important role in designing of a reliable structure under this kind of loading. The objective of this combined experimental and numerical study is to analyze the deformation and failure characteristics of 5A06 aluminum alloy plates under underwater shock loading. Some non-explosive underwater blast loading experiments were carried out on air backed circular plates of 2 mm thickness. The deformation history of the clamped circular plate was recorded using a high speed camera and the deflections of specimens at different radii were measured in order to identify deformation and failure modes. In the finite element simulations, the strength model of 5A06 aluminum alloy is considered using the slightly modified Johnson-cook mode to describe structure deformation. Good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental results is found. Detailed computational results of each scenario are offered to understand the deformation and failure mechanism.

  6. Effects of temperature, particle features and vent geometry on volcanic jet dynamics, a shock-tube investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The lowermost part of an eruptive plume commonly shows characteristics of an underexpanded jet. The dynamics of this gas-thrust region are likely to be a direct consequence of intrinsic (magma properties, overpressure) and extrinsic (vent geometry, weather) eruption conditions. Additionally, they affect the subsequent evolution of the eruptive column and have, therefore, important hazard assessment implications for both near- and far-field. Direct observation of eruptive events is possible, but often insufficient for complete characterization. Important complementary data can be achieved using controlled and calibrated laboratory experiments. Loose natural particles were ejected from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25° and 500°C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), density (basaltic and phonolitic), gas-particle ratio and vent geometry (nozzle, cylindrical, funnel with a flaring of 15° and 30°, respectively). For each experiment, we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle, the presence of electric discharges and the production of fines and analysed their dynamic evolution. Data shows velocity of up to 296 m/s and deceleration patterns following nonlinear paths. Gas spreading angles range between 21° and 41° while the particle spreading angles between 3° and 32°. Electric discharges, in the form of lightning, are observed, quantified and described. Moreover, a variation in the production of fines is recognized during the course of single experiments. This experimental investigation, which mechanistically mimics the process of pyroclast ejection, is shown to be capable of constraining the effects of input parameters and conduit/vent geometry on pyroclastic plumes. Therefore, the results should greatly enhance the ability of numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  7. The Pulsatile Propagation of a Finger of Air Within a Fluid-Occluded Cylindrical Tube

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bradford J.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2008-01-01

    We computationally investigate the unsteady pulsatile propagation of a finger of air through a liquid-filled cylindrical rigid tube using a combined boundary element method and lubrication theory approach. The flow-field is governed by the dimensionless parameters CaQ(t) = CaM + CaΩ sin(Ωt) = μQ*(t*)/πR2γ, Ω = μωR/γ and A = 2CaΩ/Ω. Here, CaQ(t) consists of both mean (CaM) and oscillatory (CaΩ) components. It is shown that the behavior of this system is appropriately described by steady-state responses until the onset of reverse flow, wherein the system operates in the unsteady regime (CaΩ > CaM). When flows in this regime are considered, converging and diverging stagnation points move dynamically throughout the cycle and may temporarily separate from the interface at high Ω. We have also found that for CaΩ < 10CaM the bubble tip pressure drop ΔPtip may be estimated accurately from the pressure measured downstream of the bubble tip when corrections for the pressure drop due to Poiseuille flow are applied. The normal stress gradient at the tube wall (∂τn/∂z) is discussed in detail, as this is believed to be the primary factor in airway epithelial cell damage (Bilek et al 2003). In the unsteady regime we find that local film-thinning produces high ∂τn/∂z at low CaΩ. Film thickening at moderate CaΩ in the unsteady regime protects the tube wall from the large gradients near the bubble tip, therefore reducing ∂τn/∂z. We find that the stress field is highly dynamic and exhibits intriguing spatial and temporal characteristics that may be of interest to our field of study, pulmonary airway reopening. PMID:19081756

  8. An air-cooled pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianying; Wang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Luo, Ercang; Li, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    A pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K is developed to cool superconducting devices mounted on automobiles. The envisioned cryocooler weight is less than 40 kg, and the input electric power is less than 1 kW. To achieve these requirements, the working frequency is increased to 75 Hz, and the dual-opposed pistons use gas bearings to reduce compressor weight and volume. The heat from the main heat exchanger is rejected by forced convective air instead of water. The compressor and the cold finger are carefully matched to improve the efficiency. The details of these will be presented in this paper. After some adjustment, a no load temperature for the pulse tube cryocooler of 40 K was achieved with 1 kW input electric power in surroundings at 298 K. At 77 K, the cooling capacity is 50 W. If the main heat exchanger is cooled by water at 293 K, the cooling capacity increases to 64 W, corresponding to a relative Carnot efficiency of 18%.

  9. Spectral Evidence for Ionization in Air-Filled Glow Discharge Tubes: Application to Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. A.; Williams, E. R.; Golka, R. K.; Williams, D. R.

    2001-12-01

    The question of ionization in sprites and the evidence for VLF backscatter from sprites has motivated a quantitative spectral analysis of the various (classical) regions of the glow discharge tube under DC excitation and at air densities appropriate for sprites in the mesosphere. A PR-650 colorimeter (Photo Research, Inc.) has enabled calibrated irradiance measurements for localized zones along the axis of the discharge tube--in the dominantly blue negative glow, in the Faraday dark space and in the red/pink positive column. Consistent with historical nomenclature, nitrogen first and second positive emission is dominant in the positive column (associated with neutral N2), and nitrogen first negative emission, with a prominent peak at 4278 A, is dominant in the blue negative glow (associated with ionized N2+). Whereas nitrogen first and second positive emission are also detected in the negative glow, no spectral evidence for ionization (no 4279, no 3914, no Meinel) is found in the red/pink positive column. This negative result is attributed not to an absence of ionization in the positive column, but rather to a sparse population of N2+ relative to neutral nitrogen in this region, and to the prominent emission in the blue part of the spectrum due to nitrogen second positive. A similar interpretation may be appropriate for the time-integrated spectra from the red body of sprites, also lacking direct evidence for ionization.

  10. Formation of Nano-Bacteria-Like Flow Textures Formed at Oxygen-Rich Air Condition of Shock Wave Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Tanosaki, T.

    2011-03-01

    Nano-flow textures with irregular shapes are obtained by shock impact on carbon-fibers with oxygen-rich air condition (not at vacuum condition), which are different with nano-bacteria texture of the martian meteorite with regular nano-flow textures.

  11. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Schnekenburger, Marc; Paxton, Karen; Brown, Anthony; Mendis, Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure is associated with compromised tracheal mucosal perfusion and injuries. No published data are available for Australia on pressures in the fixed-wing air medical retrieval setting. Objective. After introduction of a cuff pressure manometer (Mallinckrodt, Hennef, Germany) at the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Base in Dubbo, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we assessed the prevalence of increased cuff pressures before, during, and after air medical retrieval. Methods. This was a retrospective audit in 35 ventilated patients during fixed-wing retrievals by the RFDS in NSW, Australia. Explicit chart review of ventilated patients was performed for cuff pressures and changes during medical retrievals with pressurized aircrafts. Pearson correlation was calculated to determine the relation of ascent and ETT cuff pressure change from ground to flight level. Results. The mean (± standard deviation) of the first ETT cuff pressure measurement on the ground was 44 ± 20 cmH2O. Prior to retrieval in 11 patients, the ETT cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O and in 11 patients >50 cmH2O. After ascent to cruising altitude, the cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O in 22 patients and >50 cmH2O in eight patients. The cuff pressure was reduced 1) in 72% of cases prior to take off and 2) in 85% of cases during flight, and 3) after landing, the cuff pressure increased in 85% of cases. The correlation between ascent in cabin altitude and ETT cuff pressure was r = 0.3901, p = 0.0205. Conclusions. The high prevalence of excessive cuff pressures during air medical retrieval can be avoided by the use of cuff pressure manometers. Key words: cuff pressure; air medical retrieval; prehospital. PMID:23252881

  12. Comparison of success rate of intubation through Air-Q with ILMA using two different endotracheal tubes

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, SK; Bharath, KV; Saini, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q™ is a newly introduced airway device, which can be used to facilitate endotracheal intubation. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether use of two different endotracheal tubes (ETTs) (standard polyvinyl chloride [PVC] and reinforced PVC) increases the success rate of blind intubation through Air-Q™ (Group Q) when compared with intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA- Fastrach™) keeping ILMA as control (Group I). Methods: One hundred and twenty patients aged between 18 and 60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia, were enrolled into this prospective, randomised, case–control study to compare the success rate of tracheal intubation between ILMA (Fastrach™) and Air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway. Those patients with anticipated difficult airway were excluded from the study. All the recruited patients completed the study. Reinforced PVC ETT was used in both airway devices to secure intubation. Since standard PVC tube is recommended for use in Air-Q, when first intubation attempt failed, second or third attempt was made with standard PVC ETT. Total of three attempts were made for each procedure: Whereas in ILMA group, only reinforced tube was used in all three attempts. Results: The overall success rate after three attempts was more with Air-Q (96.6%) in our study compared with ILMA (91.6%) but no significant difference was seen between the groups (P = 0.43). Conclusion: The present study shows that when intubation with reinforced tube fails, the success rate with use of conventional PVC tube is more with Air-Q when compared with ILMA. PMID:27141106

  13. Shock enhancement and control of hypersonic mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Hendricks, Gavin; Waitz, Ian

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and computational analyses of the possibility that shock-enhanced mixing can substantially increase the rate of mixing between coflowing streams of hydrogen and air are discussed. Numerical computations indicate that the steady interaction between a weak shock in air with a coflowing hydrogen jet can be approximated by the two-dimensional time-dependent interaction between a weak shock and an initially circular region filled with hydrogen imbedded in air. Experimental results obtained in a shock tube and contoured wall injector are presented. It is shown that the shock impinging process causes the light gas cylinder to split into two parts; one of these mixes rapidly with air and the other forms a stably stratified vortex pair which mixes more slowly. The geometry of the flow field and the mixing process and scaling parameters are assessed.

  14. Application of laser-induced thermal acoustics in air to measurement of shock-induced temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Matsuzawa, Toyoki

    2009-10-01

    The laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) method was used to measure the temperature profiles induced behind spherical shock waves, generated by high-voltage discharge in air with an energy of 6 J. A Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 532 nm, energy 300 mJ, pulse duration 10 ns, line width 0.005 cm-1) and an Ar-ion laser (wavelength 488 nm, power 4 W) served as the pump and probe lasers, respectively for the LITA measurements. The peak temperatures were in good agreement with results calculated with the Euler equations. The temperature profiles behind the shock, however, differed in decay rates. The peak temperatures behind the shock wave were determined by reflected overpressure and agreed with those from the LITA measurements within a maximum error of 5%.

  15. Shock tube measurements of specific reaction rates in branched chain CH4-CO-O2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Rate constants of two elementary bimolecular reactions involved in the oxidation of methane were determined by monitoring the exponential growth of CO flame band emission behind incident shocks in three suitably chosen gas mixtures.

  16. Shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1998-02-01

    Shock heating t-butyl hydroperoxide behind a reflected shock wave has proved to be as a convenient source of hydroxyl radicals at temperatures near 1000 K. We applied this technique to the measurement of reaction rate coefficients of OH with several species of interest in combustion chemistry, and developed a thermochemical kinetics/transition state theory (TK-TST) model for predicting the temperature dependence of OH rate coefficients.

  17. Detailed Simulations of Shock-Bifurcation and Ignition of an Argon-diluted Hydrogen/Oxygen Mixture in a Shock Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ihme, Matthias; Sun, Yong; Deiterding, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Detailed simulations of the bifurcation and ignition of an Argon-diluted Hydrogen/Oxygen mixture in the two-stage weak ignition regime are performed. An adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) technique is employed to resolve all relevant physical scales that are associated with the viscous boundary-layer, the reaction front, and the shock-wave. A high-order hybrid WENO/central-differencing method is used as spatial discretization scheme, and a detailed chemical mechanism is employed to describe the combustion of the H2/O2 mixture. The operating conditions considered in this study are p = 5 bar and T = 1100 K, and fall in the third explosion limit. The computations show that the mixing of the thermally stratified fluid, carrying different momentum and enthalpy, introduces inhomogeneities in the core-region behind the reflected shock. These inhomogeneities act as localized ignition kernels. During the induction period, these kernels slowly expand and eventually transition to a detonation wave that rapidly consumes the unburned mixture.In competition with this detonation wave are the presence of secondary ignition kernels that appear in the unreacted core-region between reflected shock and detonation wave.

  18. The Development of a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for Diisobutylene and Comparison to Shock Tube Ignition Times

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, W; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-21

    skeletal structure of iso-octane. There are few previous studies on diisobutylene. Kaiser et al. [1] examined the exhaust emission from a production spark ignition engine with neat diisobutylene and with it mixed with gasoline. They found the exhaust emissions of diisobutylene to be similar to that of iso-octane. They saw a significant increase in the amount of 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene measured in the exhaust of the engine. They also found appreciable amount of propene in the exhaust, but could not explain the source of this product as they did others in terms of C-C bond beta scission of alkyl radicals. Risberg et al. [2] studied a number of fuel blends to evaluate their autoignition quality for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine, using diisobutylene to represent olefins in one of their test fuels. In this study, experiments on the shock tube ignition of both isomers of diisobutylene will be described. Then, the development of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the two isomers of diisobutylene will be discussed.

  19. Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Thermal Shock, Air Exposure, and Fishing Capture on the Physiological Stress of Squilla mantis (Stomatopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Raicevich, Saša; Minute, Fabrizio; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Caranfa, Francesca; Di Muro, Paolo; Scapolan, Lucia; Beltramini, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the effects of multiple stressors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) on the benthic stomatopod Squilla mantis, a burrowing crustacean quite widespread in the Mediterranean Sea. Laboratory analyses were carried out to explore the physiological impairment onset over time, based on emersion and thermal shocks, on farmed individuals. Parallel field-based studies were carried out to also investigate the role of fishing (i.e., otter trawling) in inducing physiological imbalance in different seasonal conditions. The dynamics of physiological recovery from physiological disruption were also studied. Physiological stress was assessed by analysing hemolymph metabolites (L-Lactate, D-glucose, ammonia, and H+), as well as glycogen concentration in muscle tissues. The experiments were carried out according to a factorial scheme considering the three factors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air) at two fixed levels in order to explore possible synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects among factors. Additive effects on physiological parameters were mainly detected when the three factors interacted together while synergistic effects were found as effect of the combination of two factors. This finding highlights that the physiological adaptive and maladaptive processes induced by the stressors result in a dynamic response that may encounter physiological limits when high stress levels are sustained. Thus, a further increase in the physiological parameters due to synergies cannot be reached. Moreover, when critical limits are encountered, mortality occurs and physiological parameters reflect the response of the last survivors. In the light of our mortality studies, thermal shock and exposure to air have the main effect on the survival of S. mantis only on trawled individuals, while lab-farmed individuals did not show any mortality during exposure to air until after 2 hours. PMID:25133593

  20. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes. PMID:25322031

  1. Nitric oxide formation in a lean, premixed-prevaporized jet A/air flame tube: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Bianco, Jean; Deur, John M.; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on a lean, premixed-prevaporized Jet A/air flame tube. The NO(x) emissions were measured in a flame tube apparatus at inlet temperatures ranging from 755 to 866 K (900 to 1100 F), pressures from 10 to 15 atm, and equivalence ratios from 0.37 to 0.62. The data were then used in regressing an equation to predict the NO(x) production levels in combustors of similar design. Through an evaluation of parameters it was found that NO(x) is dependent on adiabatic flame temperature and combustion residence time, yet independent of pressure and inlet air temperature for the range of conditions studied. This equation was then applied to experimental data that were obtained from the literature, and a good correlation was achieved.

  2. Performance testing of the NIOSH charcoal tube technique for the determination of air concentrations of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Saalwaechter, A T; McCammon, C S; Roper, P; Carlberg, K S

    1977-09-01

    The use of the charcoal tube-gas chromatographic method to evaluate workplace air contamination has proliferated greatly in the las 10 years. This report documents early efforts by NIOSH researchers to evaluate several sampling and analytical parameters and their effect on the reliability of the technique. The effects of humidity, sample stability, sample migration and variations in the desorption efficiency are presented. A protocol is suggested for basic testing of the method for new substances. PMID:906963

  3. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  4. Shock tube measurements of specific reaction rates in the branched chain CH4-CO-O2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Rate constants of two elementary bimolecular reactions involved in the oxidation of methane have been determined by monitoring the exponential growth of CO flame band emission behind incident shocks in three suitably chosen gas mixtures. The data do not support a mechanism which invokes the four center process CH3 + O2 yields CH2O + OH for the reaction of methyl with oxygen.

