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Sample records for air sparging remediation

  1. In situ aeration: Air sparging, bioventing, and related remediation process

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.N.; Johnson, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. This volume focuses on the use of air sparging, bioventing, and other aeration processes to remediate hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location - in situ air sparging system (revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Health, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Air sparging is the process of injecting clean air directly into an aquifer for remediation of contaminated groundwater. For removing contaminants, air sparging relies on two basic mechanisms working either alone or in tandem: biodegradation and volatilization. The objective of air sparging is to force air through contaminated aquifer materials to provide oxygen for bioremediation and/or to strip contaminants out of the aquifer.

  3. [Simulation on remediation of benzene contaminated groundwater by air sparging].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan-Ling; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Dan; Zhong, Mao-Sheng; Jia, Xiao-Yang

    2012-11-01

    Air sparging (AS) is one of the in situ remedial technologies which are used in groundwater remediation for pollutions with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, the field design of air sparging system was mainly based on experience due to the lack of field data. In order to obtain rational design parameters, the TMVOC module in the Petrasim software package, combined with field test results on a coking plant in Beijing, is used to optimize the design parameters and simulate the remediation process. The pilot test showed that the optimal injection rate was 23.2 m3 x h(-1), while the optimal radius of influence (ROI) was 5 m. The simulation results revealed that the pressure response simulated by the model matched well with the field test results, which indicated a good representation of the simulation. The optimization results indicated that the optimal injection location was at the bottom of the aquifer. Furthermore, simulated at the optimized injection location, the optimal injection rate was 20 m3 x h(-1), which was in accordance with the field test result. Besides, 3 m was the optimal ROI, less than the field test results, and the main reason was that field test reflected the flow behavior at the upper space of groundwater and unsaturated area, in which the width of flow increased rapidly, and became bigger than the actual one. With the above optimized operation parameters, in addition to the hydro-geological parameters measured on site, the model simulation result revealed that 90 days were needed to remediate the benzene from 371 000 microg x L(-1) to 1 microg x L(-1) for the site, and that the opeation model in which the injection wells were progressively turned off once the groundwater around them was "clean" was better than the one in which all the wells were kept operating throughout the remediation process.

  4. Air Sparging Versus Gas Saturated Water Injection for Remediation of Volatile LNAPL in the Borden Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J.; Nelson, L.; Doughty, C.; Thomson, N.; Lambert, J.

    2009-05-01

    In the shallow, rather homogeneous, unconfined Borden sand aquifer, field trials of air sparging (Tomlinson et al., 2003) and pulsed air sparging (Lambert et al., 2009) have been conducted, the latter to remediate a residual gasoline source emplaced below the water table. As well, a supersaturated (with CO2) water injection (SWI) technology, using the inVentures inFusion system, has been trialed in two phases: 1. in the uncontaminated sand aquifer to evaluate the radius of influence, extent of lateral gas movement and gas saturation below the water table, and 2. in a sheet pile cell in the Borden aquifer to evaluate the recovery of volatile hydrocarbon components (pentane and hexane) of an LNAPL emplaced below the water table (Nelson et al., 2008). The SWI injects water supersaturated with CO2. The supersaturated injected water moves laterally away from the sparge point, releasing CO2 over a wider area than does gas sparging from a single well screen. This presentation compares these two techniques in terms of their potential for remediating volatile NAPL components occurring below the water table in a rather homogeneous sand aquifer. Air sparging created a significantly greater air saturation in the vicinity of the sparge well than did the CO2 system (60 percent versus 16 percent) in the uncontaminated Borden aquifer. However, SWI pushed water, still supersaturated with CO2, up to about 2.5 m from the injection well. This would seem to provide a considerable advantage over air sparging from a point, in that gas bubbles are generated at a much larger radius from the point of injection with SWI and so should involve additional gas pathways through a residual NAPL. Overall, air sparging created a greater area of influence, defined by measurable air saturation in the aquifer, but air sparging also injected about 12 times more gas than was injected in the SWI trials. The pulsed air sparging at Borden (Lambert et al.) removed about 20 percent (4.6 kg) of gasoline

  5. In-situ bioventing and air sparging for remediation of LUST sites

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, L.; Locke, B.

    1994-12-31

    The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality administers a program for investigation and remediation of leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites in Wyoming. Soil and groundwater have been contaminated with gasoline and/or diesel at these sites. Minor amounts of free product are present and the contaminated ground water plume extends for large distances downgradient. Geology consists primarily of sands and gravels. Field scale studies and bench tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of soil vapor extraction, bioventing, and air sparging at these sites. Microcosm CO{sub 2} evolution and column bioventing tests were performed on collected soil samples to assess the feasibility of biodegradation and determine the nutrient requirements. Soil vapor extraction/bioventing field scale tests were conducted with horizontal and vertical extraction wells. Air sparging field scale tests were conducted to assess the feasibility of this remediation alternative at several sites. Tests included sites with typical air sparge completions with the screened interval placed approximately 10 to 15 feet below the water table and sites with the screened interval only several feet below the ground water table. Off-gas concentrations produced by air sparging were also measured. The results from the bench scale bioremediation tests indicated that bioventing was feasible to reduce the concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene to below the clean-up criteria.

  6. In situ groundwater remediation using air sparging, vapor extraction and bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Stumpf, P.; Cotton, D.W.; Bayliss, R.

    1994-12-31

    Over 60 years of refining operations have resulted in petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater at the 74-acre former Golden Eagle Refinery in Carson, California. Successful negotiations with the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)-Los Angeles Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) resulted in the use of a phased approach, separating the soil and groundwater remediation activities. Based on the findings of site assessments conducted to define and characterize the soil and groundwater contamination at the site, remediation of the soil was initiated first. By obtaining agency approval on the soil cleanup, the site could proceed with development during the groundwater remediation activities. Prior to groundwater remediation, an air sparging pilot test was performed at the site on a highly heterogeneous site consisting of mostly low permeability soils in southern California. This paper how the pilot test was performed, the test results and the accuracy of the results when scaled up to the full operating system.

  7. Mathematical modeling of air sparging for subsurface remediation: state of the art.

    PubMed

    McCray, J E

    2000-02-25

    A review of published mathematical models used to simulate air sparging is provided. Applicability of the models, efforts to test the models using experimental data and contributions of modeling efforts to the practice of air sparging are also discussed. Compartmentalized lumped-parameter models and multiphase flow models have dominated air-sparging modeling efforts. In essence, each class of models requires the assumption of a continuum over some model domain. Each approach has significant benefits as well as some inherent disadvantages. Based on the literature, both lumped-parameter modeling and multiphase-flow modeling have been successful in improving our theoretical understanding of the air-sparging process and in facilitating practical development of sparging systems. Lumped-parameter models are simpler to use, and can lend considerable insight to sparging operations. Multiphase flow models have the potential to offer a more realistic simulation of the airflow process, but may require a considerable amount of data collection for model input. The literature suggests that for any air-sparging model to be useful for field applications, detailed model calibration is necessary. It is recommended that models incorporate, in some fashion, the diffusion and dispersion of contaminants to macro-scale air channels, and nonequilibrium interphase mass transfer of contaminants. These mass-transfer-limited processes are frequently listed as causes for the "tailing" of vapor-extraction effluent contaminant concentrations that are frequently observed during field applications. However, time-varying mixing of relatively clean and contaminated vapors in the extraction system may also explain this tailing. Geophysical imaging techniques and inverse modeling combined with air-sparging pilot tests and measurement of traditional hydrogeologic parameters may allow for successful modeling efforts.

  8. In-Situ Remediation of Mixed Radioactive Tank Waste, Via Air Sparging and Poly-Acrylate Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Edgett, S.M.; Eaton, D.L.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes remediation activities performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) on an underground storage tank (UST) from the Idaho National Laboratory's Test Area North (TAN) complex. The UST had been used to collect radioactive liquid wastes from and for the TAN evaporator. Recent analyses had found that the residual waste in Tank V-14 had contained quantities of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in excess of F001 treatment standards. In addition, the residual waste in Tank V-14 was not completely solidified. As a result, further remediation and solidification of the waste was required before the tank could be properly disposed of at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). Remediation of the PCE-contaminated waste in Tank V-14 was performed by first adding sufficient water to fluidize the residual waste in the tank. This was followed by high-volume, in-situ air sparging of the fluidized waste, using air lances that were inserted to the bottom of V-14. The high-volume air sparging removed residual PCE from the fluidized waste, collecting it on granular activated carbon filters within the off-gas system. The sparged waste was then solidified by educting large-diameter crystals of an acrylic acrylate resin manufactured by WaterWorks America{sup TM} into the fluidized waste, via the air-sparging lances. To improve solidification, the air-sparging lances were rotated during the eduction step, while continuing to provide high-volume air flow into the waste. Eduction was continued until the waste had solidified sufficiently to not allow for further eduction of WaterWorks{sup TM} crystals into the waste. The tank was then disposed of at the ICDF, with the residual void volume in the tank filled with cement. (authors)

  9. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 4 In Situ Air Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  10. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  11. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging (OKC, OK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  12. Vapor extraction, air sparging, and bioventing in combination form a technically and cost effective scenario to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A.; Baker, J.N.; Mailloux, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    When the appropriate site conditions exist, air sparging, vapor extraction and bioventing can be combined to form a technically and cost effective scenario to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. A former Gulf Terminal in Upstate New York meets these conditions. The site geology consists of highly permeable sands and gravels with only trace amounts of silt. The groundwater table is approximately 15 feet below the ground surface which provides an ideal vadose zone. The site contaminants are petroleum fuel residuals primarily from the former storage and transfer of gasoline distillates. A series of pilot studies were conducted at the site in July, August, and September of 1994 to determine the validity of the proposed technologies. Based on the pilot study results, it was determined that the combined technologies of soil vapor extraction, air sparging, and bioventing could be used to effectively remediate the site. Using the pilot study data as the design basis, Parsons ES designed and installed a full-scale remediation system to address both the vadose and phreatic zone contaminants. The SVE portion of the system was placed into operation in April of 1995, and to date has removed over 12,000 pounds of petroleum hydrocarbons, including over 30 pounds of benzene. The overall costs for remediating the site including pilot studies, detailed design, system installation, and one year of operation are estimated at $5.60 per cubic yard for the estimated 35,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil at the site. The pilot study, full-scale operational results, and projected remediation costs are the focus of this paper.

  13. Air sparging and bioremediation: The case for in situ mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, W.S.; Brown, R.A.; Bass, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging has sparked considerable controversy in the remediation industry. Some feel air sparging is a significant advance in remedial technology, whereas others feel that air sparging is a very limited technology. A central question in this debate is the presence (or lack thereof) of groundwater mixing during air sparging. Groundwater mixing is important to overcome the diffusion limitations of sparging caused by air channeling and effectively deliver oxygen for in situ bioremediation. Possible mechanisms of groundwater mixing include physical displacement, capillary interactions of air and water, frictional drag, makeup of evaporative loss, thermal convection, and movement of fines. Physical groundwater displacement and groundwater movement resulting from capillary pressure gradients are the two most likely and most commonly effective mechanisms. An important question is the relative degree of groundwater mixing during nonsteady-state and steady-state sparging. Evidence indicates that mixing occurs primarily during nonsteady-state air sparging. Because groundwater mixing is important to overcome the diffusion limitations of air sparging, it is important to operate sparging systems to maximize mixing. Field data show that pulsed sparging, which emphasizes the nonsteady-state aspects of air sparging, greatly enhances groundwater mixing.

  14. Optimized air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction to remediate groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, M.; Linck, J.; Manz, C.; Petrofske, T.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) has obvious benefits for groundwater contamination consisting of volatile organic compounds, particularly benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTEX). Although AS/SVE is easily employed given suitable site conditions, optimized AS/SVE system operation and monitoring (O/M) are often overlooked once treatment is initiated. Site O/M typically is conducted with on-site field staff, or as an alternative, by remotely connecting to the site via modem and programmable logic controller (PLC). Two AS/SVE sites located in Wisconsin have used either traditional on-site O/M or the remote modem/PLC option to evaluate and optimize system operation. System on-time efficiency using remote telemetry was improved compared to traditional O/M and system operations.

  15. Air sparging technology: State of the art in air sparging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.

    1995-11-01

    In situ air sparging is a remediation technology primarily applied to the removal of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) or biodegradable organic compounds from ground water aquifers. Conceptually, IAS is simple: clean air is injected into the aquifer beneath the water table to induce mass transfer of contaminants to the vapor phase and mass transfer of oxygen to the aqueous phase. IAS usually is used in conjunction with soil vapor extraction to control the migration of sparged contaminants in the vadose zone. This paper will present an update on air sparging in a number of areas including the applicability of air sparging, air flow in porous media, ground water mounding and hydraulics, aquifer clogging, biological degradation and pilot testing for radius of influence.

  16. Using radon-222 as indicator for the evaluation of the efficiency of groundwater remediation by in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Schmidt, Axel; Müller, Kai; Weiss, Holger

    2011-02-01

    A common approach for remediation of groundwater contamination with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is contaminant stripping by means of in situ air sparging (IAS). For VOC stripping, pressurized air is injected into the contaminated groundwater volume, followed by the extraction of the contaminant-loaded exhaust gas from the vadose soil zone and its immediate on-site treatment. Progress assessment of such remediation measure necessitates information (i) on the spatial range of the IAS influence and (ii) on temporal variations of the IAS efficiency. In the present study it was shown that the naturally occurring noble gas radon can be used as suitable environmental tracer for achieving the related spatial and temporal information. Due to the distinct water/air partitioning behaviour of radon and due to its straightforward on-site detectability, the radon distribution pattern in the groundwater can be used as appropriate measure for assessing the progression of an IAS measure as a function of space and time. The presented paper discusses both the theoretical background of the approach and the results of an IAS treatment accomplished at a VOC contaminated site lasting six months, during which radon was applied as efficiency indicator.

  17. Hydrogeo-chemical impacts of air sparging remediation on a semi-confined aquifer: evidences from field monitoring and modeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yang, Y S; Lu, Y; Du, X Q; Zhang, G X

    2013-01-01

    Air sparging (AS) was explored for remediation of a petroleum contaminated semi-confined groundwater system in NE China. Physical, hydro-chemical and hydraulic behaviors in subsurface environment during AS were investigated with support of modeling to understand the hydrogeo-chemical impacts of AS on the aquifer. The responses of groundwater, dissolved oxygen and temperature indicated that the radius of influence of AS was up to 8-9 m, and a 3D boundary of the zone of influence (ZOI) was accordingly obtained with volume of 362 m(3). Water mounding unlike normal observations was featured by continuous up-lift and blocked dissipation. AS induced water displacement was calculated showing no obvious spreading of contaminant plume under this AS condition. Slug tests were employed before and after AS to reveal that the physical perturbation led to sharp increase in permeability and porosity. Modeling indicated that the regional groundwater flow field was not affected by AS except the physical perturbation in ZOI. Hydro-chemically increase of pH and Eh, and reduction of TDS, electrical conductivity and bicarbonate were observed in ZOI during AS. PHREEQC modeling inferred that these chemical phenomena were induced by the inorganic carbon transfer during air mixing.

  18. Air Sparging Design Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-12

    that the air distribution in the aquifer is non-uniform about the air injection, exhibiting tendencies to flow along the axis defined by MP6 , MP12...MW2 MW9 MW7 MW1 MW3 MP9, N9 MP11, N11 MP5, N5 MP7, N7 MP12, N12 MP6 , N6 MP3, N3MP1, N1 - Multi-level sampler and neutron access tube - Air...MP9 and MP12. This hypothesis is supported by the high saturations at MP3, MP6 , MP9 and MP12 in the upper part of the aquifer (3 to 4 m BGS) and low

  19. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Neutron probe measurements of air saturation near an air sparging well

    SciTech Connect

    Acomb, L.J.; McKay, D.; Currier, P.; Berglund, S.T.; Sherhart, T.V.; Benediktsson, C.V.

    1995-12-31

    In situ air sparging is being used to remediate diesel-fuel-contaminated soils in the zone of water table fluctuation at a remote Alaskan Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air navigation aid site. A neutron probe was used to measure changes in percent air saturation during air sparging in a uniform, aeolian sand. Air was injected about 15 ft below the water table at air flowrates of 4 to 16 ft{sup 3}/min (cfm). The neutron probe data show that during air sparging the distribution of injected air changed through time, initially expanding outward from the sparge well screen, then consolidating around the air sparging well, until a steady-state condition was reached. The maximum radius of influence, measured at an air flowrate of 16 cfm, was about 15 ft during steady-state flow. At all air flowrates the percent air saturation was highest near the air sparging well and decreased radially away from the sparging well. Near the sparging well, the percent air saturation ranged from about 30% to >50% at air injection rates of 4 to 16 cfm. Where the percent air saturation is similar to that in the vadose zone, volatilization and biodegradation may occur at rates similar to those in the vadose zone. Selected air saturation results are presented, and dissolved oxygen and saturated zone pressure data are summarized.

  1. Air sparging for in situ bioremediation of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Leonard, W.C.; Leahy, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater contamination was discovered at a manufacturing site in New York State. The contamination was due to the use of a burn pit to dispose of waste solvents, primarily toluene and a mixture of chlorinated ethenes. These solvents were partiality absorbed into a sandy fill. Over a period of time, these adsorbed solvents leached into the groundwater and eventually impacted a local wetlands. Of longer term environmental concern was the existence of a municipal water well approximately 1,200 ft downgradient of the site. Air sparging was chosen as the remedial method to address the soil and groundwater contamination on site. Air sparging was chosen as a direct volatilization method and as an oxygen source for bioremediation. This case history illustrates the efficacy and limitations of air sparging for in situ bioremediation applications. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the selection, design, and operation of an air sparging/bioremediation system so that a remediation practitioner can adequately evaluate the use of air sparging for in situ bioremediation applications.

  2. In-situ air sparging under confined aquifer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, L.B.; Swartz, T.E.; Pringle, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    In the summer of 1993, an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air sparging (IAS) and soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remedy jet fuel condition found in Colorado River Terrace deposits was initiated by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. Preliminary field tests were performed to develop air injection flow rates, IAS radius of influence, air entry pressure requirements, SVE radii of influence, SVE well head vacuum requirements, and SVE air extraction flow rates. In addition to the field tests, soil samples were, collected for formal geotechnical laboratory analysis. The information gathered from these preliminary field investigations were then used to design and install a pilot scale ground-water remediation system. The pilot scale system represents a modified version of the traditional IAS/SVE approach. Due to the presence of an overlying low permeability confining layer, the system was modified to inject and extract air from the phreatic zone. The vapor extraction wells are screened down into the saturated interval to provide an escape route for the air injected by the sparging system. This system is intended to trigger two remedial processes. The first is the physical stripping of dissolved phase volatile petroleum constituents as ground water contacts air channels forming around each sparge point. The second remedial process which may be activated by this system is enhanced aerobic biodegradation of organics due to the oxygenation of the saturated interval.

  3. Conceptual air sparging decision tool in support of the development of an air sparging optimization decision tool

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The enclosed document describes a conceptual decision tool (hereinafter, Tool) for determining applicability of and for optimizing air sparging systems. The Tool was developed by a multi-disciplinary team of internationally recognized experts in air sparging technology, lead by a group of project and task managers at Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. (Parsons ES). The team included Mr. Douglas Downey and Dr. Robert Hinchee of Parsons ES, Dr. Paul Johnson of Arizona State University, Dr. Richard Johnson of Oregon Graduate Institute, and Mr. Michael Marley of Envirogen, Inc. User Community Panel Review was coordinated by Dr. Robert Siegrist of Colorado School of Mines (also of Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Dr. Thomas Brouns of Battelle/Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The Tool is intended to provide guidance to field practitioners and environmental managers for evaluating the applicability and optimization of air sparging as remedial action technique.

  4. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Headington, G.L.; Vogel, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.

  5. Existing air sparging model and literature review for the development of an air sparging optimization decision tool

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this Report are two-fold: (1) to provide overviews of the state-of-the-art and state-of-the-practice with respect to air sparging technology, air sparging models and related or augmentation technologies (e.g., soil vapor extraction); and (2) to provide the basis for the development of the conceptual Decision Tool. The Project Team conducted an exhaustive review of available literature. The complete listing of the documents, numbering several hundred and reviewed as a part of this task, is included in Appendix A. Even with the large amount of material written regarding the development and application of air sparging, there still are significant gaps in the technical community`s understanding of the remediation technology. The results of the literature review are provided in Section 2. In Section 3, an overview of seventeen conceptual, theoretical, mathematical and empirical models is presented. Detailed descriptions of each of the models reviewed is provided in Appendix B. Included in Appendix D is a copy of the questionnaire used to compile information about the models. The remaining sections of the document reflect the analysis and synthesis of the information gleaned during the literature and model reviews. The results of these efforts provide the basis for development of the decision tree and conceptual decision tool for determining applicability and optimization of air sparging. The preliminary decision tree and accompanying information provided in Section 6 describe a three-tiered approach for determining air sparging applicability: comparison with established scenarios; calculation of conceptual design parameters; and the conducting of pilot-scale studies to confirm applicability. The final two sections of this document provide listings of the key success factors which will be used for evaluating the utility of the Decision Tool and descriptions of potential applications for Decision Tool use.

  6. Air sparging/high vacuum extraction to remove chlorinated solvents in groundwater and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Gilliat, M.D.

    1998-11-01

    An air sparging and high vacuum extraction was installed as an alternative to a containment pump and treat system to reduce the long-term remediation schedule. The site is located at the DOE Mound facility in Miamisburg, Ohio, just south of Dayton. The air sparging system consists of 23 wells interspersed between 17 soil vapor extraction wells. The SVE system has extracted about 1,500 lbs of VOCs in five months. The air sparging system operated for about 6 weeks before shutdown due to suspected biochemical fouling. Technical data are presented on the operating characteristics of the system.

  7. In situ air sparging for bioremediation of groundwater and soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, D.; Lei, J.; Chapdelaine, M.C.; Sansregret, J.L.; Cyr, B.

    1995-12-31

    Activities at a former petroleum products depot resulted in the hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater over a 30,000-m{sup 2} area. Site remediation activities consisted of three phases: site-specific characterization and treatability study, pilot-scale testing, and full-scale bioremediation. During Phase 1, a series of site/soil/waste characterizations was undertaken to ascertain the degree of site contamination and to determine soil physical/chemical and microbiological characteristics. Treatability studies were carried out to simulate an air sparging process in laboratory-scale columns. Results indicated 42% mineral oil and grease removal and 94% benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) removal over an 8-week period. The removal rate was higher in the unsaturated zone than in the saturated zone. Phase 2 involved pilot-scale testing over a 550-m{sup 2} area. The radius of influence of the air sparge points was evaluated through measurements of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the groundwater and of groundwater mounding. A full-scale air sparging system (Phase 3) was installed on site and has been operational since early 1994. Physical/chemical and microbiological parameters, and contaminants were analyzed to evaluate the system performance.

  8. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Kirshner, M.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes.

  9. Iodine evolution from nuclear fuel dissolver solutions by air sparging

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.G.; Holland, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    Iodine removal rates were measured from air-sparged nitric acid solutions in experiments designed to simulate part of the iodine recovery system in an advanced fuel reprocessing flowsheet. Variables studied were temperature, sparge rate, and iodine and acid concentrations. Experimental mass transfer coefficients were determined and compared to results based on correlations available in the literature.

  10. PULSED AIR SPARGING IN AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging was evaluated for remediation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) present as dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in aquifers. A two-dimensional laboratory tank with a transparent front wall allowed for visual observation of DNAPL mobilization. A DNAPL zone 50 cm high was ...

  11. Air sparging technology: A practice update

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.; Bruell, C.J.; Hopkins, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    An evaluation of data describing in situ air sparging (IAS) systems at 59 sites has been assembled into a database by the American Petroleum Institute (API-IAS Database). The IAS radius of influence (ROI) is defined in the field based on measurements in a number of physical, chemical, or biological monitoring parameters. Measurement of groundwater dissolved oxygen levels was the technique used most often to evaluate the ROI. Other parameters such as pressure changes in the vadose and saturated zones, groundwater mounding, air bubbling in wells, and tracer gases were used to aid in the evaluation of IAS ROI. A review of 37 pilot studies revealed that IAS ROI is generally between 3 m and 8 m (10 to 26 ft). Analysis of design and operation data at 40 IAS sites revealed that a typical IAS well is 5.08 cm (2 in.) in diameter, with a 0.61 m (2 ft) screen, positioned 1.52 to 3.05 m (5 to 10 ft) beneath the water table. The wells typically were operated at an overpressure of less than 34.45 kPa (5 psi) with a flowrate of less than 8.5 m{sup 3}/h (5 cfm).

  12. Centrifuge modeling of air sparging - a study of air flow through saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, C; Culligan, P J; Germaine, J T

    2000-02-25

    The success of air sparging as a remedial technology for treatment of contaminated aquifers is well documented. However, there is no consensus, to date, on the mechanisms that control the flow of injected air through the saturated ground. Currently, only qualitative results from laboratory experiments are available to predict the zone of influence of a sparging well. Given that the patterns of air flow through the soil will ultimately determine the efficiency of an air sparging treatment, it is important to quantify how sparged air travels through a saturated porous medium. The main objective of this research is to develop a model that describes air transport through saturated porous media. This paper presents results from an ongoing study that employs centrifuge modeling to reproduce in situ air sparging conditions. Centrifuge testing is an experimental technique that allows reduced-scale duplication, in the laboratory, of the stresses and pressure distributions encountered in the field. In situ conditions are critical in the development of actual air flow patterns. Experiments are being conducted in a transparent porous medium consisting of crushed borosilicate glass submerged in fluids of matching indices of refraction. Air is observed as it flows through the porous medium at varying gravitational accelerations. Recorded images of experiments allow the determination of flow patterns, breakthrough velocities, and plume shapes as a function of g-level and injection pressure. Results show that air flow patterns vary from fingering, at low g-levels, to pulsing at higher accelerations. Grain and pore size distribution of the porous medium do not exclusively control air flow characteristics. Injector geometry has a definite effect on breakthrough velocities and air plume shapes. Experiments have been conducted to compare the velocity of air flow through the saturated porous medium to that of air in pure liquids. Results show that the velocity of air through the medium

  13. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND AIR SPARGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging, also called "in situ air stripping and in situ volatilization" injects air into the saturated zone to strip away volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in groundwater and adsorbed to soil. hese volatile contaminants transfer in a vapor phase to the unsaturated ...

