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Sample records for air soil groundwater

  1. The role of soil air composition for noble gas tracer applications in tropical groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese; Peregovich, Bernhard; Machado, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved noble gases (NGs) in groundwater provide a well-established tool for paleo temperature reconstruction. However, reliable noble gas temperature (NGT) determination needs appropriate assumptions or rather an exact knowledge of soil air composition. Deviations of soil air NG partial pressures from atmospheric values have already been found in mid latitudes during summer time as a consequence of subsurface oxygen depletion. This effect depends on ambient temperature and humidity and is thus expected to be especially strong in humid tropical soils, which was not investigated so far. We therefore studied NGs in soil air and shallow groundwater near Santarém (Pará, Brazil) at the end of the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Soil air data confirms a correlation between NG partial pressures, the sum value of O2+CO2 and soil moisture contents. During the rainy season, we find significant NG enhancements in soil air by up to 7% with respect to the atmosphere. This is twice as much as observed during the dry season. Groundwater samples show neon excess values between 15% and 120%. Nearly all wells show no seasonal variations of excess air, even though the local river level seasonally fluctuates by about 8 m. Assuming atmospheric NG contents in soil air, fitted NGTs underestimate the measured groundwater temperature by about 1-2° C. However, including enhanced soil air NG contents as observed during the rainy season, resulting NGTs are in good agreement with local groundwater temperatures. Our presented data allows for a better understanding of subsurface NG variations. This is essential with regard to NG tracer applications in humid tropical areas, for which reliable paleoclimate data is of major importance for modern climate research.

  2. Evaluation of short-term tracer fluctuations in groundwater and soil air in a two year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, Florian; Mayer, Simon; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    The application of gas tracers like noble gases (NGs), SF6 or CFCs in groundwater studies such as paleo temperature determination requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of reactive and inert gases in the soil air with which the infiltrating water equilibrates. Due to microbial gas consumption and production, NG partial pressures in soil air can deviate from atmospheric air, an effect that could bias noble gas temperatures estimates if not taken into account. So far, such an impact on NG contents in groundwater has not been directly demonstrated. We provide the first long-term study of the above mentioned gas tracers and physical parameters in both the saturated and unsaturated soil zone, sampled continuously for more than two years near Mannheim (Germany). NG partial pressures in soil air correlate with soil moisture and the sum value of O2+CO2, with a maximal significant enhancement of 3-6% with respect to atmospheric air during summer time. Observed seasonal fluctuations result in a mass dependent fractionation of NGs in soil air. Concentrations of SF6 and CFCs in soil air are determined by corresponding fluctuations in local atmospheric air, caused by industrial emissions. Arising concentration peaks are damped with increasing soil depth. Shallow groundwater shows short-term NG fluctuations which are smoothed within a few meters below the water table. A correlation between NG contents of soil air and of groundwater is observable during strong recharge events. However, there is no evidence for a permanent influence of seasonal variations of soil air composition on shallow groundwater. Fluctuating NG contents in shallow groundwater are rather determined by variations of soil temperature and water table level. Our data gives evidence for a further temperature driven equilibration of groundwater with entrapped air bubbles within the topmost saturated zone, which permanently occurs even some years after recharge. Local subsurface temperature fluctuations

  3. Air sparging/high vacuum extraction to remove chlorinated solvents in groundwater and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Gilliat, M.D.

    1998-11-01

    An air sparging and high vacuum extraction was installed as an alternative to a containment pump and treat system to reduce the long-term remediation schedule. The site is located at the DOE Mound facility in Miamisburg, Ohio, just south of Dayton. The air sparging system consists of 23 wells interspersed between 17 soil vapor extraction wells. The SVE system has extracted about 1,500 lbs of VOCs in five months. The air sparging system operated for about 6 weeks before shutdown due to suspected biochemical fouling. Technical data are presented on the operating characteristics of the system.

  4. Screening for volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater by use of a portable gas chromatograph during field investigations at an Air Force installation in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of the portable gas chromatograph for screening of soil and water samples in the field was part of the drilling program for the installation of monitoring wells for a basewide ground-water monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Selected soil and ground-water samples were screened in the field for volatile organic compounds to determine if contamination was present, to define the vertical and lateral extent of contamination, and to aid in the placement of the well screens for optimal interception of contaminants. This report describes the screening methods, sample-collection, quality-assurance/quality-control methods, and data-interpretation procedures necessary for screening of soil and ground-water samples in the field during the water resources investigations.

  5. Soil- and groundwater-quality data for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, David A.; Rowe, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Ellsworth Air Force Base is an Air Combat Command located approximately 10 miles northeast of Rapid City, South Dakota. Ellsworth Air Force Base occupies about 6,000 acres within Meade and Pennington Counties, and includes runways, airfield operations, industrial areas, housing, and recreational facilities. Fuels Area C within Ellsworth Air Force Base is a fuels storage area that is used to support the mission of the base. In fall of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, Ellsworth Air Force Base, to estimate groundwater-flow direction, select locations for permanent monitoring wells, and install and sample monitoring wells for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C. Nine monitoring wells were installed for the study within Fuels Area C during November 4–7, 2014. Soil core samples were collected during installation of eight of the monitoring wells and analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene,m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. Groundwater samples were collected from seven of the nine wells (two of the monitoring wells did not contain enough water to sample or were dry) during November 19–21, 2014, and analyzed for select physical properties, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene, m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. This report describes the nine monitoring well locations and presents the soil- and groundwater-quality data collected in 2014 for this study.

  6. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Kirshner, M.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes.

  7. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  8. Integrated technologies for expedited soil and groundwater remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.; Wellman, D.

    1996-12-01

    A fast-track and economic approach was necessary to meet the needs of a property transfer agreement and to minimize impact to future usage of a site in the Los Angeles Basin. Woodward-Clyde responded by implementing site investigation, remedial action plan preparation for soil and groundwater, and selection and installation of remedial alternatives in an aggressive schedule of overlapped tasks. Assessment of soil and groundwater was conducted at the site, followed by design and construction of remediation systems. This phase of activity was completed within 2 years. Soil and groundwater were found to be impacted by chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons. A vapor extraction system (2,000 scfm capacity) was installed for soil remediation, and an innovative air sparging system was installed for cost effective groundwater cleanup. A bioventing system was also applied in selected areas. The vapor extraction wellfield consists of 26 extraction and monitoring well points, with multiple screened casings. The air sparging wellfield consists of 32 sparging wells with a designed maximum flow of 400 scfm. The systems began operation in 1993, and have resulted in the estimated removal of approximately 30,000 pounds of contaminants, or about 90% of the estimated mass in place. The combined vapor extraction/air sparging system is expected to reduce the time for on-site groundwater remediation from 1/3 to 1/6 the time when compared to the conventional pump and treat method for groundwater remediation.

  9. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND AIR SPARGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging, also called "in situ air stripping and in situ volatilization" injects air into the saturated zone to strip away volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in groundwater and adsorbed to soil. hese volatile contaminants transfer in a vapor phase to the unsaturated ...

  10. Soil-aquifer phenomena affecting groundwater under vertisols: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Baram, S.; Dahan, O.

    2015-09-01

    Vertisols are cracking clayey soils that: (i) usually form in alluvial lowlands where normally, groundwater pools into aquifers, (ii) have different types of voids (due to cracking) which make flow and transport of water, solutes and gas complex, and (iii) are regarded as fertile soils in many areas. The combination of these characteristics results in the unique soil-aquifer phenomena that are highlighted and summarized in this review. The review is divided into the following four sections: (1) soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants; in this section lysimeter- to basin-scale observations that show the significance of cracks as preferential flow paths in vertisols which bypass matrix blocks in the unsaturated zone are summarized. Relatively fresh-water recharge and groundwater contamination from these fluxes and their modeling are reviewed, (2) soil cracks as deep evaporators and unsaturated-zone salinity; deep sediment samples under uncultivated vertisols in semiarid regions reveal a dry (immobile), saline matrix, partly due to enhanced evaporation through soil cracks. Observations of this phenomenon are compiled in this section and the mechanism of evapoconcentration due to air flow in the cracks is discussed, (3) impact of cultivation on flushing of the unsaturated zone and aquifer salinization; the third section examines studies reporting that land-use change of vertisols from native land to cropland promotes greater fluxes through the saline unsaturated-zone matrix, eventually flushing salts to the aquifer. Different degrees of salt flushing are assessed as well as aquifer salinization on different scales, and a comparison is made with aquifers under other soils, (4) relatively little nitrate contamination in aquifers under vertisols; In this section we turn the light on observations showing that aquifers under cultivated vertisols are somewhat resistant to groundwater contamination by nitrate (the major agriculturally related

  11. Soil-aquifer phenomena affecting groundwater under vertisols: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Baram, S.; Dahan, O.

    2016-01-01

    Vertisols are cracking clayey soils that (i) usually form in alluvial lowlands where, normally, groundwater pools into aquifers; (ii) have different types of voids (due to cracking), which make flow and transport of water, solutes and gas complex; and (iii) are regarded as fertile soils in many areas. The combination of these characteristics results in the unique soil-aquifer phenomena that are highlighted and summarized in this review. The review is divided into the following four sections: (1) soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants: in this section lysimeter-to basin-scale observations that show the significance of cracks as preferential-flow paths in vertisols, which bypass matrix blocks in the unsaturated zone, are summarized. Relatively fresh-water recharge and groundwater contamination from these fluxes and their modeling are reviewed; (2) soil cracks as deep evaporators and unsaturated-zone salinity: deep sediment samples under uncultivated vertisols in semiarid regions reveal a dry (immobile), saline matrix, partly due to enhanced evaporation through soil cracks. Observations of this phenomenon are compiled in this section and the mechanism of evapoconcentration due to air flow in the cracks is discussed; (3) impact of cultivation on flushing of the unsaturated zone and aquifer salinization: the third section examines studies reporting that land-use change of vertisols from native land to cropland promotes greater fluxes through the saline unsaturated-zone matrix, eventually flushing salts to the aquifer. Different degrees of salt flushing are assessed as well as aquifer salinization on different scales, and a comparison is made with aquifers under other soils; (4) relatively little nitrate contamination in aquifers under vertisols: in this section we turn the light on observations showing that aquifers under cultivated vertisols are somewhat resistant to groundwater contamination by nitrate (the major agriculturally related

  12. Apparent pollution of groundwater caused by natural formation of chloroform in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, O.; Laier, T.; Albers, C. N.; Hunkeler, D.

    2011-12-01

    Halogenated compounds are known to be formed in natural environments. Many of these compounds are similar to industrially produced compounds and are toxic or carcinogenic. High concentration of chloroform in groundwater is usually attributed to anthropogenic input, but we have found that the groundwater beneath some pristine areas contained chloroform exceeding 1 μg/L. We investigated four coniferous forests over a period of several years in order to measure the net-formation of chloroform. Field measurements of atmospheric and soil air concentrations of chloroform were monitored. Analyses of soil air at 40 cm depth in different parts of the forests and adjacent areas revealed an extremely large variation in chloroform concentration exceeding two orders of magnitude. Up to 100 ppbv was found in soil air under the spruce forest, to be compared to an ambient atmospheric concentration of 0.02 ppbv. The concentration of chloroform in soil air showed seasonal variation similar to that of CO2. Chloroform formation during incubation of undisturbed top-soil samples was found to be largest in soils from dense conifers stands with well-developed humus layers, while low chloroform formation occurred in soils from beech forest and agricultural grassland. We suggest that the mechanism behind the formation of chloroform is an unspecific chlorination of organic matter, caused by microbial activity in the soil. The aquifers are in fluvio-glacial sands with few layers of silt and a groundwater table from 4 to 7 m below the surface. In the shallowest parts of the aquifer, the groundwater has chloroform concentrations of 0.1 to 5 μg/L, and the groundwater is oxic with an age from 5 to 45 years using CFC-dating. Analyses of oxic groundwater > 40 years showed that it still contained chloroform at concentrations of 1 μg/L. Stable carbon isotopic analyses of chloroform from the uppermost groundwater in different parts of the forests and from soil water showed values from δ13C = -13

  13. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  14. Use of Additives in Bioremediation of Contaminated Groundwater and Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews application of additives used in bioremediation of chlorinated solvents and fuels for groundwater and soil remediation. Soluble carbon substrates are applicable to most site conditions except aquifers with very high or very low groundwater flow. Slow-release ...

  15. Hot spot formation of chloroform in forest soils caused pollution of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Ole S.; Albers, Christian N.; Laier, Troels; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    High concentration of chloroform in groundwater is usually attributed to anthropogenic input, but we have found that the groundwater beneath some pristine areas contained chloroform from 1 - 10 µg/L. Groundwater containing chloroform that exceeds 1 µg/L could not be used for drinking water according to Danish regulations. The strict demands on groundwater quality may have to be taken into account when decisions are made regarding the change of land use in order to protect major recharge areas from pollution with nitrate and pesticides resulting from high-yield agriculture production. The terrestrial environment and especially hot spots in forest soils seem to be important contributors to apparent pollution of groundwater with chloroform. We performed a field study to investigate concentration and fluxes of chloroform to the groundwater from in four coniferous forests in order to increase knowledge on the hot spot formation and fate of natural chloroform. We investigated four stations over a period of several years in order to measure the net-formation of chloroform. Field measurements soil air concentrations of chloroform were monitored in five soil profiles down to the groundwater table. Meteorological data were recorded at all stations In the hotspots up to 120 ppbv was found in soil air under the spruce forest, to be compared to an ambient atmospheric concentration of 0.02 ppbv. The concentration of chloroform in soil air showed seasonal variation with a maximum in August-September. The chloroform concentration decreased with depth in all profiles during the summer half-year to about 20 % of concentration in the production layer. However, the concentration is still high enough to give an equilibrium concentration in the upper groundwater of 1-10 µg/L. Stable carbon isotopic analyses of chloroform from the uppermost groundwater in different parts of the forests and from soil water showed values from δ13C = -13 ‰ to -27 ‰, corresponding to the ratio in

  16. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  17. Connecting carbon and nitrogen storage in rural wetland soil to groundwater abstraction for urban water supply.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David Bruce; Feit, Sharon J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether groundwater abstraction for urban water supply diminishes the storage of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and organic matter in the soil of rural wetlands. Wetland soil organic matter (SOM) benefits air and water quality by sequestering large masses of C and N. Yet, the accumulation of wetland SOM depends on soil inundation, so we hypothesized that groundwater abstraction would diminish stocks of SOM, C, and N in wetland soils. Predictions of this hypothesis were tested in two types of subtropical, depressional-basin wetland: forested swamps and herbaceous-vegetation marshes. In west-central Florida, >650 ML groundwater day(-1) are abstracted for use primarily in the Tampa Bay metropolis. At higher abstraction volumes, water tables were lower and wetlands had shorter hydroperiods (less time inundated). In turn, wetlands with shorter hydroperiods had 50-60% less SOM, C, and N per kg soil. In swamps, SOM loss caused soil bulk density to double, so areal soil C and N storage per m(2) through 30.5 cm depth was diminished by 25-30% in short-hydroperiod swamps. In herbaceous-vegetation marshes, short hydroperiods caused a sharper decline in N than in C. Soil organic matter, C, and N pools were not correlated with soil texture or with wetland draining-reflooding frequency. Many years of shortened hydroperiod were probably required to diminish soil organic matter, C, and N pools by the magnitudes we observed. This diminution might have occurred decades ago, but could be maintained contemporarily by the failure each year of chronically drained soils to retain new organic matter inputs. In sum, our study attributes the contraction of hydroperiod and loss of soil organic matter, C, and N from rural wetlands to groundwater abstraction performed largely for urban water supply, revealing teleconnections between rural ecosystem change and urban resource demand. PMID:25394332

  18. USEPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM ON REMEDIATION AND CONTAINMENT OF ARSENIC AND MERCURY IN SOILS, INDUSTRIAL WASTES, AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the U.S. and around the world, mercury and arsenic contaminated soils, industrial wastes, and groundwater are difficult to effectively and cheaply remediate and contain. Mercury is a serious health concern and has been identified as a contaminant in the air, soil, sediment, su...

  19. Assessing soil and groundwater contamination in a metropolitan redevelopment project.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junki; Lee, Ju Young; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ji, Won Hyun

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess contaminated soil and groundwater for the urban redevelopment of a rapid transit railway and a new mega-shopping area. Contaminated soil and groundwater may interfere with the progress of this project, and residents and shoppers may be exposed to human health risks. The study area has been remediated after application of first remediation technologies. Of the entire area, several sites were still contaminated by waste materials and petroleum. For zinc (Zn) contamination, high Zn concentrations were detected because waste materials were disposed in the entire area. For petroleum contamination, high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and hydrocarbon degrading microbe concentrations were observed at the depth of 7 m because the underground petroleum storage tank had previously been located at this site. Correlation results suggest that TPH (soil) concentration is still related with TPH (groundwater) concentration. The relationship is taken into account in the Spearman coefficient (α). PMID:23307052

  20. Sources of arsenic and fluoride in highly contaminated soils causing groundwater contamination in Punjab, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Farooqi, A.; Masuda, H.; Siddiqui, R.; Naseem, M.

    2009-05-15

    Highly contaminated groundwater, with arsenic (As) and fluoride (F{sup -}) concentrations of up to 2.4 and 22.8 mg/L, respectively, has been traced to anthropogenic inputs to the soil. In the present study, samples collected from the soil surface and sediments from the most heavily polluted area of Punjab were analyzed to determine the F{sup -} and As distribution in the soil. The surface soils mainly comprise permeable aeolian sediment on a Pleistocene terrace and layers of sand and silt on an alluvial flood plain. Although the alluvial sediments contain low levels of F, the terrace soils contain high concentrations of soluble F{sup -} (maximum, 16 mg/kg; mean, 4 mg/kg; pH > 8.0). Three anthropogenic sources were identified as fertilizers, combusted coal, and industrial waste, with phosphate fertilizer being the most significance source of F{sup -} accumulated in the soil. The mean concentration of As in the surface soil samples was 10.2 mg/kg, with the highest concentration being 35 mg/kg. The presence of high levels of As in the surface soil implies the contribution of air pollutants derived from coal combustion and the use of fertilizers. Intensive mineral weathering under oxidizing conditions produces highly alkaline water that dissolves the F{sup -} and As adsorbed on the soil, thus releasing it into the local groundwater.

  1. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  2. Spatial Variations of Soil Microbial Activities in Saline Groundwater-Irrigated Soil Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Juan; Feng, Qi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Song, You-Xi; Liu, Wei; Si, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Bao-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Spatial variations of soil microbial activities and its relationship with environmental factors are very important for estimating regional soil ecosystem function. Based on field samplings in a typical saline groundwater-irrigated region, spatial variations of soil microbial metabolic activities were investigated. Combined with groundwater quality analysis, the relationship between microbial activities and water salinity was also studied. The results demonstrated that moderate spatial heterogeneity of soil microbial activities presented under the total dissolved solids (TDS) of groundwater ranging from 0.23 to 12.24 g L-1. Groundwater salinity and microbial activities had almost opposite distribution characteristics: slight saline water was mainly distributed in west Baqu and south Quanshan, while severe saline and briny water were dominant in east Baqu and west Huqu; however, total AWCD was higher in the east-center and southwest of Baqu and east Huqu, while it was lower in east Baqu and northwest Huqu. The results of correlation analyses demonstrated that high-salinity groundwater irrigation had significantly adverse effects on soil microbial activities. Major ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl_, and SO4 2- in groundwater decisively influenced the results. Three carbon sources, carbohydrates, amines, and phenols, which had minor utilization rates in all irrigation districts, were extremely significantly affected by high-salinity groundwater irrigation. The results presented here offer an approach for diagnosing regional soil ecosystem function changes under saline water irrigation.

  3. Spatial Variations of Soil Microbial Activities in Saline Groundwater-Irrigated Soil Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Juan; Feng, Qi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Song, You-Xi; Liu, Wei; Si, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Bao-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Spatial variations of soil microbial activities and its relationship with environmental factors are very important for estimating regional soil ecosystem function. Based on field samplings in a typical saline groundwater-irrigated region, spatial variations of soil microbial metabolic activities were investigated. Combined with groundwater quality analysis, the relationship between microbial activities and water salinity was also studied. The results demonstrated that moderate spatial heterogeneity of soil microbial activities presented under the total dissolved solids (TDS) of groundwater ranging from 0.23 to 12.24 g L(-1). Groundwater salinity and microbial activities had almost opposite distribution characteristics: slight saline water was mainly distributed in west Baqu and south Quanshan, while severe saline and briny water were dominant in east Baqu and west Huqu; however, total AWCD was higher in the east-center and southwest of Baqu and east Huqu, while it was lower in east Baqu and northwest Huqu. The results of correlation analyses demonstrated that high-salinity groundwater irrigation had significantly adverse effects on soil microbial activities. Major ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cl(_), and SO4 (2-) in groundwater decisively influenced the results. Three carbon sources, carbohydrates, amines, and phenols, which had minor utilization rates in all irrigation districts, were extremely significantly affected by high-salinity groundwater irrigation. The results presented here offer an approach for diagnosing regional soil ecosystem function changes under saline water irrigation. PMID:26872886

  4. Record of Decision Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact of groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank far soil and groundwater at INTEC.

  5. Chemistry of trace elements in soils and groundwater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present information about sources of processes that affect trace elements in soils and groundwater; precipitation and dissolution, surface interactions and absorption and oxidation-reduction reactions. For each element or group of elements, we provide a review of mode of occurrence, sources and ...

  6. A Preliminary Study for Chemical Ranking System in Terms of Soil and Groundwater Contamination by Chemical Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Jeong, Y. C.; Kim, K. E.; Lee, D.; Yoo, K.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.

    2015-12-01

    A variety of chemicals could affect human health and ecosystems by chemical accidents such as fire, explosion, and/or spill. Chemical accidents make chemicals spread to the environment via various routes such as dispersion into ambient air, soil, and surface/ground water media. Especially, soil and groundwater contamination by chemical accidents become a secondary source to have a long term effect on human health and environment. Strength of long term effect by soil and groundwater contamination depends largely on inherent characteristics of a chemical and its fate in soil and groundwater. Therefore, in this study, we developed a framework on how to determine what kind of chemicals is more important in management scheme in terms of soil and groundwater contamination during chemical accidents. We ranked approximately fifty chemicals using this framework which takes into account an exposure into soil and groundwater, toxicity, persistence, and bioaccumulation of a chemical. This framework helps to prepare systematically the management plan for chemical related facilities. Furthermore, results from our study can make a policy maker have interests in highly ranked chemicals and facilities.

  7. Regional scale assessment of soil predictors of groundwater phosphate (P) levels in acidic sandy agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabilde, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Possible factors affecting the leaching of P to the groundwater in the Belgian sandy area are examined via regression analysis. The main objective is to investigate the dependency of phreatic groundwater phosphate concentrations (Flemish VMM monitoring net, monitoring period 2010-2013) on soil phosphate saturation degree (PSD) (1994-1997 mapping for Flemish Land Agency) (n = 1032). Additionally explored parameters include: depth distributions of Fe- and Al-oxides, sorbed P and phosphate sorption capacity (PSC) and soil pH. Interpolated data of these soil parameters in 3 depth layers (0-30, 30-60, 60-90 cm) were generated by ordinary kriging. Secondly, we assessed the significance of other edaphic factors potentially controlling the groundwater P: topsoil organic carbon content (OC %), soil clay content and fluctuation of the groundwater table. Overall, the mean PSD halved with each 30 cm depth layer (56 > 24 > 13 %) and was correlated to groundwater PO43‑ level. The statistical significance of the correlation with groundwater PO43‑ concentrations increased with depth layer. The poor correlation (R2 = 0.01) between PSD and groundwater phosphate concentration indicates that many factors, other than soil P status, control the transport of P from soil solution to the groundwater in Belgian sandy soils. A significant (P<0.01) positive non-linear relationship was found between groundwater PO43‑concentration and pHKCl in all three studied depth layers, again increasingly with depth. Within the pH range of the 30-60 cm layer (pHKCl 4.0-5.7) PO4‑ solubility should increase with pH. Elevated soil OC levels surprisingly co-occurred with low groundwater PO43‑ concentrations (r = -0.18, P<0.01, n = 191). Groundwater PO43‑ was furthermore significantly and positively correlated to clay % in both the 0-15 cm (r = 0.15, τ = 0.25, P<0.01, n = 1032) and 60-90 cm (r = 0.13, τ = 0.20, P<0.01, n = 1032) depth increments. These positive correlations were unexpected and

  8. A new separation and treatment method for soil and groundwater restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchens, G.D.

    1997-10-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination by organic compounds is a widespread environmental pollution problem. In many cases, contaminated soil is excavated and transported to a landfill or is incinerated to remove contaminants. These remediation practices are expensive, environmentally disruptive, require extensive permitting, and only move contamination from one location to another. Onsite and in situ treatment techniques offer a safer, more cost-effective, and permanent solution. Many soil and groundwater contaminants are highly volatile, enabling the use of methods such as in situ vacuum extraction and air injection for their removal. However, these methods are often difficult to use because of slow volatilization rates and the lack of effective methods to treat the extracted hazardous material. This Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program focuses on developing an in situ soil and groundwater remediation technique that is effective against volatile as well as nonvolatile compounds and that will shorten treatment times. The technique forms the basis of a new catalytic process to degrade extracted contaminants onsite. Key hardware elements on which the new technique is based have been proven in preliminary research. The method has a high potential for public and regulatory acceptance because of its low environment impact.

  9. Air permeability and trapped-air content in two soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, D.A.; Rubin, J.

    1989-01-01

    To improve understanding of hysteretic air permeability relations, a need exists for data on the water content dependence of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping (especially for wetting-drying cycles). To obtain these data, a special instrument was designed. The instrument is a combination of a gas permeameter (for air permeability determination), a suction plate apparatus (for retentivity curve determination), and an air pycnometer (for trapped-air-volume determination). This design allowed values of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping to be codetermined, i.e., determined at the same values of water content using the same sample and the same inflow-outflow boundaries. Such data were obtained for two nonswelling soils. -from Authors

  10. Modelling near subsurface temperature with mixed type boundary condition for transient air temperature and vertical groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev Ranjan; Ramana, D. V.; Singh, R. N.

    2012-10-01

    Near-subsurface temperatures have signatures of climate change. Thermal models of subsurface have been constructed by prescribing time dependent Dirichlet type boundary condition wherein the temperature at the soil surface is prescribed and depth distribution of temperature is obtained. In this formulation it is not possible to include the relationship between air temperatures and the temperature of soil surface. However, if one uses a Robin type boundary condition, a transfer coefficient relates the air and soil surface temperatures which helps to determine both the temperature at the surface and at depth given near surface air temperatures. This coefficient is a function of meteorological conditions and is readily available. We have developed such a thermal model of near subsurface region which includes both heat conduction and advection due to groundwater flows and have presented numerical results for changes in the temperature-depth profiles for different values of transfer coefficient and groundwater flux. There are significant changes in temperature and depth profiles due to changes in the transfer coefficient and groundwater flux. The analytical model will find applications in the interpretation of the borehole geothermal data to extract both climate and groundwater flow signals.

  11. Effects of Soil Behavior on Solute Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Huijie

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of solute transport in groundwater is particularly important for environmental engineers involved in the design of urban environments. In general, the simulation of solute transport in porous medium has been linked with fluid flow, which has commonly based on Darcy law. Unlike previous work, we use a more generalized fluid flow model with poro-elastic theory, in which Darcy model is one of its special cases. The new feature of the new model is the inclusion of soil characteristics and behavior in the prediction of solute transport in aquifers. Based on the new model, numerical example demonstrates significant influence of poro-elastic soil behavior on the movement of zone of peak concentration of solute in groundwater.

  12. Bioremediation: A natural solution. [Decontamination of soils and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.N.; Caplan, J.A. )

    1993-01-15

    Bioremediation is an attractive remediation alternative because most full-scale bioremediation projects involve cost-effective contaminant treatment on-site. Recently, large scale bioremediation projects have included cleanups of ocean tanker spills, land-based chemical spills, and leaking chemical and petroleum storage tanks. Contaminated matrices have included beaches, soils, groundwater, surface waters (i.e., pits, ponds, lagoons), process waste streams and grease traps. Bioremediation is especially cost-effective when both soil and groundwater matrices are impacted because one remediation treatment system can be design to treat both media simultaneously in place. The primary advantages of in situ bioremediation include: on-site destruction of contaminants; accelerated cleanup time; minimal disruption to operations; lower remediation costs; and reduction of future liability.

  13. An analysis of trichloroethylene movement in groundwater at castle Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Avon, L.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    A trichloroethylene (TCE) plume has been identified in the groundwater under a U.S. Air Force Base in the Central Valley of California. An areal, two-dimensional numerical solute transport model indicates that the movement of TCE due to advection, dispersion, and linear sorption is simulated over a 25-year historic period. The model is used in several ways: (1) to estimate the extent of the plume; (2) to confirm the likely sources of contamination as suggested by a soil organic vapor survey of the site; and (3) to make predictions about future movement of the plume. Despite the noisy and incomplete data set, the model reproduces the general trends in contamination at a number of observation wells. The analysis indicates that soil organic vapor monitoring is an effective tool for identifying contaminant source locations. Leaky sewer pipes and underground tanks are the indicated pathways for TCE to have entered the groundwater system. The chemical mass balance indicates that a total of about 100 gallons of TCE - a relatively small amount of organic solvent - has created the observed groundwater plume. ?? 1989.

  14. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logsdon, S. D.; Schilling, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Lateral groundwater flow can cause a large rise in water table at toeslope and depressional landscape positions. As plants transpire, water can move up into the root zone from the water table and wet soil below the root zone. Roots can utilize water in the capillary fringe. The purpose of this study was to interface automated measurements of soil water content and water table depth for determining the importance of drainage and upward movement. In 2006 soil water and water table depth were monitored at three positions: shoulder, backslope, and toeslope. Neutron access tubes were manually monitored to 2.3 m depth, and automated soil moisture was measured using CS616 probes installed at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 m depth. Water table depths were monitored manually and automated, but the automated measurements failed during the season at two sites. In 2007, similar measurements were made at one toeslope position, but the CS616 probes were installed at nine depths and better quality automated well depth equipment was used. The 2006 data revealed little landscape position effect on daytime soil water loss on a wetter date; however, on a dry day just before a rain, daytime water loss was greatest for the toeslope positon and least for the shoulder position. After a period of intense rain, a rapid and significant water table rise occurred at the toeslope position but little water table rise occurred at the other landscape positions. The rapid toeslope water table rise was likely caused by lateral groundwater flow whereas minor water table rise at the other positions was likely due to preferential flow since the soil had not wet up below 0.6 m. Use of automated equipment has improved

  15. Movement of DBCP in laboratory soil columns and field soils to groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggar, J. W.; Nielsen, D. R.; Tillotson, W. R.

    1983-09-01

    The nematocide DBCP has been an effective chemical for the control of nematodes but, because of contamination of groundwaters and for health reasons, its use has been curtailed. To evaluate the tendency of DBCP to leach, adsorption and transport characteristics were examined on laboratory samples of a field soil through which the chemical was also leached. Adsorption of DBCP on Panoche clay loam was small, and displacement experiments in soil columns demonstrated that loading rate and flux of water were significant for the dissipation of the chemical by microbial degradation and/or volatilization. Dissipation rate constants were estimated by optimizing the fit to experimental BTCs of the convective-dispersion equation with linear adsorption and a first-order degradation rate. Although field measurements did not establish conclusively that leaching to groundwater would occur in a fine-textured soil, evidence was obtained that leaching below the root zone could occur in many soils.

  16. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1993-11-23

    A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

  17. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.; Kaback, Dawn S.; Looney, Brian B.

    1993-01-01

    A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

  18. Natural attenuation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in soil and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, D.; Gates, M.; Evans, W.

    1995-12-31

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NMDA) has been detected in groundwater and in the influent as well as effluent from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) North Boundary Treatment System (NTBS). Since nitrosamines possess carcinogenic, teratogenic, mutagenic, and hepatotoxic properties at low concentrations, their presence in groundwater is disconcerting. However, even though NDMA has been found in the water samples collected from observation wells, it has not been detected in any of the off-post wells. Therefore, the abundance of NDMA-degrading populations and the rate and extent of mineralization of NDMA by the microorganisms in the granulated activated carbon (GAC) absorber units, recharge trenches, and saturated aquifer soils was investigated in this study. A significant activity of NDMA-degrading microbes was detected in these samples, which suggests that microbial degradation may be a major cause of NDMA attenuation in natural systems. The results of microbial enumerations and biodegradation studies will be presented in this presentation.

  19. The Trends of Soil Temperature Change Associated with Air Temperature Change in Korea from 1973 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bo-Hyun; Park, Byeong-Hak; Koh, Eun-Hee; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Examining long-term trends of the soil temperature can contribute to assessing subsurface thermal environment. The recent 40-year (1973-2012) meteorological data from 14 Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) stations was analyzed in this study to estimate the temporal variations of air and soil temperatures (at depths 0.5 and 1.0m) in Korea and their relations. The information on regional characteristics of study sites was also collected to investigate the local and regional features influencing the soil temperature. The long-term increasing trends of both air and soil temperatures were estimated by using simple linear regression analysis. The air temperature rise and soil temperature rise were compared for every site to reveal the relation between air and soil temperature changes. In most sites, the proportion of soil temperature rise to air temperature rise was nearly one to one except a few sites. The difference between the air and soil temperature trends at those sites may be attributed to the combined effect of soil properties such as thermal diffusivity and soil moisture content. The impact of urbanization on the air and soil temperature was also investigated in this study. Establishment of the relationship between the air and soil temperatures can help predicting the soil temperature change in a region where no soil temperature data is obtained by using air temperature data. For rigorous establishment of the relationship between soil and air temperatures, more thorough investigation on the soil thermal properties is necessary through additional monitoring and accompanied validation of the proposed relations. Keywords : Soil temperature, Air temperature, Cross-correlation analysis, Soil thermal diffusivity, Urbanization effect Acknowledgement This work was supported by the research project of "Advanced Technology for Groundwater Development and Application in Riversides (Geowater+)" in "Water Resources Management Program (code 11 Technology Innovation C05

  20. Assessment of heavy metals in soils and groundwater in an urban watershed of Yaoundé (Cameroon-West Africa).

    PubMed

    Defo, Célestin; Yerima, Bernard Palmer Kfuban; Noumsi, Ives Magloire Kengne; Bemmo, Nestor

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the heavy metals concentrations in soils and groundwater within the Ntem watershed in Yaoundé, to prevent the risk on the public health. Soils investigated were sampled in five (05) representative profiles at the surface and the bottom of the unsaturated zone of each profile. Soil samples were air-dried and ground to pass through a 2-mm sieve, and different soil extracts were prepared for chemical analysis (organic matter, cation exchange capacity and pH). By soil digestion method with diacid, total Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni were extracted and determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Representative groundwater samples were also collected directly from some soil profiles and analysed using AAS instrument after filtration. Average metals concentrations in groundwater were higher than those of the World Health Organisation (WHO) norms. Besides, the geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) were ranged between zero and one (0 < Igeo < 1) for Pb (0.13-0.19), Cr (0.13-0.16) and Ni (0.09-0.11), indicating that the soils are contaminated by these metals, except Cd (Igeo < 0) in the whole watershed. Gleysols (Mollic (Igeo = 0.18) and Plenthic (Igeo = 0.16)) were found more contaminated than Ferralsols (Igeo = 0.15). Regardless of the sampling stations, soils were typified polluted by metals (pollution index (PI) > 1), except Cd (PI < 1). The integrated pollution index (IPI) values were ranged in descending order for soil pollution level as follows: Mollic Gleysols (3.47-4.94) > Plenthic Gleysol (1.89) > Xanthic Ferralsol (1.79) > Rhodic Ferralsol (1.69). The soils and groundwater pollution observed may be a severe threat for the public health in this watershed. PMID:25648762

  1. Thermal Removal of Tritium from Concrete and Soil to Reduce Groundwater Impacts - 13197

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

    2013-07-01

    Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg. C (1,500 deg. F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg. C (212 deg. F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total

  2. Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

    2012-12-04

    Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of

  3. Simulating the fate and transport of TCE from groundwater to indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yu, Soonyoung; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth

    2009-07-21

    This work provides an exploratory analysis on the relative importance of various factors controlling the fate and transport of volatile organic contaminants (in this case, TCE) from a DNAPL source zone located below the water table and into the indoor air. The analysis is conducted using the multi-phase compositional model CompFlow Bio, with the base scenario problem geometry reminiscent of a field experiment conducted by Rivett [Rivett, M.O., (1995), Soil-gas signatures from volatile chlorinated solvents: Borden field experiments. Groundwater, 33(1), 84-98.] at the Borden aquifer where groundwater was observed to transport a contaminant plume a substantial distance without vertical mass transport of the contaminant across the capillary fringe and into the vadose zone. Results for the base scenario model indicate that the structure of the permeability field was largely responsible for deflecting the groundwater plume upward towards the capillary fringe, permitting aqueous phase diffusion to transport the TCE into the vadose zone. Alternative permeability realizations, generated as part of a Monte Carlo simulation process, at times deflected the groundwater plume downwards causing the extended thickness of the saturated zone to insulate the vadose zone from exposure to the TCE by upward diffusive transport. Comparison of attenuation coefficients calculated using the CompFlow Bio and Johnson and Ettinger [Johnson, P.C. and Ettinger, R.A., (1991), Heuristic model for predicting the intrusion rate of contaminant vapors into buildings. Environmental Science and Technology, 25, 1445-1452.] heuristic model exhibited fortuitous agreement for the base scenario problem geometry, with this agreement diverging for the alternative permeability realizations as well as when parameters such as the foundation slab fracture aperture, the indoor air pressure drop, the capillary fringe thickness, and the infiltration rate were varied over typical ranges. PMID:19525028

  4. Temporal evolution of soil moisture statistical fractal and controls by soil texture and regional groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xinye; Shen, Chaopeng; Riley, William J.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture statistical fractal is an important tool for downscaling remotely-sensed observations and has the potential to play a key role in multi-scale hydrologic modeling. The fractal was first introduced two decades ago, but relatively little is known regarding how its scaling exponents evolve in time in response to climatic forcings. Previous studies have neglected the process of moisture re-distribution due to regional groundwater flow. In this study we used a physically-based surface-subsurface processes model and numerical experiments to elucidate the patterns and controls of fractal temporal evolution in two U.S. Midwest basins. Groundwater flow was found to introduce large-scale spatial structure, thereby reducing the scaling exponents (τ), which has implications for the transferability of calibrated parameters to predict τ. However, the groundwater effects depend on complex interactions with other physical controls such as soil texture and land use. The fractal scaling exponents, while in general showing a seasonal mode that correlates with mean moisture content, display hysteresis after storm events that can be divided into three phases, consistent with literature findings: (a) wetting, (b) re-organizing, and (c) dry-down. Modeling experiments clearly show that the hysteresis is attributed to soil texture, whose "patchiness" is the primary contributing factor. We generalized phenomenological rules for the impacts of rainfall, soil texture, groundwater flow, and land use on τ evolution. Grid resolution has a mild influence on the results and there is a strong correlation between predictions of τ from different resolutions. Overall, our results suggest that groundwater flow should be given more consideration in studies of the soil moisture statistical fractal, especially in regions with a shallow water table.

  5. Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-08-01

    In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

  6. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILLS ON UNDERLYING SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three municipal landfill sites in the eastern and central United States were studied to determine the effects of the disposal facilities on surrounding soils and groundwater. Borings were made up the groundwater gradient, down the groundwater gradient and through the landfill. So...

  7. Modeling the air-soil transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mid-Ohio Valley using linked air dispersion and vadose zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ryan, P. Barry; Vieira, Verónica M.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2012-05-01

    As part of an extensive modeling effort on the air-soil-groundwater transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), this study was designed to compare the performance of different air dispersion modeling systems (AERMOD vs. ISCST3), and different approaches to handling incomplete meteorological data using a data set with substantial soil measurements and a well characterized point source for air emissions. Two of the most commonly used EPA air dispersion models, AERMOD and ISCST3, were linked with the EPA vadose zone model PRZM-3. Predicted deposition rates from the air dispersion model were used as input values for the vadose zone model to estimate soil concentrations of PFOA at different depths. We applied 34 years of meteorological data including hourly surface measurements from Parkersburg Airport and 5 years of onsite wind direction and speed to the air dispersion models. We compared offsite measured soil concentrations to predictions made for the corresponding sampling depths, focusing on soil rather than air measurements because the offsite soil samples were less likely to be influenced by short-term variability in emission rates and meteorological conditions. PFOA concentrations in surface soil (0-30 cm depth) were under-predicted and those in subsurface soil (>30 cm depth) were over-predicted compared to observed concentrations by both linked air and vadose zone model. Overall, the simulated values from the linked modeling system were positively correlated with those observed in surface soil (Spearman's rho, Rsp = 0.59-0.70) and subsurface soil (Rsp = 0.46-0.48). This approach provides a useful modeling scheme for similar exposure and risk analyses where the air-soil-groundwater transport is a primary contamination pathway.

  8. Soil Profile Sulfate in Irrigated Southern High Plains Cotton Fields and Ogallala Groundwater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Profile Sulfate in Irrigated Southern High Plains Cotton Fields and Ogallala Groundwater Abstract: Sulfate (SO4) is one of the most important anions in soils and groundwater in semiarid regions, including West Texas. Crops’ sulfur (S) requirement is about 10 to 20 % of the nitrogen (N) require...

  9. Flooding forested groundwater recharge areas modifies microbial communities from top soil to groundwater table.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Kirsten; Nagel, Peter; Vetter, Walter; Kandeler, Ellen; Ruess, Liliane

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface microorganisms are crucial for contaminant degradation and maintenance of groundwater quality. This study investigates the microbial biomass and community composition [by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs)], as well as physical and chemical soil characteristics at woodland flooding sites of an artificial groundwater recharge system used for drinking water production. Vertical soil profiles to c. 4 m at two watered and one nonwatered site were analyzed. The microbial biomass was equal in watered and nonwatered sites, and considerable fractions (25-42%) were located in 40-340 cm depth. The microbial community structure differed significantly between watered and nonwatered sites, predominantly below 100 cm depth. Proportions of the bacterial PLFAs 16:1omega5, 16:1omega7, cy17:0 and 18:1omega9t, and the long-chained PLFAs 22:1omega9 and 24:1omega9 were more prominent at the watered sites, whereas branched, saturated PLFAs (iso/anteiso) dominated at the nonwatered site. PLFA community indices indicated stress response (trans/cis ratio), higher nutrient availability (unsaturation index) and changes in membrane fluidity (iso/anteiso ratio) due to flooding. In conclusion, water recharge processes led to nutrient input and altered environmental conditions, which resulted in a highly active and adapted microbial community residing in the vadose zone that effectively degraded organic compounds. PMID:19016869

  10. Field performance of air-sparging system for removing TCE from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Rabideau, A.J.; Blayden, J.M.; Ganguly, C.

    1999-01-01

    The removal of volatile organic compounds from groundwater by air sparging (AS) is well-established, although reliable methods for predicting the time required to reach site closure have not been established. To develop and improved understanding of mass transfer processes that limit AS performance, two extended controlled shutdowns of an operating AS system were performed. Monitoring of TCE concentrations in source zone groundwater indicated tailing and rebound behavior similar to that observed for pump-and-treat systems. A simple two-compartment model provided a reasonable description of the 3-year AS history, using parameters calibrated from data collected during the first shutdown period. Comparison of the calibrated rate constants with parameters estimated from laboratory soil columns suggest that, for the study site, aqueous diffusion to discrete air channels has a stronger influence on system performance than rate-limited desorption. Predictions based on the calibrated model indicated that restoration of the source zone to drinking water standards would require approximately 1 decade for the current AS system.

  11. Field-scale relationships among soil properties and shallow groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Derby, Nathan E; Korom, Scott F; Casey, Francis X M

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand the link between land surface/soil properties and shallow groundwater quality. To that end, soil properties and near-water-table groundwater chemistry of a shallow, unconfined aquifer were measured on a 100-m grid on a 64-ha irrigated field in southeastern North Dakota. Soil properties and hydrochemistry were compared via multivariate analysis that included product-moment correlations and factor analysis/principal component analysis. Topographic low areas where the water table was in close proximity to the soil surface generally had higher apparent electrical conductivity (ECa ) and higher percent silt and clay than higher positions on the landscape. The majority of the groundwater was characterized by Ca- and Mg-HCO3 type water and was associated with topographic high areas with lower ECa and net groundwater recharge. Small topographic depressions were areas of higher ECa (net groundwater discharge) where salts that precipitated via evapotranspiration and evaporative discharge dissolved and leached to the groundwater during short-term depression-focused recharge events. At this site, groundwater quality and soil ECa were related to surface topography. High-resolution topography and EC(a) measurements are necessary to characterize the land surface/soil properties and surficial groundwater quality at the field-scale and to delineate areas where the shallow groundwater is most susceptible to contamination. PMID:22913586

  12. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is

  13. Simulating tracer transport in variably saturated soils and shallow groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, F.; Yakirevich, A.; Guber, A.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Gish, T. J.; Nicholson, T. J.; Cady, R.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a realistic model to simulate the complex processes of flow and tracer transport in variably saturated soils and to compare simulation results with the detailed monitoring observations. The USDA-ARS OPE3 field site was selected for the case study due to availability of the extensive database on geophysical, biophysical, remote sensing, soil water and groundwater monitoring accumulated in past 10 years. High soil spatial heterogeneity and shallow groundwater were encountered at the site. A pulse of KCL solution was applied to the irrigation plot with an area of 13x14m, and then the plot was irrigated twice a day for three months using the tap water. The chloride concentration was measured at three sampling depths of 12 observation wells at 7 m and 14 m distances from the irrigation plot. Two three-dimensional flow and transport models, HYDRUS-3D and TOUGH2 codes, were applied in this study to simulate flow and chloride transport for the tracer experiment. Respectively, these models represent two conceptual approaches for flow and transport: (a) transport through all of the domain (b) preferential transport via a network of well-connected pathways (fractures) that comprise only part of the bulk soil porosity (matrix) at the field scale, assuming mass exchange between fracture and matrix continua. The atmospheric boundary condition was applied at surface of the model domain and no flux boundary was set at the bottom. The spatially variable and temporally constant pressure heads were specified along the lateral boundaries. The trial-and-error calibration based on zonation of the flow and transport domain was reasonably successful. The maximum concentration levels and the 50% concentration arrival times were described satisfactory. However, with HYDRUS3D we could not accurately reproduce the shape of the breakthrough curves, unlike TOUGH2 that better simulated the front and tailing part of observed breakthrough curves. The

  14. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  15. Impacts of Shallow Groundwater and Soil Texture on Agricultural Drought Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, S. C.; Soylu, M. E.; Booth, E.; Steven, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting increasing global food demands while fostering environmental sustainability requires a detailed understanding of the drivers of yield sensitivity within agroecosystems. In this study, we untangle the roles of soil texture and shallow groundwater as simultaneous drivers of corn yield resistance to excessively wet and dry growing seasons. Specifically, we ask (1) does the presence of groundwater in or near the root zone increase/decrease yield?; and (2) how does yield response to water table depth interact with variability in soil texture and growing season weather conditions? We combine a multi-year field study at a commercial corn field in south-central Wisconsin with ecohydrological modeling using AgroIBIS-VSF to assess the yield response to a broad spectrum of groundwater, soil, and weather conditions. We find that shallow groundwater (<1 m) increases yield sensitivity to overly wet growing season conditions, but acts as a stable reservoir of water to increase drought resistance by providing a groundwater yield subsidy during dry years. Modeling results indicate that coarser soils receive a groundwater yield subsidy at shallower water table depths than finer-grained soils, and that the magnitude of the groundwater yield subsidy tends to be larger. We also find that crops growing on soils with different textures experience a comparable response to changes in growing season precipitation and evapotranspiration demands. Overall, we find that the benefits of shallow groundwater (drought resistance) outweigh the negatives (waterlogging and yield loss) at our study site.

  16. Fiscal Year 2010 Program of the U.S. DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2011-03-07

    The mission of the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) is to perform assessments, establish technical criteria and promote cross-site integration. The Office provides guidance for the development and implementation of plans for remediation of groundwater and is responsible for development of technologies needed to reduce risk from groundwater contamination. It is also responsible for providing technical direction and/or assistance to sites in resolving difficult technical groundwater and soil remediation problems. This paper discusses the activities funded by EM-32 for FY-2010.

  17. Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-08-25

    In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

  18. Effects of changing channel morphology on vegetation, groundwater, and soil moisture regimes in groundwater dependent ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loheide, S. P.; Booth, E. G.

    2008-12-01

    Channel incision and excessive floodplain sedimentation are major causes of riparian degradation across the country. Though the causes and consequences of these processes vary significantly, the resulting morphology in both cases is steep streambanks and a stream that is less connected with the floodplain. A case study from semi-arid, wet meadows with snow-melt driven hydrology in the Sierra Nevada of CA will be compared with one from a riparian wet prairie in the humid environment of the Driftless Area of southern Wisconsin. In the mountain meadows, 80 years of logging and overgrazing led to more flashy runoff and downcutting of the stream. This led to drainage of groundwater from the meadow and a shift in vegetation composition from sedges and rushes to dryland grasses and sagebrush in this groundwater dependent ecosystem. In the Driftless Area of WI, the introduction of agricultural practices by European settlers in the 1830s resulted in severe erosion from the cropped areas in the uplands. This sediment was transported to the stream valleys where it was deposited on the floodplain, raising this surface relative to the streambed. As a result, the water table is at a greater depth from this elevated land surface. In this ecosystem, the vegetation has shifted from wet prairie and sedge meadow communities to grasses and lowland forests dominated by box elder trees. The geomorphic result at both sites was a channel bounded by tall banks with reduced hydrologic connectivity with the floodplain. In both cases, the slope of the water table towards the stream is greater than the topographic slope across the riparian zone and the greatest depth to the water table is found adjacent to the channel. Transects exhibit a decreasing trend in soil moisture with increasing variability toward the channel. Remotely sensed imagery shows trends of drier vegetation communities adjacent to channels and wetter vegetation communities toward the margin of the riparian zones. Coupled

  19. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the trichloroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were inst...

  20. Contamination valuation of soil and groundwater source at anaerobic municipal solid waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Shuokr Qarani; Maulood, Yousif Ismael

    2015-12-01

    The present work aimed to determine the risks that formed landfill leachate from anaerobic Erbil Landfill Site (ELS) poses on groundwater source and to observe the effects of disposed municipal solid waste (MSW) on soil properties. The study further aims to fill the gap in studies on the effects of disposed MSW and produced leachate on the groundwater characteristics and soil quality at ELS, Iraq. Soil, leachate, and groundwater samples were collected from ELS for use as samples in this study. Unpolluted groundwater samples were collected from an area outside of the landfill. Field and laboratory experiments for the soil samples were conducted. Chemical analyses for the soil samples such as organic matter, total salts, and SO4 (=) were also performed. Raw leachate and groundwater samples were analyzed using physical and chemical experiments. The yields for sorptivity, steady-state infiltration rate, and hydraulic conductivity of the soil samples were 0.0006 m/√s, 0.00004 m/s, and 2.17 × 10(-5) m/s, respectively. The soil at ELS was found to be light brown clayey gravel with sand and light brown gravely lean clay layers with low permeability. Unprocessed leachate analysis identified the leachate as stabilized. Findings showed that the soil and groundwater at the anaerobic ELS were contaminated. PMID:26577215

  1. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  2. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  3. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  4. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  5. 40 CFR 280.65 - Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investigations for soil and ground... Containing Petroleum or Hazardous Substances § 280.65 Investigations for soil and ground-water cleanup. (a) In order to determine the full extent and location of soils contaminated by the release and...

  6. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  7. Phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater: lessons from the field

    SciTech Connect

    Vangronsveld, J.; van der Lelie, D.; Herzig, R.; Weyens, N.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, K.; Ruttens, A.; Thewys, T.; Vassilev, A.; Meers, E.; Nehnevajova, E.; Mench, M.

    2009-11-01

    The use of plants and associated microorganisms to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) and to revitalize contaminated sites is gaining more and more attention. In this review, prerequisites for a successful remediation will be discussed. The performance of phytoremediation as an environmental remediation technology indeed depends on several factors including the extent of soil contamination, the availability and accessibility of contaminants for rhizosphere microorganisms and uptake into roots (bioavailability), and the ability of the plant and its associated microorganisms to intercept, absorb, accumulate, and/or degrade the contaminants. The main aim is to provide an overview of existing field experience in Europe concerning the use of plants and their associated microorganisms whether or not combined with amendments for the revitalization or remediation of contaminated soils and undeep groundwater. Contaminations with trace elements (except radionuclides) and organics will be considered. Because remediation with transgenic organisms is largely untested in the field, this topic is not covered in this review. Brief attention will be paid to the economical aspects, use, and processing of the biomass. It is clear that in spite of a growing public and commercial interest and the success of several pilot studies and field scale applications more fundamental research still is needed to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between contaminants, soil, plant roots, and microorganisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more data are still needed to quantify the underlying economics, as a support for public acceptance and last but not least to convince policy makers and stakeholders (who are not very familiar with such techniques).

  8. Groundwater fluctuations and footslope ferricrete soils in the humid tropical zone of southern Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, Emile; Djeuda Tchapnga, Henri-Bosko; Tanawa, Emile; Guenat, Claire; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between the differentiation of ferruginous accumulations and the variable water saturation of footslope soil patterns. An analysis of the slope morphology of a typical hill in the forest zone of southern Cameroon and a seasonal survey of the levels of groundwaters, springs and rivers were considered in relation to the petrology of different soil patterns. The study site is a tabular hillock whose slopes present a progressive development from steep to gentle slopes. The variable residence time of water within the soil, creating an alternation of reducing and oxidizing conditions, affects soil chemistry, structure and lateral extension of the soil patterns. The ferruginous soil patterns, being formed on the footslopes, gradually increase in extent with decreasing slope angle and the relative rise of the groundwater level. The steep footslopes, where groundwater has a shorter residence time, show a soft mottled clay pattern, restricted to the bottom part of the slope. The moderate footslopes exhibit a deep permanent and a temporary perched groundwater table. The latter, with its regular capillary fringe, contributes to more reducing conditions within isolated domains in the soil patterns, and thus to the alternation with oxidizing conditions, generating a continuous hard soil pattern (massive carapace). The more gently dipping footslopes exhibit groundwater levels near the surface and also a significant amplitude of groundwater fluctuation. Iron, previously accumulated in moderate footslope patterns, is reduced, remobilized, and leached. The soil patterns formed develop into a variegated carapace, more extended along the slope, containing less iron, but nevertheless more hardened, due to the important fluctuations of the groundwater table. These patterns are limited to the zone of groundwater fluctuation and deteriorate as the water fluctuation zone recedes.