  5. High-temperature shock tube and modeling studies on the reactions of methanol with D-atoms and CH3-radicals.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions D + CH3OH → CH2O + H + HD (A) and CH3 + CH3OH → CH2O + H + CH4 (B). For reaction A, the experiments span a T-range of 1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K, at pressures 0.25 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.46 bar. The experiments on reaction B, CH3 + CH3OH, cover a T-range of 1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K, at pressures around 0.40 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments, monitoring the depletion of D-atoms by applying D-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS), were performed on reaction A using gas mixtures of C2D5I and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. C2D5I was used as precursor for D-atoms. For reaction B, reflected shock tube experiments monitoring H-atom formation with H-ARAS, were carried out using gas mixtures of diacetyl ((CH3CO)2) and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. (CH3CO)2 was used as the source of CH3-radicals. Detailed reaction models were assembled to fit the D-atom and H-atom time profiles in order to obtain experimental rate constants for reactions A and B. Total rate constants from the present experiments on D + CH3OH and CH3 + CH3OH can be represented by the Arrhenius equations kA(T) = 1.51 × 10(-10) exp(-3843 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K) and kB(T) = 9.62 × 10(-12) exp(-7477 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K). The experimentally obtained rate constants were compared with available rate data from the literature. The results from quantum chemical studies on reaction A were found to be in good agreement with the present results. The present work represents the first direct experimental study on these bimolecular reactions at combustion temperatures and is important to the high-temperature oxidation of CH3OH. PMID:23968550

  6. Rate constants for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-30

    High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants. The experimental results can be expressed in Arrhenius form in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} as follows: K{sub OH+n-heptane} = (2.48 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1927 {+-} 69 K)/T] (838-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = (8.26 {+-} 0.89) x 10{sup -11} exp[(-1337 {+-} 94 K)/T] (789-1061 K); K{sub OH+n-pentane} = (1.60 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1903 {+-} 146 K)/T] (823-1308 K); K{sub OH+n-hexane} = (2.79 {+-} 0.39) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-2301 {+-} 134 K)/T] (798-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = (1.27 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1617 {+-} 118 K)/T] (843-1292 K). The available experimental data, along with lower-T determinations, were used to obtain evaluations of the experimental rate constants over the temperature range from {approx}230 to 1300 K for most of the title reactions. These extended-temperature-range evaluations, given as three-parameter fits, are as follows: k{sub OH+n-heptane} = 2.059 x 10{sup -5}T{sup 1.401} exp(33 K/T) cm{sup 3

  7. Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive, high-speed measurements in a shock tube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-01-11

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a transient environment (in this study, a shock tube). The broadband nature of the ps pulses enabled instantaneous coupling of the laser beam into roughly a thousand cavity modes, which grants excellent immunity to laser-cavity coupling noise in environments with heavy vibrations, even with an on-axis alignment. In this proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrated an absorption gain of 49, which improved the minimum detectable absorbance by ~20 compared to the conventional single-pass strategy at similar experimental conditions. For absorption measurements behind reflected shock waves, an effective time-resolution of ~2 μs was achieved, which enabled time-resolved observations of transient phenomena, such as the vibrational relaxation of O(2) demonstrated here. The substantial improvement in detection sensitivity, together with microsecond measurement resolution implies excellent potential for studies of transient physical and chemical processes in nonequilibrium situations, particularly via measurements of weak absorptions of trace species in dilute reactive systems. PMID:26832262

  8. Permanent hydrophilization of outer and inner surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes using ambient air plasma generated by surface dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pavliňák, D.; Galmiz, O.; Zemánek, M.; Brablec, A.; Čech, J.; Černák, M.

    2014-10-13

    We present an atmospheric pressure ambient air plasma technique developed for technically simple treatment of inner and/or outer surfaces of plastic tubes and other hollow dielectric bodies. It is based on surface dielectric barrier discharge generating visually diffuse plasma layers along the treated dielectric surfaces using water-solution electrodes. The observed visual uniformity and measured plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures of 333 K and 2350 K indicate that the discharge can be readily applied to material surface treatment without significant thermal effect. This is exemplified by the obtained permanent surface hydrophilization of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes related to the replacement of a high fraction (more than 80%) of the surface fluorine determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A tentative explanation of the discharge mechanism based on high-speed camera observations and the discharge current and voltage of measurements is outlined.

  9. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  10. Multistage open-tube trap for enrichment of part-per-trillion trace components of low-pressure (below 27-kPa) air samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, D.; Vo, T.; Vedder, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A multistage open-tube trap for cryogenic collection of trace components in low-pressure air samples is described. The open-tube design allows higher volumetric flow rates than densely packed glass-bead traps commonly reported and is suitable for air samples at pressures below 27 kPa with liquid nitrogen as the cryogen. Gas blends containing 200 to 2500 parts per trillion by volume each of ethane and ethene were sampled and hydrocarbons were enriched with 100 + or - 4 percent trap efficiency. The multistage design is more efficient than equal-length open-tube traps under the conditions of the measurements.

  11. High temperature shock tube studies on the thermal decomposition of O3 and the reaction of dimethyl carbonate with O-atoms.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-01

    The shock tube technique was used to study the thermal decomposition of ozone, O3, with a view to using this as a thermal precursor of O-atoms at high temperatures. The formation of O-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range, 819 K ≤ T ≤ 1166 K, at pressures 0.13 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.6 bar. Unimolecular rate theory provides an excellent representation of the falloff characteristics from the present and literature data on ozone decomposition at high temperatures. The present decomposition study on ozone permits its usage as a thermal source for O-atoms allowing measurements for, O + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → OH + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [A]. Reflected shock tube experiments monitoring the formation and decay of O-atoms were performed on reaction A using mixtures of O3 and CH3OC(O)OCH3, (DMC), in Kr bath gas over the T-range, 862 K ≤ T ≤ 1167 K, and pressure range, 0.15 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.33 bar. A detailed model was used to fit the O-atom temporal profile to obtain experimental rate constants for reaction A. Rate constants from the present experiments for O + DMC can be represented by the Arrhenius expression: kA(T) = 2.70 × 10(-11) exp(-2725 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (862-1167 K). Transition state theory calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for reaction A are in good agreement with the experimental rate constants. The theoretical rate constants can be well represented (to within ±10%) over the 500-2000 K temperature range by: kA(T) = 1.87 × 10(-20)T(2.924) exp(-2338 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The present study represents the first experimental measurement and theoretical study on this bimolecular reaction which is of relevance to the high temperature oxidation of DMC. PMID:23510082

  12. General chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions, with application to combustion and shock-tube kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics program is described for complex, homogeneous ideal-gas reactions in any chemical system. Its main features are flexibility and convenience in treating many different reaction conditions. The program solves numerically the differential equations describing complex reaction in either a static system or one-dimensional inviscid flow. Applications include ignition and combustion, shock wave reactions, and general reactions in a flowing or static system. An implicit numerical solution method is used which works efficiently for the extreme conditions of a very slow or a very fast reaction. The theory is described, and the computer program and users' manual are included.

  13. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ∼600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  14. Behavior of embedded phase in shock-driven two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehner, Garrett; Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Corbin, Clint; Bernard, Tennille; Vorobieff, Peter; Truman, C. Randall

    2013-11-01

    We present an experimental study of droplet acceleration in a shock-driven two-phase flow (air with embedded liquid droplets). The droplets (propylene glycol, diameter 0.5-3 μm) were pre-mixed with the air in the test section of a shock tube, then impulsively accelerated with planar shock wave with a Mach number of 1.7. A cross-section of the flow is illuminated with multiple pulses from Nd:YAG lasers, producing time-resolved visualizations of the seeded volume. The images are then analyzed to quantify droplet velocity and acceleration from the shock passage to about 1.5 ms after the shock. Based on the velocity measurements, we can resolve the droplet lag after the shock, when the massive droplets ``catch up'' with the flow of the surrounding air, as well as validate our earlier estimates of boundary layer growth. This research is supported by NNSA (US National Nuclear Security Agency).

  15. Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow with droplets injection in annular heated air tube using the Reynolds stress model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merouane, H.; Bounif, A.; Abidat, M.

    2013-12-01

    This work presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of single-phase and two-phase flow. The droplets are injected in annular heated air tube. The numerical simulation is performed by using a commercial CFD code witch uses the finite-volume method to discretize the equations of fluid flow. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Reynolds stress model were used in the computation. The governing equations are solved by using a SIMPLE algorithm to treat the pressure terms in the momentum equations. The results of prediction are compared with the experimental data.

  16. The effects of electron thermal radiation on laser ablative shock waves from aluminum plasma into ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of electron thermal radiation on 7 ns laser ablative shock waves from aluminum (Al) plasma into an ambient atmospheric air has been numerically investigated using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion, and radiation) radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI. The governing equations in Lagrangian form are solved using an implicit scheme for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The shockwave velocities (Vsw) obtained numerically are compared with our experimental values obtained over the intensity range of 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. It is observed that the numerically obtained Vsw is significantly influenced by the thermal radiation effects which are found to be dominant in the initial stage up to 2 μs depending on the input laser energy. Also, the results are found to be sensitive to the co-ordinate geometry used in the simulation (planar, cylindrical, and spherical). Moreover, it is revealed that shock wave undergoes geometrical transitions from planar to cylindrical nature and from cylindrical to spherical nature with time during its propagation into an ambient atmospheric air. It is also observed that the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma electron and ion parameters such as temperature, specific energy, pressure, electron number density, and mass density were found to be modified significantly due to the effects of electron thermal radiation.

  17. Measured pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes on blunt bodies at incidence in hypersonic air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1982-01-01

    Pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients, and shock shapes were measured on blunt bodies of revolution in Mach 6 CF4 and in Mach 6 and Mach 10 air. The angle of attack was varied from 0 deg to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. Configurations tested were a hyperboloid with an asymptotic angle of 45 deg, a sonic-corner paraboloid, a paraboloid with an angle of 27.6 deg at the base, a Viking aeroshell generated in a generalized orthogonal coordinate system, and a family of cones having a 45 deg half-angle with spherical, flattened, concave, and cusp nose shapes. Real-gas effects were simulated for the hperboloid and paraboloid models at Mach 6 by testing at a normal-shock density ratio of 5.3 in air and 12 CF4. Predictions from simple theories and numerical flow field programs are compared with measurement. It is anticipated that the data presented in this report will be useful for verification of analytical methods for predicting hypersonic flow fields about blunt bodies at incidence.

  18. High temperature kinetic study of the reactions H + O2 = OH + O and O + H2 = OH + H in H2/O2 system by shock tube-laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Hwang, Soon Muk; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    The reactions: (1) H + O2 = OH + O; and (2) O + H2 = OH + H are the most important elementary reactions in gas phase combustion. They are the main chain-branching reaction in the oxidation of H2 and hydrocarbon fuels. In this study, rate coefficients of the reactions and have been measured over a wide range of composition, pressure, density and temperature behind the reflected shock waves. The experiments were performed using the shock tube - laser absorption spectroscopic technique to monitor OH radicals formed in the shock-heated H2/O2/Ar mixtures. The OH radicals were detected using the P(1)(5) line of (0,0) band of the A(exp 2) Sigma(+) from X(exp 2) Pi transition of OH at 310.023 nm (air). The data were analyzed with the aid of computer modeling. In the experiments great care was exercised to obtain high time resolution, linearity and signal-to-noise. The results are well represented by the Arrhenius expressions. The rate coefficient expression for reaction (1) obtained in this study is k(1) = (7.13 +/- 0.31) x 10(exp 13) exp(-6957+/- 30 K/T) cu cm/mol/s (1050 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 2500 K) and a consensus expression for k(1) from a critical review of the most recent evaluations of k(1) (including our own) is k(1) = 7.82 x 10(exp 13) exp(-7105 K/T) cu cm/mol/s (960 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 5300 K). The rate coefficient expression of k(2) is given by k(2) = (1.88 +/- 0.07) x 10(exp 14) exp(-6897 +/- 53 K/T) cu cm/mol/s (1424 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 2427 K). For k(1), the temperature dependent A-factor and the correlation between the values of k(1) and the inverse reactant densities were not found. In the temperature range of this study, non-Arrhenius expression of k(2) which shows the upward curvature was not supported.

  19. Shock tube measurements of specific reaction rates in the branched chain CH4-CO-O2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Growth constants, obtained by measuring the blue CO flame band emission behind incident shock waves, were obtained for two elementary bimolecular reactions involved in the oxidation of methane. Gas mixtures containing small amounts of CH4 with varying amounts of CO, O2, and in one case CO2, diluted with argon, were investigated, and exponential growth constants were derived from plots of the logarithm of observed light intensity versus gas time. The rate constant for the reaction O + CH4 yields CH3 + OH was found to be 1.9 times 10 to the 14th exp(-5900/T) cu cm per mole per sec in the range 1300-2000 K; for the reaction CH3 + O2 yields CH3O + O, the rate constant was determined to be 2.4 times 10 to the 13th exp(-14,500/T) cu cm per mole per sec in the range 1200 to 1900 K.

  20. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Ramachandra, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Soot formation in oxidation of allene, 1,3-butadiene, vinylacetylene and chlorobenzene and in pyrolysis of ethylene, vinylacetylene, 1-butene, chlorobenzene, acetylen-hydrogen, benzene-acetylene, benzene-butadiene and chlorobenzene-acetylene argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves. The results are rationalized within the framework of the conceptual models. It is shown that vinylacetylene is much less sooty than allene, which indicates that conjugation by itself is not a sufficient factor for determining the sooting tendency of a molecule. Structural reactivity in the context of the chemical kinetics is the dominant factor in soot formation. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of soot formation in pyrolysis of acetylene is reported. The main mass growth was found to proceed through a single dominant route composed of conventional radical reactions. The practically irreversible formation reactions of the fused polycyclic aromatics and the overshoot by hydrogen atom over its equilibrium concentration are the g-driving kinetic forces for soot formation.

  1. Effect of Mach number, valve angle and length to diameter ratio on thermal performance in flow of air through Ranque Hilsch vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devade, Kiran D.; Pise, Ashok T.

    2016-04-01

    Ranque Hilsch vortex tube is a device that can produce cold and hot air streams simultaneously from pressurized air. Performance of vortex tube is influenced by a number of geometrical and operational parameters. In this study parametric analysis of vortex tube is carried out. Air is used as the working fluid and geometrical parameters like length to diameter ratio (15, 16, 17, 18), exit valve angles (30°-90°), orifice diameters (5, 6 and 7 mm), 2 entry nozzles and tube divergence angle 4° is used for experimentation. Operational parameters like pressure (200-600 kPa), cold mass fraction (0-1) is varied and effect of Mach number at the inlet of the tube is investigated. The vortex tube is tested at sub sonic (0 < Ma < 1), sonic (Ma = 1) and supersonic (1 < Ma < 2) Mach number, and its effect on thermal performance is analysed. As a result it is observed that, higher COP and low cold end temperature is obtained at subsonic Ma. As CMF increases, COP rises and cold and temperature drops. Optimum performance of the tube is observed for CMF up to 0.5. Experimental correlations are proposed for optimum COP. Parametric correlation is developed for geometrical and operational parameters.

  2. Correlation of Forced-convection Heat-transfer Data for Air Flowing in Smooth Platinum Tube with Long-approach Entrance at High Surface and Inlet-air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmon, Leland G; Sams, Eldon W

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air in an electrically heated platinum tube with long-approach entrance, inside diameter of 0.525 inch, and effective heat-transfer length of 24 inches over ranges of Reynolds number up to 320,000, average inside-tube-wall temperature up to 3053 degrees R, and inlet-air temperature up to 1165 degrees R. Correlation of data by the conventional Nusselt relation resulted in separation of data with tube-wall temperature. Good correlation was obtained, however, by use of a modified Reynolds number.

  3. Internal-liquid-film-cooling Experiments with Air-stream Temperatures to 2000 Degrees F. in 2- and 4-inch-diameter Horizontal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, George R; Abramson, Andrew E; Sloop, John L

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effectiveness of liquid-cooling films on the inner surfaces of tubes containing flowing hot air. Experiments were made in 2- and 4-inch-diameter straight metal tubes with air flows at temperatures from 600 degrees to 2000 degrees F. and diameter Reynolds numbers from 2.2 to 14 x 10(5). The film coolant, water, was injected around the circumference at a single axial position on the tubes at flow rates from 0.02 to .24 pound per second per foot of tube circumference (0.8 to 12 percent of the air flow). Liquid-coolant films were established and maintained around and along the tube wall in concurrent flow with the hot air. The results indicated that, in order to film cool a given surface area with as little coolant flow as possible, it may be necessary to limit the flow of coolant introduced at a single axial position and to introduce it at several axial positions. The flow rate of inert coolant required to maintain liquid-film cooling over a given area of tube surface can be estimated when the gas-flow conditions are known by means of a generalized plot of the film-cooling data.

  4. Tri (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate--an unexpected organochlorine contaminant in some charcoal air-sampling sorbent tubes

    SciTech Connect

    van Netten, C.; Brands, R.; Park, J.; Deverall, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Air sampling in a government building was necessary in response to reports of a cancer cluster. SKC (Eighty Four, Pa.) charcoal coconut shell-based sorbent tubes (226-01 lot 120) were recommended for this procedure. A recently purchased supply was present at the University of British Columbia and consequently was used for this particular study. Analysis of the front charcoal section showed the presence of a flame retardant, tri (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate, which was confirmed by gas liquid chromatography (GLC) and mass spectrometry analysis. In an effort to identify the source of this fire retardant in the building, it became apparent from the analysis done on unknown field blanks that tri (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate was a contaminant of the sorbent tubes used. Analysis of additional blank tubes identified the foam separators as the most likely source of contamination. Levels of tri (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate in the front charcoal section ranged from 1.3 to 5.9 micrograms. The foam separator contained between 11.4 and 16.5 micrograms, and the backup charcoal section contained between 14.5 and 24.0 micrograms of tri (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate. In addition, another flame retardant, tri (1,3 dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate was also found. Because these contaminants have long column retention times in GLC, it may not be apparent that these contaminants are present and consequently are likely to have modified the sorbent characteristics of the activated charcoal. Another batch of sorbent tubes bearing the same catalog number and lot number was purchased from the supplier; no flame retardants were found in this batch.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation on air-side performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers with various fin patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, L.H.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Q.W.