  14. Remedial Process Optimization and Green In-Situ Ozone Sparging for Treatment of Groundwater Impacted with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, J.

    2012-12-01

    A former natural gas processing station is impacted with TPH and BTEX in groundwater. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/AVE) remediation systems had previously been operated at the site. Currently, a groundwater extraction and treatment system is operated to remove the chemicals of concern (COC) and contain the groundwater plume from migrating offsite. A remedial process optimization (RPO) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of historic and current remedial activities and recommend an approach to optimize the remedial activities. The RPO concluded that both the AS/SVE system and the groundwater extraction system have reached the practical limits of COC mass removal and COC concentration reduction. The RPO recommended an in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) study to evaluate the best ISCO oxidant and approach. An ISCO bench test was conducted to evaluate COC removal efficiency and secondary impacts to recommend an application dosage. Ozone was selected among four oxidants based on implementability, effectiveness, safety, and media impacts. The bench test concluded that ozone demand was 8 to 12 mg ozone/mg TPH and secondary groundwater by-products of ISCO include hexavalent chromium and bromate. The pH also increased moderately during ozone sparging and the TDS increased by approximately 20% after 48 hours of ozone treatment. Prior to the ISCO pilot study, a capture zone analysis (CZA) was conducted to ensure containment of the injected oxidant within the existing groundwater extraction system. The CZA was conducted through a groundwater flow modeling using MODFLOW. The model indicated that 85%, 90%, and 95% of an injected oxidant could be captured when a well pair is injecting and extracting at 2, 5, and 10 gallons per minute, respectively. An ISCO pilot test using ozone was conducted to evaluate operation parameters for ozone delivery. The ozone sparging system consisted of an ozone generator capable of delivering 6 lbs/day ozone through two ozone

  15. Bio-polymer slurry trench method for installation of in-situ air sparging system

    SciTech Connect

    Linneman, D.M.

    1996-08-01

    An investigation was conducted at a site in Greenville Country, South Carolina which detected contaminants in the groundwater. It was then decided that remedial action was required. The contaminants and their location in the groundwater led to the selection of an in-situ air sparging system to be installed at approximately thirty-four feet deep. Due to design depth requirements and other site conditions, the bio-polymer slurry trench (B-P drain) Method was utilized in the air sparging system installation. The two trenches were installed using a biodegradable slurry in lieu of the bentonite slurry commonly utilized in the more traditional slurry trench technique. The slurry temporarily supported the trench walls while the air sparging components were submerged and set at the proper elevations Once backfilled with stone, the slurry in both trenches was broken by introducing a breaker solution which reduced the slurry to sugar water. The trenching, air sparging piping installation, and backfilling operations were completed in about six weeks.

  16. A laboratory assessment of air sparging performance on oil-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, M.R.; Bracco, A.A.; Ciampa, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    The efficacy of air sparging to remediate a subsurface plume of transformer oil is evaluated in a comprehensive laboratory study. Shake flask assays containing contaminated soil indicated the oil was highly (>80%) biodegradable by indigenous bacteria when oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorous were supplied. From 50 to 60% of the oil was removed from the soil in a 169-day biodegradation rate study performed in laboratory soil columns designed to mimic air sparged conditions. Maximal total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation rates of {approximately}70 mg/kg per day were observed in nutrient (N and P) amended columns at 23 C, based upon O{sub 2} uptake and CO{sub 2} production. The total TPH biodegraded in these columns was 3-fold higher than in an unamended control column.

  17. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  18. Do conventional monitoring practices indicate in situ air sparging performance?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.C.; Johnson, R.L.; Neaville, C.; Hansen, E.E.; Stearns, S.M.; Dortch, I.J.

    1995-12-31

    Short-term pilot tests play a key role in the selection and design of in situ air sparging systems. Most pilot tests are less than 24 h in duration and consist of monitoring changes in dissolved oxygen, water levels in wells, soil gas pressures, and soil gas contaminant concentrations while air is injected into the aquifer. These parameters are assumed to be indicators of air sparging feasibility and performance, and are also used in the design of full-scale systems. In this work the authors assess the validity of this critical assumption. Data are presented from a study site where a typical pilot-scale short-term test was conducted, followed by continued operation of a full-scale system for 110 days. Conventional sampling practices were augmented with more discrete and detailed assessment methods. In addition, a tracer gas was used to better understand air distributions, vapor flow paths, and vapor recovery efficiency. The data illustrate that conclusions regarding the performance and applicability of air sparging at the study site vary significantly depending on the monitoring approach used. There was no clear correlation between short-term pilot-test data and extended system performance when using data collected only from conventional groundwater monitoring wells. Attention is focused on petroleum hydrocarbons.

  19. Application Evaluation of Air-Sparging and Aerobic Bioremediation in PAM(Physical Aquifer Model) with Advanced and Integrated Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, U.; Ko, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Kwon, S.; Ha, J.; Lim, J.; Han, K.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally difficult for a single process to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated with various organic compounds such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) because those contaminants show different chemical properties in two phases (e.g. soil and groundwater). Therefore, it is necessary to design an in-situ remediation system which can remove various contaminants simultaneously. For the purpose, we constructed integrated well module which can apply several remediation process such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, and bioventing. The advanced integrated module consisted of three main parts such as head, body, and end cap. First of all, head part has three 3.6-cm-diameter stainless lines and can simultaneously inject air or extract NAPL, respectively. Secondly, body part has two 10-cm-height screen intervals with 100-mesh stainless inserts for unsaturated and smear zone. Lastly, we constructed three different sizes of end caps for injection and extraction from a saturated zone. We assumed that the integrated module can play bioremediation, air sparging, cometabolic sparging, chemical oxidation. In this study, we examined application of air sparing and aerobic bioremediation of toluene in Physical Aquifer Model (PAM) with an integrated well module. During air sparging experiments, toluene concentration decreased by injection of air. In addition, we accomplished bioremediation experiment to evaluate removal of toluene by indigenous microbes in PAM with continuous air injection. From the two experiments result, we confirmed that air sparging and aerobic bioremediation processes can be simultaneously carried out by an intergrated well module.

  20. Combined Air Sparge and Bioremediation of an Underground Coal Gasification Site

    SciTech Connect

    Covell, J.R.; Thomas, M.H.

    1996-12-01

    EG&G Technical Services of West Virginia (TSWV) Inc. is successfully remediating a former underground coal gasification (UCG) test site in northeastern Wyoming. EG&G is demonstrating the effectiveness of combined air sparge and biostimulation technology. This project is being conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE ) - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), the lease holder of the site. UCG testing from 1976 through 1979 contaminated three water-bearing units at the site with benzene. Previous pump and treat operations at the site showed the presence of a persistent non-dissolved benzene source material. The Felix I coal seam is the most contaminated unit at the site and was the target unit for the initial demonstration. Air sparging was selected to strip dissolved benzene, volatilize the non- dissolved benzene source material, and to provide oxygen for increasing aerobic bacteria populations. Indigenous bacteria populations were stimulated with ammonium phosphate addition. EG&G designed the remediation system to take advantage of the hydrogeologic environment to produce a cost-effective approach to the groundwater remediation. Groundwater pumping was used to manipulate subsurface air flow, nutrient transport, and biomass management. Demonstration operations began on September 29, 1995, and were suspended on April 30, 1996 to begin demonstration expansion. Initial results of the demonstration show substantial reduction in benzene concentrations across the demonstration area. Benzene concentration reductions greater than 80% were observed two months after demonstration operations were suspended.

  1. Effect of air sparging on fate and transport of trichloroethylene in chambers with alfalfa plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Hu, J.; Erickson, L.E.; Davis, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    To study the effect of air sparging in soil with trichloroethylene present as a dense nonaqueous phase, air was supplied through pipes installed at the bottom of two chambers planted with alfalfa. Air input rate was 2.14 L/m{sup 2}/day. The fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) was investigated by monitoring TCE concentration in both outflow groundwater and soil gas. Comparison of these results with those of the previous study without air sparging indicates that air sparging appreciably increases the groundwater concentration of TCE. The soil gas at the surface shows even greater concentration difference. The flux of TCE to the atmosphere is increased significantly by air input. Accordingly, the authors can conclude that air sparging improved mass transfer of TCE from the nonaqueous phase to groundwater phase. Air sparging appeared to negatively impact the health of the alfalfa because of the elevated TCE present in the vadose zone of the chamber.

  2. Air sparging: Much ado about mounding

    SciTech Connect

    Lundegard, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater mounding is the upward movement of the water table that can occur in association with air injection into the saturated zone. Multiphase flow simulations are here used to define general mounding behavior and dynamics under simplified subsurface conditions. Field observations at three sites are then used to describe a range of expected groundwater mounding responses for subsurface conditions, ranging from relatively homogeneous to highly heterogeneous. Results show that mounding (1) is a transient response that is usually negligible at steady state, (2) dissipates by radial wavelike spreading, and (3) occurs well beyond the saturated zone region of airflow.

  3. Site 5 air sparging pilot test, Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Murray, W A; Lunardini, R C; Ullo, F J; Davidson, M E

    2000-02-25

    A 72-h air sparging pilot test was conducted at Site 5 (Operable Unit 2), Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Jacksonville, FL, to determine performance parameters necessary for full-scale design. The sparge well was completed to a depth of 29 ft, several feet below the groundwater plume contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Air flow rates supplied to the sparge well were 3 cubic feet/min (cfm) during the first day, 2 cfm during the second day, and 1 cfm during the third day. Water levels in monitoring wells initially rose approximately 2 ft during the first 4-5 h of the test, then receded back to pre-test equilibrium levels over the next 15 h, for a total duration of water mounding of about 20 h. A small (approximately 0.5 ft) water table drop, with subsequent recovery to equilibrium level, occurred each time the air sparging rate was decreased. Although there is considerable variation depending on direction from the sparge well, the average radius of influence varied from approximately 30 ft at 1 cfm to 50 ft at 3 cfm. The air sparge system was capable of increasing the dissolved oxygen from 0 to 6 or 7 mg/l within 12-15 h of air channels reaching a given location. A lag time of approximately 13 h was observed before air channels reached a radius of 30 ft and dissolved oxygen levels began to increase at that radius. CO(2) (stripped out of the groundwater by the sparging) decreased from a pre-test concentration of 150 to 20 mg/l at r=5 ft, and from 150 to 50 mg/l at r=30 ft, within a period of about 24 h. The rate of VOC mass removal during the pilot test was 0.06 lb/day at a sparge rate of 3 cfm, and it appears that air sparging will effect a rapid cleanup of the VOCs in the Site 5 groundwater plume.

  4. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-02

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  5. Review of a long-term air sparging pilot test in a shallow aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Weymann, D.F.; Hoffman, G.D.; Kuhn, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    A 5-month-long air sparging pilot study was conducted on a shallow surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline. The pilot study was conducted on a shallow surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline. The pilot study documented the physical and biological response of the aquifer and evaluated sampling techniques. Results indicated that sparging increased biological activity, but the zone of influence was limited. A transition from methanogenic to aerobic conditions was indicated. Monitoring results were significantly affected by sampling techniques.

  6. Oil/Water Emulsion and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology January 2003 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oil/Water Emulsion and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology...iii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 2. ASH

  7. Air sparging for prevention of antibody disulfide bond reduction in harvested CHO cell culture fluid.

    PubMed

    Mun, Melissa; Khoo, Stefanie; Do Minh, Aline; Dvornicky, James; Trexler-Schmidt, Melody; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Laird, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    During the scale-up of several Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell monoclonal antibody production processes, significant reduction of the antibody interchain disulfide bonds was observed. The reduction was correlated with excessive mechanical cell shear during the harvest operations. These antibody reduction events resulted in failed product specifications and the subsequent loss of the drug substance batches. Several methods were recently developed to prevent antibody reduction, including modifying the cell culture media, using pre- and post-harvest chemical additions to the cell culture fluid (CCF), lowering the pH, and air sparging of the harvested CCF (HCCF). The work described in this paper further explores the option of HCCF air sparging for preventing antibody reduction. Here, a small-scale model was developed using a 3-L bioreactor to mimic the conditions of a manufacturing-scale harvest vessel and was subsequently employed to evaluate several air sparging strategies. In addition, these studies enabled further understanding of the relationships between cell lysis levels, oxygen consumption, and antibody reduction. Finally, the effectiveness of air sparging for several CHO cell lines and the potential impact on product quality were assessed to demonstrate that air sparging is an effective method in preventing antibody reduction.

  8. Air sparging: Effects of VOCs and soil properties on VOC volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.P.; Ong, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of the physical-chemical properties of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soil on the volatilization of VOCs during air sparging was investigated using a laboratory-scale air sparging system. The variables studied included two types of soils, three different VOCs, and various air flowrates. VOCs used were chloroform, trichloroethylene (TCE), and carbon tetrachloride. As expected, the percent removal efficiencies of VOCs over a 24-h period were proportional to the injected air flowrate and Henry`s law constant. Experimental results also indicated that beyond a certain air flowrate, the mass of TCE removed was similar for the two porous media used in the experiments. The VOCs volatilized from the porous media appeared to be limited by the interfacial surface area of the water-air interface of the air channels. However, other physical processes, such as diffusion, may also be limiting.

  9. A laboratory simulation of toluene cleanup by air sparging of water-saturated sands.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J W; DeBoer, M J; Lake, K L

    2000-02-25

    Laboratory air sparging experiments were performed in narrow acrylic tanks to evaluate the cleanup of toluene in water-saturated sands. Air flow channels in the sediment were identified by way of a colorimetric visualization technique, which allowed pore water samples to be collected at a known horizontal distance from an air channel. Pore water was sampled at periodic intervals during sparging experiments and analyzed by gas chromatography to yield toluene concentration vs. time data. Results indicate that channelized air flow is effective in reducing toluene concentrations in the range of 36-3 ppm, within 2 to 5 days, at least up to 185 mm from an active air channel. While relatively rapid, these toluene reduction times are longer than previously published data, from similar type experiments. The discrepancy is likely a function of air delivery flow rate and proximity of sampling sites to active air channels. Data from the current investigation were used to attempt an estimate of effective diffusion coefficients (D*) for toluene in clean, well-characterized sands in which the concentration gradient was imposed by sparge air. Calculated D* values range from 2. 98x10(-8) m(2)/s to 5.74x10(-9) m(2)/s, and are significantly faster than previously published values of toluene diffusion in clay soils. However, the values are also slightly greater than diffusion coefficients for toluene in aqueous solutions, indicating that the calculations more likely estimate coefficients of hydrodynamic dispersion (D(L)).

  10. Fine coal flotation in a centrifugal field with an air sparged hydrocyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; van Camp, M.C.

    1982-11-01

    Preliminary results are reported for the design and development of a pilot-scale air-sparged hydrocyclone for cleaning fine coal (590 ..mu..m, - 28 mesh) containing 24% ash and 1.6% sulphur. The principle of separation is the flotation of hydrophobic coal particles in the centrifugal field generated by the fluid flow in the air-sparged hydrocyclone. This 152 mm hydrocyclone has a nominal capacity of 0.9 ton/h, and experimental results suggest that separations vastly superior to a water-only cyclone are possible. In addition, the separation efficiency is as good, if not better, than that achieved with conventional flotation cells. Typical results indicate that 75% clean coal can be recovered at 15% ash leaving a tailing product of almost 50% ash.

  11. Flue gas treatment for SO2 removal with air-sparged hydrocyclone technology.

    PubMed

    Bokotko, Romuald P; Hupka, Jan; Miller, Jan D

    2005-02-15

    Laboratory results from an initial study on the removal of SO2 from gas mixtures are reported using air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) technology. Tap water and alkaline solutions were used for absorption, and the influence of gas flow rate, water flow rate, and length of the ASH unit were investigated. The research results indicate thatthe air-sparged hydrocyclone can be used as a highly efficient absorber for SO2 emissions. The ASH allows for 97% SO2 removal using water alone for sulfur dioxide content in the gas phase of 5 g/m3. All SO2 is removed in weakly alkaline solution (0.01 mol NaOH/dm3).

  12. Lipids and Molecular Tools as Biomarkers in Monitoring Air Sparging Bioremediation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heipieper, Hermann J.; Fischer, Janett

    2010-05-01

    The fluctuation of membrane lipids offers a promising tool as biomarkers for the analysis of microbial population changes as well as for the physiological status of micro-organisms. The investigation of changes in lipid composition is of common use for the assessment of physiological conditions in pure cultures. However, as lipid composition does not show drastic diversity among living organisms the use of lipids as biomarkers in mixed cultures and environmental samples has certain limitations. Therefore, special marker phospholipid fatty acids as well as modern statistical analysis of the results are necessary to receive certain information about the qualitative and quantitative changes of e.g. a soil microflora due to a contamination with organic compounds and its bioremediation. The use of lipids as biomarker in monitoring bioremediation are shown at the Hradčany site, a former Russian air force base in the Czech Republic that operated until 1990. In this time in an area of 32 ha soil and groundwater were contaminated with kerosene and BTEX compounds in an amount of 7,150 tons. This highly contaminated site is treated with the so-called air sparging method to clean-up the contamination by aerobic biodegradation. The results of PLFA analysis demonstrated a community shift to a gram-negative bacterial biomass with time. The results, including a principal component analysis (PCA) of the obtained fatty acid profiles, showed that the air sparging leads to substantial differences in microbial communities depending on the contamination levels and length of treatment, respectively. Obviously, the length of air sparging treatment controlling the BTEX concentration in soils causes temporal changes of bacterial community and adaptations of its respective members. This work was supported by the project BIOTOOL (Contract No. 003998) of the European Commission within its Sixth Framework Programme. Kabelitz N., Machackova J., Imfeld G., Brennerova M., Pieper D.H., Heipieper H

  13. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Soil Vapor Extraction & Air Sparging

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically, approximately one-quarter of Superfund source control projects have involved soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sorbed to soil in the unsaturated (vadose) zone.

  14. Petroleum mass removal from low permeability sediment using air sparging/soil vapor extraction: impact of continuous or pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Brian C.; Aelion, C. Marjorie

    2000-02-01

    Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) are innovative remediation techniques that utilize volatilization and microbial degradation to remediate petroleum spills from soils and groundwater. This in situ study investigated the use of AS/SVE to remediate a gasoline spill from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) in the low permeability, clayey soil of the Appalachian Piedmont. The objectives of this study were to evaluate AS/SVE in low permeability soils by quantifying petroleum mass removal rates, monitoring vadose zone contaminant levels, and comparing the mass extraction rates of continuous AS/SVE to 8 and 24 h pulsed operation. The objectives were met by collecting AS/SVE exhaust gas samples and vadose zone air from multi-depth soil vapor probes. Samples were analyzed for O 2, CO 2, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), and total combustible hydrocarbon (TCH) concentrations using portable hand meters and gas chromatography. Continuous AS/SVE was effective in removing 608 kg of petroleum hydrocarbons from low permeability soil in 44 days (14.3 kg day -1). Mass removal rates ranged from 2.6 times higher to 5.1 times lower than other AS/SVE studies performed in sandy sediments. BTEX levels in the vadose zone were reduced from about 5 ppm to 1 ppm. Ten pulsed AS/SVE tests removed 78 kg in 23 days and the mean mass removal rate (17.6 kg day -1) was significantly higher than the last 15 days of continuous extraction. Pulsed operation may be preferable to continuous operation because of increased mass removal and decreased energy consumption.

  15. Hydrodynamic effects of air sparging on hollow fiber membranes in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lijun; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Fane, Anthony G

    2013-07-01

    Air sparging is now a standard approach to reduce concentration polarization and fouling of membrane modules in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The hydrodynamic shear stresses, bubble-induced turbulence and cross flows scour the membrane surfaces and help reduce the deposit of foulants onto the membrane surface. However, the detailed quantitative knowledge on the effect of air sparging remains lacking in the literature due to the complex hydrodynamics generated by the gas-liquid flows. To date, there is no valid model that describes the relationship between the membrane fouling performance and the flow hydrodynamics. The present study aims to examine the impact of hydrodynamics induced by air sparging on the membrane fouling mitigation in a quantitative manner. A modelled hollow fiber module was placed in a cylindrical bubble column reactor at different axial heights with the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) monitored under constant flux conditions. The configuration of bubble column without the membrane module immersed was identical to that studied by Gan et al. (2011) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), to ensure a good quantitative understanding of turbulent flow conditions along the column height. The experimental results showed that the meandering flow regime which exhibits high flow instability at the 0.3 m is more beneficial to fouling alleviation compared with the steady flow circulation regime at the 0.6 m. The filtration tests also confirmed the existence of an optimal superficial air velocity beyond which a further increase is of no significant benefit on the membrane fouling reduction. In addition, the alternate aeration provided by two air stones mounted at the opposite end of the diameter of the bubble column was also studied to investigate the associated flow dynamics and its influence on the membrane filtration performance. It was found that with a proper switching interval and membrane module orientation, the membrane fouling can be effectively

  16. Field Application of Modified In Situ Soil Flushing in Combination with Air Sparging at a Military Site Polluted by Diesel and Gasoline in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan; Lee, Yoonjin; Kim, Jaeyoung; Kim, Choltae

    2014-01-01

    In this study the full-scale operation of soil flushing with air sparging to improve the removal efficiency of petroleum at depths of less than 7 m at a military site in Korea was evaluated. The target area was polluted by multiple gasoline and diesel fuel sources. The soil was composed of heterogeneous layers of granules, sand, silt and clay. The operation factors were systemically assessed using a column test and a pilot study before running the full-scale process at the site. The discharged TPH and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) concentrations in the water were highest at 20 min and at a rate of 350 L/min, which was selected as the volume of air for the full-scale operation in the pilot air sparging test. The surfactant-aid condition was 1.4 times more efficient than the non-surfactant condition in the serial operations of modified soil flushing followed by air sparging. The hydraulic conductivity (3.13 × 10−3 cm/s) increased 4.7 times after the serial operation of both processes relative to the existing condition (6.61 × 10−4 cm/s). The removal efficiencies of TPH were 52.8%, 57.4%, and 61.8% for the soil layers at 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 8 to 9 m, respectively. Therefore, the TPH removal was improved at depth of less than 7 m by using this modified remediation system. The removal efficiencies for the areas with TPH and BTEX concentrations of more than 500 and 80 mg/kg, were 55.5% and 92.9%, respectively, at a pore volume of 2.9. The total TPH and BTEX mass removed during the full-scale operation was 5109 and 752 kg, respectively. PMID:25166919

  17. ASSESSING UST CORRECTIVE ACTION TECHNOLOGIES: LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT IN SITU AIR SPARGING AT THE DENISON AVENUE SITE - CLEVELAND, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been proposed and installed at an increasing number of sites to address contamination in both the saturated and unsaturated zones. Because of the lack of experimental and substantive performance data, however, the actual performance and effectivene...

  18. Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone/Advanced Froth Flotation fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Shirey, G.A.; Stoessner, R.D.; Pennsylvania Electric Co., Johnstown, PA )

    1988-12-30

    The objective of the project is to evaluate the Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) and Advanced Froth Flotation (AFF) procedures for their effectiveness in cleaning fine (minus 100 mesh) coal. The two processes will be tested in a circuit capable of processing 0.124 to 0.15 tons per hour of coal at the EPRI-CQDC. Performance of the two processes will be evaluated, and the economics of fine coal cleaning by both processes will be determined. During the past quarter, efforts were concentrated on the following tasks: installation of process equipment and characterization of the test feed coal; start-up of the ASH and AFF circuits; and initialization of the AFF Test Program. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Testing of the 15-inch air-sparged hydrocyclone for fine coal flotation at the Homer City preparation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Battista, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    Previous plant testing had been limited to the processing of minus 100 mesh classifier overflow (Upper Freeport Coal {approximately} 20% ash) with the 6-inch air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH-6C) as reported at Coal Prep 92. The ASH-6C unit was found to provide separation efficiencies equivalent, or superior, to separations with the ASH-2C system. During the summer of 1992 the construction of the first 15-inch air-sparged hydrocyclone prototype was completed by the Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. Installation at the Homer City Coal Preparation Plant was accomplished and testing began in October 1992. The ASH-15C unit can operate at a flowrate as high as 1,000 gpm. Experimental results are reported with respect to capacity, combustible recovery and clean coal quality.

  20. Comparison of bioventing and air sparging for in situ bioremediation of fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kampbell, D.H.; Griffin, C.J.; Blaha, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Bioremediation pilot-scale subsurface venting and sparging systems were operated at a low aeration rate at an aviation gasoline spill site. Bioventing removed 99 percent of vadose zone contamination in 8 months with minimal surface emissions. The biosparging process is presently operating and has removed one-third of oily phase residue below the water table in 1 year. The ground water plume has been cleansed of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) components by sparging.

  1. Axial flow reversal and its significance in air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Das, A.; Yin, D.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the potential of air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated both in pilot plant testing and in a plant-site demonstration program. Further improvements in the ASH technology will depend, to some extent, on improved understanding of the complex multiphase fluid flow. Froth transport plays a very important role in determining the efficiency of fine coal cleaning by ASH flotation. It should be noted that the surface of zero axial velocity is of particular significance in froth transport because the location of this surface actually accounts for the amount of froth being transported to the overflow. In this regard, the axial flow reversal has been examined based on specially designed tracer experiments. On the basis of these experimental results, modeling efforts were made to characterize the flow pattern in the ASH. The theoretical predictions based on turbulent fluid dynamic considerations were found to describe experimental observations regarding the surface of zero axial velocity. These results that define the surface of zero axial velocity together with froth phase features established from X-ray CT measurements provide an excellent description of the flow characteristics in ASH flotation and explain the effect of various process variables, such as dimensionless area (A*), dimensionless flowrate (Q*), inlet pressure, percent solids, etc., on flotation recovery. On this basis it is expected that further advances in the design and operation of the ASH system can be made, leading to more efficient use of the ASH technology for fine coal cleaning.