  9. Precipitation and Air Temperature Impact on Seasonal Variations of Groundwater Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitola, Ilva; Vircavs, Valdis; Abramenko, Kaspars; Lauva, Didzis; Veinbergs, Arturs

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify seasonal effects of precipitation and temperature on groundwater level changes in monitoring stations of the Latvia University of Agriculture - Mellupīte, Bērze and Auce. Groundwater regime and level fluctuations depend on climatic conditions such as precipitation intensity, evapotranspiration, surface runoff and drainage, as well as other hydrological factors. The relationship between precipitation, air temperature and groundwater level fluctuations could also lead and give different perspective of possible changes in groundwater quality. Using mathematical statistics and graphic-analytic methods it is concluded that autumn and winter precipitation has the dominant impact on groundwater level fluctuations, whereas spring and summer season fluctuations are more dependent on the air temperature.

  10. Organics in soils and groundwater at non-arid sites (A-1) integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.L.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-06-01

    One of the most common environmental problems in the United States is soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile chemical solvents classified as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which were used as degreasers and cleaning agents. Leakage of solvents (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) from an underground process sewer line has contaminated soils and underlying groundwaters at SRS. This site was chosen for DOE-OTD`s integrated demonstration program to demonstrate innovative technologies for cleanup of soils and groundwater contaminated with VOCs. The Savannah River Site was especially well suited as the test bed for this integrated demonstration project due to the presence of a pre-existing line source of soil and groundwater-based contamination, on-going environmental remediation efforts at the site, and full cooperation from the concerned environmental regulatory agencies. The Integrated Demonstration (ID) at the Savannah River Site has demonstrated systems of technologies and evaluated them with respect to performance, safety and cost effectiveness.

  11. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOIL AND GROUNDWATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY NEEDS, PLANS AND INITIATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, B; V. ADAMS, V; G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, G; T. L. STEWART, T

    2007-12-12

    This paper presents the process used by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program to collect and prioritize DOE soil and groundwater site science and technology needs, develop and document strategic plans within the EM Engineering and Technology Roadmap, and establish specific program and project initiatives for inclusion in the EM Multi-Year Program Plan. The paper also presents brief summaries of the goals and objectives for the established soil and groundwater initiatives.

  12. The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 S&T Roadmap Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-11

    The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 Science and Technology Roadmap Project is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies and technology for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by EM-20 Roadmap Project staff.

  13. China's soil and groundwater management challenges: Lessons from the UK's experience and opportunities for China.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Frédéric; Jones, Kevin; Li, Hong; Hu, Qing; Gao, Jingyang; Li, Fasheng; Chen, Mengfang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Liu, Rongxia; Liu, Ming; Canning, Kate; Harries, Nicola; Bardos, Paul; Nathanail, Paul; Sweeney, Rob; Middleton, David; Charnley, Maggie; Randall, Jeremy; Richell, Martin; Howard, Trevor; Martin, Ian; Spooner, Simon; Weeks, Jason; Cave, Mark; Yu, Fang; Zhang, Fang; Jiang, Ying; Longhurst, Phil; Prpich, George; Bewley, Richard; Abra, Jonathan; Pollard, Simon

    2016-05-01

    There are a number of specific opportunities for UK and China to work together on contaminated land management issues as China lacks comprehensive and systematic planning for sustainable risk based land management, encompassing both contaminated soil and groundwater and recycling and reuse of soil. It also lacks comprehensive risk assessment systems, structures to support risk management decision making, processes for verification of remediation outcome, systems for record keeping and preservation and integration of contamination issues into land use planning, along with procedures for ensuring effective health and safety considerations during remediation projects, and effective evaluation of costs versus benefits and overall sustainability. A consequence of the absence of these overarching frameworks has been that remediation takes place on an ad hoc basis. At a specific site management level, China lacks capabilities in site investigation and consequent risk assessment systems, in particular related to conceptual modelling and risk evaluation. There is also a lack of shared experience of practical deployment of remediation technologies in China, analogous to the situation before the establishment of the independent, non-profit organisation CL:AIRE (Contaminated Land: Applications In Real Environments) in 1999 in the UK. Many local technology developments are at lab-scale or pilot-scale stage without being widely put into use. Therefore, a shared endeavour is needed to promote the development of technically and scientifically sound land management as well as soil and human health protection to improve the sustainability of the rapid urbanisation in China. PMID:26970591

  14. Groundwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Monitoring the Perturbation of Soil and Groundwater Microbial Communities Due to Pig Production Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Yannarell, Anthony C.; Dai, Qinghua; Ekizoglu, Melike

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if biotic contaminants originating from pig production farms are disseminated into soil and groundwater microbial communities. A spatial and temporal sampling of soil and groundwater in proximity to pig production farms was conducted, and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) was utilized to determine the abundances of tetracycline resistance genes (i.e., tetQ and tetZ) and integrase genes (i.e., intI1 and intI2). We observed that the abundances of tetZ, tetQ, intI1, and intI2 in the soils increased at least 6-fold after manure application, and their abundances remained elevated above the background for up to 16 months. Q-PCR further determined total abundances of up to 5.88 × 109 copies/ng DNA for tetZ, tetQ, intI1, and intI2 in some of the groundwater wells that were situated next to the manure lagoon and in the facility well used to supply water for one of the farms. We further utilized 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing to assess the microbial communities, and our comparative analyses suggest that most of the soil samples collected before and after manure application did not change significantly, sharing a high Bray-Curtis similarity of 78.5%. In contrast, an increase in Bacteroidetes and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial populations was observed in the groundwaters collected from lagoon-associated groundwater wells. Genera associated with opportunistic human and animal pathogens, such as Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, Yersinia, and Coxiella, were detected in some of the manure-treated soils and affected groundwater wells. Feces-associated bacteria such as Streptococcus, Erysipelothrix, and Bacteroides were detected in the manure, soil, and groundwater ecosystems, suggesting a perturbation of the soil and groundwater environments by invader species from pig production activities. PMID:23396341

  16. Impact of long-term land application of biosolids on groundwater quality and surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Surampalli, R.Y.; Lin, K.L.; Banerji, S.K.

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the long-term land application of Biosolids and its potential impact on groundwater quality and surface soils. For this study, an existing site, that has been in operation for 8--15 years were selected for sampling and analyses. From this site sludge applied soil samples, background soil samples, and groundwater monitoring samples were obtained. The samples were analyzed for the following: pH, conductivity, total solids, fecal coliform, fecal streptococci, nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, TKN, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc. The results of this study indicate that groundwater at this biosolids application site was not contaminated with heavy metals or pathogens. The bacteriological soil data also indicated that the levels of fecal coliform and fecal streptococci were close to background level with no evidence of contamination. The results also indicate that there is no heavy metals buildup in biosolids-amended soils.

  17. Relationships between basic soils-engineering equations and basic ground-water flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, Donald G.

    1980-01-01

    The many varied though related terms developed by ground-water hydrologists and by soils engineers are useful to each discipline, but their differences in terminology hinder the use of related information in interdisciplinary studies. Equations for the Terzaghi theory of consolidation and equations for ground-water flow are identical under specific conditions. A combination of the two sets of equations relates porosity to void ratio and relates the modulus of elasticity to the coefficient of compressibility, coefficient of volume compressibility, compression index, coefficient of consolidation, specific storage, and ultimate compaction. Also, transient ground-water flow is related to coefficient of consolidation, rate of soil compaction, and hydraulic conductivity. Examples show that soils-engineering data and concepts are useful to solution of problems in ground-water hydrology.

  18. Groundwater recharge assessment at local and episodic scale in a soil mantled perched karst aquifer in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, V.; De Vita, P.; Manna, F.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Groundwater recharge assessment of karst aquifers, at various spatial and temporal scales, is a major scientific topic of current importance, since these aquifers play an essential role for both socio-economic development and fluvial ecosystems. In this study, groundwater recharge was estimated at local and episodic scales in a representative perched karst aquifer in a region of southern Italy with a Mediterranean climate. The research utilized measurements of precipitation, air temperature, soil water content, and water-table depth, obtained in 2008 at the Acqua della Madonna test area (Terminio Mount karst aquifer, Campania region). At this location the aquifer is overlain by ash-fall pyroclastic soils. The Episodic Master Recession (EMR) method, an improved version of the Water Table Fluctuation (WTF) method, was applied to estimate the amount of recharge generated episodically by individual rainfall events. The method also quantifies the amount of precipitation generating each recharge episode, thus permitting calculation of the Recharge to the Precipitation Ratio (RPR) on a storm-by-storm basis. Depending on the seasonally varying air temperature, evapotranspiration, and precipitation patterns, calculated values of RPR varied between 35% and 97% among the individual episodes. A multiple linear correlation of the RPR with both the average intensity of recharging rainfall events and the antecedent soil water content was calculated. Given the relatively easy measurability of precipitation and soil water content, such an empirical model would have great hydrogeological and practical utility. It would facilitate short-term forecasting of recharge in karst aquifers of the Mediterranean region and other aquifers with similar hydrogeological characteristics. By establishing relationships between the RPR and climate-dependent variables such as average storm intensity, it would facilitate prediction of climate-change effects on groundwater recharge. The EMR methodology

  19. Greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of soils amended with raw and carbonized swine solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to study the greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of the soils amended with raw swine solids and swine biochars made from different thermochemical conditions. Triplicate sets of small pots were designed: 1) control soil with a 50/50 mixture o...

  20. Greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of soils amended with different swine biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of the soils amended with various biochars using different biomass feedstocks and thermal processing conditions. Triplicate sets of small pots were designed; control soil consisting of Histi...

  1. Dissipation of the herbicide oxyfluorfen in subtropical soils and its potential to contaminate groundwater.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Sheu, Wey-Shin; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2003-02-01

    The dissipation and mobility of the herbicide oxyfluorfen (2-chloro-alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluoro-p-tolyl 3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenyl ether) in field soil of Taiwan were investigated in the laboratory with six tea garden soils. The dissipation coefficients of oxyfluorfen in soils of different moisture content (30%, 60%, and 90% of soil field capacity) and soil temperature (10 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 40 degrees C) were studied. Results indicate that the half-life of oxyfluorfen ranged from 72 to 160 days for six tea garden soils. It was found that if the temperature is high, the dissipation rate is rapid, and there is almost no dissipation at 10 degrees C. Possible contamination of groundwater by the herbicide oxyfluorfen was assessed using the behavior assessment model and the groundwater pollution-potential (GWP) model. The results obtained after evaluating the residue and travel time using the GWP model illustrated that oxyfluorfen is not very mobile in soil and may not contaminate groundwater under normal conditions. But in the case of soil of extremely low organic carbon content and coarse texture, oxyfluorfen has the potential to contaminate groundwater less than 3m deep. PMID:12550092

  2. APPLICATION STRATEGIES AND DESIGN CRITERIA FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF SOIL AND GROUNDWATER IMPACTED BY PAHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotreatability studies conducted in our laboratory used soils from two former wood-treatment facilities to evaluate the use of in situ bioventing and biosparging applications for their potential ability to remediate soil and groundwater containing creosote. The combination of ph...

  3. EFFECTS OF FLUE GAS CLEANING WASTE ON GROUNDWATER QUALITY AND SOIL CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil and water samples from several test borings and hydrological data were collected and analyzed for three flue gas cleaning sludge disposal sites in order to assess the extent of migration of pollutants into the local groundwater and the effects on surrounding soils. Physical ...

  4. SWB-A modified Thornthwaite-Mather Soil-Water-Balance code for estimating groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, S.M.; Kelson, V.A.; Dripps, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    A Soil-Water-Balance (SWB) computer code has been developed to calculate spatial and temporal variations in groundwater recharge. The SWB model calculates recharge by use of commonly available geographic information system (GIS) data layers in combination with tabular climatological data. The code is based on a modified Thornthwaite-Mather soil-water-balance approach, with components of the soil-water balance calculated at a daily timestep. Recharge calculations are made on a rectangular grid of computational elements that may be easily imported into a regional groundwater-flow model. Recharge estimates calculated by the code may be output as daily, monthly, or annual values.

  5. Environmental impacts on soil and groundwater at airports: origin, contaminants of concern and environmental risks.

    PubMed

    Nunes, L M; Zhu, Y-G; Stigter, T Y; Monteiro, J P; Teixeira, M R

    2011-11-01

    Environmental impacts of airports are similar to those of many industries, though their operations expand over a very large area. Most international impact assessment studies and environmental management programmes have been giving less focus on the impacts to soil and groundwater than desirable. This may be the result of the large attention given to air and noise pollution, relegating other environmental descriptors to a second role, even when the first are comparatively less relevant. One reason that contributes to such "biased" evaluation is the lack of systematic information about impacts to soil and groundwater from airport activities, something the present study intends to help correct. Results presented here include the review of over seven hundred documents and online databases, with the objective of obtaining the following information to support environmental studies: (i) which operations are responsible for chemical releases?; (ii) where are these releases located?; (iii) which contaminants of concern are released?; (iv) what are the associated environmental risks? Results showed that the main impacts occur as a result of fuel storage, stormwater runoff and drainage systems, fuel hydrant systems, fuel transport and refuelling, atmospheric deposition, rescue and fire fighting training areas, winter operations, electrical substations, storage of chemical products by airport owners or tenants, and maintenance of green areas. A new method for ranking environmental risks of organic substances, based on chemical properties, is proposed and applied. Results show that the contaminants with the highest risks are the perfluorochemicals, benzene, trichloroethylene and CCl(4). The obtained information provides a basis for establishing the planning and checking phases of environmental management systems, and may also help in the best design of pollution prevention measures in order to avoid or reduce significant environmental impacts from airports. PMID:22002748

  6. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  7. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Late...

  8. Pesticides in western Canadian mountain air and soil.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gillian L; Lei, Ying D; Teixeira, Camilla; Muir, Derek C G; Wania, Frank

    2007-09-01

    The distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCP; in past and current use) in the mountains of western Canada was determined by sampling air, soil, and lichen along three elevational transects in 2003-2004. Two transects west of the Continental Divide were located in Mount Revelstoke and Yoho National Park, while the Observation Peak transect in Banff National Park is east of the divide. XAD-based passive air samplers, yielding annually averaged air concentrations, were deployed, and soils were collected at all 22 sampling sites, whereas lichen were only sampled in Revelstoke. Back trajectory analysis showed limited air mass transport from the Prairies to the east, but a high frequency of air arriving from the southwest, which includes agricultural regions in British Columbia and Washington State. Endosulfan, dieldrin, and a-hexachlorocyclohexane were the most prevalent OCPs in air and soil; hexachlorobenzene was only abundant in air; chlorothalonil, dacthal, and pentachloronitrobenzene were also consistently present. OCP air concentrations were similar across the three transects, suggesting efficient atmospheric mixing on a local and regional scale. Soil concentrations and soil/air concentration ratios of many OCPs were significantly higher west of the Continental Divide. The soil and lichen concentrations of most OCPs increased with altitude in Revelstoke, and displayed maxima at intermediate elevations at Yoho and Observation Peak. These distribution patterns can be understood as being determined by the balance between atmospheric deposition to, and retention within, the soils. Higher deposition, due to more precipitation falling at lower temperatures, likely occurs west of the divide and at higher elevations. Higher retention, due to higher soil organic matter content, is believed to occur in soils below the tree line. Highest pesticide concentrations are thus found intemperate mountain soils that are rich in organic matter and receive large amounts of cold

  9. Comparison of soil solution sampling techniques to assess metal fluxes from contaminated soil to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Coutelot, F; Sappin-Didier, V; Keller, C; Atteia, O

    2014-12-01

    The unsaturated zone plays a major role in elemental fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. A representative chemical analysis of soil pore water is required for the interpretation of soil chemical phenomena and particularly to assess Trace Elements (TEs) mobility. This requires an optimal sampling system to avoid modification of the extracted soil water chemistry and allow for an accurate estimation of solute fluxes. In this paper, the chemical composition of soil solutions sampled by Rhizon® samplers connected to a standard syringe was compared to two other types of suction probes (Rhizon® + vacuum tube and Rhizon® + diverted flow system). We investigated the effects of different vacuum application procedures on concentrations of spiked elements (Cr, As, Zn) mixed as powder into the first 20 cm of 100-cm columns and non-spiked elements (Ca, Na, Mg) concentrations in two types of columns (SiO2 sand and a mixture of kaolinite + SiO2 sand substrates). Rhizon® was installed at different depths. The metals concentrations showed that (i) in sand, peak concentrations cannot be correctly sampled, thus the flux cannot be estimated, and the errors can easily reach a factor 2; (ii) in sand + clay columns, peak concentrations were larger, indicating that they could be sampled but, due to sorption on clay, it was not possible to compare fluxes at different depths. The different samplers tested were not able to reflect the elemental flux to groundwater and, although the Rhizon® + syringe device was more accurate, the best solution remains to be the use of a lysimeter, whose bottom is kept continuously at a suction close to the one existing in the soil. PMID:25277861

  10. Changing aldicarb residue levels in soil and groundwater, eastern Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacenka, Steven; Porter, Keith S.; Jones, Russell L.; Zecharias, Yemane B.; Hughes, Henry B. F.

    1987-09-01

    A study that involved repeated groundwater and soil-core sampling in four representative potato-growing areas of Long Island, New York was carried out between 1980 and 1984 to investigate the impact of the pesticide aldicarb on groundwater quality. Aldicarb residue concentrations in both the saturated and unsaturated zones were analyzed together with hydrologic data from the study sites. Results showed that the timing of initial residue delivery to groundwater was dependent on water-table depth. After arrival at the saturated zone, the rate of residue advance within the aquifer depended on the rate of groundwater movement, which is strongly associated in this area with location relative to regional groundwater divides. Residue concentrations in groundwater peaked earliest and highest in areas closest to the aldicarb application sites and later and lower in areas farther downgradient. Based on the observed patterns of residue distribution, the impact of the pesticide on the aquifer as a whole will be shorter in duration than some previous estimates. The continuing processes of groundwater flow, residue degradation, and dispersion will drop aldicarb residue concentrations in groundwater to below the New York State drinking-water guideline of 7 μg/L long before the associated groundwater leaves the aquifer through natural discharge.

  11. 3D modeling of soil structure in urban groundwater areas: case studies in Kolpene, Rovaniemi, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupila, Juho

    2015-04-01

    3D modeling of groundwater areas is an important research method in groundwater surveys. Model of geological soil structure improves the knowledge of linkage between land use planning and groundwater protection. Results can be used as base information when developing the water supply services and anticipating and performing the measures needed in case of environmental accidents. Also, collected information is utilized when creating the groundwater flow model. In Finland, structure studies have been conducted in cooperation (among others) with the municipalities and local water suppliers and with the authorities from the Centre for Economic Development, Transport and the Environment. Geological Survey of Finland carries out project "Structure studies in Kolpene groundwater area" in Rovaniemi, Finnish Lapland. Study site is located in northern Finland, in the vicinity of the city center of Rovaniemi. Extent of the area is about 13 square kilometers and there are lots of urban residential areas and other human activities. The objective of this project is to determine the geological structure of the Kolpene groundwater area so that the results can be used to estimate the validity of the present exclusion area and possible risks to the groundwater caused by the land use. Soil layers of the groundwater area are studied by means of collecting information by heavy drilling, geophysical surveying (ground penetrating radar and gravimeter measurements) and water sampling from the installed observation pipes. Also the general geological and hydrological mappings are carried out. Main results which will be produced are: 1) the model of the bedrock surface, 2) the model of the surface of the ground water and flow directions, 3) the thickness of ground water saturated soil layers and 4) location and main characteristics of the soil layers which are significant to the ground water conditions. The preparing studies have been started at the end of 2013 and the results will be

  12. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appreciating when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is important for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To explore the shallow groundwater effect, we numerically exposed two soil profiles – one havi...

  13. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  14. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 {mu}g/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 {mu}g/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model.

  15. Nutrient Characterization of Rainwater, Soil and Groundwater from Two Different Watersheds, Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaw, M.; Gao, F.; Yu, Z.; Acharya, K.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past two decades, an increase of nutrients to Lake Taihu, China has resulted in hyper-eutrophication and the production of severe cyanobacterial blooms. While many past studies have focused on how surface water transports nutrients to the lake, this study seeks to characterize the concentration of nutrients in different media, including rainwater, soil and groundwater from two different watersheds. These two watersheds varied in overall land use, and agricultural sites within each watershed varied by crop type and growing method. Samples were collected from the Meilin watershed, a mix of forest and agricultural land and the Zhangjiagang watershed, which consisted of industrial, urban and agricultural lands. Samples included soils, groundwater and rain water. Soils from each site were characterized by aggregate size class and analyzed for total nitrogen and total phosphorus. Rainwater and groundwater samples were analyzed for total nitrogen and total phosphorus.

  16. Groundwater control of mangrove surface elevation: shrink and swell varies with soil depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, K.R.T.; Smith, T. J., III; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Anderson, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    We measured monthly soil surface elevation change and determined its relationship to groundwater changes at a mangrove forest site along Shark River, Everglades National Park, Florida. We combined the use of an original design, surface elevation table with new rod-surface elevation tables to separately track changes in the mid zone (0?4 m), the shallow root zone (0?0.35 m), and the full sediment profile (0?6 m) in response to site hydrology (daily river stage and groundwater piezometric pressure). We calculated expansion and contraction for each of the four constituent soil zones (surface [accretion and erosion; above 0 m], shallow zone [0?0.35 m], middle zone [0.35?4 m], and bottom zone [4?6 m]) that comprise the entire soil column. Changes in groundwater pressure correlated strongly with changes in soil elevation for the entire profile (Adjusted R2 5 0.90); this relationship was not proportional to the depth of the soil profile sampled. The change in thickness of the bottom soil zone accounted for the majority (R2 5 0.63) of the entire soil profile expansion and contraction. The influence of hydrology on specific soil zones and absolute elevation change must be considered when evaluating the effect of disturbances, sea level rise, and water management decisions on coastal wetland systems.

  17. Experimental study of the effect of shallow groundwater table on soil thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianmei; Zhao, Lin; Zeng, Yijian; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-03-01

    In plains areas with semi-arid climates, shallow groundwater is one of the important factors affecting soil thermal properties. In this study, soil temperature and water content were measured when groundwater tables reached 10 cm, 30 cm, and 60 cm depths (Experiment I, II, and III) by using sensors embedded at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm for 5 days. Soil thermal properties were analyzed based on the experimental data using the simplified de Vries model. Results show that soil water content and temperature have fluctuations that coincide with the 24 h diurnal cycle, and the amplitude of these fluctuations decreased with the increase in groundwater table depth. The amplitude of soil water content at 5 cm depth decreased from 0.025 m3·m-3 in Experiment II to 0.01 m3·m-3 in Experiment III. Moreover, it should be noted that the soil temperature in Experiment III gradually went up with the lowest value increasing from 26.0°C to 28.8°C. By contrast, the trends were not evident in Experiments I and II. Results indicate that shallow groundwater has a "cooling" effect on soil in the capillary zone. In addition, calculated values of thermal conductivity and heat capacity declined with the increasing depth of the groundwater table, which is consistent with experimental results. The thermal conductivity was stable at a value of 2.3W·cm-1·K-1 in Experiment I. The average values of thermal conductivity at different soil depths in Experiment II were 1.82W·cm-1·K-1, 2.15W·cm-1·K-1, and 2.21W·cm-1·K-1, which were always higher than that in Experiment III.

  18. Assessment of the water exchange between soil and groundwater in an Alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2013-04-01

    The soil-water balance in temperate climates can be sensitively characterised by the water exchange between soil and groundwater. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the water table depth are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen, but these latter extimate is still a major challenge for hydrological applications. Aiming at contributing to better characterise the soil-water balance and the water exchange between soil and groundwater, at the local scale in an Alpine valley, a micrometeorological station was installed during summer 2012 at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex orography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The soil upper layers, lying on an anthropised loose rock, are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). The station is equipped with longwave and shortwave radiometers, a thermo-hygrometer, two rain-gauges, eddy correlation devices (Gill WindMaster sonic anemometer and Licor Li7500 gas analyser, sampling at 20Hz), a TDR with multiplexer apparatus and four probes at different depths, three soil-thermometers and a heat exchanger plate. Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the main soil hydraulic properties (i.e. hydraulic conductivity at saturation by means of infiltration tests and falling head permeameter, porosity, residual water content and water content at saturation, soil-water retention relationships, organic matter content and grain size distribution curve). Three different hypothesis to model the water exchange between soil-water and groundwater were introduced. They are (i) a null exchange rate which accounts for a shortage of precipitation and for representing the underlying soil as a capillary barrier, (ii) a pure percolation with unitary gradient of the total hydraulic potential and (iii) a percolation or

  19. A case study of the natural attenuation of gas condensate hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Barker, G W; Raterman, K T; Fisher, J B; Corgan, J M; Trent, G L; Brown, D R; Kemp, N; Sublette, K L

    1996-01-01

    Condensate liquids have been found to contaminate soil and groundwater at two gas production sites in the Denver Basin operated by Amoco Production Co. These sites have been closely monitored since July 1993 to determine whether intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurs at a sufficient rate and to an adequate end point to support a no-intervention decision. Groundwater monitoring and analysis of soil cores suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at these sites by multiple pathways, including aerobic oxidation, Fe(III) reduction, and sulfate reduction. PMID:8669918

  20. Nitrate Distribution in Soil Moisture and Groundwater with Intensive Plantation Management on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantations treatments were much higher than the old field.

  1. Treatment of TNT contaminated soil and groundwater using plant-based enzyme systems

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, V.F.; Wolfe, L.; McCutcheon, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is considered toxic and a mutagen. For over 100 years, TNT has been widely used in explosives for both military and commercial applications. Soil and groundwater contamination by TNT is prevalent at military bases, manufacturing facilities and at commercial (such as mining) sites were TNT was used or stored. TNT is a difficult compound to treat. It is resistant to complete microbial degradation. Although incineration is feasible, it can be costly. One promising technology is degradation using plant enzyme systems, which has become known as phytoremediation. This paper will highlight bench and field studies of phytoremediation of TNT contaminated soil and groundwater. Parameters for developing a model will be discussed.

  2. Groundwater recharge assessment at local and episodic scale in a soil mantled perched karst aquifer in southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allocca, V.; De Vita, P.; Manna, F.; Nimmo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Depending on the seasonally varying air temperature, evapotranspiration, and precipitation patterns, calculated values of RPR varied between 35% and 97% among the individual episodes. A multiple linear correlation of the RPR with both the average intensity of recharging rainfall events and the antecedent soil water content was calculated. Given the relatively easy measurability of precipitation and soil water content, such an empirical model would have great hydrogeological and practical utility. It would facilitate short-term forecasting of recharge in karst aquifers of the Mediterranean region and other aquifers with similar hydrogeological characteristics. By establishing relationships between the RPR and climate-dependent variables such as average storm intensity, it would facilitate prediction of climate-change effects on groundwater recharge. The EMR methodology could further be applied to other aquifers for evaluating the relationship of recharge to various hydrometeorological and hydrogeological processes.

  3. BIOREMEDIATION OF MIXED VAPOR PHASE CONTAMINANTS FROM SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor phase contaminants commonly include combinations of chlorinated ethenes and petroleum hydrocarbons. Many chlorinated ethenes and petroleum hydrocarbons are readily degradable by a range of aerobic soil microorganisms, making the use of biological systems for degrading ...

  4. Methodology of determining soil structure in important groundwater areas: case studies in Kauvonkangas, Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupila, Juho

    2016-04-01

    Finland is fully self-sufficient in clean groundwater and even has a capacity of exportation. There are approx. 6000 groundwater areas with a total yield of 5.4 million m3/day. Currently only 10% of this groundwater resource is in use. For the efficient and safe exploitation of these areas in the future, detailed modeling of soil structure is an important method in groundwater surveys. 3D -models improve the general knowledge of linkage between land use planning and groundwater protection. Results can be used as a base information in water supply service development and when performing the measures needed in case of environmental accidents. Also, when creating the groundwater flow models the collected information is utilized and is usually the main data source. Geological Survey of Finland has carried out soil structure studies in co-operation with authorities, municipalities and the local water suppliers. The main objectives of these projects are to determine the geological structure of groundwater area for estimating the validity of the present exclusion area, the quantity of ground water volume and recharge capability and possible risks to the groundwater. Research areas are usually under an active water supply service. Kauvonkangas groundwater area is located in the municipality of Tervola, in Southern part of Finnish Lapland. Extent of the area is 7.9 km2 and it is an important water source for the local and nearby population centers. There are two active water supply companies in the area. Field studies in the project will include general geological and hydrological mapping, soil drilling with observation pipe installation, test pumping and water sampling. Geophysical measures will play a key-role, including ground penetrating radar (GPR) and gravimetric measurements. Studies will be carried out in spring and summer 2016. The main results will be the models of the bedrock and groundwater level and main characteristics of the soil layers in the area. Results

  5. THE GROUNDWATER GEOCHEMISTRY OF AREA 6, DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, DOVER, DELAWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report reviews and interprets groundwater chemistry data collected at the Dover Air Force Base (AFB), Area 6, from July 1995 through March 1997. The work was conducted as part of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF) Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents Ac...

  6. Compiling a data base of groundwater levels in German organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Belting, Susanne; Laggner, Andreas; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    Although covering only around 5 % of the country, drained peatlands are the largest single source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions besides the energy sector in Germany. GHG emissions from peatlands are very sensitive to changes in the groundwater level, which poses an enormous challenge when upscaling hydrological and gas exchange models to the national scale. However, to compile an improved inventory of GHG emissions from organic soils and to assess the effects of re-wetting measures, upscaling methods for the groundwater level need to be developed. Moreover, to develop robust vegetation indicators for GHG emissions, groundwater level parameters of relevant vegetation types need to be known. Here, we present a unique dataset on groundwater levels in organic soils. Groundwater level data from research and re-wetting projects was collected, checked and harmonised. Presently, our data base contains time series from more than 60 peatlands and 1100 dipwells, resulting in around 8000 annual data sets. Per area, 3 to 91 dipwells have been installed, while the lengths of the time series span from one to 21 years, facilitating the analysis of temporal trends. As groundwater data is generally mainly collected within the frame of re-wetting projects, the majority of the data is from such areas. Thus, the main land use categories for peatlands in Germany, grassland and arable land, are still underrepresented in the data set. At the moment, for all dipwells, land use as taken from official land use statistics (ATKIS), soil type according to the geological map GUEK200 (1:200.000), climatic parameters and the protection status (e.g. nature reserves and NATURA2000) are known. If available, the data base contains more precise site information on vegetation, restoration methods and soils. This dataset will used for both the regionalisation of the groundwater table and and an improvement of vegetation-based proxies for GHG emissions.

  7. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  8. Soil Activation and Groundwater Contamination at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, D.E.P.G.; Chek Beng, Ng P.E.; Penny, G.

    2008-07-01

    In November 1999, tritium (H-3) was detected in the groundwater near one of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) accelerator experiments at concentrations above the 20,000 pico curie per liter (pCi/L) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). Sodium-22 (Na-22) was also detected in the groundwater, but at concentrations well below the 400 pCi/L MCL. An investigation into the source of the contamination revealed that the tritium and sodium-22 originated from activated soil shielding located adjacent to the g-2 target building where approximately five percent of the beam was inadvertently striking one of the beam-line magnets. Rainwater was able to infiltrate the activated soils and carry the tritium and sodium-22 into the groundwater. The highest tritium level detected in groundwater during the 1999 investigation was nearly 1.8 million pCi/L. To prevent additional rainwater infiltration into the activated soil shielding, a concrete cap was constructed over the soil shielding in December 1999. Other corrective actions included refocusing the beam and improved beam loss monitoring to reduce additional soil activation, storm-water management improvements, and additional groundwater monitoring. From 2001 through 2004, three high concentration zones (or slugs) of tritium were observed passing through the groundwater monitoring well network immediately down-gradient of the source area, with a maximum observed concentration of 3.4 million pCi/L. Some of the tritium that was previously leached from the activated soil was trapped in the vadose (unsaturated) zone soils directly above the water table after then cap was installed. A portion of this residual tritium was later mobilized into the groundwater during periods of high groundwater table elevations, which can occur following heavy seasonal rainfall. Monitoring results for the past two years indicate that the amount of tritium being released from the vadose zone is decreasing, with tritium concentrations consistently below 100

  9. A New Screening Method for Methane in Soil Gas Using Existing Groundwater Monitoring Wells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane in soil gas may have undesirable consequences. The soil gas may be able to form a flammable mixture with air and present an explosion hazard. Aerobic biodegradation of the methane in soil gas may consume oxygen that would otherwise be available for biodegradation of gasol...

  10. Immobilization of selenite in soil and groundwater using stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbo; Liang, Qiqi; Qian, Tianwei; Zhao, Dongye

    2015-03-01

    Stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and tested for removal and in-situ immobilization of Se(IV) in groundwater and soil. A water-soluble starch or food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as a stabilizer to facilitate in-situ delivery of the particles into contaminated soil. While bare and stabilized nanoparticles showed rapid sorption kinetics, starch-stabilized Fe-Mn offered the greatest capacity for Se(IV). The Langmuir maximum capacity was determined to be 109 and 95 mg-Se/g-Fe for starch- and CMC-stabilized nanoparticles, respectively, and the high Se(IV) uptake was observed over the typical groundwater pH range of 5-8. Column breakthrough tests indicated that the stabilized nanoparticles were deliverable in a model sandy soil while non-stabilized particles were not. When a Se(IV)-spiked soil was treated in situ with the nanoparticles, >90% water leachable Se(IV) was transferred to the nanoparticle phase, and thereby immobilized as the particles were retained in the downstream soil matrix. The nanoparticle amendment reduced the TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) leachability and the California WET (waste extraction test) leachability of Se(IV) by 76% and 71%, respectively. The technology holds the potential to fill a major technology gap in remediation of metals-contaminated soil and groundwater. PMID:25577492

  11. Chemical substance transport in soils and its effect on groundwater quality.

    PubMed Central

    Khublarian, M G

    1989-01-01

    The problems of chemical substance applications in different spheres of industry and agriculture and their effects on groundwater quality and human health are described. Sources of groundwater contamination from industrial and municipal wastes, agricultural pollutants, etc., are listed. The experience in the application of chemical fertilizers and pesticides in the USSR is described. A brief estimation of groundwater salinity is given for various regions of the USSR where irrigation is practiced, as well as the experience in environmental protection. Special attention is given to methods of simulating water seepage and chemical substance transport in soils. Boundary problems for free-surface seepage and dissolved solids transport in porous media are stated, and methods of solution are described in the example of the hydrodynamic theory of seepage and dispersion. Some results of calculations with this method are presented. The influence of groundwater quality on the morbidity of the population is given and the main diseases and associated medical problems are listed. PMID:2559843

  12. PHYTOREMEDIATION: USING PLANTS TO CLEAN UP CONTAMINATED SOIL, GROUNDWATER, AND WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation is an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost. The cleanup technology is defined as the use of green plants to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy ...

  13. IN SITU TREATMENT OF SOIL AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATED WITH CHROMIUM - TECHNICAL RESOURCE GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New information and treatment approaches have been developed for chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater treatment. The prupose of this report is to bring together the most current information pertaining to the science of chromium contamination and the insitu treatment and co...

  14. Groundwater pollution potential and greenhouse gas emission from soils amended with different swine biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there exist numerous research studies in the literature on greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of soils amended with plant-based biochar made from traditional dry pyrolysis (hereafter referred as pyrochar), a very few such studies exist for hydrochar made from hydro...

  15. IN-SITU REDUCTION OF CHROMIUM-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER, SOILS, AND SEDIMENTS BY SODIUM DITHIONITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies were conducted to characterize the extent of chromium contamination in the groundwater and underlying soils and sediments of a chrome-plating shop at the USCG Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. Most of the mobile Cr(VI) is present in the capillary zone ...

  16. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  17. SOIL AIR CARBON DIOXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN A NEW ENGLAND SPRUCE-FIR FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research and modeling efforts to evaluate soil-soil solution chemical interactions must take into account solution equilibria with soil air CO2. Measurements of soil air CO2 and soil temperature were made in the major horizons of a forest soil in eastern Maine through the 1985 gr...

  18. Relationships between groundwater, surface water, and soil salinity in Polder 32, Southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, D. C.; Ayers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In the coastal areas of Southwest Bangladesh polders are surrounded by tidal channels filled with brackish water. In the wet season, farmers create openings in the embankments to irrigate rice paddies. In the dry season, farmers do the same to create saline shrimp ponds. Residents on Polder 32, located within the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta system, practice these seasonal farming techniques. Soils in the area are entisols, being sediment recently deposited, and contain mostly silt-sized particles. Brackish water in brine shrimp ponds may deposit salt in the soil, causing soil salinization. However, saline connate groundwater could also be contributing to soil salinization. Groundwater, surface water (fresh water pond, rice paddy and tidal channel water) and soil samples have been analyzed via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and ion chromatography in an attempt to correlate salinity measurements with each other in order to determine major sources of soil salinity. Multiple parameters, including distances of samples from tidal channels, inland streams, shrimp ponds and tube wells were measured to see if spatial correlations exist. Similarly, values from wet and dry seasons were compared to quantify temporal variations. Salt content in many soil samples were found to be high enough to significantly decrease rice yields. Continued soil salinization can decrease these yields even more, leading to farmers not producing enough food to sustain their families.

  19. Reactive transport controls on sandy acid sulfate soils and impacts on shallow groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, S. Ursula; Rate, Andrew W.; Rengel, Zed; Appleyard, Steven; Prommer, Henning; Hinz, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Disturbance or drainage of potential acid sulfate soils (PASS) can result in the release of acidity and degradation of infrastructure, water resources, and the environment. Soil processes affecting shallow groundwater quality have been investigated using a numerical code that integrates (bio)geochemical processes with water, solute, and gas transport. The patterns of severe and persistent acidification (pH < 4) in the sandy, carbonate-depleted podzols of a coastal plain could be reproduced without calibration, based on oxidation of microcrystalline pyrite after groundwater level decrease and/or residual groundwater acidity, due to slow vertical solute transport rates. The rate of acidification was limited by gas phase diffusion of oxygen and hence was sensitive to soil water retention properties and in some cases also to oxygen consumption by organic matter mineralization. Despite diffusion limitation, the rate of oxidation in sandy soils was rapid once pyrite-bearing horizons were exposed, even to a depth of 7.5 m. Groundwater level movement was thus identified as an important control on acidification, as well as the initial pyrite content. Increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation lead to slightly lower pH and greater accumulation of Fe(III) phases, but had little effect on the overall amount of pyrite oxidized. Aluminosilicate (kaolinite) dissolution had a small pH-buffering effect but lead to the release of Al and associated acidity. Simulated dewatering scenarios highlighted the potential of the model for risk assessment of (bio)geochemical impacts on soil and groundwater over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

  20. In situ treatment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by air sparging.

    PubMed

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major problem in some areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh where it is caused by reducing conditions in the aquifer. In situ treatment, if it can be proven as operationally feasible, has the potential to capture some advantages over other treatment methods by being fairly simple, not using chemicals, and not necessitating disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. In this study, the potential for in situ treatment by injection of compressed air directly into the aquifer (i.e. air sparging) is assessed. An experimental apparatus was constructed to simulate conditions of arsenic-rich groundwater under anaerobic conditions, and in situ treatment by air sparging was employed. Arsenic (up to 200 μg/L) was removed to a maximum of 79% (at a local point in the apparatus) using a solution with dissolved iron and arsenic only. A static "jar" test revealed arsenic removal by co-precipitation with iron at a molar ratio of approximately 2 (iron/arsenic). This is encouraging since groundwater with relatively high amounts of dissolved iron (as compared to arsenic) therefore has a large theoretical treatment capacity for arsenic. Iron oxidation was significantly retarded at pH values below neutral. In terms of operation, analysis of experimental results shows that periodic air sparging may be feasible. PMID:24561624

  1. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  2. Simulation of regional-scale groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varni, Marcelo R.; Usunoff, Eduardo J.

    A three-dimensional modular model (MODFLOW) was used to simulate groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, in order to assess the correctness of the conceptual model of the hydrogeological system. Simulated heads satisfactorily match observed heads in the regional water-table aquifer. Model results indicate that: (1) groundwater recharge is not uniform throughout the region but is best represented by three recharge rates, decreasing downgradient, similar to the distribution of soils and geomorphological characteristics; and (2) evapotranspiration rates are larger than previous estimates, which were made by using the Thornthwaite-Mather method. Evapotranspiration rates estimated by MODFLOW agree with results of independent studies of the region. Model results closely match historical surface-flow records, thereby suggesting that the model description of the aquifer-river relationship is correct. Résumé Un modèle modulaire tridimensionnel (MODFLOW) a été utilisé pour simuler les écoulements souterrains dans le bassin de la rivière Azul (Province de Buenos Aires, Argentine), dans le but d'évaluer la justesse du modèle conceptuel du système hydrogéologique. La piézométrie simulée s'ajuste de façon satisfaisante à celle observée pour l'ensemble de la nappe. Les résultats du modèle indiquent que: (1) la recharge de la nappe n'est pas uniforme sur toute la région, mais qu'elle est mieux approchée par trois valeurs différentes, décroissant vers l'aval-gradient, en suivant la même distribution que les sols et les caractéristiques géomorphologiques et (2) l'évapotranspiration est nettement plus importante que prévu initialement à partir de la méthode de Thornthwaite-Mather. Les valeurs d'évapotranspiration fournies par MODFLOW concordent bien avec les résultats d'autres études portant sur la région. Les résultats du modèle reproduisent convenablement les chroniques de débit des écoulements de surface

  3. Geochemical study of groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and its contractor, Rust Geotech, support the Kirtland Area Office by assisting Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (Sandia/NM) with remedial action, remedial design, and technical support of its Environmental Restoration Program. To aid in determining groundwater origins and flow paths, the GJPO was tasked to provide interpretation of groundwater geochemical data. The purpose of this investigation was to describe and analyze the groundwater geochemistry of the Sandia/NM Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Interpretations of groundwater origins are made by using these data and the results of {open_quotes}mass balance{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}reaction path{close_quote} modeling. Additional maps and plots were compiled to more fully comprehend the geochemical distributions. A more complete set of these data representations are provided in the appendices. Previous interpretations of groundwater-flow paths that were based on well-head, geologic, and geochemical data are presented in various reports and were used as the basis for developing the models presented in this investigation.

  4. Characterization and assessment of contaminated soil and groundwater at an organic chemical plant site in Chongqing, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Geng; Niu, Junjie; Zhang, Chao; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-04-01

    Contamination from organic chemical plants can cause serious pollution of soil and groundwater ecosystems. To characterize soil contamination and to evaluate the health risk posed by groundwater at a typical organic chemical plant site in Chongqing, China, 91 soil samples and seven groundwater samples were collected. The concentrations of different contaminants and their three-dimensional distribution were determined based on the 3D-krige method. Groundwater chemistry risk index (Chem RI) and cancer risk were calculated based on TRIAD and RBCA models. The chemistry risk indices of groundwater points SW5, SW18, SW22, SW39, SW52, SW80, and SW82 were 0.4209, 0.9972, 0.9324, 0.9990, 0.9991, 1.0000, and 1.0000, respectively, indicating that the groundwater has poor environmental status. By contrast, the reference Yangtse River water sample showed no pollution with a Chem RI of 0.1301. Benzene and 1,2-dichloroethane were the main contaminants in the groundwater and were responsible for the elevated cancer risk. The cumulative health risk of groundwater points (except SW5 and SW18) were all higher than the acceptable baselines of 10(-6), which indicates that the groundwater poses high cancer risk. Action is urgently required to control and remediate the risk for human health and groundwater ecosystems. PMID:26193833

  5. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  6. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (CD-ROM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the tricWoroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were insta...

  7. Organochlorine pesticides in soils and air of southern Mexico: Chemical profiles and potential for soil emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Fiona; Alegria, Henry A.; Jantunen, Liisa M.; Bidleman, Terry F.; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Gold-Bouchot, Gerardo; Ceja-Moreno, Victor; Waliszewski, Stefan M.; Infanzon, Raul

    The extent of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) contamination in southern Mexico was investigated in this study. Biweekly air samplings were carried out in two sites in the state of Chiapas (during 2002-2003), and one in each state of Veracruz and Tabasco (during 2003-2004). Corresponding to the air sampling locations, soil samples were also collected to gauge the soil-air exchange of OCs in the region. ∑DDTs in soils ranged from 0.057 to 360 ng g -1 whereas those in air ranged from 240 to 2400 pg m -3. DDT and metabolite DDE were expressed as fractional values, FDDTe = p, p'-DDT/( p, p'-DDT + p, p'-DDE) and FDDTo = p,p'-DDT/( p,p'-DDT + o,p'-DDT). FDDTe in soils ranged from 0.30 to 0.69 while those in air ranged from 0.45 to 0.84. FDDTe in air at a farm in Chiapas (0.84) was closer to that of technical DDT (0.95) which is suggestive of fresh DDT input. Enantiomer fractions (EF) of o,p'-DDT in air were racemic at all locations (0.500-0.504). However, nonracemic o,p'-DDT was seen in the soils (EFs = 0.456-0.647). Fugacities of OCs in soil ( fs) and air ( fa) were calculated, and the fugacity fraction, ff = fs/( fs + fa) of DDTs ranged from 0.013 to 0.97 which indicated a mix of net deposition ( ff < 0.5) and volatilization ( ff > 0.5) from soil among the sites. It is suggested that DDTs in Mexico air are due to a combination of ongoing regional usage and re-emission of old DDT residues from soils. Total toxaphene in soils ranged from 0.066 to 69 ng g -1 while levels in air ranged from 6.2 to 230 pg m -3. Chromatographic profiles of toxaphenes in both air and soil showed depletion of Parlar congeners 39 and 42. Fugacity fractions of toxaphene were within the equilibrium range or above the upper equilibrium threshold boundary. These findings suggested that soil emission of old residues is the main source of toxaphenes to the atmosphere. Results from this study provide baseline data for establishing a long-term OC monitoring program in Mexico.

  8. Monitoring the Remediation of Salt-Affected Soils and Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, L. R.; Callaghan, M. V.; Cey, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    Salt-affected soil is one of the most common environmental issues facing the petroleum hydrocarbon industry. Large quantities of brines are often co-produced with gas and oil and have been introduced into the environment through, for example, flare pits, drilling operations and pipe line breaks. Salt must be flushed from the soil and tile drain systems can be used to collect salt water which is then be routed for disposal. A flushing experiment over a 2 m deep tile drain system is being monitored by arrays of tensiometers, repeated soil coring, direct push electrical conductivity profiles (PTC), electromagnetic surveys and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys. Water table elevation is monitored with pressure transducers. Thermocouple arrays provide temperature profiles that are used to adjust electrical conductivity data to standard temperature equivalents. A 20 m by 20 m plot was deep tilled and treated with soil amendments. Numerous infiltration tests were conducted inside and outside the plot area using both a tension infiltrometer and Guelph permeameter to establish changes in soil hydraulic properties and macroporosity as a result of deep tillage. The results show that till greatly diminished the shallow macroporosity and increased the matrix saturated hydraulic conductivity. A header system is used to evenly flood the plot with 10 m3 of water on each of three consecutive days for an approximate total of 7.5 cm of water. The flood event is being repeated four times over a period of 6 weeks. Baseline PTC and ERT surveys show that the salt is concentrated in the upper 2 to 3 m of soil. Tensiometer data show that the soil at 30 cm depth responds within 2 to 3 hours to flooding events once the soil is wetted and begins to dry again after one week. Soil suction at 1.5 m does not show immediate response to the daily flooding events, but is steadily decreasing in response to the flooding and rainfall events. An ERT survey in October will provide the first

  9. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth L

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence. PMID:23026643

  11. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J. A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence.

  12. Water dynamics and groundwater contributions in a young mountain soil under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater contribution to the soil-water content and to the evapotranspiration is a major uncertainty to assess the water balance. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the depth of the water table are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen. Aiming at better understanding these processes at the local scale, a micrometeorological station, equipped with both traditional sensors, an eddy covariance (EC) apparatus with a 20Hz sonic anemometer and infrared CO2 and H2O gas analyser, and four multiplexed TDR probes, was installed at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, Italy, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex topography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The young, anthropised, soil upper layers are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the soil hydraulic properties. Particularly the soil-water retention relationships were measured by means of a low- and a high-pressure Richards' apparatus, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of each soil layer was estimated by 2-dimensional, axis-symmetrical, inverse modelling of field infiltration tests from single ring infiltrometer. The measurements were performed during Summer 2012 and Summer 2013. The groundwater exchange was numerically estimated both in wet (Summer 2012) and in dry meteorlogical conditions (Summer 2013). Evapotranspiration was assessed by means of Penman-Monteith method, which was found to be in the range between EC-estimated fluxes and an indirect estimate based on the Bowen ratio correction for Summer 2012. The two seasons are meteorologically very different and it results also in the soil-water regime. During Summer 2012, the weather was relatively wet, the soil did not reach very small water contents, so that precipitation was able to percolate towards the

  13. Natural attenuation processes for remediation of arsenic contaminated soils and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiling; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination presents a hazard in many countries. Natural attenuation (NA) of As-contaminated soils and groundwater may be a cost-effective in situ remedial option. It relies on the site intrinsic assimilative capacity and allows in-place cleanup. Sorption to solid phases is the principal mechanism immobilizing As in soils and removing it from groundwater. Hydroxides of iron, aluminum and manganese, clay and sulfide minerals, and natural organic matter are commonly associated with soils and aquifer sediments, and have been shown to be significant As adsorbents. The extent of sorption is influenced by As speciation and the site geochemical conditions such as pH, redox potential, and the co-occurring ions. Microbial activity may catalyze the transformation of As species, or mediate redox reactions thus influencing As mobility. Plants that are capable of hyperaccumulating As may translocate As from contaminated soils and groundwater to their tissues, providing the basis for phytoremediation. However, NA is subject to hydrological changes and may take substantial periods of time, thus requiring long-term monitoring. The current understanding of As NA processes remains limited. Sufficient site characterization is critical to the success of NA. Further research is required to develop conceptual and mathematical models to predict the fate and transport of As and to evaluate the site NA capacity. Engineering enhanced NA using environmentally benign products may be an effective alternative. PMID:17049728

  14. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  15. Air-soil exchange of mercury from background soils in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ericksen, J A; Gustin, M S; Xin, M; Weisberg, P J; Fernandez, G C J

    2006-08-01

    The air-surface exchange of mercury (Hg) was measured, using a dynamic polycarbonate flux chamber, for soils with low or "background" Hg concentrations (<0.1 mg/kg) at eleven locations across the contiguous United States. Sampling locations included agricultural, desert, grassland, mixed and pine forest ecosystems (n=1326 soil flux measurements at 46 individual sites). An overall soil Hg flux of 0.9+/-0.2 ng/m2/h for these background soils was obtained by averaging the means for the different locations. Soil Hg fluxes were significantly lower in dark conditions than in the light for all but the grassland sites. Mean inlet air Hg concentrations were 1.0+/-0.1 ng/m3 in the dark and 1.3+/-0.2 ng/m3 in the light. Soil temperature inside and outside of the chamber, air temperature, relative humidity, and irradiance were measured concurrently with soil Hg flux. Soil-air Hg exchange was weakly predicted by environmental variables (R2 from 0.07 to 0.52). For a single location, flux was better correlated with soil moisture than other measured environmental parameters, suggesting that soil moisture might be an important driver for Hg emissions from background soils. In addition, based on data collected we suggest some quality control measures for use of Tekran 2537A analyzers when measuring low mercury fluxes. Using basic scaling procedures, we roughly estimate that natural emissions from soils in the contiguous U.S. release approximately 100 Mg/yr of Hg to the atmosphere. PMID:16181661

  16. Ecohydrology of groundwater-dependent ecosystems: 2. Stochastic soil moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2009-05-01

    In groundwater-dependent ecosystems, interactions between rainfall, water table fluctuations, and vegetation are exerted through the soil water content. The dynamics of soil moisture, in fact, are strongly coupled to fluctuations of the water table and, together, they control the overall ecosystem dynamics. We propose here a simple process-based stochastic model for the study of soil moisture dynamics at a generic depth, to complement the stochastic model of water table depth presented in the companion paper. The model presented here is based on a local and depth-dependent water balance driven by stochastic rainfall (marked Poisson noise) and accounting for processes such as rainfall infiltration, root water uptake, and capillary rise. We obtain a semianalytical formulation of the stationary probability distribution of soil water content at different depths, which is studied for different values of soil, climate, and vegetation parameters. The probability distributions are used to investigate the ecohydrology of groundwater-dependent ecosystems, including the quantitative description of the vegetation-water table-soil moisture interplay and the probabilistic analysis of root water uptake.

  17. MODELS FOR LEACHING OF PESTICIDES IN SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models are developed which describe leaching of pesticides in the root zone and the intermediate vadose zone, and flushing of residual solute mass in the aquifer. Pollutants' loss pathways in the soil, such as volatilization, crop uptake, and biochemical decay, are emphasized, a...

  18. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Robert W.; Frank, James R.; Feng, Xiandong

    1998-01-01

    An in situ method for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal.

  19. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

    1998-06-23

    An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

  20. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF ARSENIC IN SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will include laboratory batch experiments to determine the desorption/mobilization of arsenic species for both specific solids and contaminated soils. The first portion of the study will involve using several different chemical solutions to determine their ability to d...

  1. PHYTOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH: REMEDIATION OF SOIL, SEDIMENT, GROUNDWATER, AND ET CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL has a number of research efforts underway in the general field of using plants as all or part of an environmental improvement strategy. Planted systems have been demonstrated on several SITE program locations for PAH and PCP degradation in soil, TCE uptake and degradation ...

  2. Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report for Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Howard S.

    2010-04-10

    This annual report summarizes maintenance, monitoring, and inspection activities performed to implement the selected remedy for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Results from monitoring perched water and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center are also presented.

  3. Impacts of soil and groundwater salinization on tree crop performance in post-tsunami Aceh Barat, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, C.; Distel, A.; Dercon, G.; Wahyunto; Tomlinson, R.; Noordwijk, M. v.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 had far reaching consequences for agriculture in Aceh province, Indonesia, and particularly in Aceh Barat district, 150 km from the seaquake epicentre. In this study, the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of soil and groundwater salinity and their impact on tree crops were monitored in Aceh Barat from 2006 to 2008. On 48 sampling points along ten transects, covering 40 km of coastline, soil and groundwater salinity were measured and related to mortality and yield depression of the locally most important tree crops. Given a yearly rainfall of over 3000 mm, initial groundwater salinity declined rapidly from over 10 to less than 2 mS cm-1 within two years. On the other hand, seasonal dynamics of the groundwater table in combination with intrusion of saline water into the groundwater body led to recurring elevated salinity, sufficient to affect crops. Tree mortality and yield depression in the flooded area varied considerably between tree species. Damage to coconut (65% trees damaged) was related to tsunami run-up height, while rubber (50% trees damaged) was mainly affected by groundwater salinity. Coconut yields (-35% in average) were constrained by groundwater Ca2+ and Mg2+, while rubber yields (-65% on average) were related to groundwater chloride, pH and soil sodium. These findings have implications on planting deep-rooted tree crops as growth will be constrained by ongoing oscillations of the groundwater table and salinity.