    2009-07-15

    Air-side heat transfer and friction characteristics of five kinds of fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with the number of tube rows (N = 12) and the diameter of tubes (D{sub o} = 18 mm), have been experimentally investigated. The test samples consist of five types of fin configurations: crimped spiral fin, plain fin, slit fin, fin with delta-wing longitudinal vortex generators (VGs) and mixed fin with front 6-row vortex-generator fin and rear 6-row slit fin. The heat transfer and friction factor correlations for different types of heat exchangers were obtained with the Reynolds numbers ranging from 4000 to 10000. It was found that crimped spiral fin provides higher heat transfer and pressure drop than the other four fins. The air-side performance of heat exchangers with the above five fins has been evaluated under three sets of criteria and it was shown that the heat exchanger with mixed fin (front vortex-generator fin and rear slit fin) has better performance than that with fin with delta-wing vortex generators, and the slit fin offers best heat transfer performance at high Reynolds numbers. Based on the correlations of numerical data, Genetic Algorithm optimization was carried out, and the optimization results indicated that the increase of VG attack angle or length, or decrease of VG height may enhance the performance of vortex-generator fin. The heat transfer performances for optimized vortex-generator fin and slit fin at hand have been compared with numerical method. (author)

  6. A vacuum tube vee-trough collector for solar heating and air conditioning applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the performance of a vee-trough vacuum tube collector proposed for use in solar heating and cooling applications. The vee-trough reflector is a triangular sectioned, flat surfaced reflector, whose axis is laid in the East-West direction. A vacuum tube receiver placed at the bottom of the vee-trough collects solar heat most efficiently since convection is completely eliminated. Radiation losses are reduced by use of selective coatings on the absorber. Owing to its high temperature capabilities (300-400 F), the proposed scheme could also be used for power generation applications in combination with an organic Rankine conversion system. It is especially recommended for unattended pumping stations since the reflectors only require reversal once every six months.

  7. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  8. Combustion of n-heptane in a shock tube and in a stirred reactor: A detailed kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffuri, P.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1995-04-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is used to study the oxidation of n-heptane under several classes of conditions. Experimental results from ignition behind reflected shock waves and in a rapid compression machine were used to develop and validate the reaction mechanism at relatively high temperatures, while data from a continuously stirred tank reactor (cstr) were used to refine the low temperature portions of the reaction mechanism. In addition to the detailed kinetic modeling, a global or lumped kinetic mechanism was used to study the same experimental results. The lumped model was able to identify key reactions and reaction paths that were most sensitive in each experimental regime and provide important guidance for the detailed modeling effort. In each set of experiments, a region of negative temperature coefficient (NTC) was observed. Variation in pressure from 5 to 40 bars were found to change the temperature range over which the NTC region occurred. Both the lumped and detailed kinetic models reproduced the measured results in each type of experiments, including the features of the NTC region, and the specific elementary reactions and reaction paths responsible for this behavior were identified and rate expressions for these reactions were determined.

  9. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF THE ART, AND POTENTIAL DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS, FOR FLAT-TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS IN AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION APPLICATIONS - PHASE I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Park, Y.; Tafti, D.; Zhang, X.

    2001-09-30

    Project objective is to evaluate the air-side heat transfer and pressure-drop performance of serpentine-fin, flat-tube heat exchangers. This assessment is conducted for smooth, corrugated, and interrupted fins, over a wide range of geometric and operating parameters, spanning HVAC and R applications. The performance of serpentine-fin, flat-tube exchangers is compared to that of conventional round-tube designs, which are considered the technology baseline. The research includes a literature review, a preliminary comparison of flat-tube to round-tube performance, a computational fluid dynamic study of flow through the heat exchangers, and complementary modeling to predict the performance of flat-tube designs over a wide range of conditions. Recommendations are provided for a new experimental study to provide performance data for dry, wet, and frosted-surface conditions. Specific flow visualization and naphthalene sublimation experiments are recommended to understand the flow and heat transfer interactions in the flat-tube geometry. These data could be used to evaluate condensate retention and frost-formation effects on flat-tube heat exchanger performance, and to compare this behavior to that of the conventional round-tube geometry. These findings will be highly valuable to design and development engineers as they work toward the next generation of highly compact, energy efficient HVAC and R systems.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Average Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Air Flowing in Circular Tubes Having Square-Thread-Type Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, E. W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through electrically heated Inconel tubes having various degrees of square-thread-type roughness, an inside diameter of 1/2 inch, and a length of 24 inches. were obtained for tubes having conventional roughness ratios (height of thread/radius of tube) of 0 (smooth tube), 0.016, 0.025, and 0.037 over ranges of bulk Reynolds numbers up to 350,000, average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 1950deg R, and heat-flux densities up to 115,000 Btu per hour per square foot. Data The experimental data showed that both heat transfer and friction increased with increase in surface roughness, becoming more pronounced with increase in Reynolds number; for a given roughness, both heat transfer and friction were also influenced by the tube wall-to-bulk temperature ratio. Good correlation of the heat-transfer data for all the tubes investigated was obtained by use of a modification of the conventional Nusselt correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of air density evaluated at the average film temperature and the so-called friction velocity; in addition, the physical properties of air were evaluated at the average film temperature. The isothermal friction data for the rough tubes, when plotted in the conventional manner, resulted in curves similar to those obtained by other investigators; that is, the curve for a given roughness breaks away from the Blasius line (representing turbulent flow in smooth tubes) at some value of Reynolds number, which decreases with increase in surface roughness, and then becomes a horizontal line (friction coefficient independent of Reynolds number). A comparison of the friction data for the rough tubes used herein indicated that the conventional roughness ratio is not an adequate measure of relative roughness for tubes having a square-thread-type element. The present data, as well

  11. AIRS pulse tube cooler system-level and in-space performance comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the test and analysis techniques as well as the measured system-level performance of the flight AIRS coolers during instrument-level, spacecraft-level, and in-space operation.

  12. DNA Microarray Analysis of Anaerobic Methanosarcina Barkeri Reveals Responses to Heat Shock and Air Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-04-08

    Summary Methanosarcina barkeri can grow only under strictly anoxic conditions because enzymes in methane formation pathways of are very oxygen sensitive. However, it has been determined that M. barkeri can survive oxidative stress. To obtain further knowledge of cellular changes in M. barkeri in responsive to oxidative and other environmental stress, a first whole-genome M. barkeri oligonucleotide microarray was constructed according to the draft genome sequence that contains 5072 open reading frames (ORFs) and was used to investigate the global transcriptomic response of M. barkeri to oxidative stress and heat shock. The result showed that 552 genes in the M. barkeri genome were responsive to oxidative stress, while 177 genes responsive to heat-shock, respectively using a cut off of 2.5 fold change. Among them, 101 genes were commonly responsive to both environmental stimuli. In addition to various house-keeping genes, large number of functionally unknown genes (38-57% of total responsive genes) was regulated by both stress conditions. The result showed that the Hsp60 (GroEL) system, which was previously thought not present in archaea, was up-regulated and may play important roles in protein biogenesis in responsive to heat shock in M. barkeri. No gene encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase, nonspecific peroxidases or thioredoxin reductase was differentially expressed when subjected to oxidative stress. Instead, significant downregulation of house-keeping genes and up-regulation of genes encoding transposase was found in responsive to oxidative stress, suggesting that M. barkeri may be adopting a passive protective mechanism by slowing down cellular activities to survive the stress rather than activating a means against oxidative stress.

  13. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William J.; Fackler, Cameron J.; Berger, Elliott H.; Shaw, Peter B.; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  14. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    PubMed

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  15. The pulmonary air-blood barrier of human shock lungs (a clinical, ultrastructural and morphometric study).

    PubMed

    Riede, U N; Joachim, H; Hassenstein, J; Costabel, U; Sandritter, W; Augustin, P; Mittermayer, C

    1978-05-01

    Interstitial edema in the alveolar septa is the first morphologically recognisable change to be observed in cases of shock. It is brought about by the altered function of the membranes of the damaged epithelium and endothelium in the alveolar wall. At the same time there is an impairment of gaseous exchange, which is rendered more difficult by the exudative process in the interstitium. Pari passu with these events there is injury to the cells of both the alveolar epithelium and the alveolar capillary endothelium. Both these processes are still reversible. The point of irreversibility appears to be reached--so far as time is concerned--at the end of the first week, after which the injurious effects on the cell are established, since the thin alveolar wall necessary for the exchange of gases becomes overgrown with bulky alveocytes (Tpye II), and the fibroblasts in thealveolar interstitium push the capillaries away from the surface of the alveolus. In most of the advanced cases of shock this process of thickening of the alveolar wall exceeds the critical value, and respiratory exchange is so impaired that satisfactory functioning of the lungs is no longer possible. PMID:683896

  16. Non-Boltzmann Modeling for Air Shock-Layer Radiation at Lunar-Return Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian R.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the non-Boltzmann modeling of the radiating atomic and molecular electronic states present in lunar-return shock-layers. The Master Equation is derived for a general atom or molecule while accounting for a variety of excitation and de-excitation mechanisms. A new set of electronic-impact excitation rates is compiled for N, O, and N2+, which are the main radiating species for most lunar-return shock-layers. Based on these new rates, a novel approach of curve-fitting the non-Boltzmann populations of the radiating atomic and molecular states is developed. This new approach provides a simple and accurate method for calculating the atomic and molecular non-Boltzmann populations while avoiding the matrix inversion procedure required for the detailed solution of the Master Equation. The radiative flux values predicted by the present detailed non-Boltzmann model and the approximate curve-fitting approach are shown to agree within 5% for the Fire 1634 s case.

  17. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air frames in a two concentric tube combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markatos, N. C.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a two-concentric-tube combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described and models for chemical-equilibrium and chemical-kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical-equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical-kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor considered consists of two coaxial ducts. Concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air enter the inlet duct at one end; the flow then reverses and flows out through the outer duct. Two sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered and the results are discussed.

  18. Investigation on the Importance of Fast Air Temperature Measurements in the Sampling Cell of Short-Tube Closed-Path Gas Analyzer for Eddy-Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathilankal, J. C.; Fratini, G.; Burba, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    High-speed, precise gas analyzers used in eddy covariance flux research measure gas content in a known volume, thus essentially measuring gas density. The classical eddy flux equation, however, is based on the dry mole fraction. The relation between dry mole fraction and density is regulated by the ideal gas law and law of partial pressures, and depends on water vapor content, temperature and pressure of air. If the instrument can output precise fast dry mole fraction, the flux processing is significantly simplified and WPL terms accounting for air density fluctuations are no longer required. This will also lead to the reduction in uncertainties associated with the WPL terms. For instruments adopting an open-path design, this method is difficult to use because of complexities with maintaining reliable fast temperature measurements integrated over the entire measuring path, and also because of extraordinary challenges with accurate measurements of fast pressure in the open air flow. For instruments utilizing a traditional long-tube closed-path design, with tube length 1000 or more times the tube diameter, this method can be used when instantaneous fluctuations in the air temperature of the sampled air are effectively dampened, instantaneous pressure fluctuations are regulated or negligible, and water vapor is measured simultaneously with gas, or the sample is dried. For instruments with a short-tube enclosed design, most - but not all - of the temperature fluctuations are attenuated, so calculating unbiased fluxes using fast dry mole fraction output requires high-speed, precise temperature measurements of the air stream inside the cell. In this presentation, authors look at short-term and long-term data sets to assess the importance of high-speed, precise air temperature measurements in the sampling cell of short-tube enclosed gas analyzers. The CO2 and H2O half hourly flux calculations, as well as long-term carbon and water budgets, are examined.

  19. Significance of High-Speed Air Temperature Measurements in the Sampling Cell of a Closed-Path Gas Analyzer with a Short Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathilankal, James; Fratini, Gerardo; Burba, George

    2015-04-01

    Eddy covariance gas analyzers measure gas content in a known volume, thus essentially measuring gas density. The fundamental flux equation, however, is based on the dry mole fraction. The relationship between dry mole fraction and density is regulated by the ideal gas law describing the processes of temperature- and pressure-related expansions and contractions, and by the law of partial pressures, describing the process of dilution. As a result, this relationship depends on water vapor content, temperature and pressure of the air sample. If the instrument is able to output precise high-speed dry mole fraction, the flux processing is significantly simplified and WPL density terms accounting for the air density fluctuations are no longer required. This should also lead to the reduction in uncertainties associated with the density terms resulting from the eddy covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes used in these terms. In this framework, three main measurement approaches may be considered: Open-path approach Outputting correct high-speed dry mole fraction from the open-path instrument is difficult because of complexities with maintaining reliable fast temperature measurements integrated over the entire measuring path, and also because of extraordinary challenges with accurate measurements of fast pressure in the open air flow. Classical long-tube closed-path approach For instruments utilizing traditional long-tube closed-path design, with tube length 1000 or more times the tube diameter, the fast dry mole fraction can be used successfully when instantaneous fluctuations in the air temperature of the sampled air are effectively dampened to negligible levels, instantaneous pressure fluctuations are regulated or negligible, and water vapor is measured simultaneously with gas or the air sample is dried. Short-tube closed-path approach, the enclosed design For instruments with a short-tube enclosed design, most - but not all - of the temperature

  20. Underwater Shock Wave Research Applied to Therapeutic Device Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Shimokawa, H.

    2013-07-01

    The chronological development of underwater shock wave research performed at the Shock Wave Research Center of the Institute of Fluid Science at the Tohoku University is presented. Firstly, the generation of planar underwater shock waves in shock tubes and their visualization by using the conventional shadowgraph and schlieren methods are described. Secondly, the generation of spherical underwater shock waves by exploding lead azide pellets weighing from several tens of micrograms to 100 mg, that were ignited by irradiating with a Q-switched laser beam, and their visualization by using double exposure holographic interferometry are presented. The initiation, propagation, reflection, focusing of underwater shock waves, and their interaction with various interfaces, in particular, with air bubbles, are visualized quantitatively. Based on such a fundamental underwater shock wave research, collaboration with the School of Medicine at the Tohoku University was started for developing a shock wave assisted therapeutic device, which was named an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Miniature shock waves created by irradiation with Q-switched HO:YAG laser beams are studied, as applied to damaged dysfunctional nerve cells in the myocardium in a precisely controlled manner, and are effectively used to design a catheter for treating arrhythmia.

  1. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  2. [Study on the solid sorbent tube for capturing mercury in the workplace air and determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen-Nong; Sun, Yi; Ruan, Xiao-Lin; Wu, Bang-Hua; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Huang, Jun-Yi; Huang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Han-Lin

    2014-05-01

    A new KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent tube for capturing mercury in workplace air was developed. Experimental conditions for solid multisorbent tube, efficiency of sampling, desorption efficiency and stability were studied. Mercury and its compounds in air were captured by solid KMnO4-MnO2 sorbent filled tube and desorbed with 0. 90 mol L-1 sulfuric acid solution. Mercury and its compounds were quantitatively analyzed according to the method of GBZ/T 160. 14-2004 cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. The linear range of the proposed method was 0. 000 2-0. 015 0 mg L-1 with r=0. 999 1, the average efficiency of sampling was 99. 9%-100. 0% in the concentration range of 0. 001-2. 820 mg m-3 , and the breakthrough capacity was more than 505.4 microg for 300 mg KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent, the average recovery rate was 96. 4% approximately103. 8%, the intra-day and inter-day precision was 3. 0% approximately 3. 3% and 3. 5% approximately 5. 2% respectively, the limit of detection was 0. 0013 mg m-3 (7. 5 L of air ) and 0. 000 6 mg m-3 (96 L of air), after sampling, and the solid multisorbent tube could be kept at least 30 d at room temperature without significant loss. The present method was simple and suitable for capturing mercury and its compounds in the workplace air and ambient air. The solid multisorbent tube was useful for personal sampling and time weighted average sampling. PMID:25095449

  3. Extent of sample loss on the sampling device and the resulting experimental biases when collecting volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in air using sorbent tubes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-08-20

    Not all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suitable for sampling from air onto sorbent tubes (ST) with subsequent analysis by thermal desorption (TD) with gas chromatography (GC). Some compounds (such as C2 hydrocarbons) are too volatile for quantitative retention by sorbents at ambient temperature, while others are too reactive - either for storage stability on the tubes (post-sampling) or for thermal desorption/GC analysis. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are one of the compound groups that present a challenge to sorbent tube sampling. In this study, we evaluated sample losses on the inner wall surface of the sorbent tube sampler. The sorptive losses of five VFA (acetic, propionic, n-butyric, i-valeric, and n-valeric acid) were tested using two types of tubes (stainless steel and quartz), each packed with three sorbent beds arranged in order of sorbent strength from the sampling end of the tube (Tenax TA, Carbopack B, and Carbopack X). It showed significantly higher losses of VFAs in both liquid phase and vapor phase when using stainless steel tube samplers. These losses were also seen if vapor-phase fatty acids were passed through empty stainless steel tubing and increased dramatically with increasing molecular weight, e.g., losses of 33.6% (acetic acid) to 97.5% (n-valeric acid). Similar losses of VFAs were also observed from headspace sampling of cheese products. Considering that stainless steel sampling tubes are still used extensively by many researchers, their replacement with quartz tubes is recommended to reduce systematic biases in collecting VFA samples or in their calibration. PMID:23869450