  2. Design and application of an alternative groundwater sparging technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schrauf, T.W.; Pennington, L.H.

    1995-12-31

    Density-driven convection, an alternative method of in situ groundwater sparging, is being used to remediate 27 underground storage tank releases involving a wide distillation range of petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline to waste oil) in a variety of site soils (silty clay to sandy gravel). The described method overcomes many of the inherent disadvantages of air sparging methods currently in use (such as pressurized injection) without additional complexity in design, installation, or operation. The principles of operation and design for density-driven convection are discussed in detail and supported by field and laboratory studies. Primary factors affecting the hydraulic driving force, groundwater circulation patterns around the sparging well, and air stripping performance are identified and related to system design. The effectiveness of the system is demonstrated with results from full-scale system installations.

  3. FIELD ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE DNAPL REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated in constructed test cells at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor...

  4. TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

    2003-03-31

    The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide

  5. Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone/Advanced Froth Flotation fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessner, R.D. ); Shirey, G.A.; Zawadzki, E.A. ); Welsh, C.F. ); Miller, J.D. ); Shell, W.P. )

    1990-05-27

    In May 1988, the Pennsylvania Electric Company (Penelec) and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) were awarded a contract from the Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center (DOE-PETC) to evaluate the performance of a two-inch Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) for cleaning fine minus-100-mesh coal. A 24-month study was successfully completed, optimizing the performance of the ASH for cleaning raw classified, naturally-occurring minus-100-mesh Upper Freeport coal, and comparing its performance with Advanced Froth Flotation (AFF), a procedure utilizing conventional flotation equipment operated in an advanced manner (low impeller speeds, starvation float, multiple-stage cleaning, etc.) with highly selective reagents to optimize ash and pyritic sulfur rejection. The economics of cleaning fine coal by both processes at commercial scale, for retrofit and greenfield applications were found to be comparable within the accuracy of the study. Technical performance of the two processes were also found to be essentially identical. Thus, the ASH would be the best choice for a retrofit installation into an existing plant because of requiring less space. Both processes were successful in achieving excellent separations when cleaning the Upper Freeport coal. Both the ASH and AFF circuits were able to produce a clean-coal product of yield (65--80 percent weight recovery) and quality (5--6 percent ash) equivalent to that as theoretically determined by float-sink washability analyses. Combining either of the two fine coal flotation processes with a classifying cyclone circuit resulted in pyritic sulfur rejection values of about 85 percent. 47 refs., 109 figs., 75 tabs.

  6. Sparging effectiveness for groundwater restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, P.M.; Piontek, K.R.; Newman, P.A.B.

    1995-12-31

    Sparging is becoming a widely applied groundwater remediation technology, even though there are few published case studies with post-sparging groundwater monitoring data to document cleanup. The best way to monitor the effectiveness of sparging systems and predict achievable postsparging contaminant concentrations is still uncertain. Most monitoring data from sparging systems are indirect measurements of system performance [dissolved oxygen, groundwater levels, soil vapor pressures, soil vapor oxygen/volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations] rather than direct analysis of dissolved-phase contaminants. Furthermore, few distinctions have been made regarding achievable cleanup levels and required treatment durations in (1) dissolved-phase plumes and (2) source areas with residual nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL). This paper discusses changes in dissolved-phase chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) concentrations at two sites where sparging was undertaken. Both sites are favorable for sparging, having relatively uniform, clean, fine- to medium-grained sandy soil. One site had a known presence of NAPL, while the other was a dissolved-phase plume without NAPL.

  7. Enhancement of the microbial community biomass and diversity during air sparging bioremediation of a soil highly contaminated with kerosene and BTEX.

    PubMed

    Kabelitz, Nadja; Machackova, Jirina; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Brennerova, Maria; Pieper, Dietmar H; Heipieper, Hermann J; Junca, Howard

    2009-03-01

    In order to obtain insights in complexity shifts taking place in natural microbial communities under strong selective pressure, soils from a former air force base in the Czech Republic, highly contaminated with jet fuel and at different stages of a bioremediation air sparging treatment, were analyzed. By tracking phospholipid fatty acids and 16S rRNA genes, a detailed monitoring of the changes in quantities and composition of the microbial communities developed at different stages of the bioventing treatment progress was performed. Depending on the length of the air sparging treatment that led to a significant reduction in the contamination level, we observed a clear shift in the soil microbial community being dominated by Pseudomonads under the harsh conditions of high aromatic contamination to a status of low aromatic concentrations, increased biomass content, and a complex composition with diverse bacterial taxonomical branches.

  8. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 8 Air-Based Remediation Technology Selection Logic

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  9. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF PARTIAL DNAPL SOURCE ZONE DELETION USING SPARGING AS A REMEDIATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contamination of the subsurface environment by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) is a wide-spread problem that poses a significant threat to soil and groundwater quality. Implementing different remediation techniques can lead to the removal of a high fraction of the DNA...

  10. Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes Using In-Situ Air Sparging—A 2-D Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Krishna R.; Tekola, Lue

    2011-01-01

    In-situ air sparging has evolved as an innovative technique for soil and groundwater remediation impacted with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including chlorinated solvents. These may exist as non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) or dissolved in groundwater. This study assessed: (1) how air injection rate affects the mass removal of dissolved phase contamination, (2) the effect of induced groundwater flow on mass removal and air distribution during air injection, and (3) the effect of initial contaminant concentration on mass removal. Dissolved-phase chlorinated solvents can be effectively removed through the use of air sparging; however, rapid initial rates of contaminant removal are followed by a protracted period of lower removal rates, or a tailing effect. As the air flow rate increases, the rate of contaminant removal also increases, especially during the initial stages of air injection. Increased air injection rates will increase the density of air channel formation, resulting in a larger interfacial mass transfer area through which the dissolved contaminant can partition into the vapor phase. In cases of groundwater flow, increased rates of air injection lessened observed downward contaminant migration effect. The air channel network and increased air saturation reduced relative hydraulic conductivity, resulting in reduced groundwater flow and subsequent downgradient contaminant migration. Finally, when a higher initial TCE concentration was present, a slightly higher mass removal rate was observed due to higher volatilization-induced concentration gradients and subsequent diffusive flux. Once concentrations are reduced, a similar tailing effect occurs. PMID:21776228

  11. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction for the 105-KW Basin integrated water treatment system filter vessel sparging vent

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-02-23

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Filter Vessel Sparging Vent at 105-KW Basin. Additionally, the following description, and references are provided as the notices of startup, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) and (2) in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The 105-K West Reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The IWTS, which has been described in the Radioactive Air Emissions NOC for Fuel Removal for 105-KW Basin (DOE/RL-97-28 and page changes per US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office letter 97-EAP-814) will be used to remove radionuclides from the basin water during fuel removal operations. The purpose of the modification described herein is to provide operational flexibility for the IWTS at the 105-KW basin. The proposed modification is scheduled to begin in calendar year 1998.

  12. Analysis of the remediation systems on the contaminant plume at the Plainville landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, R.L.

    1999-06-01

    The Plainville landfill, located in Plainville, Massachusetts, has been the subject of study by several groups in recent years. A contaminant plume, exiting from the southwest corner of the landfill, is contaminating the groundwater downgradient and may affect drinking water wells located there. A two-phase remediation scheme, consisting of an interim overburden air sparging system and a final proposed pump and treat and air sparging system, has been proposed to mitigate the groundwater contaminant plume. This thesis assesses these remediation systems to determine their ability to remediate the contaminants in the groundwater plume. The interim and final proposed air sparging systems were analyzed using existing quarterly reports and a literature review. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was used to analyze the pump and treat system. These analyses were then compared to the model utilized to design the remediation scheme. Several discrepancies in the design of the remediation scheme were noted as a result of this analysis. First, the presence of till lenses throughout the remediation zone was not addressed. Also, the extraction of water from the competent bedrock layer appears counterproductive. In addition, the air sparging system was not field tested to ascertain the flow pattern in the subsurface. Finally, the installation of the bedrock air sparging wells appears redundant. These discrepancies, however, will only decrease the projected efficiency of the proposed remediation schemes and increase clean up time. Consequently, the results of this study seem to indicate that the proposed remediation scheme is adequately designed.

  13. Remediation Technology for Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is the most commonly selected technology for remediation of ground water at Superfund sites in the USA. The next most common technology is Chemical treatment, followed by Air Sparging, and followed by Permeable Reactive Barriers. This presentation reviews the the...

  14. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    During this quarter a new set of experiments was carried out with and without collector in order to understand the flow patterns inside the ASH unit for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles. These tests were designed to study the effects of percent solids in the feed, A* - the nondimensional ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area, and the effect of collector addition on the flow characteristics. These experiments were done with 0%, 5% and 15% solids in the feed. The latter two cases were studied for three different A* values and also with and without the addition of collector. The value of Q*, the dimensionless ratio of air f low rate and slurry flow rate was maintained at the same level (Q* 4.55). Quartz particles of size [minus]100 +200 mesh were used for this study rather than coal particles because they did not abrade and were of a higher density. The reagents and their dosages used were 40 ppm (water basis) of frother (MIBC) and 800 g of collector (dodecyl amine) per ton of solids in the suspension. At room temperature, quartz is intrinsically hydrophilic while addition of the amine collector renders the quartz particles hydrophobic. The absence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophilic case and the presence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophobic case.A total of 11 scans was taken over the entire length of the ASH unit. Software has now been developed to analyze the CT images obtained from these tests and is able to account for any offset of the air core from the axis of the ASH. In this way, the image is reconstructed and a radial density profile of the time averaged flow is generated. Some experimental results are presented graphically in Figures 1 through 4 at 0% and 5% solids in the suspension for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cases.

  15. SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF AIR SPARGING TO REMEDIATE ETHYLENE DEBROMIDE (EDB) IN GROUND WATER INKANSAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) was banned in conventional motor fuel in the USA by 1990, EDB continues to contaminate ground water at many old gasoline service station sites. Although EDB contamination is widespread, there is little performance data on technology to remediat...

  16. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1992-08-17

    The effect of A* (the dimensionless ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area) on the fluid flow behavior of the 2 inch ASH-2C unit was studied for different percentage of solids in the suspension. Limestone, a hydrophilic solid was chosen for study. The particle size of the solids was taken as [minus]100 [plus]200 mesh. Three different concentrations of solids in the suspension were considered, 5, 10 and 20% by weight. The corresponding pulp densities of the feed suspension for these three cases are 1.09, 1.18 and 1.36 g/cc respectively. Since no collector was added to the suspension, all the solids are expected to report to the underflow. For all these studies the Q* value was maintained at the same level (Q* = 2.28). Reconstructed images from the CT scanner were analyzed using the graphics software developed at the University of Utah. Assuming the air core to be cylindrical in shape and using the previously generated calibration curve, the average density of the swirl layer and its average thickness were estimated for each slice. These results are presented graphically in the accompanying figures along the axis of the ASH unit from bottom to top.

  17. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Fifteenth quarterly report, 14 February 1994--13 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-08-10

    During this quarter of the DOE project, ``Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation``, the x-ray CT measurements were correlated with the results from the flotation experiments reported in the 13th quarterly report. In this regard the axial view of the flow regimes in the ASH during steady state operation were constructed from the radial density profiles as revealed by x-ray CT measurements. Construction of the axial view of the flow regimes was explained in the last quarterly report. By studying the characteristics of the flow regimes from these axial views and relating them with flotation recovery data, a phenomenological description of ASH flotation was possible. The effect of two operating variables, inlet pressure and dimensionless flow rate ratio (A* = air flow rate/slurry flow rate), are reported in this quarterly report.

  18. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 6 Thermal Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  19. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  20. Air-Base Remediation Workshop - Section 3 Bioventig

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  1. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Final report, 14 August 1990--13 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-10-18

    Air sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation is a new particle separation technology that has been developed at the University of Utah. This technology combines froth flotation principles with the flow characteristics of a hydrocyclone such that the ASH system can perform flotation separations in less than a second. This feature provides the ASH with a high specific capacity, 100 to 600 times greater than the specific capacity of conventional flotation machines. In an effort to develop a more detailed understanding of ASH flotation, multiphase flow characteristics of the air sparged hydrocyclone were studied and the relationship of these characteristics with flotation performance was investigated. This investigation was divided into four phases. In the first phase, the time-averaged multiphase flow characteristics of the ASH during its steady state operation were studied using x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT). In this regard, a model system, mono-sized quartz flotation with dodecyl amine as collector, using a 2 in. diameter ASH unit (ASH-2C), was selected for study. Various flow regimes, namely, the air core, the froth phase, and the swirl layer, were identified and their spatial extent established for different experimental conditions by x-ray CT analysis. In the second phase, a detailed parametric study of flotation response of the ASH for the same system was carried out in order to establish the effect of various operating variables on flotation response. The findings of this phase of investigation were then correlated with the multiphase flow characteristics as revealed by x-ray CT in the first phase. Thus, the impact of various operating variables on the flow regimes, and hence, on flotation response was established.

  2. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 1 Sampling And Analysis Revelant To Air-Based Remediation Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Force Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environme...

  3. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Fourteenth quarterly report, 14 November 1993--13 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-08-10

    During this quarter of the DOE project, ``Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation``, efforts were made to correlate the x-ray CT measurements with the flotation experiments reported in the last. quarterly report. In this regard the axial view of the flow regimes in the ASH during steady state operation were constructed from the radial density profiles as revealed by x-ray CT measurements. By studying the characteristics of the flow regimes from these axial views and relating them with flotation recovery data, a more detailed understanding of ASH flotation was possible. Construction of the axial view of the flow regimes and the effect of two operating variables, dimensionless area ratio (A* = overflow opening area/underflow opening area) and percent solids in the feed, are reported in this quarterly report.

  4. Integrated technologies for expedited soil and groundwater remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.; Wellman, D.

    1996-12-01

    A fast-track and economic approach was necessary to meet the needs of a property transfer agreement and to minimize impact to future usage of a site in the Los Angeles Basin. Woodward-Clyde responded by implementing site investigation, remedial action plan preparation for soil and groundwater, and selection and installation of remedial alternatives in an aggressive schedule of overlapped tasks. Assessment of soil and groundwater was conducted at the site, followed by design and construction of remediation systems. This phase of activity was completed within 2 years. Soil and groundwater were found to be impacted by chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons. A vapor extraction system (2,000 scfm capacity) was installed for soil remediation, and an innovative air sparging system was installed for cost effective groundwater cleanup. A bioventing system was also applied in selected areas. The vapor extraction wellfield consists of 26 extraction and monitoring well points, with multiple screened casings. The air sparging wellfield consists of 32 sparging wells with a designed maximum flow of 400 scfm. The systems began operation in 1993, and have resulted in the estimated removal of approximately 30,000 pounds of contaminants, or about 90% of the estimated mass in place. The combined vapor extraction/air sparging system is expected to reduce the time for on-site groundwater remediation from 1/3 to 1/6 the time when compared to the conventional pump and treat method for groundwater remediation.

  5. Comparison of Microcosm Tests and a Field Demonstration of Cometabolic Air Sparging With Propane for the Bioremediation of Trichloroethylene and cis-Dichloroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmins, B.; Dolan, M. E.; Tovannabootr, A.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.; Magar, V. S.; Leeson, A.

    2001-12-01

    Cometabolic air sparging (CAS) is an innovative form of conventional air sparging, and is designed to degrade or remove chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs) in groundwater and to potentially treat these contaminants in the vadose zone. A CAS demonstration was conducted at McClellan AFB, California, for removal of chloroethenes (TCE, cis-DCE) from groundwater using propane as the cometabolic substrate. In support of this field demonstration both groundwater and vadose zone microcosm studies were performed. The microcosms were created with groundwater and aquifer materials from the demonstration site. Concentrations of compounds in the microcosms were created to mimic conditions where the demonstration was performed. The microcosms were used to test the potential of the propane-utilizers to transform the CAHs of interest, and determine their nutrient requirements while transforming these compounds. Results from the first season of field-testing showed propane-utilizers could be effectively stimulated in the saturated zone with repeated intermediate sparging of propane and air. The lag time for effective propane utilization to be observed in the field was about 30 to 40 days, while in laboratory microcosms the lag period was about 12 days. Consistent with the field tests the groundwater microcosms showed cis-DCE was more rapidly transformed than TCE. Microcosm tests also indicated that propane inhibited the transformation of cis-DCE and TCE, and as observed in the field, most of the transformation of these compounds occurred after propane was reduced to low concentrations. In the field demonstration propane utilization rates and rates of CAH removal slowed after three to four months of repeated propane additions, which coincided with the depletion of nitrogen (as nitrate) in the treatment zone. Similar results were obtained with repeated additions of propane to the microcosms. In the field test ammonia was added to the propane/air mixture to provide a

  6. Inert gas sparge leads to alternate reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M K; Carstensen, J T

    2000-06-01

    The effect of sparging with an inert gas (argon) was evaluated during the investigation of the solution kinetics of an oxidation-prone amphiphilic drug containing a sulphide moiety. Samples stored with an air headspace in pH7 and 8 phosphate buffers at elevated temperatures and in the absence of light degraded to two main products, a sulphoxide and a cinnamic acid analogue. Initially, this appeared to be a sequential mechanism which could be blocked by removing oxygen. Instead, argon-sparge forced the direct degradation to the cinnamate, which was evidenced by the formation of a strong odour of sulphide. In addition, argon-sparged samples remained colourless, while those sparged with oxygen or stored with an air headspace turned yellow and had negligible odour. The half-lives for samples stored in pH 8 buffers at 93 degrees C at an initial drug concentration of 25 mg mL(-1) were 128 days (argon sparged), 86 days (air headspace), and 65 days (oxygen sparged). The results indicated that for the drug under study, sparging with an inert gas affected the mechanism as well as the rate of the reaction at elevated temperatures.

  7. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by X-ray CT. Thirteenth quarterly report: 14 August--13 November, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-11-16

    The research activities during this quarter of the DOE project, {open_quotes}Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation{close_quotes}, involved a detailed parametric study of the flotation response of the ASH, establishing an empirical correlation between flotation response and operating variables, and development of a phenomenological description of the observed responses. In these experiments with quartz particles, flotation response is essentially characterized by recovery of the solids to the overflow. Dimensionless variables such as the ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area, the ratio of air flow rate to slurry flow rate, percent solids in the feed suspension, particle size, inlet velocity (i.e. slurry pressure) are all of paramount importance. A series of experiments were designed to systematically study the effects of these variables on the flotation response. The radial density distribution profiles obtained from x-ray CT measurements (presented in earlier quarterly reports) reflect the fluid flow behavior of the ASH to a great extent. Based on the results of the experimental tests an empirical model has been developed correlating recovery with the operating variables.

  8. Measurement of air and VOC vapor fluxes during gas-driven soil remediation: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heonki; Kim, Taeyun; Shin, Seungyeop; Annable, Michael D

    2012-09-04

    In this laboratory study, an experimental method was developed for the quantitative analyses of gas fluxes in soil during advective air flow. One-dimensional column and two- and three-dimensional flow chamber models were used in this study. For the air flux measurement, n-octane vapor was used as a tracer, and it was introduced in the air flow entering the physical models. The tracer (n-octane) in the gas effluent from the models was captured for a finite period of time using a pack of activated carbon, which then was analyzed for the mass of n-octane. The air flux was calculated based on the mass of n-octane captured by the activated carbon and the inflow concentration. The measured air fluxes are in good agreement with the actual values for one- and two-dimensional model experiments. Using both the two- and three-dimensional models, the distribution of the air flux at the soil surface was measured. The distribution of the air flux was found to be affected by the depth of the saturated zone. The flux and flux distribution of a volatile contaminant (perchloroethene) was also measured by using the two-dimensional model. Quantitative information of both air and contaminant flux may be very beneficial for analyzing the performance of gas-driven subsurface remediation processes including soil vapor extraction and air sparging.

  9. Assessing UST corrective action technologies: Lessons learned about in situ air sparging at the Denison Avenue Site, Cleveland, Ohio. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.R.; Chaudet, R.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been used at an increasing number of sites to address groundwater contamination. Because of the lack of substantive performance data, however, the actual effectiveness of the system is not known. The EPA Office of Research and Development Risk reduction Engineering Laboratory (ORD RREL) with the EPA Region 5 Office of Underground Storage Tanks, the Ohio State Fire Marshal, and BP Exploration & Oil, Inc. (BP) participated in a field evaluation of an IAS system at a petroleum leaking UST site in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the study was to provide performance data that will be independently evaluated by EPA to better understand IAS effectiveness. The report presents the site and monitoring data provided by BP over a 2-year period. The chemical data indicated an overall decrease of BTEX concentrations in groundwater to nondetectable levels shortly after startup of the IAS system. Variability in the chemical and process data also precludes making any definitive link between the decrease in contaminant concentrations and IAS performance at this site.

  10. Metagenomics reveals diversity and abundance of meta-cleavage pathways in microbial communities from soil highly contaminated with jet fuel under air-sparging bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Brennerova, Maria V; Josefiova, Jirina; Brenner, Vladimir; Pieper, Dietmar H; Junca, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The extradiol dioxygenase diversity of a site highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons under air-sparging treatment was assessed by functional screening of a fosmid library in Escherichia coli with catechol as substrate. The 235 positive clones from inserts of DNA extracted from contaminated soil were equivalent to one extradiol dioxygenase-encoding gene per 3.6 Mb of DNA screened, indicating a strong selection for genes encoding this function. Three subfamilies were identified as being predominant, with 72, 55 and 43 fosmid inserts carrying genes, related to those encoding TbuE of Ralstonia pickettii PK01 (EXDO-D), IpbC of Pseudomonas sp. JR1 (EXDO-K2) or DbtC of Burkholderia sp. DBT1 (EXDO-Dbt), respectively, whereas genes encoding enzymes related to XylE of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were not observed. Genes encoding oxygenases related to isopropylbenzene dioxygenases were usually colocalized with genes encoding EXDO-K2 dioxygenases. Functional analysis of representative proteins indicated a subcluster of EXDO-D proteins to show exceptional high affinity towards different catecholic substrates. Based on Vmax/Km specificity constants, a task-sharing between different extradiol dioxygenases in the community of the contaminated site can be supposed, attaining a complementary and community-balanced catalytic power against diverse catecholic derivatives, as necessary for effective degradation of mixtures of aromatics. PMID:19575758

  11. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 5 Multi-Phase Extraction And Product Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  12. A review of sparging technology

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.; Droste, E.X.

    1995-12-31

    A data base of 59 sites was assembled and evaluated to provide insight on sparging system design, operation, and evaluation. Data from 53 pilot-scale sites and 19 full-scale sites were input to the data base. Long-term water quality data from 12 sites indicated significant reductions of dissolved phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) resulting from sparging. Significant improvements in ground water quality were not observed in pilot tests reported in the data base, which were typically less than one day in duration. The predominant outcome of pilot-scale evaluations was the estimation of a sparging well radius of influence (ROI). The most reliable methods to estimate ROI appear to be the appropriate use and evaluation of tracer gases or the measurement of dissolved oxygen in conjunction with other observed field parameters. The influence of system configuration or soil type on ROI is not well defined, and ROI appears to be site specific. This is likely due to soil heterogeneities.

  13. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  14. Contamination removal rates in pulsed and steady-flow aquifer sparging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.C.; Blaske, A.R.; VanHouten, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    A field experiment was conducted to determine whether pulsed-injection aquifer sparging induced greater mass transfer of trichloroethylene (TCE) than steady-flow sparge air injection in the same location. Current literature indicates that, despite an increase in air-water interfacial surface area induced by sparge air injection, mass transfer of volatile contaminants from aqueous to gaseous phase is limited by aqueous-phase diffusion rates. It was hypothesized that pulsed sparge air injection would induce bulk water movement, minimizing the mass transfer rate limitation caused by aqueous-phase diffusion. This effect was expected to be observed through an increase in the rate of TCE concentration reductions as the experimental system shifted from steady to pulsed-flow operation. Experimental results showed highly variable groundwater TCE concentrations during steady-flow operations. Average TCE concentrations increased slightly during the steady-flow trials at both 1.5- and 3.0-m radial distances from the sparge well, but the increases were not significant. During the pulsed-flow trial, a significant decline in TCE concentrations was observed at the 1.5-m radius. At the 3.0-m radius, a slight decline was observed, which was not significant.

  15. Remedial action selection using groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, B.I.; Parish, G.B.; Hauge, L.

    1996-12-31

    An environmental investigation uncovered petroleum contamination at a gasoline station in southern Wisconsin. The site was located in part of the ancestral Rock River valley in Rock County, Wisconsin where the valley is filled with sands and gravels. Groundwater pump tests were conducted for determination of aquifer properties needed to plan a remediation system; the results were indicative of a very high hydraulic conductivity. The site hydrogeology was modeled using the U.S. Geological Survey`s groundwater model, Modflow. The calibrated model was used to determine the number, pumping rate, and configuration of recovery wells to remediate the site. The most effective configuration was three wells pumping at 303 liters per minute (1/m) (80 gallons per minute (gpm)), producing a total pumping rate of 908 l/m (240 gpm). Treating 908 l/min (240 gpm) or 1,308,240 liters per day (345,600 gallons per day) constituted a significant volume to be treated and discharged. It was estimated that pumping for the two year remediation would cost $375,000 while the air sparging would cost $200,000. The recommended remedial system consisted of eight air sparging wells and four vapor recovery laterals. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) approved the remedial action plan in March, 1993. After 11 months of effective operation the concentrations of removed VOCs had decreased by 94 percent and groundwater sampling indicated no detectable concentrations of gasoline contaminants. Groundwater modeling was an effective technique to determine the economic feasibility of a groundwater remedial alternative.