  4. Exchange of Groundwater and Surface-Water Mediated by Permafrost Response to Seasonal and Long Term Air Temperature Variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Shemin; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Voss, Clifford; Wu, Qingbai

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost dynamics impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under seasonal and decadal air temperature variations, permafrost temperature changes control the exchanges between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA, was modified to simulate groundwater flow and heat transport in the subsurface containing permafrost. The northern central Tibet Plateau was used as an example of model application. Modeling results show that in a yearly cycle, groundwater flow occurs in the active layer from May to October. Maximum groundwater discharge to the surface lags the maximum subsurface temperature by two months. Under an increasing air temperature scenario of 3?C per 100 years, over the initial 40-year period, the active layer thickness can increase by three-fold. Annual groundwater discharge to the surface can experience a similar three-fold increase in the same period. An implication of these modeling results is that with increased warming there will be more groundwater flow in the active layer and therefore increased groundwater discharge to rivers. However, this finding only holds if sufficient upgradient water is available to replenish the increased discharge. Otherwise, there will be an overall lowering of the water table in the recharge portion of the catchment.

  5. Exchange of groundwater and surface-water mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term air temperature variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, S.; McKenzie, J.; Voss, C.; Wu, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost dynamics impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under seasonal and decadal air temperature variations, permafrost temperature changes control the exchanges between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA, was modified to simulate groundwater flow and heat transport in the subsurface containing permafrost. The northern central Tibet Plateau was used as an example of model application. Modeling results show that in a yearly cycle, groundwater flow occurs in the active layer from May to October. Maximum groundwater discharge to the surface lags the maximum subsurface temperature by two months. Under an increasing air temperature scenario of 3C per 100 years, over the initial 40-year period, the active layer thickness can increase by three-fold. Annual groundwater discharge to the surface can experience a similar three-fold increase in the same period. An implication of these modeling results is that with increased warming there will be more groundwater flow in the active layer and therefore increased groundwater discharge to rivers. However, this finding only holds if sufficient upgradient water is available to replenish the increased discharge. Otherwise, there will be an overall lowering of the water table in the recharge portion of the catchment. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Biodegradation and biotransformation of groundwater pollutants, when present as mixtures, by soil microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Burback, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability of soil microorganisms to metabolize mixtures of groundwater pollutants in pure culture and defined mixed culture was investigated. Mycobacterium vaccae strain JOB-5 catabolized acetone, cyclohexane, styrene, benzene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, dioxane and 1,2 dichloroethylene. Analysis indicated that the products of benzene degradation by M. vaccae were phenol and hydroquinone. The products of chlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, and propylbenzene degradation were identified as 4-chlorophenol, 4-ethylphenol, and 4-propylphenol. When toluene and benzene were present concomitantly toluene was degraded first. The presence of toluene promoted the degradation of styrene. These results suggested that components in mixtures may have a positive or a negative effect on the rates of biodegradation of other pollutants. The toxicity of seven major groundwater pollutants (benzene, chlorobenzene, propylbenzene, ethylbenzene, trichloroethylene, toluene, and styrene) and their metabolites to a soil mycobacterium (Mycobacterium vaccae strain JOB-5) that catabolized these pollutants was determined. Three metabolites were less toxic to M. vaccae than their parent compound. Three of the pollutants were less toxic than their metabolites. The metabolites 4-chlorophenol, 4-ethylphenol, and 4-propylphenol all inhibited the degradation of toluene by M. vaccae. A culture containing Mycobacterium vaccae and Rhodococcus sp. (strain R-22) was investigated to determine the effect two organisms would have on the catabolism of groundwater pollutants. The mixture mineralized benzene to CO[sub 2] at five times the amount of pure cultures. The physiological mechanism is described. This study demonstrates the complex interactions involved in the biodegradation of mixed groundwater pollutants.

  7. Determination of fumaric acid, maleic acid, and phthalic acid in groundwater and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, E.A.; Singley, K.F. . Technology Center)

    1994-01-01

    When present at > 1 [mu]g/mL, each title compound was determined in groundwater by ion-exclusion chromatography after sample acidification and filtration. For groundwater with one or all analyte concentrations of < 1 [mu]g/mL, the acid anions were first concentrated from a 100-mL sample using a quaternary amine anion-exchange cartridge. The acids were recovered by eluting the cartridge with 1 mL of N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and 2-mL deionized water washes; this solution then was examined by anion-exclusion chromatography. Analytes were monitored with a UV detector operated at 200 nm. The analysis procedures for groundwater were validated with solutions which were fortified with from 50 ng/mL to 200 [mu]g/mL of each analyte; recoveries ranged from 90 to 110%. The soil method was validated using fortified samples which contained each acid at concentrations of from 5 to 160 [mu]g/g. Recovery values were between 81 and 120%. For samples exhibiting minimal detector response from compounds other than the acids of interest, 100-[mu]L injection volumes provided an estimated detection limit of 1 [mu]g/g for soil and 10 ng/mL for groundwater.

  8. The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports applied research and technology development (AR&TD) for remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The program centers on delivering advanced scientific approaches and technologies from highly-leveraged, strategic investments that maximize impact to reduce risk and life-cycle cleanup costs. The current groundwater and soil remediation program consists of four applied programmatic areas: • Deep Vadose Zone – Applied Field Research Initiative • Attenuation Based Remedies – Applied Field Research Initiative • Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants – Applied Field Research Initiative • Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management. This paper provides an overview of the applied programmatic areas, fiscal year 11 accomplishments, and their near-term technical direction.

  9. Evidence of terrestrial discharge of deep groundwater on the Canadian Shield from helium in soil gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gascoyne, M.; Sheppard, M.I. )

    1993-11-01

    Assessment of the impact of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel wastes at a site in the Canadian Shield requires knowledge of the location and size of areas of discharge of deep groundwater from the vicinity of the underground disposal vault. A strong He anomaly has been detected in soil gases in a 10 X 10 m area of wetland on the banks of Boggy Creek, near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The area has He concentrations in near-surface soils as high as 360 nL[center dot]L[sup [minus]1] and is assumed to indicate discharge of He-rich groundwater through a permeable subsurface bedrock fracture. Elevated Cl[sup [minus

  10. VERTICAL PROFILING OF VOCS IN GROUNDWATER AND SOIL VAPORS TO EVALUATE THE RISK OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document was established to address the incremental increases in exposures and risks from subsurface contaminants that may be intruding into indoor air@. The document utilizes attenuation factors based on indoor air/soil gas or i...

  11. Soil air CO2 concentration as an integrative parameter of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Corinna; Gaertig, Thorsten; Fründ, Heinz-Christian

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of soil structure is an important but difficult issue and normally takes place in the laboratory. Typical parameters are soil bulk density, porosity, water or air conductivity or gas diffusivity. All methods are time-consuming. The integrative parameter soil air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) can be used to assess soil structure in situ and in a short time. Several studies highlighted that independent of soil respiration, [CO2] in the soil air increases with decreasing soil aeration. Therefore, [CO2] is a useful indicator of soil aeration. Embedded in the German research project RÜWOLA, which focus on soil protection at forest sites, we investigated soil compaction and recovery of soil structure after harvesting. Therefore, we measured soil air CO2 concentrations continuously and in single measurements and compared the results with the measurements of bulk density, porosity and gas diffusivity. Two test areas were investigated: At test area 1 with high natural regeneration potential (clay content approx. 25 % and soil-pH between 5 and 7), solid-state CO2-sensors using NDIR technology were installed in the wheel track of different aged skidding tracks in 5 and 10 cm soil depths. At area 2 (acidic silty loam, soil-pH between 3.5 and 4), CO2-sensors and water-tension sensors (WatermarkR) were installed in 6 cm soil depth. The results show a low variance of [CO2] in the undisturbed soil with a long term mean from May to June 2014 between 0.2 and 0.5 % [CO2] in both areas. In the wheel tracks [CO2] was consistently higher. The long term mean [CO2] in the 8-year-old-wheel track in test area 1 is 5 times higher than in the reference soil and shows a high variation (mean=2.0 %). The 18-year-old wheel track shows a long-term mean of 1.2 % [CO2]. Furthermore, there were strong fluctuations of [CO2] in the wheel tracks corresponding to precipitation and humidity. Similar results were yielded with single measurements during the vegetation period using a portable

  12. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  13. Contamination of soils and groundwater with new organic micropollutants: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Yakovlev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The input of organic micro- and nanopollutants to the environment has grown in recent years. This vast class of substances is referred to as emerging micropollutants, and includes organic chemicals of industrial, agricultural, and municipal provenance. There are three main sources of emerging pollutants coming to the environment, i.e., (1) upon soil fertilization with sewage and sewage sludge; (2) soil irrigation with reclaimed wastewater and (3) due to filtration from municipal landfills of solid wastes. These pollutants contaminate soil, affect its inhabitants; they are also consumed by plants and penetrate to the groundwater. The pharmaceuticals most strongly affect the biota (microorganisms, earthworms, etc.). The response of microorganisms in the contaminated soil is controlled not only by the composition and the number of emerging pollutants but also by the geochemical environment.

  14. Groundwater level and nitrate concentration trends on Mountain Home Air Force Base, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain Home Air Force Base in southwestern Idaho draws most of its drinking water from the regional aquifer. The base is located within the State of Idaho's Mountain Home Groundwater Management Area and is adjacent to the State's Cinder Cone Butte Critical Groundwater Area. Both areas were established by the Idaho Department of Water Resources in the early 1980s because of declining water levels in the regional aquifer. The base also is listed by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality as a nitrate priority area. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began monitoring wells on the base in 1985, and currently monitors 25 wells for water levels and 17 wells for water quality, primarily nutrients. This report provides a summary of water-level and nitrate concentration data collected primarily between 2001 and 2013 and examines trends in those data. A Regional Kendall Test was run to combine results from all wells to determine an overall regional trend in water level. Groundwater levels declined at an average rate of about 1.08 feet per year. Nitrate concentration trends show that 3 wells (18 percent) are increasing in nitrate concentration trend, 3 wells (18 percent) show a decreasing nitrate concentration trend, and 11 wells (64 percent) show no nitrate concentration trend. Six wells (35 percent) currently exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant limit of 10 milligrams per liter for nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate, measured as nitrogen).

  15. 3-D modeling useful tool for planning. [mapping groundwater and soil pollution and subsurface features

    SciTech Connect

    Calmbacher, C.W. )

    1992-12-01

    Visualizing and delineating subsurface geological features, groundwater contaminant plumes, soil contamination, geological faults, shears and other features can prove invaluable to environmental consultants, engineers, geologists and hydrogeologists. Three-dimensional modeling is useful for a variety of applications from planning remediation to site planning design. The problem often is figuring out how to convert drilling logs, map lists or contaminant levels from soil and groundwater into a 3-D model. Three-dimensional subsurface modeling is not a new requirement, but a flexible, easily applied method of developing such models has not always been readily available. LYNX Geosystems Inc. has developed the Geoscience Modeling System (GMS) in answer to the needs of those regularly having to do three-dimensional geostatistical modeling. The GMS program has been designed to allow analysis, interpretation and visualization of complex geological features and soil and groundwater contamination. This is a powerful program driven by a 30 volume modeling technology engine. Data can be entered, stored, manipulated and analyzed in ways that will present very few limitations to the user. The program has selections for Geoscience Data Management, Geoscience Data Analysis, Geological Modeling (interpretation and analysis), Geostatistical Modeling and an optional engineering component.

  16. Soil zinc content, groundwater usage, and prostate cancer incidence in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Burch, James B.; Hussey, Jim; Temples, Tom; Bolick-Aldrich, Susan; Mosley-Broughton, Catishia; Liu, Yuan; Hebert, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PrCA) incidence in South Carolina (SC) exceeds the national average, particularly among African Americans (AAs). Though data are limited, low environmental zinc exposures and down-regulation of prostatic zinc transporter proteins among AAs may explain, in part, the racial PrCA disparity. Methods Age-adjusted PrCA rates were calculated by census tract. Demographic data were obtained from the 1990 census. Hazardous waste site locations and soil zinc concentrations were obtained from existing federal and state databases. A geographic information system and Poisson regression were used to test the hypothesis that census tracts with reduced soil zinc concentrations, elevated groundwater use, or more agricultural or hazardous waste sites had elevated PrCA risks. Results Census tracts with high groundwater use and low zinc concentrations had higher PrCA rate ratios (RR: 1.270; 95% confidence interval: 1.079, 1.505). This effect was not more apparent in areas populated primarily by AAs. Conclusion Increased PrCA rates were associated with reduced soil zinc concentrations and elevated groundwater use, although this observation is not likely to contribute to SC’s racial PrCA disparity. Statewide mapping and statistical modeling of relationships between environmental factors, demographics, and cancer incidence can be used to screen hypotheses focusing on novel PrCA risk factors. PMID:18949566

  17. [Phenols pollutants in soil and shallow groundwater of a retired refinery site].

    PubMed

    Pei, Fang; Luo, Ze-Jiao; Peng, Jin-Jin; Qi, Shi-Hua

    2012-12-01

    To study the distribution of phenol compounds in a retired refinery site, 21 soil sampling sites and 8 shallow groundwater wells were investigated. The results showed, shallow unconfined groundwater of the site was in a serious pollution situation and the phenols concentration was much higher than quality standard for ground water. Confined water sample was slightly contaminated by phenols and the total quality was good. Approximately half of the area was heavily polluted by phenol compounds. According to the retired refinery layout, the phenols pollution distribution in shallow groundwater and soil exhibited the regional similarity. The highly contaminated area was production workshop, oil tank and plant storage. Horizontal diffusion of pollutants was not serious. Vertical diffusion of pollutants was different, and a site with pollutant diffusion was deeper than ten meters. The 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 2,4-xylenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol in typical soils were analyzed by GC/MS. It showed that concentrations of seven phenol compounds were 0.01-232.96 mg x kg(-1), and the concentrations of 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol were high. PMID:23379149

  18. Calibrating a large-extent high-resolution coupled groundwater-land surface model using soil moisture and discharge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, E. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; de Jong, S. M.; van Geer, F. C.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using remotely sensed soil moisture data and in situ discharge observations to calibrate a large-extent hydrological model. The model used is PCR-GLOBWB-MOD, which is a physically based and fully coupled groundwater-land surface model operating at a daily basis and having a resolution of 30 arc sec (about 1 km at the equator). As a test bed, we use the combined Rhine-Meuse basin (total area: about 200,000 km2), where there are 4250 point-scale observed groundwater head time series that are used to verify the model results. Calibration is performed by simulating 3045 model runs with varying parameter values affecting groundwater head dynamics. The simulation results of all runs are evaluated against the remotely sensed soil moisture time series of SWI (Soil Water Index) and field discharge data. The former is derived from European Remote Sensing scatterometers and provides estimates of the first meter profile soil moisture content at 30 arc min resolution (50 km at the equator). From the evaluation of these runs, we then introduce a stepwise calibration approach that considers stream discharge first, then soil moisture, and finally verify the resulting simulation to groundwater head observations. Our results indicate that the remotely sensed soil moisture data can be used for the calibration of upper soil hydraulic conductivities determining simulated groundwater recharge of the model. However, discharge data should be included to obtain full calibration of the coupled model, specifically to constrain aquifer transmissivities and runoff-infiltration partitioning processes. The stepwise approach introduced in this study, using both discharge and soil moisture data, can calibrate both discharge and soil moisture, as well as predicting groundwater head dynamics with acceptable accuracy. As our approach to parameterize and calibrate the model uses globally available data sets only, it opens up the possibility to set up large-extent coupled

  19. Biochar- and phosphate-induced immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soil and water: implication on simultaneous remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling; Arellano, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Long-term wastewater irrigation or solid waste disposal has resulted in the heavy metal contamination in both soil and groundwater. It is often separately implemented for remediation of contaminated soil or groundwater at a specific site. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the hypothesis of simultaneous remediation of both heavy metal contaminated soil and groundwater by integrating the chemical immobilization and pump-and-treat methods. To accomplish the objective, three experiments were conducted, i.e., an incubation experiment was first conducted to determine how dairy-manure-derived biochar and phosphate rock tailing induced immobilization of Cd in the Cd-contaminated soils; second, a batch sorption experiment was carried out to determine whether the pre-amended contaminated soil still had the ability to retain Pb, Zn and Cd from aqueous solution. BCR sequential extraction as well as XRD and SEM analysis were conducted to explore the possible retention mechanism; and last, a laboratory-scale model test was undertaken by leaching the Pb, Zn, and Cd contaminated groundwater through the pre-amended contaminated soils to demonstrate how the heavy metals in both contaminated soil and groundwater were simultaneously retained and immobilized. The incubation experiment showed that the phosphate biochar were effective in immobilizing soil Cd with Cd concentration in TCLP (toxicity characteristics leaching procedure) extract reduced by 19.6 % and 13.7 %, respectively. The batch sorption experiment revealed that the pre-amended soil still had ability to retain Pb, Zn, and Cd from aqueous solution. The phosphate-induced metal retention was mainly due to the metal-phosphate precipitation, while both sorption and precipitation were responsible for the metal stabilization in the biochar amendment. The laboratory-scale test demonstrated that the soil amended with phosphate removed groundwater Pb, Zn, and Cd by 96.4 %, 44.6 %, and 49.2 %, respectively, and the

  20. Groundwater Availability Alters Soil-plant Nutrient Cycling in a Stand of Invasive, N-fixing Phreatophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, B. D.; Miyazawa, Y.; Hughes, F.; Ostertag, R.; Kettwich, S. K.; MacKenzie, R.; Dulaiova, H.; Waters, C. A.; Bishop, J.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    N-fixing phreatophytic trees are common in arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, and can play significant roles in modifying hydrology and soil-plant nutrient cycling where they are present. In light of reductions in groundwater levels in many arid regions we estimated annual transpiration rates at a stand level, and alterations to C, N and P accretion in soils as a function of groundwater depth in a ca.120 year old stand of Prosopis pallida along an elevation gradient in coastal leeward Hawaii. We measured sapflow and stand level sapwood area to quantify transpiration, and calculated groundwater transpiration rates using P. pallida stem water δ18O values. By measuring soil resistivity, we were able to compare the volume of groundwater transpired by these trees to groundwater depth across the stand. We examined nutrient deposition and accretion in soils in lowland areas of the stand with accessible shallow groundwater, compared to upland areas with no groundwater access, as indicated by stem water δ18O values. Resistivity results suggested that groundwater was at a height close to sea level throughout the stand. Transpiration was around 1900 m3 ha-1 year-1 in the areas of the stand closest to the sea (where groundwater was at around 1-4 m below ground level) and decreased to around a tenth of that volume where groundwater was not accessible. Litterfall rates over the course of the year studied were 17 times greater at lowland sites, but this litterfall contributed ca. 24 times the N, and 35 times the P of upland sites. Thus, groundwater access contributed to the total mass of nitrogen and phosphorus deposited in the form of litter through higher litter quantity and quality. Total N content of soils was 4.7 times greater and inorganic N pools were eight times higher at lowland plots. These results suggest that groundwater depth can have strong effects on soil-plant nutrient cycling, so that reductions in the availability of shallow groundwater are likely to impact

  1. Effects of Air Drying on Soil Available Phosphorus in Two Grassland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerer, M.; Frossard, E.; Sinaj, S.

    2003-04-01

    Mobilization of P from the soil to ground and surface water is principally determined by the amount of P in the soil and physico-chemical as well as biological processes determining the available P-pool that is in equilibrium with soil solution. Soil available P is commonly estimated on air dry soil using a variety of methods (extraction with water, dilute acids and bases, anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange or infinite sinks). Recently, attempts have been made to use these measurements to define the potential for transport of P from soil to water by overland flow or subsurface flow. The effect of air drying on soil properties in general, and plant nutrient status in particular, have been subject of a number of studies. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the effect of air-drying on soil properties and available P. For this experiment, grassland soils were sampled on two study sites located on slopes in the watershed of Lake Greifensee, 25 km south-east of Zurich. Both soils (0-4 cm depth) are rich in P with 1.7 and 1.3 g kg-1 total P at site I and site II, respectively. The concentrations on isotopically exchangeable P within 1 minute (E1min, readily available P) for the same depth were also very high, 58 and 27 mg P kg soil-1 for the site I and II, respectively. In the present study both field moist and air dried soil samples were analyzed for microbial P (Pmic), resin extractable P (P_r), isotopically exchangeable P (E1min) and amorphous Al and Fe (Alox, Feox). Generally, the microbial P in field moist soils reached values up to 120 mg P/kg soil, whereas after drying they decreased by 73% in average for both soils. On the contrary to Pmic, available P estimated by different methods strongly increased after drying of the soil samples. The concentration of phosphate ions in the soil solution c_p, E1min and P_r were 4.2, 2.2 and 2 times higher in dry soils than in field moist soils. The increase in available P shows significant semilogarithmic

  2. In Situ Formation of Calcium Apatite in Soil for Sequestering Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert; Szecsody, Jim; Thompson, Mike

    2015-10-20

    A new method for in situ formation of a calcium apatite permeable reactive barrier that is a groundbreaking technology for containing radioactive/heavy metal contaminants threatening groundwater supplies.

  3. Fate of Acrylamide in Soil and Groundwater Systems: Microbial Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labahn, S.; Moser, D.; Arrowood, T.; Young, M.; Robleto, E.

    2007-12-01

    Acrylamide monomer (AMD), a suspected human neurotoxin and carcinogen, is present as a contaminant (up to 0.05%) in commercial preparations of polyacrylamide (PAM). PAM is currently being evaluated for wide-spread use as a temporary water-delivery canal sealant across the western United States. To better constrain potential risks associated with PAM applications, we examined the capacity of natural canal microorganisms to degrade AMD in laboratory and field experiments. Dilution cultivation and enrichment approaches were employed to determine the abundance of culturable microorganisms in several canal habitats which can utilize AMD as a sole nitrogen source (typically 104-106/mL) and a collection of isolates was developed. AMD-degrading microorganisms in our collection fell within a limited diversity of genera including Arthrobacter, Xanthomonas, and Pseudomonas; with the latter demonstrating highest capacity for degrading AMD under laboratory conditions. One strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, isolated from Klamath Irrigation District (Klamath Falls, OR) canal sediment, was chosen for further study in part because this species is well-studied and ubiquitous. The potential for microbial AMD degradation was tested under laboratory conditions using this strain in repacked short (15 cm) column tests with two relevant soil types (sand and loam). Subsequently, the capacity of mixed natural microbial populations to degrade AMD was examined using soil cores collected from the Highline Canal (Rocky Ford, CO), and canal water/sediment slurries with spiked (5 ppm AMD) in situ bottle tests. Degradation of the monomer in the repacked column experiments was evaluated using a step input of 5 ppm AMD and the canal columns were tested with a range of AMD concentrations (1-5 ppm) followed by quantification with an HPLC. The repacked soil columns inoculated with P. fluorescens demonstrated 80-100% AMD degradation within 12 hours. Natural microbial communities in fresh canal sediment

  4. Geophysical investigation for groundwater resources at the Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.D.; Simms, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A geophysical investigation was undertaken to explore the potential for further ground water development around the Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras. Electrical resistivity vertical sounding and horizontal profiling were utilized. The main ground-water aquifer in the area, a buried river channel now filled with gravel, was clearly defined. A tributary to this aquifer was also detected. Currently, the main ground-water aquifer has reached its capacity in the driest part of the year and additional water resources are needed at the current level of demand. A location southeast of the air base was determined for an exploratory water well which has possible yields of 20 to 60 gpm. Similar capacities may be achieved with a carefully located well in the tributary channel aquifer under the air base. Additional geophysical studies are recommended to determine the precise location of the tributary channel aquifer, locate another aquifer at the east edge of the Comayagua valley and Rio Canquigue, and investigate the feasibility of a deep (+1000 meters) well. It is also recommended that an aquifer management program be initiated where withdrawal flows are metered-and charted, monitoring wells are installed, and the aquifer drawdown observed and projected. Geoelectrical, Resistivity, Geophysics, Ground water.

  5. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation. PMID:24670909

  6. Simulation of bioventing for soil and ground-water remediation

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, P.D.; Sleep, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference model for simulation of bioventing is presented. The model incorporates three-phase (gas-water-organic) flow with equilibrium interphase mass transfer and dispersive transport of organic compounds, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Growth of microorganisms, substrate and oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production due to microbial activity are included. Biodegradation limitations due to both substrate and oxygen availability are modeled using the dual Monod formulation. The model is applied to predict the fate of a spill of toluene in the vadose zone under natural conditions and with various configurations of air injection and vapor extraction wells. Configurations of wells are determined that maximize biodegradation and minimize both the amount of toluene withdrawn in extraction wells and the amount lost to the atmosphere.

  7. Comparing risk assessment at the site and community scales via Monte Carlo simulations with a new coupled groundwater-vapour-indoor air model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumford, K. G.; Mustafa, N. A.; Gerhard, J.

    2012-12-01

    At many former industrial sites, nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination presents a significant limitation to site closure and brownfield redevelopment. Achieving site closure means soil and/or groundwater remediation to a level at which the associated risk is reduced to an acceptable level. In some jurisdictions, this risk is evaluated at the site boundary even if the critical risk receptors are located in the surrounding community; the consequence may be a site left untreated because the remediation target is technically or economically impractical. The goal of this study was to explore the implications of assessing risk at the site boundary versus in the community and the factors that affect the differences between the two. Because the controlling risk pathway for many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is the contamination of indoor air, risk assessment at the community scale requires simulation tools that can predict the transport of dissolved VOCs in groundwater followed by vapour intrusion into residential houses. Existing tools and research had focused on vapour intrusion only in the near vicinity of the source (i.e., scale of meters) and primarily at steady s tate. Therefore, this work developed a novel numerical simulator that coupled an established groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to a state-of-the-art vapor intrusion model, which enables the prediction of indoor air concentrations in response to an evolving groundwater plume at the community (i.e., kilometre) scale. In the first phase of this work, the extent of source zone remediation required to achieve regulatory compliance at the site boundary was compared to the extent required to achieve compliance at receptors in the community. The sensitivity of this difference to physicochemical properties of the contaminant and whether compliance was based on groundwater or indoor air risk receptors was evaluated. In the second phase of this work, the influence of heterogeneity on the

  8. Groundwater-Driven Chemical Weathering of Young Granitic Soils in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, S. A.; Amundson, R.

    2008-12-01

    Sierran rivers that drain into the eastern San Joaquin Valley have deposited large alluvial fans of granitic glacial outwash of latest Pleistocene age. From the well-drained apex, to the poorly drained distal margins of these fans, soils change from slightly acidic and relatively salt free to highly alkaline and saline due to differential interactions with shallow aquifers. Here, we examined three soils representing the gradation from salt free to highly saline (Hanford, Hesperia and Fresno), focusing on major and minor element chemistry. The applicability of a mass-balance approach for quantifying net chemical gains and losses was tested. The Hanford soil has a relatively uncomplicated weathering history and elemental depth profiles are governed by downward aqueous transport and biological cycling. The elemental depth profiles of the Hesperia and Fresno soils are determined by the combination of downward transport by rainfall and upward transport by groundwater through capillary action. The Hesperia soil, which is in the intermediate elevation position, has only minor evidence of gleying but has experienced considerable accumulations of both Ca and Na carbonates. In contrast, the Fresno soil has abundant redoximorphic features and significant accumulations of secondary phyllosilicates (and zeolite) and secondary opal due to weathering processes enhanced by the longer duration of water in the soil and the extremely high pH. Despite the chemical heterogeneity of the alluvium from which the soil formed, mass balance analyses provided useful information. Bulk average transport functions combined with depth trends of immobile elements like Zr and the rare earths revealed that the effects of the groundwater on the soils consist of net additions, mostly of Ca, Sr and Mg carbonates and phosphates. The mass balance also suggests that the processes that formed the secondary clay and opal were largely conservative, and only a small loss of Si is likely. The soils reveal the

  9. Greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potential of soils amended with raw swine manure, dry and wet pyrolyzed swine biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to study the greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of the soils amended with raw swine solid and swine biochars made from different thermochemical conditions. Triplicate sets of small pots were designed: 1) control soil with a 50/50 mixture of...

  10. In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.B.; Clark, D.A.; Handler, M.; Zhing-Ming Huang

    1996-09-01

    Tennessee`s first horizontal groundwater remediation well was installed at Madisonville located in the eastern Valley and Ridge Province. The open-ended well, drilled through clay soil, is constructed of 280 feet HDPE pipe, 2 inches in diameter, with a screen length of 100 feet at 18 feet below ground surface. The purpose of the well is to remediate gasoline contaminated groundwater that resulted from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) system. The groundwater benzene and TPH plumes covered an area of one-half acre and extended beneath a rural grocery store. Remediation is achieved by injecting aerated water, nutrients and microbes to reduce contaminant levels to drinking water standards. MODFLOW was utilized to computer-model the development of the groundwater mound that would result from injection. It was calculated that one horizontal injection well would equal the efficiency of 80 vertical injection wells. Benzene and TPH masses have been reduced by 92% and 95% respectively. BIOTRANS calculated the bio-decay rate to determine remediation time. This system will reduce project life and eliminate additional costs associated with: operations and maintenance (versus vertical pump and treat), water disposal, emissions controls, well installations, and site disturbance. A {open_quotes}Minimum Economic Plume Size{close_quotes}, the minimum plume volume required to support a horizontal system has been developed. Although costs per foot are greater for horizontal drilling than vertical drilling, project costs savings are realized later in the project.

  11. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  12. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: groundwater biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Witt, Michael E; Klecka, Gary M; Lutz, Edward J; Ei, Tom A; Grosso, Nancy R; Chapelle, Francis H

    2002-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/ aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally atteuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. PMID:12143993

  14. Evaluation of ground-water flow by particle tracking, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Sheets, R.A.; Schalk, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) began a Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) in 1992. The purpose of the BMP was to establish a long-term ground-water and surface- water sampling network in order to (1) characterize current ground-water and surface-water quality; (2) describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits Base boundaries; (3) conduct statistical analyses of water quality; and (4) estimate the effect of WPAFB on regional water quality. As part of the BMP, the USGS conducted ground-water particle-tracking analyses based on a ground-water-flow model produced during a previous USGS study. This report briefly describes the previous USGS study, the inherent assumptions of particle-tracking analyses, and information on the regional ground-water-flow field as inferred from particle pathlines. Pathlines for particles placed at the Base boundary and particles placed within identified Installation Restoration Program sites are described.

  15. Characterization and fingerprinting of soil and groundwater contamination sources around a fuel distribution station in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Macías, Felipe; Monterroso, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination around a fuel distribution station in Tomiño (NW Spain) was evaluated. For this purpose, top and subsoil (up to 6.4 m) and groundwater were sampled around the station, approximately in a 60-m radius. Samples were analysed by HS-SPME-GC-MS to identify and quantify volatile fuel organic compounds (VFOC) (MTBE, ETBE and BTEX) and diesel range organics (DRO). Analysis and fingerprinting data suggested that the contamination of soil and groundwater was provoked by a fuel leak from underground storage tanks. This was reflected by hydrocarbon indices and principal component analysis, which discriminated a direct source of contamination of the subsoil samples around the station. The contaminants probably migrated from tank nearby soils to surrounding soils and leached to groundwater, following a SW direction. Irrigation with contaminated groundwater provoked a severe contamination of topsoils, which were enriched with the lightest components of gasoline and diesel. Fingerprinting also revealed the continuity of the leak, reflected by the presence of volatiles in some samples, which principally appeared in fresh leaks. MTBE was detected in a very high concentration in groundwater samples (up to 690 μg L(-1)), but it was not detected in fresh gasoline. This also evidenced an old source of contamination, probably starting in the mid-1990s, when the use of MTBE in gasoline was regulated. PMID:27080856

  16. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Groundwater and soil data

    SciTech Connect

    Cozens-Roberts, C.; Kremesec, V.J.; Hockman, E.L.

    1991-03-01

    At the Amoco Company refinery in Yorktown, Virginia, potential sources and sinks of groundwater contamination were evaluated to determine the affects of the plant on the subsurface. Subsurface characterization of the refinery included an extensive subsurface sampling program that included 39 soil borings, 181 monitoring wells, and 23 surface water sampling points. Groundwater flow was modeled using FTWORK, a modification of MODFLOW. Results showed that, due to above ground process piping, contamination at the Yorktown refinery was significantly less than that observed at other refineries. Free-phase hydrocarbons were only detected in one monitoring well. Metals contamination was limited to monitoring wells associated with historic waste management activities at the east end of the refinery. Contamination was detected in monitoring wells located adjacent to process units but affects were limited due to the process sewer acting as a collection point.

  17. Radon levels in groundwaters and natural radioactivity in soils of the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain.

    PubMed

    Moreno, V; Bach, J; Baixeras, C; Font, Ll

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater radon level and soil radionuclide concentration have been measured in the volcanic region of La Garrotxa (Catalonia, Spain) to further research on the origin and dynamics of high radon levels over volcanic materials found in this region. Water samples from different aquifers have been collected from wells and springs and the water radon levels obtained have been lower than 30 Bq l(-1). Soil samples have been collected from different geological formations (volcanic and non-volcanic), being Quaternary sedimentary deposits those that have presented the highest mean values of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations (448 ± 70 Bq kg(-1), 35 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 38 ± 5 Bq kg(-1), respectively). Additionally, indoor/outdoor terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rate in air have been measured to better characterize the region from the radiological point of view. Terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rates measurement points have been chosen on the basis of geological and demographical considerations and the results obtained, from 27 to 91 nGy h(-1), show a clear relation with geological formation materials. The highest terrestrial gamma absorbed dose rate is observed over Quaternary sedimentary deposits as well. All these results help to better understand previous surveys related with indoor and outdoor radon levels and to reinforce the hypotheses of a radon transport through the fissure network. PMID:24239577

  18. Assessment of metal contamination in groundwater and soils in the Ahangaran mining district, west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Behzad; Mehrabani, Shiva; Rafiei, Behrouz; Yaghoubi, Behrouz

    2015-12-01

    In this study, 28 groundwater and 13 soil samples from Ahangaran mining district in Hamedan Province, west of Iran were collected to evaluate the level of contamination. Average concentrations of As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb, and Ni in groundwater samples were 1.39, 3.73, 2.18, 9.37, 2.35, 4.44, and 5.50 μg/L (wet season), and 11.64, 4.92, 4.32, 14.77, 5.43, 4.12, and 0.98 μg/L (dry season), respectively. Results of groundwater samples analysis showed that the average of analyzed metals in the wet and dry seasons were below the permissible limits, except As in the dry season which displays concentrations that exceed US EPA water quality criteria recommended for drinking water. Also, the heavy metal pollution index (HPI) values in each sampling station were less than the critical index limit and were suitable for drinking. Factor analysis revealed that variables influential to groundwater quality in one season may not be as important in another season. Average concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn in soil samples were 2.61, 31.44, 0.51, 55.90, 1284.9, 21.26, and 156.04 mg kg(-1), respectively. The results of the geoaccumulation index (I geo) showed the following decreasing order: Pb > Zn > Cu > As > Sb > Cd > Ag. Potential ecological risk index (RI) suggests that the contamination in the investigated area is moderate to very high risk and the ranking of the contaminants in decreasing order is Ag > Sb > Pb > Cd > As > Cu > Zn. PMID:26545371

  19. Hydrogeologic framework and ground-water resources at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, A.P.; Howe, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    A preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base was constructed from published data, available well data, and reports from Air Base files, City of Goldsboro and Wayne County records, and North Carolina Geological Survey files. Borehole geophysical logs were run in selected wells; and the surficial, Black Creek, and upper Cape Fear aquifers were mapped. Results indicate that the surficial aquifer appears to have the greatest lateral variability of clay units and aquifer material of the three aquifers. A surficial aquifer water-level surface map, constructed from selected monitoring wells screened exclusively in the surficial aquifer, indicates the general direction of ground-water movement in this mostly unconfined aquifer is toward the Neuse River and Stoney Creek. However, water-level gradient data from a few sites in the surficial aquifer did not reflect this trend, and there are insufficient hydrologic and hydrogeologic data to determine the cause of these few anamalous measurements. The Black Creek aquifer underlies the surficial aquifer and is believed to underlie most of Wayne County, including the Air Base where the aquifer and overlying confining unit are estimated from well log data to be as much as 100 feet thick. The Black Creek confining unit ranges in thickness from less than 8 feet to more than 20 feet. There are currently no accessible wells screened exclusively in the Black Creek aquifer from which to measure water levels. The upper Cape Fear aquifer and confining unit are generally found at depths greater than 80 feet below land surface at the Air Base, and are estimated to be as much as 70 feet thick. Hydrologic and hydrogeologic data are insufficient to determine localized surficial aquifer hydrogeology, ground-water movement at several sites, or hydraulic head differences between the three aquifers.

  20. Application of iron sulfide particles for groundwater and soil remediation: A review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanyan; Tang, Jingchun; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-02-01

    Rapid industrialization and urbanization have resulted in elevated concentrations of hazardous inorganic and organic contaminants in groundwater and soil, which has become a paramount concern to the environment and the public health. In recent years, iron sulfide (FeS), a major constituent of acid-volatile sulfides, has elicited extensive interests in environmental remediation due to its ubiquitous presence and high treatment efficiency in anoxic environment. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in: (1) synthesis of FeS particles (including nanoscale FeS); and (2) reactivity of FeS towards a variety of common environmental contaminants in groundwater and soil over extended periods of time, namely, heavy metals (Hg(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Cr(VI)), oxyanions (arsenite, arsenate, selenite, and selenate), radionuclides (e.g., uranium (U) and neptunium (Np)), chlorinated organic compounds (e.g., trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and p-chloroaniline), nitroaromatic compounds, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Different physiochemical and biological methods for preparing FeS with desired particle size, structure, and surface properties are discussed. Reaction principles and removal effectiveness/constraints are discussed in details. Special attention is placed to the application of nanoscale FeS particles because of their unique properties, such as small particle size, large specific surface area, high surface reactivity, and soil deliverability in the subsurface. Moreover, current knowledge gaps and further research needs are identified. PMID:26707732

  1. Bisphenol A, nonylphenols, benzophenones, and benzotriazoles in soils, groundwater, surface water, sediments, and food: a review.

    PubMed

    Careghini, Alessando; Mastorgio, Andrea Filippo; Saponaro, Sabrina; Sezenna, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are not commonly monitored in the environment, but they can enter the environment from a variety of sources. The most worrying consequence of their wide use and environmental diffusion is the increase in the possible exposure pathways for humans. Moreover, knowledge of their behavior in the environment, toxicity, and biological effects is limited or not available for most CECs. The aim of this work is to edit the state of the art on few selected CECs having the potential to enter the soil and aquatic systems and cause adverse effects in humans, wildlife, and the environment: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), benzophenones (BPs), and benzotriazole (BT). Some reviews are already available on BPA and NP, reporting about their behavior in surface water and sediments, but scarce and scattered information is available about their presence in soil and groundwater. Only a few studies are available about BPs and BT in the environment, in particular in soil and groundwater. This work summarizes the information available in the literature about the incidence and behavior of these compounds in the different environmental matrices and food. In particular, the review focuses on the physical-chemical properties, the environmental fate, the major degradation byproducts, and the environmental evidence of the selected CECs. PMID:25548011

  2. Radioactivity in rocks and soil and interaction with groundwater in an arid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshamsi, Dalal; Murad, Ahmed; Aldahan, Ala; Hou, Xiaolin; El Saiy, Ayman

    2014-05-01

    Interaction of groundwater with soil and rocks changes the chemical composition of the water both spatially and temporally. In arid regions, surficial recharge of groundwater is generally limited to sporadic rainfall events which may cause rapid interaction between the recharge water and the aquifers materials. Among the elements that commonly increase in concentration as groundwater interact with the aquifer materials are the radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium and their decay chain products. Here, we present data on 235U, 238U, 232Th as well as 137Cs in some sediments and rock aquifers located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in southeastern Arabian Peninsula. The Quaternary sediments are composed of silt, sand and gravel with varying proportions of quartz, carbonates, feldspars, evaporites, while the carbonates are mainly limestones, dolomitic limestones, dolomite and calcareous mudstones. These carbonate rocks cover ages extending from 10-230 Myr. After complete digestion using fluoric and nitric acids and chemical separation, the isotopes were measured using ICP-MS. The 235U, 238U and 232Th concentrations ranges are 2.66-32.5 ng/g, 354.7-4453 ng/g and 13.2-1367 ng/g respectively in the carbonate rocks. In the sediments the concentrations are 4.6-17.5 ng/g for 235U, 631.7-2406 ng/g for 238U and 25.6-799.6 ng/g for 232Th. Although it is difficult to quantify the amounts of uranium isotopes that enter the hydrological system from the aquifers, it seems that in the presence of carboxyl ions, uranium forms highly soluble complexes which can be transported to large distances in groundwater. The variations in 232Th concentrations are probably controlled by the availability of sulfate salt rocks (like gypsum) interacting with thorium and forming soluble thorium compounds which can also explain the highly variable concentrations in groundwater.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations of soil water balance at the hinterland of the Badain Jaran Desert for groundwater recharge estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lizhu; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Hu, Bill X.; Shang, Jie; Wan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Quantification of groundwater recharge from precipitation in the huge sand dunes is an issue in accounting for regional water balance in the Badain Jaran Desert (BJD) where about 100 lakes exist between dunes. In this study, field observations were conducted on a sand dune near a large saline lake in the BJD to investigate soil water movement through a thick vadose zone for groundwater estimation. The hydraulic properties of the soils at the site were determined using in situ experiments and laboratory measurements. A HYDRUS-1D model was built up for simulating the coupling processes of vertical water-vapor movement and heat transport in the desert soil. The model was well calibrated and validated using the site measurements of the soil water and temperature at various depths. Then, the model was applied to simulate the vertical flow across a 3-m-depth soil during a 53-year period under variable climate conditions. The simulated flow rate at the depth is an approximate estimation of groundwater recharge from the precipitation in the desert. It was found that the annual groundwater recharge would be 11-30 mm during 1983-2012, while the annual precipitation varied from 68 to 172 mm in the same period. The recharge rates are significantly higher than those estimated from the previous studies using chemical information. The modeling results highlight the role of the local precipitation as an essential source of groundwater in the BJD.

  4. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt C.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    Dover Air Force Base in Kent County, Delaware, has many contaminated sites that are in active remediation. To assist in this remediation, a steady-state model of ground-water flow was developed to aid in understanding the hydrology of the system, and for use as a ground-watermanagement tool. This report describes the hydrology on which the model is based, a description of the model itself, and some applications of the model.Dover Air Force Base is underlain by unconsolidated sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The primary units that were investigated include the upper Calvert Formation and the overlying Columbia Formation. The uppermost sand unit in the Calvert Formation at Dover Air Force Base is the Frederica aquifer, which is the deepest unit investigated in this report. A confining unit of clayey silt in the upper Calvert Formation separates the Frederica aquifer from the lower surficial aquifer, which is the basal Columbia Formation. North and northwest of Dover Air Force Base, the Frederica aquifer subcrops beneath the Columbia Formation and the upper Calvert Formation confining unit is absent. The Calvert Formation dips to the southeast. The Columbia Formation consists predominately of sands, silts, and gravels, although in places there are clay layers that separate the surficial aquifer into an upper and lower surficial aquifer. The areal extent of these clay layers has been mapped by use of gamma logs. Long-term hydrographs reveal substantial changes in both seasonal and annual ground-water recharge. These variations in recharge are related to temporal changes in evaporation, transpiration, and precipitation. The hydrographs show areas where extensive silts and clays are present in the surficial aquifer. In these areas, the vertical gradient between water levels in wells screened above and below the clays can be as large as several feet, and local ground-water highs typically form during normal recharge conditions. When drought conditions persist

  5. Effect of Harsh or Mild Extraction of Soil on Pesticide Leaching to Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide-soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such studies decreases with time, the harshness of the extraction method influences these pesticide-soil properties. This study investigates the effect of using a mild or harsh extraction method on simulated leaching to groundwater with consideration of substances with a range of half-lives and organic matter sorption coefficient values for selected leaching scenarios. The model for linking the concentrations of the mild and the harsh systems was based on laboratory studies with two pesticides and a Dutch sandy soil and was tested against Canadian field studies with atrazine (6-chloro-2-ethyl-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine). The degradation rate and the aged-sorption parameters of each "mild" soil-substance system were derived from a hypothetical laboratory incubation study using prescribed parameter values for the corresponding "harsh" soil-substance system. Simulations were performed for three European leaching scenarios (United Kingdom, France, Portugal). For the best-guess parameter set, the leaching concentrations of the harsh system were approximately equal to those of the mild system at leaching concentrations greater than 1 μg L and were at most approximately a factor of two higher than those of the mild systems at mild leaching concentrations between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. However, an extreme parameter set led to harsh leaching concentrations that were at most approximately 10 times higher than the mild leaching concentrations at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. PMID:27380081

  6. Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.K.

    1995-03-01

    Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

  7. Groundwater Depletion versus Soil Salinization in Irrigated Agriculture in Semiarid Southern High Plains, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Gates, J. B.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Because irrigated agriculture is the primary consumer of global freshwater resources, there is increased emphasis on using more water conservative irrigation application techniques to reduce depletion of water resources while maintaining crop productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of land use change from natural or rainfed agricultural ecosystems to irrigated agricultural ecosystems on water resources and soil salinity using data from the southern High Plains (SHP, 75,000 km2) in Texas, USA as an example. Approximately 11% of the land surface is irrigated with groundwater from the Ogallala (High Plains) Aquifer. Boreholes were drilled beneath irrigated cropland (13 boreholes) and beneath rainfed cropland (19 boreholes) and native vegetation (3 boreholes) to provide baseline control. Unsaturated zone soil samples were analyzed for water content, matric potential, and water-extractable chloride, bromide, sulfate, and nitrate concentrations. Increased drainage beneath irrigated sites displaced pre-existing salt bulges downward to 5 m in fine-grained soils and to greater than profile depths in coarser soils (4 - 17 m). Most irrigated profiles showed salt bulges which are attributed to deficit irrigation. Large inventories of nitrate and high correlations with chloride indicate overapplication of fertilizers and leaching below the root zone. Estimated drainage rates beneath irrigated sites are similar to the range of drainage/recharge rates beneath rainfed agriculture. These results emphasize the potential for soil salinization with deficit irrigation when the irrigation water quality is poor and precipitation is insufficient to flush accumulating salts.

  8. Simulation of future groundwater recharge using a climate model ensemble and SAR-image based soil parameter distributions - A case study in an intensively-used Mediterranean catchment.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Frank; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Blaschek, Michael; Deidda, Roberto; Duttmann, Rainer; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Vereecken, Harry; Wendland, Frank

    2016-02-01

    We used observed climate data, an ensemble of four GCM-RCM combinations (global and regional climate models) and the water balance model mGROWA to estimate present and future groundwater recharge for the intensively-used Thau lagoon catchment in southern France. In addition to a highly resolved soil map, soil moisture distributions obtained from SAR-images (Synthetic Aperture Radar) were used to derive the spatial distribution of soil parameters covering the full simulation domain. Doing so helped us to assess the impact of different soil parameter sources on the modelled groundwater recharge levels. Groundwater recharge was simulated in monthly time steps using the ensemble approach and analysed in its spatial and temporal variability. The soil parameters originating from both sources led to very similar groundwater recharge rates, proving that soil parameters derived from SAR images may replace traditionally used soil maps in regions where soil maps are sparse or missing. Additionally, we showed that the variance in different GCM-RCMs influences the projected magnitude of future groundwater recharge change significantly more than the variance in the soil parameter distributions derived from the two different sources. For the period between 1950 and 2100, climate change impacts based on the climate model ensemble indicated that overall groundwater recharge will possibly show a low to moderate decrease in the Thau catchment. However, as no clear trend resulted from the ensemble simulations, reliable recommendations for adapting the regional groundwater management to changed available groundwater volumes could not be derived. PMID:26190446

  9. Evaluation of Trichloroethylene vapour fluxes using measurements at the soil-air interface and in the atmosphere close to the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Solenn; Nagel, Vincent; Schäfer, Gerhard; Marzougui, Salsabil; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Millet, Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Industrialization during the 19th and 20th century led to the use of chemical products such as chlorinated solvents, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). At locations where volatile organic compounds were accidentally spilled on the soil during transport or leaked from their storage places, they could have migrated vertically through the unsaturated zone towards the underlying groundwater. As a result of their high volatility a large vapour plume is consequently formed. Understanding when, at which concentrations and how long, these pollutants will be present in soil, groundwater, atmosphere or indoor air, still remains a challenge up to date. This study was conducted as part of a broader experiment of TCE multiphase mass transfer in a large (25m×12m×3m) well-instrumented artificial basin. TCE was injected as liquid phase in the vadose zone and experiments were conducted during several months. Firstly, TCE vapour fluxes were experimentally determined in two different ways: (a) direct measurements at the soil-air interface using a flux chamber and (b) evaluations based on measurements of TCE concentrations in the air above the soil surface using a modular experimental flume (5m×1m×1m) with a fixed air flow. Secondly, numerical simulations were conducted to analyse the differences between these two types of fluxes. Several positions of the flume on the soil surface were tested. Based on the TCE concentrations measured in the air, vapour fluxes were determined with the aerodynamic method using the modified Thornthwaite-Holzmann equation. It assumes that the concentrations and velocities are temporally and spatially constant in horizontal planes and requires data on the gradients of concentration, horizontal wind velocity and temperature. TCE vapour fluxes measured at the soil-air interface decrease with distance from the source zone. However, this decrease was either high, at the first stage of experiment (120μg/(m2s) near the source zone compared to 1,1μg/(m2s) 2m

  10. Nitrate in groundwater of the midwestern United States: A regional investigation on relations to land use and soil properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.; Burkart, M.; Goolsby, D.

    1999-01-01

    The intense application of nitrogen-fertilizer to cropland in the midwestern United States has created concern about nitrate contamination of the region's aquifers. Since 1991, the US Geological Survey has used a network of 303 wells to investigate the regional distribution of nitrate in near-surface aquifers of the midwestern United States. Detailed land use and soil data were compiled within a 2 km radius of 100 unconsolidated wells in the regional network to determine relations to nitrate concentrations in groundwater. For land use, the amount of irrigated land was directly related to nitrate concentrations in groundwater. For soils, the general water table depth and soil factors associated with rates of water movement were directly related to nitrate concentrations in groundwater.

  11. Incidence of metal and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas spp. from the river water, agricultural soil irrigated with wastewater and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Malik, Abdul; Aleem, Asma

    2011-07-01

    A total of 144 isolates of Pseudomonas spp. (48 each from the Yamuna River water, wastewater irrigated soil and groundwater irrigated soil) were tested for their resistance against certain heavy metals and antibiotics. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Hg(2+ ), Cd(2+ ), Cu(2+ ), Zn(2+ ), Ni(2+ ), Pb(2+ ), Cr(3+ ) and Cr(6+ ) for each isolate were also determined. A maximum MIC of 200 μg/ml for mercury and 3,200 μg/ml for other metals were observed. The incidences of metal resistance and MICs of metals for Pseudomonas isolates from the Yamuna water and wastewater irrigated soil were significantly different to those of groundwater irrigated soil. A high level of resistance against tetracycline and polymyxin B (81.2%) was observed in river water isolates. However, 87.5% of Pseudomonas isolates from soil irrigated with wastewater showed resistance to sulphadiazine, whereas 79.1% were resistant to both ampicillin and erythromycin. Isolates from soil irrigated with groundwater exhibited less resistance towards heavy metals and antibiotics as compared to those of river water and wastewater irrigated soil. Majority of the Pseudomonas isolates from water and soil exhibited resistance to multiple metals and antibiotics. Resistance was transferable to recipient Escherichia coli AB2200 strains by conjugation. Plasmids were cured with the curing agent ethidium bromide and acridine orange at sub-MIC concentration. PMID:20853188

  12. Promising approaches to the purification of soils and groundwater from hydrocarbons (A Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Shoba, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Soils and waters are affected by oil spills in the course of oil production and hydrocarbon leakages because of the corrosion of underground reservoirs, as well as the filtration of hydrocarbons from the tailing ponds formed during the extraction of oil from oil sands. The conventional technology for the withdrawal of contaminated water and its purification on the surface is low-efficient and expensive. New approaches are proposed for the in situ purification of soils and groundwater. To accelerate the oxidation, active substances atypical for the supergenesis zone are used: peroxides of metals and hydrogen. The efficiency of hydrogen peroxide significantly increases when the oxidation is catalyzed by Fe2+ or Fe3+ (Fenton reaction). The effects of Fe(III), sulfates, and carbon dioxide as electron acceptors are studied under anaerobic conditions (with oxygen deficit).