  4. Combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes and activated carbon bioreactor for oilfield wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunmei; Chen, Yi; Chen, Jinfu; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guangqing; Wang, Jingxiu; Cui, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigated the enhancement of the COD reduction of an oilfield wastewater treatment process by installing air-lift tubes and adding an activated carbon bioreactor (ACB) to form a combined hydrolysis acidification and bio-contact oxidation system with air-lift tubes (HA/air-lift BCO) and an ACB. Three heat-resistant bacterial strains were cultivated and subsequently applied in above pilot plant test. Installing air-lift tubes in aerobic tanks reduced the necessary air to water ratio from 20 to 5. Continuous operation of the HA/air-lift BCO system for 2 months with a hydraulic retention time of 36 h, a volumetric load of 0.14 kg COD/(m(3)d) (hydrolysis-acidification or anaerobic tank), and 0.06 kg COD/(m(3)d) (aerobic tanks) achieved an average reduction of COD by 60%, oil and grease by 62%, total suspended solids by 75%, and sulfides by 77%. With a COD load of 0.56 kg/(m(3)d), the average COD in the ACB effluent was 58 mg/L. PMID:25105268

  5. Formaldehyde concentrations in household air of asthma patients determined using colorimetric detector tubes

    PubMed Central

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Murphy, Johnna S.; Dixon, Sherry L.; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Jacobs, David E.; Sandel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a colorless, pungent gas commonly found in homes that is a respiratory irritant, sensitizer, carcinogen and asthma trigger. Typical household sources include plywood and particleboard, cleaners, cosmetics, pesticides, and others. Development of a fast and simple measurement technique could facilitate continued research on this important chemical. The goal of this research is to apply an inexpensive short-term measurement method to find correlations between formaldehyde sources and concentration, and formaldehyde concentration and asthma control. Formaldehyde was measured using 30-minute grab samples in length-of-stain detector tubes in homes (n=70) of asthmatics in the Boston, MA area. Clinical status and potential formaldehyde sources were determined. The geometric mean formaldehyde level was 35.1 ppb and ranged from 5–132 ppb. Based on one-way ANOVA, t-tests, and linear regression, predictors of log-transformed formaldehyde concentration included absolute humidity, season, and the presence of decorative laminates, fiberglass, or permanent press fabrics (p<0.05), as well as temperature and household cleaner use (p<0.10). The geometric mean formaldehyde concentration was 57% higher in homes of children with very poorly controlled asthma compared to homes of other asthmatic children (p=0.078). This study provides a simple method for measuring household formaldehyde and suggests that exposure is related to poorly controlled asthma. PMID:23278296

  6. Formaldehyde concentrations in household air of asthma patients determined using colorimetric detector tubes.

    PubMed

    Dannemiller, K C; Murphy, J S; Dixon, S L; Pennell, K G; Suuberg, E M; Jacobs, D E; Sandel, M

    2013-08-01

    Formaldehyde is a colorless, pungent gas commonly found in homes and is a respiratory irritant, sensitizer, carcinogen, and asthma trigger. Typical household sources include plywood and particleboard, cleaners, cosmetics, pesticides, and others. Development of a fast and simple measurement technique could facilitate continued research on this important chemical. The goal of this research is to apply an inexpensive short-term measurement method to find correlations between formaldehyde sources and concentration, and formaldehyde concentration and asthma control. Formaldehyde was measured using 30-min grab samples in length-of-stain detector tubes in homes (n = 70) of asthmatics in the Boston, MA area. Clinical status and potential formaldehyde sources were determined. The geometric mean formaldehyde level was 35.1 ppb and ranged from 5 to 132 ppb. Based on one-way ANOVA, t-tests, and linear regression, predictors of log-transformed formaldehyde concentration included absolute humidity, season, and the presence of decorative laminates, fiberglass, or permanent press fabrics (P < 0.05), as well as temperature and household cleaner use (P < 0.10). The geometric mean formaldehyde concentration was 57% higher in homes of children with very poorly controlled asthma compared to homes of other asthmatic children (P = 0.078). This study provides a simple method for measuring household formaldehyde and suggests that exposure is related to poorly controlled asthma. PMID:23278296

  7. Parametric study of shock-induced combustion in a hydrogen air system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical parametric study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion under various free-stream conditions and varying blunt body diameter. A steady combustion front is established if the free-stream Mach number is above the Chapman-Jouguet speed of the mixture, whereas an unsteady reaction front is established if the free-stream Mach number is below or at the Chapman-Jouguet speed of the mixture. The above two cases have been simulated for Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 with a projectile diameter of 15 mm. Mach 5.11, which is an underdriven case, shows an unsteady reaction front, whereas Mach 6.46, which is an overdriven case, shows a steady reaction front. Next for Mach 5. 11 reducing the diameter to 2.5 mm causes the instabilities to disappear, whereas, for Mach 6.46 increasing the diameter of the projectile to 225 mm causes the instabilities to reappear, indicating that Chapman-Jouguet speed is not the only deciding factor for these instabilities to trigger. The other key parameters are the projectile diameter, induction time, activation energy and the heat release. The appearance and disappearance of the instabilities have been explained by the one-dimensional wave interaction model.

  8. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  9. Ignition delay times of shock-heated tetraethoxysilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, and titanium tetraisopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdali, A.; Fikri, M.; Orthner, H.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.

    2014-05-01

    Ignition delay times of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) were determined from the onset of chemiluminescence in shock-tube experiments behind reflected shock waves in dry as well as in humid gas mixtures. Additionally, the ignition delay times of TEOS and HMDSO have been investigated in humid air and as a function of water vapor concentration in the initial gas mixture.

  10. Liquid-Nitrogen Test for Blocked Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Nondestructive test identifies obstructed tube in array of parallel tubes. Trickle of liquid nitrogen allowed to flow through tube array until array accumulates substantial formation of frost from moisture in air. Flow stopped and warm air introduced into inlet manifold to heat tubes in array. Tubes still frosted after others defrosted identified as obstructed tubes. Applications include inspection of flow systems having parallel legs.

  11. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  12. Conversion of oscillation frequency at the front of an electromagnetic shock wave in a coaxial line with a gas-discharge tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, V. N.; Kataev, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is made of oscillation-frequency conversion at an electromagnetic shock front in a circular gas-filled waveguide with insulated walls. The study is performed in the linear approximation, with allowance for the dispersion of the moving plasma formed in the shock wave fields as well as for the dispersion of the waveguide itself. Two possible cases of interaction between microwave oscillations and the shock wave are identified: subluminal and superluminal.

  13. High temperature shock tube and theoretical studies on the thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate and its bimolecular reactions with H and D-atoms.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-01

    The shock tube technique was used to study the high temperature thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate, CH3OC(O)OCH3 (DMC). The formation of H-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range of 1053-1157 K at pressures ∼0.5 atm. The H-atom profiles were simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC thermal decomposition. Simulations indicate that the formation of H-atoms is sensitive to the rate constants for the energetically lowest-lying bond fission channel, CH3OC(O)OCH3 → CH3 + CH3OC(O)O [A], where H-atoms form instantaneously at high temperatures from the sequence of radical β-scissions, CH3OC(O)O → CH3O + CO2 → H + CH2O + CO2. A master equation analysis was performed using CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for all thermal decomposition processes in DMC. The theoretical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the present experimentally derived rate constants for the bond fission channel (A). The theoretically derived rate constants for this important bond-fission process in DMC can be represented by a modified Arrhenius expression at 0.5 atm over the T-range 1000-2000 K as, kA(T) = 6.85 × 10(98)T (-24.239) exp(-65250 K/T) s(-1). The H-atom temporal profiles at long times show only minor sensitivity to the abstraction reaction, H + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → H2 + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [B]. However, H + DMC is an important fuel destruction reaction at high temperatures. Consequently, measurements of D-atom profiles using D-ARAS allowed unambiguous rate constant measurements for the deuterated analog of reaction B, D + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → HD + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [C]. Reaction C is a surrogate for H + DMC since the theoretically predicted kinetic isotope effect at high temperatures (1000 - 2000K) is close to unity, kC ≈ 1.2 kB. TST calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties

  14. Rate constants for the thermal decomposition of ethanol and its bimolecular reactions with OH and D: reflected shock tube and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Su, M-C; Michael, J V; Klippenstein, S J; Harding, L B; Ruscic, B

    2010-09-01

    The thermal decomposition of ethanol and its reactions with OH and D have been studied with both shock tube experiments and ab initio transition state theory-based master equation calculations. Dissociation rate constants for ethanol have been measured at high T in reflected shock waves using OH optical absorption and high-sensitivity H-atom ARAS detection. The three dissociation processes that are dominant at high T are C2H5OH--> C2H4+H2O (A) -->CH3+CH2OH (B) -->C2H5+OH (C).The rate coefficient for reaction C was measured directly with high sensitivity at 308 nm using a multipass optical White cell. Meanwhile, H-atom ARAS measurements yield the overall rate coefficient and that for the sum of reactions B and C , since H-atoms are instantaneously formed from the decompositions of CH(2)OH and C(2)H(5) into CH(2)O + H and C(2)H(4) + H, respectively. By difference, rate constants for reaction 1 could be obtained. One potential complication is the scavenging of OH by unreacted ethanol in the OH experiments, and therefore, rate constants for OH+C2H5OH-->products (D)were measured using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) as the thermal source for OH. The present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k=(2.5+/-0.43) x 10(-11) exp(-911+/-191 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) over the T range 857-1297 K. For completeness, we have also measured the rate coefficient for the reaction of D atoms with ethanol D+C2H5OH-->products (E) whose H analogue is another key reaction in the combustion of ethanol. Over the T range 1054-1359 K, the rate constants from the present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression, k=(3.98+/-0.76) x10(-10) exp(-4494+/-235 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The high-pressure rate coefficients for reactions B and C were studied with variable reaction coordinate transition state theory employing directly determined CASPT2/cc-pvdz interaction energies. Reactions A , D , and E were studied with conventional transition state theory

  15. Rate constants for the thermal decomposition of ethanol and its bimolecular reactions with OH and D : reflected shock tube and theoretical studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Su, M.-C.; Michael, J. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Ruscic, B.

    2010-09-09

    The thermal decomposition of ethanol and its reactions with OH and D have been studied with both shock tube experiments and ab initio transition state theory-based master equation calculations. Dissociation rate constants for ethanol have been measured at high T in reflected shock waves using OH optical absorption and high-sensitivity H-atom ARAS detection. The three dissociation processes that are dominant at high T are: C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH {yields} CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 2}OH; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + OH. The rate coefficient for reaction C was measured directly with high sensitivity at 308 nm using a multipass optical White cell. Meanwhile, H-atom ARAS measurements yield the overall rate coefficient and that for the sum of reactions B and C, since H-atoms are instantaneously formed from the decompositions of CH{sub 2}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} into CH{sub 2}O + H and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H, respectively. By difference, rate constants for reaction 1 could be obtained. One potential complication is the scavenging of OH by unreacted ethanol in the OH experiments, and therefore, rate constants for OH + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH {yields} products were measured using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) as the thermal source for OH. The present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (2.5 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -11} exp(- 911 {+-} 191 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} over the T range 857-1297 K. For completeness, we have also measured the rate coefficient for the reaction of D atoms with ethanol D + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH {yields} products whose H analogue is another key reaction in the combustion of ethanol. Over the T range 1054-1359 K, the rate constants from the present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression, k = (3.98 {+-} 0.76) x 10{sup -10} exp(- 4494 {+-} 235 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The high-pressure rate coefficients for reactions B and C

  16. Measurements of average heat-transfer and friction coefficients for subsonic flow of air in smooth tubes at high surface and fluid temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humble, Leroy V; Lowdermilk, Warren H; Desmon, Leland G

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through smooth tubes for an over-all range of surface temperature from 535 degrees to 3050 degrees r, inlet-air temperature from 535 degrees to 1500 degrees r, Reynolds number up to 500,000, exit Mach number up to 1, heat flux up to 150,000 btu per hour per square foot, length-diameter ratio from 30 to 120, and three entrance configurations. Most of the data are for heat addition to the air; a few results are included for cooling of the air. The over-all range of surface-to-air temperature ratio was from 0.46 to 3.5.

  17. Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

    2012-09-01

    Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

  18. Impact of air and refrigerant maldistributions on the performance of finned-tube evaporators with R-22 and R-407C. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jangho; Domanski, P.A.

    1997-07-01

    The report presents basic features of the evaporator model, EVAP5M, and simulation results for an evaporator operating with R-22 and R-407C at non-uniform air and refrigerant distributions. EVAP5M was developed under this project to provide a tool for simulating a finned-tube air-to refrigerant evaporator operating with single-component refrigerants and refrigerant mixtures. The tube-by-tube modeling approach allowed for one-dimensional non-uniformity in the air velocity profile and arbitrary maldistribution on the refrigerant side. The model uses the Carnahan-Starling-DeSantis equation of state for calculating refrigerant thermodynamic properties. Simulations were performed for three evaporator slabs with different refrigerant circuitry designs. For the maldistributions studied, maldistributed air caused much more significant capacity degradation than maldistributed refrigerant. In some cases capacity decreased to as low as 57 percent of the value obtained for uniform velocity profile. Simulation results showed that R-22 and R-407C have similar susceptibility to capacity degradation. Relative change of capacity varied depending on the evaporator design and maldistribution studied. 17 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical tube in evaporating a heated falling alcohols liquid film into a stream of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senhaji, S.; Feddaoui, M.; Mediouni, T.; Mir, A.

    2009-03-01

    A numerical study of the evaporation in mixed convection of a pure alcohol liquid film: ethanol and methanol was investigated. It is a turbulent liquid film falling on the internal face of a vertical tube. A laminar flow of dry air enters the vertical tube at constant temperature in the downward direction. The wall of the tube is subjected to a constant and uniform heat flux. The model solves the coupled parabolic governing equations in both phases including turbulent liquid film together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by TDMA method. A Van Driest model is adopted to simulate the turbulent liquid film flow. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied alcohols and water in the same conditions is made.

  20. Mock-up tests on the combustion of hydrogen air mixture in the vertical tube simulating the CNS channel of the CARR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Xu, Jian

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop for removing nuclear heating and maintaining the stable liquid level in the moderator cell was adopted for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China advanced research reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon loop consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The main feature of the loop is that the moderator cell is covered by the helium sub-cooling system. The cold helium gas from the helium refrigerator is firstly introduced into the helium sub-cooling system and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS vertical channel made of aluminum alloy 6061 T6 (Al-6061-T6) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS channel, the combustion tests using a tube compatible with the CNS channel were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.14 MPa G. This condition is involved with the maximum design basis accident of the CARR-CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion was 1.09 MPa, and the design pressure of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the maximum design basis accident occurs. The pressure and stress distributions along the axial direction and the displacement of the tube were also measured.

  1. VELOCITY-FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF A SHOCK-ACCELERATED FLUID INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    K. PRESTRIDGE; C. ZOLID; ET AL

    2001-05-01

    A cylinder of heavy gas (SF{sub 6}) in air is hit by a Mach 1.2 shock. The resultant Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is observed as it propagates through the test section of the shock tube. Six images are taken after shock impact, and the velocity field at one time is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The images of the density field show the development of a secondary instability in the cylinder. The velocity field provides us with information about the magnitudes of the velocities as well as the magnitude of the vorticity in the flow.

  2. Quantitative numerical and experimental studies of the shock accelerated heterogeneous bubbles motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layes, G.; Le Métayer, O.

    2007-04-01

    This work deals with quantitative comparisons between experimental and numerical results for shock-bubbles interactions. The bubbles are filled with three different gases (nitrogen, krypton and helium) surrounded by air in order to investigate all kind of density jumps across the interface. For each case, three incident shock wave intensities are also studied. The experiments are led by using a shock tube coupled with a visualization diagnostic device: the T80 shock tube [G. Jourdan, L. Houas, L. Schwaederlé, G. Layes, R. Carrey, and F. Diaz, "A new variable inclination shock tube for multiple investigations," Shock Waves 13, 501 (2004)]. Considering the same initial and geometrical conditions, the numerical results are obtained with the help of a recent numerical method: the discrete equations method [R. Abgrall and R. Saurel, "Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures," J. Comput. Phys. 186, 361 (2003); R. Saurel, S. Gavrilyuk, and F. Renaud, "A multiphase model with internal degrees of freedom: Application to shock-bubble interaction," J. Fluid Mech. 495, 283 (2003); A. Chinnayya, E. Daniel, and R. Saurel, "Modelling detonation waves in heterogeneous energetic materials," J. Comput. Phys. 196, 490 (2004); O. Le Métayer, J. Massoni, and R. Saurel, "Modelling evaporation fronts with reactive Riemann solvers," J. Comput. Phys. 205, 567 (2005)], devoted to the computation of interface problems as well as multiphase mixtures. For each configuration, the quantitative comparisons are in good agreement showing the capability of both methods (numerical and experimental) to describe complex physical flows.

  3. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  4. Osmotic regulation of seamless tube growth.