  16. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF WORKER AND AMBIENT AIR EXPOSURES DURING SOIL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous waste site remediation workers or neighboring residents may be exposed to particulates during the remediation of lead contaminated soil sites. An industrial hygiene survey and air monitoring program for both lead and dust were performed during initial soil sampling acti...

  17. Coupling risk-based remediation with innovative technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodheart, G.F.; Teaf, C.M. |; Manning, M.J.

    1998-05-01

    Tiered risk-based cleanup approaches have been effectively used at petroleum sites, pesticide sites and other commercial/industrial facilities. For example, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has promulgated guidance for a Tiered Approach to Corrective action Objectives (TACO) to establish site-specific remediation goals for contaminated soil and groundwater. As in the case of many other state programs, TACO is designed to provide for adequate protection of human health and the environment based on potential risks posed by site conditions. It also incorporates site-related information that may allow more cost-effective remediation. IEPA developed TACO to provide flexibility to site owners/operators when formulating site-specific remediation activities, as well as to hasten property redevelopment to return sites to more productive use. Where appropriate, risk-based cleanup objectives as set by TACO-type programs may be coupled with innovative remediation technologies such as air sparging, bioremediation and soil washing.

  18. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 1. Final remedial investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Volume 1 of this report covers the Remedial Investigation conducted on Site 1, Fire Training Area at Volk Field Air National Guard Base. The remedial work is described and the testing conducted after remediation to insure all contamination has been removed. The study as conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents include: Meteorology; Hydrology; Soils; Water wells; Groundwater; Borings; Samplings; Chemical contamination; Migration; Decontamination.

  19. Building Sustainability into the Air Force Remediation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-06

    Case Studies 10 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 19 91 19 93 19 95 19 97 19 99 20 01 20 03 20 05 20 07 20 09 20 11 20 13 Fiscal Year Pe...Sustainability in AF Remediation: “Green” Remediation Phytoremediation , Travis AFB, CA  Sustainability metrics not new endeavor  ER programs focus on cost, risk...remediation technology examples:  Phytoremediation – 5  LNAPL recovery – 16  Passive in situ treatment Wetlands  Enh bio – 114  MNA –

  20. Environmental Footprint Analysis of Steam Enhanced Extraction Remedy: Former Williams Air Force Base, Site ST012 Mesa, AZ

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This green remediation (GR) study quantifies environmental footprint for an In-Situ Thermal Treatment (ISTT) remedy using Steam Enhanced Extraction (SEE) for Site ST012 located on the Former Williams Air Force Base (AFB) in Mesa, Arizona.

  1. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Tenth quarterly report, 14 November 1992--13 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    During this quarter a new set of experiments was carried out with and without collector in order to understand the flow patterns inside the ASH unit for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles. These tests were designed to study the effects of percent solids in the feed, A* - the nondimensional ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area, and the effect of collector addition on the flow characteristics. These experiments were done with 0%, 5% and 15% solids in the feed. The latter two cases were studied for three different A* values and also with and without the addition of collector. The value of Q*, the dimensionless ratio of air f low rate and slurry flow rate was maintained at the same level (Q* 4.55). Quartz particles of size {minus}100 +200 mesh were used for this study rather than coal particles because they did not abrade and were of a higher density. The reagents and their dosages used were 40 ppm (water basis) of frother (MIBC) and 800 g of collector (dodecyl amine) per ton of solids in the suspension. At room temperature, quartz is intrinsically hydrophilic while addition of the amine collector renders the quartz particles hydrophobic. The absence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophilic case and the presence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophobic case.A total of 11 scans was taken over the entire length of the ASH unit. Software has now been developed to analyze the CT images obtained from these tests and is able to account for any offset of the air core from the axis of the ASH. In this way, the image is reconstructed and a radial density profile of the time averaged flow is generated. Some experimental results are presented graphically in Figures 1 through 4 at 0% and 5% solids in the suspension for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cases.

  2. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Eighth quarterly report, 14 May 1992--13 August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1992-08-17

    The effect of A* (the dimensionless ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area) on the fluid flow behavior of the 2 inch ASH-2C unit was studied for different percentage of solids in the suspension. Limestone, a hydrophilic solid was chosen for study. The particle size of the solids was taken as {minus}100 {plus}200 mesh. Three different concentrations of solids in the suspension were considered, 5, 10 and 20% by weight. The corresponding pulp densities of the feed suspension for these three cases are 1.09, 1.18 and 1.36 g/cc respectively. Since no collector was added to the suspension, all the solids are expected to report to the underflow. For all these studies the Q* value was maintained at the same level (Q* = 2.28). Reconstructed images from the CT scanner were analyzed using the graphics software developed at the University of Utah. Assuming the air core to be cylindrical in shape and using the previously generated calibration curve, the average density of the swirl layer and its average thickness were estimated for each slice. These results are presented graphically in the accompanying figures along the axis of the ASH unit from bottom to top.

  3. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Twelfth quarterly report, 14 May--13 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-08-13

    During this quarter some experiments from the previous set were repeated to check the reproducibility of the results. Also, a new set of experiments was carried out to study the effects of (1) collector dosage, (2) Q* -- the nondimensional ratio of air flow rate to slurry flow rate, and (3) slurry pressure on the flow characteristics. Four different Q* values with hydrophobic particles in the feed slurry were studied. The value of A*, the dimensionless ratio of overflow opening area to underflow opening area, was maintained at the same level (A* 1.00). Quartz particles of size {sup {minus}}100 {sup +}200 mesh were used for this study rather than coal particles because they did not abrade and were of a higher density. The reagents used were 40 ppM (water basis) of MIBC frother and 800 g of dodecyl amine collector per ton of dry solids in the suspension. In other experiments with no solids in the feed suspension, collector level in the water was varied at 0, 10 and 20 ppM. At room temperature, quartz is intrinsically hydrophilic while addition of the amine collector renders the quartz particles hydrophobic. The absence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophilic case and the presence of collector will be referred to as the hydrophobic case.

  4. The air quality monitoring program for the 1100-EM-1 remedial investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Laws, G.L.

    1990-09-01

    Air quality monitoring for the remedial investigation of the Hanford Site's 1100-EM-1 operable unit was conducted in the spring and fall of 1989 and during January 1990. The monitoring program was divided into two phases. The first phase examined the air quality impact of routine atmospheric emissions at three of the operable unit's waste sites before the beginning of intrusive remedial investigation activities. The second phase of monitoring examined the air quality impact of routine atmospheric emissions from two of the operable unit's waste sites during intrusive remedial investigation activities. Each phase of the program consisted of a series of monitoring events that measured pollutant concentrations at key locations upwind and downwind of individual waste sites. During each monitoring event, sampling was conducted to determine the air concentrations of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds. Monitoring for heavy metals and asbestos was also conducted during some monitoring events. 8 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Preliminary assessment of worker and ambient air exposures during soil remediation technology demonstration.

    PubMed

    Romine, James D; Barth, Edwin F

    2002-01-01

    Hazardous waste site remediation workers or neighboring residents may be exposed to particulates during the remediation of lead-contaminated soil sites. Industrial hygiene surveys and air monitoring programs for both lead and dust were performed during initial soil sampling activities and during pilot scale technology demonstration activities at two lead-contaminated soil sites to assess whether worker protection or temporary resident relocation would be suggested during any subsequent remediation technology activities. The concentrations of lead and dust in the air during pilot scale technology demonstration studies were within applicable exposure guidelines, including Occupational Health and Safety Administration permissible exposure limits, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure limits, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene threshold limit values, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air Quality Standards program limits.

  6. In-situ remediation system for volatile organic compounds with deep recharge mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Jr., Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Nichols, Ralph L.; Phifer, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the treatment and remediation of a contaminated aquifer in the presence of an uncontaminated aquifer at a different hydraulic potential. The apparatus consists of a wellbore inserted through a first aquifer and into a second aquifer, an inner cylinder within the wellbore is supported and sealed to the wellbore to prevent communication between the two aquifers. Air injection is used to sparge the liquid having the higher static water level and, to airlift it to a height whereby it spills into the inner cylinder. The second treatment area provides treatment in the form of aeration or treatment with a material. Vapor stripped in sparging is vented to the atmosphere. Treated water is returned to the aquifer having the lower hydraulic potential.

  7. Instrumentation design and installation for monitoring air injection ground water remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.L.; Baldwin, C.K.; Lachmar, T.E.; Dupont, R.R.

    2000-03-31

    An in situ instrumentation bundle was designed for inclusion in monitoring wells that were installed at the Wasatch Trailer Sales site in Layton, Utah, to evaluate in situ air sparging (IAS) and in-well aeration (IWA). Sensors for the bundle were selected based on laboratory evaluation of accuracy and precision, as well as consideration of size and cost. SenSym pressure transducers, Campbell Scientific, Inc. (CSI) T-type thermocouples, and dissolved oxygen (DO) probes manufactured by Technalithics Inc. (Waco, Texas), were selected for each of the 27 saturated zone bundles. Each saturated zone bundle also included a stirring blade to mix water near the DO probe. A Figaro oxygen sensor was included in the vadose zone bundle. The monitoring wells were installed by direct push technique to minimize soil disruption and to ensure intimate contact between the 18 inch (46 cm) long screens and the soil. A data acquisition system, comprised of a CSI 21X data logger and four CSI AM416 multiplexers, was used to control the stirring blades and record signals from more than 70 in situ sensors. The instrumentation performed well during evaluation of IAS and IWA at the site. However, the SenSym pressure transducers were not adequately temperature compensated and will need to be replaced.

  8. Standardization methods for testing photo-catalytic air remediation materials: Problems and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifang, S.; Gallus, M.; Liedtke, S.; Kurtenbach, R.; Wiesen, P.; Kleffmann, J.

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, problems of different methods used for quantifying the air remediation activity of photo-catalytic active surfaces are described. It is demonstrated that in bed photo-reactors (e.g. ISO), transport limitations can lead to underestimation of the activity, if fast heterogeneous reactions are investigated. In contrast, in stirred tank photo-reactors (e.g. UNI), complex secondary chemistry may lead to an overestimation of the photo-catalytic remediation of NOx, if NO2 is also present. In addition, the quantities, used for ranking the photo-catalytic air remediation activity in the different methods are not independent of the applied experimental conditions, and thus, make any intercomparison between the different methods or the extrapolation to atmospheric conditions very difficult. Furthermore, unrealistic high NOx levels are used, for which the chemical kinetics may already be affected by surface saturation problems. Finally, it is shown that the use of only nitrogen monoxide (NO) will not enable users to judge about the quality and effectiveness of a photo-catalytic surface for improving air quality, since surfaces which are active toward NO may be completely non-reactive toward other important atmospheric pollutants. A modified method for quantifying the air remediation activity of photo-catalytic surfaces is proposed here to overcome these problems.

  9. STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

  10. Foaming and media surfactant effects on the cultivation of animal cells in stirred and sparged bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Handa-Corrigan, A; Spier, R E

    1992-09-01

    Foam formation and the subsequent cell damage/losses in the foam layer were found to be the major problems affecting cell growth and monoclonal antibody (MAb) production in stirred and sparged bioreactors for both serum-supplemented and serum-free media. Surfactants in the culture media had a profound effect on cell growth by changing both the properties of bubbles and the qualities of foam formed. Comparable cell growth and MAb production in sparged bioreactors and in stirred and surface-aerated control cultures were observed only in Pluronic F-68 containing culture media. In media devoid of Pluronic F-68, cells became more sensitive to direct bubble aeration in the presence of antifoam agent which was used to suppress foam formation. Compared with serum-supplemented medium, more severe cell damage effects were observed in serum-free medium. In addition, serum-free medium devoid of cells was partially degraded under continuous air sparging. The mechanism of this damage effect was not clear. Pluronic F-68 provided protective effect to cells but not to the medium. A theoretical model based on the surface active properties of Pluronic F-68 was proposed to account for its protective effect on cell growth. Optimum media surfactant composition in terms of maximum cell growth and minimum foam formation was proposed for stirred and sparged animal cell bioreactor.

  11. Water displacement during sparging under perched water-table conditions

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiulio, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of using sparging to purposefully displace perched water in silt loam soils was evaluated at a field site in northwestern Oklahoma. Soils and groundwater are contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, trichloroethene (TCE), and vinyl chloride. During sparging, a transient response in water level measurements was observed in observation wells which is attributed to water displacement. Evidence of water displacement was manifested by water-table collapse upon the cessation of sparging.

  12. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Bullen Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-18

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report as part of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) to present results of RI/FS activities at five sites at the Bullen Point radar installation. The IRP provides for investigating, quantifying, and remediating environmental contamination from past waste management activities at Air Force installations throughout the United States.

  13. Building Sustainability into the Air Force Remediation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Technology  GSR Through Optimization  In-depth Case Study : Travis AFB  Necessary  Optimization  GSR Treatment Train  In situ Bioreactor...y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Case Study : Travis AFB 12 Goals  Out of necessity  Reduce energy consumption, air emissions, material... Phytoremediation Biobarrier  Wrap-up  Future Direction 2 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e AF Environmental Restoration

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Castle Air Force Base, Merced County, CA. (First remedial action), August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    The 2,777-acre Castle Air Force Base is a Strategic Air Command training base 6 miles northwest of the City of Merced in Merced County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. Since 1941, the site has been used as a military air training base. Fire training activities, as well as aircraft and jet engine maintenance activities including metal plating and processing, have occurred onsite. In 1984, the base was required not only to implement remedial measures to correct the identified contamination but also to prevent future ground water degradation from waste discharges. The site has been divided into operable units (OUs) for remediation. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides an interim remedy for the main TCE plume, as OU1. Future RODs will address remaining soil and ground water contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE. The selected remedial action for the interim remedy is included.

  15. Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2007-02-15

    On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain

  16. Remediation of the Wells G & H Superfund Site, Woburn, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Bair, E Scott; Metheny, Maura A

    2002-01-01

    Remediation of ground water and soil contamination at the Wells G & H Superfund Site, Woburn, Massachusetts, uses technologies that reflect differences in hydrogeologic settings, concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and costs of treatment. The poorly permeable glacial materials that overlie fractured bedrock at the W.R. Grace property necessitate use of closely spaced recovery wells. Contaminated ground water is treated with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet (UV) oxidation. At UniFirst, a deep well completed in fractured bedrock removes contaminated ground water, which is treated by hydrogen peroxide, UV oxidation, and granular activated carbon (GAC). The remediation system at Wildwood integrates air sparging, soil-vapor extraction, and ground water pumping. Air stripping and GAC are used to treat contaminated water; GAC is used to treat contaminated air. New England Plastics (NEP) uses air sparging and soil-vapor extraction to remove VOCs from the unsaturated zone and shallow ground water. Contaminated air and water are treated using separate GAC systems. After nine years of operation at W.R. Grace and UniFirst, 30 and 786 kg, respectively, of VOCs have been removed. In three years of operation, 866 kg of VOCs have been removed at Wildwood. In 15 months of operation, 36 kg of VOCs were removed at NEP. Characterization work continues at the Olympia Nominee Trust, Whitney Barrel, Murphy Waste Oil, and Aberjona Auto Parts properties. Risk assessments are being finalized that address heavy metals in the floodplain sediments along the Aberjona River that are mobilized from the Industri-Plex Superfund Site located a few miles upstream.

  17. Treatability Study in Support of Intrinsic Remediation for the Hangar 10 Site. Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    ANCHORAGE , ALASKA March 1995 D Prepared for: I * AIR FORCE CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER DIVISION BROOKS AIR FORCE BASE SAN...ANTONIO, TEXAS AND ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE ANCHORAGE , ALASKA I Prepared by: I Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. 1700 Broadway, Suite 900 Denver, Colorado...Wnrinsic Remediation TS Elmendorf Air Force Base Anchorage . Alaska 0 125250 500 1000 MENARSNSEIGUINE N FEET Denver, Colorado 5-31

  18. Design and use of a sparged platform for energy flux measurements over lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gijsbers, S.; Wenker, K.; van Emmerik, T.; de Jong, S.; Annor, F.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    Energy flux measurements over lakes or reservoirs demand relatively stable platforms. Platforms can not be stabilized by fixing them on the bottom of the lake when the water body is too deep or when water levels show significant fluctuations. We present the design and first operational results of a sparged platform. The structure consists of a long PVC pipe, the sparge, which is closed at the bottom. On the PVC pipe rests an aluminum frame platform that carries instrumentation and solar power panel. In turn, the platform rests partially on a large inflated tire. At the bottom of the PVC pipe, lead weights and batteries were placed to ensure a very low point of gravity to minimize wave impact on the platform movement. The tire ensures a large second moment of the water plane. The overall volume of displacement is small in this sparged design. The combination of large second momentum of the water plane and small displacement ensure a high placement of the metacenter. The distance between the point of gravity and the metacenter is relatively long and the weight is large due to the weights and batteries. This ensures that the eigenfrequency of the platform is very low. The instrumentation load consisted of a WindMaster Pro (sonic anemometer for 3D wind speed and air temperature to perform eddy covariance measurements of sensible heat flux), a NR Lite (net radiometer), and air temperature and relative humidity sensors. The platform had a wind vane and the sparge could turn freely around its anchor cable to ensure that the anemometer always faced upwind. A compass in the logger completed this setup. The stability was measured with an accelerometer. In addition to the design and its stability, some first energy flux results will be presented.

  19. Evaluation of subsurface oxygen sensors for remediation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.X.; Lundegard, P.D.

    1996-05-01

    Continuous remediation monitoring using sensors is potentially a more effective and inexpensive alternative to current methods of sample collection and analysis. Gaseous components of a system are the most mobile and easiest to monitor. Continuous monitoring of soil gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and contaminant vapors can provide important quantitative information regarding the progress of bioremediation efforts and the area of influence of air sparging or soil venting. Laboratory and field tests of a commercially available oxygen sensor show that the subsurface oxygen sensor provides rapid and accurate data on vapor phase oxygen concentrations. The sensor is well suited for monitoring gas flow and oxygen consumption in the vadose zone during air sparging and bioventing. The sensor performs well in permeable, unsaturated soil environments and recovers completely after being submerged during temporary saturated conditions. Calibrations of the in situ oxygen sensors were found to be stable after one year of continuous subsurface operation. However, application of the sensor in saturated soil conditions is limited. The three major advantages of this sensor for in situ monitoring are as follows: (1) it allows data acquisition at any specified time interval; (2) it provides potentially more accurate data by minimizing disturbance of subsurface conditions; and (3) it minimizes the cost of field and laboratory procedures involved in sample retrieval and analysis.

  20. Site characterization and remediation monitoring using in situ subsurface sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.X.

    1995-09-01

    Site characterization and remediation monitoring using in situ sensors is potentially a more effective and inexpensive alternative to current methods of sample collection and analysis. Gaseous components of a system are the most mobile and easiest to monitor. Soil gas measurements can not only indicate the presence of hydrocarbon contamination, but also provide important quantitative information regarding the progress of bioremediation efforts and the area of influence of air sparging or soil venting. In situ subsurface sensors can provide potentially more accurate data by minimizing disturbance of subsurface conditions and allow continuous and unattended measurements over a long period of time. Tests of in situ soil gas sensors show that the sensors provide rapid and accurate data on soil gas pressures and vapor phase concentrations. The sensors perform well in permeable, unsaturated soil environments and recover completely after being submerged during temporary saturated conditions. The pressure and subsurface oxygen sensors are well suited for monitoring gas flow and oxygen consumption in the vadose zone during air sparging and bioventing. These sensors have been used to develop a new dynamic technique of evaluating in situ respiration rates during air injection or vapor extraction which has several advantages over the traditional static oxygen uptake method. By using a subsurface oxygen sensor, the dynamic technique offers continuous monitoring capability during the bioventing process. Unlike the traditional respiration test that measures localized respiration rates, this method determines an average respiration rate in the air flow path. Because the measurements can be made at the startup of a remediation process, the operation can run without interruption.

  1. Multiphase fluid simulation tools for winning remediation solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Deschaine, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Releases of petroleum product such as gasoline and diesel fuels from normal operating practices to aquifers are common. The costs to remediate these releases can run in the billions of dollars. Solutions to remediate these releases usually consist of some form of multiphase (air, water, oil) fluid movement, whether it be a multiphase high vacuum extraction system, bioslurping, groundwater pump and treat system, an air sparging system, a soil vapor extraction system, a free product recovery system, bioremediation or the like. The software being tested in Test Drive, Multiphase Organic Vacuum Enhanced Recovery Simulator (MOVER) is a computer simulation tool that will give the practitioner the ability to design high vacuum enhanced multiple phase recovery systems and bioslurping systems, which are often the low cost effective remediation approach. It will also allow for the comparison of various proposed remediation approaches and technologies so the best solution can be chosen for a site. This is a key competitive advantage to translate conceptual ideas into winning bids.

  2. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign.

  3. Observation and modelling of dissolved gases as indicators for mass transfer during gas sparging in a contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, S.; Balcke, G.

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of organic contaminants in aquifers is often limited by the availability of electron acceptors, and the attenuation of contaminants could be enhanced by additional supply of oxygen. Gas sparging is a remediation technique that supplies additional oxygen to ground water via injection of air or oxygen gas. For the performance of this method the mass transfer of gases from the gas phase trapped after injection is a key process. Our study investigated kinetic gas-water mass transfer between trapped gas phase in porous media and groundwater by spatially and temporally resolved dissolved gas measurements in an unconfined model aquifer. The aquifer model was built on-site as a 12 m tall underground tank filled with aquifer material and recharged in vertical direction by the local, contaminated groundwater. For the injection of short gas pulses, oxygen and air as injected gas phase were studied in view of interfacial mass transfer, gas transport in the aqueous phase, and accumulation of trapped gas in the porous space. At several locations dissolved nitrogen, methane and oxygen were observed at different stages of gas dissolution. Kinetic gas-water mass transfer in presence of oxygen demanding reactions in the polluted aquifer material and the transport of dissolved gases were simulated numerically for heterogeneous distribution of gas phase as was observed. Partitioning of nitrogen played an important role in the accumulation of trapped gas and contributes additional information on gas transfer processes. While injection of pure oxygen resulted in complete dissolution of trapped gas within a few meters, nitrogen and methane showed distinct patterns of mass transfer into the gas phase and back into aqueous phase. Naturally occurring gases such as methane or nitrogen were demonstrated to be valuable tracers to describe multiple compound gas-water mass transfer and to assist in predicting gas dissolution and oxygen consumption in porous media.

  4. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Lay Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-04

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report to present the results of RI/FS activities at four sites located at the Point Lay radar installation. The remedial investigation (RI) field activities were conducted at the Point Lay radar installation during the summer of 1993. The four sites at Point Lay were investigated because they were suspected of being contaminated with hazardous substances. RI activities were conducted using methods and procedures specified in the RI/FS Work Plan, Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), and Health and Safety Plan.

  5. Hot air vapor extraction system for remediation of petroleum contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, D.; Karr, L.; Fann, S.; Mathews, A.P.; Price, P.A.; Linginemi, S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a demonstration of a technology entitled ``Hot Air Vapor Extraction (HAVE)`` at the Hydrocarbon National Test Site (HNTS), Port Hueneme, California. The demonstration of the HAVE technology at HNTS was conducted over a 3-month period between August 21, 1995 and November 22, 1995 and the lessons learned from the demonstration are discussed in details to guide the Department of Defense decision makers in analyzing the applicability of this technology to their contaminated sites. This technology demonstration was conducted under the Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) as part of the National Environmental Technology Demonstration Program (NETDP). The primary objectives of the demonstration were to (1) validate the efficacy of the HAVE technology to treat a wide range of hydrocarbons contaminated soils, (2) gather data to estimate treatment costs, and (3) develop engineering guidance needed to apply this remediation technology DoD-wide. Test runs were made on 5 different treatment cells containing various fuel hydrocarbons, ranging from gasoline to heavier petroleum fractions such as lubricating oil. Computer modeling was conducted to analyze the test results and also to optimize the HAVE system design. An economic analysis conducted for various remediation project sizes ranging from 750 to 9,000 cubic yards, the per cubic yard treatment costs are found to vary from $64.05 down to $36.54 respectively.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Eielson Air Force Base, AK. (First remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-29

    The 19,700-acre Eielson Air Force Base (EAFB) site, located 26 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska, is primarily a tactical air support installation. Constructed in 1944, EAFB was originally a satellite installation of Fort Wainwright. Used jointly by the Army and Air Force, the site was designated Eielson AFB in 1948. Many industrial operations were conducted at the base, which generated waste oils, contaminated fuels and sludge, and spent solvents and cleansers. The selected remedial action for the site includes in situ bioventing of BTEX contaminated soil in the vadose zone, with monitoring of soil gases; collecting floating petroleum hydrocarbons from the ground water through wells, culverts, or trenches; incinerating recovered product onsite or transporting the offsite for recycling or disposal; treating extracted ground water, as needed, using air stripping, oil-water separation, or carbon filtration, as determined during the remedial design stage; and discharging the residual water onsite; monitoring petroleum product levels; collecting BTEX-LNAPLS using vacuum extraction wells, with carbon adsorption, followed by offsite disposal of carbon residuals; treating collected liquids using an oil and water separator, air stripper, or carbon adsorption; destroying air emissions using tip flare incineration; and monitoring ground water. The estimated capital cost for the remedial action is $3,867, with an annual O M cost of $3,375 for 5 years.

  7. Radio Frequency Heating for Soil Remediation.

    PubMed

    Price, Stephen L; Kasevich, Raymond S; Johnson, Mark A; Wiberg, Dan; Marley, Michael C

    1999-02-01

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) is a technology that increases the cost-effectiveness of a variety of site remediation technologies by accelerating the rate of contaminant removal. Heating makes the physical, chemical, and biological properties of materials such as contaminants, soil, and groundwater more amenable to remediation. RFH brings controlled heating to the subsurface, enhancing the removal of contaminants by soil vapor extraction (SVE), groundwater aeration (air sparging), bioremediation, and product recovery. The results presented are from a bench-scale study and a field demonstration that both used RFH to enhance the performance of SVE. The bench-scale study performed on PCE-contaminated soil revealed an increase, by a factor of 8, in the removal rate when RFH was used to heat soil to 90 °C. The application of RFH for a three-week period at a former gasoline station near St. Paul, MN, resulted in raising the ambient soil temperature from 8 °C to 100 °C in the immediate vicinity of the RFH applicator and to 40 °C 1.5 m (5 ft) away. Most significantly, the use of an integrated RFH/SVE system achieved an overall 50% reduction in gasoline range organics (GRO) in soil over a two- to three-month period. The discussion includes applications of RFH for enhancing bioremediation and product recovery.