  13. Thermoelectric Air/Soil Energy-Harvesting Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Lawrence, Eric

    2005-01-01

    A proposed thermoelectric device would exploit natural temperature differences between air and soil to harvest small amounts of electric energy. Because the air/soil temperature difference fluctuates between nighttime and daytime, it is almost never zero, and so there is almost always some energy available for harvesting. Unlike photovoltaic cells, the proposed device could operate in the absence of sunlight. Unlike a Stirling engine, which could be designed to extract energy from the air/soil temperature difference, the proposed device would contain no moving parts. The main attractive feature of the proposed device would be high reliability. In a typical application, this device would be used for low-power charging of a battery that would, in turn, supply high power at brief, infrequent intervals for operating an instrumentation package containing sensors and communication circuits. The device (see figure) would include a heat exchanger buried in soil and connected to a heat pipe extending up to a short distance above the ground surface. A thermoelectric microgenerator (TEMG) would be mounted on top of the heat pipe. The TEMG could be of an advanced type, now under development, that could maintain high (relative to prior thermoelectric generators) power densities at small temperature differentials. A heat exchanger exposed to the air would be mounted on top of the TEMG. It would not matter whether the air was warmer than the soil or the soil warmer than the air: as long as there was a nonzero temperature difference, heat would flow through the device and electricity would be generated. A study of factors that could affect the design and operation of the device has been performed. These factors include the thermal conductances of the soil, the components of the device, the contacts between the components of the device, and the interfaces between the heat exchangers and their environments. The study included experiments that were performed on a model of the device

  14. Impact of Climate Change on Soil and Groundwater Chemistry Subject to Process Waste Land Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Nonhazardous aqueous process waste streams from food and beverage industry operations are often discharged via managed land application in a manner designed to minimize impacts to underlying groundwater. Process waste streams are typically characterized by elevated concentrations of solutes such as ammonium, organic nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and organic acids. Land application involves the mixing of process waste streams with irrigation water which is subsequently applied to crops. The combination of evapotranspiration and crop salt uptake reduces the downward mass fluxes of percolation water and salts. By carefully managing application schedules in the context of annual climatological cycles, growing seasons, and process requirements, potential adverse environmental impacts to groundwater can be mitigated. However, climate change poses challenges to future process waste land application efforts because the key factors that determine loading rates - temperature, evapotranspiration, seasonal changes in the quality and quantity of applied water, and various crop factors - are all likely to deviate from current averages. To assess the potential impact of future climate change on the practice of land application, coupled process modeling entailing transient unsaturated fluid flow, evapotranspiration, crop salt uptake, and multispecies reactive chemical transport was used to predict changes in salt loading if current practices are maintained in a warmer, drier setting. As a first step, a coupled process model (Hydrus-1D, combined with PHREEQC) was calibrated to existing data sets which summarize land application loading rates, soil water chemistry, and crop salt uptake for land disposal of process wastes from a food industry facility in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California. Model results quantify, for example, the impacts of evapotranspiration on both fluid flow and soil water chemistry at shallow depths, with secondary effects including carbonate mineral

  15. Isotopic tracing of landfill leachates and pollutant lead mobility in soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Vilomet, J D; Veron, A; Ambrosi, J P; Moustier, S; Bottero, J Y; Chatelet-Snidaro, L

    2003-10-15

    Here we provide evidence of the capability of stable lead isotopes to trace landfill leachate in a shallow groundwater. The municipal landfill we have investigated is located in southeastern France. It has no bottom liner, and wastes are placed directly on the ground. Stable lead isotopes allow the characterization of this landfill leachate signature (206Pb/207Pb = 1.189 +/- 0.004) that is clearly different from that of the local atmosphere (206Pb/207Pb = 1.150 +/- 0.006) and crustal lead (206Pb/207Pb = 1.200 +/- 0.005). Piezometers located in the direct vicinity of the landfill generally display this contaminant imprint. The landfill plume is monitored up to 1000 m downgradient of the landfill, in very good agreement with evaluation from chloride concentration. Meanwhile, 206Pb/207Pb ratios measured at a piezometer located 4600 m downgradient of the landfill suggest a contamination by the landfill plume. This result shows that the complexity of a pollutant plume dispersion in this shallow groundwater system requires several independent tracers to clearly resolve origin and transport pathways for contaminants. Furthermore, seasonal rainfall variation for this Mediterranean mixed Quaternary alluvion reservoir and the use of KCl fertilizers might favor an efficient remobilization of atmospheric lead in plowed soils and its transfer into groundwater as shown by lead isotope systematics. PMID:14594365

  16. Spatial analysis of soil and shallow groundwater physicochemical parameters in El-Mujib Basin-central Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Abeer; Al-Qinna, Mohammed; Kuisi, Mustafa Al

    2014-01-01

    In this study statistical and geostatistical methods were applied to a monitoring data set in order to assess contamination risk in soil and shallow groundwater. The study covered an area within El-Mujib Basin in central Jordan, where the barren land is dominating with a small number of irrigated areas in the vicinity of Wadi El-Mujib and in the northern part of the basin. A total of 77 soil and 104 water samples were collected randomly and analyzed physically, chemically, statistically and spatially using ordinary and indicator kriging techniques. Phosphate, nitrate, organic matter and effective field capacity in the soil system were spatially investigated and correlated to current landuse. Maximum soil maximum nitrate (125.6 mg/L), phosphate (9.7 mg/L), and organic matter (3%) contents are encountered in the central area at Wadi El-Mujib, Qattrana and Umm Rasas due to the use of fertilizers and existence of solid landfill. The soil has low water holding capacity as it is dominated by coarse texture and therefore subjecting the groundwater for potential risks through the fast soil system. The major cations and anions in the groundwater were mainly concentrated in the Wadi El-Mujib and in the central part of the Basin increases along the groundwater flow direction. Spatial groundwater indicator maps of salinity; nitrate and sulfate contents proves the high susceptibility of the study area to be contaminated. By determining the impacts, more effective (specific to contamination sources) measures for preventing groundwater quality could be implemented.

  17. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-11-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  18. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  19. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  20. Perfluorinated compounds in soil, surface water, and groundwater from rural areas in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Jiao, Xing-Chun; Gai, Nan; Li, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Guo-Hui; Piao, Hai-Tao; Rao, Zhu; Yang, Yong-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Little research on perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) has been conducted in rural areas, although rural PFC sources are less complicated than in urban and industrial areas. To determine the levels and geographical distribution of 17 PFC compounds, samples of soil, surface water, and groundwater were collected from eight rural areas in eastern China. The total PFC concentrations (∑PFCs) in soils ranged from 0.34 to 65.8 ng/g ∑PFCs in surface waters ranged from 7.0 to 489 ng/L and ∑PFCs in groundwater ranged from 5.3 to 615 ng/L. Ratios of perfluorononanoic acid/perfluorooctanoic acid (PFNA/PFOA), perfluoro-n-butyric acid/perfluorooctanoic acid (PFBA/PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid/perfluorooctanoic acid (PFHpA/PFOA) in rainwater increased due to the fluorine chemical plants in the surrounding rural and urban areas, suggesting that atmospheric precipitation may carry PFCs and their precursors from the fluorochemical industrial area to the adjacent rural areas. PMID:26745397

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): New London Submarine Base, Defense Reutilization Marketing Office (contaminated soil and groundwater), Groton, CT, March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) is located on the Naval Submarine Base New London (NSB-NLON), Groton, Connecticut. This Interim Record of Decision (Interim ROD) addresses the contaminated soil and groundwater at this site. This Interim ROD presents the following interim remedy for soil and groundwater at the DRMO: Institutional Controls and Monitoring.

  2. Ground-water conditions at Beale Air Force Base and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-water conditions were studied in a 168-square-mile area between the Sierra Nevada and the Feather River in Yuba County, Calif. The area is in the eastern part of the Sacramento Valley and includes most of Beale Air Force Base. Source, occurrence, movement, and chemical quality of the ground water were evaluated. Ground water occurs in sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The base of the freshwater is in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Oligocene and Eocene age, that contain water of high dissolved-solids concentration. The ground water occurs under unconfined and partly confined conditions. At Beale Air Force Base it is at times partly confined. Recharge is principally from the rivers. Pumpage in the study area was estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet in 1975. In the 1960's, water levels in most parts of the study area declined less rapidly than in earlier years or became fairly stable. In the 1970's, water levels at Beale Air Force Base declined only slightly. Spacing of wells on the base and rates of pumping are such that excessive pumping interference is avoided. Water quality at the base and throughout the study area is generally good. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 700 to 900 milligrams per liter in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks beneath the base well field. (USGS)

  3. Groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling at an air weapons range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Schäfer, Dirk; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-07-01

    Numerical modelling was done at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, Canada, to test whether the dissolved RDX and nitrate detected in groundwater come from the same sources, and to predict whether contamination poses a threat to the surface water receptors near the site. Military live fire training activities may indeed pose a risk of contamination to groundwater resources, however field investigations on military bases are quite recent, and little information is available on the long-term behaviour of munition residues related contaminants. Very limited information was available about the contaminant source zones, which were assigned based on our knowledge of current training activities. The RDX plume was well represented with the model, but the heterogeneous distribution of nitrate concentrations was more difficult to reproduce. It was nonetheless determined that both contaminants originate from the same areas. According to the model, both contaminants should reach the nearby river, but concentrations in the river should remain very low if the source zone concentration does not change. Finally, the model allowed the recommendation of a new location for the main bombing target, which would offer added protection to the river and the lake into which it flows.

  4. Arsenic removal from real-life groundwater by adsorption on laterite soil.

    PubMed

    Maji, Sanjoy Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption characteristics of arsenic on laterite soil, a low-cost natural adsorbent, were studied in the laboratory scale using real-life sample. The studies were conducted by both batch and continuous mode. Laterite soil was found to be an efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal from the groundwater collected from arsenic affected area. The initial concentration of arsenic in the sample was 0.33 ppm. Under optimized conditions the laterite soil could remove up to 98% of total arsenic. The optimum adsorbent dose was 20 g/l and the equilibrium time was 30 min. Isotherm studies showed that the process is favorable and spontaneous. The kinetics showed that the removal of arsenic by laterite soil is a pseudo-second-order reaction. In the column study the flow rate was maintained at 1.49 m3/(m2 h). Using 10 cm column depth, the breakthrough and exhaust time found were 6.75 h and 19.0 h, respectively. Height of adsorption zone was 9.85 cm, the rate at which the adsorption zone was moving through the bed was 0.80 cm/h, and the percentage of the total column saturated at breakthrough was 47.12%. The value of adsorption rate coefficient (K) and the adsorption capacity coefficient (N) were 1.21 l/(mgh) and 69.22 mg/l, respectively. Aqueous NaOH (1 M) could regenerate the adsorbent, and the regenerated adsorbent showed higher efficiency. PMID:17658682

  5. Impact of groundwater capillary rises as lower boundary conditions for soil moisture in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Decharme, Bertrand; Habets, Florence

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is a key component of the global hydrological cycle. It sustains base flow in humid climate while it receives seepage in arid region. Moreover, groundwater influences soil moisture through water capillary rise into the soil and potentially affects the energy and water budget between the land surface and the atmosphere. Despite its importance, most global climate models do not account for groundwater and their possible interaction with both the surface hydrology and the overlying atmosphere. This study assesses the impact of capillary rise from shallow groundwater on the simulated water budget over France. The groundwater scheme implemented in the Total Runoff Integrated Pathways (TRIP) river routing model in a previous study is coupled with the Interaction between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model. In this coupling, the simulated water table depth acts as the lower boundary condition for the soil moisture diffusivity equation. An original parameterization accounting for the subgrid elevation inside each grid cell is proposed in order to compute this fully-coupled soil lower boundary condition. Simulations are performed at high (1/12°) and low (0.5°) resolutions and evaluated over the 1989-2009 period. Compared to a free-drain experiment, upward capillary fluxes at the bottom of soil increase the mean annual evapotranspiration simulated over the aquifer domain by 3.12 % and 1.54 % at fine and low resolutions respectively. This process logically induces a decrease of the simulated recharge from ISBA to the aquifers and contributes to enhance the soil moisture memory. The simulated water table depths are then lowered, which induces a slight decrease of the simulated mean annual river discharges. However, the fully-coupled simulations compare well with river discharge and water table depth observations which confirms the relevance of the coupling formalism.

  6. Functional microbial community response to nutrient pulses by artificial groundwater recharge practice in surface soils and subsoils.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Kirsten; Kandeler, Ellen; Nagel, Peter; Scheu, Stefan; Ruess, Liliane

    2010-06-01

    Subsurface microorganisms are essential constituents of the soil purification processes associated with groundwater quality. In particular, soil enzyme activity determines the biodegradation of organic compounds passing through the soil profile. Transects from surface soil to a depth of 3.5 m were investigated for microbial and chemical soil characteristics at two groundwater recharge sites and one control site. The functional diversity of the microbial community was analyzed via the activity of eight enzymes. Acid phosphomonoesterase was dominant across sites and depths, followed by L-leucine aminopeptidase and beta-glucosidase. Structural [e.g. phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern] and functional microbial diversities were linked to each other at the nonwatered site, whereas amendment with nutrients (DOC, NO(3)(-)) by flooding uncoupled this relationship. Microbial biomass did not differ between sites, whereas microbial respiration was the highest at the watered sites. Hence, excess nutrients available due to artificial groundwater recharge could not compensate for the limitation by others (e.g. phosphorus as assigned by acid phosphomonoesterase activity). Instead, at a similar microbial biomass, waste respiration via overflow metabolism occurred. In summary, ample supply of carbon by flooding led to a separation of decomposition and microbial growth, which may play an important role in regulating purification processes during groundwater recharge. PMID:20557572

  7. Surface and groundwater quality in the northeastern region of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, G.; Sainato, C.; Dapeña, C.; Fernández-Turiel, J. L.; Gimeno, D.; Pomposiello, M. C.; Panarello, H. O.

    2007-04-01

    This work studies the water quality of the Pergamino-Arrecifes River zone in the Rolling Pampa, northeast Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Temperature, pH, specific conductivity, Na, K, Mg, Ca, SO42-, Cl -, HCO3-, NO3-, Si, Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Tl, U, V, Zn, and the environmental stable δ18O and δ2H isotope ratios were determined in 18 sampling stations. Natural and anthropogenic features influence surface and groundwater quality. Point pollution sources (septic wells and other domestic and farming effluents) increase the nitrate concentration. The values of pH, NO3-, Al, As, B, Fe, and Mn exceed the respective Argentine reference thresholds in different sampling stations for human drinking water; B, Mo, U, and V for irrigation; and V and Zn for cattle consumption.

  8. Estimation of the Effect of Soil Texture on Nitrate-Nitrogen Content in Groundwater Using Optical Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Witheetrirong, Yongyoot; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Tipdecho, Taravudh; Parkpian, Preeda

    2011-01-01

    The use of chemical fertilizers in Thailand increased exponentially by more than 100-fold from 1961 to 2004. Intensification of agricultural production causes several potential risks to water supplies, especially nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N) pollution. Nitrate is considered a potential pollutant because its excess application can move into streams by runoff and into groundwater by leaching. The nitrate concentration in groundwater increases more than 3-fold times after fertilization and it contaminates groundwater as a result of the application of excess fertilizers for a long time. Soil texture refers to the relative proportion of particles of various sizes in a given soil and it affects the water permeability or percolation rate of a soil. Coarser soils have less retention than finer soils, which in the case of NO3−-N allows it to leach into groundwater faster, so there is positive relationship between the percentage of sands and NO3−-N concentration in groundwater wells. This study aimed to estimate the effect of soil texture on NO3−-N content in groundwater. Optical reflectance data obtained by remote sensing was used in this study. Our hypothesis was that the quantity of nitrogen leached into groundwater through loam was higher than through clay. Nakhon Pathom province, Thailand, was selected as a study area where the terrain is mostly represented by a flat topography. It was found that classified LANDSAT images delineated paddy fields as covering 29.4% of the study area, while sugarcane covered 10.4%, and 60.2% was represented by “others”. The reason for this classified landuse was to determine additional factors, such as vegetation, which might directly affect the quantity of NO3−-N in soil. Ideally, bare soil would be used as a test site, but in fact, no such places were available in Thailand. This led to an indirect method to estimate NO3−-N on various soil textures. Through experimentation, it was found that NO3−-N measured through the loam

  9. Estimation of the effect of soil texture on nitrate-nitrogen content in groundwater using optical remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Witheetrirong, Yongyoot; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Tipdecho, Taravudh; Parkpian, Preeda

    2011-08-01

    The use of chemical fertilizers in Thailand increased exponentially by more than 100-fold from 1961 to 2004. Intensification of agricultural production causes several potential risks to water supplies, especially nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3) (-)-N) pollution. Nitrate is considered a potential pollutant because its excess application can move into streams by runoff and into groundwater by leaching. The nitrate concentration in groundwater increases more than 3-fold times after fertilization and it contaminates groundwater as a result of the application of excess fertilizers for a long time. Soil texture refers to the relative proportion of particles of various sizes in a given soil and it affects the water permeability or percolation rate of a soil. Coarser soils have less retention than finer soils, which in the case of NO(3) (-)-N allows it to leach into groundwater faster, so there is positive relationship between the percentage of sands and NO(3) (-)-N concentration in groundwater wells. This study aimed to estimate the effect of soil texture on NO(3) (-)-N content in groundwater. Optical reflectance data obtained by remote sensing was used in this study. Our hypothesis was that the quantity of nitrogen leached into groundwater through loam was higher than through clay. Nakhon Pathom province, Thailand, was selected as a study area where the terrain is mostly represented by a flat topography. It was found that classified LANDSAT images delineated paddy fields as covering 29.4% of the study area, while sugarcane covered 10.4%, and 60.2% was represented by "others". The reason for this classified landuse was to determine additional factors, such as vegetation, which might directly affect the quantity of NO(3) (-)-N in soil. Ideally, bare soil would be used as a test site, but in fact, no such places were available in Thailand. This led to an indirect method to estimate NO(3) (-)-N on various soil textures. Through experimentation, it was found that NO(3) (-)-N measured

  10. Streamflow forecasting and data assimilation: bias in precipitation, soil moisture states, and groundwater fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreight, J. L.; Gochis, D. J.; Hoar, T.; Dugger, A. L.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in precipitation forcing, soil moisture states, and model groundwater fluxes are first-order sources of error in streamflow forecasting. While near-surface estimates of soil moisture are now available from satellite, very few soil moisture observations below 5 cm depth or groundwater discharge estimates are available for operational forecasting. Radar precipitation estimates are subject to large biases, particularly during extreme events (e.g. Steiner et al., 2010) and their correction is not typically available in real-time. Streamflow data, however, are readily available in near-real-time and can be assimilated operationally to help constrain uncertainty in these uncertain states and improve streamflow forecasts. We examine the ability of streamflow observations to diagnose bias in the three most uncertain variables: precipitation forcing, soil moisture states, and groundwater fluxes. We investigate strategies for their subsequent bias correction. These include spinup and calibration strategies with and without the use of data assimilation and the determination of the proper spinup timescales. Global and spatially distributed multipliers on the uncertain states included in the assimilation state vector (e.g. Seo et al., 2003) will also be evaluated. We examine real cases and observing system simulation experiments for both normal and extreme rainfall events. One of our test cases considers the Colorado Front Range flood of September 2013 where the range of disagreement amongst five precipitation estimates spanned a factor of five with only one exhibiting appreciable positive bias (Gochis et al, submitted). Our experiments are conducted using the WRF-Hydro model with the NoahMP land surface component and the data assimilation research testbed (DART). A variety of ensemble data assimilation approaches (filters) are considered. ReferencesGochis, DJ, et al. "The Great Colorado Flood of September 2013" BAMS (Submitted 4-7-14). Seo, DJ, V Koren, and N

  11. Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14

    SciTech Connect

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-16

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality

  12. Glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. streams, groundwater, precipitation and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Dietze, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are used in more than 130 countries on more than 100 crops. In the United States (U.S.), agricultural use of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has increased from less than 10,000 metric tons per year (active ingredient) in 1993 to more than 70,000 metric tons per year in 2006. In 2006, glyphosate accounted for about 20 percent of all herbicide use (by weight of active ingredient). Glyphosate formulations such as Roundup® are used in homes and in agriculture. Part of the reason for the popularity of glyphosate is the perception that it is an “environmentally benign” herbicide that has low toxicity and little mobility or persistence in the environment. The U.S. Geological Survey developed an analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry that can detect small amounts of glyphosate and its primary degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in water and sediment. Results from more than 2,000 samples collected from locations distributed across the U.S. indicate that glyphosate is more mobile and occurs more widely in the environment than was previously thought. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected (reporting limits between 0.1 and 0.02 micrograms per liter) in samples collected from surface water, groundwater, rainfall, soil water, and soil, at concentrations from less than 0.1 to more than 100 micrograms per liter. Glyphosate was detected more frequently in rain (86%), ditches and drains (71%), and soil (63%); and less frequently in groundwater (3%) and large rivers (18%). AMPA was detected more frequently in rain (86%), soil (82%), and large rivers (78%); and less frequently in groundwater (8%) and wetlands or vernal pools (37%). Most observed concentrations of glyphosate were well below levels of concern for humans or wildlife, and none exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Maximum Contaminant Level of 700 micrograms per liter. However, the ecosystem effects of chronic low

  13. Phosphate-Based Mineralization of Arsenic in Contaminated Soil: A Potential Remediation Method for Soil and Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, G.; Donahoe, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Soil arsenic contamination resulting from the use of arsenical compounds is a widespread environmental problem. A phosphate-based remediation method which has the potential to immobilize arsenic in both oxidizing and reducing subsurface systems is under laboratory investigation. Although phosphate treatments have been reported to be effective in removal of arsenic from contaminated water, its use in contaminated soils has not been tested. This study aims to (1) determine the competitive adsorption/desorption of arsenate and phosphate at surfaces of ferric hydroxide coated sand in the absence or presence of calcium ions, and (2) develop a method of arsenic fixation which involves phosphoric acid flushing of arsenic from contaminated soil and precipitation of arsenic as apatite-like phases. Ferric hydroxide is a significant arsenic sequestering constituent in soil. Phosphate competes with arsenate for adsorption sites on the ferric hydroxide surface. Batch adsorption experiments conducted using ferric hydroxide coated sand have indicated similar pH-controlled adsorption mechanisms for both arsenate and phosphate. The data obtained from the adsorption experiments is being used to guide the development of a phosphate-based method for soil and groundwater arsenic remediation. Batch experiments were performed using 3g of contaminated soil in contact with 45 ml of treatment fluid (a dilute phosphoric acid and calcium hydroxide solution). Solution samples were collected at 24, 72, 144, 312, and 384 hours, with continuous agitation at 200 rpm. Solution concentrations of phosphorus and calcium generally decreased with time and were primarily controlled by pH. It has been experimentally demonstrated that solution arsenic concentrations can be lowered by maintaining high pH with adequate calcium supply. A batch experiment conducted at pH > 11, using 1 kg of soil in contact with 1 liter of 0.25% H3PO4, precipitated a white material giving an XRD signature indicative of brushite

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN-SITU STEAM/HOT AIR SOIL STRIPPING TOXIC TREATMENT (USA) INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology uses steam and hot air to strip volatile organics from contaminated soil. The treatment equipment is mobile and treats the soil in-situ without need for soil excavation or transportation. The organic contaminants volatilized from the soil are condensed and col...

  15. [Effect of soil texture in unsaturated zone on soil nitrate accumulation and groundwater nitrate contamination in a marginal oasis in the middle of Heihe River basin].

    PubMed

    Su, Yong-Zhong; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Rong

    2014-10-01

    In irrigated agricultural ecosystems, the accumulation, distribution and transfer of nitrate nitrogen (NO(3-)-N) in soil profile and groundwater nitrate pollution were influenced by irrigation and fertilization, and were closely related to soil textural characteristics. In this study, a monitoring section with 10 groundwater observation wells along Heihe River flood land-old oasis croplands-newly cultivated sandy croplands-fixed sandy land outside oasis was established in Pingchuan desert-oasis in Linze county in the middle of Heihe river basin, and groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration was continuously monitored. Soil texture and NO(3-)-N concentration in the unsaturated zone at different landscape locations were determined. The NO(3-)-N transfer change in soil profile, nitrate leaching of soils with different texture and fertility levels in the 0-100 cm layer were analyzed. The results indicated that the vertical distribution of soil texture was sandy loam in the 0-130 cm depth, loam in the 130-190 cm and clay loam in the 190-300 cm for the old oasis croplands. For newly cultivated sandy croplands, sand content was more than 80% in each soil layer of the 0-300 cm profile, although a thin clay layer occurred in the 140-160 cm depth. The clay layer occurred 160 cm below the sand-fixing zone outside oasis. There were significant correlations between soil NO(3-)-N concentration and silt + clay content, and the order of significant degree was the natural soils of sandy lands > the newly cultivated sandy croplands > the old oasis croplands. The loss of N leaching was closely correlated to the silt + caly content in the 0-100 cm soil depth. The groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration varied from 1.01 to 5.17 mg · L(-1), with a mean value of 2.65 mg · L(-1) and from 6.6 to 29.5 mg · L(-1), with an average of 20.8 mg · L(-1) in the area of old oasis croplands and the newly cultivated croplands, respectively. The averaged groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration in the area of newly

  16. Nitrogen responses in groundwater, surface water and air following nitrate action plans in the Netherlands and Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, H.; Rozemeijer, J.; Visser, A.; Kronvang, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Refsgaard, J.; Thorling, L.; Slomp, C. P.; Prommer, H.

    2012-12-01

    The emissions of nutrients to air and water tend to increase worldwide. Both The Netherlands and Denmark are notorious for large inputs of nutrients in intensive agricultural practice in the previous 60 years. However, both countries have established legislation and action programs to reduce the supply and impacts of nutrients to air, groundwater and surface waters since 1985. This presentation analyses the response of nitrogen in air, surface water and groundwater following these action programs over the period 1985-2010. Responses of agriculturally derived N in air show a significant and rapid decrease since the beginning of these programs. Responses of N concentrations in many Dutch and Danish agriculturally dominated watersheds are also rapid. A clear response of nitrate-N in groundwater was revealed by age dating the water and simulations show that this also leads to a quick response of N outflow to surface waters. The rapid response of surface water is contra dictionary to the generally accepted idea that the slow transport of the groundwater N pool tends to lengthen the time scales necessary for the full recovery of N concentrations in surface waters. We stipulate that the young and shallow component of groundwater flow can discharge previously applied N effectively which causes the improvement of shallow groundwater quality to be reflected in the quick surface water response. While delay of N discharge may be true for areas with thick unsaturated zones and very limited agricultural use close to water courses, this is clearly not the case for areas with pronounced groundwater-surface water interaction such as the Netherlands delta setting or the Danish estuarine setting. The Dutch and Danish results show that N fluxes towards air and water can be managed and effectively monitored, which may help to counteract the increasing nutrient emissions in other densely populated and intensively used parts of the world. In order to predict time scales for recovery, it

  17. Solar Park Impacts on Air and Soil Microclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A.; Ostle, N. J.; Whitaker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The drive towards low carbon energy sources and increasing energy demand has resulted in a rapid rise in solar photovoltaics across the world. A substantial proportion of photovoltaics are large-scale ground-mounted systems, solar parks, causing a notable land use change. While the impacts of photovoltaic panel production and disposal have been considered, the consequences of the operation of solar parks on the hosting landscape are poorly resolved. Here, we present data which demonstrates that a solar park sited on permanent grassland in the UK significantly impacted the air and soil microclimate. Specifically, we observed (1) cooler soil under the photovoltaic panels during the summer and between the photovoltaic panel rows during the winter; (2) dampening of the diurnal variation in air temperature and absolute humidity from the spring to the autumn; (3) lower photosynthetically active radiation and a lower direct:diffuse under the panels; and (4) reduced wind speed between the panel rows and substantially reduced wind speeds under the panels. Further, there were differences in vegetation type and productivity and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the centrality of climate on ecosystem function, quantifying the microclimatic impacts of this emerging land use change is critical. We anticipate these data will help develop understanding of effects in other climates, under different solar park designs and the implications for the function and service provision of the hosting landscape.

  18. Environmental application of nanotechnology: air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rusul Khaleel; Hayyan, Maan; AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Adeeb; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2016-07-01

    Global deterioration of water, soil, and atmosphere by the release of toxic chemicals from the ongoing anthropogenic activities is becoming a serious problem throughout the world. This poses numerous issues relevant to ecosystem and human health that intensify the application challenges of conventional treatment technologies. Therefore, this review sheds the light on the recent progresses in nanotechnology and its vital role to encompass the imperative demand to monitor and treat the emerging hazardous wastes with lower cost, less energy, as well as higher efficiency. Essentially, the key aspects of this account are to briefly outline the advantages of nanotechnology over conventional treatment technologies and to relevantly highlight the treatment applications of some nanomaterials (e.g., carbon-based nanoparticles, antibacterial nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanoparticles) in the following environments: (1) air (treatment of greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols via adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, thermal decomposition, and air filtration processes), (2) soil (application of nanomaterials as amendment agents for phytoremediation processes and utilization of stabilizers to enhance their performance), and (3) water (removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, pathogens through adsorption, membrane processes, photocatalysis, and disinfection processes). PMID:27074929

  19. Distribution, bioavailability, and potential ecological risk of Cu, Pb, and Zn in soil in a potential groundwater source area.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yanguo; Feng, Dan; Wu, Jin; Zuo, Rui; Song, Liuting; Wang, Jinsheng

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we examined three horizontal and vertical soil profiles along a sewage drainage ditch in order to determine the spatial distribution of Cu, Pb, and Zn in soils and to assess the bioavailability and potential ecological risks associated with these metals in a potential groundwater source area. Results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn were approximately at background level, suggesting that human activities (industrial and agricultural pollution) had a negligible influence on these metals in soil, and that the concentrations reflected the natural background levels in the study area. Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations were slightly higher in topsoil (0-20 cm) than deeper in the soil profile. Using a modified BCR sequential extraction method to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of metals showed that the potential bioavailability sequence of Cu, Pb, and Zn at three depths in the soil profile was in the order Cu ≈ Pb < Zn. The potential ecological risk from the metals was evaluated using risk assessment code, and the results suggest that Cu and Zn pose no or low risk, while there is a low or medium risk from Pb. Results from groundwater monitoring showed that the groundwater was not polluted by leaching from soil. PMID:25910722

  20. Estimating the Impact of Vadose Zone Sources on Groundwater to Support Performance Assessment of Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.

    2014-03-13

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a prevalent remediation approach for volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. To support selection of an appropriate endpoint for the SVE remedy, an evaluation is needed to determine whether vadose zone contamination has been diminished sufficiently to protect groundwater. When vapor-phase transport is an important component of the overall contaminant fate and transport from a vadose zone source, the contaminant concentration expected in groundwater is controlled by a limited set of parameters, including specific site dimensions, vadose zone properties, and source characteristics. An approach was developed for estimating the contaminant concentration in groundwater resulting from a contaminant source in the vadose zone based on pre-modeling contaminant transport for a matrix of parameter value combinations covering a range of potential site conditions. An interpolation and scaling process are then applied to estimate groundwater impact for site-specific conditions.

  1. Uranium geochemistry in soil and groundwater at the F and H seepage basins

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, W.H.

    1994-09-01

    For 33 years, low activity liquid wastes from the chemical separation areas at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site were disposed of in unlined seepage basins. Soil and associated pore water samples of widely varying groundwater chemistries and contaminant concentrations were collected from the region downgradient of these basins using cone penetrometer technology. Analysis of samples using inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry has allowed the investigation of uranium partitioning between the aqueous phase and soil surfaces at this site. The distribution of uranium was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH, redox potential, cation and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation modeling. The uranium soil source term at the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB) is much smaller than has been used in previous modeling efforts. This should result in a much shorter remediation time and a greater effectiveness of a pump-and-treat design than previously predicted. Distribution coefficients at the (FHSB) were found to vary between 1.2 to 34,000 1 kg{sup {minus}1} for uranium. Differences in sorption of these elements can be explained primarily by changes in aqueous pH and the associated change in soil surface charge. Sorption models were fit directly to sorption isotherms from field samples. All models underestimated the fraction of uranium bound at low aqueous uranium concentrations. Linear models overestimated bound uranium at locations where the aqueous concentration was greater than 500 ppb. Mechanistic models provided a much better estimate of the bound uranium concentrations, especially at high aqueous concentrations. Since a large fraction of the uranium at the site is associated with the low-pH portion of the plume, consideration should be given to pumping water from the lowest pH portions of the plume in the F-Area.

  2. In situ denitrification and DNRA rates in soils and underlying groundwater of an integrated constructed wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofizur Rahman Jahangir, Mohammad; Fenton, Owen; McAleer, Eoin; Carroll, Paul; Harrington, Rory; Johnston, Paul; Müller, Christoph; Richards, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) removal efficiency in constructed wetlands (CW) is low and again it does not in itself explain whether the removed N species are reactive or benign. Evaluation of environmental benefits of CW necessitates knowing N removal mechanisms and the fate of the removed N in such system. In situ denitrification and DNRA (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) rates were measured in an earthen lined 5-cell integrated CW using 15N-enriched nitrate (NO3--N) push-pull method. Measurements were conducted in 2 groundwater depths (shallow- soils in CW bed; and deep- 4 m below CW soils) in 2 contrasting cells (high vs. low nutrient loads) of the CW. Denitrification (N¬2O-N + N2-N) and DNRA were the major NO3--N removal processes accounting together for 54-79% of the total biochemical removal of the applied NO3--N. Of which 14-17 and 40-68% were removed by denitrification and DNRA, respectively. Both the processes significantly differed with CW cells indicating that N transformations depend on the rate of nutrient loads in different cells. They were significantly higher in shallow than deep groundwater. Environmental conditions were favourable for both the processes (i.e. low dissolved oxygen and low redox potential, high dissolved organic carbon, high total carbon and high dissolved organic N) but DNRA rate was favoured over denitrification by high ambient NH4+ concentrations, reduced sulphide and low pH (5.9 - 7.0). Low pH might have limited denitrification to some extent to an incomplete state, being evident by a high N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratio (0.35 ± 0.17, SE). Relatively higher N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratio and higher DNRA rate over denitrification suggest that the end products of N transformations are reactive. This N2O can be consumed to N2 and/or emit to atmosphere directly and indirectly. The DNRA rate and accumulation of NH4+ indicated that CW is a net source of NH4+ in groundwater. Ammonium produced by DNRA can be fixed in soils and, when exchange sites are

  3. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranibar, J. N.; Villagra, P. E.; Gomez, M. L.; JobbáGy, E.; Quiroga, M.; Wuilloud, R. G.; Monasterio, R. P.; Guevara, A.

    2011-12-01

    In arid ecosystems, vegetation controls water and nitrate movement in the soil, reducing solute transport to aquifers. Here we analyzed nitrate distribution and transport throughout the soil profile and to the groundwater under different ecologic (vegetation type) and topographic (upland/lowland) situations across sand dune ecosystems with shallow water tables, subject to domestic grazing in the Monte desert. Based on vertical nitrate distributions in deep soil profiles we found that dune uplands (deep groundwater, low productivity) lost relatively more nitrogen than lowlands (shallow groundwater, high productivity), likely reinforcing productivity contrasts along these topographic positions. The traditional practice of nighttime animal concentration in corrals may affect nitrogen transport, with poorly vegetated interdunes at livestock posts showing higher subsoil nitrate concentrations than a well-vegetated nonsettled interdune. Vegetation left its imprint on the vertical distribution of nitrate, as suggested by the presence of a depletion zone that matched the depth of maximum root densities, followed by an underlying zone of accumulation. To explore how nitrogen exports to groundwater could affect water quality and nutrient supply to phreatophyte plants, we characterized groundwater flow patterns based on a potentiometric map and sediment characteristics, and measured groundwater electric conductivity, nitrate and arsenic concentration, and stable isotopes across 29 wells (5.8-12 m deep). Under the present land use and climate conditions, nitrate leaching does not seem to have an important and widespread effect on water quality. Nitrate concentration exceeded established limits for human consumption (45 mg L-1) in only one well, while arsenic concentration exceeded the established limits (10 μg L-1) in all but one well, reaching extreme values of 629 μg L-1. Yet, our analysis suggests that nitrate exports from corrals can reach the aquifer in localized areas

  4. MODELING MICROBIAL TRANSPORT IN SOIL AND GROUNDWATER: MICROBIOLOGISTS CAN ASSIST IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODELS OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large body of literature describes the processes affecting the fate of microorganisms in the subsurface environment (i.e., soil and groundwater). The fate of microorganisms depends on two main components: survival and transport. other components must be considered when determin...

  5. Visualization of the Links Between Rainfall, Soil Water, Groundwater and Subsurface Stormflow: A Physics-Based 3-D Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A. L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Tromp-van Meerveld, H.

    2006-12-01

    Recent experimental work at the Panola Mountain Experimental Watershed trenched hillslope (Atlanta, GA) has shown that formation of transient groundwater in bedrock depressions during storm events is a precondition for the generation of subsurface stormflow. While there are clear threshold relations between subsurface stormflow and storm total precipitation, resolving the linkages between rainfall input, soil water recharge, transient groundwater formation and resulting subsurface stormflow has been difficult. Part of the problem is that we lack observational capabilities to interrogate the distributed internal slope response to storm rainfall. Even more problematic is our inability to quantify key boundary conditions like the permeability contrast at the soil-bedrock interface and its spatial variability. This paper uses a 3-D physically-based distributed model of the Panola hillslope (the TOUGH2 simulator) to model and visualize the linkages between storm rainfall, soil water recharge, transient groundwater development and resulting subsurface stormflow. We explore the effect of the bedrock permeability on the development of transient saturation within the hillslope in response to observed storm events. Preliminary results indicate that an increase in the estimated characteristic bedrock permeability at the Panola hillslope can deteriorate and even eliminate the connected patterns of transient saturation developed during a storm event that result in subsurface storm runoff. Our 3-D visualizations and virtual experiments with different bedrock permeability values provide insight into how bedrock permeability, antecedent soil moisture and storm conditions conspire to create the patterns of transient groundwater and resulting subsurface stormflow.

  6. Nitrate Remediation of Soil and Groundwater Using Phytoremediation: Transfer of Nitrogen Containing Compounds from the Subsurface to Surface Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Sheldon

    2013-04-01

    Nitrate Remediation of Soil and Groundwater Using Phytoremediation: Transfer of Nitrogen Containing Compounds from the Subsurface to Surface Vegetation Sheldon Nelson Chevron Energy Technology Company 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road San Ramon, California 94583 snne@chevron.com The basic concept of using a plant-based remedial approach (phytoremediation) for nitrogen containing compounds is the incorporation and transformation of the inorganic nitrogen from the soil and/or groundwater (nitrate, ammonium) into plant biomass, thereby removing the constituent from the subsurface. There is a general preference in many plants for the ammonium nitrogen form during the early growth stage, with the uptake and accumulation of nitrate often increasing as the plant matures. The synthesis process refers to the variety of biochemical mechanisms that use ammonium or nitrate compounds to primarily form plant proteins, and to a lesser extent other nitrogen containing organic compounds. The shallow soil at the former warehouse facility test site is impacted primarily by elevated concentrations of nitrate, with a minimal presence of ammonium. Dissolved nitrate (NO3-) is the primary dissolved nitrogen compound in on-site groundwater, historically reaching concentrations of 1000 mg/L. The initial phases of the project consisted of the installation of approximately 1750 trees, planted in 10-foot centers in the areas impacted by nitrate and ammonia in the shallow soil and groundwater. As of the most recent groundwater analytical data, dissolved nitrate reductions of 40% to 96% have been observed in monitor wells located both within, and immediately downgradient of the planted area. In summary, an evaluation of time series groundwater analytical data from the initial planted groves suggests that the trees are an effective means of transfering nitrogen compounds from the subsurface to overlying vegetation. The mechanism of concentration reduction may be the uptake of residual nitrate from the

  7. Mining Environmental Data from a Coupled Modelling System to Examine the Impact of Agricultural Management Practices on Groundwater and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V.; Cooter, E. J.; Hayes, B.; Murphy, M. S.; Bash, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) resulting from current agricultural management practices can leach into sources of drinking water as nitrate, increasing human health risks of 'blue baby syndrome', hypertension, and some cancers and birth defects. Nitrogen also enters the atmosphere from land surfaces forming air pollution increasing human health risks of pulmonary and cardio-vascular disease. Characterizing and attributing nitrogen from agricultural management practices is difficult due to the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with the nitrogen cascade. Coupled physical process-based models, however, present new opportunities to investigate relationships among environmental variables on new scales; particularly because they link emission sources with meteorology and the pollutant concentration ultimately found in the environment. In this study, we applied a coupled meteorology (NOAA-WRF), agricultural (USDA-EPIC) and air quality modelling system (EPA-CMAQ) to examine the impact of nitrogen inputs from corn production on ecosystem and human health and wellbeing. The coupled system accounts for the nitrogen flux between the land surface and air, and the soil surface and groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effect of management practices such as type and timing of fertilization, tilling and irrigation on both groundwater and air quality across the conterminous US. In conducting the study, we first determined expected relationships based on literature searches and then identified model variables as direct or surrogate variables. We performed extensive and methodical multi-variate regression modelling and variable selection to examine associations between agricultural management practices and environmental condition. We then applied the regression model to predict and contrast pollution levels between two corn production scenarios (Figure 1). Finally, we applied published health functions (e.g., spina bifida and cardio

  8. Jet grouting for a groundwater cutoff wall in difficult glacial soil deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.F.; Pepe, F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Jet grouting is being used as part of a groundwater cutoff wall system in a major New York City subway construction project to limit drawdowns in an adjacent PCB contamination plume. A circular test shaft of jet grout columns was conducted during the design phase to obtain wall installation parameters. The test program also included shaft wall mapping, and measurements of; inflows, piezometric levels, ground heave and temperature, and jet grout hydraulic conductivity. An axisymmetric finite element method groundwater model was established to back calculate the in-situ hydraulic conductivities of both the surrounding glacial soils and the jet grout walls by matching observed inflows and piezometric levels. The model also verified the use of packer permeability test as a tool in the field to evaluate the hydraulic conductivities of jet grout columns. Both the test program and analytic studies indicated that adjustments to the construction procedures would be required to obtain lower hydraulic conductivities of the jet grout walls for construction. A comparison is made with the conductivities estimated from the test program/analytic studies with those from the present construction.

  9. Design, installation and operational methods of implementing horizontal wells for in situ groundwater and soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    The design and installation of horizontal wells is the primary factor in the efficiency of the remedial actions. Often, inadequacies in the design and installation of remediation systems are not identified until remedial actions have commenced, at which time, required modifications of operational methods can be costly. The parameters required for designing a horizontal well remediation system include spatial variations in contaminant concentrations and lithology, achievable injection and/or extraction rates, area of influence from injection and/or extraction processes, and limitations of installation methods. As with vertical wells, there are several different methods for the installation of horizontal wells. This paper will summarize four installation methods for horizontal wells, including four sites where horizontal wells have been utilized for in-situ groundwater and soil remediation.

  10. The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Skip; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports technology development and technical assistance for the remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The core of the program is centered on delivering proactive, responsive expertise and technologies with highly-leveraged, carefully selected investments that maximum impact on life-cycle cleanup costs and risks across the DOE complex. The program currently focuses on four main priorities: improved sampling and characterization strategies, advanced predictive capabilities, enhanced remediation methods, and improved long-term performance evaluation and monitoring. In FY 2010, the program developed a detailed research and development (R and D) plan in support of a larger initiative to integrate R and D efforts across EM. This paper provides an overview of the priority action areas and the program's near-term technical direction.

  11. The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports technology development and technical assistance for the remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The core of the program is centered on delivering proactive, responsive expertise and technologies with highly-leveraged, carefully selected investments that maximize impact on life-cycle cleanup costs and risks across the DOE complex. The program currently focuses on four main priorities: improved sampling and characterization strategies, advanced predictive capabilities, enhanced remediation methods, and improved long-term performance evaluation and monitoring. In FY 2010, the program developed a detailed research and development (R&D) plan in support of a larger initiative to integrate R&D efforts across EM. This paper provides an overview of the high priority action areas and the program s near-term technical direction.

  12. Development of Enhanced Remedial Techniques for Petroleum Fuel and Related Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-10

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with Earth Tech and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was to identify proper sites with soils and/or groundwater contaminated by petroleum constituents and MTBE. Biodegradation rates would have been quantitatively assessed in both laboratory and field tests to achieve the optimal destruction of contaminants of concern. WRI and Earth Tech identified a site contaminated with high concentrations of methanol associated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was assessed and a remediation project plan was prepared; however, the site was soon acquired by a new company. An agreement between Earth Tech, WRI, and the new site owners could not be reached; therefore, a work was performed to identify a new project site. Task 33 was terminated and the available funding was redeployed to other Tasks after receiving approval from the U.S. DOE task manager.

  13. Soil-Water Balance (SWB) model estimates of soil-moisture variability and groundwater recharge in the South Platte watershed, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. M.; Walker, E. L.; Hogue, T. S.; Ruybal, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Unconventional energy production in semi-arid regions places additional stress on already over-allocated water systems. Production of shale gas and oil resources in northern Colorado has rapidly increased since 2010, and is expected to continue growing due to advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This unconventional energy production has implications for the availability of water in the South Platte watershed, where water demand for hydraulic fracturing of unconventional shale resources reached ~16,000 acre-feet in 2014. Groundwater resources are often exploited to meet water demands for unconventional energy production in regions like the South Platte basin, where surface water supply is limited and allocated across multiple uses. Since groundwater is often a supplement to surface water in times of drought and peak demand, variability in modeled recharge estimates can significantly impact projected availability. In the current work we used the Soil-Water Balance Model (SWB) to assess the variability in model estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) and soil-moisture conditions utilized to derive estimates of groundwater recharge. Using both point source and spatially distributed data, we compared modeled actual ET and soil-moisture derived from several potential ET methods, such as Thornthwaite-Mather, Jense-Haise, Turc, and Hargreaves-Samani, to historic soil moisture conditions obtained through sources including the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). In addition to a basin-scale analysis, we divided the South Platte watershed into sub-basins according to land cover to evaluate model capabilities of estimating soil-moisture parameters with variations in land cover and topography. Results ultimately allow improved prediction of groundwater recharge under future scenarios of climate and land cover change. This work also contributes to complementary subsurface groundwater modeling and decision support modeling in the South Platte.

  14. Assessment of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, 1982-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T.R.; Twenter, F.R.

    1986-01-01

    Study of ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, defined the movement and distribution of volatile organic compounds in the glacial sand and gravel aquifer at known sites of contamination, and has defined new plumes at two other sites. The Arrow Street purge system, installed in 1982 to remove contaminants from the Building 43 plume, has lowered concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in the central part of the most contaminated area from a range of 1,000 to 2,000 microg/L to about 200 microg/L. TCE is not escaping off-Base from this area. In the southern part of the Base a plume containing principally TCE and dichloroethylene (DCE) has been delineated along Mission Drive. Maximum concentrations observed were 3,290 microg/L of TCE and 1,480 microg/L of DCE. Hydrologically suitable sites for purge wells were identified in the southern part of the plume using a new ground-water flow model of the Base. A benzene plume near the bulk-fuel storage area has shifted to a more northerly direction under influence of the Arrow Street purge system. Sites initially identified for purging the benzene plume have been repositioned because of the change in contaminant movement. JP-4 fuel was found to be accumulating in wells near the bulk-fuel storage area, largely in response to seasonal fluctuations in the water-table. It is thought to originate from a spill that occurred several years ago. In general, concentrations found in water do not differ greatly from those observed in 1981. Since 1981, concentrations of TCE have decreased significantly in the Alert Apron plume. Near the origin of the plume, the concentration of TCE has decreased from 1,000 microg/L in 1980 to 50 microg/L in 1984. Water from Van Etten Lake near the termination of the plume had only a trace of TCE at one site. Benzene detected in water from well AF2 seems to originate near the former site of buried fuel tanks west of the operational apron. During periods of normal

  15. Geochemical Assessment of Groundwater in the Peri-urban Environment of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pollution is a major concern in peri-urban environments. Thus, water quality is being investigated at several domestic wells in Brandsen, 70 km south of Buenos Aires, Argentina. To present, about 20 water sources were sampled in orchards and small farms of the area. There is limited data about the wells construction, although collected information suggests that groundwater is derived from the superficial sandy loams of the Pampean Aquifer. Samples were analysed for major inorganic elements using ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Titration was used to estimate alkalinity. Physical characteristics (EC, pH, temperature) were measured on site. Results show that groundwater pH ranges from 6.5 to 7.8, with a specific conductance of 180 to 255 mS/m. A peak of 360 mS/m in one horticultural parcel is associated to local NO3- concentrations up to 140 mg/L. This value exceeds the maximum recommendations set by the WHO (50 mg/L). Considering that fertilizer inputs in that property are negligible, the high levels of NO3- might be attributed to effluents from a neighbour septic tank. An increase in NO3- (>150mg/L) was also detected in two conventional farms. This increase correlates to elevated SO42- concentrations (>300 mg/L) suggesting thus, fertilizers percolation into the saturated zone. The leaching of these fluids might be exacerbated by irrigation during new planting, and accumulations of fertilizer-solids in the root zones from previous seasons. Chloride concentrations average ~90 mg/L and would not pose a threat to health at the moment. Its main origin would be related to connate waters in the loam matrix, although some anthropogenic inputs might occur in the previously described farms. In general, the rest of the analysed elements fall within acceptable levels for drinking purposes as well. Nevertheless, further work is still necessary to better define the fate of the potential harmful elements and assess seasonal variations in water quality.

  16. Groundwater Under Vertisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Baram, S.; Dahan, O.

    2015-12-01

    Vertisols are cracking clayey soils that: i) usually form in alluvial lowlands where normally, groundwater pools into aquifers; ii) have different types of voids (due to cracking) which make flow and transport of water and gas complex, and iii) are regarded as fertile soils in many areas. The combination of these characteristics results in the unique soil-aquifer phenomena that are highlighted and summarized in this review work. The following four vertisols-aquifer topics will be discussed: 1) Soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants - Lysimeter to basin-scale observations show the significance of cracks as preferential flow paths in vertisols that bypass matrix blocks in the unsaturated zone. Fresh recharge and groundwater contamination from these fluxes will be reviewed; 2) Soil cracks as deep evaporators and unsaturated-zone salinity - Deep soil samples under uncultivated vertisols in semiarid regions reveal a dry (immobile), saline matrix, partly due to enhanced evaporation through soil cracks. Observations of this phenomenon will be compared and the mechanism of evapoconcentration due to air flow in the cracks is discussed; 3) Impact of cultivation on flushing of the unsaturated zone and aquifer salinization - Land-use change of vertisols from native land to cropland promotes greater fluxes through the saline unsaturated-zone matrix, eventually flushing salts to the aquifer. Different degrees of salt flushing will be presented as well as aquifer salinization on different scales, and a comparison is made with aquifers under other soils; 4) Relatively little nitrate contamination in aquifers under vertisols - A number of observations show that aquifers under cultivated vertisols are somewhat resistant to groundwater contamination by nitrate (the major agriculturally related groundwater problem). Denitrification is probably the main mechanism supporting this resistance, whereas a certain degree of anion-exchange capacity may have a

  17. Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M.C.; Hinchman, R.R.; Gatliff, E.G.

    1996-07-01

    Phytoremediation, an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost, is defined as the engineered use of green plants (including grasses, forbs, and woody species) to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy metals, trace elements, organic compounds and radioactive compounds in soil or water. Our research includes a successful field demonstration of a plant bioreactor for processing the salty wastewater from petroleum wells; the demonstration is currently under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma, in cooperation with Devon Energy Corporation. A greenhouse experiment on zinc uptake in hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) was initiated in 1995. These experiments are being conducted to confirm and extend field data indicating high levels of zinc (4,200 ppm) in leaves of hybrid poplar growing as a cleanup system at a site with zinc contamination in the root zone of some of the trees. Analyses of soil water from experimental pots that had received several doses of zinc indicated that the zinc was totally sequestered by the plants in about 4 hours during a single pass through the root system. The data also showed concentrations of sequestered metal of >38,000 ppm Zn in the dry root tissue. These levels of sequestered zinc exceed the levels found in either roots or tops of many of the known ``hyperaccumulator`` species. Because the roots sequester most of the contaminant taken up in most plants, a major objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of root harvesting as a method to maximize the removal of contaminants from soils. Available techniques and equipment for harvesting plant roots, including young tree roots, are being evaluated and modified as necessary for use with phytoremediation plants.

  18. An Investigation on Soil Chemical Composition and Shallow Groundwater Condition in a Saline Area in Nakhon Panom Province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeboonruang, U.

    2010-12-01

    The Mekong River Basin region is a potential salt-accumulated neighborhood. Several subbasin areas have been reported to have the saline soil problem and these include Lower Songkram River, Nam Oon Brook, Nam Thew Brook, and Namkam Brook. The study area is located on the lower of the Namkam River Basin mainly in 3 districts of the Nakhon Panom Province and these districts are Amphoe That Panom, Amphoe Nakae, and Amphoe Renu Nakhon. Soil salinity is found risen sparsely in some villages of these three districts. Generally, shallow groundwater is known to facilitate the distribution of dissolved salts away from the salinity sources and to pick up the salts to the top soils. Thus, groundwater plays a major role in salinity distribution everywhere. The objective of this research is to investigate the soil chemical composition and shallow groundwater evolution in the study area. Soil samples are analyzed using X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRF). The depth to groundwater, groundwater pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), electrical resistivity (EC), and salinity are the parameters and the measurement takes place from October 2007 to present. There are 19 sampling locations distributed in the study area. The depth of the observation wells varies from 4 m to 40 m. Groundwater table is found to be up to 7 m below the groundwater surface and the depth is increasing from December to April. Groundwater pH is constantly less than 7 and greater than 4. Groundwater pH varies significantly between 10 mg/l to 45,000 mg/l and EC also differs between 10 µS/cm to 90,000 µS/cm. Most of groundwater sampled in the study area is slight blackish with salinity measured below 1.00 ppt and these are Ban Don Dang, Ban Wang Yang, Ban Na Khu, Ban Piman Ta, Pan Sala, and Ban Lao Tung. On the other hand, Ban Bo Dong Sorn and Ban Pra Song Noi have very saline shallow groundwater with salinity greater 1ppt. The results from the XRF show that SiO2 and Al2O3 are the main composition and the soil is

  19. Analysis of ground-water data for selected wells near Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, 1950-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water-level, ground-water-withdrawal, and ground- water-quality data were evaluated for trends. Holloman Air Force Base is located in the west-central part of Otero County, New Mexico. Ground-water-data analyses include assembly and inspection of U.S. Geological Survey and Holloman Air Force Base data, including ground-water-level data for public-supply and observation wells and withdrawal and water-quality data for public-supply wells in the area. Well Douglas 4 shows a statistically significant decreasing trend in water levels for 1972-86 and a statistically significant increasing trend in water levels for 1986-90. Water levels in wells San Andres 5 and San Andres 6 show statistically significant decreasing trends for 1972-93 and 1981-89, respectively. A mixture of statistically significant increasing trends, statistically significant decreasing trends, and lack of statistically significant trends over periods ranging from the early 1970's to the early 1990's are indicated for the Boles wells and wells near the Boles wells. Well Boles 5 shows a statistically significant increasing trend in water levels for 1981-90. Well Boles 5 and well 17S.09E.25.343 show no statistically significant trends in water levels for 1990-93 and 1988-93, respectively. For 1986-93, well Frenchy 1 shows a statistically significant decreasing trend in water levels. Ground-water withdrawal from the San Andres and Douglas wells regularly exceeded estimated ground-water recharge from San Andres Canyon for 1963-87. For 1951-57 and 1960-86, ground-water withdrawal from the Boles wells regularly exceeded total estimated ground-water recharge from Mule, Arrow, and Lead Canyons. Ground-water withdrawal from the San Andres and Douglas wells and from the Boles wells nearly equaled estimated ground- water recharge for 1989-93 and 1986-93, respectively. For 1987- 93, ground-water withdrawal from the Escondido well regularly exceeded estimated ground-water recharge from Escondido Canyon, and

  20. Comparison of CO2 and O2 concentrations in soil air: A lesson learned about CO2 diffusivity in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, A.; Davidson, E. A.; Savage, K.; Yakir, D.; Luz, B.

    2002-12-01

    Soil respiration is a major component of the global carbon and oxygen cycles and accounts for about one quarter of global respiration. Since respiration consumes O2 and emits CO2, a simple relationship may be expected between the concentration of these gases in soil-air. However, because the [O2] signal in well-drained soils is small, deriving this relationship from field observations is not trivial. In this study, we present high accuracy measurements of O2 concentrations in soil air, that for the first time, enable precise comparison of these concentrations with CO2 concentrations. Soil air was sampled in two sites: an orchard in Israel, and a temperate forest (Harvard forest). The expected ratio of the decrease in [O2] in soil air to the increase in [CO2] can be calculated from the ratio of O2 consumption to CO2 emission in respiration, and the ratio between the diffusivities of these two gases in air as 0.79-0.07. The measured ratio of the decrease in [O2] to the increase in [CO2] in soil air was 0.56-2.48 in the orchard site and 1.06-1.20 in Harvard Forest. These ratios deviate strongly from the expected relationship. In the orchard site, these deviations were probably caused by reactions in the carbonate system due to the calcareous soil of this site. At Harvard Forest, such reactions cannot be quantitatively important because of the low pH of the soil. In this site, we propose that the relationship between CO2 and O2 in the soil air indicates that the ratio of diffusivity of O2 and CO2 in soils is higher than the diffusivity ratio in air. Our results demonstrate that a combination of high accuracy measurements of the O2 and CO2 in soil air is important for better understanding of the soil CO2 dynamics. Such observations will improve estimates of soil respiration that are based only on CO2 concentration and diffusivity.