    PubMed

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Ghabrial, Amin S

    2013-02-01

    Most organs are composed of tubes of differing cellular architectures, including intracellular 'seamless' tubes. Two studies examining the morphogenesis of the seamless tubes formed by the excretory canal cell in Caenorhabditis elegans reveal a previously unappreciated role for osmoregulation of tubulogenesis: hyperosmotic shock recruits canalicular vesicles to the lumenal membrane to promote seamless tube growth. PMID:23377027

  5. Shock-bubble interactions: Features of divergent shock-refraction geometry observed in experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Devesh; Niederhaus, John H. J.; Oakley, Jason G.; Anderson, Mark H.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Greenough, Jeffrey A.

    2008-03-01

    The interaction of a planar shock wave with a spherical bubble in divergent shock-refraction geometry is studied here using shock tube experiments and numerical simulations. The particular case of a helium bubble in ambient air or nitrogen (A≈-0.8) is considered, for 1.4shock refraction, including the formation of a long-lived primary vortex ring, as well as counter-rotating secondary and tertiary upstream vortex rings that appear at late times for M ⩾2. Remarkable correspondence between experimental and numerical results is observed, which improves with increasing M, and three-dimensional effects are found to be relatively insignificant. Shocked-bubble velocities, length scales, and circulations extracted from simulations and experiments are used successfully to evaluate the usefulness of various analytical models, and characteristic dimensionless time scales are developed that collapse temporal trends in these quantities. Those linked directly to baroclinicity tend to follow time scales based on shock wave speeds, while those linked to interface deformation and vortex- or shear-induced motion tend to follow a time scale based on the postshock flow speed, though no single time scale is found to be universally successful.

  6. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  7. The effect of air injection on the parameters of swirling flow in a Turbine-99 draft tube model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripkin, S. G.; Kuibin, P. A.; Shtork, S. I.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experimental modeling of a swirling flow in a Turbine-99 draft tube prototype are presented. The influence of gas phase injection into the flow has been studied. Experiments were performed on a closed hydrodynamic setup containing a working stage with the Turbine-99 draft tube geometry. It is established that the gas content affects the flow structure. Gas injection leads to a change in the frequency of precession of the vortex core formed in the draft tube cone, which is not related to an increase in the gas-liquid mixture flow rate.

  8. Some aspects of shock-wave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1986-01-01

    The major portion of the paper is devoted to a specific shock-wave research problem, namely, pseudostationary oblique shock-wave reflections in perfect and imperfect gases. Consideration is given to what has been achieved to date by using two- and three-shock theory to predict what type of reflection results when a planar shock wave M(S), in a shock tube, collides with a sharp compressive wedge of angle, theta(W). Expermental (interferometric and other optical) data are presented in (M(S), theta(W))-plots for argon, nitrogen, oxygen, air, carbon-dioxide, Freon-12 and sulfurhexafluoride, in order to check the validity of the analytically predicted regions and transition lines of the four types of reflection. Some disagreements are noted and discussed. The present interferometric isopycnic data are also compared with state-of-the-art computational results from a solution of the inviscid Euler equations using a CRAY I computer. Good agreement was obtained; it would be important, however, to obtain new data by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as the rate equations for imperfect-gas excitations, in order to judge the improvement obtained with real-flow interferograms.

  9. A shock-tube determination of the CN ground state dissociation energy and electronic transition moments for the CN violet and red band systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Nicholls, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The CN ground state dissociation energy and the sum of squares of the electronic transition moments of the CN violet bands have been simultaneously determined from spectral emission measurements behind incident shock waves. The unshocked test gases were composed of various CO2-CO-N2-Ar mixtures, and the temperatures behind the incident shocks ranged from 3500 to 8000 K. The variation of the electronic transition moment with internuclear separation was found to be small for both the CN violet and red band systems.

  10. Shock initiation of the TATB based explosive PBX 9502 heated to ~ 76∘C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, Richard; Gehr, Russell; Bucholtz, Scott; Pacheco, Adam; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Recently we reported on shock initiation of PBX 9502 (95 wt.% tri-amino-trinitro-benzene, 5 wt.% Kel-F800 binder) cooled to -55°C and to 77K Shock waves were generated by gas-gun driven plate impacts and reactive flow in the cooled PBX 9502 was measured with embedded electromagnetic gauges. Here we use similar methods to warm the explosive to ~ 76°C. The explosive sample is heated by warm air flowing through channels in an aluminum sample mounting plate and a copper tubing coil surrounding the sample. Temperature in the sample is monitored using six type-E thermocouples. Results show increased shock sensitivity; time and distance to detonation onset vs. initial shock pressure are shorter than when the sample is initially at ambient temperature. Our results are consistent with those reported by Dallman & Wackerle. Particle velocity wave profiles were also obtained during the shock-to-detonation transition and will be presented.

  11. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  12. Exploratory wind tunnel tests of a shock-swallowing air data sensor at a Mach number of approximately 1.83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Couch, L. M.; Webb, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The test probe was designed to measure free-stream Mach number and could be incorporated into a conventional airspeed nose boom installation. Tests were conducted in the Langley 4-by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel with an approximate angle of attack test range of -5 deg to 15 deg and an approximate angle of sideslip test range of + or - 4 deg. The probe incorporated a variable exit area which permitted internal flow. The internal flow caused the bow shock to be swallowed. Mach number was determined with a small axially movable internal total pressure tube and a series of fixed internal static pressure orifices. Mach number error was at a minimum when the total pressure tube was close to the probe tip. For four of the five tips tested, the Mach number error derived by averaging two static pressures measured at horizontally opposed positions near the probe entrance were least sensitive to angle of attack changes. The same orifices were also used to derive parameters that gave indications of flow direction.

  13. Turbulence in argon shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J. P.; I, L.

    1981-01-01

    Irregular density fluctuations with turbulent-like behaviors are found in ionizing shock fronts produced by an arc-driven shock tube. Electric probes are used as the primary diagnostic. Spectral analyses show statistical patterns which seem frozen-in and characterizable by a dominant mode and its harmonics.

  14. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  16. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  17. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  18. Application of sound-absorbent plastic to weak-shock-wave attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuta, Katsuhisa; Matsuoka, Kei; Sasoh, Akihiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1998-04-01

    A device for attenuating weak shock waves propagating in a duct has been developed utilizing sound-absorbent plastic which is usually used for attenuating sound waves. The device has a tube made of the sound-absorbent plastic installed coaxially to a surrounding metal tube with a clearance between them. The clearance acts as an air layer to enhance the performance of the shock wave attenuation. When a weak shock wave propagates through this device, the pressure gradient of the shock wave is gradually smeared and hence its overpressure is decreased. The performance of the device was examined using a 1/250-scaled train tunnel simulator which simulated the discharge of weak shock waves created by high-speed entry of trains to tunnels. The overpressure of the shock waves ranged up to 5 kPa. The shock wave overpressure was decreased by 90% with the present attenuator attached. This device can be applied to various industrial noise suppressions which are associated with unsteady compressible flows.

  19. Method of making shock cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, R. F.; Cummins, W. T.

    1984-10-16

    A method of making an energy-absorbing shock cell for mounting bumper devices on legs of offshore oil rig structures having inner and outer metal tubes connected by an intervening vulcanized rubber sleeve maintained under compression adhesively bonded to the inner and outer metal tubes. The shock cell is made by a series of operations in which portions of the metal tubes are coated with adhesive material, and the rubber sleeve is bonded to the adhesive coated areas by vulcanization and post-vulcanized heating.

  20. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data. PMID:27380878

  1. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  2. The Effect of Compressibility on the Pressure Reading of a Prandtl Pitot Tube at Subsonic Flow Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O

    1939-01-01

    Errors arising from yawed flow were also determined up to 20 degrees angle of attack. In axial flow, the Prandtl pitot tube begins at w/a approx. = 0.8 to give an incorrect static pressure reading, while it records the tank pressure correctly, as anticipated, up to sonic velocity. Owing to the compressibility of the air, the Prandtl pitot tube manifests compression shocks when the air speed approaches velocity of sound. This affects the pressure reading of the instrument. Because of the increasing importance of high speed in aviation, this compressibility effect is investigated in detail.

  3. DDT and detonation waves in dust-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Grönig, H.; van de Ven, A.

    This paper summarizes the studies of DDT and stable detonation waves in dust-air mixtures at the Stosswellenlabor of RWTH Aachen. The DDT process and propagation mechanism for stable heterogeneous dust detonations in air are essentially the same as in the oxygen environment studied previously. The dust DDT process in tubes is composed of a reaction compression stage followed by a reaction shock stage as the pre-detonation process. The transverse waves that couple the shock wave and the chemical energy release are responsible for the propagation of a stable dust-air detonation. However, the transverse wave spacing of dust-air mixtures is much larger. Therefore, DDT and propagation of a stable detonation in most industrial and agricultural, combustible dust-air mixtures require a tube that has a large diameter between 0.1 m and 1 m and a sufficient length-diameter ratio beyond 100, when an appropriately strong initiation energy is used. Two dust detonation tubes, 0.14 m and 0.3 m in diameter, were used for observation of the above-mentioned results in cornstarch, anthraquinone and aluminum dust suspended in air. Smoked-foil technique was also used to measure the cellular structure of dust detonations in the 0.3 m detonation tube.

  4. [Historical vision of shock].

    PubMed

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock. PMID:9816693

  5. A comparison of measured and predicted sphere shock shapes in hypersonic flows with density ratios from 4 to 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Measured shock shapes are presented for sphere and hemisphere models in helium, air, CF4, C2F6, and CO2 test gases, corresponding to normal-shock density ratios (primary factor governing shock detachment distance of blunt bodies at hypersonic speeds) from 4 to 19. These shock shapes were obtained in three facilities capable of generating the high density ratios experienced during planetary entry at hypersonic conditions; namely, the 6-inch expansion tube, with hypersonic CF4 tunnel, and pilot CF4 Mach 6 tunnel (with CF4 replaced by C2F6). Measured results are compared with several inviscid perfect-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, and with real-gas predictions which include effects of a laminar viscous layer and thermochemical nonequilibrium.

  6. Diagnostics of the loss of stability of loaded constructions and the development of the sites of breakdown during the action of seismic explosion and air shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmudov, Kh. F.; Menzhulin, M. G.; Zakharyan, M. V.; Sultonov, U.; Abdurakhmanov, Z. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the challenging problems for mining enterprises, namely, predicting the decrease in the strength of the structure elements in guarded buildings and constructions during blasting, is solved in terms of a stress concentration factor, the time of exceeding the long-term tensile strength, and the crack growth rate. It is shown that the existence of stress concentrators in the form of natural heterogeneities or defects in the building materials of the building elements subjected to the action of seismic explosion and air shock waves results in crack growth. The distribution of cracks in samples of some materials and the ultimate tensile strength of these materials are determined to find the surface energy. The size distribution of cracks is used to calculate the effective crack length.

  7. The stability of aerobic granular sludge under 4-chloroaniline shock in a sequential air-lift bioreactor (SABR).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Lv, Mei-le; Dai, Xin; Zhou, Jia-heng; Xu, Xiang-yang

    2013-07-01

    The aerobic granular sludge technology has a great potential in treatment of municipal wastewater and industrial wastewater containing toxic non-degradable pollutants. However, the formation and structural stability of aerobic granular sludge is susceptible to toxic shock. In the study, the effect of 4-chloroaniline (4-ClA) as a common toxic pollutant on the granular structure and performance was investigated, and the mechanism was revealed to provide more information on 4-ClA degradation with aerobic granular sludge process. The results showed that a 4-ClA shock at influent 200 mg L(-1) could cause the disintegration of aerobic granular sludge and decrease of the pollutant removal performance. The analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the mature and disintegrated granular sludge showed that the decrease of protein content in EPS, especially the components like Amide I 3-turn helix and β-sheet structures and aspartate, was not good for the stability of aerobic granular sludge. The microbial community results demonstrated that the disappearance of dominant bacteria like Kineosphaera limosa or appearance like Acinetobacter, might contribute to the reduction of EPS and disintegration of aerobic granular sludge. PMID:23685649

  8. Heat transfer to two-phase air/water mixtures flowing in small tubes with inlet disequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, J. M.; Florschuetz, L. W.; Fiszdon, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The cooling of gas turbine components was the subject of considerable research. The problem is difficult because the available coolant, compressor bleed air, is itself quite hot and has relatively poor thermophysical properties for a coolant. Injecting liquid water to evaporatively cool the air prior to its contact with the hot components was proposed and studied, particularly as a method of cooling for contingency power applications. Injection of a small quantity of cold liquid water into a relatively hot coolant air stream such that evaporation of the liquid is still in process when the coolant contacts the hot component was studied. No approach was found whereby heat transfer characteristics could be confidently predicted for such a case based solely on prior studies. It was not clear whether disequilibrium between phases at the inlet to the hot component section would improve cooling relative to that obtained where equilibrium was established prior to contact with the hot surface.

  9. Three-dimensional features of shock-driven mixing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Dell; Vorobieff, Peter; Corbin, Clint; Bernard, Tennille; Wayne, Patrick; Kuehner, Garrett; Truman, C. Randall

    2013-11-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is created by passing an oblique shock wave across a cylindrical column of heavy gas (sulfur hexafluoride SF6) in air at Mach numbers ranging from 1.2 to 2.0. These initial conditions are inherently three-dimensional, unlike nominally two-dimensional conditions used in many earlier works. To capture the development of the RMI, Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) images were obtained in multiple planes along and across the RMI-perturbed column. The oblique shockwave is obtained in a shock tube inclined up to 30 degrees with the horizontal and using gravity-driven (vertical) flow to form the SF6 cylinder. The development of RMI for a cylindrical interface subjected to a normal shockwave is also documented. The main subject of the investigation is the role of the angle between the cylinder and the shock front in the formation and evolution of the three-dimensional features in the flow. Experiments also show that consideration must be given to the effects of the walls of the shock tube and especially of the holes in the walls used to form the heavy-gas column. This research is supported by NNSA (US National Nuclear Security Agency).

  10. Experimental research on dust lifting by propagating shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żydak, P.; Oleszczak, P.; Klemens, R.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the presented work was to study the dust lifting process from a layer of dust behind a propagating shock wave. The experiments were conducted with the use of a shock tube and a specially constructed, five-channel laser optical device enabling measurements at five positions located in one vertical plane along the height of the tube. The system enabled measurements of the delay in lifting up of the dust from the layer, and the vertical velocity of the dust cloud was calculated from the dust concentration measurements. The research was carried out for various initial conditions and for three fractions of black coal dust. In the presented tests, three shock wave velocities: 450, 490 and 518 m/s and three dust layer thicknesses, equal to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm, were taken into consideration. On the grounds of the obtained experimental results, it was assumed that the vertical component of the lifted dust velocity is a function of the dust particle diameter, the velocity of the air flow in the channel, the layer thickness and the dust bulk density. It appeared, however, that lifting up of the dust from the thick layers, thicker than 1 mm, is a more complex process than that from thin layers and still requires further research. A possible explanation is that the shock wave action upon the thick layer results in its aggregation in the first stage of the dispersing process, which suppresses the dust lifting process.

  11. Ignition of Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures Behind the Incident Shock Wave Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. A.; Gerasimov, G. Ya.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental investigation of the ignition of a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture behind an incident shock wave in a shock tube at pressures p = 0.002-0.46 MPa and temperatures T = 500-1000 K is carried out. The existence of three limits of ignition typical of the ignition of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in a spherical vessel is noted. It is shown that at pressures p ≥ 0.1 MPa the ignition of a hydrogen-oxygen mixture begins at a much lower temperature than the ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture. The measured induction times agree well with theoretical estimates.

  12. Ignition of Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures Behind the Incident Shock Wave Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. A.; Gerasimov, G. Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental investigation of the ignition of a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture behind an incident shock wave in a shock tube at pressures p = 0.002-0.46 MPa and temperatures T = 500-1000 K is carried out. The existence of three limits of ignition typical of the ignition of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in a spherical vessel is noted. It is shown that at pressures p ≥ 0.1 MPa the ignition of a hydrogen-oxygen mixture begins at a much lower temperature than the ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture. The measured induction times agree well with theoretical estimates.

  13. Shock Tube and Modeling Study of the H + O2 = OH + O Reaction over a Wide Range of Composition, Pressure, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Hwang, Soon Muk; Rabinowitz, Martin Jay

    1995-01-01

    The rate coefficient of the reaction H + 02 = OH + 0 was determined using OH laser absorption spectroscopy behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range 1050-2500 K and the pressure range 0.7-4.0 atm. Eight mixtures and three stoichiometries were used. Two distinct and independent criteria were employed in the evaluation of k(sub 1). Our recommended expression for k(sub 1) is k(sub 1) = 7.13 x 10(exp 13)exp(-6957 K/T) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) with a statistical uncertainty of 6%. A critical review of recent evaluations of k(sub 1) yields a consensus expression given by k(sub 1) = 7.82 x 10(exp 13)exp(-7105 K/7) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) over the temperature range 960-5300 K. We do not support a non-Arrhenius rate coefficient expression, nor do we find evidence of composition dependence upon the determination of k(sub 1).

  14. Vibrational energy transfer and quenching of OH A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}{prime}=1) measured at high temperatures in a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.