  8. Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

  9. Mercury concentrations in air during the Phase I remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.O.; Owens, J.G.; Lindberg, S.E.; Turner, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    During the Phase I remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the mercury concentration in air was monitored continuously at a nearby off-site location. The purpose of the monitoring was to ensure that the remediation did not adversely affect the off-site concentration of mercury in air. The concentrations of mercury in air did increase during the remediation. However, based on the results of a previous study, this increase was caused by the increase in sunlight intensity and temperature during remediation, which occurred in the summer months. In any case, all concentrations measured before, during, and after remediation were well below the standard of 300 ng/m{sup 3} recommended for continuous exposure to mercury in air.

  10. Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

  11. Remediation of muddy tidal flat sediments using hot air-dried crushed oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tamiji; Kondo, Shunsuke; Kim, Kyung-Hoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tokuoka, Makoto; Hibino, Tadashi

    2012-11-01

    In order to prove that hot air-dried crushed oyster shells (HACOS) are effective in reducing hydrogen sulfide in muddy tidal flat sediments and increasing the biomass, field experiments were carried out. The concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the interstitial water, which was 16 mg SL(-1) before the application of HACOS, decreased sharply and maintained almost zero in the experimental sites (HACOS application sites) for one year, whereas it was remained at ca. 5 mg SL(-1) in the control sites. The number of macrobenthos individuals increased to 2-4.5 times higher than that in the control site. Using a simple numerical model, the effective periods for suppression of hydrogen sulfide were estimated to be 3.2-7.6 and 6.4-15.2 years for the experimental sites with 4 and 8 tons per 10 × 10 × 0.2m area, respectively. From these results, it is concluded that HACOS is an effective material to remediate muddy tidal flats.

  12. Expedited soil remediation employing soil vapor extraction and bioventing at Castle Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hoge, J.

    1996-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) involves in-situ removal and treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the vadose zone. An SVE system includes vent wells screened in the areas of highest contamination, a piping network connecting the vent wells to a SVE treatment unit, blower(s), and a treatment unit. Typical treatment units include granular activated carbon, catalytic oxidation (catox), thermal oxidation and internal combustion (IC) engines. The type of treatment unit selected is a function of the characteristics of the incoming vapor stream. The blower(s) apply vacuum to selected vent wells, resulting in propagation of a pressure gradient some distance from the wells. This is known as the radius of influence. The zone of remediation within this radius of influence is the distance from the well where sufficient flow velocity exists such that timely clean up of VOCs from the vadose zone can occur. Bioventing is most effective in removing petroleum hydrocarbons with less than 10 carbon chains (C10+). Bioventing involves passive or active injection of air into the subsurface, thus promoting the natural biodegradation of residual petroleum hydrocarbons. Passive injection involves opening vent wells to the atmosphere. Active injection is performed by connecting blowers to vent wells, or the existing piping manifold, and injecting air. Bioventing is most effective in promoting natural biodegradation of residual hydrocarbons in compounds with more than C10+ carbon chains. Factors effecting bioventing performance include: (1) Microorganisms (capable of producing enzymes that can degrade the contamination), (2) Energy source (carbon), (3) Electron acceptor (oxygen), (4) Soil moisture, (5) pH, (6) Nutrients, (7) Soil temperature, and (8) Absence of compounds toxic to microorganisms.

  13. Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

  14. Phase 1 remediation of jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport using dual phase extraction and bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Bianco, P. Rizzo, M.; Pressly, N.; Frumer, B.

    1995-12-31

    Soil and groundwater contaminated with jet fuel at Terminal One of the JFK International Airport in New York have been remediated using dual phase extraction (DPE) and bioventing. Two areas were remediated using 51 DPE wells and 20 air sparging/air injection wells. The total area remediated by the DPE wells is estimated to be 4.8 acres. Groundwater was extracted to recover nonaqueous phase and aqueous phase jet fuel from the shallow aquifer and treated above ground by the following processes; oil/water separation, iron-oxidation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, air stripping and liquid-phase granular activated carbon (LPGAC) adsorption. The extracted vapors were treated by vapor-phase granular activated carbon (VPGAC) adsorption in one area, and catalytic oxidation and VPGAC adsorption in another area. After 6 months of remediation, approximately 5,490 lbs. of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were removed by soil vapor extraction (SVE), 109,650 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were removed from the extracted groundwater, and 60,550 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were biologically oxidized by subsurface microorganisms. Of these three mechanisms, the rate of petroleum hydrocarbon removal was the highest for biological oxidation in one area and by groundwater extraction in another area.

  15. Progress in remediation of groundwater at petroleum sites in California.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Kulkarni, Poonam R; Newell, Charles J; Connor, John A; Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the overall progress in remediation of contaminated groundwater has been a significant challenge. We utilized the GeoTracker database to evaluate the progress in groundwater remediation from 2001 to 2011 at over 12,000 sites in California with contaminated groundwater. This paper presents an analysis of analytical results from over 2.1 million groundwater samples representing at least $100 million in laboratory analytical costs. Overall, the evaluation of monitoring data shows a large decrease in groundwater concentrations of gasoline constituents. For benzene, half of the sites showed a decrease in concentration of 85% or more. For methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), this decrease was 96% and for TBE, 87%. At remediation sites in California, the median source attenuation rate was 0.18/year for benzene and 0.36/year for MTBE, corresponding to half-lives of 3.9 and 1.9 years, respectively. Attenuation rates were positive (i.e., decreasing concentration) for benzene at 76% of sites and for MTBE at 85% of sites. An evaluation of sites with active remediation technologies suggests differences in technology effectiveness. The median attenuation rates for benzene and MTBE are higher at sites with soil vapor extraction or air sparging compared with sites without these technologies. In contrast, there was little difference in attenuation rates at sites with or without soil excavation, dual phase extraction, or in situ enhanced biodegradation. The evaluation of remediation technologies, however, did not evaluate whether specific systems were well designed or implemented and did not control for potential differences in other site factors, such as soil type.

  16. Development of a sparging technique for volatile emissions from potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdis, Elizabeth; Peterson, Barbara Vieux; Yorio, Neil C.; Batten, Jennifer; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    1993-01-01

    Accumulation of volatile emissions from plants grown in tightly closed growth chambers may have allelopathic or phytotoxic properties. Whole air analysis of a closed chamber includes both biotic and abiotic volatile emissions. A method for characterization and quantification of biogenic emissions solely from plantlets was developed to investigate this complex mixture of volatile organic compounds. Volatile organic compounds from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Norland) were isolated, separated and identified using an in-line configuration consisting of a purge and trap concentrator with sparging vessels coupled to a GC/MS system. Analyses identified plant volatile compounds: transcaryophyllene, alpha-humulene, thiobismethane, hexanal, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, and cis-3-hexenyl acetate.

  17. Isooctane transport and remediation in soil using lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarieti, M. L.; Toscano, G.; Greco, G.

    2009-04-01

    The AMRA lysimeter station (near Piana di Monte Verna, Caserta, Italy) consists of eight weighable monolithic groundwater lysimeters fully equipped with sensors to provide continuous monitoring of temperature, humidity, water tension and weight, as well as ports for soil, liquid and gas sampling. An air-injection system allows to perform venting or sparging actions into contaminated soils and groundwater. A meteo station provides the indispensable data to evaluate the interactions between lysimeters and the meteorological phenomena on site. A preliminary experiment was performed last year to investigate the reactive transport of a NAPL-type contaminant under passive transport conditions and during an air-venting remediation action. 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) was chosen as a representative contaminant from gasoline fuels. Four lysimeters containing undisturbed soil extracted from a former industrial site were used. Surface vegetation was cut to avoid leaves interference during contamination phase. Two lysimeters were contaminated by distributing a fixed amount of isooctane onto the soil surface, while two more lysimeters were left uncontaminated for reference. Only for one of the two contaminated lysimeters air was vented through a port at 150 cm depth. Air injection started 30 min after the contamination, lasted all the experiment time, and was applied also to one of the reference lysimeters. Gas samples were drawn periodically at different depths of the two contaminated lysimeters and analysed for isooctane content. Evolution of isooctane concentration profiles was different in the two contaminated lysimeters. In case of air-venting the contaminant maximum concentration was lower and the maximum depth reached by the contaminant was reduced. The time needed for a complete remediation action was compared with theoretical estimates computed according to normative procedures.

  18. STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION IN FRACTURED BEDROCK AT LORING AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated groundwater occurs at many Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfields sites. Chlorinated solvents which can form a dense nonaqueous phase (DNAPL) when released to the subsurface can pose an extreme challenge for remediation, as DNAPLs are often difficult to locate and even ha...

  19. Sustainable operation of submerged Anammox membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin; Xu, Xindi; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, FengLin; Zhang, ShuShen

    2015-12-01

    A submerged anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling has been successfully operated for 100d. Based on the batch tests, a recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2m(3)h(-1) was fixed as an ultimate value for the sustainable operation. The mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (VSS) of the inoculum for the long operation was around 3000mgL(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate increasing stepwise from 0 to 0.2m(3)h(-1), the reactor reached an influent total nitrogen (TN) up to 1.7gL(-1), a stable TN removal efficiency of 83% and a maximum specific Anammox activity (SAA) of 0.56kg TNkg(-1) VSSd(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2 m(3) h(-1) (corresponding to an aeration intensity of 118m(3)m(-2)h(-1)), the membrane operation circle could prolong by around 20 times compared to that without gas sparging. Furthermore, mechanism of membrane fouling was proposed. And with recycling biogas sparging, the VSS and EPS content increasing rate in cake layer were far less than the ones without biogas sparging. The TN removal performance and sustainable membrane operation of this system showed the appealing potential of the submerged Anammox MBR with recycling biogas sparging in treating high-strength nitrogen-containing wastewaters.

  20. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

  1. Trial of a negative ion generator device in remediating problems related to indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, W.; Camp, J.; Horstman, S. )

    1991-06-01

    It has been suggested that supplementation of indoor air with negative ions can improve air quality. This study examined the effects of a negative ion-generator device on air contaminants and symptom reporting in two office buildings. Separate sets of functional and nonfunctional negative ion generators were monitored using a double blind, crossover design involving two 5-week exposure periods. There were no detectable direct or residual effects of negative ion generator use on air ion levels, airborn particulates, carbon dioxide levels, or symptom reporting. Symptom reporting declined at both sites initially and appeared to be consistent with placebo effect. Job dissatisfaction was an apparent contributor to symptom reporting, with a magnitude comparable to presumed effects of air quality. Further testing of such devices is needed before they should be considered for office air quality problems.

  2. Limitations of pump and treat remediation in a common New England hydrogeologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, D.A.; Marin, P.A. )

    1993-03-01

    A common hydrogeologic setting in New England consists of a thin layer of permeable glacial outwash (0--20 ft.) which overlays dense contact till deposited directly by glacial ice. These settings provide quite a challenge for hydrogeologists attempting to contain and remediate ground water contamination. Average linear migration velocities are often high because of the high permeability of the outwash (ranging from 1 to 100 ft/day or more). Spills in these environments can quickly create contaminated ground water plumes of large size threatening drinking water wells and other sensitive receptors. Pump and treat'' systems (consisting of a pumped recovery well with a treatment system to clean pumped water prior to discharge) are commonly installed in these environments, but they often fail to contain and remediate ground water contamination. Data from several case studies and from analytical models used to evaluate pump and treat options demonstrate that pumping rates are limited by the available drawdown in the shallow outwash unit and by the low hydraulic conductivity of the lower till unit. Therefore, pump and treat systems often fail to develop effective capture zones in these environments even though highly permeable outwash sands are present. Combined air sparging and soil venting techniques (AS/SV) may provide an effective alternative to pump and treat remediation systems in these environments. Data from cases studies show that AS/SV can remove more contaminant mass than pump and treat while treating soil and ground water in place.

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Dover Air Force Base, DE. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 3,734-acre Dover Air Force Base site is an active military base in Dover, Kent County, Delaware. Hazardous waste has been generated at the base from industrial operations, fuels management, fire training, and pesticide use. These wastes have been handled in various manners since 1941, including disposal in onsite landfills and pits, use in fire training exercises, and discharge to surface drainage ditches. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of soil and structures within the FT-3 area. Subsequent RODs will address other sources of contamination and contaminated ground water in other site areas. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, and debris are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; metals including lead; and oils.

  4. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans

    2003-11-17

    In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane

  5. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  6. REMEDIATION OF MTBE FROM DRINKING WATER: AIR STRIPPING FOLLOWED BY OFF-GAS ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as an oxygenate in gasoline has resulted in the contamination of a large number of ground and surface water sources. Even though air stripping has been proven to be an effective treatment technology for MTBE removal, off-ga...

  7. A review of centrifugal testing of gasoline contamination and remediation.

    PubMed

    Meegoda, Jay N; Hu, Liming

    2011-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced.

  8. A Review of Centrifugal Testing of Gasoline Contamination and Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Meegoda, Jay N.; Hu, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced. PMID:21909320

  9. CO2 Sparging Phase 3 Full Scale Implementation and Monitoring Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In-situ carbon dioxide (CO2) sparging was designed and implemented to treat a subsurface causticbrine pool (CBP) formed as a result of releases from historical production of industrial chemicals at theLCP Chemicals Site, Brunswick, GA (Site).

  10. Site remediation using biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, J.; Sansregret, J.L.; Cyr, B.; Pouliot, Y.

    1995-11-01

    The main process used in the bioremediation of contaminated sites is the microbial degradation and mineralization of pollutants. The bioengineering processes developed and applied by the company to optimize the microbial degradation are described and full scale case studies are reviewed. In each case, the site characteristics (type of contaminants, nature of soil, geographic location, etc.) and the results obtained are presented. The selected projects cover different bioremediation techniques (biopile, bioventing and air sparging), different contaminants (PAH, PCP, hydrocarbons) and different types of industrial sites (former gas work plant, petroleum depot, refinery, etc.).

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Middletown Air Field, Pennsylvania (first remedial action), December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-31

    The Middletown Air Field site covers what is now the Harrisburg International Airport (HIA), located between the town of Middletown and Nighspire, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The airport is owned and operated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The area surrounding the base is characterized as mixed residential/industrial. Between 1898 and 1962, the property was owned by the U.S. Government and used by the military. HIA and several other entities occupy what was referred to as the Olmsted Air Force Base. In March 1983, TCA contamination caused six of the ten onsite production wells supplying HIA to be taken out of service. Studies initiated under the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program indicate that while ground-water contamination due to volatile organic compounds exists, the exact source(s) of contamination cannot be clearly defined. Ground water contamination may result from one or more, possibly current, sources in the 'industrial area'. To date, HIA has been able to temporarily meet the water requirements of the facility by taking the most contaminated well off-line as a potable water source, and by blending potable water from a number of wells.

  12. The influence of electrodialytic remediation on dioxin (PCDD/PCDF) levels in fly ash and air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Jensen, Pernille E

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash and Air Pollution Control (APC) residues collected from three municipal solid waste incinerators in Denmark and Greenland were treated by electrodialytic remediation at pilot scale for 8-10 h. This work presents for the first time the effect of electrodialytic treatment on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and how these levels impact on the valorization options for fly ash and APC residue. PCDD/PCDF levels in the original residues ranged between 4.85 and 197 ng g(-1), being higher for the electrostatic precipitator fly ash. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) varied ten fold, ranging 0.18-2.0 ng g(-1) I-TEQ, with penta and hexa-homologs being most significant for toxicity. After the electrodialytic treatment PCDD/PCDF levels increased in the residues (between 1.4 and 2.0 times). This does not mean PCDD/PCDF were synthesized, but else that soluble materials dissolve, leaving behind the non-water soluble compounds, such as PCDD/PCDF. According to the Basel Convention, PCDD/PCDF levels in these materials is low (<15 μg WHO-TEQ kg(-1)) and the fly ash and APC residue could eventually be valorized, for instance as construction material, provided end-of-waste criteria are set and that a risk assessment of individual options is carried out, including the end-of-life stage when the materials become waste again.

  13. Evaluation of in situ remedial technologies for sites contaminated with hydrocarbons. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lige, J.E.; Kunkel, M.L.; MacFarlane, I.D.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive literature review that was performed to assess the overall effectiveness, applicability, and limitations of the various in situ technologies currently being applied to remediate sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Of 17 technologies that were identified in an initial review and database search, nine were selected as widely used or promising for increased future use: soil vapor extraction, bioventing, pump and treat, aquifer air sparging, biosparging, in situ enhanced aquifer bioremediation, natural attenuation, in-well aeration, and dual-phase extraction. Following a general discussion of in situ technology, the report devotes one chapter to each of these nine technologies, presenting in each chapter a description of the technology; criteria to be used in considering applicability of the technology at a site; a discussion of design criteria and operating conditions; a strategy for monitoring remediation and determining when clean-up criteria are met; a discussion of performance-related issues; documented case studies; and a hypothetical application of the technology. Report appendices provide an overview of petroleum hydrocarbon constituents and their properties, and a glossary of terms.

  14. Attenuated geophysical signatures associated with ongoing remediation efforts at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sauck, W. A.; Nolan, J. T.; Slater, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    Previous geophysical investigations (1996, 1997, 2003, and 2004) conducted at the decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) showed a clearly defined high conductivity anomaly associated with hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone and ground water near the source area. The source of the geophysical anomalies was attributed to biogeochemical modifications of the contaminated zone resulting from intrinsic bioremediation. During these previous surveys, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data showed a zone of attenuated GPR reflections extending from the vadose zone to below the water table. Self potential data (SP) data defined a positive anomaly coincident with the hydrochemically defined plume, while electrical resistivity data showed anomalously high conductivity within the zone of impact. In 2007, another integrated geophysical study of the site was conducted. GPR, SP, electrical resistivity, and induced polarization surveys were conducted with expectations of achieving similar results as the past surveys. However, preliminary assessment of the data shows a marked decrease in electrical conductivity and SP response over the plume. GPR data still showed the attenuated signals, but the zone of attenuation was only observed below the water table. We attribute the attenuation of the observed geophysical anomalies to ongoing soil vapor extraction initiated in 2003. Significant removal of the contaminant mass by the vapor extraction system has altered the subsurface biogeochemical conditions and these changes were documented by the 2007 geophysical and geochemical data. The results of this study show that the attenuation of the contaminant plume is detectable with geophysical methods.

  15. Remediation of oil-contaminated sand with self-collapsing air microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Zhou, Yufeng; Liu, Yu

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel chemical-free approach for cleaning oil-contaminated sand with self-collapsing air microbubbles (MBs) with diameter less than 50 μm was developed without the use of chemicals, such as surfactants and alkalis. Diesel and rotary-vane pump oil-contaminated fine and medium sands were treated with MBs to study the effect of oil viscosity and sand grain size on oil removal with MBs. About 95 % of diesel removal was achieved for 24 h old 10 % (w/w) diesel-contaminated medium sand in contrast to only 70 % removal from fine sand after 40-min treatment with MBs. While rotary-vane pump oil removal exceeds that of diesel after 40-min treatment with MBs, combination of mechanical stirring with MBs significantly enhanced the oil removal rate, whereby 95 % diesel removal was achieved from fine sand in 30 min in contrast to only 52 % diesel removal with MBs alone. A possible MBs cleaning mechanism for oil-contaminated sand was also proposed. This study provides experimental evidence for the applicability of self-collapsing MBs as a novel chemical-free approach for cleaning oil-contaminated sand.

  16. Draft Treatability Study in Support of Remediation by Natural Attenuation Building 1212 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Spokane, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    5-17 5.5 Sensitivity Analysis ........................................................................ 5-20 5.6 Model Results...722450\\261 .DOC TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) t) 10 S6 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REMEDIAL ALTERNATIVES ............. 6-1 6.1 Remedial Alternative...and POC well locations and a sampling arid analysis plan. The field work conducted under this program was oriented toward collecting supplementary

  17. US Air Force installation restoration program: Remedial investigation of former herbicide storage site at Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report represents a synthesis and reformatting of six primary documents and other related materials on soils, ocean sediments, air, and biota investigations conducted at Johnston Island (JI), Pacific Ocean, to characterize contamination resulting from storage of 1.37 million gallons of Herbicide Orange (HO) from 1972 through 1977. The individual study components comprise the Remedial Investigation (RI) of the former HO storage site at JI. This report describes the procedures, results, and conclusions of the sampling and analysis programs conducted at JI. Samples of site soils, ocean sediments, airborne particulates, dust, sweepings, and aquatic organisms were collected and analyzed for HO-derived 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), and 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Environmental media other than soils at the storage facility itself were found to be free of contamination or to contain very low contaminant concentrations. No contamination was found in ocean sediments, indicating possible dispersion of contaminants due to erosion. A few of the biological specimens collected were found to contain TCDD levels below the guidelines of 25 to 50 parts per trillion established by the US Food and Drug Administration; TCDD in all other biota samples was nondetectable. Analysis of samples of airborne particulates and of soils, dust, and sweepings from high-use and residential areas outside the boundaries of the former storage site indicated that there is little or no concern of adverse impacts from airborne transport and deposition of TCDD.

  18. In-Situ Air Sparaing: Engineering and Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-31

    as is discussed in greater detail in paragraph 6-6b. With sparging trenches, the use of high permeability material can offset to some degree the...aquifer, which we may think of as “the aquarium model.” Illustrations of the aquarium model frequently showed a conical distribution of air bub- bles...for biofouling of IAS well screens or filter pack materials near the sparge well. Although biofouling is not typically a major problem, it is

  19. Measurements of the Radiolytic Oxidation of Aqueous CsI Using a Sparging Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Ashmore, C.B.; Brown, D.; Dickinson, S.; Sims, H.E.

    2000-03-15

    Radiolytic oxidation is considered to be the main mechanism for the formation of I{sub 2} from aqueous CsI in the containment of a water-cooled reactor after a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. Despite the amount of study over the last 60 yr on the radiation chemistry of iodine, there have, until recently, been few consistent sets of experiments spanning a wide enough range of conditions to allow models to be verified with confidence.The results from a set of experiments carried out to remedy this deficiency are described. In this work the rate of evolution of I{sub 2} from sparged irradiated borate solutions containing CsI labeled with {sup 131}I was measured on-line over a range of conditions. This work involved the measurement of the effects of pH, temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, I{sup -} concentration, phosphate concentration, dose-rate, and impurities on the rate of evolution of I{sub 2}. The range of conditions was chosen to span as closely as possible the range of conditions expected in a LOCA, but also to help to elucidate some of the mechanisms especially at high pH.The pH was found to be a very important factor in determining iodine volatility. Over the temperature range studied, the extent of oxidation decreased with increasing temperature, but this was counteracted, to a greater or lesser extent, by the decrease in partition coefficient. The oxygen concentration was more important in solutions not containing phosphate. The fractional oxidation was not particularly dependent on iodide concentration, but G{sub I2} was very dependent on [I{sup -}]. There was no effect of added impurities, Fe, Mn, Mo, or organics although, in separate work, silver was found to have a very important effect.During attempts to interpret the data, it was found that it was necessary to consider the iodine atom as a volatile species with a partition coefficient of 1.9 taken from thermodynamic data. The modeling work is described in a separate

  20. Risks to children from exposure to lead in air during remedial or removal activities at Superfund sites: a case study of the RSR lead smelter Superfund site.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ghassan A; Diamond, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    Superfund sites that are contaminated with lead and undergoing remedial action generate lead-enriched dust that can be released into the air. Activities that can emit lead-enriched dust include demolition of lead smelter buildings, stacks, and baghouses; on-site traffic of heavy construction vehicles; and excavation of soil. Typically, air monitoring stations are placed around the perimeter of a site of an ongoing remediation to monitor air lead concentrations that might result from site emissions. The National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standard, established in 1978 to be a quarterly average of 1.5 microg/m(3), is often used as a trigger level for corrective action to reduce emissions. This study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emissions from the RSR Superfund site in West Dallas, TX, during demolition and removal of a smelter facility. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and the International Commission of Radiologic Protection (ICRP) lead model were used to simulate blood lead concentrations in children, based on monitored air lead concentrations. Although air lead concentrations at monitoring stations located in the downwind community intermittently exceeded the NAAQ standard, both models indicated that exposures to children in the community areas did not pose a significant long-term or acute risk. Long-term risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a long-term blood lead concentration that exceeded 10 microg/dl, which is the CDC and the EPA blood lead concern level. Short-term or acute risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a blood lead concentration on any given day that exceeded 20 microg/dl, which is the CDC trigger level for medical evaluation (this is not intended to imply that 20 microg/dl is a threshold for health effects in children exposed acutely to airborne lead). The estimated potential long-term and short-term exposures

  1. Characterization and remediation of 91B radioactive waste sites under performance based contracts at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, P.A.; Anderson, K.D.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the challenges behind the implementation of the characterization, remediation, and the Site Closure for three 91b Radioactive Wastes under a Performance Based Contract at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) was established by Section 211 of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). A part of the DERP provides for the cleanup of hazardous substances associated with past Department of Defense (DoD) activities and is consistent with the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). It is the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP) that has responsibility for the cleanup activities associated with CERCLA. Under contract to the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), the ECC Project Team, that included ECC, Cabrera Services, and Malcolm Pirnie, was responsible for the implementation of the actions at three sites. The three IRP (91b) sites included RW015, a 0.02 square kilometer (5.5 acre) site, RW017 a 0.003 square kilometer (0.9 acre) site, and RW033 an 0.356 square kilometer (88 acre) site. Adding to the complexities of the project were issues of archaeological areas of interest, jurisdictional wetlands, land open to hunting, issues of security as well as compliance to the myriad of air force base rules, regulations, and Air Force Instructions (AFI). The award of the project task order was July of 2005, the project plan phase started in July of 2005 followed by the remedy implementation that included characterization and remediation as required reached completion in June of 2006. The project closure including the development and approval final status survey reports, proposed plans, and decision documents that parallel the CERCLA process was initiated in June of 2006 and is expected to reach completion in August of 2007. This paper will focus on the issues of working to achieve radiological

  2. Effect of biogas sparging with different membrane modules on membrane fouling in anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR).