  1. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Arnold Air Force Base, Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, C.J.; Mahoney, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force at Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB), in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, is investigating ground-water contamination in selected areas of the base. This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation of the regional hydrogeology of the AAFB area. Three aquifers within the Highland Rim aquifer system, the shallow aquifer, the Manchester aquifer, and the Fort Payne aquifer, have been identified in the study area. Of these, the Manchester aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic use. Drilling and water- quality data indicate that the Chattanooga Shale is an effective confining unit, isolating the Highland Rim aquifer system from the deeper, upper Central Basin aquifer system. A regional ground-water divide, approximately coinciding with the Duck River-Elk River drainage divide, underlies AAFB and runs from southwest to northeast. The general direction of most ground-water flow is to the north- west or to the northwest or to the southeast from the divide towards tributary streams that drain the area. Recharge estimates range from 4 to 11 inches per year. Digital computer modeling was used to simulate and provide a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. The model indicates that most of the ground-water flow occurs in the shallow and Manchester aquifers. The model was most sensitive to increases in hydraulic conductivity and changes in recharge rates. Particle-tracking analysis from selected sites of ground-water contamination indicates a potential for contami- nants to be transported beyond the boundary of AAFB.

  2. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  3. Integrating Raster Based GIS with Land Use, Surface Soil and Rainfall Records for the Estimation of Groundwater Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. H.; Chen, Y. W.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    In Taiwan, groundwater resource plays a vital role in regional water supply because the quantity of groundwater pumpage has exceeded 1/3 of the total quantity of water supply. However, without proper management of groundwater usage, series environmental impacts such as land subsidence and seawater intrusions have occurred. To achieve the goal of sustainable management of groundwater resource, an accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is required. This study proposes to integrate PCRaster with maps of land use and surface soil and rainfall records to determine the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater recharge. PCRaster is a kind of raster based GIS software and its scripting interface is easy to create a spatio-temporal recharge estimation model. In the first step, the map of land use is re-grouped into three categories, impermeable zones, permeable zones and water bodies. For impermeable zones, the recharge quantities are assumed as zeros. Two kinds of estimating equations, a rainfall-infiltration equation and a saturated recharge equation, are respectively used to calculate the recharges of permeable zones and water bodies. The map of surface soil is used to define the spatial distribution of soil parameters in two equations. The temporal records of rainfall define the temporal variable in the rainfall-infiltration equation. The study area is Pingtung Plain which is 1,229 km2 in southern of Taiwan. In the process of estimation, the size of cells is 20 meters by 20 meters. The horizontal of estimation is during 1999 to 2010. The accumulated recharge is about 20.11 billion m3. (1.67 m3/yr). The annual recharge in 2008 is 1.89 billion m3. The annual recharges vary from 1.3 to 2.1 billion m3 because of different hydrological conditions. The infiltrated recharge in May and November in 2008 respectively are 430 (22.73%) and 67 (3.53%) million m3.

  4. Processes of bedrock groundwater seepage and their effects on soil water fluxes in a foot slope area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaoka, Naoya; Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Yamakawa, Yosuke; Tsutsumi, Daizo

    2016-04-01

    The impact of bedrock groundwater seepage on surface hydrological processes in a foot slope area is an important issue in hillslope hydrology. However, properties of water flux vectors around a seepage area are poorly understood because previous studies have lacked sufficient spatial resolution to capture detailed water movements. Here, we conducted hydrometric observations using unprecedented high-resolution and three-dimensional tensiometer nests in the mountainous foot slope area of the Hirudani experimental basin (Japan). Our findings are summarized as follows: (1) a considerable quantity of groundwater seeped from the bedrock surface in the study site. A groundwater exfiltration flux occurred constantly from a seepage area regardless of rainfall conditions. Saturated lateral flow over the bedrock surface occurred constantly in the region downslope of the seepage area. Groundwater was likely to mixed with soil water infiltration and flowed toward the lower end of the slope. (2) During the wet season, the seepage area expanded ∼3 m in the upslope direction along the bedrock valley in a single season. (3) The pressure head waveform observed in the seepage area showed gradual and significant increases after large rainfall events. However, the seepage pressure propagated within a relatively narrow area: a slope distance of ∼4 m from the seepage point in the downslope direction due to the damping of seepage pressure. (4) Within the whole study area, groundwater seeped from a narrow area located at the bottom of the valley line of the bedrock surface. The shape of the seepage area changed along the valley line in the wet season. Overall, we reveal spatial and temporal variations in bedrock groundwater seepage under the soil mantle and the effects on soil water fluxes. These findings should improve the accuracy of models for predicting surface hydrogeomorphological processes in mountainous hillslopes.

  5. Groundwater dynamics in wetland soils control the production and transfer mechanisms of dissolved reactive phosphorus in an agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Rémi; Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-04-01

    Because of its high sorption affinity on soils solid phase, mitigation options to reduce diffuse P transfer usually focus on trapping particulate P forms delivered via surface flowpaths. Therefore, vegetated buffer zones placed between croplands and watercourses have been promoted worldwide, sometimes in wetland areas. To investigate the risk of such P trapping riparian wetlands (RWs) releasing dissolved P to rivers, we monitored molybdate reactive P (MRP) in the free soil solution of two RWs in an intensively farmed catchment. Two main mechanisms causing MRP release were identified in light of the geochemical and hydrological conditions in the RWs, controlled by groundwater dynamics. First, soil rewetting after the dry summer was associated with the presence of a pool of mobile P, limited in size. Its mobilization started under conditions of water saturation caused by groundwater uprise in RW organo-mineral soil horizons. Second, the establishment of anoxic conditions in the end of the winter caused reductive solubilization of Fe oxide-hydroxide, along with release of P. Comparison between sites revealed that the first MRP release occurred only in a RW with P enriched soils, whereas the second was recorded even in a RW with a low soil P status. Seasonal variations in MRP concentrations in the stream were synchronized with those in RW soils. Hence, enriched and/or periodically anoxic RWs can act as a key component of the P transfer continuum in agricultural landscapes by converting particulate P from croplands into MRP released to rivers.

  6. Partitioning of arsenic in soil-crop systems irrigated using groundwater: a case study of rice paddy soils in southwestern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Ming; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Huang, You-Tuan; Liao, Chien-Sen; Hseu, Zeng-Yei

    2012-02-01

    The accumulation of As in rice due to groundwater irrigation in paddy fields represents a serious health hazard in South and Southeast Asia. In Taiwan, the fate of As in long-term irrigated paddy fields is poorly understood. Groundwater, surface soil, and rice samples were collected from a paddy field that was irrigated with As-containing groundwater in southwestern Taiwan. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the source and sink of As in the paddy field by comparing the As fractions in the soils that were obtained by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP) with the As uptake of rice. The risks associated with eating rice from the field can thus be better understood. The concentration of As in groundwater varied with time throughout the growing seasons of rice, but always exceeded the permitted maximum (10 μg L(-1)) for drinking water by the WHO. The As concentration increased with the concentration of Fe in the groundwater, supporting the claim that a large amount of As was concentrated in the Fe flocs collected from the internal wall of the groundwater pump. The results of the SEP revealed that As bound with amorphous and crystalline hydrous oxides exhibited high availability in the soils. The root of rice accumulated the largest amount of As, followed by the straw, husk, and grain. Although the As concentration in the rice grain was less than 1.0 mg kg(-1), the estimated intake level was close to the maximum tolerable daily intake of As, as specified by the WHO. PMID:22094052

  7. When does the fluazifop-P-butyl degradate, TFMP, leach through an agricultural loamy soil to groundwater?

    PubMed

    Vendelboe, Anders L; Norgaard, Trine; Olsen, Preben; de Jonge, Lis W; Rosenbom, Annette E

    2016-08-15

    In intensely cultivated regions, it is crucial to have knowledge of the leaching potential related to pesticides in agricultural production. This is especially true in countries, like Denmark, that base its drinking water supply on untreated groundwater. Since fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is applied to control perennial and annual weed grasses in agricultural fields, the objective of this study was to evaluate leaching of its two degradation products - fluazifop-P (FP; free acid; (R)-2-(4-(5-trifluoromethyl-2-pyridyloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid) and TFMP (5-(trifluoromethyl)-2(1H)-pyridinone) - through an agricultural field consisting of loamy soil. Drainage and groundwater samples were collected over a five-year period following four spring/summer applications of FPB, and analysed for both FP and TFMP. FP was only detected once in groundwater, whereas TFMP within the first year after the first and fourth application was detected in concentrations exceeding the value of 0.1μgL(-1) in 100% and 24% of the drainage samples and 9% and 14% of the groundwater samples, respectively. Detections of TFMP up to 18months after application were obtained both in the drainage and groundwater. What differentiated the first and fourth FPB applications from the two others were heavy precipitation events within one week of FPB application, which resulted in rapid transport of TFMP through the discontinuities in the soil and contributed to relatively high TFMP detections in drainage and groundwater. This study indicated that pesticide degradates like TFMP, often being more soluble than the pesticide, have a relatively high leaching potential especially associated with heavy precipitation events shortly after the application. Hence, such pesticide degradates should like in Denmark be considered "relevant" meaning that the EU value for drinking water applies to them, having its leaching potential regulatory assessed based on high quality estimations of their persistence, and be exposed to an

  8. Estimating the Impact of Vadose Zone Sources on Groundwater to Support Performance Assessment of Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.

    2014-03-13

    A generalized conceptual model approach was developed that can be used to estimate the impact of volatile contaminant sources in the vadose zone on groundwater for sites where soil vapor extraction (SVE) operations have diminished source strength. The model has the potential to be broadly applicable for sites where vapor-phase transport dominates. The primary target for this conceptual model and related numerical modeling estimate of groundwater impact is for sites where contaminants have been removed from readily accessible portions of the subsurface, but where contaminants may persist in localized portions of the vadose zone. This paper describes the conceptual model, uses numerical simulations to evaluate the parameters controlling impact to groundwater, and presents estimated results for a range of input conditions. Over the implied ranges, the compliance well concentrations showed (inverse) proportionality with source concentration, Henry’s Law constant, and well screen length. An increase in site recharge caused a linear response in well concentration, with slopes dependent on the groundwater velocity. All other tested parameters resulted in nonlinear responses. The functional relationship between dimensional and transport parameters and resulting groundwater concentrations provide a basis for establishing a structured approach to evaluating the potential risk to groundwater posed by a vadose zone source. This type of evaluation is particularly important to sites where SVE has been applied and reduced contaminant concentrations, but has reached a condition of diminishing returns such that a site must consider whether continuation of SVE, remedy modifications, or closure is warranted.

  9. AIR EMISSIONS FROM THE TREATMENT OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH PETROLEUM FUELS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report updates a 1992 report that summarizes available information on air emissions from the treatment of soils contaminated with fuels. Soils contaminated by leaks or spills of fuel products, such as gasoline or jet fuel, are a nationwide concern. Air emissions during remedi...

  10. Survey of hazardous organic compounds in the groundwater, air and wastewater effluents near the Tehran automobile industry.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Mahdi; Nadafi, Kazem; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Nasseri, Simin; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Rastkari, Noushin

    2013-02-01

    Potential of wastewater treatment in car industry and groundwater contamination by volatile organic compounds include perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloromethane (DCM) near car industry was conducted in this study. Samples were collected in September through December 2011 from automobile industry. Head-space Gas chromatography with FID detector is used for analysis. Mean PCE levels in groundwater ranged from 0 to 63.56 μg L(-1) with maximum level of 89.1 μg L(-1). Mean TCE from 0 to 76.63 μg L(-1) with maximum level of 112 μg L(-1). Due to the data obtained from pre treatment of car staining site and conventional wastewater treatment in car factory, the most of TCE, PCE and DCM removed by pre aeration. Therefor this materials entry from liquid phase to air phase and by precipitation leak out to the groundwater. As a consequence these pollutants have a many negative health effect on the workers by air and groundwater. PMID:23160750

  11. Occurrence and treatment of arsenic in groundwater and soil in northern Mexico and southwestern USA.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Lucy Mar; Gutiérrez, Mélida; Alarcón-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Villalba, Maria de Lourdes; Deng, Shuguang

    2011-04-01

    This review focuses on the occurrence and treatment of arsenic (As) in the arid region of northern Mexico (states of Chihuahua and Coahuila) and bordering states of the southwestern US (New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas), an area known for having high As concentrations. Information assembled and assessed includes the content and probable source of As in water, soil, and sediments and treatment methods that have been applied in the area. High As concentrations were found mainly in groundwater, their source being mostly from natural origin related to volcanic processes with significant anthropogenic contributions near mining and smelting of ores containing arsenic. The affinity of As for solid phases in alkaline conditions common to arid areas precludes it from being present in surface waters, accumulating instead in sediments and shifting its threat to its potential remobilization in reservoir sediments and irrigation waterways. Factors such as oxidation and pH that affect the mobility of As in the subsurface environment are mentioned. Independent of socio-demographic variables, nutritional status, and levels of blood lead, cognitive development in children is being affected when exposed to As. Treatments known to effectively reduce As content to safe drinking water levels as well as those that are capable of reducing As content in soils are discussed. Besides conventional methods, emergent technologies, such as phytoremediation, offer a viable solution to As contamination in drinking water. PMID:21216433

  12. Integration of automatic mesh generation for simulation of contaminants in soils and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M. Jr.

    1994-06-18

    An automatic mesh generator was modified and implemented that conforms to arbitrarily shaped two dimensional geometries. The grid generator requires no user intervention and can handle multiple component systems. The routine is well suited to dynamic situations experiencing large geometrical change such as in solidification or ground freezing processes. Additionally, the system has the option to output its results in a 2D Groundwater Modeling System format and a 3D extruded prism layer compatible with the GMS interface and the Waterways Experimental Station`s 3DFEMFAT finite element code for flow and contaminant transport in saturated and unsaturated soils. A uniform equilateral triangular grid overlays the physical domain. Increased resolution can be specified in areas of interest or in areas undergoing large geometrical change such as occurs during solidification. All elements exterior to the physical domain are eliminated. The elements closest to physical boundaries are adjusted to conform to the physical shape, and a smoothing operator is employed to assimilate these adjustments. Interior boundaries of multiple component systems are retained. This mesh generation strategy virtually eliminates user interaction which reduces the actual time required for solution substantially. The adaptive finite element mesh generator was applied to an illustrative subsurface soil situation. Therein, the multiple levels of resolution are presented as well as the various output formats.

  13. Air and groundwater flow at the interface between fractured host rock and a bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessirier, B.; Jarsjo, J.; Frampton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Designs of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel include several levels of confinement. The Swedish and Finnish concept KBS-3 targets for example sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock as host formation and would have the waste canisters embedded in an engineered buffer of compacted MX-80 bentonite. The host rock is a highly heterogeneous dual porosity material containing fractures and a rock matrix. Bentonite is a complex expansive porous material. Its water content and mechanical properties are interdependent. Beyond the specific physics of unsaturated flow and transport in each medium, the interface between them is critical. Detailed knowledge of the transitory two-phase flow regime, induced by the insertion of the unsaturated buffer in a saturated rock environment, is necessary to assess the performance of planned KBS-3 deposition holes. A set of numerical simulations based on the equations of two-phase flow for water and air in porous media were conducted to investigate the dynamics of air and groundwater flow near the rock/bentonite interface in the period following installation of the unsaturated bentonite buffer. We assume state of the two-phase flow parameter values for bentonite from laboratory water uptake tests and typical fracture and rock properties from the Äspö Hard rock laboratory (Sweden) gathered under several field characterization campaigns. The results point to desaturation of the rock domain as far as 10 cm away from the interface into matrix-dominated regions for up to 160 days. Similar observations were made during the Bentonite Rock Interaction Experiment (BRIE) at the Äspö HRL, with a desaturation sustained for even longer times. More than the mere time to mechanical and hydraulic equilibrium, the occurrence of sustained unsaturated conditions opens the possibility for biogeochemical processes that could be critical in the safety assessment of the planned repository.

  14. Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam.

    PubMed

    Mathew, S; Rajagopalan, M; Abraham, J P; Balakrishnan, D; Umadevi, A G

    2012-11-01

    Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ∼25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1). The significant radionuclides being (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1) and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg(-1). The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed. PMID:22951996

  15. CONTROL OF AROMATIC WASTE AIR STREAMS BY SOIL BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of groundwater resources is a serious environmental problem which is continuing to increase in occurrence in the United States. It has been reported that leaking underground gasoline storage tanks may pose the most serious threat of all sources of groundwater contam...

  16. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL AIR FLOW MODEL FOR SOIL VENTING: SUPERPOSITION OF ANLAYTICAL FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional computer model was developed for the simulation of the soil-air pressure distribution at steady state and specific discharge vectors during soil venting with multiple wells in unsaturated soil. The Kirchhoff transformation of dependent variables and coordinate...

  17. Investigation of ground-water contamination at a drainage ditch, Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, 2005–06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, used newly developed sampling methods to investigate ground-water contamination by chlorobenzenes beneath a drainage ditch on the southwestern side of Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, during 2005-06. The drainage ditch, which is a potential receptor for ground-water contaminants from Installation Restoration Site 4, intermittently discharges water to Corpus Christi Bay. This report uses data from a new type of pore-water sampler developed for this investigation and other methods to examine the subsurface contamination beneath the drainage ditch. Analysis of ground water from the samplers indicated that chlorobenzenes (maximum detected concentration of 160 micrograms per liter) are present in the ground water beneath the ditch. The concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the samples (less than 0.05-0.4 milligram per liter) showed that the ground water beneath and near the ditch is anaerobic, indicating that substantial chlorobenzene biodegradation in the aquifer beneath the ditch is unlikely. Probable alternative mechanisms of chlorobenzene removal in the ground water beneath the drainage ditch include sorption onto the organic-rich sediment and contaminant depletion by cattails through uptake, sorption, and localized soil aeration.

  18. Untangling the effects of shallow groundwater and soil texture as drivers of subfield-scale yield variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, Samuel C.; Soylu, Mehmet Evren; Booth, Eric G.; Loheide, Steven P.

    2015-08-01

    Water table depth (WTD), soil texture, and growing season weather conditions all play critical roles in determining agricultural yield; however, the interactions among these three variables have never been explored in a systematic way. Using a combination of field observations and biophysical modeling, we answer two questions: (1) under what conditions can a shallow water table provide a groundwater yield subsidy and/or penalty to corn production?; and (2) how do soil texture and growing season weather conditions influence the relationship between WTD and corn yield?. Subfield-scale yield patterns during a dry (2012) and wet (2013) growing season are used to identify sensitivity to weather. Areas of the field that are negatively impacted by wet growing seasons have the shallowest observed WTD (<1 m), while areas with consistently strong yield have intermediate WTD (1-3 m). Parts of the field that perform consistently poorly are characterized by deep WTD (>3 m) and coarse soil textures. Modeling results find that beneficial impacts of shallow groundwater are more common than negative impacts under the conditions studied, and that the optimum WTD is shallower in coarser soils. While groundwater yield subsidies have a higher frequency and magnitude in coarse-grained soils, the optimum WTD responds to growing season weather at a relatively constant rate across soil types. We conclude that soil texture defines a baseline upon which WTD and weather interact to determine overall yield. Our work has implications for water resource management, climate/land use change impacts on agricultural production, and precision agriculture.

  19. Documentation of input datasets for the soil-water balance groundwater recharge model of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2015-01-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries supply water to more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico, irrigating more than 4.5 million acres of farmland, and generating about 12 billion kilowatt hours of hydroelectric power annually. The Upper Colorado River Basin, encompassing more than 110,000 square miles (mi2), contains the headwaters of the Colorado River (also known as the River) and is an important source of snowmelt runoff to the River. Groundwater discharge also is an important source of water in the River and its tributaries, with estimates ranging from 21 to 58 percent of streamflow in the upper basin. Planning for the sustainable management of the Colorado River in future climates requires an understanding of the Upper Colorado River Basin groundwater system. This report documents input datasets for a Soil-Water Balance groundwater recharge model that was developed for the Upper Colorado River Basin.

  20. N leaching to groundwater from dairy production involving grazing over the winter on a clay-loam soil.

    PubMed

    Necpalova, M; Fenton, O; Casey, I; Humphreys, J

    2012-08-15

    This study investigated concentrations of various N species in shallow groundwater (<2.2m below ground level) and N losses from dairy production involving grazing over the winter period on a clay loam soil with a high natural attenuation capacity in southern Ireland (52°51'N, 08°21'W) over a 2-year period. A dense network of shallow groundwater piezometers was installed to determine groundwater flow direction and N spatial and temporal variation. Estimated vertical travel times through the unsaturated zone (<0.5 yr, time lag) allowed the correlation of management with groundwater N within a short space of time. There was a two way interaction of the system and sampling date (P<0.05) on concentrations of DON, oxidised N and NO(3)(-)-N. In contrast, concentrations of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N were unaffected by the dairy system. Grazing over the winter had no effect on N losses to groundwater. Mean concentrations of DON, NH(4)(+)-N, NO(2)(-)-N and NO(3)(-)-N were 2.16, 0.35, 0.01 and 0.37 mg L(-1) respectively. Soil attenuation processes such as denitrification and DNRA resulted in increased NH(4)(+)-N levels. For this reason, DON and NH(4)(+)-N represented the highest proportion of N losses from the site. Some of the spatial and temporal variation of N concentrations was explained by correlations with selected chemical and hydro-topographical parameters (NO(3)(-)-N/Cl(-) ratio, distance of the sampling point from the closest receptor, watertable depth, depth of sampling piezometer, DOC concentration). A high explanatory power of NO(3)(-)-N/Cl(-) ratio and the distance of the sampling point from the closest receptor indicated the influence of point sources and groundwater-surface water interactions. PMID:22728303

  1. Magnetic, geo-electric, and groundwater and soil quality analysis over a landfill from a lead smelter, Cairo, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Mohamed H.

    2012-11-01

    A detailed ground magnetic survey, geoelectric vertical electric sounding (VES), and groundwater and soil quality analysis were conducted in the area of the abandoned landfill of the Awadallah lead (Pb) smelter, northeastern Cairo, Egypt. The integration between the applied techniques located successfully the buried solid waste, demarcated the groundwater and its possible contamination, and determined the lead level in soil. Magnetic survey comprised 50 magnetic profiles each 190 m length. Vertical derivatives, wavelength filters, and continuation filters characterized the eastern and central parts of the landfill by high intense magnetic anomalies reflecting metal and lead wastes, whereas the western part was characterized by low intense anomalies indicating change in the landfill composition to non-magnetized material. The geoelectric survey comprised 16 VES with a maximum AB/2 of 100 m. The inverted data demarcated effectively the groundwater aquifer with depth ranged from 11 to 18 m and true resistivities ranged from 96 to 118 Ω·m. The second layer (Holocene-Q3) of semi-permeable silty and sandy clay cap (true resistivities 29 ~ 51 Ω·m and thickness 9-17 m) constituted a considerable role in limiting the possible contamination from the landfill. The analyzed groundwater parameters pH, Eh, TDS, SEC, and DO indicated a good water quality with homogenous aquifer characteristics, whereas the lead concentration in groundwater (0.033-0.036 mg/L) was slightly exceeding the safe limits identified by the U.S. EPA (≤ 0.015 mg/L). Lead in soil samples revealed elevated concentrations (3130 mg/L/kg at VES-3) around the Awadallah smelter, whereas a gradual decrease in concentrations was recorded in the northwestern direction.

  2. Determination of the origin of groundwater nitrate at an air weapons range using the dual isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Savard, Martine M.; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-06-01

    Nitrate is one of the most common contaminants in shallow groundwater, and many sources may contribute to the nitrate load within an aquifer. Groundwater nitrate plumes have been detected at several ammunition production sites. However, the presence of multiple potential sources and the lack of existing isotopic data concerning explosive degradation-induced nitrate constitute a limitation when it comes to linking both types of contaminants. On military training ranges, high nitrate concentrations in groundwater were reported for the first time as part of the hydrogeological characterization of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR), Alberta, Canada. Explosives degradation is thought to be the main source of nitrate contamination at CLAWR, as no other major source is present. Isotopic analyses of N and O in nitrate were performed on groundwater samples from the unconfined and confined aquifers; the dual isotopic analysis approach was used in order to increase the chances of identifying the source of nitrate. The isotopic ratios for the groundwater samples with low nitrate concentration suggested a natural origin with a strong contribution of anthropogenic atmospheric NO x. For the samples with nitrate concentration above the expected background level the isotopic ratios did not correspond to any source documented in the literature. Dissolved RDX samples were degraded in the laboratory and results showed that all reproduced degradation processes released nitrate with a strong fractionation. Laboratory isotopic values for RDX-derived NO 3- produced a trend of high δ18O-low δ15N to low δ18O-high δ15N, and groundwater samples with nitrate concentrations above the expected background level appeared along this trend. Our results thus point toward a characteristic field of isotopic ratios for nitrate being derived from the degradation of RDX.

  3. Determination of the origin of groundwater nitrate at an air weapons range using the dual isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Savard, Martine M; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-06-01

    Nitrate is one of the most common contaminants in shallow groundwater, and many sources may contribute to the nitrate load within an aquifer. Groundwater nitrate plumes have been detected at several ammunition production sites. However, the presence of multiple potential sources and the lack of existing isotopic data concerning explosive degradation-induced nitrate constitute a limitation when it comes to linking both types of contaminants. On military training ranges, high nitrate concentrations in groundwater were reported for the first time as part of the hydrogeological characterization of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR), Alberta, Canada. Explosives degradation is thought to be the main source of nitrate contamination at CLAWR, as no other major source is present. Isotopic analyses of N and O in nitrate were performed on groundwater samples from the unconfined and confined aquifers; the dual isotopic analysis approach was used in order to increase the chances of identifying the source of nitrate. The isotopic ratios for the groundwater samples with low nitrate concentration suggested a natural origin with a strong contribution of anthropogenic atmospheric NOx. For the samples with nitrate concentration above the expected background level the isotopic ratios did not correspond to any source documented in the literature. Dissolved RDX samples were degraded in the laboratory and results showed that all reproduced degradation processes released nitrate with a strong fractionation. Laboratory isotopic values for RDX-derived NO(3)(-) produced a trend of high delta(18)O-low delta(15)N to low delta(18)O-high delta(15)N, and groundwater samples with nitrate concentrations above the expected background level appeared along this trend. Our results thus point toward a characteristic field of isotopic ratios for nitrate being derived from the degradation of RDX. PMID:18499297

  4. Feasibility analysis of using inverse modeling for estimating natural groundwater recharge from a large-scale soil moisture monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Yue, Weifeng; Szilagyi, Jozsef; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; You, Jinsheng; Chen, Xunhong; Shulski, Martha D.; Young, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of groundwater recharge (GR), its accurate estimation still remains one of the most challenging tasks in the field of hydrology. In this study, with the help of inverse modeling, long-term (6 years) soil moisture data at 34 sites from the Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) were used to estimate the spatial distribution of GR across Nebraska, USA, where significant spatial variability exists in soil properties and precipitation (P). To ensure the generality of this study and its potential broad applications, data from public domains and literature were used to parameterize the standard Hydrus-1D model. Although observed soil moisture differed significantly across the AWDN sites mainly due to the variations in P and soil properties, the simulations were able to capture the dynamics of observed soil moisture under different climatic and soil conditions. The inferred mean annual GR from the calibrated models varied over three orders of magnitude across the study area. To assess the uncertainties of the approach, estimates of GR and actual evapotranspiration (ETa) from the calibrated models were compared to the GR and ETa obtained from other techniques in the study area (e.g., remote sensing, tracers, and regional water balance). Comparison clearly demonstrated the feasibility of inverse modeling and large-scale (>104 km2) soil moisture monitoring networks for estimating GR. In addition, the model results were used to further examine the impacts of climate and soil on GR. The data showed that both P and soil properties had significant impacts on GR in the study area with coarser soils generating higher GR; however, different relationships between GR and P emerged at the AWDN sites, defined by local climatic and soil conditions. In general, positive correlations existed between annual GR and P for the sites with coarser-textured soils or under wetter climatic conditions. With the rapidly expanding soil moisture monitoring networks around the

  5. Controls of soil hydraulic characteristics on modeling groundwater recharge under different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.

    2015-02-01

    To meet the challenge of estimating spatially varying groundwater recharge (GR), increasing attention has been given to the use of vadose zone models (VZMs). However, the application of this approach is usually constrained by the lack of field soil hydraulic characteristics (SHCs) required by VZMs. To tackle this issue, SHCs based on the van Genuchten or Brooks-Corey model are generally estimated by pedotransfer functions or taken from texture based class averages. With the increasing use of this method, it is important to elucidate the controls of SHCs on computing GR mostly due to the high nonlinearity of the models. In this study, it is hypothesized that the nonlinear controls of SHCs on computing GR would vary with climatic conditions. To test this hypothesis, a widely used VZM along with two SHCs datasets for sand and loamy sand is used to compute GR at four sites in the continental Unites States with a significant gradient of precipitation (P). The simulation results show that the distribution patterns of mean annual GR ratios (GR ‾ / P ‾ , where GR ‾ and P ‾ are mean annual GR and P, respectively) vary considerably across the sites, largely depending on soil texture and climatic conditions at each site. It is found that GR ‾ / P ‾ is mainly controlled by the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model and the nonlinear effect of n on GR ‾ / P ‾ varies with climatic conditions. Specifically, for both soil textures, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ is smallest at the Andrews Forest with the highest P ‾ (191.3 cm/year) and GR ‾ / P ‾ is least sensitive to n; whereas, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ at the Konza Prairie (P ‾ = 84.2 cm/year) is the largest and GR ‾ / P ‾ is most sensitive to n. With further decreasing P ‾ , the nonlinear effect of n weakens at the Barta Brothers (P ‾ = 57.3 cm/year) and Sevilleta (P ‾ = 20.3 cm/year), leading to smaller GR ‾ / P ‾ variability at those two sites than at the Konza Prairie. The

  6. Coupling a spatio-temporally distributed soil water budget with stream-depletion functions and a groundwater numerical model to constrain stakeholder-driven management of groundwater-dependent ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Laura; McNally, Alison; Harter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Excessive groundwater use may significantly impact groundwater dependent ecosystems through increased streamflow depletion, particularly in semi-arid and arid regions. The effects may be seasonal or long-term trends. They may be further exacerbated by climate change. Here, we develop a spatio-temporally distributed soil water budget model and that is coupled with an analytical model for stream depletion from groundwater pumping to assess seasonal impacts of groundwater pumping on streamflow during critical low flow periods. We demonstrate the applicability of the tool for the Scott Valley in Northern California, where protected salmon depend on sufficient summer streamflow, which is impacted by seasonal pumping. In this example, results suggest that increased recharge of snowmelt-driven runoff in the period immediately preceding the critical low streamflow season, and transfer of groundwater pumping during the critical period away from the stream are promising tools to address ecosystem concerns. Comparison to numerical model results suggests that the water mass balance model coupled to an analytical streamflow model provides a potentially powerful tool to build intuitive system knowledge among stakeholders enabling them to creative scenario development. Detailed impacts of management practices are evaluated with fully-three-dimensional groundwater-surface water flow model linked to the soil water budget model. Sensitivity analysis and calibration are performed on the coupled soil water budget - groundwater - surface water model. The results drive data collection efforts and are applied to develop uncertainty analyses for future scenarios.

  7. Arsenic species in broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter, soils, maize (Zea mays L.), and groundwater from litter-amended fields.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Elisa; Zeigler, Georgia; Beck, E Glenn; Grove, John; Sikora, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Manure and bedding material (litter) generated by the broiler industry (Gallus gallus domesticus) often contain high levels of arsenic (As) when organoarsenical roxarsone and p-arsanilic acid are included in feed to combat disease and improve weight gain of the birds. This study was conducted to determine As levels and species in litter from three major broiler producing companies, and As levels in soils, corn tissue (Zea mays L.), and groundwater in fields where litter was applied. Total As in litter from the three different integrators ranged between <1 and 44 mg kg(-1). Between 15 and 20% of total As in litter consisted of mostly of arsenate, with smaller amounts of roxarsone and several transformation products that were extractable with phosphate buffer. Soils amended with litter had higher levels of bioavailable As (extractable with Mehlich 3 solution and taken up by corn leaves). Arsenic concentrations in plant tissue and groundwater, however, were below the World Health Organization thresholds, which was attributed to strong sorption/precipitation of arsenate in Fe- and Al-rich soils. Ecological impacts of amending soils with As-laden litter depend on the As species in the litter, and chemical and physical properties of soil that strongly affect As mobility and bioavailability in the environment. PMID:23010102

  8. INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION UNIT CONVERSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which can migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying buil...

  9. Seasonal changes in ground-water quality and ground-water levels and directions of ground-water movement in southern Elmore County, southwestern Idaho, including Mountain Home Air Force Base, 1990-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.; Jones, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    The study area is located in southern Elmore County, southwestern Idaho, and includes the Mountain Home Air Force Base located approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of Mountain Home. Chemical analyzes have been made periodically since the late 1940's on water samples from supply wells on the Air Force Base. These analyses indicate increases in specific conductance and in concentrations of nitrogen compounds, chloride, and sulfate. The purposes of this report, which was prepared in cooperation with the Department of the Air Force, are to describe the seasonal changes in water quality and water levels and to depict the directions of ground-water movement in the regional aquifer system and perched-water zones. Although data presented in this report are from both the regional ground-water system and perched-water zones, the focus is on the regional system. A previous study by the U.S. Geological Survey (Parliman and Young, 1990) describes the areal changes in water quality and water levels during the fall of 1989. During March, July, and October 1990, 141 wells were inventoried and depth to water was measured. Continuous water-level recorders were installed on 5 of the wells and monthly measurements of depth to water were made in 17 of the wells during March 1990 through February 1991. Water samples from 33 wells and 1 spring were collected during the spring and fall of 1990 for chemical analyses. Samples also were collected monthly from 11 of those wells during April to September 1990 (table 1). Selected well-construction and water-use data and measurements of depth to water for 141 wells are given in table 2 (separated sheets in envelope). Directions of ground-water movement and selected hydrographs showing seasonal fluctuations of water levels in the regional ground-water system and perched-water zones are shown on sheet 2. Changes in water levels in the regional ground-water system during March to October 1990 are shown on sheet 2.

  10. Soil-based filtration technology for air purification: potentials for environmental and space life support application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Bohn, Hinrich

    Soil biofiltration, also known as Soil bed reactor (SBR), technology was originally developed in Germany to take advantage of the diversity in microbial mechanisms to control gases producing malodor in industrial processes. The approach has since gained wider international acceptance and seen numerous improvements, for example, by the use of high-organic compost beds to maximize microbial processes. This paper reviews the basic mechanisms which underlay soil processes involved in air purification, advantages and limitations of the technology and the cur-rent research status of the approach. Soil biofiltration has lower capital and operating/energetic costs than conventional technologies and is well adapted to handle contaminants in moderate concentrations. The systems can be engineered to optimize efficiency though manipulation of temperature, pH, moisture content, soil organic matter and airflow rates. SBR technology was modified for application in the Biosphere 2 project, which demonstrated in preparatory research with a number of closed system testbeds that soil could also support crop plants while also serving as soil filters with air pumps to push air through the soil. This Biosphere 2 research demonstrated in several closed system testbeds that a number of important trace gases could be kept under control and led to the engineering of the entire agricultural soil of Biosphere 2 to serve as a soil filtration unit for the facility. Soil biofiltration, coupled with food crop produc-tion, as a component of bioregenerative space life support systems has the advantages of lower energy use and avoidance of the consumables required for other air purification approaches. Expanding use of soil biofiltration can aid a number of environmental applications, from the mitigation of indoor air pollution, improvement of industrial air emissions and prevention of accidental release of toxic gases.

  11. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water. PMID:9380841

  12. New species of ice nucleating fungi in soil and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gray D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    -8°C. The IN seem not be bound to cells because they can be easily washed off the mycelium. They pass through a 0.1 µm filter and can be inactivated by 60°C treatment. Ongoing investigations of various soil and air samples indicate that diverse ice nucleation active fungi from more than one phylum are not only present in air and soil but can also be abundant components of the cultivable community. A recently discovered group of IN fungi in soil was also found to possess easily suspendable IN smaller than 300 kDa. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium may ramify topsoils and release cell-free IN into it. If some of these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces this contribution will accumulate over time, perhaps to be transported with soil dust and influencing its ice nucleating properties. Thanks for collaboration and support to M.O. Andreae, B. Baumgartner, I. Germann-Müller, T. Godwill, L.E. Hanson, A.T. Kunert, J. Meeks, T. Pooya, S. Lelieveld, J. Odhiambo Obuya, C. Ruzene-Nespoli, and D. Sebazungu. The Max Planck Society (MPG), Ice Nuclei research UnIT (INUIT), the German Research Foundation (PO1013/5-1), and the National Science Foundation (NSF, grant 0841542) are acknowledged for financial support. 1. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., et al. (2009) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci., 106, 12814-12819 2. Després, V. R., et al. (2012) Tellus B, 64, 15598 3. Georgakopoulos, D.G., et al. (2009) Biogeosciences, 6, 721-737 4. Pouleur, S., et al. (1992) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58, 2960-2964 5. Burrows, S.M., et al. (2009a) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, (23), 9281-9297 6. Burrows, S.M., et al. (2009b) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, (23), 9263-9280 7. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., et al. (2012) Biogeosciences, 9, 1125-1136 8. Huffman A. J. et al. (2013) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 6151-6164

  13. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  14. Safety Improves Dramatically In Fluor Hanford Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.L.; Gerber, M.S.; VonBargen, B.H.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walk-downs, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site. (authors)

  15. Coupling ANIMO and MT3DMS for 3D regional-scale modeling of nutrient transport in soil and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, G.; Del Val Alonso, L.; Groenendijk, P.; Griffioen, J.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an on-line coupling between the 1D/quasi-2D nutrient transport model ANIMO and the 3D groundwater transport model code MT3DMS. ANIMO is a detailed, process-oriented model code for the simulation of nitrate leaching to groundwater, N- and P-loads on surface waters and emissions of greenhouse gasses. It is the leading nutrient fate and transport code in the Netherlands where it is used primarily for the evaluation of fertilization related legislation. In addition, the code is applied frequently in international research projects. MT3DMS is probably the most commonly used groundwater solute transport package worldwide. The on-line model coupling ANIMO-MT3DMS combines the state-of-the-art descriptions of the biogeochemical cycles in ANIMO with the advantages of using a 3D approach for the transport through the saturated domain. These advantages include accounting for regional lateral transport, considering groundwater-surface water interactions more explicitly, and the possibility of using MODFLOW to obtain the flow fields. An additional merit of the on-line coupling concept is that it preserves feedbacks between the saturated and unsaturated zone. We tested ANIMO-MT3DMS by simulating nutrient transport for the period 1970-2007 in a Dutch agricultural polder catchment covering an area of 118 km2. The transient groundwater flow field had a temporal resolution of one day and was calculated with MODFLOW-MetaSWAP. The horizontal resolution of the model grid was 100x100m and consisted of 25 layers of varying thickness. To keep computation times manageable, we prepared MT3DMS for parallel computing, which in itself is a relevant development for a large community of groundwater transport modelers. For the parameterization of the soil, we applied a standard classification approach, representing the area by 60 units with unique combinations of soil type, land use and geohydrological setting. For the geochemical parameterization of the deeper subsurface, however, we

  16. Air stripping. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including groundwater decontamination and wastewater purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in groundwater and soil cleanup. (Contains a minimum of 71 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Effects of irrigated agroecosystems: 2. Quality of soil water and groundwater in the southern High Plains, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Gates, J. B.; Reedy, R. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Bordovsky, J. P.

    2010-09-01

    Trade-offs between water-resource depletion and salinization need to be understood when promoting water-conservative irrigation practices. This companion paper assesses impacts of groundwater-fed irrigation on soil water and groundwater quality using data from the southern High Plains (SHP). Unsaturated zone soil samples from 13 boreholes beneath irrigated agroecosystems were analyzed for water-extractable anions. Salt accumulation in soils varies with irrigation water quality, which ranges from low salinity in the north (median Cl: 21 mg/L) to higher salinity in the south (median Cl: 180 mg/L). Large Cl bulges under irrigated agroecosystems in the south are similar to those under natural ecosystems, but they accumulated over decades rather than millennia typical of natural ecosystems. Profile peak Cl concentrations (1200-6400 mg/L) correspond to irrigation efficiencies of 92-98% with respect to drainage and are attributed to deficit irrigation with minimal flushing. Perchlorate (ClO4) also accumulates under irrigated agroecosystems, primarily from irrigation water, and behaves similarly to Cl. Most NO3-N accumulation is below the root zone. Groundwater total dissolved solids (TDS) have increased by ≤960 mg/L and NO3-N by ≤9.4 mg/L since the early 1960s. Mobilization of salts that have accumulated under irrigated agroecosystems is projected to degrade groundwater much more in the future because of the essentially closed-basin status of the aquifer, with discharge occurring primarily through irrigation pumpage. TDS are projected to increase by an additional 2200 mg/L (median), ClO4 by 21 μg/L, and NO3-N by 52 mg/L. Water and salt balances should be considered in irrigation management in order to minimize salinization issues.

  18. The groundwater land-surface atmosphere connection: Soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini Katopodes; Kollet, Stefan J.

    2007-12-01

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can simulate spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-h period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land-surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  19. Studies on the integration of nanofiltration and soil treatment for municipal effluent reclamation as a groundwater supplement.

    PubMed

    Linlin, Wu; Xuan, Zhao; Meng, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Water shortage leads to increasing attention to artificial groundwater recharge by reclaimed water. An injection well is the most common recharge approach. In this paper, a new kind of integrated technology-short-term vadose soil treatment followed by nanofiltration-is recommended as pretreatment for artificial groundwater recharge by an injection well. Laboratory-scale experiments demonstrate that the short-term vadose soil can remove approximately 30% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and 40% of dissolved organic matter with a molecular weight less than 1 kDa. As a compensatory process of soil treatment, nanofiltration offers a favorable desalination and additional organics removal. The removal efficiencies for total dissolved solids and conductivity amount to 45 and 48%, respectively. The residual DOC in the final effluent is below 1.0 mg/L. In addition, short-term vadose soil offers effective elimination of aromatic protein-like and polysaccharide-like substances, which are detected as components of the membrane foulant. PMID:20112534

  20. Arsenic contamination of the soil-wheat system irrigated with high arsenic groundwater in the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Junting; Guo, Huaming; Wei, Chao

    2014-10-15

    As one of the most important crop in the world, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was irrigated with low As water and high As water. However, little is known about As cycling in the soil-wheat-water system. Two wheat fields (site G and site Y), irrigated with high dissolved As (178 μg L(-1)) groundwater and low dissolved As (8.2 μg L(-1)) surface water, respectively, were systematically sampled in the Hetao Basin, including irrigation water, soils and plants. The annual As (including dissolved As and suspended As) input per m(2) was estimated at 140 and 36.7 mg in site G and site Y, respectively. Topsoils of site G contained relatively higher As content (average 18.8 mg kg(-1)) than those of site Y (13.8 mg kg(-1)). Arsenic content of wheat grains in site G is systematically higher than in the site Y, which were positively correlated with non-specifically sorbed-As and amorphous Fe/Al oxide-bound As in topsoils. Arsenic-contaminated groundwater led to As accumulation in irrigated soils and the increase in As bioavailability, and subsequently resulted in the increase in As content of wheat grain. It suggested that less problematic water resources should be used for wheat irrigation in order to avoid As accumulation in the soil-plant system. PMID:25108250

  1. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  2. Groundwater quality and occurrence and distribution of selected constituents in the Aquia and Upper Patapsco aquifers, Naval Air Station Patuxent River, St. Mary's County, Maryland, July 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, Cheryl A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Baker, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    The Naval Air Station Patuxent River in southern Maryland has continued to expand in the first decade of the 21st century, contributing to rapid population growth in the surrounding area. The increase in population has caused State and County water managers and others to be concerned about the impact of population growth on the quantity and quality of groundwater supplies. The U.S. Geological Survey has been investigating the groundwater resources of the air station since 1998. As part of that ongoing investigation, groundwater was sampled in 2008 in six wells in the Aquia aquifer and two wells in the Upper Patapsco aquifer in the vicinity of Naval Air Station Patuxent River and Webster Outlying Field. Groundwater samples were analyzed for basic chemistry (field parameters, major ions, and nutrients) as well as several water-quality issues of concern including the occurrence of arsenic and tungsten, and saltwater intrusion. The results of the 2008 groundwater-quality sampling indicate that the overall quality of groundwater in the Aquia aquifer has not changed since 1943; data are too limited to determine if groundwater quality has changed in the Upper Patapsco aquifer. At one well in the Aquia aquifer, the arsenic concentration exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard for drinking water. Arsenic was not detected in samples from the Upper Patapsco aquifer. Tungsten concentrations were detected at low concentrations near the laboratory reporting level in all eight samples. There was no evidence of saltwater intrusion in any of the wells.

  3. New species of ice nucleating fungi in soil and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Janine; Hill, Tom; Franc, Gary; Poeschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere (1). Several types of PBAP have been identified as ice nuclei (IN) that can initiate the formation of ice at relatively high temperatures (2, 3). The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is due to a surface protein on the outer cell membrane that catalyses ice formation, for which the corresponding gene has been identified and detected by DNA analysis (2). Fungal spores or hyphae can also act as IN, but the biological structures responsible for their IN activity have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, properties, and effects of fungal IN in the atmosphere have neither been characterized nor quantified. Recent studies have shown that airborne fungi are highly diverse (1), and that atmospheric transport leads to efficient exchange of species among different ecosystems (4, 5). The results presented in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. 2012 (6) clearly demonstrate the presence of geographic boundaries in the global distribution of microbial taxa in air, and indicate that regional differences may be important for the effects of microorganisms on climate and public health. Thus, the objective of this study is the identification and quantification of ice nuclei-active fungi in and above ecosystems, and the unraveling of IN-active structures in fungi. Results obtained from the analysis of various soil and air samples and the presence of new fungal ice active species will be revealed. Thanks for collaboration and support to M.O. Andreae, J.-D. Förster, I. Germann-Müller, L.E. Hanson, S. Lelieveld, J. Odhiambo Obuya, T. Pooya, and C. Ruzene-Nespoli. The Max Planck Society (MPG), Ice Nuclei research UnIT (INUIT), and the German Research Foundation (PO1013/5-1) are acknowledged for financial support. 1. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., et al. (2009) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci., 106, 12814-12819 2. Georgakopoulos

  4. Preliminary development of a GIS-tool to assess threats to shallow groundwater quality from soil pollutants in Glasgow, UK (GRASP).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochartaigh, B. É. Ó.; Fordyce, F. M.; Ander, E. L.; Bonsor, H. C.

    2009-04-01

    The protection of groundwater and related surface water quality is a key aspect of the European Union Water Framework Directive and environmental legislation in many countries worldwide. Globally, the protection of urban groundwater resources and related ecosystem services is of growing concern as urbanisation increases. Although urban areas are often where groundwater resources are most in need of protection, there is frequently a lack of information about threats to groundwater quality. Most studies of soil and groundwater contamination, although detailed, are site-specific, and city-wide overviews are generally lacking. The British Geological Survey (BGS) is currently undertaking the Clyde Urban Super-Project (CUSP), delivering multi-disciplinary geoscience products for the Glasgow conurbation. Under this project, a GIS-based prioritisation tool known as GRASP (GRoundwater And Soil Pollutants) has been trialled to aid urban planning and sustainable development by providing a broad-scale assessment of threats to groundwater quality across the conurbation. GRASP identifies areas where shallow groundwater quality is at greatest threat from the leaching and downward movement of potentially harmful metals in the soil. Metal contamination is a known problem in many urban centres including Glasgow, which has a long industrial heritage and associated contamination legacy, notably with respect to Cr. GRASP is based primarily upon an existing British Standard - International Standards Organisation methodology to determine the leaching potential of metals from soils, which has been validated for 11 metals: Al, Fe, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn (BS-ISO 15175:2004). However, the GRASP tool is innovative as it combines assessments of soil leaching potential with soil metal content data to highlight threats to shallow groundwater quality. The input parameters required for GRASP (soil pH, clay, organic matter, sesquioxide and metal content) are based upon a systematic

  5. Treatment of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater Using Highly-Selective, Regenerable Anion-Exchange Resins at Edwards Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.

    2003-05-30

    Selective ion exchange is one of the most effective treatment technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from contaminated water because of its high efficiency without adverse impacts on the water quality caused by adding or removing any chemicals or nutrients. This report summarizes both the laboratory and a field pilot-scale studies to determine the ability and efficiency of the bifunctional synthetic resins to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from the contaminated groundwater at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. Regeneration of the resins after groundwater treatment was also evaluated using the FeCl{sub 3}-HCl regeneration technique recently developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On the basis of this study, the bifunctional resin, D-3696 was found to be highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed much better than one of the best commercial nitrate-selective resins (Purolite A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than the Purolite A-500 resin (with a relatively low selectivity). At an influent concentration of {approx} 450 {micro}g/L ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater, the bifunctional resin bed treated {approx} 40,000 empty bed volumes of groundwater before a significant breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred. The presence of relatively high concentrations of chloride and sulfate in site groundwater did not appear to affect the ability of the bifunctional resin to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. However, the presence of high iron or iron oxyhydroxides and/or biomass in groundwater caused a significant fouling of the resin beds and greatly influenced the effectiveness in regenerating the resins sorbed with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under such circumstances, a prefilter ({approx} 0.5-1 {micro}m) was found to be necessary to remove these particulates and to reduce the risk of fouling of the resin beds. Without significant fouling, the resin bed could be effectively regenerated by the FeCl{sub 3} displacement technique

  6. Comparison of Groundwater Recharge under Irrigated Cropland versus Natural Land in Clayey Soils under Mediterranean Climate in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Land use change from natural ecosystems to cropland influences groundwater recharge, including water quantity and quality. Soil core samples (0-11 m depth) from 6 boreholes beneath irrigated cropland (field crops) and 2 boreholes beneath natural ecosystems, in clayey soils undelain by sands, were analyzed for grain-size distribution, water content, and water-extractable Cl. Chloride mass balance and numerical 1D unsaturated zone flow and transport modeling were used for assessing average and transient recharge fluxes, and for testing matrix versus preferential flow hypotheses. Water contents under irrigated cropland are significantly higher than those found under natural land with similar grain-size distribution. Pore water Cl concentrations in deep unsaturated zone under irrigated cropland (900-2000 mg/L) are similar to recent local groundwater Cl and significantly lower than pore water Cl in deep unsaturated zone under natural ecosystems (3000 and 6000 mg/L, Figure 1). Calibrated models’ recharge rates through the soil matrix are much higher under irrigated cropland (90-230 mm/yr) than under natural ecosystems (0-2 mm/yr) and are consistent with groundwater balance estimates of average recharge (110-160 mm/yr). In contrast, matrix-recharge rates under natural ecosystems are much lower than those based on groundwater balance (50-80 mm/yr). While matrix flow in the unsaturated zone under irrigated cropland explains both groundwater and unsaturated zone observations, under natural land, preferential flow paths are needed for supporting unsaturated zone observations and pre-extensive-cultivation groundwater Cl concentrations. Plowing and irrigation prevent development of crack networks and promote matrix percolation through the clay, which flushes salts from previously immobile unsaturated zone pore-water. After flushing is completed, water recharge fluxes are correlated to precipitation of the recent and previous year, while the salinity of recharging water

  7. Experimental study on evaporation from seasonally frozen soils under various water, solute and groundwater conditions in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mousong; Huang, Jiesheng; Wu, Jingwei; Tan, Xiao; Jansson, Per-Erik

    2016-04-01

    Soil freezing and thawing significantly impact water balance in cold regions. To improve estimations of evaporation from seasonally frozen and saline soils, field experiments representing various water and solute conditions were conducted during a 5-month-period in Inner Mongolia, China. A mass balance method was used to estimate evaporation from frost tubes (5.5 × 300 cm) with treatments combining three solute contents (0.2%, 0.4%, and 0.6% g g-1 dry soil) with three initial groundwater table depth (GWTDs) (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 m). The dynamics of water, heat and solute transport in the frost tubes and in field plots were also investigated. Seasonal changes in evaporation rates were observed during soil freezing/thawing periods. Low evaporation rates were maintained when the soil was deeply frozen (e.g., in P3), and relatively higher values occurred at the beginning and the end of the experiments (e.g., in P1 and P5). The cumulative evaporation amount increased with an increase in initial solute content and declined with a lowering of the initial GWTDs. Solute accumulation with water in the surface layer during freezing decreased the osmotic potential in soil, resulting in obvious freezing point depressions and higher liquid water contents in the uppermost layer of soil. During the soil thawing periods, no evidence of any control of water availability on evaporation was noticed, although the surface soil contained large amounts of water. This study has led to an improved understanding of the coupled effects of water, heat and solute on evaporation from seasonally frozen saline soils and also has important implications for water and energy balance studies in cold regions.

  8. Air-soil exchange of PCBs: levels and temporal variations at two sites in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yolsal, Didem; Salihoglu, Güray; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-03-01

    Seasonal distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the air-soil intersection was determined for two regions: one with urban characteristics where traffic is dense (BUTAL) and the other representing the coastal zone (Mudanya). Fifty-one air and soil samples were simultaneously collected. Total PCB (Σ82 PCB) levels in the soil samples collected during a 1-year period ranged between 105 and 7,060 pg/g dry matter (dm) (BUTAL) and 110 and 2,320 pg/g dm (Mudanya). Total PCB levels in the gaseous phase were measured to be between 100 and 910 pg/m(3) (BUTAL) and 75 and 1,025 pg/m(3) (Mudanya). Variations in the concentrations were observed depending on the season. Though the PCB concentrations measured in the atmospheres of both regions in the summer months were high, they were found to be lower in winter. However, while soil PCB levels were measured to be high at BUTAL during summer months, they were found to be high during winter months in Mudanya. The direction and amount of the PCB movement were determined by calculating the gaseous phase change fluxes at air-soil intersection. While a general PCB movement from soil to air was found for BUTAL, the PCB movement from air to soil was calculated for the Mudanya region in most of the sampling events. During the warmer seasons PCB movement towards the atmosphere was observed due to evaporation from the soil. With decreases in the temperature, both decreases in the number of PCB congeners occurring in the air and a change in the direction of some congeners were observed, possibly caused by deposition from the atmosphere to the soil. 3-CB and 4-CB congeners were found to be dominant in the atmosphere, and 4-, 5-, and 6-CBs were found to dominate in the surface soils. PMID:24293299

  9. Linking soil water balance and water age with leaching of nitrate to groundwater in an agricultural setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigler, W.; Ewing, S. A.; Payn, R. A.; Jones, C. A.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of land management on groundwater chemistry are often poorly understood due to uncertainties about residence times of water and solutes in the unsaturated and the saturated zones. In central Montana, a strath terrace mantled with 20-100 cm of loess-derived clay loam is composed of 5-10 meters of gravel hosting a shallow aquifer overlying shale. The landform is isolated from mountain front stream recharge and drained by springs at the gravel/shale interface surrounding the terrace. Ninety three percent of the terrace surface is cultivated, predominantly for production of small grains. A typical cropping system on the terrace is a three year rotation of winter wheat, spring wheat or barley, and fallow, where each phase represents a different regime of evapotranspiration, recharge, fertilizer application, mineralization and nitrate leaching to groundwater. Age of water in discharge from the perched aquifer in the gravel can potentially be characterized by monitoring springs and streams that are ultimately sourced by infiltration and recharge across the terrace. Work presented here couples a simple daily soil water balance model with ground and surface water chemistry to infer travel times through the unsaturated and saturated zones. These results are evaluated against estimates of groundwater age derived from pool turnover time calculations, finite difference groundwater flow modeling, and use of chemical age tracers.