    1995-05-25

    Rate coefficients are reported for vibrational energy transfer and electronic quenching of OH A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}{prime}=1) by N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Rate coefficients for electronic quenching of OH A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}{prime}=0) by the same set of collision partners are also reported. The measurements were performed at high temperatures (1900 and 2300 K) behind reproducible shock waves. The cross sections for quenching in {nu}{prime} = 1 were observed to be quite similar to the values found for quenching in {nu}{prime} = 0. For all of the species studied, the cross sections were found to be independent of temperature from 1900 to 2300 K. However, all of the high-temperature cross sections were found to be smaller than the previously reported values for quenching and vibrational energy transfer at 300 K. The decrease in the cross sections with temperature was observed to be more pronounced for vibrational energy transfer than for electronic quenching. 33 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Vortex formation in oblique shock interaction with a heavy gas column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-11-01

    In an oblique shockwave interaction with a column of heavy gas, we observe both the expected counter-rotating vortex pairs (same as caused by normal shockwaves) and periodic co-rotating vortices that vary with Mach number. We study the effects of oblique shock interaction with a column of acetone-infused sulfur-hexafluoride (SF6) gas. Visualization of the shock-accelerated gas column is accomplished via Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. The shock tube itself is inclined at a 30° angle, while the initial conditions (ICs) are introduced into the test section vertically. Because of the inclined angle, the normal shock propagates down the shock tube and impacts the ICs at a 30° down-angle, producing an oblique shock. Vertical plane PLIF images reveal vorticity deposition between the SF6 column and the surrounding air leading to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The evolving vortices cascade down the entire vertical length of the gas column, and interact with the counter-rotating vortex structures along the column. The most interesting aspect of this discovery is that these small-scale instabilities exhibit periodic behavior and, according to preliminary data, this behavior is Mach number dependent. This research is supported by the US DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Grant DE-NA0002220.

  16. Operational experience in the Langley expansion tube with various test gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    A resume' of operating experiences with the Langley Expansion Tube is presented. The driver gas was unheated helium at a nominal pressure of 5000 psi and the majority of the data presented are for air and carbon dioxide test gases. The primary purpose of these data is to illustrate the effects of various parameters on quasi-steady test flow duration, as well as free stream and post-normal shock flow conditions. The discussion shows that the Langley Expansion Tube is an operational facility capable of producing good quality, highly repeatable, quasi-steady flow for test times sufficient to establish flow about blunt axisymmetric and two-dimensional models.

  17. Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1944-01-01

    An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described.

  18. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  19. Summary of efficiency testing of standard and high-capacity high-efficiency particulate air filters subjected to simulated tornado depressurization and explosive shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Pressure transients in nuclear facility air cleaning systems can originate from natural phenomena such as tornadoes or from accident-induced explosive blast waves. This study was concerned with the effective efficiency of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters during pressure surges resulting from simulated tornado and explosion transients. The primary objective of the study was to examine filter efficiencies at pressure levels below the point of structural failure. Both standard and high-capacity 0.61-m by 0.61-m HEPA filters were evaluated, as were several 0.2-m by 0.2-m HEPA filters. For a particular manufacturer, the material release when subjected to tornado transients is the same (per unit area) for both the 0.2-m by 0.2-m and the 0.61-m by 0.61-m filters. For tornado transients, the material release was on the order of micrograms per square meter. When subjecting clean HEPA filters to simulated tornado transients with aerosol entrained in the pressure pulse, all filters tested showed a degradation of filter efficiency. For explosive transients, the material release from preloaded high-capacity filters was as much as 340 g. When preloaded high-capacity filters were subjected to shock waves approximately 50% of the structural limit level, 1 to 2 mg of particulate was released.

  20. Heat shock transcription factors expression during fruit development and under hot air stress in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) fruit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Jiang, Qing; Lin, Juanying; Wang, Dengliang; Li, Shaojia; Liu, Chunrong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) play a role in plant responses to stress. Citrus is an economically important fruit whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed characterization of the Hsf gene family is available for citrus. A genome-wide analysis was carried out in Citrus clementina to identify Hsf genes, named CcHsfs. Eighteen CcHsfs were identified and classified into three main clades (clades A, B and C) according to the structural characteristics and the phylogenetic comparison with Arabidopsis and tomato. MEME motif analysis highlighted the conserved DBD and HR-A/B domains, which were similar to Hsf protein structures in other species. Gene expression analysis in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) fruit identified 14 Hsf genes, named CrHsf, as important candidates for a role in fruit development and ripening, and showed seven genes to be expressed in response to hot air stress. CrHsfB2a and CrHsfB5 were considered to be important regulators of citrate content and showed variation in both developmentally-related and hot air-triggered citrate degradation processes. In summary, the data obtained from this investigation provides the basis for further study to dissect Hsf function during fruit development as well as in response to heat stress and also emphasizes the potential importance of CrHsfs in regulation of citrate metabolism in citrus fruit. PMID:25596345

  1. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  2. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  3. Field Air Sampling and Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Livestock Odorants with Sorbent Tube GC-MS/Olfactometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shicheng; Cai, Lingshuang; Koziel, Jacek A.; Hoff, Steven; Clanton, Charles; Schmidt, David; Jacobson, Larry; Parker, David; Heber, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Characterization and quantification of livestock odorants is one of the most challenging analytical tasks because odor-causing gases are very reactive, polar and often present at very low concentrations in a complex matrix of less important or irrelevant gases. The objective of this research was to develop a novel analytical method for characterization of the livestock odorants including their odor character, odor intensity, and hedonic tone and to apply this method for quantitative analysis of the key odorants responsible for livestock odor. Sorbent tubes packed with Tenax TA were used for field sampling. The automated one-step thermal desorption module coupled with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry system was used for simultaneous chemical and odor analysis. Fifteen odorous VOCs and semi-VOCs identified from different livestock species operations were quantified. Method detection limits ranges from 40 pg for skatole to 3590 pg for acetic acid. In addition, odor character, odor intensity and hedonic tone associated with each of the target odorants are also analyzed simultaneously. We found that the mass of each VOCs in the sample correlates well with the log stimulus intensity. All of the correlation coefficients (R2) are greater than 0.74, and the top 10 correlation coefficients were greater than 0.90.

  4. A new facility for studying shock-wave passage over dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. Y.; Marks, B. D.; Johnston, H. Greg; Mannan, M. Sam; Petersen, E. L.

    2016-03-01

    Dust explosion hazards in areas where coal and other flammable materials are found have caused unnecessary loss of life and halted business operations in some instances. The elimination of secondary dust explosion hazards, i.e., reducing dust dispersion, can be characterized in shock tubes to understand shock-dust interactions. For this reason, a new shock-tube test section was developed and integrated into an existing shock-tube facility. The test section has large windows to allow for the use of the shadowgraph technique to track dust-layer growth behind a passing normal shock wave, and it is designed to handle an initial pressure of 1 atm with an incident shock wave Mach number as high as 2 to mimic real-world conditions. The test section features an easily removable dust pan with inserts to allow for adjustment of the dust-layer thickness. The design also allows for changing the experimental variables such as initial pressure, shock Mach number (Ms), dust-layer thickness, and the characteristics of the dust itself. The characterization experiments presented herein demonstrate the advantages of the authors' test techniques toward providing new physical insights over a wider range of data than what have been available heretofore in the literature. Limestone dust with a layer thickness of 3.2 mm was subjected to Ms = 1.23, 1.32, and 1.6 shock waves, and dust-layer rise height was mapped with respect to time after shock passage. Dust particles subjected to a Ms = 1.6 shock wave rose more rapidly and to a greater height with respect to shock wave propagation than particles subjected to Ms = 1.23 and 1.32 shock waves. Although these results are in general agreement with the literature, the new data also highlight physical trends for dust-layer growth that have not been recorded previously, to the best of the authors' knowledge. For example, the dust-layer height rises linearly until a certain time where the growth rate is dramatically reduced, and in this second

  5. Experimental drag histories of shocked spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestridge, Katherine; Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube (HST) facility at Los Alamos is used to investigate the drag forces on micrometer-sized particles dispersed in air when they are accelerated by a shock. Eight-frame, high-speed particle tracking velocimetry/accelerometry (PTVA) diagnostics are implemented to measure the trajectory of individual particles with high spatial and temporal resolution, and a shadowgraphy system is used to measure the shock position on each image. We present experiments over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, particle sizes, and particle densities that explore the drag forces on solid, spherical, non-deforming particles. Experimental drag coefficients are calculated from eight dynamic measurements of particle position versus time, for Mach 1.3 and Mach 1.2 experiments. Experimental results show drag coefficients significantly larger than those predicted by the standard drag model for solid, spherical particles. These results are consistent with measurements made by Rudinger (1970) and Sommerfeld (1985). We will present experimental results and analysis of unsteady drag as a function of particle Reynolds number, Mach number and Stokes number.

  6. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  7. Experimental investigation of door dynamic opening caused by impinging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Igra, O.; Massol, A.; Houas, L.

    2011-02-01

    To prevent damage caused by accidental overpressure inside a closed duct (e.g. jet engine) safety valves are introduced. The present study experimentally investigates the dynamic opening of such valves by employing a door at the end of a shock tube driven section. The door is hung on an axis and is free to rotate, thereby opening the tube. The evolved flow and wave pattern due to a collision of an incident shock wave with the door, causing the door opening, is studied by employing a high speed schlieren system and recording pressures at different places inside the tube as well as on the rotating door. Analyzing this data sheds light on the air flow evolution and the behavior of the opening door. In the present work, emphasis is given to understanding the complex, unsteady flow developed behind the transmitted shock wave as it diffracts over the opening door. It is shown that both the door inertia and the shock wave strength influence the opening dynamic evolution, but not in the proportions that might be expected.

  8. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000185.htm Cardiogenic shock To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cardiogenic shock is when the heart has been damaged so ...

  9. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs when a body-wide infection leads to dangerously low blood ... Septic shock occurs most often in the very old and the very young. It may also occur in ...

  10. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Luo, Xisheng

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF6 surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  11. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Luo, Xisheng

    2015-06-15

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF{sub 6} surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  12. A selected ion flow tube study of the reactions of NO + and O + 2 ions with some organic molecules: The potential for trace gas analysis of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David

    1996-02-01

    A study has been carried out using our selected ion flow tube apparatus of the reactions of NO+ and O+2 ions in their vibronic ground states with ten organic species: the hydrocarbons, benzene, toluene, isoprene, cyclopropane, and n-pentane; the oxygen-containing organics, methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and diethyl ether. The major objectives of this work are, on the one hand, to fully understand the processes involved in these reactions and, on the other hand, to explore the potential of NO+ and O+2 as chemical ionization agents for the analysis of trace gases in air and on human breath. Amongst the NO+ reactions, charge transfer, hydride-ion transfer, and termolecular association occur, and the measured rate coefficients, k, for the reactions vary from immeasurably small to the maximum value, collisional rate coefficient, kc. The O+2 reactions are all fast, in each case the k being equal to or an appreciable fraction of kc, and charge transfer producing the parent organic ion or dissociative charge transfer resulting in two or three fragments of the parent ion are the reaction processes that occur. We conclude from these studies, and from previous studies, that NO+ ions and O+2 ions can be used to great effect as chemical ionization agents for trace gas analysis, especially in combination with H3O+ ions which we now routinely use for this purpose.

  13. A numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for chemically nonequilibrium, merged stagnation shock layers on spheres and two-dimensional cylinders in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. D.; Hendricks, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of solving the Navier-Stokes equations for chemically nonequilibrium, merged stagnation shock layers on spheres and two-dimensional cylinders are presented. The effects of wall catalysis and slip are also examined. The thin shock layer assumption is not made, and the thick viscous shock is allowed to develop within the computational domain. The results show good comparison with existing data. Due to the more pronounced merging of shock layer and boundary layer for the sphere, the heating rates for spheres become higher than those for cylinders as the altitude is increased.

  14. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  15. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-11-12

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  16. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of the effect of ventilation mode and tracheal tube position on air flow in the large airways.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Burns, A D; Figueroa Rosette, J A; Gradzik, K B; Ingham, D B; Pourkashanian, M

    2015-05-01

    We have used computational fluid dynamic modelling to study the effects of tracheal tube size and position on regional gas flow in the large airways. Using a three-dimensional mathematical model, we simulated flow with and without a tracheal tube, replicating both physiological and artificial breathing. Ventilation through a tracheal tube increased proportional flow to the left lung from 39.5% with no tube to 43.1-47.2%, depending on tube position. Ventilation mode and tube distance from the carina had no effect on flow. Lateral displacement and deflection of the tube increased ventilation to the ipsilateral lung; for example, when deflected 10° to the left of centre, flow to the left lung increased from 43.8 to 53.7%. Because of the small diameter of a tracheal tube relative to the trachea, gas exits a tube at high velocity such that regional ventilation may be affected by changes in the position and angle of the tube. PMID:25581493

  18. Image tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Csorba, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    This text provides a wealth of valuable, hard-to-find data on electron optics, imaging, and image intensification systems. The author explains details of image tube theory, design, construction, and components. He includes material on the design and operation of camera tubes, power components, and secondary electron emitters, as well as data on photomultiplier tubes and electron guns.

  19. Shock Layer Radiation Measurements and Analysis for Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Bogdanoff, David W.; Wright, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion program is supporting the development of shock radiation transport models for aerocapture missions to Mars. A comprehensive test series in the NASA Antes Electric Arc Shock Tube facility at a representative flight condition was recently completed. The facility optical instrumentation enabled spectral measurements of shocked gas radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared. The instrumentation captured the nonequilibrium post-shock excitation and relaxation dynamics of dispersed spectral features. A description of the shock tube facility, optical instrumentation, and examples of the test data are presented. Comparisons of measured spectra with model predictions are also made.

  20. High-speed Air Temperature Measurements in a Closed-path Cell and Quality of CO2 and H2O Fluxes from a Short-tube Gas Analyzer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Fratini, G.

    2015-12-01

    Gas analyzers traditionally used for eddy covariance method measure gas density. When fluxes are calculated, corrections are applied to account for the changes in gas density due to changing temperature and pressure (Ideal Gas Law) and changing water vapor density (Dalton's Law). The new generation of gas analyzers with fast air temperature and pressure measurements in the sampling cell enables on-the-fly calculation of fast dry mole fraction. This significantly simplifies the flux processing because the WPL density terms are no longer required, and leads to the reduction in uncertainties associated with latent and sensible heat flux inputs into the density terms. Traditional closed-path instruments with long intake tubes often can effectively dampen the fast temperature fluctuations in the tube before reaching the measurement cell, thus reducing or eliminating the need for temperature correction for density-based fluxes. But in instruments with a short-tube design, most - but not all - of the temperature fluctuations are attenuated, so calculating unbiased fluxes using fast dry mole fraction requires high-speed precise temperature measurements of the air stream inside the cell. Fast pressure and water vapor content of the sampled air should also be measured in the cell and carefully aligned in time with gas density and sample temperature measurements.In this study we examine the impact of fast-response air temperature measurements in the cell on the calculations of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes at different time scales from three different ecosystems. The fast cell air temperature data is filtered mathematically to obtain slower response cell temperature time series, which is used in the calculation of fluxes. This exercise is intended to simulate the use of thicker slower response thermocouples instead of fast response fine wire thermocouples for estimating cell temperature. The directly measured block temperature is also utilized to illustrate the

  1. Flux limiters. [for shock tube flow computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweby, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that first order accurate difference schemes for the numerical solution of conservation laws produce results which suffer from excessive numerical diffusion, classical second order schemes, although giving better resolution, suffer from spurious oscillations. Recently much effect has been put into achieving high resolution without these oscillations, using a variety of techniques. Here one class of such methods, that of flux limiting, is outlined together with the TVD constraint used to ensure oscillation free solutions. Brief numerical comparisons of different limiting functions are also presented.

  2. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1988-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30 percent. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  3. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1987-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30%. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  4. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  5. On the propagation mechanism of a detonation wave in a round tube with orifice plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Cross, M.

    2016-06-01

    This study deals with the investigation of the detonation propagation mechanism in a circular tube with orifice plates. Experiments were performed with hydrogen air in a 10-cm-inner-diameter tube with the second half of the tube filled with equally spaced orifice plates. A self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation wave was initiated in the smooth first half of the tube and transmitted into the orifice-plate-laden second half of the tube. The details of the propagation were obtained using the soot-foil technique. Two types of foils were used between obstacles, a wall-foil placed on the tube wall, and a flat-foil (sooted on both sides) placed horizontally across the diameter of the tube. When placed after the first orifice plate, the flat foil shows symmetric detonation wave diffraction and failure, while the wall foil shows re-initiation via multiple local hot spots created when the decoupled shock wave interacts with the tube wall. At the end of the tube, where the detonation propagated at an average velocity much lower than the theoretical CJ value, the detonation propagation is much more asymmetric with only a few hot spots on the tube wall leading to local detonation initiation. Consecutive foils also show that the detonation structure changes after each obstacle interaction. For a mixture near the detonation propagation limit, detonation re-initiation occurs at a single wall hot spot producing a patch of small detonation cells. The local overdriven detonation wave is short lived, but is sufficient to keep the global explosion front propagating. Results associated with the effect of orifice plate blockage and spacing on the detonation propagation mechanism are also presented.

  6. 21 CFR 874.3880 - Tympanostomy tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3880 Tympanostomy tube. (a) Identification... middle ear. The device is inserted through the tympanic membrane to permit a free exchange of air between the outer ear and middle ear. A type of tympanostomy tube known as the malleous clip tube attaches...