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mustafa; Saatçi, Yusuf; Hanay, Özge; Hasar, Halil

    2014-03-01

    This study focused on the effect of biogas sparging and different membrane modules such as cylinder shaped, funnel-shaped, and U-shaped on the membrane fouling behavior in a lab-scale submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) which was operated for over 60 days. In order to investigate the membrane fouling behavior, a series of analysis such as SMP, EPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), particle size distribution, and filtration resistances were performed. Although the rapid generation of cake layer took placed in case of the absence of biogas sparging, the membrane module design mostly influenced the membrane resistance when biogas sparging was applied. Total resistance was the highest for U-shaped module. The permeate fluxes with biogas sparging were higher about one half and two times than those without biogas sparging. Cylinder-shaped module had the lowest SMP and EPS concentrations followed by U-shaped and funnel-shaped modules under both cases with and without biogas sparging. The total resistances of all membrane modules without biogas sparging were found to be very high compared the pore blocking resistances (Rp).

  3. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  4. Intrinsic Remediation Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Car Care Center at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, DC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    service. At the time of this remedial investigation, the facility provided automobile maintenance services as its primary function. The Car Care Center...BTEX) contamination in the shallow saturated zone. Parsons ES conducted field investigations during August 1994 and June 1996 at the former Car Care...groundwater to migrate from the former Car Care Center Site (Building 41) to potential receptors. The Bioplume II model was used to estimate the 0 rate

  5. PERFORMANCE OF CONVENTIONAL REMEDIAL TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF MTBE AND BENZENE AT UST SITES IN KANSAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water at most UST spills sites in Kansas contains both MTBE and benzene, and both contaminants must be effectively treated to close the sites. Soil vacuum extraction, air sparging, and excavation are the most common treatment technologies in Kansas. To compare the relati...

  6. In situ remediation of hydrocarbon contamination using an injection-extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, A.; Tremblay, C.; Boulanger, C.

    1995-12-31

    Ecosite Inc. has developed a soil treatment technology to be applied in situ using an injection-extraction system (IES). This new restoration process uses custom-designed equipment for recovering free-phase hydrocarbons and for injection/recovery of different treatment solutions through cyclic manipulation of the water table level. Process development applied the basic principles of soil washing with improved distribution of the washing solution and improved hydraulic control using air sparging and vacuum capability. In this case study, free-phase recovery and soil washing have been used successfully to remediate the site. During the fall and winter of 1993--94, in situ restoration of soil contaminated with cutting oil below a machine shop was begun. The contamination extended from 1.83 to 4.27 m underneath the concrete slab. This represents a volume of 1,800 m{sup 3} of oil-laden soil with concentrations reaching 200,000 mg/kg. Moreover, free-floating phase hydrocarbons up to 1 m thick were observed. To clean the site, 400 injection/recovery points were arranged into three networks. A data collection system was used to monitor the water table level. A total of 160,000 kg of oil was extracted from the subsoil in less than 110 days of operation.

  7. CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis for HBr production using a direct sparging contactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Panchal, C. B.; Doctor, R. D.; Energy Systems

    2009-09-01

    The calcium-bromine cycle being investigated is a novel continuous hybrid cycle for hydrogen production employing both heat and electricity. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}) hydrolysis generates hydrogen bromide (HBr) which is electrolyzed to produce hydrogen. The CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis at 1050 K (777 C) is endothermic with the heat of reaction {delta}G{sub T} = 181.5 KJ/mol (43.38 kcal/mol) and the Gibbs free energy change is positive at 99.6 kJ/mol (23.81 kcal/mol). What makes this hydrolysis reaction attractive is both its rate and that well over half the thermodynamic requirements for water-splitting heat of reaction of {delta}G{sub T} = 285.8 KJ/mol (68.32 kcal/mol) are supplied at this stage using heat rather than electricity. Molten-phase calcium bromide reactors may overcome the technical barriers associated with earlier hydrolysis approaches using supported solid-phase calcium bromide studied in the Japanese UT-3 cycle. Before constructing the experiment two design concepts were evaluated using COMSOL{trademark} multi-physics models; (1) the first involved sparging steam into a calcium-bromide melt, while (2) the second considered a 'spray-dryer' contactor spraying molten calcium bromide counter-currently to upward-flowing steam. A recent paper describes this work. These studies indicated that sparging steam into a calcium-bromide melt is more feasible than spraying molten calcium bromide droplets into steam. Hence, an experimental sparging hydrolysis reactor using a mullite tube (ID 70 mm) was constructed capable of holding 0.3-0.5 kg (1.5-2.5 x 10{sup -3} kg mol) CaBr{sub 2} forming a melt with a maximum 0.08 m (8 cm) depth. Sparging steam at a steam rate of 0.02 mol/mol of CaBr{sub 2} per minute (1.2-2.3 x 10{sup -5} kg/s), into this molten bath promptly yielded HBr in a stable operation that converted up to 25% of the calcium bromide. The kinetic constant derived from the experimental data was 2.17 x 10{sup -12} kmol s{sup -1} m{sup -2} MPa{sup -1} for

  8. Effect of biogas sparging on the performance of bio-hydrogen reactor over a long-term operation

    PubMed Central

    Nualsri, Chatchawin; Kongjan, Prawit; Imai, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance hydrogen production from sugarcane syrup by biogas sparging. Two-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor were used to produce hydrogen and methane, respectively. Biogas produced from the UASB was used to sparge into the CSTR. Results indicated that sparging with biogas increased the hydrogen production rate (HPR) by 35% (from 17.1 to 23.1 L/L.d) resulted from a reduction in the hydrogen partial pressure. A fluctuation of HPR was observed during a long term monitoring because CO2 in the sparging gas and carbon source in the feedstock were consumed by Enterobacter sp. to produce succinic acid without hydrogen production. Mixed gas released from the CSTR after the sparging can be considered as bio-hythane (H2+CH4). In addition, a continuous sparging biogas into CSTR release a partial pressure in the headspace of the methane reactor. In consequent, the methane production rate is increased. PMID:28207755

  9. Effect of biogas sparging on the performance of bio-hydrogen reactor over a long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Nualsri, Chatchawin; Kongjan, Prawit; Reungsang, Alissara; Imai, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance hydrogen production from sugarcane syrup by biogas sparging. Two-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor were used to produce hydrogen and methane, respectively. Biogas produced from the UASB was used to sparge into the CSTR. Results indicated that sparging with biogas increased the hydrogen production rate (HPR) by 35% (from 17.1 to 23.1 L/L.d) resulted from a reduction in the hydrogen partial pressure. A fluctuation of HPR was observed during a long term monitoring because CO2 in the sparging gas and carbon source in the feedstock were consumed by Enterobacter sp. to produce succinic acid without hydrogen production. Mixed gas released from the CSTR after the sparging can be considered as bio-hythane (H2+CH4). In addition, a continuous sparging biogas into CSTR release a partial pressure in the headspace of the methane reactor. In consequent, the methane production rate is increased.

  10. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  11. Studies of Contaminant Diffusion in an Aquitard and Groundwater Remediation by Reactive Metals at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    is unlimited. DESTRUCTION NOTICE - Destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents or reconstruction of this document. AIR FORCE...research reported in this report relates to both of the above-stated concerns (better understanding of long-term contaminant fate and improved methods of...specific objectives outlined above, while taking best advantage of the previously developed facilities, methods , and understanding. No known Air Force

  12. Development of Computer Software to Aid Environmental Decision Makers in the Education and Training of Air Force Remedial Project Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    the MITRE Air Force site coordinator education report, the environmental education research being done by the School of Aerospace Medicine, and the...Each iteration is a result 56 of discussions with Lt Col Maricle and Maj Duncan- and a review of the environmental education research completed by the

  13. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location. Demonstration of hot air vapor extraction for fuel hydrocarbon cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Hot air vapor extration (HAVE) is a fast track, innovative environmental cleanup technolgy that uses a combination of thermal, heap pile, and vapor extraction techniques to remove and destroy hydrocarbon contamination in soil. This technology is very effective in cleaning soils contaminated with gasoline, diesel, heavy oil, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).

  14. Remediation; An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1988-09-01

    The U.SD. government began committing the nation legally and financially in the last decade to the ultimate remediation of virtually all of the hazardous wastes that were produced in the past and remain to threaten human health and the environment, all that continue to be generated, and all that will be created in the future. Whether engendered by acts of God or human industry, the laws and regulations mandate, hazardous wastes and the threats they pose will be removed or rendered harmless. As mobilization for tackling the monumental task implied by those commitments has progressed, key concepts have changed in meaning. The remedy of remediation once literally meant burying our hazardous waste problems in landfills, for example, a solution now officially defined as the least desirable-although still commonly chosen - course of action. The process of identifying hazardous substances and determining in what quantities they constitute health and environmental hazards continues apace. As measurement technologies become increasingly precise and capable to detecting more 9s to the right of the decimal point, acceptable levels of emissions into the air and concentrations in the ground or water are reduced. This article is intended as a sketch of where the national commitment of remediation currently stands, with examples of implications for both generators of hazardous wastes and those who have entered-or seek to enter-the rapidly growing business of remediation.

  15. Large-scale soil remediation using low temperature thermal volatilization technology at the Chanute Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Silkebakken, D.M.; Ghosh, S.B.; Beardsley, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    Chanute Air Force Base (AFB) in Rantoul, Illinois, was selected for closure by the Round 1 Base Closure Commission, pursuant to the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act of 1988. As part of the requirements for base closure, Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. was retained by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) to treat petroleum-contaminated soil using low temperature thermal volatilization (LTTV). Using this technology, over 40,000 tons of fuel contaminated soils were successfully treated using one of the largest transportable LTTV treatment units in the world. The soil treatment system, soil management procedures, cost-effectiveness, and limitations of the use of this system are described in this paper.

  16. Installation Restoration Program Stage 2-1 Remedial Investigation. Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California. Volume 3. Appendix B - K

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    satisfy the requirements contained in the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, to identify all Applicable or Relevant and...a), 264.18(b), 264.18(c). Superfund Amend’ nts and Reauthorization Act of 1986, Report 99-962 to accompany H.R. 2005, Title II of the Social Security...5-86-001. CERCLA Compliance with Other Laws Manual, OSWER Directive 9234.1-01, Interim Final. State Mulford-Carrell Air Resources Act, California

  17. Demonstration of Bioventing for Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent Contamination at Hill Air Force Base, Ogden, Utah, Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the evaluation of the application of bioventing technology to non-petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soils. Bioventing has been...study and a field pilot-scale demonstration to evaluate the potential for applying bioventing to treat dichlorobenzenes in order to expand the list of...contaminants impacting Air Force and other Department of Defense Installations beyond petroleum hydrocarbons. A pilot-scale bioventing system consisting

  18. Application of high energy chemistry methods for purification of water and air (on the basis of the materials of the I International Conference on Advanced Oxidation Technologies for Water and Air Remediation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    The I International Conference on Advanced Oxidation Technologies for Water and Air Remediation was held from June 25-30, 1994, in London (province of Ontario, Canada). Dr. H. Al-Ekabi (Canada) was the chairman of Organizing Committee. Over 350 specialists from Russia, USA, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, Italy, Great Britain, Poland, Switzerland, Holland, People`s Republic of China, Austria, Finland, South Korea, Spain, Hong Kong, Denmark, Taiwan, Belgium, and Iraq took part. During the conference there was also an exhibition, at which several companies demonstrated products which were related to the themes of the conference. About 200 invited and contributed reports and poster communications were presented, evaluated and discussed. There were also three panel discussions about governmental ecological programs, the transfer of oxidation technologies, etc.

  19. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial Investigation Report. Minnesota Air National Guard Base Duluth International Airport, Duluth, Minnesota. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Hazard Index Values For Site 2 - Upper Bound 6-46 6-11 Summary of Hazard Index Values For Site 2 - Best Estimate 6-47 6-12 Summary of Risk From Potential...Carcinogens For Site 2 - Upper Bound 6-48 6-13 Summaryof Risk From Potential Carcinogens For Site 2 - Best Estimate 6-49 6-14 Site 3 Indicator...Point Concentrations With Air Criteria - Site 3 6-57 6-17 Summary of Hazard Index Values for Site 3 -Upper Bound 6-60 6-18 Summary of Hazard Index Values

  20. Tungsten carbide production from ore concentrates by molten salt-natural gas sparging treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, T.G.; Kazonich, G.; Raddatz, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a bench-scale study to delineate the important parameters in a three-step process to produce commercial-quality tungsten carbide (WC) directly from tungsten minerals. In the process, tungsten concentrates of wolframite or wolframite and scheelite are decomposed at 1,050{sup 0}C in a molten mixture of NcCl and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} that forms two immiscible phases. Tungsten, as sodium tungstate, reports to the halide phase and is separated from the gangue constituents, which report to the silicate phase. After decanting to separate the two phases, natural gas is sparged into the molten halide phase a 1,070{sup 0}C. Submicrometer crystals of WC are initially produced. These crystals grow into thin triangular-shaped plates up to 100 {mu}m on a side or into popcorn-shaped conglomerates. Sparged WC was examined for its suitability for use in sintered carbide products. In physical evaluations, sparged WC ground to an average particle size of 1.52 {mu}m and compacted with 10 pct Co binder into standard 6-by 22-mm test bars had a density of 14.35 and a Rockwell A hardness of 89.6. This compared favorably with 14.39 and 89.7 respectively, for test bars made from a standard commercial 1.52-{mu}m WC powder. Test bars made from Bureau of Mines WC had no C'' porosity or eta phase.

  1. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  2. Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R.; Schlosser, R.M.

    1991-11-01

    This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

  3. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  4. Treatability Study in Support of Intrinsic Remediation for Site OT 24 at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    years (calendar year 2016) without the implementation of an engineered remedial action. If a source removal technology such as in situ bioventing is...10 6.3.2 Alternative 2-- Bioventing /Biosparging in Source Area, Intrinsic Remediation, and Institutional Controls with Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring...6-16 6.3.3 Alternative 3--Groundwater Extraction, Bioventing /Biosparging in

  5. Reimagining Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.; Williams, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the College Board's Community College Advisory Panel--a group of college presidents that advises the organization's membership on community college issues--asked these authors to write a paper describing effective remedial education programs. They never wrote the paper. The problem was not the lack of dedicated faculty and staff working…

  6. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  7. Diagnostic Tools for the Monitoring and Organization of In-Situ Air Sparging Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    monitoring points at 11’ BGS. It should be noted that the dissolved oxygen readings at MP1 through MP6 could not be taken until after the tracer tests...points which yielded water at rates exceeding 75 mL/min were selected for the continuous pumping tests. These points were MP1 at 11’, MP6 at 13...8217, MP9 at 13’, and MP11 at 13’. During the August test, MP4 at 11’ was substituted for MP6 at 13’. Pumping speeds were reduced to yield flow rates of

  8. Use of Borehole-Radar Methods to Monitor a Steam-Enhanced Remediation Pilot Study at a Quarry at the Former Loring Air Force Base, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, Colette; Joesten, Peter K.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography surveys were used in conjunction with conventional borehole-geophysical methods to evaluate the effectiveness of borehole-radar methods for monitoring the movement of steam and heat through fractured bedrock. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), conducted surveys in an abandoned limestone quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base during a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation (SER) pilot project conducted by the USEPA, the U.S. Air Force, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to study the viability of SER to remediate non-aqueous phase liquid contamination in fractured bedrock. Numerical modeling and field experiments indicate that borehole-radar methods have the potential to monitor the presence of steam and to measure large temperature changes in the limestone matrix during SER operations. Based on modeling results, the replacement of water by steam in fractures should produce a decrease in radar reflectivity (amplitude of the reflected wave) by a factor of 10 and a change in reflection polarity. In addition, heating the limestone matrix should increase the bulk electrical conductivity and decrease the bulk dielectric permittivity. These changes result in an increase in radar attenuation and an increase in radar-wave propagation velocity, respectively. Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography data were collected in two boreholes using 100-megahertz antennas before the start of steam injection, about 10 days after the steam injection began, and 2 months later, near the end of the injection. Fluid temperature logs show that the temperature of the fluid in the boreholes increased by 10?C (degrees Celsius) in one borehole and 40?C in the other; maximum temperatures were measured near the bottom of the boreholes. The results of the numerical modeling were used to interpret the borehole-radar data. Analyses of the

  9. Monitoring and remediating groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Vedder, M.

    1995-03-01

    Choosing the optimum groundwater remediation process is a site-specific task. A variety of factors--including soil type, water type, water flow, water table levels and contaminant type--influence sampling and treatment techniques. Because underground contaminant plumes must first be characterized and mapped, initial sampling often is a hit or miss proposition. Historical geophysical data can be obtained from many local water boards to supplement the process. Equipment used in sampling includes drilling rigs, depth probes, bailers, sample tubing and well pumps. Once samples are collected, they are preserved with ice and transported to an environmental laboratory for analysis. Common groundwater contaminants include hydrocarbons, solvents, metals and volatile organic compounds. Typical lab analysis methods include gas chromatography and spectrometry. Remediation options include air stripping, carbon adsorption, the use of bacterial cultures, chemical precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration.

  10. Multidisciplinary investigation of the fate, transport, and remediation of chlorinated solvents in fractured rocks at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC): Scientific and management challenges, and strategies for a successful research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedeman, C. R.; Goode, D. J.; Shapiro, A. M.; Lacombe, P. J.; Chapelle, F. H.; Bradley, P. M.; Imbrigiotta, T. E.; Williams, J. H.; Curtis, G. P.; Hsieh, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    At the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton NJ, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Navy and under support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), is investigating the fate, transport, and remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its daughter products in dipping, fractured mudstones underlying the site. TCE concentrations in ground water are as high as ~100 mg/L. Objectives of multidisciplinary research at the NAWC include (1) understanding the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes and properties affecting the fate, transport, and removal of chlorinated solvents in fractured rocks, (2) assessing the efficiency of different remediation methods (pump and treat, natural and enhanced biodegradation), and (3) transferring the results to help remediate other contaminated fractured rock aquifers. There are numerous scientific and technical challenges to meeting these goals, including the extreme spatial variability of flow and transport properties at the NAWC and the complex distribution of contaminants, geochemical constituents, and microorganisms in fractures and the rock matrix. In addition, there are management challenges that are equally important to address in order to achieve a successful research program. These include balancing the requirements of the many parties involved at the site, including researchers, the site owner, and regulatory agencies; and ensuring that limited research funds are directed towards work that addresses the most important scientific questions as well as stakeholder concerns. Strategies for the scientific challenges at NAWC include developing a carefully planned program to characterize spatial variability in rock properties and groundwater constituents so that the data obtained are applicable to solving research questions focused on remediation. Strategies for the management challenges include fostering open lines of communication among all parties and

  11. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study: Oliktok Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1. (Includes appendices a - b)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-15

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Oliktok Point radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  12. From the utilization point of view, the two approaches seem to United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Barrow Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-02-19

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Point Barrow radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  13. EVALUATION OF FOAMING/ANTIFOAMING IN WTP TANKS EQUIPPED WITH PULSE JET MIXERS AND AIR SPARGERS

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, TIMOTHYM.

    2004-09-01

    The foaminess of Hanford waste samples [i.e., pretreated AN-104 Hanford sample--post ion exchange and AN-104 blended with Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) recycle, then evaporated to 5 M Na] and waste simulants AP-101, AN-104, and AZ-101 was determined using an air-sparged foam column (3.1 cm inside diameter x 60 cm height). The Hanford waste samples AN-104 post ion exchange solution and AN-104/SBS recycle solution, and the simulants AP-101 and AN-104, were mixed with different weight percents of AY-102/ C-106 sludge to determine the effect of insoluble particles. The AN-104 Hanford samples have shown a tendency to foam when subjected to air sparging. The percent foaminess, defined as [100 (volume fraction of gas entrained liquid and foam)--(volume fraction of gas entrained liquid)], increased to a well-defined maximum with the increase of the amount of solid particles added to solution. For example, at a sparge rate of 4.4 ft3/min/ft2, the foaminess of an air-sparged AN-104/SBS recycle sample with no added insoluble solid particles was 80 percent vs. 95 percent for 12 wt. percent insoluble solids concentration in the sample. A more dramatic foaminess was observed for an AN-104 Hanford sample that was pretreated in ion exchange columns. The foaminess for this sample (no insoluble solids) at a nominal WTP flux of 2.2 ft3/min/ft2 was 358 percent as compared to 1048 percent when the sample was mixed with AY-102/C-106 sludge to a 6 wt. percent insoluble solids. For AN-104 simulant with 6 wt. percent insoluble solids sparged at air flux of 2.2 ft3/min/ft2, the foaminess was less than 2 percent. The measured surface tension of this simulant was 68.63 dyne/cm as compared to that of the AN-104 Hanford sample (post ion exchange), which was 71.59 dyne/cm. A 20-day air sparging experiment was performed to examine the effect of CO2 on the pH or chemical composition of the slurry and to determine how rheology may be impacted by air sparging. The experiment showed that air sparging

  14. Installation Restoration Program Stage 3. McClellan Air Force Base, California. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Groundwater Sampling and Analysis Program Data Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM .. STAGE 3 X..::.. MCCLELLAN AIR FORCE BASE 71! rPREPARED BY: Radian Corporation 10395 Old Plbcerille Road...PREPARED FOR: .................HEADQUARTERS AFLIDEY WRIGHTPATTERSON AFB, OHIO 4543 R~ - - -1 .~~~...... Ajr..J .~ .......... United States Air Force... AIR FORCE HEAoQUARTERS SACRAMENTO AIR LOGISTICS CENTER (AFLC)0 ELLAN AIR FORCE BASE. CALIFORNIA S6112-1O REPLY TO t0i3 J I 989 ATTN OF: EK SUBJECT Third

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 10): Mountain Home Air Force Base, Site 8, Fire Training Area 8, Operable Unit 4, Elmore County, Mountain Home, ID. (First remedial action), June 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-16

    The 7-acre Mountain Home Air Force Base (AFB) site was a fire department training area located in Mountain Home, Elmore County, Idaho. From 1962 to 1975, the Mountain Home Air Force Base used the site for fire department training exercises. Each exercise began by saturating the bermed training area with water, followed directly by applying 250 to 500 gallons of fuel. The flames were extinguished with Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF), or prior to 1972, with a water-based protein foam. The training session was completed with a post-exercise ignition of the residual fuel in a bermed area. The USAF investigations identified solvents and petroleum, oil, lubricant (POL) wastes in the soil. Under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP), the USAF conducted a record search, drilling, and sampling of soil borings to bedrock, the installation of monitoring wells, and hand auger samples. The ROD provided a final remedy for onsite soil as OU4. Because contaminants were found at such low concentrations, the soil was covered by crushed asphalt and has little potential to impact ecological receptors. The soil posed low risks for humans at the site and no remediation was necessary.

  16. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the

  17. Effects of bubble–liquid two-phase turbulent hydrodynamics on cell damage in sparged bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Fanxing; Hu, Weiwei; Wiltberger, Kelly; Ryll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    According to recent experimental studies on sparged bioreactors, significant cell damage may occur at the gas inlet region near the sparger. Although shear stress was proposed to be one of the potential causes for cell damage, detailed hydrodynamic studies at the gas inlet region of gas–liquid bioreactors have not been performed to date. In this work, a second-order moment (SOM) bubble–liquid two-phase turbulent model based on the two-fluid continuum approach is used to investigate the gas–liquid hydrodynamics in the bubble column reactor and their potential impacts on cell viability, especially at the gas inlet region. By establishing fluctuation velocity and bubble–liquid two-phase fluctuation velocities correlation transport equations, the anisotropy of two-phase stresses and the bubble– liquid interactions are fully considered. Simulation results from the SOM model indicate that shear and normal stresses, turbulent energy dissipation rate, and the turbulent kinetic energy are generally smaller at the gas inlet region when compared with those in the fully developed region. In comparison, a newly proposed correlation expression, stress-induced turbulent energy production (STEP), is found to correlate well with the unusually high cell death rate at the gas inlet region. Therefore, STEP, which represents turbulent energy transfer to a controlled volume induced by a combination of shear and normal stresses, has the potential to provide better explanation for increased cell death at the sparger region.

  18. Home Assessment and Remediation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Charles S; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the relationship of fungi to asthma in indoor air is very old and well documented. There is substantial evidence that mold and dampness exacerbate asthma in sensitized individuals. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations around the world have issued guidelines to the effect that the elimination of moisture intrusion and the removal of moldy items from living space can improve respiratory health. The process of home assessment for moisture and mold presence is discussed along with factors that can be used to guide fungal exposure reduction efforts. An approach to the assessment process itself is outlined, and common causes of moisture and mold damage are described. Points that should be included in a report resulting from a home assessment and rudimentary elements of report interpretation are discussed. Emphasis is that interpretation of sampling for moisture and fungal presence should be provided by the person performing the assessment. We conclude that multifaceted remediation contributes to fungal allergen avoidance. The use of an indoor environmental professional to generate evaluation reports and remediation activities can be a valuable contribution to an overall allergen avoidance strategy.

  19. Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, R.C.; Cherry, R.S.

    2000-09-30

    Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced {approximately}7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe{reg_sign} rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The

  20. Reinventing Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    Remedial education, although widely used and disguised with other names, was rarely talked about for it could tarnish a school's reputation if widely discussed. Today, more and more colleges and universities are ditching the old stigma associated with remedial education, reinventing their remedial education and retention programs and, in the…

  1. In-Situ Electrokinetic Remediation for Metal Contaminated Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    laboratory from what is currently being observed in the field. In addition to the retarding effects produced by the naturally occurring ions, the...military need to develop cost- effective remediation tools for cleaning up metals-contaminated soil. In -situ electrokinetic remediation was identified as a...Facilities. Priority: Medium • Air Force 95-2009- More Cost Effective Treatment Methods to Remediate Sites with Metal Contaminants in Vadose. Priority

  2. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation.