  10. Chemistry of groundwater of Al-Ahsa Oasis eastern region Saudi Arabia and its predictive effects on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Al-Zarah, Abdullah I

    2008-02-01

    Saudi Arabia is an arid and the largest country in the middle east with a total land area of 2.253 x 10(6) km2. Recent urban and rural expansion has shown manifold increases in water use in various sectors. Water resources are limited and non-renewable coupled with unpredicted scanty rainfall. In order to meet the rising water needs, evaluation of water quality is important for allocation to various uses. A total of 101 well water samples were collected from Al-Ahsa Oasis. Water samples were analyzed for total salt concentration, pH, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, Cl, SO4, NO3, F and B contents. Soil Salinity Development (SSD), adjusted sodium adsorption ratio (adj.SAR), adjusted sodium adsorption ratio (adj. R(Na)) and Exchangeable Sodium Percentage (ESP) were calculated. The EC of groundwater ranged between 1.23 and 5.05 dS m(-1). Sodium was the most abundant cation followed by Ca, Mg and K in descending order. Chloride was the most abundant anion followed by SO4 and HCO3 in groundwater of Al-Ahsa Oasis. A significant correlation was found between Na and Cl (R2 = 0.936). Thermodynamics calculation revealed that an appreciable amount of Ca and Mg is associated with Cl and SO4 ions. The SAR and ESP values are within the permissible limits according to Ayers and Westcot, 1985. The NO3 concentration is within safe limits for drinking purpose according to WHO (1998) standards. The Saturation Indices (SI) indicated that groundwater is under-saturated (negative SI) with respect to certain minerals (for example: calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite, halite, pyrite, fluorite and aragonite) and oversaturated (positive SI) with respect to some other minerals (For example: Goethite, Siderite and hematite). The negative saturation index (SI) reveals that most of minerals are in un-saturated state and will dissolve more Ca and Mg into the soil solution after irrigation. A good relationship exists between Cl and other ions (Na, Ca and Mg) as well as between SO4 and Ca and Mg ion of

  11. Effects of land cover on water table, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge: A Field observation and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.-K.; Schilling, K.E.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of land cover on water table, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge were studied with water level measurements collected from two monitoring wells over a period of 122 days. The two wells were installed under similar conditions except that one was drilled on the east side of a creek which was covered with grass, and the other on the west side of the creek which was burned into a bare ground. Substantial differences in water level fluctuations were observed at these two wells. The water level in the east grass (EG) well was generally lower and had much less response to rainfall events than the west no-grass (WNG) well. Grass cover lowered the water table, reduced soil moisture through ET losses, and thus reduced groundwater recharge. The amount of ET by the grass estimated with a water table recession model decreased exponentially from 7.6 mm/day to zero as the water table declined from near the ground surface to 1.42 m below the ground surface in 33 days. More groundwater recharge was received on the WNG side than on the EG side following large rainfall events and by significant slow internal downward drainage which may last many days after rainfall. Because of the decreased ET and increased R, significantly more baseflow and chemical loads may be generated from a bare ground watershed compared to a vegetated watershed. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the Effects of Horizontal Spatial Discretization on Interflow in the Soil Zone Using the Richards and Groundwater Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In many mountainous regions, a large proportion of streamflow originates as shallow subsurface storm flow (interflow) within the shallow soils of hillslopes. Infiltration can accumulate to form perched groundwater within the upper few meters of the soil horizon that drains to streams through both macropores and soil-matrix. Richards Equation has become a commonly used governing equation for simulating interflow in regional-scale models. Recent research has shown that optimal vertical discretization for Richards Equation near land surface and the water table is much smaller than the discretization typically used in basin-scale hydrologic models, yet little is known about optimal horizontal discretization or potential effects of horizontal discretization on interflow solutions. Most of the work related to the effects of discretization on the solution of Richards Equation has focused on the vertical infiltration problem. This study evaluates horizontal spatial discretization effects on interflow predictions using 1) a modified version of GSFLOW and 2) VS2DT. The modified GSFLOW couples Smith-Parlange 1-D infiltration equations with 3-D unconfined groundwater flow equation, whereas VS2DT uses Richards Equation to represent infiltration and variably saturated flow. Interflow solutions and breakthrough at the stream were compared using a model domain similar to Vauclin and others (1979) with horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 0.05-5m and vertical resolutions ranging between 0.05-1m, with horizontal flow path lengths of 25m to the stream. Variable horizontal spatial resolutions affected VS2DT interflow solutions (RMSE up to 0.12) and interflow breakthrough at the stream, whereas GSFLOW solutions were well correlated (RMSE <0.052). Interflow breakthrough was delayed by up to 10 days with increasing resolution in VS2DT, whereas GSFLOW breakthrough was consistently the same day. Results indicate that the solution of Richards Equation for soil-zone interflow is much

  13. Sensitivity of water stress in a two-layered sandy grassland soil to variations in groundwater depth and soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Seuntjens, P.; Joris, I.; Boënne, W.; Van Hoey, S.; Campling, P.; Cornelis, W. M.

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring and modeling tools may improve irrigation strategies in precision agriculture. We used non-invasive soil moisture monitoring, a crop growth and a soil hydrological model to predict soil-water content fluctuations and crop yield in a heterogeneous sandy grassland soil under supplementary irrigation. The sensitivity of the model to hydraulic parameters, water stress, crop yield and lower boundary conditions was assessed. Free drainage and incremental constant head conditions was implemented in a lower boundary sensitivity analysis. A time-dependent sensitivity analysis showed that changes in soil water content are mainly affected by the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and the Mualem-van Genuchten retention curve shape parameters n and α. Results further showed that different parameter optimization strategies (two-, three-, four- or six-parameter optimizations) did not affect the calculated water stress and water content as significantly as does the bottom boundary. For this case, a two-parameter scenario, where Ks was optimized for each layer under the condition of a constant groundwater depth at 135-140 cm, performed best. A larger yield reduction, and a larger number and longer duration of stress conditions occurred in the free drainage condition as compared to constant boundary conditions. Numerical results showed that optimal irrigation scheduling using the aforementioned water stress calculations can save up to 12-22 % irrigation water as compared to the current irrigation regime. This resulted in a yield increase of 4.5-6.5 %, simulated by crop growth model.

  14. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  15. Historical changes in air temperature are evident in temperature fluxes measured in the sub-soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Fiona; McCormick, Benjamin; Hallett, Paul; Wookey, Philip; Hopkins, David

    2013-04-01

    Warming trends in soil temperature have implications for a plethora of soil processes, including exacerbated climate change through the net release of greenhouse gases. Whereas long-term datasets of air temperature changes are abundant, a search of scientific literature reveals a lack of information on soil temperature changes and their specific consequences. We analysed five long-term data series collected in the UK (Dundee and Armagh) and Canada (Charlottetown, Ottawa and Swift Current). They show that the temperatures of soils at 5 - 20 cm depth, and sub-soils at 30 - 150 cm depth, increased in line with air temperature changes over the period 1958 - 2003. Differences were found, however, between soil and air temperatures when data were sub-divided into seasons. In spring, soil temperature warming ranged from 0.19°C at 30 cm in Armagh to 4.30°C at 50 cm in Charlottetown. In summer, however, the difference was smaller and ranged from 0.21°C at 10 cm in Ottawa to 3.70°C at 50 cm in Charlottetown. Winter temperatures were warmer in soil and ranged from 0.45°C at 5 cm in Charlottetown to 3.76°C at 150 cm in Charlottetown. There were significant trends in changes to soil temperature over time, whereas air temperature trends tended only to be significant in winter (changes range from 1.27°C in Armagh to 3.35°C in Swift Current). Differences in the seasonal warming patterns between air and soil temperatures have potential implications for the parameterization of models of biogeochemical cycling.

  16. Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Nitrate to Distinguish Contaminant Sources in Hanford Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark; Bill, Markus

    2008-08-01

    The nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotopic compositions of nitrate in the environment are primarily a function of the source of the nitrate. The ranges of isotopic compositions for nitrate resulting from common sources are outlined in Figure 1 from Kendall (1998). As noted on Figure 1, processes such as microbial metabolism can modify the isotopic compositions of the nitrate, but the effects of these processes are generally predictable. At Hanford, nitrate and other nitrogenous compounds were significant components of most of the chemical processes used at the site. Most of the oxygen in nitrate chemicals (e.g., nitric acid) is derived from atmospheric oxygen, giving it a significantly higher {delta}{sup 18}O value (+23.5{per_thousand}) than naturally occurring nitrate that obtains most of its oxygen from water (the {delta}{sup 18}O of Hanford groundwater ranges from -14{per_thousand} to -18{per_thousand}). This makes it possible to differentiate nitrate from Hanford site activities from background nitrate at the site (including most fertilizers that might have been used prior to the Department of Energy plutonium production activities at the site). In addition, the extreme thermal and chemical conditions that occurred during some of the waste processing procedures and subsequent waste storage in select single-shell tanks resulted in unique nitrate isotopic compositions that can be used to identify those waste streams in soil and groundwater at the site (Singleton et al., 2005; Christensen et al., 2007). This report presents nitrate isotope data for soil and groundwater samples from the Hanford 200 Areas and discusses the implications of that data for potential sources of groundwater contamination.

  17. Simplified continuous simulation model for investigating effects of controlled drainage on long-term soil moisture dynamics with a shallow groundwater table.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaiwei; Tong, Juxiu; Luo, Wenbing; Wang, Xiugui; Yang, Jinzhong

    2016-08-01

    Accurate modeling of soil water content is required for a reasonable prediction of crop yield and of agrochemical leaching in the field. However, complex mathematical models faced the difficult-to-calibrate parameters and the distinct knowledge between the developers and users. In this study, a deterministic model is presented and is used to investigate the effects of controlled drainage on soil moisture dynamics in a shallow groundwater area. This simplified one-dimensional model is formulated to simulate soil moisture in the field on a daily basis and takes into account only the vertical hydrological processes. A linear assumption is proposed and is used to calculate the capillary rise from the groundwater. The pipe drainage volume is calculated by using a steady-state approximation method and the leakage rate is calculated as a function of soil moisture. The model is successfully calibrated by using field experiment data from four different pipe drainage treatments with several field observations. The model was validated by comparing the simulations with observed soil water content during the experimental seasons. The comparison results demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the model in the prediction of average soil moisture values. The input data required to run the model are widely available and can be measured easily in the field. It is observed that controlled drainage results in lower groundwater contribution to the root zone and lower depth of percolation to the groundwater, thus helping in the maintenance of a low level of soil salinity in the root zone. PMID:27126870

  18. Impact of rainfall distribution on the parameterisation of a soil-moisture balance model of groundwater recharge in equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileham, L.; Taylor, R.; Thompson, J.; Todd, M.; Tindimugaya, C.

    2007-12-01

    Robust calibration of hydrological models, driven by gridded precipitation data derived from either Regional Climate Models or statistical downscaling of General Circulation Models, is essential to the quantitative analysis of the impact of climate change on catchment hydrology and freshwater resources. Predicted warming in equatorial Africa, accompanied by greater evaporation and more frequent heavy precipitation events, will have significant but uncertain impacts on terrestrial hydrology. In this study, we examine how the spatial representation of precipitation influences the parameterisation and calibration of a soil-moisture balance model (SMBM) in the humid tropics of equatorial Uganda. The advantages of SMBMs are that they explicitly account for changes in soil moisture and partition effective precipitation into groundwater recharge and runoff. Despite comparable mean annual totals (<7% difference) between gridded (i.e., interpolated) and point-based precipitation data, application of more uniformly distributed, gridded precipitation to a semi-distributed, SMBM calibrated using point- based precipitation over a 15-year period (1965 to 1979), underestimates runoff and recharge by 30% and 55% respectively. Calibration of the SMBM using gridded precipitation requires an 18% reduction in potential evapotranspiration and a 36% increase in the runoff-coefficient that are inconsistent with local, point-based observations of these parameters. Although current efforts seek to improve the distribution and duration of key hydrological measurements ( e.g., soil moisture, groundwater levels) in data-poor regions, the parameterisation of gridded hydrological models remains largely empirical due to the discrepancy between gridded and locally observed hydrological parameter.

  19. AIR DRYING AND PRETREATMENT EFFECTS ON SOIL SULFATE SORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drying, freezing, and refrigeration are commonly employed to facilitate the handling and storage of soil samples on which chemical, biological and physical analyses are to be performed. hese laboratory protocol have the potential to alter soil chemical characteristics and may res...

  20. CONTROL OF AROMATIC WASTE AIR STREAMS BY SOIL BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three soils were examined for the ability to degrade hydrocarbon vapors of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX). Each of these compounds are major aromatic constituents of gasolines. The soils examined were Rubicon Sand from Traverse City, Michigan, Durant Loam fro...

  1. Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be tra...

  2. Simple system for part-per-billion-level volatile organic compound analysis in groundwater and urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Ljiubov; Caruana, Daren J.; Williams, David E.

    2002-04-01

    A simple device is described, capable of measuring reliably and reproducibly low levels (0.1 ppbv with a total analysis time of approximately 40 min) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air and in the headspace of groundwater. The VOCs were pre-concentrated onto a small bed of Tenax TA®, and subsequently released by temperature-programmed thermal desorption (TPD). TPD profiles were recorded by a solid-state sensor array. The success of the method was based on a well defined TPD peak shape if the absorbent bed was sufficiently thin, linearity and additivity of appropriately transformed sensor signals, the use of a very stable sensor array utilizing chromium-titanium oxide as the sensor material and devices with different electrode gaps and the use of dry air as the carrier gas. Successful analysis of groundwater headspace was achieved by diluting the sample stream 1:4 with dry air (which prevented saturation of the adsorbent surface by water) and by introducing a dry air purge of the bed at room temperature before desorption (which removed excess water from the bed and hence stabilized the sensor baseline before the desorption). Principal components analysis and spectral decomposition (SD) methods were used successfully for identification of VOCs and quantification in simple mixtures. The SD method expressed the measured desorption trace on the elements of the sensor array as the sum of a small number of sensor array spectra. The individual desorption traces for each characteristic sensor spectrum thus derived could be further resolved by a peak fitting procedure because the TPD trace had a well defined form, in which both peak temperature and peak width in TPD correlated with the boiling temperature of the VOCs, and peak width varied according to functional type: phenols>aliphatics>alkyl-substituted benzenes.

  3. Removal of volatile and semivolatile organic contamination from soil by air and steam flushing.

    PubMed

    Sleep, B E; McClure, P D

    2001-07-01

    A soil core, obtained from a contaminated field site, contaminated with a mixture of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC) was subjected to air and steam flushing. Removal rates of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds were monitored during flushing. Air flushing removed a significant portion of the VOC present in the soil, but a significant decline in removal rate occurred due to decreasing VOC concentrations in the soil gas phase. Application of steam flushing after air flushing produced a significant increase in contaminant removal rate for the first 4 to 5 pore volumes of steam condensate. Subsequently, contaminant concentrations decreased slowly with additional pore volumes of steam flushing. The passage of a steam volume corresponding to 11 pore volumes of steam condensate reduced the total VOC concentration in the soil gas (at 20 degrees C) by a factor of 20 to 0.07 mg/l. The corresponding total SVOC concentration in the condensate declined from 11 to 3 mg/l. Declines in contaminant removal rates during both air and steam flushing indicated rate-limited removal consistent with the persistence of a residual organic phase, rate-limited desorption, or channeling. Pressure gradients were much higher for steam flushing than for air flushing. The magnitude of the pressure gradients encountered during steam flushing for this soil indicates that, in addition to rate-limited contaminant removal, the soil permeability (2.1 x 10(-9) cm2) would be a limiting factor in the effectiveness of steam flushing. PMID:11475159

  4. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  5. The role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil temperature, an important component of land surface, can influence the climate through its effects on surface energy and water budgets and resulted changes in regional atmospheric circulation. However, the effects of soil temperature on climate variations have been less discussed. This study investigates the role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in influencing summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia by means of regional climate model (RCM) simulations. For this aim, two long-term simulations with and without subsurface soil temperature feedbacks are performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. From our investigation, it is evident that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks make a dominant contribution to amplifying summer surface air temperature variability over the arid/semi-arid regions. Further analysis reveals that subsurface soil temperature exhibits an asymmetric effect on summer daytime and nighttime surface air temperature variability, with a stronger effect on daily minimum temperature variability than that of daily maximum temperature variability. This study provides the first RCM-based demonstration that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks play an important role in influencing climate variability over East Asia, such as summer surface air temperature. In the meanwhile, the model bias should be recognized. The results achieved by this study thus need to be further confirmed in a multi-model framework to eliminate the model dependence.

  6. An investigation of groundwater organics, soil minerals, and activated carbon on the complexation, adsorption, and separation of technetium-99

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Dowlen, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes studies on the interactions of technetium-99 (Tc) with different organic compounds and soil minerals under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The report is divided into four parts and includes (1) effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the complexation and solubility of Tc, (2) complexation between Tc and trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solutions, (3) adsorption of Tc on soil samples from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), and (4) adsorption and separation of Tc on activated carbon. Various experimental techniques were applied to characterize and identify Tc complexation with organic compounds and TCE, including liquid-liquid extraction, membrane filtration, size exclusion, and gel chromatography. Results indicate, within the experimental error, Tc (as pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}) did not appear to form complexes with groundwater or natural organic matter under both atmospheric and reducing conditions. However, Tc can form complexes with certain organic compounds or specific functional groups such as salicylate. Tc did not appear to form complexes with TCE in aqueous solution.Both liquid-liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gave no indication Tc was complexed with TCE. The correlations between Tc and TCE concentrations in monitoring wells at PGDP may be a coincidence because TCE was commonly used as a decontamination reagent. Once TCE and Tc entered the groundwater, they behaved similarly because both TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TCE are poorly adsorbed by soils. An effective remediation technique to remove TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from PGDP contaminated groundwater is needed. One possibility is the use of an activated carbon adsorption technique developed in this study.

  7. Analysis of the NASA AirMOSS Root Zone Soil Water and Soil Temperature from Three North American Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagimoto, Y.; Cuenca, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Root zone soil water and temperature are controlling factors for soil organic matter accumulation and decomposition which contribute significantly to the CO2 flux of different ecosystems. An in-situ soil observation protocol developed at Oregon State University has been deployed to observe soil water and temperature dynamics in seven ecological research sites in North America as part of the NASA AirMOSS project. Three instrumented profiles defining a transect of less than 200 m are installed at each site. All three profiles collect data for in-situ water and temperature dynamics employing seven soil water and temperature sensors installed at seven depth levels and one infrared surface temperature sensor monitoring the top of the profile. In addition, two soil heat flux plates and associated thermocouples are installed at one of three profiles at each site. At each profile, a small 80 cm deep access hole is typically made, and all below ground sensors are installed into undisturbed soil on the side of the hole. The hole is carefully refilled and compacted so that root zone soil water and temperature dynamics can be observed with minimum site disturbance. This study focuses on the data collected from three sites: a) Tonzi Ranch, CA; b) Metolius, OR and c) BERMS Old Jack Pine Site, Saskatchewan, Canada. The study describes the significantly different seasonal root zone water and temperature dynamics under the various physical and biological conditions at each site. In addition, this study compares the soil heat flux values estimated by the standard installation using the heat flux plates and thermocouples installed near the surface with those estimated by resolving the soil heat storage based on the soil water and temperature data collected over the total soil profile.

  8. Assessment of groundwater, soil-gas, and soil contamination at the Vietnam Armor Training Facility, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, Georgia, assessed the groundwater, soil gas, and soil for contaminants at the Vietnam Armor Training Facility (VATF) at Fort Gordon, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included the detection of organic compounds in the groundwater and soil gas, and inorganic compounds in the soil. In addition, organic contaminant assessment included organic compounds classified as explosives and chemical agents in selected areas. The assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Four passive samplers were deployed in groundwater wells at the VATF in Fort Gordon. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected above the method detection level at all four wells. The only other volatile organic compounds detected above their method detection level were undecane and pentadecane, which were detected in two of the four wells sampled. Soil-gas samplers were deployed at 72 locations in a grid pattern across the VATF. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 71 of the 72 samplers (one sampler was destroyed in the field and not analyzed) at levels above the method detection level, and the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene was detected above the detection level in 31 of the 71 samplers that were analyzed. Other volatile organic compounds detected above their respective method detection levels were naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, tridecane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and perchloroethene. Subsequent to the soil-gas survey, four areas determined to have elevated contaminant mass were selected and sampled for explosives and chemical agents. No detections of explosives or chemical agents above their

  9. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed. PMID:25597683

  10. Interactions between root water uptake, groundwater levels, and soil moisture dynamics in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C.; Loheide, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    In high elevation meadow environments within the Sierra Nevada Mountains soil moisture is controlled by the position of the water table and the partitioning of evapotranspiration through root water uptake and evaporation at the land surface. Because of the relative lack of precipitation over the growing season plant communities rely on stored soil moisture and shallow groundwater during the dry summer months. Field result, from Tuolumne Meadows show both temporally and spatially dynamic soil moisture patterning caused by the timing of spring snowmelt and subsequent drying of the meadow. Through the use of numerical modeling we are able to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of soil moisture and the potential impact on water use by plant communities. Results highlight the importance of both the position of the water table in the early growing season and sediment layering within the meadow on plant water up take. These results have implications for current meadow restorations projects and stress the importance of designing projects that focus on soil moisture dynamics in order to supply sufficient water for native plant communities.

  11. ANALYSIS OF MODIFIED WET-AIR OXIDATION FOR SOIL DETOXIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of research on wet-air oxidation as a method for the destruction of hazardous wastes. For organics in the presence of large amounts of water, the water need not be vaporized during wet-air oxidation, an attractive characteristic for energy conserva...

  12. Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkin, Thomas J.; Favara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this

  13. Task summary for cone penetrating testing sounding and soil and groundwater sampling Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Salmon Site (SS), located in Mississippi, was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion testes conducted deep underground in the Tatum Salt Dome between 1964 and 1970. As a consequence radionuclides generated during the testing were released into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. US DOE is conducting a series of investigations as a part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (under CERCLA) This report summarizes the cone penetrometer testing (CPT) and sampling program conducted in fall 1993, providing a description of the activities and a discussion of the results. The objectives of the CPT program were to determine subsurface conditions and stratification; determine the depth to the potentiometric surface; obtain soil samples from predetermined depths; obtain groundwater samples at predetermined depths.

  14. Decomposition Odour Profiling in the Air and Soil Surrounding Vertebrate Carrion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chemical profiling of decomposition odour is conducted in the environmental sciences to detect malodourous target sources in air, water or soil. More recently decomposition odour profiling has been employed in the forensic sciences to generate a profile of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by decomposed remains. The chemical profile of decomposition odour is still being debated with variations in the VOC profile attributed to the sample collection technique, method of chemical analysis, and environment in which decomposition occurred. To date, little consideration has been given to the partitioning of odour between different matrices and the impact this has on developing an accurate VOC profile. The purpose of this research was to investigate the decomposition odour profile surrounding vertebrate carrion to determine how VOCs partition between soil and air. Four pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their odour profile monitored over a period of two months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the VOC profile of the surrounding environment. Samples were collected from the soil below and the air (headspace) above the decomposed remains using sorbent tubes and analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 249 compounds were identified but only 58 compounds were common to both air and soil samples. This study has demonstrated that soil and air samples produce distinct subsets of VOCs that contribute to the overall decomposition odour. Sample collection from only one matrix will reduce the likelihood of detecting the complete spectrum of VOCs, which further confounds the issue of determining a complete and accurate decomposition odour profile. Confirmation of this profile will enhance the performance of cadaver-detection dogs that are tasked with detecting decomposition odour in both soil and air to locate victim remains. PMID:24740412

  15. Sensitivity of water stress in a two-layered sandy grassland soil to variations in groundwater depth and soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Seuntjens, P.; Joris, I.; Boënne, W.; Van Hoey, S.; Campling, P.; Cornelis, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and modelling tools may improve irrigation strategies in precision agriculture. We used non-invasive soil moisture monitoring, a crop growth and a soil hydrological model to predict soil water content fluctuations and crop yield in a heterogeneous sandy grassland soil under supplementary irrigation. The sensitivity of the soil hydrological model to hydraulic parameters, water stress, crop yield and lower boundary conditions was assessed after integrating models. Free drainage and incremental constant head conditions were implemented in a lower boundary sensitivity analysis. A time-dependent sensitivity analysis of the hydraulic parameters showed that changes in soil water content are mainly affected by the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and the Mualem-van Genuchten retention curve shape parameters n and α. Results further showed that different parameter optimization strategies (two-, three-, four- or six-parameter optimizations) did not affect the calculated water stress and water content as significantly as does the bottom boundary. In this case, a two-parameter scenario, where Ks was optimized for each layer under the condition of a constant groundwater depth at 135-140 cm, performed best. A larger yield reduction, and a larger number and longer duration of stress conditions occurred in the free drainage condition as compared to constant boundary conditions. Numerical results showed that optimal irrigation scheduling using the aforementioned water stress calculations can save up to 12-22 % irrigation water as compared to the current irrigation regime. This resulted in a yield increase of 4.5-6.5 %, simulated by the crop growth model.

  16. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Soil-air exchange controls on background atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo, A.; Dachs, J.; Jones, K. C.; Barceló, D.

    2011-09-01

    Soils are the major terrestrial reservoir of persistent organic pollutants, and thus net volatilization from soil, when it happens, may exert a control on the atmospheric occurrence and variability of organic pollutants. Here, we report and discuss the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) such as hexachlorobencene (HCB), hexaclorocyclohexanes (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the atmosphere and in soils, their measured fugacities in soil, the soil-air partition coefficients (KSA) and soil-air fugacity ratios (fs/fa) in rural background areas of N-NE Spain and N-NW England. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in Spain and UK to assess seasonal variability and differences between sampling sites. KSA values were significantly dependent on soil temperature and soil organic matter quantity, and to a minor extent on organic matter type. HCH isomers and DDT metabolites in soil are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere at rural background areas of Spain with a tendency to volatilize and deposit during warm and cold periods, respectively. The mixture of HCH and DDT found in the atmosphere is clearly strongly influenced by the mixture of HCH and DDT which escapes from soil, with significant correlations between them (r2 ranging between 0.74-0.76 and p-level < 0.001 for the Ebro sampling sites), thus suggesting a close coupling of air and soil concentrations demonstrating that net volatilization from soil control the atmospheric levels of OCPs in the Northern Spain background atmosphere. Conversely, soils at rural UK sites were usually a sink for atmospheric DDT and HCH, but not for HCB. The negative statistically significant relationship found between log KSA and the log (fs/fa) ratio, suggests that high latitude regions, due to the high soil organic matter content and lower temperatures, will act as larger traps and accumulate more atmospheric OCPs. Thus, the extent to which soils are secondary sources to the atmosphere is

  18. Soil-Air exchange controls on background atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo, A.; Dachs, J.; Jones, K. C.; Barceló, D.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are the major terrestrial reservoir of persistent organic pollutants, and thus net volatilization from soil, when it happens, may exert a control on the atmospheric occurrence and variability of organic pollutants. Here, we report and discuss the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) such as hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexaclorocyclohexanes (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the atmosphere and in soils, their measured fugacities in soil, the soil-air partition coefficients (KSA) and soil-air fugacity ratios (fs/fa) in rural background areas of N-NE Spain and N-NW England. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in Spain and UK to assess seasonal variability and differences between sampling sites. KSA values were significantly dependent on soil temperature and soil organic matter quantity, and to a minor extent on organic matter type. HCH isomers and DDT metabolites in soil are close to equilibrium with the overlying atmosphere at rural background areas of Spain with a tendency to volatilize and deposit during warm and cold periods, respectively. The mixture of HCH and DDT found in the atmosphere is clearly strongly influenced by the mixture of HCH and DDT which escapes from soil, with significant correlations between them (r2 ranging between 0.63-0.76 and p-level<0.001 for the Ebro sampling sites), thus suggesting a close coupling of air and soil concentrations, demonstrating that net volatilization from soil control the atmospheric levels of OCPs in the Northern Spain background atmosphere. Conversely, soils at rural UK sites were usually a sink for atmospheric DDT and HCH, but not for HCB. The negative statistically significant relationship found between log KSA and the log (fs/fa) ratio, suggests that high latitude regions, due to the high soil organic matter content and lower temperatures, will act as larger traps and accumulate more atmospheric OCPs. Thus, the extent to which soils are secondary sources to the atmosphere

  19. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  20. Long-term (1930-2010) trends in groundwater levels in Texas: influences of soils, landcover and water use.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu

    2014-08-15

    Rapid groundwater depletion has raised grave concerns about sustainable development in many parts of Texas, as well as in other parts of the world. Previous hydrologic investigations on groundwater levels in Texas were conducted mostly on aquifer-specific basis, and hence lacked state-wide panoramic view. The aim of this study was to present a qualitative overview of long-term (1930-2010) trends in groundwater levels in Texas and identify spatial patterns by applying different statistical (boxplots, correlation-regression, hierarchical cluster analysis) and geospatial techniques (Moran's I, Local Indicators of Spatial Association) on 136,930 groundwater level observations from Texas Water Development Board's database. State-wide decadal median water-levels declined from about 14 m from land surface in the 1930s to about 36 m in the 2000s. Number of counties with deeper median water-levels (water-level depth>100 m) increased from 2 to 13 between 1930s and 2000s, accompanied by a decrease in number of counties having shallower median water-levels (water-level depth<25 m) from 134 to 113. Water-level declines across Texas, however, mostly followed logarithmic trends marked by leveling-off phenomena in recent times. Assessment of water-levels by Groundwater Management Areas (GMA), management units created to address groundwater depletion issues, indicated hotspots of deep water-levels in Texas Panhandle and GMA 8 since the 1960s. Contrasting patterns in water use, landcover, geology and soil properties distinguished Texas Panhandle from GMA 8. Irrigated agriculture is the major cause of depletion in the Texas Panhandle as compared to increasing urbanization in GMA 8. Overall our study indicated that use of robust spatial and statistical methods can reveal important details about the trends in water-level changes and shed lights on the associated factors. Due to very generic nature, techniques used in this study can also be applied to other areas with similar eco

  1. Soil concentrations, occurrence, sources and estimation of air-soil exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Breivik, Knut; Jones, Kevin C

    2016-08-15

    Past studies have shown potentially increasing levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Indian environment. This is the first attempt to investigate the occurrence of PCBs in surface soil and estimate diffusive air-soil exchange, both on a regional scale as well as at local level within the metropolitan environment of India. From the north, New Delhi and Agra, east, Kolkata, west, Mumbai and Goa and Chennai and Bangalore in the southern India were selected for this study. 33 PCB congeners were quantified in surface soil and possible sources were derived using positive matrix factorization model. Net flux directions of PCBs were estimated in seven major metropolitan cities of India along urban-suburban-rural transects. Mean Σ33PCBs concentration in soil (12ng/g dry weight) was nearly twice the concentration found in global background soil, but in line with findings from Pakistan and urban sites of China. Higher abundance of the heavier congeners (6CB-8CB) was prevalent mostly in the urban centers. Cities like Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata with evidence of ongoing PCB sources did not show significant correlation with soil organic carbon (SOC). This study provides evidence that soil is acting as sink for heavy weight PCB congeners and source for lighter congeners. Atmospheric transport is presumably a controlling factor for occurrence of PCBs in less polluted sites of India. PMID:27136304

  2. Identifying groundwater recharge connections in the Moscow (USA) sub-basin using isotopic tracers and a soil moisture routing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, Jasper; Brooks, Erin; Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Grader, George; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-06-01

    Globally, aquifers are suffering from large abstractions resulting in groundwater level declines. These declines can be caused by excessive abstraction for drinking water, irrigation purposes or industrial use. Basaltic aquifers also face these conflicts. A large flood basalt area (1.1 × 105 km2) can be found in the Northwest of the USA. This Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick series of basalt flows of Miocene age. The two major hydrogeological units (Wanapum and Grand Ronde formations) are widely used for water abstraction. The mean decline over recent decades has been 0.6 m year-1. At present day, abstraction wells are drying up, and base flow of rivers is reduced. At the eastern part of CRBG, the Moscow sub-basin on the Idaho/Washington State border can be found. Although a thick poorly permeable clay layer exists on top of the basalt aquifer, groundwater level dynamics suggest that groundwater recharge occurs at certain locations. A set of wells and springs has been monitored bi-weekly for 9 months for δ18O and δ2H. Large isotopic fluctuations and d-excess values close to the meteoric water line in some wells are indicating that recharge occurs at the granite/basalt interface through lateral flow paths in and below the clay. A soil moisture routing (SMR) model showed that most recharge occurs on the granitic mountains. The basaltic aquifer receives recharge from these sedimentary zones around the granite/basalt interface. The identification of these types of areas is of major importance for future managed-aquifer recharge solutions to solve problems of groundwater depletion.

  3. Modeling aerosol suspension from soils and oceans as sources of micropollutants to air.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asif; MacLeod, Matthew; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Soil and marine aerosol suspension are two physical mass transfer processes that are not usually included in models describing fate and transport of environmental pollutants. Here, we review the literature on soil and marine aerosol suspension and estimate aerosol suspension mass transfer velocities for inclusion in multimedia models, as a global average and on a 1 x 1 scale. The yearly, global average mass transfer velocity for soil aerosol suspension is estimated to be 6 x 10(-10)mh(-1), approximately an order of magnitude smaller than marine aerosol suspension, which is estimated to be 8 x 10(-9)mh(-1). Monthly averages of these velocities can be as high as 10(-7)mh(-1) and 10(-5)mh(-1) for soil and marine aerosol suspension, respectively, depending on location. We use a unit-world multimedia model to analyze the relevance of these two suspension processes as a mechanism that enhances long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants. This is done by monitoring a metric of long-range transport potential, phi-one thousand (phi1000), that denotes the fraction of modeled emissions to air, water or soil in a source region that reaches a distance of 1000 km in air. We find that when the yearly, globally averaged mass transfer velocity is used, marine aerosol suspension increases phi1000 only fractionally for both emissions to air and water. However, enrichment of substances in marine aerosols, or speciation between ionic and neutral forms in ocean water may increase the influence of this surface-to-air transfer process. Soil aerosol suspension can be the dominant process for soil-to-air transfer in an emission-to-soil scenario for certain substances that have a high affinity to soil. When a suspension mass transfer velocity near the maximum limit is used, soil suspension remains important if the emissions are made to soil, and marine aerosol suspension becomes important regardless of if emissions are made to air or water compartments. We recommend that multimedia models

  4. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Turick, Charles E.; Apel, William W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed.

  5. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Turick, C.E.; Apel, W.W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed. 10 figs.

  6. How can we get a better estimation for vegetation water uptake in groundwater discharge areas using high frequency soil moisture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration induces diurnal signal of soil moisture, and also of water table in shallow water table environments. Shallow water table diurnal signal was widespreadly used for estimation of groundwater uptake by plants. The limitation of all groundwater signal based methods lies in the difficulty of specific yield estimation. In this paper a new technique is demonstrated by which more exact evapotranspiration values can be calculated from aggregated soil moisture profile dataset taking into account diurnally changing replenishment rate. The technique is of great benefit to provide sufficient accuracy without soil specific calibration. New technique was successfully tested on the soil moisture profile dataset of a riparian alder forest in Hidegvíz Valley experimental catchment in the summer of 2013. Comparing traditional evapotranspiration estimation from soil moisture data the new technique gives much higher water uptake taking into account soil moisture continuous replenishment from shallow groundwater. The water uptake seems to be acceptable if oasis effect is taken into account in a well watered valley situation in a period when hot and dry environment can add significant amount of heat enhancing transpiration. Soil moisture replenishment rates from groundwater can provide high portion (60-80This publication has been supported by funds from: OTKA (NN 79835) and TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0013 project. The research of Zoltán Gribovszki was supported by the European Union and the State of Hungary, co-financed by the European Social Fund in the framework of TÁMOP 4.2.4. A/2-11-1-2012-0001 'National Excellence Program'. Keywords: groundwater evapotranspiration, diurnal fluctuation, forest vegetation

  7. Hot air injection for removal of dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid contaminants from low-permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.C.

    1996-08-01

    The performance of soil vapor extraction systems for the recovery of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds is potentially enhanced by the injection of heated air to increase soil temperatures. The soil temperature increase is expected to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) performance by increasing target compound vapor pressures and by increasing soil permeability through drying. The vapor pressure increase due to temperature rise relieves the vapor pressure limit on the feasibility of soil vapor extraction. However, the system still requires an air flow through the soil system to deliver heat and to recover mobilized contaminants. Although the soil permeability can be increased through drying, very low permeability soils and low permeability soils adjacent to high permeability air flow pathways will be treated slowly, if at all. AR thermal enhancement methods face this limitation. Heated air injection offers advantages relative to other thermal techniques, including low capital and operation costs. Heated air injection is at a disadvantage relative to other thermal techniques due to the low heat capacity of air. To be effective, heated air injection requires that higher air flows be established than for steam injection or radio frequency heating. Heated air injection is not economically feasible for the stratified soil system developed as a standard test for this document. This is due to the inability to restrict heated air flow to the clay stratum when a low-resistance air flow pathway is available in the adjoining sand. However, the technology should be especially attractive, both technically and economically, for low-volatile contaminant recovery from relatively homogeneous soil formations. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Extreme environments in the critical zone: Linking acidification hazard of acid sulfate soils in mound spring discharge zones to groundwater evolution and mantle degassing.

    PubMed

    Shand, Paul; Gotch, Travis; Love, Andrew; Raven, Mark; Priestley, Stacey; Grocke, Sonia

    2016-10-15

    A decrease in flow from the iconic travertine mound springs of the Great Artesian Basin in South Australia has led to the oxidation of hypersulfidic soils and extreme soil acidification, impacting their unique groundwater dependent ecosystems. The build-up of pyrite in these systems occurred over millennia by the discharge of deep artesian sulfate-containing groundwaters through organic-rich subaqueous soils. Rare iron and aluminium hydroxysulfate minerals form thick efflorescences due to high evaporation rates in this arid zone environment, and the oxidised soils pose a significant risk to local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The distribution of extreme acidification hazard is controlled by regional variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. Geochemical processes fractionate acidity and alkalinity into separate parts of the discharge zone allowing potentially extreme environments to form locally. Differences in groundwater chemistry in the aquifer along flow pathways towards the spring discharge zone are related to a range of processes including mineral dissolution and redox reactions, which in turn are strongly influenced by degassing of the mantle along deep crustal fractures. There is thus a connection between shallow critical zone ecosystems and deep crustal/mantle processes which ultimately control the formation of hypersulfidic soils and the potential for extreme geochemical environments. PMID:27256909

  9. Soil cleanup by in-situ aeration. XXII. Effect of air channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.J.; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Gomez-Lahoz, C.

    1995-07-01

    A distributed diffusion model for soil vapor extraction (SVE) is developed in which air advection occurs through conducting channels or tubes of high air permeability; volatile organic compound (VOC) is removed by diffusion from the surrounding porous medium to these channels, where it is removed by advection. The results obtained with this model are similar to those obtained with other distributed diffusion SVE models in that initial rapid VOC removal is followed by a rather rapid decrease in effluent soil gas VOC concentration and extended tailing of the cleanup. It is noted that soil gas VOC concentration rebound after SVE well shutdown provides useful information about the extent of cleanup only if the soil gas is recovered from the domain which was actually contaminated.

  10. Utilization of air pollution control residues for the stabilization/solidification of trace element contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Travar, I; Kihl, A; Kumpiene, J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stabilization/solidification (S/S) of trace element-contaminated soil using air pollution control residues (APCRs) prior to disposal in landfill sites. Two soil samples (with low and moderate concentrations of organic matter) were stabilized using three APCRs that originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste, bio-fuels and a mixture of coal and crushed olive kernels. Two APCR/soil mixtures were tested: 30% APCR/70% soil and 50% APCR/50% soil. A batch leaching test was used to study immobilization of As and co-occurring metals Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. Solidification was evaluated by measuring the unconfined compression strength (UCS). Leaching of As was reduced by 39-93% in APCR/soil mixtures and decreased with increased amounts of added APCR. Immobilization of As positively correlated with the amount of Ca in the APCR and negatively with the amount of soil organic matter. According to geochemical modelling, the precipitation of calcium arsenate (Ca3(AsO4)2/4H2O) and incorporation of As in ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 · 26H2O) in soil/APCR mixtures might explain the reduced leaching of As. A negative effect of the treatment was an increased leaching of Cu, Cr and dissolved organic carbon. Solidification of APCR/soil was considerably weakened by soil organic matter. PMID:26233740

  11. Air stripping. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including groundwater decontamination and wastewater purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in groundwater and soil cleanup. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Air stripping. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including groundwater decontamination and wastewater purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in groundwater and soil cleanup. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make

  14. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  15. Heat transfer Effect by soil temperature changes under shallow groundwater in the Mu Us desert, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, X.; Lu, R.; Donghui, C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil temperature change is principle elements to biological growth, soil freeze or thawing process. A situ field was conducted in the Mu Us desert of Wushen Qi County, Inner Mongolia, to mainly monitor soil temperature, moisture content and groundwater level. The unconfined aquifer constituted by Quaternary fine eolian sand, groundwater level is 125cm. This paper, choosing date from May 1, 2013 to April 30, 2014, soil day temperature is conducted by 3:00, 6:00,till 24:00, vertical spacing including 2cm,5 cm、10 cm、15 cm、20 cm, 75cm,125cm,which its symbol is T10, T15, T20, T75, T125 respectively. Here, surface layer temperature TS calculated by soil temperature of 2-5cm depth. Due to only 5 minutes interval, this state was taken as a state one. (1) soil temperature has mixture change on surface layer and its temperature different is over 35 ℃. (2) Surface layer temperature changes of every month have three stages and its conducted heat, which calculated between TS and T10. Since TS exceeds T10 and heat transfer direction is from surface to underground in May, June and July 2013, even heat transfer amounts reduced by participation in July. However, TS is inferior to T10 and conduced heat direction reverse in August till to February 2014.Continually conduced heat start to next circulation and then it's heat direction from surface to underground due to TS exceeds T10 again in March and April 2014. (3) Temperature changes of phreatic water table every month have also three stages and its conducted heat which calculated between T75 and T125, heat transfer direction from unsaturated zone to saturated zone due to T75 exceeds T125 from May till middle September 2013. However, T75 is inferior to T125 and heat direction reverse from late September 2013 till May 2014, but conduced heat direction starts to change from unsaturated zone to saturated zone again in early April 2014.The result can imply shallow gruondwater has some contribution to surface layer temperature in

  16. Groundwater transit time distribution and transfer of nitrates from soils to river network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalczyk, Tomasz; Bar-Michalczyk, Dominika; Duliński, Marek; Kania, Jarosław; Malina, Grzegorz; Różański, Kazimierz; Szklarczyk, Tadeusz; Wachniew, Przemysław; Witczak, Stanisław; Zięba, Damian; Żurek, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Measures undertaken to reduce nitrate loadings of agricultural origin to surface waters have to take into account delays associated with pollution transport between the root zone and groundwater abstraction wells or natural discharge zones. Parts of an important fissured-carbonate aquifer (Major Groundwater Basin No. 326) located in southern Poland are polluted, with concentrations of nitrates significantly exceeding the European Union limit of 50 mg/L. The polluted groundwater discharges to the streams of the Kocinka river catchment affecting their water quality. The MODFLOW and MT3DMS codes were used to model flow and transport of contaminants in the aquifer. Transport of conservative solutes was performed in a transient mode, with the steady-state flow field calibrated using present-day distribution of hydraulic heads and discharges of streams draining the aquifer. Time series of tritium data available for 21 production wells and springs, some of them extending over the period of 30 years, were used for calibration of flow and transport model resulting in significant changes in the original conceptual framework of this groundwater system. The regional-scale numerical model of flow and transport allowed for identification of the gaining stream reaches and for estimation of groundwater contributions to streamflow. Observations of in stable isotope composition and stream water chemistry confirmed the results of the numerical model for these particular stream reaches. The numerical model provided also the transit time distribution of groundwater flow through the saturated zone with an average value of 8 years and dominant transit times in the range from 3 to 20 years. Transit times of water through the unsaturated zone are in the range from less than 5 to 25 years with an average value of 10 years. Because of these delays, the results of measures aimed at reducing nitrate loads to the river network will be visible only within the relevant timescales.

  17. Effect of the Entrapped air on Water Flow in Heterogeneous Soil: Experimental Set- up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, M.; Sobotkova, M.; Cislerova, M.

    2008-12-01

    Temporal variations of steady state water flow rates were observed in laboratory infiltration experiments done on a sample of compacted sand and on an undisturbed soil sample (Eutric Cambisol). These variations are found to be in relation with entrapped air content. Infiltration-outflow experiments consisted of a series of ponded infiltration runs with seepage face boundary condition at the lower end of columns. The amount of the entrapped was derived from continuous weighing of the sample. The initial water contents were different for each run, which led to different amount of the air trapped in the soil during the first stages of infiltrations. The results of the experiments done on undisturbed soil showed that the flux rates and water contents varied during quasi-steady state. This finding contradicts the standard theory. The fluctuations of the water content during the steady state flow can be ascribed to the variations in volume of the entrapped air. Similarly, shape of the bromide breakthrough curve, which were performed simultaneously during the quasi-steady state varied for undisturbed soil. The same behaviour was not observed in the sample of homogeneous sand. Computer tomography was used to characterize the structure of the undisturbed soil sample with focus on potential preferential flow pathways, which are likely to host the entrapped air. To formulate more general conclusions, an extended series of infiltration outflow and bromide breakthrough experiments is in progress. This research has been supported by research project GACR 103/08/1552 and MSMT CEZ MSM 6840770002.

  18. Air temperature evolution during dry spells and its relation to prevailing soil moisture regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    The complex interplay between land and atmosphere makes accurate climate predictions very challenging, in particular with respect to extreme events. More detailed investigations of the underlying dynamics, such as the identification of the drivers regulating the energy exchange at the land surface and the quantification of fluxes between soil and atmosphere over different land types, are thus necessary. The recently started DROUGHT-HEAT project (funded by the European Research Council) aims to provide better understanding of the processes governing the land-atmosphere exchange. In the first phase of the project, different datasets and methods are used to investigate major drivers of land-atmosphere dynamics leading to droughts and heatwaves. In the second phase, these findings will be used for reducing uncertainties and biases in earth system models. Finally, the third part of the project will focus on the application of the previous findings and use them for the attribution of extreme events to land processes and possible mitigation through land geoengineering. One of the major questions in land-atmosphere exchange is the relationship between air temperature and soil moisture. Different studies show that especially during dry spells soil moisture has a strong impact on air temperature and the amplification of hot extremes. Whereas in dry and wet soil moisture regimes variations in latent heat flux during rain-free periods are expected to be small, this is not the case in transitional soil moisture regimes: Due to decreasing soil moisture content latent heat flux reduces with time, which causes in turn an increase in sensible heat flux and, subsequently, higher air temperatures. The investigation of air temperature evolution during dry spells can thus help to detect different soil moisture regimes and to provide insights on the effect of different soil moisture levels on air temperature. Here we assess the underlying relationships using different observational and

  19. Effect of air sparging on fate and transport of trichloroethylene in chambers with alfalfa plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Hu, J.; Erickson, L.E.; Davis, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    To study the effect of air sparging in soil with trichloroethylene present as a dense nonaqueous phase, air was supplied through pipes installed at the bottom of two chambers planted with alfalfa. Air input rate was 2.14 L/m{sup 2}/day. The fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) was investigated by monitoring TCE concentration in both outflow groundwater and soil gas. Comparison of these results with those of the previous study without air sparging indicates that air sparging appreciably increases the groundwater concentration of TCE. The soil gas at the surface shows even greater concentration difference. The flux of TCE to the atmosphere is increased significantly by air input. Accordingly, the authors can conclude that air sparging improved mass transfer of TCE from the nonaqueous phase to groundwater phase. Air sparging appeared to negatively impact the health of the alfalfa because of the elevated TCE present in the vadose zone of the chamber.

  20. An evaluation of remote sensing derived soil pH and average spring groundwater table for ecological assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofsen, Hans D.; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Kooistra, Lammert; van Amerongen, Jorg J.; Witte, Jan-Philip M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological assessments such as species distribution modelling and benchmarking site quality towards regulations often rely on full spatial coverage information of site factors such as soil acidity, moisture regime or nutrient availability. To determine if remote sensing (RS) is a viable alternative to traditional data sources of site factor estimates, we analysed the accuracy (using ground truth validation measurements) of traditional and RS sources of pH and mean spring groundwater level (MSL, in m) estimates. Traditional sources were a soil map and hydrological model. RS estimates were obtained using vegetation indicator values (IVs) from a Dutch national system as an intermediate between site factors and spectral response. IVs relate to those site factors that dictate vegetation occurrence, whilst also providing a robust link to canopy spectra. For pH, the soil map and the RS estimate were nearly as accurate. For MSL, the RS estimates were much closer to the observed groundwater levels than the hydrological model, but the error margin of the estimates still exceeded the tolerance range of moisture sensitive vegetation. The relatively high accuracy of the RS estimates was made possible by the availability of local calibration points and large environmental gradients in the study site. In addition, the error composition of the RS estimates could be analysed step-by-step, whereas the traditional sources had to be accepted 'as-is'. Also considering that RS offers high spatial and temporal resolution at low costs, RS offered advantages over traditional sources. This will likely hold true for any other situation where prerequisites of accurate RS estimates have been met.

  1. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Miller, D.E.; Morris, S.A.; Sheader, L.R.; Glenn, E.P.; Moore, D.; Carroll, K.C.; Benally, L.; Roanhorse, M.; Bush, R.P.; none,

    2010-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

  2. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuthbert, M.O.; Mackay, R.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is developed and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via macropore flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in the macropore system due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil, and a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  3. Impact of rainfall distribution on the parameterisation of a soil-moisture balance model of groundwater recharge in equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileham, Lucinda; Taylor, Richard; Thompson, Julian; Todd, Martin; Tindimugaya, Callist

    2008-09-01

    SummaryRobust calibration of hydrological models, driven by gridded precipitation data derived from either Regional Climate Models or statistical downscaling of General Circulation Models, is essential to the quantitative analysis of the impacts of climate change on catchment hydrology and freshwater resources. Predicted warming in equatorial Africa, accompanied by greater evaporation and more frequent heavy precipitation events, may have substantial but uncertain impacts on terrestrial hydrology. In this study, we examine how the spatial representation of precipitation influences the parameterisation and calibration of a soil-moisture balance model (SMBM) in the humid tropics of equatorial Uganda. SMBMs explicitly account for changes in soil-moisture and partition effective precipitation into groundwater recharge and runoff. The semi-distributed SMBM, calibrated with daily station data over a 15 year period (1965-1979), estimates a mean annual recharge of 104 mm a -1 and mean annual surface runoff of 144 mm a -1. Interpolation of station precipitation by inverse distance weighting produces a more uniform distribution, and a 7% increase, in mean annual catchment precipitation relative to point-based station data. Application of interpolated (gridded), uncorrected precipitation to the SMBM results in an underestimation of runoff and overestimation of recharge by 57% and 52%; respectively whereas use of corrected, gridded precipitation results in an underestimation of recharge and runoff by 10% and 64%; respectively. Recalibration of the SMBM using gridded precipitation data requires a 3% reduction in potential evapotranspiration, a 12% increase in the runoff-coefficient, and an 18% reduction in the rainfall threshold. These values are inconsistent with local, point-based observations of these parameters. Although current efforts seek to improve the distribution and duration of key hydrological measurements (e.g. soil-moisture, groundwater levels) in data

  4. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater in a chemical industrial park in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benhua; Li, Yuehua; Ma, Jianfeng; Huang, Linxian; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    China is suffering from serious water and soil pollution, especially in the North China Plain. This work investigated semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in surface water, groundwater and soil within a chemical industrial park in Eastern China, for which the volatile organic compound (VOC) results have been previously reported. A total of 20 samples were collected from the field, and analyzed in the laboratory. A 100% detection frequency of SVOCs in samples from this chemical industrial park was observed (same as VOCs). Moreover, the detection frequency of 113 SVOCs in each sample reached 15.93, 12.39 and 20.35% for surface water, groundwater and soil, respectively. The most detected SVOCs in the park included N-containing SVOCs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, organic pesticides and polychlorodiphenyls. The elevated detecting frequencies and concentration levels of SVOCs identified in the groundwater were attributed to the intensive chemical production activities in the park. In addition, the agricultural activities in the area might also have contributed to the SVOCs to the groundwater. The results of VOCs and SVOCs from this and previous studies suggest that the groundwater in this industrial park has been severely contaminated, and the contamination likely spreads beyond the park. Imminent hydrogeological assessments and remedial actions are warranted to eliminate the source and mitigate the potential plume expansion beyond the park boundary. PMID:26942541

  5. BOREAS RSS-17 Stem, Soil, and Air Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; McDonald, Kyle C.; Way, JoBea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team collected several data sets in support of its research in monitoring and analyzing environmental and phenological states using radar data. This data set consists of tree bole and soil temperature measurements from various BOREAS flux tower sites. Temperatures were measured with thermistors implanted in the hydroconductive tissue of the trunks of several trees at each site and at various depths in the soil. Data were stored on a data logger at intervals of either 1 or 2 hours. The majority of the data were acquired between early 1994 and early 1995. The primary product of this data set is the diurnal stem temperature measurements acquired for selected trees at five BOREAS tower sites. The data are provided in tabular ASCII format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Evaluating Adult Groundwater Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerakis, Argyrios

    1998-01-01

    One-day groundwater education workshops held to educate soil conservation personnel were assessed for effect on participant knowledge using a quasiexperimental design. Participants were tested on their groundwater knowledge and attitude toward groundwater conservation before and after the training. Participant scores improved significantly in only…

  7. Impacts of Agriculture on Nitrates in Soil and Groundwater in the Southeastern Coastal Plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) contamination of surface and groundwater is a health concern for both humans and animals. Excess N in surface water bodies may contribute to eutrophication. Elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations in drinking water have caused infant death from the disease methemoglobinemia. Nitrates...

  8. Tracer transport in soils and shallow groundwater: model abstraction with modern tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vadose zone controls contaminant transport from the surface to groundwater, and modeling transport in vadose zone has become a burgeoning field. Exceedingly complex models of subsurface contaminant transport are often inefficient. Model abstraction is the methodology for reducing the complexity of a...