  7. 21 CFR 874.3880 - Tympanostomy tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3880 Tympanostomy tube. (a) Identification... middle ear. The device is inserted through the tympanic membrane to permit a free exchange of air between the outer ear and middle ear. A type of tympanostomy tube known as the malleous clip tube attaches...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3880 - Tympanostomy tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3880 Tympanostomy tube. (a) Identification... middle ear. The device is inserted through the tympanic membrane to permit a free exchange of air between the outer ear and middle ear. A type of tympanostomy tube known as the malleous clip tube attaches...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3880 - Tympanostomy tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3880 Tympanostomy tube. (a) Identification... middle ear. The device is inserted through the tympanic membrane to permit a free exchange of air between the outer ear and middle ear. A type of tympanostomy tube known as the malleous clip tube attaches...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3880 - Tympanostomy tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3880 Tympanostomy tube. (a) Identification... middle ear. The device is inserted through the tympanic membrane to permit a free exchange of air between the outer ear and middle ear. A type of tympanostomy tube known as the malleous clip tube attaches...

  11. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  12. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... A nasogastric tube (NG tube) is a special tube that carries food and medicine to the stomach through the nose. It can be ...

  13. Unsteady interaction of shock and detonation waves in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, Viktor P.

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of unsteady shock-wave interactions (SWIs) in gases are discussed in chapters contributed by leading Soviet experts. Topics addressed include the thermodynamic and electrophysical parameters of gas flow behind shock waves, the effect of nonequilibrium physicochemical processes on the flow parameters behind a shock wave, shock-tube investigations of unsteady SWI, SWI with a porous compressible medium, and the reflection of shock waves by a plane surface. Consideration is given to the diffraction of a shock wave at a convex corner, unsteady SWIs with curvilinear surfaces, numerical simulations of SWIs with bodies of various shapes, and the unsteady interaction of detonation waves. Diagrams, graphs, and photographs.

  14. Experimental investigation of the breakup of a round liquid jet in a shock-induced crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olles, Joseph; Guildenbecher, Daniel; Wagner, Justin; Demauro, Edward; Farias, Paul; Grasser, Thomas; Sojka, Paul

    2015-11-01

    The breakup of a round water jet due to a step change in the convective air velocity following a 1D air-shock was experimentally investigated. Variations of this experiment have been conducted in the past, however here quantitative results on the breakup sizes and trajectories are shown. A shock tube was utilized to create the jet breakup, and the primary shape of the liquid and secondary droplet sizes were recorded optically. Through the use of digital in-line holography (DIH), the sizes, 3D position, and 3C velocities of secondary droplets were measured at kHz rates. Care was taken to ensure that the jet was kept round throughout the shock tube test section (absent of Plateau-Rayleigh instability). While the liquid jet geometry and velocity was kept constant, various gas-phase velocities allowed for the investigation of multiple breakup morphologies, as a function of the crossflow Weber number. The typical breakup regimes are seen; bag, multimode, and sheet-thinning. With high temporal and spatial resolution, interfacial and liquid column instabilities are seen in the jet breakup.

  15. Hypovolemic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... x-ray of suspected areas Echocardiogram (sound wave test of heart structure and function) Endoscopy (tube placed in the mouth to the stomach (upper endoscopy) and/or colonoscopy (tube place ... urine output) In some cases, other tests may be done as well.

  16. Hypovolemic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... clammy skin Confusion Decreased or no urine output General weakness Pale skin color (pallor) Rapid breathing Sweating , moist skin Unconsciousness The greater and more rapid the blood loss, the more severe the symptoms of shock.

  17. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  18. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  19. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N.; Mursenkova, Irina V.; Znamenskaya, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4-2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2-1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves.

  20. Shock Initiation and Detonability of Liquid Nitroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaka, Akio; Zhang, Fan

    2004-07-01

    Shock initiation of detonation in liquid nitroethane (NE) was investigated using a cylindrical donor-attenuator-receptor configuration. While NE is less sensitive than nitromethane (NM) and isopropyl nitrate (IPN), similar behaviour of direct initiation of detonation and SDT were observed at higher shock pressures. The critical shock initiation peak pressure was found to be above 9.2 GPa at 17±6 °C initial temperature. Critical diameter experiments were performed using steel and tungsten tubes of various wall thicknesses. The critical diameter was found to lie between 89 mm with 6.6 mm wall (no detonation) and 97 mm with 8.9 mm wall (detonation) in steel tubes, and between 51 mm and 63 mm in 6.35 mm wall tungsten tubes at 21±5 °C. The steady detonation velocity measured was 5.39 mm/μsec.

  1. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  2. Investigation of shock focusing in a cavity with incident shock diffracted by an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Chen, X.; He, L.-M.; Rong, K.; Deiterding, R.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out in order to investigate the focusing of a shock wave in a test section after the incident shock has been diffracted by an obstacle. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach numbers of 1.4 and 2.1 were tested. A high-speed camera was employed to obtain schlieren photos of the flow field in the experiments. In the numerical simulations, a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme of third-order accuracy supplemented with structured dynamic mesh adaptation was adopted to simulate the shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experiments and numerical results is observed. The configurations exhibit shock reflection phenomena, shock-vortex interaction and—in particular—shock focusing. The pressure history in the cavity apex was recorded and compared with the numerical results. A quantitative analysis of the numerically observed shock reflection configurations is also performed by employing a pseudo-steady shock transition boundary calculation technique. Regular reflection, single Mach reflection and transitional Mach reflection phenomena are observed and are found to correlate well with analytic predictions from shock reflection theory.

  3. Nitric oxide emission spectroscopy measurements in a hypervelocity post-shock flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, Andrew; Austin, Joanna

    2012-11-01

    In hypervelocity flight conditions, typical of sub-orbital and reentry trajectories, the coupling between the fluid mechanics and the thermochemistry of the flow becomes important. In the current work, we use an expansion tube facility to accelerate air to hypervelocity test conditions (stagnation enthalpy 8MJ/kg, velocity 3.8 km/s). A double wedge model is used to generate an oblique shock, a strong bow shock, and a shock-boundary-layer interaction which is known to be very sensitive to the thermochemical state of the gas. We investigate the nitric oxide emission signal in the ultraviolet region (220-255 nm, A-X transition) at four spatial locations downstream of the bow shock (0, 2, 4, and 6 mm). An in-house code is used to simulate the spectrum in this region and thus obtain a temperature fit. Temperatures are observed to decrease when traversing downstream, starting at approximately the frozen temperature (about 7700 K) at the location of the shock (0 mm). The furthest downstream point deviates from this trend, potentially due to heating in a shear layer formed in the flow field. The flow field is seen to be in non-equilibrium in this region, as temperatures do not reach the equilibrium temperature (about 3900 K). This work was supported by an AFOSR award FA9550-11-1-0129 with Dr John Schmisseur as Program Manager.

  4. A general method for the calculation of absolute trace gas concentrations in air and breath from selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanel, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, David

    2006-03-01

    A complete description is presented of a numerical method that allows the calculation, in real time, of absolute concentrations of trace gases, including volatile organic compounds and water vapour, from selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, data. No assumptions are made concerning the SIFT-MS instrument size or its configuration and thus the calculation can be applied to the currently available, relatively large instruments and the anticipated new generation of smaller SIFT-MS instruments. This numerical method clearly distinguishes those parameters that are obviously specific to a particular instrument, including flow tube geometry, degree of mass discrimination in the analytical mass spectrometer and flow tube reaction time, from general fundamental processes, in particular the differential diffusive loss of ions along the flow tube that is dependent on the properties of those ions involved in the determination of the concentrations of particular trace gases. The essential reaction and transport kinetics are outlined, which describe the formation and loss of the product ions formed in the chemical ionisation of the trace gases by the precursor ions. A generalised calculation of the required ionic diffusion coefficients is introduced with options either for their accurate determination from the molecular geometry of ions or for less accurate but simpler estimates obtained using just the ionic mass. Based on the above ideas, a straightforward calculation sequence is shown to determine trace gas concentrations by SIFT-MS, and its utility demonstrated by an example of the analysis of acetone in exhaled breath.

  5. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  6. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  7. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  8. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air... employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required. (c)(1) A flexible, nonkinking type breathing tube...

  9. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  10. Experimental investigation of flow and heating in a resonance tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Back, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the basic mechanism of heating in resonance tubes of square section with constant area excited by underexpanded jet flows. The jet flow between the nozzle exit and the tube inlet plays a key role in the performance of a resonance tube. A detailed and systematic investigation of the unsteady complex shock structure in this part of the flow region has led to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms associated with the gas heating in such tubes. A study of the effects of tube location in relation to free-jet shock location (without the presence of the resonance tube) has shed further light on the underlying mechanism of sustained oscillations of the flow in a resonance tube.

  11. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer rates for the shock-induced unsteady laminar boundary layer on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady laminar boundary layer induced by the flow-initiating shock wave passing over a flat plate mounted in a shock tube was theoretically and experimentally studied in terms of heat transfer rates to the plate for shock speeds ranging from 1.695 to 7.34 km/sec. The theory presented by Cook and Chapman for the shock-induced unsteady boundary layer on a plate is reviewed with emphasis on unsteady heat transfer. A method of measuring time-dependent heat-transfer rates using thin-film heat-flux gages and an associated data reduction technique are outlined in detail. Particular consideration is given to heat-flux measurement in short-duration ionized shocktube flows. Experimental unsteady plate heat transfer rates obtained in both air and nitrogen using thin-film heat-flux gages generally agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental results indicate that the theory continues to predict the unsteady boundary layer behavior after the shock wave leaves the trailing edge of the plate even though the theory is strictly applicable only for the time interval in which the shock remains on the plate.

  12. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  13. [Neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury. PMID:25199226

  14. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  15. Photomultiplier tube selection for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Maomao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yingtao; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shoushan; Wang, Chong; Bi, Baiyang

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of selecting the most suitable photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA), we have performed extensive tests on seven models of 25.4 mm PMTs: Hamamatsu R1924A and R7899, Beijing Hamamatsu CR303, CR332A and CR364, and HZC Photonics XP3102 and XP3182. A dedicated test system has been developed to measure the PMT characteristics such as single photo-electron spectrum, gain, linearity, and spatial uniformity of anode output. The XP3182 and CR364 (R7899) tubes both meet the pivotal requirement due to their superior pulse linearity. The PMT test system, techniques used for these measurements, and their results are also reported.

  16. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Tan, Sheng; He, Liming; Rong, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP) Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO) scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing) were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  17. Experimental study on the interaction of planar shock wave with polygonal helium cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Si, T.; Luo, X.

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of a polygonal helium cylinder impacted by a planar weak shock wave is investigated experimentally. Three different polygonal interface shapes including a square, an equilateral triangle and a diamond are formed by the soap film technique, where thin pins are used as edges to connect the adjacent sides of soap films. Shock tube experiments are conducted to obtain sequences of schlieren images using a high-speed video camera. In each case, the development of the wave system and the evolution of the polygonal helium cylinder subjected to a planar shock wave with a Mach number of are obtained in a single test. For comparison, numerical simulations are also performed using the two-dimensional and axisymmetric vectorized adaptive solver (VAS2D). The variations of the interface properties including the displacement, the length and the height of the distorted interfaces in the three cases are given. For the square helium cylinder, two counter-rotating vortices connected by a thin link can be observed. The height of the distorted interface always increases, and its length first decreases and then increases. In the triangle case, an air jet is formed quickly and moves downwards within the volume and eventually encounters the downstream interface, resulting in a bulge on the downstream interface. In the diamond case, the upstream interface quickly forms a re-entrant air jet similar to that in the triangle case, and the downstream interface becomes flat. The circulation in the three cases is calculated numerically, revealing the main driving mechanism of the development of the shocked polygonal interface. This work exhibits the great potential of the experimental method in studying shock-polygonal interface interactions in the case of slow/fast (air/helium) situations.

  18. Investigating shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov ripple evolution before and after re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Raman, K. S.; Baumann, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Islam, T. S.; Felker, S.; Holder, J. P.; Seugling, R. M.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.; Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Late-time Rayleigh-Taylor/Richtmyer-Meshkov(RM) ripple growth in an opposing-shock geometry is investigated using x-ray area backlit imaging of a shock-tube with indirectly driven shocks. The shocks are driven from opposing sides of the tube. The ablator layer on one side has pre-imposed ripples in the form of a sine wave with two amplitudes and a single wavelength. This ablator includes an opaque tracer layer that is used to track the perturbed interface as it is driven into a lower density foam. The ablator on the opposing side of the tube is flat, and is used to launch the shock that re-shocks the rippled interface. A large-area backlighter and gated x-ray radiography is used to capture images at different times during the RM instability growth. Here, first measurements obtained with this experimental platform at the NIF, including the optimization of the platform are presented. The RM ripple evolution before and after re-shock, including a possible loss of initial conditions are, also discussed. The data that informs the codes is compared to simulation results Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-674941.

  19. Distortion of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane shock wave.

    PubMed

    Layes, Guillaume; Jourdan, Georges; Houas, Lazhar

    2003-10-24

    The evolution of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane weak shock wave has been investigated in a square cross section shock tube via a multiple exposure shadowgraph diagnostic. Different gaseous bubbles, i.e., helium, nitrogen, and krypton, were introduced in air at atmospheric pressure in order to study the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the spherical geometry for negative, close to zero, and positive initial density jumps across the interface. We show that the bubble distortion is strongly different for the three cases and we present the experimental velocity and volume of the developed vortical structures. We prove that at late times the bubble velocities reach constant values which are in good agreement with previous calculations. Finally, we point out that, in our flow conditions, the gaseous bubble motion and shape are mainly influenced by vorticity and aerodynamic forces. PMID:14611354

  20. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  1. Flow-establishment times for blunt bodies in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Moore, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Flow establishment results are presented as obtained from shock standoff distance, pressure, and heat transfer measurements in the Langley expansion tube. The models tested were flat-faced cylinders with varying radius and a sphere with a constant radius, and they were positioned at the acceleration section exit and tested in the open jet at zero angle of attack. The experimental results were obtained as spinoff from various studies using helium, air, and CO2 test gases at freestream velocities in the range 5-7 km/sec. Time histories of shock detachment distance illustrate that the shock formation about the smaller-radii flat-faced cylinders and the sphere is symmetrical, whereas a complex, asymmetric formation is observed for the larger-radii cylinders. Flow is shown to establish more readily about the sphere than a flat-faced cylinder of the same diameter. A quasi-steady flow exists about relatively large blunt models during two-thirds of the approximate 250-microsec expansion tube test period.

  2. Modeling and Laboratory Investigations of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, Jacob; Laming, J. Martin; Manka, Charles; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Ted; Tam, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    Supernova remnants are often inhomogeneous, with knots or clumps of material expanding in ambient plasma. This structure may be initiated by hydrodynamic instabilities occurring during the explosion, but it may plausibly be amplified by instabilities of the expanding shocks such as, for example, corrugation instabilities described by D’yakov in 1954, Vishniac in 1983, and observed in the laboratory by Grun et al. in 1991. Shock instability can occur when radiation lowers the effective adiabatic index of the gas. In view of the difficulty of modeling radiation in non-equilibrium plasmas, and the dependence of shock instabilities on such radiation, we are performing a laboratory experiment to study radiative shocks. The shocks are generated in a miniature, laser-driven shock tube. The gas density inside the tube at any instant in time is measured using time and space-resolved interferometry, and the emission spectrum of the gas is measured with time-resolved spectroscopy. We simulate the experiment with a 1D code that models time dependent post-shock ionization and non-equilibrium radiative cooling. S. P. D’yakov, Zhurnal Eksperimentalnoi Teoreticheskoi Fiziki 27, 288 (1954); see also section 90 in L.D. Landau and E.M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (Butterworth-Heinemann 1987); E.T. Vishniac, Astrophys. J. 236, 880 (1983); J. Grun, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 66, 2738 (1991)

  3. Global sensitivity analysis for DSMC simulations of hypersonic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, James S.; Goldstein, David B.

    2013-08-01

    Two global, Monte Carlo based sensitivity analyses were performed to determine which reaction rates most affect the results of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations for a hypersonic shock in five-species air. The DSMC code was written and optimized with shock tube simulations in mind, and includes modifications to allow for the efficient simulation of a 1D hypersonic shock. The TCE model is used to convert Arrhenius-form reaction rate constants into reaction cross-sections, after modification to allow accurate modeling of reactions with arbitrarily large rates relative to the VHS collision rate. The square of the Pearson correlation coefficient was used as the measure for sensitivity in the first of the analyses, and the mutual information was used as the measure in the second. The quantity of interest (QoI) for these analyses was the NO density profile across a 1D shock at ˜8000 m/s (M∞ ≈ 23). This vector QoI was broken into a set of scalar QoIs, each representing the density of NO at a specific point downstream of the shock, and sensitivities were calculated for each scalar QoI based on both measures of sensitivity. Profiles of sensitivity vs. location downstream of the shock were then integrated to determine an overall sensitivity for each reaction. A weighting function was used in the integration in order to emphasize sensitivities in the region of greatest thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. Both sensitivity analysis methods agree on the six reactions which most strongly affect the density of NO. These six reactions are the N2 dissociation reaction N2 + N ⇄ 3N, the O2 dissociation reaction O2 + O ⇄ 3O, the NO dissociation reactions NO + N ⇄ 2N + O and NO + O ⇄ N + 2O, and the exchange reactions N2 + O ⇄ NO + N and NO + O ⇄ O2 + N. This analysis lays the groundwork for the application of Bayesian statistical methods for the calibration of parameters relevant to modeling a hypersonic shock layer with the DSMC method.