  3. FIELD EVALUATION OF DNAPL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGIES: PROJECT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor extraction. The effectiv...

  4. Treatability Study in Support of the Intrinsic Remediation Option at the Christmas Tree Fire Training Area at Westover Air Reserve Base Chicopee, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Summary. Brooks Air Force Base, p. 8. Altenschmidt, U. and Fuchs, G., 1991, Anaerobic degradation of toluene in denitrifying Pseudomonas sp...Trichloroethylene degradation by two independent aromatic-degrading pathways in Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134: Appl. Environ. Microbiol., vol. 56, no. 4, p. 1179

  5. Operation of a two-stage treatment train for the remediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a complex air stream

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, M.R.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; Niemi, B.A.; Hose, J.T.

    1999-07-01

    The use of aqueous biological systems to remove contaminants from waste streams has been well documented. However, in complex waste streams containing compounds of varying chemical properties, the use of only one type of treatment system may not be the best alternative. When treating a complex waste stream, the use of treatment trains, or coupled systems, may be advantageous when compared with any single technology. The purpose of this project was to design and operate a treatment train for the effective removal and biodegradation of a complex mixture of VOCs with varying chemical properties. A bench-scale system was designed consisting of a liquid bioreactor coupled to a biofilter for removal of acetone, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, naphthalene, alpha-pinene, and toluene. The liquid bioreactor contained an aqueous medium and an inert solid support (polystyrene bioballs) which immobilized a characterized microbial population. The biofiltration portion of the system utilized the same microbial inoculum, but employed Douglas fir bark as its solid support. As the air stream bubbled into the liquid bioreactor, the VOCs were made available to the bacteria for destruction in the aqueous medium or on the polystyrene solid support. The fugitive VOCs from the liquid bioreactor were then subsequently treated by the biofiltration unit. The six-compound VOC mixture was added to the air stream via in-line syringe pump injection. Concentrations of the VOC mixture in the main influent air stream, the effluent air stream from the liquid bioreactor, the aqueous medium in the liquid bioreactor, and the effluent air stream from the biofilter were monitored on a regular basis via an on-line gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Successful biodegradation of the complex VOC mixture was accomplished with this treatment train, the average total VOC removal efficiency being 96.2% ({+-}2.6).

  6. Green Remediation: Best Management Practices for Excavation and Surface Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet is one of a series describing best management practices (BMPs) for green remediation, which holistically addresses a cleanup project's energy requirements, air emissions, impacts on water, impacts on land and ecosystems, material consumpt..

  7. EFFECT OF GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES ON INDIGENOUS MICROFLORA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with the Interagency DNAPL Consortium, completed an independent evaluation of microbial responses to ground-water remediation technology demonstrations at Launch Pad 34 at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Brevard Count...

  8. Solubilities of bromide salts of aluminum, cobalt, lead, manganese, potassium, and sodium when sparged with hydrogen bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.G.; Shanks, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of HBr concentration and temperature on the solubility and hydration state of AlBr/sub 3/, CoBr/sub 2/, PbBr/sub 2/, MnBr/sub 2/, KBr, and NaBr were investigated by the Bureau of Mines. Saturated aqueous solutions of the Al, Pb, K, and Na bromides were sparged with HBr gas at 20/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/, and 60/sup 0/C, and saturated solutions of Co and Mn bromides were sparged at 20/sup 0/C. Increased HBr concentration caused decreased salt solubility because of the common ion effect for all the investigated bromides except PbBr/sub 2/. Aqueous solubilities at 20/sup 0/C were, in percent, 51.7 for AlBr/sub 3/, 53.2 for CoBr/sub 2/, 1.1 for PbBr/sub 2/, 59.6 for MnBr/sub 2/, 39.5 for KBr, and 47.4 for Na Br. At 60/sup 0/C,the solubilities were, in percent, 53.3 for AlBr/sub 3/, 2.2 for PbBr/sub 2/, 46.0 for KBr, and 53.8 for NaBr. Solubilities in solutions sparged to HBr saturation at 20/sup 0/C were, in percent, 0.5 for AlBr/sub 3/, 42.0 for CoBr/sub 2/, 32.2 for Br/sub 2/, 21.0 for MnBr/sub 2/, 0.6 for KBr, and 0.3 for NaBr. At 60/sup 0/C, the solubilities at HBr saturation were, in percent, 1.8 for AlBr/sub 3/, 41.4 for PbBr/sub 2/, 1.3 for KBr, and 0.4 for NaBr. CoBr/sub 2/ precipitated out to a minimum solubility of 27.2 pct at 28.7-pct-HBr concentration. Further increases in HBr concentration increased CoBr/sub 2/ solubility because of the formation of bromide complexes. PbBr/sub 2/ increased in solubility as HBr concentration increased.

  9. ENHANCED REMEDIATION DEMONSTRATIONS AT HILL AFB: INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine enhanced aquifer remediation technologies were demonstrated side-by-side at a Hill Air Force Base Chemical Disposal Pit/Fire Training Area site. The demonstrations were performed inside 3 x 5 m cells isolated from the surrounding shallow aquifer by steel piling. The site w...

  10. Designing Clinical Remediation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleszewski, Susan C.

    1989-01-01

    Elements and considerations in the provision of effective remediation for optometry students not achieving in clinical competence are discussed. Remediation of technical, cognitive, and noncognitive skills are included. A course in professional communication offered by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry is described. (MSE)

  11. Differential processing to separate radionuclide and VOC from soil and ground water by air-sparged hydrocyclone technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Yi

    1996-03-29

    There are a wide variety of radioactive, toxic, and heavy metal contaminants in the ground waters and soils at DOE facilities. Some of the most common are uranium, technetium, trichloroethylene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. The project is a challenging task based on several key factors. For the removal of radio nuclide or heavy metal particles, first, on a mass fraction basis there is only a small amount of radionuclide particles in either writer or soil. In this way, a successful separation process must be capable of removing small amount of radio nuclide particles or other heavy metals from a very large quantities of soil or water. This feature poses a significant difficulty for most separation technologies which have a low specific processing capacity. Second, in addition to the need to have a high specific processing capacity, the separation technology must be able to selectively separate fine particles. For example, it is expected that most of radionuclide particles as well as 10-30% of the soil particles (depending on the site) are in the size range of less than 100 microns. Thus, a successful separation process must also be capable of efficiently removing minute quantities of small-sized particles from large quantities of soil of the same fine particle size. These two key factors are of critical importance and pose tremendous difficulties for any conventional technology available today.

  12. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES; EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for a...

  13. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for ...

  14. Foaming/antifoaming in WTP Tanks Equipped with Pulse Jet Mixer and Air Spargers

    SciTech Connect

    HASSAN, NEGUIB

    2004-06-29

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using actual Hanford waste and simulants subjected to air sparging. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated in SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming and ultrafiltration studies and commercial antifoam DOW Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels, HLW Concentrate Receipt Vessel, and the Ultrafiltration Vessels to assist the performance of the Jet Pulse Mixers (JPM). Sparging of air into WTP tanks will induce a foam layer within the process vessels. The air dispersion in the waste slurries and generated foams could present problems during plant operation. Foam in the tanks could also adversely impact hydrogen removal and mitigation. Antifoam (DOW Q2-3183A) will be used to control foaming in Hanford sparged waste processing tanks. These tanks will be mixed by a combination of pulse-jet mixers and air spargers. The percent allowable foaminess or freeboard in WTP tanks are shown in tables.

  15. Integration of biotechnology in remediation and pollution prevention activities

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement/North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation provides a mechanism for an international collaboration between the US, Canada, and Mexico to jointly develop, modify, or refine technologies that remediate or protect the environment. These countries have a vested interest in this type of collaboration because contaminants do not respect the boundaries of a manufacturing site, region, city, state, or country. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of a diverse group of individuals who address a variety of environmental issues. ESD is involved in basic and applied research on the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants; environmental assessment; environmental engineering; and demonstrations of advanced remediation technologies. The remediation and protection of the environment includes water, air, and soils for organic, inorganic, and radioactive contaminants. In addition to remediating contaminated sites, research also focuses on life-cycle analyses of industrial processes and the production of green technologies. The author focuses this discussion on subsurface remediation and pollution prevention; however, the research activities encompass water, soil and air and many of the technologies are applicable to all environments. The discussion focuses on the integration of biotechnology with remediation activities and subsequently linking these biological processes to other remediation technologies.

  16. Experimental studies and statistical analysis of membrane fouling behavior and performance in microfiltration of microalgae by a gas sparging assisted process.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Najvan; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee; Fouladitajar, Amir; Zenooz, Alireza Moosavi

    2014-06-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were applied for modeling and optimization of cross-flow microfiltration of Chlorella sp. suspension. The effects of operating conditions, namely transmembrane pressure (TMP), feed flow rate (Qf) and optical density of feed suspension (ODf), on the permeate flux and their interactions were determined. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test the significance of response surface model. The effect of gas sparging technique and different gas-liquid two phase flow regimes on the permeate flux was also investigated. Maximum flux enhancement was 61% and 15% for Chlorella sp. with optical densities of 1.0 and 3.0, respectively. These results indicated that gas sparging technique was more efficient in low concentration microalgae microfiltration in which up to 60% enhancement was achieved in slug flow pattern. Additionally, variations in the transmission of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and its effects on the fouling phenomenon were evaluated.

  17. In-situ biogas sparging enhances the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) with mesh filter in low-strength wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-07-01

    In the recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology is being considered as a very attractive alternative for wastewater treatment due to the striking advantages such as upgraded effluent quality. However, fouling control is still a problem for the application of AnMBR. This study investigated the performance of an AnMBR using mesh filter as support material to treat low-strength wastewater via in-situ biogas sparging. It was found that mesh AnMBR exhibited high and stable chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies with values of 95 ± 5 % and an average methane yield of 0.24 L CH4/g CODremoved. Variation of transmembrane pressure (TMP) during operation indicated that mesh fouling was mitigated by in-situ biogas sparging and the fouling rate was comparable to that of aerobic membrane bioreactor with mesh filter reported in previous researches. The fouling layer formed on the mesh exhibited non-uniform structure; the porosity became larger from bottom layer to top layer. Biogas sparging could not change the composition but make thinner thickness of cake layer, which might be benefit for reducing membrane fouling rate. It was also found that ultrasonic cleaning of fouled mesh was able to remove most foulants on the surface or pores. This study demonstrated that in-situ biogas sparging enhanced the performance of AnMBRs with mesh filter in low-strength wastewater treatment. Apparently, AnMBRs with mesh filter can be used as a promising and sustainable technology for wastewater treatment.

  18. Biopulsing: An in situ aeration remediation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.S.; Marshall, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    In situ soil aeration is an accepted technology for remediation of soil and groundwater impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons. This technology was utilized for remediating soil and groundwater at an aerospace components manufacturing facility located in southern California, Soil and groundwater had been impacted at the facility from historical releases of petroleum and halogenated hydrocarbons. Innovations in remediation system design, installation and monitoring strategies are described in this paper. The following tasks were conducted; (1) evaluation of the extent of impacted soil and groundwater; (2) collection of site-specific data necessary to evaluate and implement an appropriate remediation system to address the hydrocarbon-impacted soil; and (3) design, installation and operation of an in situ aeration system for remediation of soil and groundwater. The in situ aeration system operates on the principles of bioventing. Air was injected weekly into the subsurface by a system of wells placed at selected locations in short pulses lasting several hours. Oxygen utilization in the subsurface was monitored using subsurface sensors. Subsurface oxygen utilization rates of up to 1.5 percent resulted in an estimate of mass reduction of 71 pounds of hydrocarbons. The concentration of halogenated hydrocarbons was reduced in groundwater following commencement of aeration was observed in subsequent sampling events. The contribution of vadose zone aeration in reducing the concentrations of halogenated hydrocarbons in groundwater is currently being evaluated.

  19. Superfund Green Remediation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Green remediation is the practice of considering all environmental effects of site cleanup and incorporating options – like the use of renewable energy resources – to maximize the environmental benefits of cleanups.

  20. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  1. Using an improved 1D boundary layer model with CFD for flux prediction in gas-sparged tubular membrane ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Taha, T; Cui, Z F

    2005-01-01

    Tubular membrane ultrafiltration and microfiltration are important industrial separation and concentration processes. Process optimisation requires reduction of membrane build-up. Gas slug introduction has been shown to be a useful approach for flux enhancement. However, process quantification is required for design and optimisation. In this work we employ a non-porous wall CFD model to quantify hydrodynamics in the two-phase slug flow process. Mass transfer is subsequently quantified from wall shear stress, which was determined from the CFD. The mass transfer model is an improved one-dimensional boundary layer model, which empirically incorporates effects of wall suction and analytically includes edge effects for circular conduits. Predicted shear stress profiles are in agreement with experimental results and flux estimates prove more reliable than that from previous models. Previous models ignored suction effects and employed less rigorous fluid property inclusion, which ultimately led to under-predictive flux estimates. The presented model offers reliable process design and optimisation criteria for gas-sparged tubular membrane ultrafiltration.

  2. Response surface methodology for the modeling and optimization of oil-in-water emulsion separation using gas sparging assisted microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Fouladitajar, Amir; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Dabir, Bahram; Rezaei, Hamid; Valizadeh, Bardiya

    2015-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were used to develop models for optimization and modeling of a gas sparging assisted microfiltration of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. The effect of gas flow rate (Q G ), oil concentration (C oil ), transmembrane pressure (TMP), and liquid flow rate (Q L ) on the permeate flux and oil rejection were studied by RSM. Two sets of experiments were designed to investigate the effects of different gas-liquid two-phase flow regimes; low and high gas flow rates. Two separate RSM models were developed for each experimental set. The oil concentration and TMP were found to be the most significant factors influencing both permeate flux and rejection. Also, the interaction between these parameters was the most significant one. At low Q G , the more the gas flow rate, the higher the permeate flux; however, in the high gas flow rate region, higher Q G did not necessarily improve the permeate flux. In the case of rejection, gas and liquid flow rates were found to be insignificant. The optimum process conditions were found to be the following: Q G  = 1.0 (L/min), C oil  = 1,290 (mg/L), TMP = 1.58 (bar), and Q L  = 3.0 (L/min). Under these optimal conditions, maximum permeate flux and rejection (%) were 115.9 (L/m(2)h) and 81.1 %, respectively.

  3. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... prevention ... more Fact Sheet: Flood Cleanup - Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems Flooding in a home or building can ...

  4. Nitrogen as an indicator of mass transfer during in-situ gas sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcke, Gerd U.; Hahn, M.; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2011-09-01

    Aiming at the stimulation of intrinsic microbial activity, pulses of pure oxygen or pressurized air were recurrently injected into groundwater polluted with chlorobenzene. To achieve well-controlled conditions and intensive sampling, a large, vertical underground tank was filled with the local unconfined sandy aquifer material. In the course of two individual gas injections, one using pure oxygen and one using pressurized air, the mass transfer of individual gas species between trapped gas phase and groundwater was studied. Field data on the dissolved gas composition in the groundwater were combined with a kinetic model on gas dissolution and transport in porous media. Phase mass transfer of individual gas components caused a temporary enrichment of nitrogen, and to a lower degree of methane, in trapped gas leading to the formation of excess dissolved nitrogen levels downgradient from the dissolving gas phase. By applying a novel gas sampling method for dissolved gases in groundwater it was shown that dissolved nitrogen can be used as a partitioning tracer to indicate complete gas dissolution in porous media.

  5. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  6. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  7. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  8. Lau Remedies Outlined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Jose A.

    The understanding of two principles is important if school districts are to develop comprehensive plans responsive to the Lau v. Nichols remedies specified by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) in ways that both adhere to the spirit of the Lau decision and allow the school district to develop coherent educational programs for…

  9. In-Situ Electrokinetic Remediation of Metal Contaminated Soils Technology Status Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    demonstration of electrokinetic remediation at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) Point Mugu. Dr. R. Mark Bricka, David Gent , and Chris Fetter of the...Profile 23 5 I. Introduction Electrokinetic remediation is an in-situ process in which an electrical field is created in a soil matrix by...technology at its current stage of development. 6 II. Technology Description Electrokinetic remediation is an in-situ process in which an

  10. Remediation Technologies Eliminate Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    groundwater tainted by chlorinated solvents once used to clean rocket engine components. The award-winning innovation (Spinoff 2010) is now NASA s most licensed technology to date. PCBs in paint presented a new challenge. Removing the launch stand for recycling proved a difficult operation; the toxic paint had to be fully stripped from the steel structure, a lengthy and costly process that required the stripped paint to be treated before disposal. Noting the lack of efficient, environmentally friendly options for dealing with PCBs, Quinn and her colleagues developed the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS). AMTS is a paste consisting of a solvent solution containing microscale particles of activated zero-valent metal. When applied to a painted surface, the paste extracts and degrades the PCBs into benign byproducts while leaving the paint on the structure. This provides a superior alternative to other methods for PCB remediation, such as stripping the paint or incinerating the structure, which prevents reuse and can release volatized PCBs into the air. Since its development, AMTS has proven to be a valuable solution for removing PCBs from paint, caulking, and various insulation and filler materials in older buildings, naval ships, and former munitions facilities where the presence of PCBs interferes with methods for removing trace explosive materials. Miles of potentially toxic caulking join sections of runways at airports. Any of these materials installed before 1979 potentially contain PCBs, Quinn says. "This is not just a NASA problem," she says. "It s a global problem."

  11. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  12. Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H.

    1994-02-01

    This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

  13. Characterization of airborne fungal levels after mold remediation.

    PubMed

    Kleinheinz, G T; Langolf, B M; Englebert, E

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to evaluate levels of airborne fungi present after a mold remediation project and determine the effectiveness of this remediation using airborne mold levels to determine the success of these projects. Andersen N6 (viable) and Air-O-Cell (non-viable) sampling techniques were utilized. Both test methodologies demonstrated that levels of mold in the successfully remediated portions of buildings were significantly different (p<0.05) from the levels found in non-complaint and outdoor samples from the same building, respectively. Conversely, levels in unsuccessful remediation projects were not significantly different (p>0.05) to non-complaint and outdoor samples. Both techniques showed high variability in the overall mold levels found between sites; however, the ratios of specific mold groups in each area tested, within the same site, were remarkably similar. The use of either viable or non-viable mold sampling techniques after mold remediation is essential for determining the success of such projects. This project demonstrates the relationship between mold levels and the success of a mold remediation projects, and will assist in the interpretation of data collected at the conclusion of a mold remediation project.

  14. Deposit control in ground water remediation equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, B.; Soeder, K.

    1995-12-31

    Remedial actions at all types of hazardous waste sites require the implementation of various water treatment technologies. Though the many groundwater treatment technologies are constantly developing, some age-old problems associated with handling any water remains. These operating problems include deposition of naturally occurring inorganic solutes such as iron, manganese, calcium and fouling by indigenous micro-organisms. Fouling of air stripping towers is a common example of this phenomenon. Virtually all groundwater treatment systems experience some degree of operating impediment from this cause. Some systems may take years for deposits to become problems, but many systems become inoperable within weeks or months. Recently released studies by the American Petroleum Institute show that deposit control is the most common operation problem causing remediation system failure. Such failures result in greatly increased operation & maintenance costs and non compliance with regulatory mandates.

  15. Risk-based approach to petroleum hydrocarbon remediation. Research study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.; Haas, P.; Faile, M.; Taffinder, S.

    1994-12-31

    The risk-based approach utilizes tools developed under the BTEX, Intrinsic Remediation (natural attenuation), Bioslurper, and Bioventing Initiatives of the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence Technology Transfer Division (AFCEE/ERT) to construct a risk-based cost-effective approach to the cleanup of petroleum contaminated sites. The AFCEE Remediation Matrix (Enclosure 1) identifies natural attenuation as the first remediation alternative for soil and ground water contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The intrinsic remediation (natural attenuation) alternative requires a scientifically defensible risk assessment based on contaminant sources, pathways, and receptors. For fuel contaminated sites, the first step is to determine contaminants of interest. For the ground water pathway (usually considered most important by regulators), this will normally be the most soluble, mobile, and toxic compounds, namely benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and o, m, p, xylene (BTEX).

  16. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Barter Island Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1 (includes appendices a through c). Revision 1. Final report, January 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.; Madden, J.; Borsetti, R.

    1996-01-05

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Barter Island radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  17. Trade Remedies: A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-30

    Developing nations, such as India and South Africa , had begun using trade remedy actions more frequently, whereas they were tools used almost exclusively...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...group of products are minerals and metals (such as brass sheet and strip; gray portland cement and clinker ; magnesium). The fourth largest group

  18. Bioaugmentation for Groundwater Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    available to environmental professionals and stakeholders. Results for the loops inoculated with 1 L and 100 L of culture showed similar rates ...Bioaugmentation for Groundwater Remediation February 2010 ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM U.S. Department of Defense...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP),4800 Mark Center Drive, Suite 17D08,Alexandria,VA,22350-3605

  19. Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John; Olsen, Wade

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews programs at NASA aimed at development at Remediation Technology development for removal of environmental pollutants from NASA sites. This is challenging because there are many sites with different environments, and various jurisdictions and regulations. There are also multiple contaminants. There must be different approaches based on location and type of contamination. There are other challenges: such as costs, increased need for resources and the amount of resources available, and a regulatory environment that is increasing.

  20. 40 CFR 204.57-9 - Prohibition of distribution in commerce; manufacturer's -remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... commerce; manufacturer's -remedy. 204.57-9 Section 204.57-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Portable Air Compressors § 204.57-9 Prohibition of distribution in commerce; manufacturer's -remedy. (a... noise emission tests conducted pursuant to this Subpart B may not be distributed in commerce...

  1. 40 CFR 204.57-9 - Prohibition of distribution in commerce; manufacturer's -remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commerce; manufacturer's -remedy. 204.57-9 Section 204.57-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Portable Air Compressors § 204.57-9 Prohibition of distribution in commerce; manufacturer's -remedy. (a... manufacturer demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Administrator that such subgroup does not exhibit...

  2. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

  3. Integrated in-situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fustos, V.; Lieberman, P.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an integrated approach to ex-situ and in-situ remediation. A sequence of processes, used successfully in their own right, but used synergistically in this approach, have achieved short-term, economic remediation. In addition the range of contaminants that can be treated is extended. The Process uses ozone, compressed oxygen, water vapor, heat, bioaugmentation and vapor extraction to remediate lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  4. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  5. Electrokinetic remediation prefield test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodko, Dalibor (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for determining the parameters critical in designing an electrokinetic soil remediation process including electrode well spacing, operating current/voltage, electroosmotic flow rate, electrode well wall design, and amount of buffering or neutralizing solution needed in the electrode wells at operating conditions are disclosed These methods are preferably performed prior to initiating a full scale electrokinetic remediation process in order to obtain efficient remediation of the contaminants.

  6. 40 CFR 63.7936 - What requirements must I meet if I transfer remediation material off-site to another facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transfer remediation material off-site to another facility? 63.7936 Section 63.7936 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation General Compliance Requirements § 63.7936 What requirements must I meet if I transfer remediation material off-site to another facility? (a) If you transfer...

  7. Electrodialytic remediation of suspended mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Rojo, Adrian; Pino, Denisse; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2008-07-01

    This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. A newly designed remediation cell, where the solids were kept in suspension by airflow, was tested. The results show that electric current could remove copper from suspended tailings applying 40 mA during 7 days. The liquid-to-solid ratios used were 3, 6 and 9 mL g(- 1). With addition of sulfuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to either 2 or 4, and copper was therefore dissolved. The maximum copper removal was 80% with addition of sulfuric acid in 7-day experiment at 40 mA, with approximately 137.5 g mine tailings on dry basis. The removal for a static (baseline) experiment only amounted 15% when passing approximately the same amount of charge through 130 g of mine tailings. The use of air bubbling to keep the tailings suspended increased the removal efficiency from 1% to 80% compared to experiments with no stirring but with the same operational conditions. This showed the crucial importance of having the solids in suspension and not settled during the remediation.

  8. Saxton soil remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

  9. Cognitive Remediation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    WEINSTEIN, CHERYL S.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence continues to emerge that childhood symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) persist into adulthood. These symptoms include motoric hyperactivity, restlessness, attention deficits, poor organizational skills, impulsivity, and memory impairment. Poor academic and work performance, frustration, humiliation, and shame are also components of adult ADHD. Psychotherapists are challenged to understand the meaning of the disorder and its ramifications in all aspects of life. An active multimodal approach, including somatic treatment and psychotherapy, is needed. In addition, cognitive remediation strategies to enhance attention, organization, memory, and problem-solving skills are an important adjunct to treatment. These strategies serve as psychological tools to circumvent deficits. PMID:22700173

  10. Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Mattigod, Shas V.

    2006-01-30

    Over the last 10-15 years, there has been an explosion of activity in the design and synthesis of nanomaterials built around a wide variety of basic architectures. In more recent years, a portion of this effort has focused on the environmental impacts and environmental applications of these nanomaterials. Why all this interest in nanomaterials? What advantages might these tiny structures provide to environmental remediation efforts? This chapter is intended to provide an overview of research in this area, as well as outline some of the advantages that these materials provide to environmental clean-up efforts.