  9. Assessment of groundwater, soil-gas, and soil contamination at the Vietnam Armor Training Facility, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, Georgia, assessed the groundwater, soil gas, and soil for contaminants at the Vietnam Armor Training Facility (VATF) at Fort Gordon, from October 2009 to September 2011. The assessment included the detection of organic compounds in the groundwater and soil gas, and inorganic compounds in the soil. In addition, organic contaminant assessment included organic compounds classified as explosives and chemical agents in selected areas. The assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. This report is a revision of "Assessment of soil-gas, surface-water, and soil contamination at the Vietnam Armor Training Facility, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010," Open-File Report 2011-1200, and supersedes that report to include results of additional samples collected in July 2011. Four passive samplers were deployed in groundwater wells at the VATF in Fort Gordon. Total petroleum hydrocarbons and benzene and octane were detected above the method detection level at all four wells. The only other volatile organic compounds detected above their method detection level were undecane and pentadecane, which were detected in two of the four wells. Soil-gas samplers were deployed at 72 locations in a grid pattern across the VATF on June 3, 2010, and then later retrieved on June 9, 2010. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 71 of the 72 samplers (one sampler was destroyed in the field and not analyzed) at levels above the method detection level, and the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene (BTEX) was detected above the detection level in 31 of the 71 samplers that were analyzed. Other volatile organic compounds

  10. Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air and soil across Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva, Gulchohra; Kurkova, Romana; Hovorkova, Ivana; Klánová, Jana; Halsall, Crispin

    2012-07-01

    Concentrations of selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are reported in air and surface soil in an extensive spatial survey across Azerbaijan, a country bordering the Caspian Sea with a history of OCP production and extensive use. Polyurethane foam disc passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed during October-November 2008 with soil samples collected in July 2009. Levels of Σ(7)PCB in ambient air were generally low (mean of 0.046 ng m(-3), n = 13) and comparable to concentrations reported in countries within Eastern Europe and similar to or lower than concentrations reported in urban air in the UK and other western countries. Surprisingly, PCB concentrations in rural/background soil fell below the method detection limits at most sites, although concentrations were 0.209 and 0.071 ng Σ(7)PCB g(-1) dry weight (dw) for two urban sites, again comparable to PCB levels measured at background sites in Europe. Levels of α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH and p,p'-DDT/E were elevated in ambient air across Azerbaijan in comparison to PAS-derived concentrations reported elsewhere, with concentrations of α-HCH in air ranging from 0.085 to 2.699 ng m(-3) and p,p'-DDE, 0.037-2.290 ng m(-3). High concentrations of OCPs occurred at several of the urban sites and at sites in proximity to old pesticide storage facilities with concentrations in soil >0.1 μg g(-1) dw for p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT at several sites. The ratio of p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE was close to unity in the soil at these sites, but elsewhere, the ratio was <1, indicating a weathered DDT pattern, which was also reflected in the air at all sites. A fugacity approach revealed the strong likelihood of net soil-to-air transfer at the majority of sites for all OCPs. The calculated annual fluxes or loading to the atmosphere from a rural/agricultural area (representing land as vineyards and cotton cultivation) were estimated to be on the order of ≈10-100 kg year(-1) for the HCH isomers (including

  11. Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1992-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

  12. Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1992-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

  13. Accumulation of Metals in Soils, Groundwater and Edible Parts of Crops Grown Under Long-Term Irrigation with Sewage Mixed Industrial Effluents.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R K; Minhas, P S; Lal, Khajanchi; Chaturvedi, R K; Yadav, Gajender; Verma, T P

    2015-08-01

    Farmers in developing countries irrigate crops using raw urban and industrial effluents with consequent risks from metal contamination. Therefore, soils, crops and groundwater from an effluent irrigation use site were assessed for Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb. Total and available contents of metals in soil followed the order Pb>Ni>Cr>Cd. Crops accumulated more Pb, followed by Cd, Ni and Cr. Pb exceeded the permissible limit with wastewater irrigation only, but Cd exceeded the limit even with combined irrigations of wastewater and groundwater. Among crops, sugar beet assimilated highest Cd (3.14 μg g(-1)) and Pb (6.42 μg g(-1)) concentrations. Legumes accumulated more metals than cereals. Long-term use of wastewater and its conjunctive use with groundwater led to toxic accumulations of Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr. Cd with higher availability and mobility indices and lower toxicity limit, posed the maximum risk of food-chain contamination. PMID:25894348

  14. Using the N2/Ar-Method to check modelled diffuse NO3¯ emissions from soils into the groundwater of Lower Saxony (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krienen, Lisa; Höper, Heinrich; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Well, Reinhard; Elbracht, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse NO3 emissions derived from agricultural N surpluses are the main cause of NO3 pollution of aquifers and open water bodies. Denitrification is the key process for the attenuation of these anthropogenic NO3 concentrations in soils and groundwater. Since the greenhouse gas N2O is an obligate intermediate of denitrification this process is also a major regulator of N2O emissions from soils and indirect N2O fluxes from aquifers and open water bodies which result from NO3-leaching. Up to now the denitrification potential of soils and the potential NO3 concentration in the groundwater recharge are modelled from agricultural N-surpluses, water balances (GROWA) and soil properties (DENUZ) (Wendland et al. 2009) (LBEG 2008). In this study we compare modelled NO3 emissions (pot-NO3) (DENUZ) to the groundwater recharge with the calculated initial NO3 concentrations in the groundwater at time of groundwater recharge (NO3t0) (N2/Ar-method (Weymann et al. 2008)). NO3t0 can be calculated from the measurement of dissolved gases N2, N2O, Ar and NO3 concentrations in groundwater samples. We analysed groundwater samples from 534 groundwater monitoring wells throughout Lower-Saxony (Germany). Median NO3 and NO3t0 concentrations were 0,4 and 29 mg NO3 l1 respectively, showing that considerable proportions of the anthropogenic N-surplus is denitrified within the saturated zone. `First results showed a good agreement between measure and modelled NO3 emissions for areas of coastal marshes in the North of Lower-Saxony (predominantly Fluvisols). Medians of measured and modelled NO3 emissions are 12,5 mg NO3t0 l1 and 0,3 mg pot-NO3#713; l1 (mean values 20 mg l1 NO3 pot and 9,3 mg l1 NO3t0), respectively. Compared to the coastal marshes and in accordance with modelled pot-NO3 concentrations our measurements show small-scale spatial heterogeneities of NO3t0 concentrations in soil regions where the dominant parent material of soils are glacio fluviatile and moraine deposits

  15. An overview of preparation and applications of stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles for soil and groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Cai, Zhengqing; Han, Bing; Qian, Tianwei; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-09-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is one of the most intensively studied materials for environmental cleanup uses over the past 20 years or so. Freshly prepared nZVI is highly reactive due to its high specific surface area and strong reducing power. Over years, the classic borohydride reduction method for preparing nZVI has been modified by use of various stabilizers or surface modifiers to acquire more stable and soil deliverable nZVI for treatment of different organic and inorganic contaminants in water and soil. While most studies have been focused on testing nZVI for water treatment, the greater potential or advantage of nZVI appears to be for in situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by directly delivering stabilized nZVI into the contaminated subsurface as it was proposed from the beginning. Compared to conventional remediation practices, the in situ remediation technique using stabilized nZVI offers some unique advantages. This work provides an update on the latest development of stabilized nZVI for various environmental cleanup uses, and overviews the evolution and environmental applications of stabilized nZVI. Commonly used stabilizers are compared and the stabilizing mechanisms are discussed. The effectiveness and constraints of the nZVI-based in situ remediation technology are summarized. This review also reveals some critical knowledge gaps and research needs, such as interactions between delivered nZVI and the local biogeochemical conditions. PMID:27206054

  16. Ecotoxicological assessment of the potential impact on soil porewater, surface and groundwater from the use of organic wastes as soil amendments.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Paula; Mourinha, Clarisse; Farto, Márcia; Palma, Patrícia; Sengo, Joana; Morais, Marie-Christine; Cunha-Queda, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the potential impact on soil porewater, surface and groundwater from the beneficial application of organic wastes to soil, using their eluates and acute bioassays with aquatic organisms and plants: luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri (15 and 30 min), Daphnia magna immobilization (48 h), Thamnocephalus platyurus survival (24 h), and seed germination of Lolium perenne (7 d) and Lactuca sativa (5 d). Some organic wastes' eluates promoted high toxic responses, but that toxicity could not be predicted by their chemical characterization, which is compulsory by regulatory documents. In fact, when organisms were exposed to the water-extractable chemical compounds of the organic wastes, the toxic responses were more connected to the degree of stabilization of the organic wastes, or to the treatment used to achieve that stabilization, than to their contaminant load. That is why the environmental risk assessment of the use of organic wastes as soil amendments should integrate bioassays with eluates, in order to correctly evaluate the effects of the most bioavailable fraction of all the chemical compounds, which can be difficult to predict from the characterization required in regulatory documents. According to our results, some rapid and standardized acute bioassays can be suggested to integrate a Tier 1 ecotoxicological evaluation of organic wastes with potential to be land applied, namely luminescence inhibition of V. fischeri, D. magna immobilization, and the germination of L. perenne and L. sativa. PMID:26741879

  17. RADIOMETRIC METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF URANIUM IN SOIL AND AIR: SINGLE-LABORATORY EVALUATION AND INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of a single-laboratory evaluation and an interlaboratory collaborative study of a method for determining uranium isotopes in soil and air samples are presented. The method is applicable to 10-gram soil samples and to both glass fiber and polystyrene air filter samples. Sa...

  18. Community perspectives on the risk of indoor air pollution arising from contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jill E; Kramer, Amanda J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2015-05-01

    The migration of volatile contaminants into overlying buildings, known as vapor intrusion, is a health concern for people living above contaminated groundwater. As public health and environmental agencies develop protocols to evaluate vapor intrusion exposure, little attention has been paid to the experiences and opinions of communities likely to be affected by vapor intrusion. Using a community-driven research approach and qualitative interviews, we explored community perspectives on the vapor intrusion pathway and the perceived impact on community health and well-being among neighbors living atop a large, shallow-chlorinated solvent plume in San Antonio, TX. Most participants associated vapor intrusion with health risks, expressing concern about the unavoidable and uncontrollable nature of their exposure. Few were satisfied with the responsiveness of public officials. Above all, participants wanted more accurate, transparent information and additional independent scientific investigations. PMID:25815742

  19. Fate and transport of trichloroethane and trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater, building 719, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorre, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene are common chlorinated aliphatic industrial organic solvents used in degreasing operations. Both are typically found in groundwater environments as a result of leaking underground storage tanks, leachate from landfills, and contaminant migration from hazardous waste dump sites. Transformation by-products are also found in association with trichloroethane and trichloroethylene without any known source other than from reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinated by-products include 1,1-dichloroethane; cis and trans 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, chloroethane, and vinyl chloride. Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene and their transformation by-products are suspected human health hazards. Vinyl chloride is a known human carcinogen, while trichloroethylene is considered a probable human carcinogen, and 1,1-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethane possible human carcinogens.

  20. Influence of Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Soil Properties on the Soil-Air Partitioning of Semivolatile Pesticides: Laboratory Measurements and Predictive Models.

    PubMed

    Davie-Martin, Cleo L; Hageman, Kimberly J; Chin, Yu-Ping; Rougé, Valentin; Fujita, Yuki

    2015-09-01

    Soil-air partition coefficient (Ksoil-air) values are often employed to investigate the fate of organic contaminants in soils; however, these values have not been measured for many compounds of interest, including semivolatile current-use pesticides. Moreover, predictive equations for estimating Ksoil-air values for pesticides (other than the organochlorine pesticides) have not been robustly developed, due to a lack of measured data. In this work, a solid-phase fugacity meter was used to measure the Ksoil-air values of 22 semivolatile current- and historic-use pesticides and their degradation products. Ksoil-air values were determined for two soils (semiarid and volcanic) under a range of environmentally relevant temperature (10-30 °C) and relative humidity (30-100%) conditions, such that 943 Ksoil-air measurements were made. Measured values were used to derive a predictive equation for pesticide Ksoil-air values based on temperature, relative humidity, soil organic carbon content, and pesticide-specific octanol-air partition coefficients. Pesticide volatilization losses from soil, calculated with the newly derived Ksoil-air predictive equation and a previously described pesticide volatilization model, were compared to previous results and showed that the choice of Ksoil-air predictive equation mainly affected the more-volatile pesticides and that the way in which relative humidity was accounted for was the most critical difference. PMID:26258946

  1. Distinct effects of moisture and air contents on acoustic properties of sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takuya; Hiraguri, Yasuhiro; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of distinct effects of moisture content and air volume on acoustic properties of soil is sought to predict the influence of human activities such as cultivation on acoustic propagation outdoors. This work used an impedance tube with the two-thickness method to investigate such effects. For a constant moisture weight percentage, the magnitude of the characteristic impedance became smaller and the absorption coefficient became higher with increase of the air space ratio. For a constant air space ratio, the absorption coefficient became larger and the magnitude of the propagation constant became smaller with increasing moisture weight percentage. PMID:26428823

  2. Air pollution: Household soiling and consumer welfare losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, W.D.; Jaksch, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper uses demand and supply functions for cleanliness to estimate household benefits from reduced particulate matter soiling. A demand curve for household cleanliness is estimated, based upon the assumption that households prefer more cleanliness to less. Empirical coefficients, related to particulate pollution levels, for shifting the cleanliness supply curve, are taken from available studies. Consumer welfare gains, aggregated across 123 SMSAs, from achieving the Federal primary particulate standard, are estimated to range from $0.9 to $3.2 million per year (1971 dollars). ?? 1982.

  3. Vertical profile measurements of soil air suggest immobilization of gaseous elemental mercury in mineral soil.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Daniel; Pokharel, Ashok K; Moore, Christopher

    2014-02-18

    Evasion of gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)g) from soil surfaces is an important source of atmospheric Hg, but the volatility and solid-gas phase partitioning of Hg(0) within soils is poorly understood. We developed a novel system to continuously measure Hg(0)g concentrations in soil pores at multiple depths and locations, and present a total of 297 days of measurements spanning 14 months in two forests in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California, U.S. Temporal patterns showed consistent pore Hg(0)g concentrations below levels measured in the atmosphere (termed Hg(0)g immobilization), ranging from 66 to 94% below atmospheric concentrations throughout multiple seasons. The lowest pore Hg(0)g concentrations were observed in the deepest soil layers (40 cm), but significant immobilization was already present in the top 7 cm. In the absence of sinks or sources, pore Hg(0)g levels would be in equilibrium with atmospheric concentrations due to the porous nature of the soil matrix and gas diffusion. Therefore, we explain decreases in pore Hg(0)g in mineral soils below atmospheric concentrations--or below levels found in upper soils as observed in previous studies--with the presence of an Hg(0)g sink in mineral soils possibly related to Hg(0)g oxidation or other processes such as sorption or dissolution in soil water. Surface chamber measurements showing daytime Hg(0)g emissions and nighttime Hg(0)g deposition indicate that near-surface layers likely dominate net atmospheric Hg(0)g exchange resulting in typical diurnal cycles due to photochemcial reduction at the surface and possibly Hg(0)g evasion from litter layers. In contrast, mineral soils seem to be decoupled from this surface exchange, showing consistent Hg(0)g uptake and downward redistribution--although our calculations indicate these fluxes to be minor compared to other mass fluxes. A major implication is that once Hg is incorporated into mineral soils, it may be unlikely subjected to renewed Hg(0)g re-emission from

  4. Using in-situ hot air/steam stripping (HASS) of hydrocarbons in soils

    SciTech Connect

    La Mori, P.N.

    1994-12-31

    The remediation of soils containing volatile (VOC) and semi-volatile (SVC) hydrocarbons is most desirably accomplished in-situ, i.e., without removal of the contaminated soils from the ground. This approach mitigates the environmental problem, i.e., does not transport it to another location, and when properly applied, does not impact on the local environment during remediation NOVATERRA has demonstrated commercially an in-situ, hot air/steam stripping (HASS) technology to remove VOC and SVC from soils both in the vadose and saturated zones. The technology consists of a drill tower which injects and mixes steam and hot air continuously into the soil below ground and a method to immediately capture all vapors escaping to the surface and remove the vaporized VOC/SVC using condensation and carbon beds. The air can be recompressed and recycled. The condensed liquid containing hydrocarbons is purified by distillation. The recovered hydrocarbons can be destroyed or recycled. The technology has successfully removed various chlorinated aliphatics and aromatics, glycol ethers, phthalates, polyaromatic compounds, ketones, petroleum hydrocarbons and many other compound types from sand to clay soils to risk based standards; e.g. 1 increased cancer risk in 1,000,000 using currently acceptable risk assessment standards.

  5. A new approach to quantifying soil temperature responses to changing air temperature and snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackiewicz, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    Seasonal snow cover provides an effective insulating barrier, separating shallow soil (0.25 m) from direct localized meteorological conditions. The effectiveness of this barrier is evident in a lag in the soil temperature response to changing air temperature. The causal relationship between air and soil temperatures is largely because of the presence or absence of snow cover, and is frequently characterized using linear regression analysis. However, the magnitude of the dampening effect of snow cover on the temperature response in shallow soils is obscured in linear regressions. In this study the author used multiple linear regression (MLR) with dummy predictor variables to quantify the degree of dampening between air and shallow soil temperatures in the presence and absence of snow cover at four Greenland sites. The dummy variables defining snow cover conditions were z = 0 for the absence of snow and z = 1 for the presence of snow cover. The MLR was reduced to two simple linear equations that were analyzed relative to z = 0 and z = 1 to enable validation of the selected equations. Compared with ordinary linear regression of the datasets, the MLR analysis yielded stronger coefficients of multiple determination and less variation in the estimated regression variables.

  6. MANURE NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS IN AIR, SOIL AND CROPS ON DAIRY FARMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only 25 to 35 % of the crude protein (CP) consumed by dairy cows is converted into milk. Such poor use of dietary CP may be due to inefficiencies associated with forage nitrogen (N) capture and metabolism. Manure N excreted in feces and urine, and the transformation of manure N in air, soil and crop...

  7. Presence of Fusarium spp. in air and soil associated with sorghum fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum grain, valuable for feed, food and bioenergy, can be colonized by several Fusarium species; therefore, it was of interest to identify possible sources of conidia. Analysis of air and soil samples provided evidence for the presence of propagules from Fusarium genotypes that may cause grain in...

  8. A survey of groundwater levels and hydrogeochemistry in irrigated fields in the Karamay Agricultural Development Area, northwest China: Implications for soil and groundwater salinity resulting from surface water transfer for irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongmei; Song, Xianfang; Currell, Matthew J.; Cao, Guoliang; Zhang, Yinghua; Kang, Yuehu

    2011-08-01

    SummaryAnalysis of the water budget, along with hydrochemistry and stable isotopes in shallow groundwater were carried out in the Karamay Agricultural Development Area (KADA) in order to assess the impact of transfer of irrigation water from the IrtySh River, in particular in relation to the mechanisms of salinization and the nature of the water table regime. In terms of aquifer dynamics, the addition of the irrigation water without any groundwater abstraction has caused a sharp rise in the water table is and the development of serious soil salinity, together with an almost complete attenuation of inter-seasonal water table oscillations. The mean rise in the groundwater table from September 1997 to October 2009 was 6.9 m, representing an accumulated total water storage change of close to 150 million cubic meters. The analysis of aquifer water budget shows that infiltration of irrigation water occupied over 90% of the total recharge of the groundwater in the KADA. Sources of groundwater recharge and mechanisms of salinization in the KADA were also investigated using geochemical and isotopic techniques. The groundwater is characterized by Cl(SO 4)-Na type, generally becoming more Na and Cl dominated with increasing salinity. The total dissolved solids (TDS) content of the groundwater ranges from 0.5 g/L to over 65 g/L, with greater TDS values in areas of low topographic relief and shallow water tables. Where the sediments are more permeable (e.g. due to the presence of palaeochannels), TDS values are generally lower and the seasonal water table fluctuations greater. The ratios of K/Cl, Ca/Cl, Na/Cl, and Mg/Cl decrease with increasing Cl - concentrations especially in the shallow groundwater from 10 to 15 m depth, indicating hydrogeochemical evolution via minor water-rock interaction (feldspar weathering) and significant evaporation. The stable isotopic compositions show a characteristic evaporation effect in the shallow groundwater and confirm that direct

  9. Mercury in soil gas and air--A potential tool in mineral exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Joseph Howard; Vaughn, W.W.; Learned, R.E.; Meuschke, J.L.

    1969-01-01

    The mercury content in soil gas and in the atmosphere was measured in several mining districts to test the possibility that the mercury content in the atmosphere is higher over ore deposits than over barren ground. At Cortez, Nev., the distribution of anorhalous amounts of mercury in the air collected at ground level (soil gas) correlates well with the distribution of gold-bearing rocks that are covered by as much as 100 feet of gravel. The mercury content in the atmosphere collected at an altitude of 200 feet by an aircraft was 20 times background over a mercury posit and 10 times background over two porphyry copper deposits. Measurement of mercury in soil gas and air may prove to be a valuable exploration tool.

  10. Assessment of soil and ground-water activation in the underground facility of the linear accelerator at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjin; Nam, Shinwoo; Chung, Yonsei; Kim, Suna; Lee, Cheol Woo

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a heavy-ion accelerator complex that is being constructed in Daejeon, Korea. The superconducting linear accelerator of RAON will provide various heavy-ion beams with a maximum power of 400 kW. In order to determine the design requirements of the underground facility for the accelerator, we considered the radiation's influence on the soil and the ground-water under the condition of long-term operation of the accelerator. A source term for prompt neutrons generated by heavy-ion beams losses along the beam lines at a rate of 1 W/m was applied to obtain the activation level of nearby material outside the tunnel by using the simulation codes MCNPX and SP-FISPACT. This report presents the analysis and the result for the tunnel shielding condition obtained from the assessment.

  11. Reducing compaction effort and incorporating air permeability in Proctor testing for design of urban green spaces on cohesive soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that compaction negatively affects agronomic productivity, that air permeability is a sensitive measure of the degree of soil compaction and therefore a good indicator of soil productivity impairment from compaction. Cohesive soils in urban settings are often heavily compacted...

  12. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  13. Free-air CO2 enrichment of sorghum: soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics.

    PubMed

    Prior, S A; Torbert, H A; Runion, G B; Rogers, H H; Kimball, B A

    2008-01-01

    The positive impact of elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration on crop biomass production suggests more carbon inputs to soil. Further study on the effect of elevated CO(2) on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics is key to understanding the potential for long-term carbon storage in soil. Soil samples (0- to 5-, 5- to 10-, and 10- to 20-cm depths) were collected after 2 yr of grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] production under two atmospheric CO(2) levels: (370 [ambient] and 550 muL L(-1) [free-air CO(2) enrichment; FACE]) and two water treatments (ample water and limited water) on a Trix clay loam (fine, loamy, mixed [calcareous], hyperthermic Typic Torrifluvents) at Maricopa, AZ. In addition to assessing treatment effects on soil organic C and total N, potential C and N mineralization and C turnover were determined in a 60-d laboratory incubation study. After 2 yr of FACE, soil C and N were significantly increased at all soil depths. Water regime had no effect on these measures. Increased total N in the soil was associated with reduced N mineralization under FACE. Results indicated that potential C turnover was reduced under water deficit conditions at the top soil depth. Carbon turnover was not affected under FACE, implying that the observed increase in soil C with elevated CO(2) may be stable relative to ambient CO(2) conditions. Results suggest that, over the short-term, a small increase in soil C storage could occur under elevated atmospheric CO(2) conditions in sorghum production systems with differing water regimes. PMID:18453395

  14. Evaluation of available data on the geohydrology, soil chemistry, and ground-water chemistry of Gas Works Park and surrounding region, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabol, M.A.; Turney, G.L.; Ryals, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    Gas Works Park, in Seattle, Washington, is located at the site of an abandon gasification plant on Lake Union. Wastes deposited during 50 years of plant operations (1906-1956) have extended the shore line 100 ft and left the park soil contaminated with a number of hazardous material. Soil contaminants include polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, cyanide, and metals. PAHs and metals have been detected in Lake Union sediments. Maximum total PAH concentrations exceeded 100 million micrograms/kilogram in some places in the soils of the park at 6-inch depths and in some lake sediments. Other contaminants present are much lower in concentrations. The park is on glacial drift overlain by gasification waste materials and clean fill. Waste materials include sand and gravels, mixed with lampblack, oil, bricks, and other industrial wastes. Groundwater flows through the soils and waste toward Lake Union. Vertical groundwater movement is uncertain, but is assumed to be upward near Lake Union. Concentrations of most soil contaminants are probably low in the groundwater and in Lake Union due to the low solubilities and high sorptive characteristics of these contaminants. However, no water quality data are available to confirm this premise. (USGS)

  15. Laboratory study of air sparging of TCE-contaminated saturated soils and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.A.; Reddy, K.R.

    1999-06-30

    Air sparging has proven to be an effective remediation technique for treating saturated soils and ground water contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Since little is known about the system variables and mass transfer mechanisms important to air sparging, several researchers have recently performed laboratory investigations to study such issues. This paper presents the results of column experiments performed to investigate the behavior of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), specifically trichloroethylene (TCE), during air sparging. The specific objectives of the study were (1) to compare the removal of dissolved TCE with the removal of dissolved light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs), such as benzene or toluene; (2) to determine the effect of injected air-flow rate on dissolved TCE removal; (3) to determine the effect of initial dissolved TCE concentration on removal efficiency; and (4) to determine the differences in removal between dissolved and pure-chase TCE. The test results showed that (1) the removal of dissolved TCE was similar to that of dissolved LNAPL; (2) increased air-injection rates led to increased TCE removal at lower ranges of air injection, but further increases at higher ranges of air injection did not increase the rate of removal, indicating a threshold removal rate had been reached; (3) increased initial concentration of dissolved TCE resulted in similar rates of removal; and (4) the removal pf pure-phase TCE was difficult using a low air-injection rate, but higher air-injection rates led to easier removal.

  16. Estimating groundwater recharge following land-use change using chloride mass balance of soil profiles: a case study at Guyuan and Xifeng in the Loess Plateau of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tianming; Pang, Zhonghe

    2011-02-01

    Groundwater recharge is affected by land use in (semi)arid areas. A new application of the chloride-mass-balance approach has been developed to estimate the reduction in groundwater recharge following land-use change by comparing chloride concentrations below the root zone and above the base of the chloride accumulation zone, before and after the land-use conversion. Two sites in the Loess Plateau of central China have been selected for study. Results from the Guyuan terrace region show that groundwater recharge beneath natural sparse small-grass was 100 mm/year, but the conversion to winter wheat about 100 years ago has reduced groundwater recharge to 55 mm/year. At the Xifeng Loess Plain the conversion from winter wheat, with groundwater recharge at 33 mm/year, to apple orchard 7 years ago has led to chloride accumulation to 5 m below land surface, suggesting the recharge rate has been reduced. This is in agreement with previous studies in these areas which have shown that the regional afforestation and other land-use conversions have resulted in deep soil desiccation and have caused an upper boundary to form with low matrix potential, thus preventing the soil moisture from actually recharging the aquifer.

  17. MICROBIOLOGICAL FIELD SAMPLING AND INSTRUMENTATION IN THE ASSESSMENT OF SOIL AND GROUND-WATER POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter emphasizes the importance of microbiological sampling of soil and ground water with respect to human heath risks, laws and regulations dealing with safe drinking water, and more prevalent subsurface monitoring activities associated with chlorinated organic compounds,...

  18. Groundwater Sampling and Soil Gas Data Analysis, Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky -- June - August 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jennifer Pauline; Peterson, Lance Nutting; Taylor, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater and soil gas sampling conducted at the Distler Brickyard Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, June-August, 2000. The purpose of the sampling activities was to address remaining data gaps regarding the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of chloroethene/ane contamination. Specifically, data gaps fall into four categories: 1) effect of seasonal recharge on contaminant concentrations, 2) geochemical conditions in the Fine Grained Alluvium (FGA), 3) conditions along the flowpath between Wells GW-11 and MW-3, and 4) the extent of aerobic degradation in the Coarse Grained Alluvium (CGA). A data collection strategy composed of both groundwater sampling and passive soil vapor sampling devices (Gore-Sorbers?) was used. The Gore-Sorber? technology was used to collect data from the FGA, which because of its low hydraulic conductivity and variable saturation makes collection of groundwater samples problematic. Gore-Sorbers were deployed in 15 wells, most of them being in the FGA, and groundwater samples were collected in 17 wells, which were mostly in the CGA. Both sampling methods were utilized in a subset of wells (7) in order to determine the general comparability of results obtained from each method. Results indicate that water levels in both the FGA and CGA were higher in June-August 2000 than in October 1999, likely due to increased infiltration of precipitation through the FGA during the wetter months. Redox conditions in the FGA and downgradient CGA were iron-reducing, less reducing than in October-1999. In general, concentrations of chloroethenes/anes were higher in June-August 2000 than October 1999. Trichloroethene (TCE) was present at concentrations as high as 65 µg/L in the FGA and 19 µg/L in the CGA. This is substantially higher than the maximum concentration in October 1999 of 11 µg/L. The following conclusions were drawn from these data collection activities: 1) two potential

  19. Health risk estimates for groundwater and soil contamination in the Slovak Republic: a convenient tool for identification and mapping of risk areas.

    PubMed

    Fajčíková, K; Cvečková, V; Stewart, A; Rapant, S

    2014-10-01

    We undertook a quantitative estimation of health risks to residents living in the Slovak Republic and exposed to contaminated groundwater (ingestion by adult population) and/or soils (ingestion by adult and child population). Potential risk areas were mapped to give a visual presentation at basic administrative units of the country (municipalities, districts, regions) for easy discussion with policy and decision-makers. The health risk estimates were calculated by US EPA methods, applying threshold values for chronic risk and non-threshold values for cancer risk. The potential health risk was evaluated for As, Ba, Cd, Cu, F, Hg, Mn, NO3 (-), Pb, Sb, Se and Zn for groundwater and As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Cu, F, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Zn for soils. An increased health risk was identified mainly in historical mining areas highly contaminated by geogenic-anthropogenic sources (ore deposit occurrence, mining, metallurgy). Arsenic and antimony were the most significant elements in relation to health risks from groundwater and soil contamination in the Slovak Republic contributing a significant part of total chronic risk levels. Health risk estimation for soil contamination has highlighted the significance of exposure through soil ingestion in children. Increased cancer risks from groundwater and soil contamination by arsenic were noted in several municipalities and districts throughout the country in areas with significantly high arsenic levels in the environment. This approach to health risk estimations and visualization represents a fast, clear and convenient tool for delineation of risk areas at national and local levels. PMID:24729053

  20. Investigating an Inverted Soil Column in Northern Tanzania: Could Intense Groundwater Weathering be the Culprit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, M. G.; Lee, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Weathering of silicate rocks permanently sequesters a significant amount CO2 on our planet (Berner et al., 1983; Dessert et al., 2003; Gaillardet et al., 1999). Therefore, the investigation of soils and their conjugate protoliths have implications for a wide range of disciplines from soil to atmospheric sciences. This study investigates soil formed in Northern Tanzania on the southern slope of the dormant volcano Mt. Kilimanjaro. Our sample site is in the Machame region at an elevation of ~1640 m where the phonotephrite to basaltic bedrock has been dated at 0.4 to 0.5 million years (Evernden and Curtis, 1965). We determined bulk elemental concentrations of soil and bedrock samples from this region using an ICP-MS and XRF. From initial investigations into the bulk soil and bedrock chemistry using a novel mass balance method, we were able to investigate the relative mobility of a suite of elements. Relative abundances of Ta, Nb, Hf, and Zr are constant and therefore these elements are immobile. In contrast, Ti, an element commonly thought to be immobile, is clearly not immobile in our samples. The entire soil column appears to be highly depleted in Si and Ca but enriched in Al. These features indicate extensive weathering and indeed some samples approach bauxite compositions. Surprisingly, however, weathering versus depth is reversed. Si and Ca have been removed by 60 and 70 % respectively from the upper 2 meters, but below 2 m, they have been removed by 95 and 99 %. This means that the soil is more weathered at depth than in the shallowest 2 meters. We believe that ground water weathering is responsible for this inverted soil profile and may increase CO2 consumption estimates by 10-30 % for similarly affected basalts.

  1. Impact of soil and groundwater corrosion on the Hierakonpolis Temple Town archaeological site, Wadi Abu Sufian, Idfu, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, A M; Atwia, M G; El-Gohary, A; Parizek, R R

    2013-06-01

    Hierakonpolis, Greek for City of the Hawk, nearly 25 km NW of Idfu (Egypt), is an important and extensive archaeological discovery covering a large area. Its richness in archaeological artifacts makes it a valuable site. It has a valid claim to be the first nation state, as indicated by the Palette of Narmer discovered in its main mound. Geological and hydrogeological investigations at the Hierakonpolis Temple Town site documented nearly a 4.0-m water table rise from as early as 1892 to the present. In addition to the rising water levels, the increase of both subsoil water salinity and humidity threatens and damages fragile carvings and paintings within tombs in Kingdom Hill, the foundation stability of the site, and the known and still to be discovered artifact that recent pottery finds dates at least 4,000 BCE. Representative rock and soil samples obtained from drilled cores in the study area were chosen for conducting detailed grain size and X-ray analysis, light and heavy mineral occurrences, distribution of moisture and total organic matter, and scanning electron microscopy investigations. Mineralogical analysis of clays indicated that the soil samples are composed of smectite/illite mixed layers with varying proportions of smectite to illite. Kaolinite is the second dominant clay constituent, besides occasional chlorite. Swelling of the clay portion of the soil, due to the presence of capillary groundwater, in contact with buried mudbrick walls expands and causes severe damage to important exposed and buried mudbrick structures, including the massive ancient "fort" believed to date from the Second Dynasty (from 2,890 to 2,686 BC). The "fort" is 1.0 km south of the Temple Town mounds near to confluence of Wadi Abu Sufian. Groundwater samples from the shallow aquifer close by the intersection of Wadi Abu Sufian and the Nile flood plain were analyzed for chemical composition and stable isotope ratios. The groundwater in the upper zone (subsoil water) within fine

  2. Cone Penetration Test and Soil Boring at the Bayside Groundwater Project Site in San Lorenzo, Alameda County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Michael J.; Sneed, Michelle; Noce, Thomas E.; Tinsley, John C., III

    2009-01-01

    Aquifer-system deformation associated with ground-water-level changes is being investigated cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) at the Bayside Groundwater Project (BGP) near the modern San Francisco Bay shore in San Lorenzo, California. As a part of this project, EBMUD has proposed an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) program to store and recover as much as 3.78x104 m3/d of water. Water will be stored in a 30-m sequence of coarse-grained sediment (the 'Deep Aquifer') underlying the east bay alluvium and the adjacent ground-water basin. Storing and recovering water could cause subsidence and uplift at the ASR site and adjacent areas because the land surface will deform as aquifers and confining units elastically expand and contract with ASR cycles. The Deep Aquifer is overlain by more than 150 m of clayey fine-grained sediments and underlain by comparable units. These sediments are similar to the clayey sediments found in the nearby Santa Clara Valley, where inelastic compaction resulted in about 4.3 m of subsidence near San Jose from 1910 to 1995 due to overdraft of the aquifer. The Deep Aquifer is an important regional resource, and EBMUD is required to demonstrate that ASR activities will not affect nearby ground-water management, salinity levels, or cause permanent land subsidence. Subsidence in the east bay area could induce coastal flooding and create difficulty conveying winter storm runoff from urbanized areas. The objective of the cooperative investigation is to monitor and analyze aquifer-system compaction and expansion, as well as consequent land subsidence and uplift resulting from natural causes and any anthropogenic causes related to ground-water development and ASR activities at the BGP. Therefore, soil properties related to compressibility (and the potential for deformation associated with ground-water-level changes) are of the most concern. To achieve this objective, 3 boreholes

  3. Responses of soil respiration to elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability in an old-field grassland

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Shiqiang; Norby, Richard J; Childs, Joanne; Weltzin, Jake

    2007-01-01

    Responses of soil respiration to atmospheric and climatic change will have profound impacts on ecosystem and global C cycling in the future. This study was conducted to examine effects on soil respiration of the concurrent driving factors of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, rising temperature, and changing precipitation in a constructed old-field grassland in eastern Tennessee, USA. Model ecosystems of seven old-field species in 12 open-top chambers (4 m in diameter) were treated with two CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 300 ppm) and two temperature (ambient and ambient plus 3 C) levels. Two split plots with each chamber were assigned with high and low soil moisture levels. During the 19-month experimental period from June 2003 to December 2004, higher CO2 concentration and soil water availability significantly increased mean soil respiration by 35.8% and 15.7%, respectively. The effects of air warming on soil respiration varied seasonally from small reductions to significant increases to no response, and there was no significant main effect. In the wet side of elevated CO2 chambers, air warming consistently caused increases in soil respiration, whereas in other three combinations of CO2 and water treatments, warming tended to decrease soil respiration over the growing season but increase it over the winter. There were no interactive effects on soil respiration among any two or three treatment factors irrespective of testing time period. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was reduced by air warming, lower in the wet than the dry side, and not affected by CO2 treatment. Variations of soil respiration responses with soil temperature and soil moisture ranges could be primarily attributable to the seasonal dynamics of plant growth and its responses to the three treatments. Using a conceptual model to interpret the significant relationships of treatment-induced changes in soil respiration with changes in soil temperature and moisture observed in this study

  4. Investigation of Chromium and Nickel mobility in serpentinite soils and rocks: Impact into groundwaters and influences of carbonation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baneschi, Ilaria; Natali, Claudio; Boschi, Chiara; Chiarantini, Laura; Guidi, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Potentially harmful elements such as Cr and Ni in soils are increasingly drawing the attention of scientists and authorities due to their potential toxicity to humans and ecosystems. In the Tuscany region high levels of Cr in Ni have been reported in ultramafic rocks and soils. Furthermore, concentrations of Cr in groundwater of several aquifer systems of this area can approach the maximum contamination level of 50 µg/l, mainly in the form of Cr (VI). The main mechanism for mobilization Cr (VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr (III) from ultramafic rock with subsequent oxidation. To characterize the effects of weathering and the accessibility of geologically sourced and potentially toxic Cr and Ni in coastal Tuscany EU and Regione Toscana financed a multidisciplinary project, named RESPIRA. The study of waters, rocks and soils was conducted in the some sites of the coastal area of Tuscany, where concentrations of Cr (VI) in springwaters are around 50 µg/l (like in Querceto and Montecastelli) or below the detection limit, such as in Santa Luce. It has to be noted that at the site of Montecastelli and Querceto carbonation of serpentinite outcrops has been revealed (Boschi, 2011), together with iron rich brucite. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were conducted on rock and soil samples by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe (EMP), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and seven-steps sequential extraction. Extraction analyses were performed to obtain quantitative information on the distribution of trace metals in different mineralogical phases (clay minerals, carbonates, amorphous Fe, Mn oxides, organic matter and other silicates and oxides). The results show that the residual fraction was the predominant form of Cr and Ni in soil and rock samples. However, the concentrations of Ni associated to exchangeable, carbonates, Mn oxides and non cristalline fractions were higher than those of Cr, indicating that Ni was more available than Cr in all samples

  5. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Boehlke, Adam R.; Engle, Mark A.; Geboy, Nicholas J.; Schroeder, K.T.; Zupancic, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (∼3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO4 salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (∼24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  6. Exposure assessment of heavy metals on abandoned metal mine areas by ingestion of soil, crop plant and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-S.; Chon, H.-T.

    2003-05-01

    In order to assess the risk of adverse health effects on human exposure to arsenic and heavy metals influence by past mining activities, environmental geochemical survey was undertaken in the abandoned metal mine areas (Dongil Au-Ag-Cu-Zn mine, Okdong Cu-Pb-Zn mine, Myungbong Au-Ag mine). Arsenic and other heavy metals were highly elevated in the tailings from the Dongil mine (8,720 As mg/kg, 5.9 Cd mg/kg, 3,610 Cu mg/kg, 5,850 Pb mg/kg, 630 Zn mg/kg). Heavy metals except As from the Okdong mine (53.6 Cd mg/kg, 910 Cu mg/kg, 1,590 Pb mg/kg, 5,720 Zn mg/kg) and As from the Myungbong mine (5,810 As mg/kg) were also elevated. Elevated levels of As, Cd and Zn were also found in agricultural soils from these mine areas. The H.I. (hazard index) values of As and Cd from the Dongil, the Okdong and Myungbong mine areas are higher than 1.0. Therefore, toxic risk for As and Cd exist via exposure (ingestion) of contaminated soil, groundwater and rice grain in these mine areas.

  7. A Novel Method for Analyzing Chlorine Isotope Fractionation for Source and Fate Assessment of Organochlorine Soil and Groundwater Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Wiegert, Charline; Holmstrand, Henry; Andersson, Per; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    We developed a simple and accurate analytical method for compound-specific determination of chlorine isotopic composition (δ37Cl) or organochlorines based on GC/MS analysis and standard isotope bracketing. Good accuracy (comparison with off-line thermal ionization mass spectrometry) and a precision comparable to other on-line δ37Cl-methods (0.6 permil vs SMOC) were achieved. We applied this method to assess biodegradation of polychlorinated phenols used for wood preservation at a former sawmill site in northern Sweden. To come up with a δ37Cl-based estimation of the importance of on-going aerobic microbial degradation, we analyzed 37Cl-enrichment during enzymatic dechlorination of polychlorinated phenols in laboratory experiments. We also investigated δ37Cl fingerprints of chloroperoxidase-mediated chlorinated phenols, which can be used for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic sources of chlorophenols in boreal soils. Furthermore, we investigated natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes in a contaminated aquifer in the Czech Republic. At this site, the extent of naturally occurring reductive tetrachloroethene (PCE) dechlorination was estimated based on PCE-δ37Cl. Overall, our laboratory and field studies demonstrate the potential of using compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis for assessing the source and fate of organochlorine groundwater and soil contaminants.

  8. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, C. R.; Boehlke, A. R.; Engle, M. A.; Geboy, N. J.; Schroeder, K. T.; Zupancic, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (˜3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na-Mg-SO4 salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (˜24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  9. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, C. R.; Boehlke, A. R.; Engle, M. A.; Geboy, N. J.; Schroeder, K. T.; Zupancic, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (∼3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO{sub 4} salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (∼24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  10. Mixed Redox Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Rupp, Erik; Bell, Suzanne; Willinger, Martin; Foley, Theresa; Barbaris, Brian; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A new thermocatalytic method to destroy chlorinated solvents has been developed in the laboratory and tested in a pilot field study. The method employs a conventional Pt/Rh catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb. Reactions proceed at moderate temperatures in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and a reductant (mixed redox conditions) to minimize catalyst deactivation. In the laboratory, stable operation with high conversions (above 90% at residence times shorter than 1 s) for perchloroethylene (PCE) is achieved using hydrogen as the reductant. A molar ratio of H2/O2 = 2 yields maximum conversions; the temperature required to produce maximum conversions is sensitive to influent PCE concentration. When a homologous series of aliphatic alkanes is used to replace hydrogen as the reductant, the resultant mixed redox conditions also produce high PCE conversions. It appears that the dissociation energy of the C–H bond in the respective alkane molecule is a strong determinant of the activation energy, and therefore the reaction rate, for PCE conversion. This new method was employed in a pilot field study in Tucson, Arizona. The mixed redox system was operated semicontinuously for 240 days with no degradation of catalyst performance and complete destruction of PCE and trichloroethylene in a soil vapor extraction gas stream. Use of propane as the reductant significantly reduced operating costs. Mixed redox destruction of chlorinated solvents provides a potentially viable alternative to current soil and groundwater remediation technologies. PMID:18991945

  11. Rapid monitoring of soil, water, and air dusts by direct large-area alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sill, C W

    1995-07-01

    During retrieval and disposition of wastes containing transuranium elements, continuous monitoring of the air, water, and soil for alpha emitters was required to ensure that safety limits were not exceeded and that the waste itself was not disturbed unknowingly. Direct measurements by alpha spectrometry were particularly promising because of their potential speed, sensitivity, and their ability to identify transuranium radionuclides under field conditions. Soil samples or settled dusts were finely ground, suspended in 80% ethanol, sprayed onto circular stainless steel pans, and dried on a hotplate. Water samples were mounted directly by spraying. Air dusts were collected with a high-volume air sampler on 20- by 25-cm membrane filters. The samples were then analyzed directly in a large pressurized gridded ionization chamber without further sample preparation. The lower limits of detection for 10-min counting times were 1.5 Bq g-1 (40 pCi g-1) for 100-mg soil samples, and 4 x 10(-2) Bq m-3 (10(-12) microCi mL-1) for a 10-min air sample taken at 0.4 m3 min-1 (14 cubic feet per minute) and counted without waiting for decay of radon progeny. PMID:7790211

  12. Investigation of ground-water pollution at Air Force Plant Number 4, Fort Worth Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Beginning in December 1982, an extensive investigation was conducted to determine the presence and extent of industrial chemical pollution at Air Force Plant No. 4. A major portion of this work was devoted to the testing of ground water flowing within the overburden. In addition, 16 wells were drilled to monitor for polluted ground water in the upper and middle zones of the Paluxy Formation. Paluxy ground water was monitored; trichloroethylene, 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene, and lesser amounts of other chlorinated hydrocarbons, and the existence of abnormally high water levels in the upper zone of the Paluxy Formation in well P-8(U) were discovered.

  13. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2. PMID:24816462

  14. Efficient remediation of pentachlorophenol contaminated soil with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Wang, Li; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that pentachlorophenol contaminated soil can be efficiently remediated with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent zerovalent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment. 2 mmol L(-1) of tetrapolyphosphate could wash away 52.8% of pentachlorophenol (PCP) at pH 7.0 and 84.2% of pentachlorophenol at pH 11.0 from contaminated soil owing to the promotion effect of tetrapolyphosphate on the soil matrix dispersion and the subsequent solubilization of pentachlorophenol. More importantly, tetrapolyphosphate ions remained in the washing effluent could greatly enhance the molecular oxygen activation by ZVI to oxidize the desorbed PCP without any pH adjustment, and also avoid the competitive consumption of reactive oxygen species, as caused by the common organic surfactants in the washing effluent. Therefore, 85.1% of pentachlorophenol could be aerobically removed from the washing effluent by merely using 5 g L(-1) of ZVI. We also interestingly found that the dissolved iron ions released from the soil could enhance the oxidation of pentachlorophenol in the washing effluent, but the dissolved organic matter had the opposite effect. This study suggests the coupling tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment is an optional approach to remediate pentachlorophenol contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:25781373

  15. Experimental investigation of infiltration in soil with occurrence of preferential flow and air trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Sacha, Jan; Cislerova, Milena

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a number of infiltration experiments have not proved the validity of standard Richards' theory of the flow in soils with wide pore size distribution. Water flow in such soils under near-saturated conditions often exhibits preferential flow and temporal instability of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. An intact sample of coarse sandy loam from Cambisol series containing naturally developed vertically connected macropore was investigated during recurrent ponding infiltration (RPI) experiments conducted during period of 30 hours. RPI experiment consisted of two ponded infiltration runs, each followed by free gravitational draining of the sample. Three-dimensional neutron tomography (NT) image of the dry sample was acquired before the infiltration begun. The dynamics of the wetting front advancement was investigated by a sequence of neutron radiography (NR) images. Analysis of NR showed that water front moved preferentially through the macropore at the approximate speed of 2 mm/sec, which was significantly faster pace than the 0.3 mm/sec wetting advancement in the surrounding soil matrix. After the water started to flow out of the sample, changes in the local water content distribution were evaluated quantitatively by subtracting the NT image of the dry sample from subsequent tomography images. As a next stage, the experiment was repeated on a composed sample packed of ceramic and coarse sand. Series of infiltration runs was conducted in the sample with different initial water contents. The neutron tomography data quantitatively showed that both in natural soil sample containing the macropore and in the composed sample air was gradually transported from the region of fine soil matrix to the macropores or to the coarser material. The accumulation of the air bubbles in the large pores affected the hydraulic conductivity of the sample reducing it up to 50% of the initial value. This supports the hypothesis on strong influence of entrapped air amount and

  16. An analytical model for solute transport in an infiltration tracer test in soil with a shallow groundwater table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    It is recommended that an in-situ infiltration tracer test is considered for simultaneously determining the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients in soil. Analytical solutions have been derived for two-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in a radial geometry in the literature which can be used for interpreting the result of such a tracer test. However, these solutions were developed for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial extent and an infinite thickness of vadose zone which might not be realistically manifested in the actual solute transport during a field infiltration tracer test. Especially, the assumption of infinite thickness of vadose zone should be invalid for infiltration tracer tests conducted in soil with a shallow groundwater table. This paper describes an analytical model for interpreting the results of an infiltration tracer test based on improving the transport domain with a bounded-radial extent and a finite thickness of vadose zone. The analytical model is obtained with the successive application of appropriate integral transforms and their corresponding inverse transforms. A comparison of the newly derived analytical solution against the previous analytical solutions in which two distinct sets of radial extent and thickness of vadose zone are considered is conducted to determine the influence of the radial and exit boundary conditions on the solute transport. The results shows that both the radial and exit boundary conditions substantially affect the trailing segment of the breakthrough curves for a soil medium with large dispersion coefficients. Previous solutions derived for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial and an infinite thickness of vadose zone boundary conditions give lower concentration predictions compared with the proposed solution at late times. Moreover, the differences between two solutions are amplified when the observation positions are near the groundwater table. In addition, we compare our

  17. Pan-Arctic linkages between snow accumulation and growing season air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Gel, Y.; Lin, J. C.; Kelly, R. E. J.; Duguay, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Arctic field studies have indicated that the air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation at a site influence the quantity of snow accumulated, and that snow accumulation can alter growing season soil moisture and vegetation. Climate change is predicted to bring about warmer air temperatures, greater snow accumulation and northward movements of the shrub and tree lines. Understanding the response of northern environments to changes in snow and growing season land surface characteristics requires: (1) insights into the present-day linkages between snow and growing season land surface characteristics; and (2) the ability to continue to monitor these associations over time across the vast pan-Arctic. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the pan-Arctic (north of 60° N) linkages between two temporally distinct data products created from AMSR-E satellite passive microwave observations: GlobSnow snow water equivalent, and NTSG (growing season air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation transmissivity). Due to the complex and interconnected nature of processes determining snow and growing season land surface characteristics, these associations were analyzed using the modern non-parametric technique of Alternating Conditional Expectations (ACE), as this approach does not impose a predefined analytic form. Findings indicate that regions with lower vegetation transmissivity (more biomass) at the start and end of the growing season tend to accumulate less snow at the start and end of the snow season, possibly due to interception and shading. Warmer air temperatures at the start and end of the growing season were associated with diminished snow accumulation at the start and end of the snow season. High latitude sites with warmer mean annual growing season temperatures tended to accumulate more snow, probably due to the greater availability of water vapor for snow season precipitation at warmer locations. Regions with drier soils preceding snow onset tended

  18. Problems of soil and groundwater pollution in the disposal of ``marble'' slurries in NW Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; D'Agostino, F.; Ercoli, L.

    2008-09-01

    This work deals with disposal of slurries generated during the cutting and polishing processes of slabs of decorative sedimentary carbonate rocks in the north western Sicily. At present, they are used as fillers of dismantled quarries near the sawmills and, as a final step of reclamation, are covered with earth layers. In spite of such inexpensive solution, there is lack of knowledge about the composition of the waste. In order to assess if there is any threat for the environment and to suggest indications for alternative solutions, such as recycling or inactivation processes, the slurries were analysed by XR diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, ICP/MS, ionic chromatography, FTIR, UV-Vis, COD and TOC measurements, grain size analysis. Results indicate that the slurries can threaten the groundwater, because of the high chemical oxygen demand; furthermore they can modify the mechanism of groundwater recharge, because of their grain size distribution. Some laboratory tests show that, even in very aggressive conditions, the solid pollutants persist in the waste and slowly release into water the products of their degradation. The slurry therefore should be subjected to inactivation treatment before disposal or, alternatively, recycled as secondary raw material for a suitable process.

  19. Air-surface exchange of mercury with soils amended with ash materials.

    PubMed

    Ericksen, Jody; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2006-07-01

    Air-surface exchange of mercury (Hg) was measured from soil low in Hg (0.013 mg/kg) amended with four different ash materials: a wood ash containing -10% coal ash (0.070 mg/kg Hg), a mixture of two subbituminous coal fly ashes (0.075 mg/kg Hg), a subbituminous coal ash containing -10% petroleum coke ash (1.2 mg/kg Hg), and an ash from incinerated municipal sewage sludge (4.3 mg/kg Hg) using a dynamic flux chamber. Ash was added to soil to simulate agricultural supplements, soil stabilization, and pad layers used in livestock areas. For the agricultural amendment, -0.4% ash was well mixed into the soil. To make the stabilized soil that could be used for construction purposes, -20% ash was mixed into soil with water. The pad layer consisted of a wetted 1-cm layer of ash material on the soil surface. Diel trends of Hg flux were observed for all of the substrates with significantly higher Hg emissions during the day and negligible flux or deposition of Hg during the night. Hg fluxes, which were measured in the summer months, were best correlated with solar radiation, temperature, and air O3 concentrations. Mean Hg fluxes measured outdoors for unamended soils ranged from 19 to 140 ng/m2 day, whereas those for soil amended with ash to simulate an agricultural application ranged from 7.2 to 230 ng/m2 day. Fluxes for soil stabilized with ash ranged from 77 to 530 ng/m2 day and for soil with pads constructed of ash ranged from -50 to 90 ng/m2 day. Simple analytical tests (i.e., total Hg content, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure, heating, and indoor gas-exchange experiments) were performed to assess whether algorithms based on these tests could be used to predict Hg fluxes observed outdoors using the flux chamber. Based on this study, no consistent relationships could be developed. More work is needed to assess long-term and seasonal variations in Hg flux from (intact and disturbed) substrates before annual estimates of emissions can be developed. PMID:16878589

  20. Air-surface exchange of mercury with soils amended with ash materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jody Ericksen; Mae Sexauer Gustin

    2006-07-15

    Air-surface exchange of mercury (Hg) was measured from soil low in Hg amended with four different ash materials: a wood ash containing {approximately} 10% coal ash, amixture of two subbituminous coal fly ashes, a subbituminous coal ash containing {approximately} 10% petroleum coke ash and an ash from incinerated municipal sewage sludge (4.3 mg/kg Hg) using a dynamic flux chamber. Ash was added to soil to simulate agricultural supplements, soil stabilization, and pad layers used in livestock areas. For the agricultural amendment, {approximately} 0.4% ash was well mixed into the soil. To make the stabilized soil that could be used for construction purposes, {approximately} 20% ash was mixed into soil with water. The pad layer consisted of a wetted 1-cm layer of ash material on the soil surface. Diel trends of Hg flux were observed for all of the substrates with significantly higher Hg emissions during the day and negligible flux or deposition of Hg during the night. Hg fluxes, which were measured in the summer months, were best correlated with solar radiation, temperature, and air O{sub 3} concentrations. Mean Hg fluxes measured outdoors for unamended soils ranged from 19 to 140 ng/m{sup 2} day, whereas those for soil amended with ash to simulate an agricultural application ranged from 7.2 to 230 ng/m{sup 2} day. Fluxes for soil stabilized with ash ranged from 77 to 530 ng/m{sup 2} day and for soil with pads constructed of ash ranged from -50 to 90 ng/m{sup 2} day. Simple analytical tests were performed to assess whether algorithms based on these tests could be used to predict Hg fluxes observed outdoors using the flux chamber. Based on this study, no consistent relationships could be developed. More work is needed to assess long-term and seasonal variations in Hg flux from substrates before annual estimates of emissions can be developed. 45 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Water Consumption, Soil Temperature and Soil Respiration in Model Ecosystems of Young Oak Stands Treated by Air-warming and Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Thomas; Arend, Matthias; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.; Schulin, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    IPCC scenarios predict a global mean annual temperature increase during the 21st century of 2 - 6 °C, as well as changes in precipitation patterns. The multidisciplinary project "Querco" addresses the question how increased air temperature and extended drought periods will influence stands of young oaks. For this purpose, mixed stands of young Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petrea (4-year-old trees from seeds of four different provenances each) were composed in the WSL open-top model-ecosystem chambers on either acid or calcareous forest soils and grown under four different climate treatments (control, air-warming, drought, air-warming & drought) from 2007 to 2009. Drought treated chambers only received about one third of water during the growing seasons from May to October as compared to the control. Further, we established longer drought periods without any irrigation. The air-warming treatment was established by keeping the side walls of the open-top chambers more closed than in the controls. Unsurprisingly, evapotranspiration from dry soils was much lower than from irrigated soils. There was significantly more evapotranspiration from the acidic than from the calcareous soil. These findings are in line with increased leaf transpiration rates and a tendency towards higher leaf biomass in oaks growing on acid as compared to calcareous soil. The higher evapotranspiration from acid soils also was in line with the fact that soil water potentials decreased more in acidic than in calcareous soils, an effect that became particularly significant during periods of high consumptive water demand by the trees. While soil water potentials were strongly decreased by the drought treatments down to 1 m depth, the air-warming treatment had almost no effect on soil water potential. Treatments, air-warming and drought, significantly increased soil temperature. In drought treated soils, this effect was related to the lower water content as compared to the control soils. As intended

  2. Medium temperature thermal desorption soil remediation case study - Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Mt. Clemens, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Flemingloss, K. )

    1994-08-01

    Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., (CET) was contracted by the Selfridge Air National Guard base (SANG) to remove an abandoned underground storage tank (UST) farm and remediate the contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology. The first phase of this project was to remove fourteen 25,000 gal underground storage tanks that had been installed during the 1930's, including all ancillary equipment at the facility. The USTs had been used to store aviation fuels, including both av-gas and jet fuels. The tank-removal project disclosed over 5000 yd[sup 3] of contaminated soil in the tank excavation pit, and excavation continued until analytical sampling demonstrated that the perimeter was within the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Act 307 Type B cleanup criteria (state superfund act). The contaminated soil was trucked to a remote location on the base property for the thermal remediation. CET employed its Cedarapids 64MT thermal desorption plant to treat the contaminated soils from the tank removal site. These soils were predominantly clays, and the contamination included BTEX compounds up to 5 parts per million (ppm), and PNA compounds per 100 ppm. The medium temperature thermal desorption process, which heats the contaminated soil to approximately 850[degrees]F was successful in removing BTEX and PNA contamination from the soil (to levels below MDNR Type B cleanup criteria). The vapor stream from the desorption process was then filtered to minimize particulate emissions, and the contaminant compounds were then destroyed in the thermal oxidizer section of the process, at temperatures up to 1800[degrees]F. The remediated soil was returned to the original excavation as clean compacted fill material. With the use of the thermal desorption technology, CET remediated the site to MDNR cleanup standards, recycled the soils from the site, and eliminated off-site disposal liability for SANG.