  4. Laboratory Astrophysics: Study of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Lanz, T.; Stehlé, C.; Michaut, C.

    2002-12-01

    Radiative shocks are high Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. They might be encountered in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction of supernovae with the intestellar medium etc. A numerical one dimensional (1D) stationary study of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is being performed. An estimate of the error made by the 1D approach in the radiative transfer treatment is done by an approximate short characteristics approach. It shows, for exemple, how much of the radiation escapes from the medium in the configuration of the experiment. The experimental study of these shocks has been performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the École Polytechnique (France). We have observed several shocks identified as radiative shocks. The shock waves propagate at about 50 km/s in a tiny 10 mm3 shock tube filled with gaz. From the measurements, it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed and the electronic density.

  5. Fluidized bed combustor and tube construction therefor

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  6. Tube construction for fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1984-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  7. Electrical instrument measures position and velocity of shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.; Humphry, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument employs a sensor consisting of twin-electrode probe mounted in shock tube wall, with small dc voltage impressed across electrodes. Power supply, amplifier, and gate pulse generator complete the system. Instrument provides data for construction of wave diagrams, as well as measurement of shock velocity.

  8. A correlation to predict the heat flux on the air-side of a vapor chamber with overturn-U flattened tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimuang, Wasan; Limkaisang, Viroj

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a conventional vapor chamber (CVC) and a loop vapor chamber (LVC) are compared. The vapor chambers consisted of a stainless steel box with different covers. The results indicated that the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of LVC is higher than CVC. An empirical correlation was developed to predict the convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of the LVC.

  9. In-Tube Laser Propulsion Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sukyum; Urabe, Naohide; Torikai, Hiroyuki; Sasoh, Akihiro; Jeung, In-Seuck

    2003-05-01

    Laser propulsion research activities at Shock Wave Research Center, Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, focus themselves on `in-tube' configurations. The thrust is enhanced in a confined acceleration region. Other advantages are obtained from the viewpoint of practical application. We are now investigating various extensions of the Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) (1) ablative in-tube propulsion, (2) thrust enhancement using applied magnetic field, (3) plasma pre-generation using a pilot laser irradiation, (4) demonstration of supersonic laser propulsion. The progresses in these subjects are presented.

  10. Shock interactions with a dense-gas wall layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L. ); Reichenbach, H. ); Ferguson, R.E. )

    1991-11-19

    Described here are experiments and calculations of the interaction of a planar shock with a dense-gas layer located on the floor of the shock tube test section. The shock front deposited vorticity in the layer by the baroclynic mechanism. The wall shear layer was unstable and rapidly evolved into a turbulent boundary layer with a wide spectrum of mixing scales. Density effects dominated the dynamics in the wall region.

  11. The Superorbital Expansion Tube concept, experiment and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J.; Morgan, R. G.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the need for ground testing facilities for super orbital re-entry research, a small scale facility has been set up at the University of Queensland to demonstrate the superorbital expansion tube concept. This unique device is a free piston driven, triple diaphragm, impulse shock facility which uses the enthalpy multiplication mechanism of the unsteady expansion process and the addition of a secondary shock driver to further heat the driver gas. The pilot facility has been operated to produce quasi-steady test flows in air with shock velocities in excess of 13 km/s and with a usable test flow duration of the order of 15 micro sec. an experimental condition produced in the facility with total enthalpy of 108 MJ/kg and a total pressure of 335 MPa is reported. A simple analytical flow model which accounts for non-ideal rupture of the light tertiary diaphragm and the resulting entropy increase in the test gas is discussed. It is shown that equilibrium calculations more accurately model the unsteady expansion process than calculations assuming frozen chemistry. This is because the high enthalpy flows produced in the facility can only be achieved if the chemical energy stored in the test flow during shock heating of the test gas is partially returned to the flow during the process of unsteady expansion. Measurements of heat transfer rates to a flat plate demonstrate the usability of test flow for aerothermodynamic testing and comparison of these rates with empirical calculations confirms the usable accuracy of the flow model.

  12. A flash photolysis-shock tube kinetic study of the H atom reaction with O sub 2 : H + O sub 2 rightleftharpoons OH + O (962 K le T le 1705 K) and H + O sub 2 + Ar yields HO sub 2 + Ar (746 K le T le 987 K)

    SciTech Connect

    Pirraglia, A.N.; Michael, J.V.; Sutherland, J.W.; Klemm, R.B. )

    1989-01-12

    Rate constants for the reactions H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O (1) and H + O{sub 2} + M {yields} HO{sub 2} + M (2) were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions by the flash photolysis-shock tube technique that employs the atomic resonance absorption detection method to monitor (H){sub t}. Rate data for reaction 1 were obtained over the temperature range from 962 to 1705 K, and the results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression k{sub 1}(T) = (2.79 {plus minus} 0.32) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp(-16132 {plus minus} 276 cal mol{sup {minus}1}/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The mean deviation of the experimentally measured rate constants from those calculated by using this expression is {plus minus}16% over the stated temperature range. The recent shock tube data of Frank and Just (1693-2577 K) were combined with the present results for k{sub 1}(T) to obtain the following Arrhenius expression for the overall temperature span (962-2577 K); k{sub 1}(T) = (3.18 {plus minus} 0.24) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp(-16439 {plus minus} 186 cal mol{sup {minus}1}/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The mean deviation of the experimentally measured rate constants from this expression is {plus minus}15% over the entire temperature range. Values for the rate constant for the reverse of reaction 1 were calculated from each of the experimentally measured K{sub 1}(T) values with expressions for the equilibrium constant derived by using the latest JANAF thermochemical data. These k{sub {minus}1}(T) values were also combined with similarly derived values from the Frank and Just data.

  13. Optical signal measurement of iso-octane autoignition behind reflected shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qisheng; Dou, Zhiguo; Li, Lan

    2015-03-01

    Ignition delay time of diluted iso-octane/Air mixtures were measured in a single pulse reflected shock tube. In this work, the onset of ignition was determined by monitoring both the pressure history and the emitted light corresponding to OH* emission. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) in specially designed housing at CaF2 window were used with 310±5nm filters to measure the ultraviolet OH* emission. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 1295K and 2487K, pressures about 1 atm. and varying equivalence ratios (Φ=0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0). Long shock tube dwell time (about 15ms) was achieved by tailored contact surface operation under such conditions. To simulate real engine environment, liquid fuel aerosol was generated by the supersonic atomizer, and the size of fuel droplet in aerosol was measured. Both pressure and OH*emission histories were obtained to determine the ignition delay time and the relative strength of the ignition process. The OH* emission time history data showed that there were different behaviors of iso-octane in ignition process under varying temperatures. Several potential chemical kinetics mechanisms were used to simulated iso-octane autoignition under the same conditions. Analysis of the experiments results and simulations supported the validation of those chemical kinetics mechanisms. The experimental data was consistent with the prediction of mechanism in low temperatures and the experiment data showed that the factors of temperature and equivalent ratio have different effect on the ignition delay time

  14. Angular glass tubing drawn from round tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Round glass tubing softened in a furnace is drawn over a shaped plug or mandel to form shapes with other than a circular cross section. Irregularly shaped tubing is formed without limitations on tube length or wall thickness.

  15. Simulations of laser experiments of radiative and non-radiative shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, B.; Rutter, E.; Myra, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan was established to study the properties of radiative shocks using both numerical simulation and shock-tube experiments on the Omega Laser at the University of Rochester. The laser accelerates a thin Be disk, which acts like a piston, driving a shock with an initial propagation velocity of 200 km/s into a tube filled with Xe. Analytic estimates indicate that a shock propagating with a velocity greater than about 60 km/s through Xe under these conditions should be strongly radiative. This paper discusses numerical simulations of a proposed modification to this experiment that produces a non-radiative shock. Comparison of the radiative and non-radiative cases provides an excellent opportunity for assessing the effects of radiation on shock structure and flow morphology. For the non-radiative case, the initial shock speed is reduced to 20 km/s by increasing the thickness of the Be disk and by decreasing the energy of the laser. Two-dimensional simulations of targets with cylindrical shock tubes and three-dimensional simulations of more complex targets with elliptical shock tubes are described. In addition, the effect of the shock speed on the cross-sectional area of the tube is discussed.

  16. Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

    2008-01-16

    The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

  17. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  18. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  19. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  20. Comparative Tests of Pitot-static Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Kenneth G; Spaulding, Ellis R

    1935-01-01

    Comparative tests were made on seven conventional Pitot-static tubes to determine their static, dynamic, and resultant errors. The effect of varying the dynamic opening, static opening, wall thickness, and inner-tube diameter was investigated. Pressure-distribution measurements showing stem and tip effects were also made. A tentative design for a standard Pitot-static tube for use in measuring air velocity is submitted.

  1. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  2. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... profile tube also has a stem length). Note: NG and NJ tubes (that go through a person’s ... Immediate Action: • Discontinue feeding. • If you have an NG or NJ tube, and the tube is curled ...

  3. Review of the PDWA Concept for Combustion Enhancement in a Supersonic Air-Breathing Combustor Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canbier, Jean-Luc; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the design of the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA) concept and the preliminary computational fluid dynamics studies that supported it. The PDWA relies on the rapid generation of detonation waves in a small tube, which are then injected into the supersonic stream of the main combustor. The blast waves thus generated are used to stimulate the mixing and combustion inside the main combustor. The mixing enhancement relies on various forms of the baroclinic interaction, where misaligned pressure and density gradients combine to produce vortical flow. By using unsteady shock waves, the concept also uses the Richtmyer-Meshkov effect to further increase the rate of mixing. By carefully designing the respective configurations of the combustor and the detonation tubes, one can also increase the penetration of the fuel into the supersonic air stream. The unsteady shocks produce lower stagnation pressure losses than steady shocks. Combustion enhancement can also be obtained through the transient shock-heating of the fuel-air interface, and the lowering of the ignition delay in these regions. The numerical simulations identify these processes, and show which configurations give the best results. Engineering considerations are also presented, and discuss the feasibility of the concept. Of primary importance are the enhancements in performance, the design simplicity, the minimization of the power, cost, and weight, and the methods to achieve very rapid cycling.

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Convective Heat Exchange in the Separation air and Oil Flows in a Staggered Bank of Round Tubes in a Wide Range of Change in the Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Malyshkin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    An analysis of the convective heat exchange in the separation air and oil flows in banks of heated round tubes and their hydraulic losses at Reynolds numbers changing in a wide range from 100 to 400 for the laminar flow and from 103 to 8·103 for the turbulent fl ow has been performed. For solving the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, multiblock computational technologies realized in the VP2/3 package and original procedures for correction of the pressure gradient in a fl ow and its mean-mass temperature were used. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed using the Menter shear-stress transfer model modified with account for the curvature of streamlines within the framework of the Leshtsiner-Rody approach with an Isaev-Kharchenko-Usachov constant equal to 0.2. The results of numerical simulation were compared with the corresponding experimental data of A. Zhukaukas. The dependence of the local and integral characteristics of a fl ow of a heat-transfer agent in a staggered bank of round tubes on the properties of this agent was determined.

  5. A. P. S. ELECTRO-TUBE EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of an Air Pollution Systems (APS) Inc. Electro-Tube, a wet electrostatic precipitator. Fine particle collection efficiency as a function of particle size was computed from data taken on the Electro-Tube. It was operated at gas flow rates ...

  6. Kundt's Tube Experiment Using Smartphones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parolin, Sara Orsola; Pezzi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with a modern version of Kundt's tube experiment. Using economic instruments and a couple of smartphones, it is possible to "see" nodes and antinodes of standing acoustic waves in a column of vibrating air and to measure the speed of sound.

  7. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  8. Tube Thoracostomy (Chest Tube) Removal in Traumatic Patients: What Do We Know? What Can We Do?

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Ghahramani, Zahra; Ghoddusi Johari, Hamed; Khezri, Samad; Ziaeian, Bizhan; Ghayyoumi, Mohammad Ali; Fallahi, Mohammad Javad; Niakan, Mohammad Hadi; Sabetian, Golnar; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Chest tube (CT) or tube thoracostomy placement is often indicated following traumatic injuries. Premature movement of the chest tube leads to increased hospital complications and costs for patients. Placement of a chest tube is indicated in drainage of blood, bile, pus, drain air, and other fluids. Although there is a general agreement for the placement of a chest tube, there is little consensus on the subsequent management. Chest tube removal in trauma patients increases morbidity and hospital expense if not done at the right time. A review of relevant literature showed that the best answers to some questions about time and decision-making have been long sought. Issues discussed in this manuscript include chest tube removal conditions, the need for chest radiography before and after chest tuberemoval, the need to clamp the chest tube prior to removal, and drainage rate and acceptability prior to removal. PMID:27162900

  9. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  10. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  11. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  12. Determination of seven pyrethroids biocides and their synergist in indoor air by thermal-desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after sampling on Tenax TA ® passive tubes.

    PubMed

    Raeppel, Caroline; Appenzeller, Brice M; Millet, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    A method coupling thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 7 pyrethroids (allethrin, bifenthrin, cyphenothrin, imiprothrin, permethrin, prallethrin and tetramethrin) and piperonyl butoxide adsorbed on Tenax TA(®) passive samplers after exposure in indoor air. Thermal desorption was selected as it permits efficient and rapid extraction without solvent used together with a good sensitivity. Detection (S/N>3) and quantification (S/N>10) limits varied between 0.001 ng and 2.5 ng and between 0.005 and 10 ng respectively with a reproducibility varied between 14% (bifenthrin) and 39% (permethrin). The method was used for the comparison indoor air contamination after low-pressure spraying and fumigation application in a rubbish chute situated in the basement of a building. PMID:25281107

  13. Effects of initial condition spectral content on shock-driven turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Grinstein, Fernando F

    2015-07-01

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the rage code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band of high density gas (SF(6)) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF(6) bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF(6) band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models. PMID:26274276

  14. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  15. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  17. Standing shocks in a two-fluid solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Hu, You Qiu; Esser, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the formation of standing shocks in the solar wind using a two-fluid time-dependent model in the presence of Alfven waves. Included in this model is the adiabatic cooling and thermal conduction of both electrons and protons. In this study, standing shocks develop in the flow when additional critical points form as a result of either localized momentum addition or rapid expansion of the flow tube below the existing sonic point. While the flow speed and density exhibit the same characteristics as found in earlier studies of the formation of standing shocks, the inclusion of electron and proton heat conduction produces different signatures in the electron and proton temperature profiles across the shock layer. Owing to the strong heat conduction, the electron temperature is nearly continuous across the shock, but its gradient has a negative jump across it, thus producing a net heat flux out of the shock layer. The proton temperature exhibits the same characteristics for shocks produced by momentum addition but behaves differently when the shock is formed by the rapid divergence of the flow tube. The adiabatic cooling in a rapidly diverging flow tube reduces the proton temperature so substantially that the proton heat conduction becomes negligible in the vicinity of the shock. As a result, protons experience a positive jump in temperature across the shock. While Alfven waves do not affect the formation of standing shocks, they contribute to the change of the mmomentum and energy balance across them. We also find that for this solar wind model the inclusion of thermal conduction and adiabatic cooling for the elctrons and protons increases significantly the range of parameters characterizing the formation of standing shocks over those previously found for isothermal and polytropic models.

  18. The physical nature of weak shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skews, Beric W.; Ashworth, Jason T.

    2005-10-01

    For weak shock waves and small wedge angles the application of three-shock (von Neumann) theory gives no physically realistic solutions and yet experiments clearly show a pattern of reflection of three shocks meeting at a triple point. This disagreement is referred to as the von Neumann paradox, and the reflection pattern as von Neumann reflection (vNR). Some recent numerical computations have indicated the existence of an expansion wave immediately behind the reflected wave as originally suggested by Guderley over fifty years ago. Furthermore, a recent solution of the inviscid transonic equations has indicated the possible existence of a very small, multi-wave structure immediately behind the three-shock confluence. A special shock tube has been constructed which allows Mach stem lengths to be obtained which are more than an order of magnitude larger than those obtainable in conventional shock tubes. Schlieren photographs do indeed show a structure consisting of an expansion wave followed by a small shock situated behind the confluence point, with some indication of smaller scale structures in some tests. This indicates that some of the earlier models of vNR, in the parameter space tested, are incorrect. The size of the region influenced by this small wave system is about 2% of the Mach stem length and it is therefore not surprising that it has not been detected before in conventional shock tube facilities.

  19. Shock-induced behavior in micron-sized water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Thomas C.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a suite of tools for studying aerosols behind shock waves. A Mie-extinction particle sizing diagnostic and a computational model, along with a specially designed square-section shock tube were developed to study the time-history of micrometer-sized aerosols behind shock waves. These tools are critically needed to pursue the use of shock tubes to study the combustion behavior of low-vapor-pressure fuels. While the facility is designed to study reactive systems, we began by measuring the behavior of water aerosols in the range of 1-10μm behind shock waves with temperatures between 450 and 600K and pressures between 0.64 and 1.1atm. From these data we determined evaporation rates and found a correlation that provides the noncontinuum evaporation rate in terms of the d2 evaporation rate and a correction function.

  20. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiogenic Shock? Cardiogenic (kar-dee-oh-JE-nik) shock is ... treated right away. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...