  3. Air/superfund national technical guidance study series. Air emissions from area sources: Estimating soil and soil-gas sample number requirements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, W.

    1993-03-01

    The document provides guidance regarding the necessary number of soil gas or soil samples needed to estimate air emissions from area sources. The Manual relies heavily on statistical methods discussed in Appendix C of Volume II of Air/Superfund National Technical Guidance Study Series (EPA 1990) and Chapter 9 of SW-846 (EPA 1986). The techniques in the manual are based on recognizing the inhomgeniety of an area, by observation or screening samples, before samples are taken. Each of the identified zones are then sampled, using random sampling techniques, and statistics calculated separately for each zone before combining the statistics to provide an estimate for the entire area. The statistical techniques presented may also be used to analyze other types of data and provide measures such as mean, variance, and standard deviation. The methods presented in the Manual are based on small sample methods. Application of the methods to data which are appropriately analyzed by large sample methods or to data which is not normally distributed will give erroneous results.

  4. Sorption and mineralization of S-metolachlor and its ionic metabolites in soils and vadose zone solids: Consequences on groundwater quality in an alluvial aquifer (Ain Plain, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Nicole; Gourcy, Laurence

    2013-11-01

    This study characterizes the transfer of S-metolachlor (SMOC) and its metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOXA) to the alluvial aquifer. Sorption and mineralization of SMOC and its two ionic metabolites were characterized for cultivated soils and solids from the vadose (unsaturated) zone in the Ain Plain (France). Under sterile soil conditions, the absence of mineralization confirms the importance of biotic processes in SMOC degradation. There is some adsorption and mineralization of the parent molecule and its metabolites in the unsaturated zone, though less than in soils. For soils, the MESA adsorption constant is statistically higher than that of MOXA and the sorption constants of the two metabolites are significantly lower than that of SMOC. After 246 days, for soils, maximums of 26% of the SMOC, 30% of the MESA and 38% of the MOXA were mineralized. This partly explains the presence of these metabolites in the groundwater at concentrations generally higher than those of the parent molecule for MESA, although there is no statistical difference in the mineralization of the 3 molecules. The laboratory results make it possible to explain the field observations made during 27 months of groundwater quality monitoring (monthly sampling frequency). The evolution of both metabolite concentrations in the groundwater is directly related to recharge dynamics; there is a positive correlation between concentrations and the groundwater level. The observed lag of several months between the signals of the parent molecule and those of the metabolites is probably due to greater sorption of the parent molecule than of its metabolites and/or to degradation kinetics.

  5. Wood chipping almond brush to reduce air pollution and to study the effect of wood chips on harvest, soil nutrients, soil aggregation, and the microbial community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wood chipping of almond prunings could provide an alternative to burning that would not contribute to air pollution and add valuable organic matter to soils. The success of wood chipping depends on whether the wood chips interfere with harvest or delete the soil of critical nutrients necessary ...

  6. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  7. Soil air carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide concentrations in profiles under tallgrass prairie and cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, D.; Rice, C.W.

    1999-05-01

    Assessing the dynamics of gaseous production in soils is of interest because they are important sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. Changes in soil air carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentrations were studied in a Reading silt loam under prairie and cultivation. Concentrations were measured in situ over a 17-mo period to a depth of 3 m. Multilevel samples permitted collection of gases with subsequent measurement by gas chromatography in the laboratory. Soil air N{sub 2}O concentrations were near atmospheric levels for a majority of the study period in the prairie site but were significantly higher in the cultivated site. Annual mean N{sub 2}O concentrations were 0.403 and 1.09 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Soil air CO{sub 2} annual mean concentrations were 1.56 {times} 10{sup 4} and 1.10 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and ranged from 0.096 {times} 10{sup 4} to 6.45 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and 0.087 {times} 10{sup 4} to 3.59 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Concentrations generally increased with depth, with maximum soil air N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations at 1.0 m in the prairie site and 0.5 m in the cultivated site. Nitrous oxide in the cultivated site and CO{sub 2} at both sites did not change markedly over winter months, but CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O concentrations reached maximums during the summer months and decreased as the year progressed. Although soil air concentrations peaked and decreased faster at shallower depths, deeper depths exhibited relative maximum concentrations for longer time periods.

  8. AirMOSS P-Band Radar Retrieval of Subcanopy Soil Moisture Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Burgin, M. S.; Duan, X.; Moghaddam, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil moisture, as a key variable of the Earth system, plays an important role in our under-standing of the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. The importance of such knowledge has led NASA to fund missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS). The AirMOSS mission seeks to improve the estimates of the North American Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) by providing high-resolution observations of the root zone soil moisture (RZSM) over regions representative of the major North American biomes. AirMOSS flies a P-band SAR to penetrate vegetation and into the root zone to provide estimates of RZSM. The flights cover areas containing flux tower sites in regions from the boreal forests in Saskatchewan, Canada, to the tropical forests in La Selva, Costa Rica. The radar snapshots are used to generate estimates of RZSM via inversion of a scattering model of vegetation overlying soils with variable moisture profiles. These retrievals will be used to generate a time record of RZSM, which will be integrated with an ecosystem demography model in order to estimate the respiration and photosynthesis carbon fluxes. The aim of this work is the retrieval of the moisture profile over AirMOSS sites using the collected P-band radar data. We have integrated layered-soil scattering models into a forest scattering model; for the backscattering from ground and for the trunk-ground double-bounce mechanism, we have used a layered small perturbation method and a coherent scattering model of layered soil, respectively. To estimate the soil moisture profile, we represent it as a second-order polynomial in the form of az2 + bz + c, where z is the depth and a, b, and c are the coefficients to be retrieved from radar measurements. When retrieved, these coefficients give us the soil moisture up to a prescribed depth of validity. To estimate the unknown coefficients of the polynomial, we use simulated

  9. An environmental screening model to assess the consequences to soil and groundwater from railroad-tank-car spills of light non-aqueous phase liquids.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J; Barkan, Christopher P L; Schaeffer, David J; Anand, Pooja

    2009-06-15

    North American railroads transport a wide variety of chemicals, chemical mixtures and solutions in railroad tank cars. In the event of an accident, these materials may be spilled and impact the environment. Among the chemicals commonly transported are a number of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). If these are spilled they can contaminate soil and groundwater and result in costly cleanups. Railroads need a means of objectively assessing the relative risk to the environment due to spills of these different materials. Environmental models are often used to determine the extent of contamination, and the associated environmental risks. For LNAPL spills, these models must account for NAPL infiltration and redistribution, NAPL dissolution and volatilization, and remediation systems such as pump and treat. This study presents the development and application of an environmental screening model to assess NAPL infiltration and redistribution in soils and groundwater, and to assess groundwater cleanup time using a pumping system. Model simulations use parameters and conditions representing LNAPL releases from railroad tank cars. To take into account unique features of railroad-tank-car spill sites, the hydrocarbon spill screening model (HSSM), which assumes a circular surface spill area and a circular NAPL lens, was modified to account for a rectangular spill area and corresponding lens shape at the groundwater table, as well as the effects of excavation and NAPL evaporation to the atmosphere. The modified HSSM was first used to simulate NAPL infiltration and redistribution. A NAPL dissolution and groundwater transport module, and a pumping system module were then implemented and used to simulate the effects of chemical properties, excavation, and free NAPL removal on NAPL redistribution and cleanup time. The amount of NAPL that reached the groundwater table was greater in coarse sand with high permeability than in fine sand or silt with lower permeabilities

  10. Assessment of soil-gas and groundwater contamination at the Gibson Road landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Soil-gas and groundwater assessments were conducted at the Gibson Road landfill in 201 to provide screening-level environmental contamination data to supplement the data collected during previous environmental studies at the landfill. Passive samplers were used in both assessments to detect volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil gas and groundwater. A total of 56 passive samplers were deployed in the soil in late July and early August for the soil-gas assessment. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at masses greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram in all samplers and masses greater than 2.0 micrograms in 13 samplers. Three samplers located between the landfill and a nearby wetland had TPH masses greater than 20 micrograms. Diesel was detected in 28 of the 56 soil-gas samplers. Undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane were detected, but undecane was the most common diesel compound with 23 detections. Only five detections exceeded a combined diesel mass of 0.10 microgram, including the highest mass of 0.27 microgram near the wetland. Toluene was detected in only five passive samplers, including masses of 0.65 microgram near the wetland and 0.85 microgram on the southwestern side of the landfill. The only other gasoline-related compound detected was octane in two samplers. Naphthalene was detected in two samplers in the gully near the landfill and two samplers along the southwestern side of the landfill, but had masses less than or equal to 0.02 microgram. Six samplers located southeast of the landfill had detections of chlorinated compounds, including one perchloroethene detections (0.04 microgram) and five chloroform detections (0.05 to0.08 microgram). Passive samplers were deployed and recovered on August 8, 2011, in nine monitoring wells along the southwestern, southeastern and northeastern sides of the landfill and down gradient from the eastern corner of the landfill. Six of the nine

  11. Georeferenced database on soil and air climate parameters of Russia and its cartographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyabina, Irina; Reshotkin, Oleg; Konyushkov, Dmitry; Khudyakov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Many theoretical and applied problems related to the assessment of ecosystem response to climate changes imply simultaneous analysis of data on air and soil climate. In particular, soil temperature is a very important characteristic allowing us to judge sensitivity of ecosystems to climatic fluctuations and anthropogenic impacts. It is also of great importance for predicting the functioning of terrestrial biocenoses, geocryological and engineering conditions of the territory, etc. The vast territory of Russia is characterized by the great diversity of soil climatic conditions and by differently directed tendencies of their recent changes. A combined study of the spatial and temporal changes in the parameters of soil and atmospheric climates of Russia and their cartographic modeling are of great interest. Russia has a well-developed network of weather stations, at which measurements of soil temperatures at standard depths have been performed using the same methods for more than a century. The analysis of these data with the use of geographic information systems seems to be promising. For this purpose, a georeferenced database on the parameters of soil and atmospheric climate is being developed. Such a database in the GIS environment makes it possible to develop a system of cartographic models of the climate of Russian soils, including data on the climatic norm (1960-1990) and on its changes in the recent decades. This system will be used for assessing soil climatic conditions in the subjects of the Russian Federation and in separate soil-geographic provinces. A series of small-scale preliminary maps of soil temperature parameters was included in the National Soil Atlas of the Russian Federation (2011). These maps indicate that the mean annual soil temperature in Russia varies from -14.5 to +15.2ºC, and the accumulated daily temperatures >10ºC increase in the southward direction from 0 to 4800ºC (degree-days). The duration of the period with soil temperatures >10

  12. Preliminary investigation of soil and ground-water contamination at a U.S. Army Petroleum Training Facility, Fort Lee, Virginia, September-October 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, W.G.; Powell, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel-oil constituents in the soil and groundwater at the Fort Lee Petroleum Training Facility near Petersburg, Virginia, were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Department of Defense, U.S. Army. The study included installation of 25 groundwater monitoring wells and description of groundwater flow patterns of the shallow-aquifer system underlying the facility. Soil and groundwater samples were collected to determine the concentrations of fuel-oil constituents and to determine the potential for off-site migration of the constituents. Total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations up to 18,400 mg/km were reported in soil samples. Concentrations of benzene in water from wells at the facility were up to 130 micrograms per liter (ug/L), and concentrations of ethylbenzene and xylene were up to 54 and 120 ug/L, respectively. Potential exists for off-site migration of the contaminants and migration of contaminants downward to deeper aquifers. Further investigations of these potential contamination-migration pathways are warranted. Risk identification at the Petroleum Training Facility cannot be properly addressed because the distribution of the fuel-oil constituents has not been fully characterized. Preliminary identification of risk, however is presented by an examination of toxicity data for the chemical constituents reported in the groundwater at the facility. Concentrations of constituents were compared to the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Concentrations of benzene in water from wells at the facility exceed the USEPA 's 5 ug/L MCL by as much as 26 times. Sufficient data are not available to fully design the remedial-action plan for the facility; however, general responses to contamination of the type associated with the facility include no-action, monitoring, institutional controls, removal, and treatment. (USGS)

  13. Changes of soil hydraulic properties from long-term irrigation with desalted brackish groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquin; Candela, Lucila

    2014-05-01

    Long term effects on soil from desalted water irrigation have been assessed in an experimental plot (9 x 5 m2) under semi-arid climate located in Alicante (SE Spain). Water flux monitoring, from volumetric water content and soil pressure head, was performed from two different monitoring strategies. Also, field scale dispersivity was estimated through a BrLi tracer test and by inverse modelling with HYDRUS. Finally, a reactive and multicomponent transport model was developed using HP1 software, coupling of HYDRUS with PHREEQC. From soil profile characterization, three layers were identified, being calcite the most important mineral of the soil solid phase in all them, followed by quartz and gypsum, the latest in low concentration. Reactive transport modelling of major ions supply by irrigation water was performed with the HP1 code. Temporal and spatial variability of saturated hydraulic conductivity were included in the computational process. Chemical results for each time step (precipitation/dissolution of minerals) were used to compute changes in soil porosity and consequently in the hydraulic conductivity, which is used in the following computational time step. Simulations were performed along a 30 years period. Results from field data show that an increase in porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity can be expected due to the slow but continuous dissolution of gypsum. Calcite dissolution is expected at the root zone (where partial pressure of CO2 is higher) and precipitation occurs below the root zone, where CO2 partial pressure decreases due to the reduction of biological activity. From the baseline case, three different scenarios were proposed: (i) gypsum free profile, (ii) rain-fed irrigation, and (iii) lower CO2 partial pressure at the root zone. For the gypsum free soil profile scenario, the important precipitation of calcite produced below the root zone is not counteract by the gypsum dissolution, which may lead to significant reduction of hydraulic

  14. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Smith, James A.

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm 2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  15. Function of peatland located on secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils on groundwater purification processes and the elution of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepański, M.; Szajdak, L.; Bogacz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The investigation of peatland is used to show the water quality functioning with respect to different forms of nitrogen and carbon. The purification of ground water by the transect of 4.5 km long consisting organic soils (peat-moorsh soils) was estimated. This transect is located in the Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew, 40 km South-West of Poznan, West Polish Lowland. There is this transect along Wyskoć ditch. pH, the contents of total and dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, N-NO3-, N-NH4+ was measured. Additionally C/N factors of peats were estimated. The investigation has shown the impact of the peatland located on the secondary transformed peat - moorsh soils on the lowering of total nitrogen, ammonium, and nitrates as well as total and dissolved organic carbon in ground water. Peat-moorsh soils were described and classified according to Polish hydrogenic soil classification and World Reference Base Soil Notation. There are these investigated points along to Wyskoc ditch. Two times a month during entire vegetation season the following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo: samples of peat, from the depth of 0-20 cm, samples of water from the ditch, samples of ground water from wells established for this investigation. Samples of peat-moorsh soils were collected at the depth 0-20 cm. Soils were sampled two times a month from 10 sites of each site. Samples were air dried and crushed to pass a 1 mm-mesh sieve. These 10 sub-samples were mixed for the reason of preparing a "mean sample", which used for the determination of pH (in 1M KCl), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (Ntotal), and N-NO3- as well as N-NH4+. In water from Wyskoć ditch pH, Ntotal, N-NO3-, N-NH4+, DTC (dissolved total carbon) and DOC (dissolved organic carbon) was measured. Ground water samples were collected from four wells established for this investigation. The water was filtered by the

  16. Potential Groundwater Recharge and the Effects of Soil Heterogeneity on Flow at Two Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    V. Yucel; D. G. Levitt

    2001-11-01

    Two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs), consisting of shallow land burial disposal units at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), are managed by Bechtel Nevada for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. The NTS has an arid climate with annual average precipitation of about 17 cm at the Area 3 RWMS and about 13 cm at the Area 5 RWMS. The vadose zone is about 490 m thick at the Area 3 RWMS, and about 235 m thick at the Area 5 RWMS. Numerous studies indicate that under current climatic conditions, there is generally no groundwater recharge at these sites. Groundwater recharge may occur at isolated locations surrounding the RWMSs, such as in large drainage washes. However, groundwater recharge scenarios (and radionuclide transport) at the RWMSs are modeled in support of Performance Assessment (PA) documents required for operation of each RWMS. Recharge scenarios include conditions of massive subsidence and flooding, and recharge resulting from deep infiltration through bare-soil waste covers. This paper summarizes the groundwater recharge scenarios and travel time estimates that have been conducted in support of the PAs, and examines the effects of soil hydraulic property heterogeneity on flow.

  17. Ground-water hydrology and water quality of the southern high plains aquifer, Melrose Air Force Range, Cannon Air Force Base, Curry and Roosevelt Counties, New Mexico, 2002-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.; Gebhardt, Fredrick E.; Falk, Sarah E.

    2004-01-01

    In cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized the ground-water hydrology and water quality at Melrose Air Force Range in east-central New Mexico. The purpose of the study was to provide baseline data to Cannon Air Force Base resource managers to make informed decisions concerning actions that may affect the ground-water system. Five periods of water-level measurements and four periods of water-quality sample collection were completed at Melrose Air Force Range during 2002 and 2003. The water-level measurements and water-quality samples were collected from a 29-well monitoring network that included wells in the Impact Area and leased lands of Melrose Air Force Range managed by Cannon Air Force Base personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a broad overview of ground-water flow and ground-water quality in the Southern High Plains aquifer in the Ogallala Formation at Melrose Air Force Range. Results of the ground-water characterization of the Southern High Plains aquifer indicated a local flow system in the unconfined aquifer flowing northeastward from a topographic high, the Mesa (located in the southwestern part of the Range), toward a regional flow system in the unconfined aquifer that flows southeastward through the Portales Valley. Ground water was less than 55 years old across the Range; ground water was younger (less than 25 years) near the Mesa and ephemeral channels and older (25 years to 55 years) in the Portales Valley. Results of water-quality analysis indicated three areas of different water types: near the Mesa and ephemeral channels, in the Impact Area of the Range, and in the Portales Valley. Within the Southern High Plains aquifer, a sodium/chloride-dominated ground water was found in the center of the Impact Area of the Range with water-quality characteristics similar to ground water from the underlying Chinle Formation. This sodium/chloride-dominated ground water of the unconfined aquifer in the Impact

  18. International evaluation of in-situ biorestoration of contaminated soil and groundwater (September 1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Staps, S.J.J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The philosophy of in-situ biorestoration is to stimulate the indigenous soil microorganisms to degrade contaminants by improving the environmental conditions in the soil using a water recirculation system. The objective of the project is to show the possibilities for application of the technique in relation with contaminants, soil conditions and other site-specific circumstances by means of integration and evaluation of results of in-situ biorestoration projects. The project is limited to the Netherlands, West Germany and the USA. Experience has especially been gained with in-situ biorestoration at hydrocarbon-contaminated petrol stations and industrial sites. The system generally consists of a water recirculation system, aboveground water treatment and conditioning of the infiltrating water with nutrients and an oxygen source. However, there is no one-and-only application method for in-situ biorestoration. The remediation, which can last from approximately six months to several years, can reach residual concentrations below the B-value of the Netherlands examination framework.

  19. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater in northern climates

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, C.M.; Braely, W.A.; Travis, M.D.; Perry, L.B.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-03-01

    A field demonstration and research project was conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska, to demonstrate, evaluate, and document the construction and operation of three selected bioremediation technologies-landfarming, recirculating leachbeds, and infiltration galleries. Landfarming involves adding water and nutrients to contaminated soil to stimulate microbial activity and contaminant degradation. Infiltration galleries are dynamic in-situ treatment systems designed to stimulate microbial activity and subsequent hydrocarbon degradation by circulating nutrient and oxygen-amended water through petroleum-contaminated soil. Recirculating leachbeds, in a way similar to slurry reactors, aerate and mix nutrients with contaminated soil, and can be built as on-site bioreactors. Estimated biotreatment costs in the landfarm were between $20 to $30 per cubic yard ($15 to $23 per cubic meter). Nutrient placement has been demonstrated to be a critical factor, even though the site is tilled and mixed frequently. Success of the infiltration gallery was more difficult to document. Benzene was detected at less than 2 ppb and BTEX levels were less than 5 ppb for water extracted from the pumping well during 1992, which is significantly lower than the 1991 levels. Problems were encountered during the brief operation of the recirculating leach bed, but a similar system has performed well. Relatively simple, low-cost techniques provided significant potential for improving degradation rates.

  20. Regional and Detailed Survey for Radon Activities in Soil-Gas and Groundwater in the Okchon Zone, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, H.-K.; Chon, H.-T.

    2012-04-01

    The Okchon zone in Korea provides a typical example of natural geological materials enriched in potentially toxic elements including uranium which is parent nuclide for radon gas. For the purpose of radon radioactivity risk assessment, making the map of radon risk grade from Okchon zone, regional and detailed field surveys were carried out during 3 years. The study area is located in the central part of Korea, called the Okchon zone (about 5,100 km2), which occur in a 80km wide, northeast-trending belt that extends across the Korean Peninsula. The Okchon zone is underlain by metasedimentary rocks of unknown age that are composed mainly of black slate, phyllite, shale, and limestone. The three research areas (defined as Boeun, Chungju, and Nonsan) for detailed survey were selected from the results of regional survey. Results of detailed radon survey indicated a wide range of radon activities for soil-gases (148-1,843 pCi/L) and ground waters (23-5,540 pCi/L). About 15 percent of soil-gas samples exceeded 1,000 pCi/L and 84 percent of ground water samples exceeded the MCL (maximum contaminant level) of drinking water, 300 pCi/L, which proposed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999. For detailed survey, radon activities of soil-gas and ground water were classified as bedrock geology, based on 1/50,000 geological map and field research. For soil-gas measurements, mean values of radon activity from black slate-shale (789 pCi/L) were highest among the other base rocks. And for groundwater measurements, mean value of radon activities were decreased in the order of granite (1,345 pCi/L) > black shale-slate (915 pCi/L) > metasediments (617 pCi/L). Result of indoor radon measurement from detailed survey areas showed that about 50% of houses exceeded the indoor guideline, 4 pCi/L. For the radon risk assessment in indoor environment showed that probability of lung cancer risk from the houses located on the granite base rock (3.0×10-2) was highest among the other

  1. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  2. Analytical results, database management and quality assurance for analysis of soil and groundwater samples collected by cone penetrometer from the F and H Area seepage basins

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, D.R.; Johnson, W.H.; Serkiz, S.M.

    1994-10-01

    The Quantification of Soil Source Terms and Determination of the Geochemistry Controlling Distribution Coefficients (K{sub d} values) of Contaminants at the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB) study was designed to generate site-specific contaminant transport factors for contaminated groundwater downgradient of the Basins. The experimental approach employed in this study was to collect soil and its associated porewater from contaminated areas downgradient of the FHSB. Samples were collected over a wide range of geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, conductivity, and contaminant concentration) and were used to describe the partitioning of contaminants between the aqueous phase and soil surfaces at the site. The partitioning behavior may be used to develop site-specific transport factors. This report summarizes the analytical procedures and results for both soil and porewater samples collected as part of this study and the database management of these data.

  3. Reactive Transport of the Uranyl Ion in Soils, Sediments, and Groundwater Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2013-05-16

    Uranium is a ubiquitous trace component in rocks ranging from 1.2 to 1.3 µg g-1 in sedimentary rocks, 2.2 to 15 µg g-1 in granites, and 20 to 120 µg g-1 in phosphates (Langmuir, 1997; Plant et al., 1999). Uranium (U) is released to natural waters in dilute concentrations (generally < 10-7 mole L-1) from the weathering of these sources, with water concentrations in uraniferous geologic terrains, such as the southwestern U.S. (USGS, 2011), being higher (~ 10-6.5 mol L-1). Elevated water-borne concentrations are associated with the weathering of natural ore bodies [~10-6 mol L-1; e.g, (Payne and Airey, 2006)], the extraction and mining of U for armaments (Jiang and Aschner, 2009; WHO, 2001) and nuclear fuels [10-6 to 10-3 mol L-1; (Abdelouas et al., 1999)], and the disposal of waste solids and liquids from nuclear fuels reprocessing and arms production [~ 10-6 to 10-2 mol L-1; e.g., (Wan et al., 2009; Zachara et al., 2007)]. The form of U present in natural waters at high concentration is generally the uranyl ion [e.g., UO22+] which is quite soluble. Groundwater in many parts of the world contains dissolved U originating from natural and anthropogenic sources (ATSDR, 2011; EFSA, 2009). Low levels of dissolved U in drinking water are considered a health concern, causing renal and other effects (Kurttio et al., 2002; Kurttio et al., 2005; Limson Zamora et al., 1998; Nriagu et al., 2012; Raymond-Whish et al., 2007; Selden et al., 2009). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a regulatory drinking water standard of 30 µg L-1 (1.26 x 10-7 mol L-1) or 30 pCi L-1, whichever is exceeded first. The World Health Organization has recommended an even lower drinking water standard of 15 µg L-1 [6.3 x 10-8 mol L-1; (WHO, 2005)]. Human exposure to U through drinking water is expected to rise as world-wide reliance on groundwater sources increase (ESS, 2010).

  4. The effects of rice canopy on the air-soil exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides using paired passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Shaorui; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Ming, Lili; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-05-01

    The rice canopy in paddy fields can influence the air-soil exchange of organic chemicals. We used paired passive air samplers to assess the exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in a paddy field, South China. Levels of OCPs and light PAHs were generally higher under the canopy than above it. We found that the rice canopy can physically obstruct the evaporation of most OCPs and light PAHs, and can also act as a barrier to the gaseous deposition of p,p'-DDT and heavy PAHs. Paddy fields can behave as a secondary source of OCPs and light PAHs. The homolog patterns of these two types of chemical varied slightly between the air below and above the rice canopy, implying contributions of different sources. Paired passive air samplers can be used effectively to assess the in situ air-soil exchange of PAHs and OCPs in subtropical paddy fields. PMID:25686886

  5. Application of pig slurry to soils. Effect of air stripping treatment on nitrogen and TOC leaching.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; García-Sinovas, David; Alvarez-Benedí, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The effect of physical-chemical slurry treatment on the mobility and transformation of nitrogen and organic matter from pig slurry after soil application is evaluated. Two different pig slurries (one treated by stripping with air at pH=9 and another non-treated) were applied at the top of a soil column, containing approximately 100 kg of soil. Effluents were monitored measuring concentration values of ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total organic carbon (TOC). The breakthrough curves were modelled using STANMOD and HYDRUS 1D codes. Low concentrations of ammonia were detected in the effluent recovered at the bottom of the soil profile for both types of slurry. Nitrate concentration in effluent was lower and more homogenous over time when applying stripping treated pig slurry. In N modelling, adsorption of ammonia by soil proved an important process, nitrite and nitrate adsorption being less significant, although not negligible. Transformation from ammonia to nitrite controls the kinetics of the nitrification process. Total organic carbon in the column effluent was higher in the experiment using treated pig slurry, which can be attributed to organic matter solubilisation in the stripping treatment process. PMID:20705384

  6. Soil erosion and causative factors at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterworth, Joel B.

    1988-01-01

    Areas of significant soil erosion and unvegetated road cuts were identified and mapped for Vandenberg Air Force Base. One hundred forty-two eroded areas (most greater than 1.2 ha) and 51 road cuts were identified from recent color infrared aerial photography and ground truthed to determine the severity and causes of erosion. Comparison of the present eroded condition of soils (as shown in the 1986 photography) with that in historical aerial photography indicates that most erosion on the base took place prior to 1928. However, at several sites accelerated rates of erosion and sedimentation may be occurring as soils and parent materials are eroded vertically. The most conspicuous erosion is in the northern part of the base, where severe gully, sheet, and mass movement erosion have occurred in soils and in various sedimentary rocks. Past cultivation practices, compounded by highly erodible soils prone to subsurface piping, are probably the main causes. Improper range management practices following cultivation may have also increased runoff and erosion. Aerial photography from 1986 shows that no appreciable headward erosion or gully sidewall collapse have occurred in this area since 1928.

  7. They all like it hot: faster cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Clean up a greasy kitchen spill with cold water and the going is slow. Us hot water instead and progress improves markedly. So it makes sense that cleanup of greasy underground contaminants such as gasoline might go faster if hot water or steam were somehow added to the process. The Environmental Protection Agency named hundreds of sites to the Superfund list - sites that have been contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum products or solvents. Elsewhere across the country, thousands of properties not identified on federal cleanup lists are contaminated as well. Given that under current regulations, underground accumulations of solvent and hydrocarbon contaminants (the most serious cause of groundwater pollution) must be cleaned up, finding a rapid and effective method of removing them is imperative. In the early 1990`s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore developed dynamic underground stripping. This method for treating underground contaminants with heat is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods.

  8. Investigating plantation-induced near-surface soil hydrophobicity and its impact on groundwater recharge in the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adane, Z. A.; Nasta, P.; Gates, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Although numerous studies in diverse environmental settings have demonstrated that plantations tend to reduce soil moisture and recharge rates, research on physical mechanisms affecting these linkages tend to focus mainly on the effects of evapotranspiration and interception. This study investigates the extent of soil hydrophobicity resulting from land use changes and its impact on groundwater recharge in a century-old experimental forest surrounded by grassland in the Northern High Plains (Nebraska National Forest). Water Drop Penetration Tests (WDPT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to investigate soil hydrophobicity on 50 cm soil cores collected from experimental plots beneath 5 land cover types. WDPT analysis indicated that most near-surface soils (0-12.5 and 12.5-25 cm) beneath pine plots were moderately to strongly hydrophobic. NMR spectroscopy analysis comparing ratios of hydrophobic (3.2-0.5 and 8.5-6.5 ppm) to hydrophilic (6.5-3.2 ppm) regions suggests that surface soils beneath the plantations were uniformly more hydrophobic than grasslands (by ~30 to 260%). Unsaturated zone soil cores were collected from beneath each experimental plot for comparison of hydrophobicity with recharge rates based on chloride and sulfate mass balance. Recharge estimates beneath the plantations (4-10 mm yr-1) represent reductions of 86-94% relative to the surrounding native grassland, suggesting a link between soil hydrophobicity and reduced infiltration beneath the plantations.

  9. Processes affecting soil and groundwater contamination by DNAPL in low-permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is one of a set of focus papers intended to document the current knowledge relevant to the contamination and remediation of soils and ground water by dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The emphasis is on low permeability media such as fractured clay and till and unconsolidated, stratified formations. Basic concepts pertaining to immiscible-fluid mixtures are described and used to discuss such aspects as DNAPL transport, dissolved-phase transport, and equilibrium mass distributions. Several implications for remediation are presented. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. In-situ mineralization of actinides for groundwater cleanup: Laboratory demonstration with soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Jensen, M.P.; Schmidt, M.A.

    1997-11-01

    An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into less mobile forms by remote treatment. The process described herein relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange in the near term. The cation exchanger is designed to subsequently decompose, transforming the actinides into insoluble phosphate mineral forms as the medium of stable long-term isolation. This material can be generated in situ in the subsurface thus eliminating the need for excavation to immobilize the actinide ions. Previous investigations have identified a suitable organophosphorus reagent and profiled its decomposition kinetics, verified the formation of phosphate mineral phases upon decomposition of the reagent, determined solubility limits for appropriate metal phosphates under groundwater conditions, and examined the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus reagent. In this report, the focus is on a laboratory-scale demonstration of the concept using a soil sample from the Fernald Environmental Management Plant.

  11. Equilibrium form of horizontally retreating, soil-mantled hillslopes: Model development and application to a groundwater sapping landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, J. Taylor; Hamon, Jennifer L.

    2012-03-01

    We present analytical solutions for the steady state topographic profile of a soil-mantled hillslope retreating into a level plain in response to a horizontally migrating base level. This model applies to several scenarios that commonly arise in landscapes, including widening valleys, eroding channel banks, and retreating scarps. For a sediment transport law in which sediment flux is linearly proportional to the topographic slope, the steady state profile is exponential, with an e-folding length, L, proportional to the ratio of the sediment transport coefficient to the base level migration speed. For the case in which sediment flux increases nonlinearly with slope, the solution has a similar form that converges to the linear case as L increases. We use a numerical model to explore the effects of different base level geometries and find that the one-dimensional analytical solution is a close approximation for the hillslope profile above an advancing channel tip. We then compare the analytical model with hillslope profiles above the tips of a groundwater sapping channel network in the Florida Panhandle. The model agrees closely with hillslope profiles measured from airborne laser altimetry, and we use a predicted log linear relationship between topographic slope and horizontal distance to estimate L for the measured profiles. Mapping 1/L over channel tips throughout the landscape reveals that adjacent channel networks may be growing at different rates and that south facing slopes experience more efficient hillslope transport.

  12. HCMM energy budget data as a model input for assessing regions of high potential groundwater pollution. [South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G. (Principal Investigator); Heilman, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Day thermal data were analyzed to assess depth to groundwater in the test site. HCMM apparent temperature was corrected for atmospheric effects using lake temperature of the Oahe Reservoir in central South Dakota. Soil surface temperatures were estimated using an equation developed for ground studies. A significant relationship was found between surface soil temperature and depth to groundwater, as well as between the surface soil-maximum air temperature differential and soil water content (% of field capacity) in the 0 cm and 4 cm layer of the profile. Land use for the data points consisted of row crops, small grains, stubble, and pasture.

  13. Fluorides in groundwater, soil and infused black tea and the occurrence of dental fluorosis among school children of the Gaza strip.

    PubMed

    Shomar, B; Müller, G; Yahya, A; Askar, S; Sansur, R

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fluoride levels in water, soil and tea, and to identify the major fluoride minerals in soil that supply water with fluoride ions. Another aim was to study the prevalence of dental fluorosis in permanent dentition of the school children of the Gaza Strip. Monitoring of fluoride levels in 73 groundwater wells and 20 topsoil samples for the last three years revealed a general trend of increasing from north to south of the Gaza Strip. A linear regression analysis found a correlation coefficient of r=0.93 between the fluoride concentrations in groundwater and soil for the same geographic areas. However, the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) results showed that none of the four major fluoride minerals were detected in the tested soil samples; the PHREEQC model showed that fluorite (CaF2) was the main donating mineral of fluoride ions to groundwater. A high positive correlation was found between fluoride concentrations in groundwater and occurrence of dental fluorosis. Among 353 school children of the five geographic areas of the Gaza Strip the prevalence of dental fluorosis was 60%, and 40% had no signs of fluorosis in their permanent dentitions. The highest occurrence, 94%, was in Khan Yunis, followed by 82% in Rafah, 68% in the middle area, 29% in Gaza and the lowest occurrence of 9% was in the northern area. These percentages were directly proportional to the average content of fluoride in groundwater of each area: 2.6, 0.9, 1.7, 1.2, and 0.7 ppm, respectively. The exception was Rafah where people drank from new groundwater wells that have been dug in the last 10 years. The occurrence of the disease was due to intake of high amounts of fluorides in drinking water, tea and fish. Communication with population indicated a heavy intake of tea starting from a very young age; not uncommonly tea is put in nursing bottles. No significant correlation was found between prevalence figures and gender or age groups. This high

  14. Evaluating the role of soil variability on groundwater pollution and recharge at regional scale by integrating a process-based vadose zone model in a stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Zdruli, Pandi

    2013-04-01

    Interpreting and predicting the evolution of water resources and soils at regional scale are continuing challenges for natural scientists. Examples include non-point source (NPS) pollution of soil and surface and subsurface water from agricultural chemicals and pathogens, as well as overexploitation of groundwater resources. The presence and build up of NPS pollutants may be harmful for both soil and groundwater resources. The accumulation of salts and trace elements in soils can significantly impact crop productivity, while loading of salts, nitrates, trace elements and pesticides into groundwater supplies can deteriorate a source of drinking and irrigation water. Consequently, predicting the spatial distribution and fate of NPS pollutants in soils at applicative scales is now considered crucial for maintaining the fragile balance between crop productivity and the negative environmental impacts of NPS pollutants, which is a basis of sustainable agriculture. Soil scientists and hydrologists are regularly asked to assist state agencies to understand these critical environmental issues. The most frequent inquiries are related to the development of mathematical models needed for analyzing the impacts of alternative land-use and best management use and management of soil and water resources. Different modelling solutions exist, mainly differing on the role of the vadose zone and its horizontal and vertical variability in the predictive models. The vadose zone (the region from the soil surface to the groundwater surface) is a complex physical, chemical and biological ecosystem that controls the passage of NPS pollutants from the soil surface where they have been deposited or accumulated due to agricultural activities, to groundwater. Physically based distributed hydrological models require the internal variability of the vadose zone be explored at a variety of scales. The equations describing fluxes and storage of water and solutes in the unsaturated zone used in these

  15. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  16. Pharmaceutical and personal care products in groundwater, subsurface drainage, soil, and wheat grain, following a high single application of municipal biosolids to a field.

    PubMed

    Gottschall, N; Topp, E; Metcalfe, C; Edwards, M; Payne, M; Kleywegt, S; Russell, P; Lapen, D R

    2012-04-01

    Dewatered municipal biosolids (DMBs) were applied to a field at a rate of ~22 Mg dw ha(-1) in October 2008. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were monitored in groundwater, tile drainage, soil, DMB aggregates incorporated into the soil post-land application, and in the grain of wheat grown on the field for a period of ~1 year following application. Over 80 PPCPs were analyzed in the source DMB. PPCPs selected for in-depth monitoring included: antibiotics (tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones), bacteriocides (triclosan, triclocarban), beta-blockers (atenolol, propranolol, metaprolol), antidepressants (fluoxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine, sertraline), antifungals (miconazole), analgesics (acetaminophen, ibuprofen) and anticonvulsants (carbamazepine). PPCPs in tile were observed twice, ~3 weeks and 2 months post-application. Of all PPCPs measured in tile drainage, only carbamazepine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, triclosan, triclocarban, venlafaxine, and citalopram were detected (5-74 ng L(-1)). PPCPs were not detected in groundwater >2 m depth below the soil surface, and concentrations above detection limits at 2 m depth were only observed once just after the first rain event post-application. In groundwater, all compounds found in tile, except carbamazepine, acetaminophen and citalopram, were detected (10-19 ng L(-1)). PPCPs were detected in DMB aggregates incorporated in soil up to 1 year post-application, with miconazole and fluoxetine having the lowest percent reductions over 1 year (~50%). For several compounds in these aggregates, concentration declines were of exponential decay form. No PPCPs were detected in the grain of wheat planted post-application on the field. No PPCPs were ever detected in water, soil or grain samples from the reference plot, where no DMB was applied. PMID:22300554

  17. Groundwater levels time series sensitivity to pluviometry and air temperature: a geostatistical approach to Sfax region, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Triki, Ibtissem; Trabelsi, Nadia; Hentati, Imen; Zairi, Moncef

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the pattern of groundwater level fluctuations is investigated by statistical techniques for 24 monitoring wells located in an unconfined coastal aquifer in Sfax (Tunisia) for a time period from 1997 to 2006. Firstly, a geostatistical study is performed to characterize the temporal behaviors of data sets in terms of variograms and to make predictions about the value of the groundwater level at unsampled times. Secondly, multivariate statistical methods, i.e., principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) of time series of groundwater levels are used to classify groundwater hydrographs regard to identical fluctuation pattern. Three groundwater groups (A, B, and C) were identified. In group "A," water level decreases continuously throughout the study periods with rapid annual cyclic variation, whereas in group "B," the water level contains much less high-frequency variation. The wells of group "C" represents a steady and gradual increase of groundwater levels caused by the aquifer artificial recharge. Furthermore, a cross-correlation analysis is used to investigate the aquifer response to local rainfall and temperature records. The result revealed that the temperature is more affecting the variation of the groundwater level of group A wells than the rainfall. However, the second and the third groups are less affected by rainfall or temperature. PMID:24141484

  18. Concentrations of legacy and emerging flame retardants in air and soil on a transect in the UK West Midlands.

    PubMed

    Drage, Daniel S; Newton, Seth; de Wit, Cynthia A; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Passive air samples were collected monthly for 6 months from 8 sites along a transect of Birmingham, United Kingdom between June 2012 and January 2013. Soil samples were collected once at each site. Average concentrations of BDE-209, ΣPBDEs17:183 and ΣPBDEs in ambient air were 150, 49, and 180 pg m(-3), respectively. Atmospheric concentrations of PBDEs were negatively correlated with distance from the city centre, exhibiting an "urban pulse". The average ΣHBCDD air concentration was 100 pg m(-3), however concentrations were not correlated with distance from the city centre. Several emerging flame retardants (EFRs) were identified in air and/or soil samples: 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEH-TEBP), 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH or DBE-DBCH), allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and dechlorane plus (DP or DDC-CO). Average concentrations of BDE-209, ΣPBDEs17:183 and ΣPBDEs in soil were 11, 3.6, and 15 ng g(-1) soil organic matter. PBDE concentrations in soil were higher at sites closest to the city centre, however correlations with distance from the city centre were not significant. BDEs-47 and -99 contributed more to ΣPBDEs in soil samples than air samples, but in both, the predominant congener was BDE-209. BATE was more abundant in air than soil but ATE was abundant in soil but not air. PMID:26807939

  19. Groundwater-soil moisture-climate interactions: lessons from idealized model experiments with forced water table depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharne, Agnès; Lo, Min-Hui; Decharme, Bertrand; Wang, Fuxing; Cheruy, Frédérique; Ghattas, Josefine; Chien, Rong-You; lan, Chia-Wei; Colin, Jeanne; Tyteca, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater (GW) constitutes by far the largest volume of liquid freshwater on Earth. The most active part is soil moisture (SM), recognized as a key variable of land/atmosphere interactions, especially in so-called transition zones, where/when SM varies between wet and dry values. But GW can also be stored in deeper reservoirs than soils, in particular unconfined aquifer systems, in which the saturated part is called the water table (WT). The latter is characterized by slow and mostly horizontal water flows towards the river network, with well-known buffering effects on streamflow variability. Where/when the WT is shallow enough, it can also sustain SM by means of capillary rise, thus increase evapotranspiration (ET), with potential impact on the climate system (including temperatures and precipitation). The large residence time of GW may also increase the Earth system's memory, with consequences on the persistence of extreme events, hydro-climatic predictability, and anthropogenic climate change, particularly the magnitude of regional warming. Here, our main goal is to explore the potential impacts of the water table depth (WTD) on historical climate through idealized model analyses. To this end, we force three state-of-the art land surface models (LSMs), namely CLM, ORCHIDEE, and SURFEX, with prescribed WTDs ranging from 0.5 to 10 m. The LSMs are run either off-line or coupled to their parent climate model, following LMIP/AMIP-like protocols for intercomparability. Within this framework, we want to assess the sensitivity of ET and the simulated climate to the WTD in a systematic way. In particular, we will identify and compare the patterns of the critical WTD, defined as the deepest one to achieve a significant change in ET. To this end, we estimate derivatives of ET with respect to WTD, which tell how the sensitivity of ET to a unit change in WTD evolves with WTD. In each grid-point, these derivatives can be used to define the critical WTD, given a threshold ET

  20. Quantification and modelling of water flow in rain-fed paddy fields in NE Thailand: Evidence of soil salinization under submerged conditions by artesian groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammecker, Claude; Maeght, Jean-Luc; Grünberger, Olivier; Siltacho, Siwaporn; Srisruk, Kriengsak; Noble, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    SummaryWater flow and solute transport in soils forms an essential part in many groundwater hydrology studies. This is especially true for Northeast Thailand, where the agricultural land is affected by the soil salinity, which is a widespread and an increasing phenomenon affecting 25% of the agricultural land. Salinization appears as scattered discrete patches of 10-100 m2 in the lowlands, illustrated by white efflorescences during the dry season and bare soil during the cropping season. A field study was undertaken in farm plots to measure the water flow and solute transport within the soil surface and the vadose zone, both inside and outside a saline patch. The water flow was measured on the soil surface with lysimeters and infiltration rings, and was derived in the soil from the hydraulic gradients measured with tensiometers placed at different depths. The salt transport was evaluated with water traps also placed at different depths, where the soil water's electrical conductivity was measured throughout the rainy season. Field study results demonstrated that the accumulation of saline solutions in rain fed paddy fields, occurred mainly during the rainy season while the soil surface remained flooded. During this period the saline water table rose towards the soil surface independently of infiltration into the soil. It happened in specific places where the compacted soil layer, generally ubiquitous in the area at a depth of 40-50 cm, is interrupted. Therefore salinity appeareds in discret points as patches. Artesian upward flow already described in this area (Haworth et al., 1966; Williamson et al., 1989; Imaizumi et al., 2002) is most probably responsible for this water table rise, thereby affecting crop productivity. Numerical modelling of water flow using HYDRUS-3D further supported these results and showed that managing the depth of flooding within the plot can significantly reduce the outbreak of these saline plumes.

  1. Pesticide pollution of soil, water and air in Delhi area, India.

    PubMed

    Pillai, M K

    1986-11-01

    In India organochlorine insecticides such as DDT and HCH constitute more than 70% of the pesticides used at present. Its continued use has given interest to monitor for the last few years the extent of organochlorine insecticide residues in soil, water, air and rain water in Delhi area. Out of the 50 samples each of soil and earthworms collected from different parts 48 samples showed that soil and earthworms contained 0-2.61 and 0-37.74 mg Kg-1 of total DDT residues respectively. The area near the vicinity of the DDT factory showed high levels of DDT residues. A two-year survey of the Yamuna river in Delhi showed that water contained an average of 0.24 ug L-1 and the bottom sediment had 0.24 mg Kg-1 of total DDT residues. The fishes collected from the Yamuna river showed very high bioaccumulation of DDT residues. The air and rainwater samples monitored from 3 different areas for two years indicated that DDT was more near the DDT factory area while HCH was more near a commercial complex. These results indicate that the overall organochlorine-residue levels in Delhi is not alarming. It probably indicates that DDT and HCH are more rapidly dissipated and degraded in a tropical country like India. PMID:3810135

  2. Plants + soil/wetland microbes: Food crop systems that also clean air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Wolverton, B. C.

    2011-02-01

    The limitations that will govern bioregenerative life support applications in space, especially volume and weight, make multi-purpose systems advantageous. This paper outlines two systems which utilize plants and associated microbial communities of root or growth medium to both produce food crops and clean air and water. Underlying these approaches are the large numbers and metabolic diversity of microbes associated with roots and found in either soil or other suitable growth media. Biogeochemical cycles have microbial links and the ability of microbes to metabolize virtually all trace gases, whether of technogenic or biogenic origin, has long been established. Wetland plants and the rootzone microbes of wetland soils/media also been extensively researched for their ability to purify wastewaters of a great number of potential water pollutants, from nutrients like N and P, to heavy metals and a range of complex industrial pollutants. There is a growing body of research on the ability of higher plants to purify air and water. Associated benefits of these approaches is that by utilizing natural ecological processes, the cleansing of air and water can be done with little or no energy inputs. Soil and rootzone microorganisms respond to changing pollutant types by an increase of the types of organisms with the capacity to use these compounds. Thus living systems have an adaptive capacity as long as the starting populations are sufficiently diverse. Tightly sealed environments, from office buildings to spacecraft, can have hundreds or even thousands of potential air pollutants, depending on the materials and equipment enclosed. Human waste products carry a plethora of microbes which are readily used in the process of converting its organic load to forms that can be utilized by green plants. Having endogenous means of responding to changing air and water quality conditions represents safety factors as these systems operate without the need for human intervention. We review

  3. [Biotechnological principles and environmental hygiene aspects of in situ sanitation methods in soil and groundwater areas].

    PubMed

    Filip, Z; Milde, G

    1989-01-01

    Biotechnological in situ measures can become a suitable mean to compete with a broad spectrum of mainly organic contaminants in soil and ground water environments. They can partly follow the spread of the contaminants, are ecologically safe and economically reasonable. Their application, however, is less effective at high concentrations of the contaminants, in the presence of toxicants and also under hydraulically unsuitable conditions. Care must be taken to avoid possible side-effects of the nutrient added, enriched microbial biomass, and some metabolical products. Long-term effects of in situ remediation techniques, and especially in connection with the possible use of added microorganisms, are not well known, yet. There is a need for further research in this complex field, in order to establish a scientific base because until now these remediation techniques were mainly based on empirical views. PMID:2658024

  4. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.; Buetnner, H.M.; Aines, R.D.

    1995-09-12

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process. 4 figs.

  5. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  6. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  7. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  8. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  9. Multi-bioindicators to assess soil microbial activity in the context of an artificial groundwater recharge with treated wastewater: a large-scale pilot experiment.

    PubMed

    Michel, Caroline; Joulian, Catherine; Ollivier, Patrick; Nyteij, Audrey; Cote, Rémi; Surdyk, Nicolas; Hellal, Jennifer; Casanova, Joel; Besnard, Katia; Rampnoux, Nicolas; Garrido, Francis

    2014-06-28

    In the context of artificial groundwater recharge, a reactive soil column at pilot-scale (4.5 m depth and 3 m in diameter) fed by treated wastewater was designed to evaluate soil filtration ability. Here, as a part of this project, the impact of treated wastewater filtration on soil bacterial communities and the soil's biological ability for wastewater treatment as well as the relevance of the use of multi-bioindicators were studied as a function of depth and time. Biomass; bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity fingerprints; potential nitrifying, denitrifying, and sulfate-reducing activities; and functional gene (amo, nir, nar, and dsr) detection were analyzed to highlight the real and potential microbial activity and diversity within the soil column. These bioindicators show that topsoil (0 to 20 cm depth) was the more active and the more impacted by treated wastewater filtration. Nitrification was the main activity in the pilot. No sulfate-reducing activity or dsr genes were detected during the first 6 months of wastewater application. Denitrification was also absent, but genes of denitrifying bacteria were detected, suggesting that the denitrifying process may occur rapidly if adequate chemical conditions are favored within the soil column. Results also underline that a dry period (20 days without any wastewater supply) significantly impacted soil bacterial diversity, leading to a decrease of enzyme activities and biomass. Finally, our work shows that treated wastewater filtration leads to a modification of the bacterial genetic and functional structures in topsoil. PMID:24608565

  10. Relating trends in land surface-air temperature difference to soil moisture and evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Karen; Taylor, Chris; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Ghent, Darren; Harris, Phil; Remedios, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is central to both physical and biogeochemical processes within the Earth System. Drying of soils leads to evapotranspiration (ET) becoming limited or "water-stressed" and is accompanied by rises in land surface temperature (LST), land surface-air temperature difference (delta T), and sensible heat flux. Climate models predict sizable changes to the global water cycle but there is variation between models in the time scale of ET decay during dry spells. The e-stress project is developing novel satellite-derived diagnostics to assess the ability of Earth System Models (ESMs) to capture behaviour that is due to soil moisture controls on ET. Satellite records of LST now extend 15 years or more. MODIS Terra LST is available from 2000 to the present and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) LST record runs from 1995 to 2012. This paper presents results from an investigation into the variability and trends in delta T during the MODIS Terra mission. We use MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua LST and ESA GlobTemperature ATSR LST with 2m air temperatures from reanalyses to calculate trends in delta T and "water-stressed" area. We investigate the variability of delta T in relation to soil moisture (ESA CCI Passive Daily Soil Moisture), vegetation (MODIS Monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and precipitation (TRMM Multi-satellite Monthly Precipitation) and compare the temporal and spatial variability of delta T with model evaporation data (GLEAM). Delta T anomalies show significant negative correlations with soil moisture, in different seasons, in several regions across the planet. Global mean delta T anomaly is small (magnitude mostly less than 0.2 K) between July 2002 and July 2008 and decreases to a minimum in early 2010. The reduction in delta T anomaly coincides with an increase in soil moisture anomaly and NDVI anomaly suggesting an increase in evapotranspiration and latent heat flux with reduced sensible heat flux. In conclusion there have been

  11. Dielectric Constant Modelling with Soil–Air Composition and Its Effect on Sar Radar Signal Backscattered over Soil Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Le Morvan, Aurélie; Baghdadi, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the contribution of a new dielectric constant characterisation fo