  11. Bioelectrochemical system platform for sustainable environmental remediation and energy generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heming; Luo, Haiping; Fallgren, Paul H; Jin, Song; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-01-01

    The increasing awareness of the energy-environment nexus is compelling the development of technologies that reduce environmental impacts during energy production as well as energy consumption during environmental remediation. Countries spend billions in pollution cleanup projects, and new technologies with low energy and chemical consumption are needed for sustainable remediation practice. This perspective review provides a comprehensive summary on the mechanisms of the new bioelectrochemical system (BES) platform technology for efficient and low cost remediation, including petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents, perchlorate, azo dyes, and metals, and it also discusses the potential new uses of BES approach for some emerging contaminants remediation, such as CO2 in air and nutrients and micropollutants in water. The unique feature of BES for environmental remediation is the use of electrodes as non-exhaustible electron acceptors, or even donors, for contaminant degradation, which requires minimum energy or chemicals but instead produces sustainable energy for monitoring and other onsite uses. BES provides both oxidation (anode) and reduction (cathode) reactions that integrate microbial-electro-chemical removal mechanisms, so complex contaminants with different characteristics can be removed. We believe the BES platform carries great potential for sustainable remediation and hope this perspective provides background and insights for future research and development.

  12. Remediating Remediation: From Basic Writing to Writing across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This article challenges faculty members and administrators to rethink current definitions of remediation. First year college students are increasingly placed into basic writing courses due to a perceived inability to use English grammar correctly, but it must be acknowledged that all students will encounter the need for remediation as they attempt…

  13. Managing soil remediation problems.

    PubMed

    Okx, J P; Hordijk, L; Stein, A

    1996-12-01

    Soil remediation has only a short history but the problem addressed is a significant one. Cost estimates for the clean-up of contaminated sites in the European Union and the United States are in the order of magnitude of 1,400 billion ECU. Such an enormous operation deserves the best management it can get. Reliable cost estimations per contaminated site are an important prerequisite. This paper addresses the problems related to site-wise estimations.When solving soil remediation problems, we have to deal with a large number of scientific disciplines. Too often solutions are presented from the viewpoint of only one discipline. In order to benefit from the combined disciplinary knowledge and experience, we think that it is necessary to describe the interrelations between these disciplines. This can be realized by developing an adequate model of the desired process which enables to consider and evaluate the essential factors as interdependent components of the total system.The resulting model provides a binding paradigm to the contributing disciplines which will result in improved efficiency and effectivity of the decision and the cost estimation process. In the near future, we will release the "Biosparging and Bioventing Expert Support System", an expert support system for problem owners, consultants and authorities dealing with the design and operation of a biosparging and/or a bioventing system.

  14. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  15. A Cercla-Based Decision Support System for Environmental Remediation Strategy Selection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    A CERCLA -BASED DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION STRATEGY SELECTION 2Lt Brian J. Grelk AFIT/GORI97M- 10 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio vimC ’QEjA BP3f AFIT/GOR/ENS/97M- 10 A CERCLA -BASED DECISION...unlimited MC QULM TnpEOM1 AFIT/GOR/ENS/97M- 10 A CERCLA -BASED DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION STRATEGY SELECTION THESIS Presented to

  16. Error Analysis and Remedial Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, S. Pit

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of error analysis in specifying and planning remedial treatment in second language learning. Part 1 discusses situations that demand remedial action. This is a quantitative assessment that requires measurement of the varying degrees of disparity between the learner's knowledge and the demands of the…

  17. Remedial Education: A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chausow, Hymen M.

    Extensive commitment to the remedial "tracking approach" over many years by the City Colleges of Chicago has not produced the desired outcomes. The results of several studies indicate that: student achievement in remedial courses has not resulted in improved performance in regular college courses; student and institutional retention is…

  18. Remediation: Real Students, Real Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culross, Rita

    1996-01-01

    Addressing the diverse educational needs of the adult student population can be achieved without dumbing down the college curriculum, using costly remedial programs, or sending the wrong message to America's youth. Possible solutions include college-public school partnerships providing remediation, community college programs, distance learning,…

  19. DDE remediation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  20. Biosparging results: How clean is the site?

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, J.F.; Griswold, J.E.; Billings, B.G.

    1995-12-31

    Biosparging, a technique similar to air sparging but with the design intent of plume discretization with low to moderate flows per sparge point and operational patience to allow for bioremediation, is producing remediation results distancing itself from air sparging in general. While some debate the efficacy of sparging, this paper discusses results at biosparging sites that are by design and operation significantly different than results from air sparging sites. The authors have participated in biosparging projects across the country for a number of years that have resulted in a range of applications with a large database of results. To provide insight into recent debate concerning the use of water quality results at sparging sites, data from permanent monitoring wells, located 50 to 200 feet beyond the direct influence of air movement, are provided. Water quality results from wells where systems have been off from weeks to more than a year also are provided, as well as confirmation borings of soil concentrations above, at, and below the water table. Additionally, results from new borings and monitoring wells are provided for systems after shutdown. Wells undergoing active sparging/agitation can provide results indicating clean water. Attention is focused on BTEX analytes.

  1. Monitoring success of remediation: seven case studies of moisture and mold damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla; Hyvärinen, Anne; Putus, Tuula; Nevalainen, Aino

    2008-07-25

    Based on seven case studies of buildings that underwent different degrees of moisture and mold damage remediation, we aimed to develop methodology for assessment of the success of the remediation process. Methods used in gauging the success included technical monitoring of performance of building structures and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, microbial monitoring of indoor air quality (IAQ), and health effects studies of building occupants. The assessment was based on measurable change in the situations before and after remediation. Based on technical monitoring, remediation was successful in three cases, with partial improvement noted in three cases, whereas no remediation was conducted in one case. Based on microbial monitoring, improvement was detected in one, partial improvement in two and no improvement in two cases, whereas no follow-up was conducted in two cases. Health effect studies (mainly self-reported health status) showed improvement in one case, partial improvement in two cases, and no improvement in two cases, whereas no follow-up was conducted in one case, and in one case, follow-up failed due to low response rate. The results illustrate that it is possible to monitor the effects of remediation using various metrics. However, in some cases, no improvement could be observed in IAQ or occupant health, even if the remediation was considered technically successful, i.e. the remediation was fully completed as recommended. This could be due to many reasons, including: 1) all damage may not have been addressed adequately; 2) IAQ or health may not have been perceived improved regardless of remediation; and/or 3) the methods used may not have been sensitive/specific enough to detect such improvement within the 6-12 months follow-up periods after completion of the remediation. There is a need to further develop tools for monitoring and assessment of the success of moisture damage remediation in buildings.

  2. Sustainable Remediation for Enhanced NAPL Recovery from Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaher, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sustainable remediation relates to the achievement of balance between environmental, social, and economic elements throughout the remedial lifecycle. A significant contributor to this balance is the use of green and sustainable technologies which minimize environmental impacts, while maximizing social and economic benefits of remedial implementation. To this end, a patented mobile vapor energy generation (VEG) technology has been developed targeting variable applications, including onsite soil remediation for unrestricted reuse and enhanced non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) recover at the water table. At the core of the mobile VEG technology is a compact, high efficiency vapor generator, which utilizes recycled water and propane within an entirely enclosed system to generate steam as high as 1100°F. Operating within a fully enclosed system and capturing all heat that is generated within this portable system, the VEG technology eliminates all emissions to the atmosphere and yields an undetected carbon footprint with resulting carbon dioxide concentrations that are below ambient levels. Introduction of the steam to the subsurface via existing wells results in a desired change in the NAPL viscosity and the interfacial tension at the soil, water, NAPL interface; in turn, this results in mobilization and capture of the otherwise trapped, weathered NAPL. Approved by the California Air Resources Control Board (and underlying Air Quality Management Districts) and applied in California's San Joaquin Valley, in-well heating of NAPLs trapped at the water table using the VEG technology has proven as effective as electrical resistivity heating (ERH) in changing the viscosity of and mobilizing NAPLs in groundwater in support of recovery, but has achieved these results while minimizing the remedial carbon footprint by 90%, reducing energy use by 99%, and reducing remedial costs by more than 95%. NAPL recovery using VEG has also allowed for completion of source removal historically

  3. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: AIR PATHWAY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bulletin presents information on estimating toxic air emissions from Superfund sites. The focus is on the collection of air emmissions data during the site inspection and remedial investigation/feasibility study and the use of these data for the selection or implementation o...

  4. A Framework for Remediating Number Combination Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a framework for the remediation of number combination (NC) deficits. Research on the remediation of NC deficits is summarized, and research program studies are used to illustrate the 3 approaches to remediation. The Framework comprises a 2-stage system of remediation. The less intensive stage implementing 1 of 3…

  5. Honey: An Effective Cough Remedy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough remedy? Is it true that honey calms coughs better than cough medicine does? Answers from James M. Steckelberg, M. ... throat. But honey alone may be an effective cough suppressant, too. In one study, children age 2 ...

  6. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  7. Assessment of a biological in situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Wuerdemann, H.; Lund, N.C.; Gudehus, G.

    1995-12-31

    A field experiment using a bioventing technique has been conducted at the center of contamination at a former gasworks site for 3 years. The emphasis of this investigation is to determine the efficiency of in situ remediation. Due to an extremely heterogeneous distribution of contamination it was impossible to satisfactorily quantify the reduction of hydrocarbons. However, a comparison of highly contaminated soil samples shows a qualitative alteration. The analyses of pollutant composition reveal a significant decrease of low condensed PAHs up to anthracene. The relative increase of high condensed PAHs in the contaminant composition indicates a PAH degradation of 54%. Soil respiration is used to assess the course of remediation. Continuous monitoring of O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the used air leads to an amount of about 2,400 kg of decomposed organics. Large-scale elution tests show a reduction of the sum parameters for the organic pollution of the flushing water of 80%. The PAHs have dropped about 97%. The Microtox test indicates a detoxification of 98%.

  8. Operable Unit D Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    Bert Ellsworth 8455 Jackson Road, Suite 120 Sacramento CA 95826 Sacramento County Environ.cjital Management Department Hazardous Materials Division...Remedial Investigation (RI) activities within Operable Unit D at MicClellan Air Force Base (McClellan AFB ) in California. This "I is a primary document, as...Moss-RI Report Graphics CH2M HILl. would like to acknowledge the cooperation .f the McClellai; AFB Office oe 1. • ,;oninentai Management for their

  9. Remedial activities effectiveness verification in tailing areas.

    PubMed

    Kluson, J; Thinova, L; Neznal, M; Svoboda, T

    2015-06-01

    The complex radiological study of the basin of sludge from the uranium ore mining and preprocessing was done. Air kerma rates (including its spectral analysis) at the reference height of 1 m above ground over the whole area were measured and radiation fields mapped during two measuring campaigns (years 2009 and 2014). K, U and Th concentrations in sludge and concentrations in depth profiles (including radon concentration and radon exhalation rates) in selected points were determined using gamma spectrometry for in situ as well as laboratory samples measurement. Results were used for the analysis, design evaluation and verification of the efficiency of the remediation measures. Efficiency of the sludge basin covering by the inert material was modelled using MicroShield code.

  10. Hanford Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, B.; Thompson, K. M.; Wilde, R.; Ford, B.; Gerber, M.

    2006-07-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource. (authors)

  11. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource.

  12. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Sixteenth quarterly report, 14 May--13 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-10-10

    The axial flow reversal was studied using tracer injection and results correlation with x-ray CT and flotation. Effects of dimensionless area ratio and flow rate ratio, percent solids in feed, and inlet pressure on location of surface of zero axial velocity in the ASH were studied. 4 figs.

  13. Remedial Action Contacts Directory - 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document, which was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), is a directory of 2628 individuals interested or involved in environmental restoration and/or remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites. This directory contains a list of mailing addresses and phone numbers of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor offices; an index of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor office sorted by state; a list of individuals, presented by last name, facsimile number, and e-mail address; an index of affiliations presented alphabetically, with individual contacts appearing below each affiliation name; and an index of foreign contacta sorted by country and affiliation. This document was generated from the Remedial Action Contacts Database, which is maintained by the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC).

  14. Sub-critical filtration conditions of commercial hollow-fibre membranes in a submerged anaerobic MBR (HF-SAnMBR) system: the effect of gas sparging intensity.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J

    2012-06-01

    A submerged anaerobic MBR demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was operated using municipal wastewater at high levels of mixed liquor total solids (MLTS) (above 22 g L(-1)). A modified flux-step method was applied to assess the critical flux (J(C)) at different gas sparging intensities. The results showed a linear dependency between J(C) and the specific gas demand per unit of membrane area (SGD(m)). J(C) ranged from 12 to 19 LMH at SGD(m) values of between 0.17 and 0.5 Nm(3) h(-1) m(-2), which are quite low in comparison to aerobic MBR. Long-term trials showed that the membranes operated steadily at fluxes close to the estimated J(C), which validates the J(C) obtained by this method. After operating the membrane for almost 2 years at sub-critical levels, no irreversible fouling problems were detected, and therefore, no chemical cleaning was conducted.

  15. HANDBOOK: APPROACHES FOR REMEDIATION OF ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This publication was developed by the Center for Environmental Research Information (CERI), Office of Research and Development, of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The information in the document is based primarily on presentations at two technology transfer seminar series: Technologies for Remediating Sites Contaminated with Explosive and Radioactive Wastes, sponsored jointly by EPA and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in spring and summer 1993; and Radioactive Site Remediation, sponsored by EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE) in summer 1992. Additional information has been provided by technical experts from EPA, DOD, DOE, academia, and private industry. present information

  16. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  17. Indigenous plant remedies in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chinemana, F; Drummond, R B; Mavi, S; de Zoysa, I

    1985-01-01

    Two household surveys undertaken in Zimbabwe between 1981 and 1983 revealed extensive use of indigenous plant remedies in the home-management of childhood diarrhoea and many adult illnesses. Names of the local plants, trees and shrubs are listed, together with the part of the plant used and the type of condition treated. The usage of medicinal plants underscores the need for further study of indigenous pharmacopoeias and the therapeutic properties of plants. The role of indigenous plant remedies within local health care systems is also worthy of closer investigation.

  18. Research issues for thermal remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.L.; Heron, G.

    1998-06-01

    In order to optimize thermal remediation techniques, all of the effects of the heat on the subsurface system must be understood and taken into consideration during the remediation. Research is needed to provide a better understanding of the effects of temperature on capillarity in soils. This should include laboratory data on the effect of temperature on capillarity in soils. This should include laboratory data on the effect of temperature on displacement pressures which is needed to determine the potential for downward movement of DNAPLS.

  19. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    low-level perchlorate (100 μg.L-1) influent as well as mixed-waste influents more typically found in the environment containing both nitrate and perchlorate. Through extended periods of operation (>70 days), no loss in treatment efficiency was noted and no measurable growth in biomass was observed. Gas phase analysis indicated that low levels of H2 produced at the cathode surface through electrolysis can provide enough reducing equivalents to mediate this metabolism. The results of these studies demonstrate that perchlorate remediation can be facilitated through the use of a cathode as the primary electron donor, and that continuous treatment in such a system approaches current industry standards. This has important implications for the continuous treatment of this critical contaminant in industrial waste streams and drinking water. Such a process has the advantage of long-term, low-maintenance operation with ease of online monitoring and control while limiting the injection of additional chemicals into the water treatment process and outgrowth of the microbial populations. This would negate the need for the continual removal and disposal of biomass produced during treatment and also the downstream issues associated with corrosion and biofouling of distribution systems and the production of toxic disinfection byproducts.

  20. Advanced Fuel Hydrocarbon Remediation National Test Location - Biopile Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    Biopile remediation is an environmental cleanup technology that uses naturally occurring microbes such as bacteria and fungi to destroy organic...contaminants in soil. Certain species of bacteria are able to consume organic pollutants as a food source, thus detoxifying the pollutants. Biopile

  1. Abstracts of Remediation Case Studies, Volume 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, published by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR), is a collection of recently published abstracts summarizing 13 cost and performance case studies on the use of remediation technologies at contaminated sites.

  2. Steam Injection For Soil And Aquifer Remediation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this Issue Paper is to provide to those involved in assessing remediation technologies for specific sites basic technical information on the use of steam injection for the remediation of soils and aquifers that are contaminated by...

  3. Key Principles of Superfund Remedy Selection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance on the primary considerations of remedy selection which are universally applicable at Superfund sites. Key guidance here include: Rules of Thumb for Superfund Remedy Selection and Role of the Baseline Risk Assessment.

  4. Data Gaps in Remedial Design (USACE)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As the number of Supertund sites In the phases of Remedial Design (RD) and Remedial Action (RA) has grown. we have become increasingly aware of the adverse effects of inadequate or insufficient design data.

  5. Adolescent Literacy: More than Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of adolescent literacy involves more than providing remediation for students who have not mastered basic reading skills. To become successful learners, adolescents must master complex texts, understand the diverse literacy demands of the different content areas, and navigate digital texts. In this article, Biancarosa reviews what the…

  6. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  7. Remedial Mathematics for Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Lodewijk; Brouwer, Natasa; Heck, Andre; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2008-01-01

    Proper mathematical skills are important for every science course and mathematics-intensive chemistry courses rely on a sound mathematical pre-knowledge. In the first-year quantum chemistry course at this university, it was noticed that many students lack basic mathematical knowledge. To tackle the mathematics problem, a remedial mathematics…

  8. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to…

  9. Re/Mediating Adolescent Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Luke, Allan, Ed.

    Suggesting that teaching in New Times requires that educators read and re/mediate the social relations, the cultural knowledges, and the relationships of power between adolescents and their social, biological, and semiotic universes, this collection of essays offers new ways of seeing and talking about adolescents and their literacies. Most of the…

  10. Green Chemistry and Environmental Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Nutrient remediation and recovery is a growing concern for two key reasons: (i) the prevention of harmful algal bloom proliferation, and (ii) the recycling of nutrients (e.g., phosphates) as they are non-renewable resources which are quickly being depleted. A wide range...

  11. Removing Remediation Requirements: Effectiveness of Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Anne; Duggan, Mickle; Braddy, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Remediation of incoming college freshman students is a national concern because remediated students are at higher risk of failing to complete their degrees. Some Oklahoma higher education institutions are working to assist K-12 systems in finding ways to reduce the number of incoming college freshman students requiring remediation. This study…

  12. Groundwater Remedies Selected at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Groundwater remediation continues to be a priority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and remedies that have been specified in RODs for groundwater remediation include treatment (including groundwater pump and treat [P&T] and in situ treat

  13. 48 CFR 2009.570-10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Organizational Conflicts of Interest 2009.570-10 Remedies. In addition to other remedies permitted by law or contract for a breach of the restrictions in this subpart or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Remedies....

  14. A MODEL PROGRAM FOR REMEDIAL READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CUTTS, WARREN G.

    WHENEVER IT BECOMES NECESSARY FOR A PUPIL TO RECEIVE EXTRA HELP OUTSIDE THE REGULAR CLASSROOM, HE IS INVOLVED IN REMEDIAL READING. REMEDIAL INSTRUCTION IS MORE HIGHLY INDIVIDUALIZED THAN REGULAR READING INSTRUCTION, AND IS TAILORED TO INDIVIDUAL NEEDS ON THE BASIS OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTING. MOTIVATION IS IMPORTANT TO ALL REMEDIAL INSTRUCTION, FOR…

  15. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  16. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  17. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Remedial plan. 92.705 Section 92.705... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... manufacturer or remanufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The...

  18. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial Plan. 85.1803 Section 85.1803... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... manufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The plan shall contain...

  19. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial plan. 92.705 Section 92.705... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... manufacturer or remanufacturer shall submit a plan to the Administrator to remedy such nonconformity. The...

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (ECRTS) DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) process was developed by P2-Soil Remediation, Inc. P-2 Soil Remediation, Inc. formed a partnership with Weiss Associates and ElectroPetroleum, Inc. to apply the technology to contaminated sites. The ECRTs process was evaluated ...

  1. GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SOLUTIONS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.

    2007-02-26

    In 2006, Congress provided funding to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to study new technologies that could be used to treat contamination from the Hanford Site that might impact the Columbia River. The contaminants of concern are primarily metals and radionuclides, which are byproducts of Hanford’s cold war mission to produce plutonium for atomic weapons. The DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to consider this problem and develop approaches to address the contamination that threatens the river. DOE identified three high priority sites that had groundwater contamination migrating towards the Columbia river for remediation. The contaminants included strontium-90, uranium and chromium. Remediation techniques for metals and radionuclides focus primarily on altering the oxidation state of the contaminant chemically or biologically, isolating the contaminants from the environment through adsorption or encapsulation or concentrating the contaminants for removal. A natural systems approach was taken that uses a mass balance concept to frame the problem and determine the most appropriate remedial approach. This approach provides for a scientifically based remedial decision. The technologies selected to address these contaminants included an apatite adsorption barrier coupled with a phytoremediation to address the strontium-90 contamination, injection of polyphosphate into the subsurface to sequester uranium, and a bioremediation approach to reduce chromium contamination in the groundwater. The ability to provide scientifically based approaches is in large part due to work developed under previous DOE Office of Science and Office of Environmental Management projects. For example, the polyphosphate and the bioremediation techniques, were developed by PNNL under the EMSP and NABIR programs. Contaminated groundwater under the Hanford Site poses a potential risk to humans and the Columbia River. These new technologies holds great promise for

  2. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  3. Bioventing and natural attenuation: The combination of in situ treatment technologies provide effective site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Malloy, J.; Sekerka, P.; Sibbett, B.; Thomas, M.; Tyner, L.; Zhong, J.; Caron, D.

    1995-12-31

    IT Corporation (IT) is evaluating the combination of free product removal, bioventing, and natural attenuation for remediation of jet fuel-impacted soil and groundwater at George Air Force Base, California. Remedial activities are focused on a 155-acre benzene and 27-acre free product plume which have resulted from a leaking liquid fuels distribution system. In situ remedial options are favored at this site due to the reduced yield of the aquifer, low groundwater velocity, large areal extent of contamination, reduced risk of exposure, and ongoing site operations. Following the completion of a long-term monitoring investigation including bioventing pilot operations, natural attenuation monitoring, and free product recovery, remedial designs will be formalized.

  4. Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

    1996-12-31

    Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

  5. A well-developed cleanup technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schrauf, T.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article describes a new in-well aeration systems (density-driven convection-DDC) which remediates hydrocarbons in ground water and soil by injecting oxygen into well to promote natural aerobic activity. Topics include biodegradation process; in situ pump and treat method; advantages over conventional air sparging; how the DDC works.

  6. Status report: Fernald site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.R. Jr.; Saric, J.A.; Schneider, T.; Yates, M.K.

    1995-01-30

    The Fernald site is rapidly transitioning from a Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) site to one where design and construction of the remedies dominates. Fernald is one of the first sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex to accomplish this task and real physical progress is being made in moving the five operable units through the CERCLA process. Two of the required Records of Decision (ROD) are in hand and all five operable units will have received their RODs (IROD for OU3) by the end of 1995. Pre-design investigations, design work or construction are now in progress on the operable units. The lessons learned from the work done to date include implementing innovations in the RI and FS process as well as effective use of Removal Actions to begin the actual site remediation. Also, forging close working relationships with the Federal and State Regulators, citizens action groups and the Fernald Citizens Task Force has helped move the program forward. The Fernald successes have been achieved by close coordination and cooperation among all groups working on the projects and by application of innovative technologies within the decision making process.

  7. In-situ field tests for site characterization and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    An effort is under way at the Groundwater Remediation Field Laboratory National Test Site at Dover AFB to conduct a field demonstration of bioventing of a controlled release containing a mixture of JP-4 jet fuel and trichloroethylene (TCE). The main objective of the field experiment is to demonstrate that the fuel vapors will support the biological co-oxidation of TCE under the aerobic conditions provided by the bioventing system. Some highly chlorinated compounds, such as perchloroethylene (PCE), cannot be biodegraded under aerobic conditions. However, under the proper anaerobic conditions, PCE can be transformed to harmless degradation products via a series of sequential reductive dechlorination steps. A collaborative effort between the Air Force, Navy and EPA is taking place at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, to determine if complete dechlorination of PCE can be efficiently stimulated in situ by the addition of suitable electron donors. Descriptions of these Air Force research demonstrations and results to date will be discussed in this presentation.

  8. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning planning of any scale and for recording

  9. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES-APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  10. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES - APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  11. Achieving Clean Air and Clean Water: The Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Blue Ribbon Panel's report consists of five issue summaries: water contamination; air quality benefits; prevention; treatment and remediation; fuel supply and cost; and comparing the fuel additives.

  12. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  13. Bioventing approach to remediate a gasoline contaminated subsurface. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Griffin, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. Two pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. Process operations began in October 1990. The field site is located at an air station. A spill in 1969 of about 100,000 kilograms aviation gasoline was caused by a broken underground transfer line. A major portion of the spilled product still persists as an oily-phase residue in a 80x360 meter plume. The subsurface is a uniform beach sand with the ground water level near five meters. Prior to startup of the venting systems, a grass cover was established and a nutrient solution was dispersed throughout the unsaturated subsurface. Subsurface air flow patterns are being determined with a tracer gas of sulfur hexafloride. Soil gas, core material, and underground water are being monitored to determine the extent of remediation. Objectives of the study are to demonstrate that surface emissions of gasoline are minimal, oily residue will be reduced to <100 mg fuel carbon/Kg core material, and the process will be applicable to full-scale remediation. Flow rate is based on a calculated residence time of 24 hours. Surface emission of fuel hydrocarbons have not exceeded 1 micrograms/liter soil gas.

  14. FIELD-SCALE EVALUATION OF IN SITU COSOLVENT FLUSHING FOR ENCHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive, field-scale evaluation of in situ cosolvent flushing for enhanced remediation of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-contaminated aquifers was performed in a hydraulically isolated test cell (about 4.3 m x 3.6 m) constructed at a field site at Hill Air Force Base, Uta...

  15. Review of Removal, Containment and Treatment Technologies for Remediation of Contaminated Sediment in the Great Lakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    this report under the thermal technology type are incineration processes, pyrolytic processes, vitrification processes, supercritical and wet air...more expensive. 103. A number of alternative incineration processes are available: fluidized bed, circulating bed combustor, high-temperature slagging...program for hazardous wastes. Incinerators have not been applied to contaminated dredged material to date, but they have been selected for remediation of

  16. [Natural remedies during pregnancy and lactation].

    PubMed

    Gut, E; Melzer, J; von Mandach, U; Saller, R

    2004-10-01

    Up to date there is a lack of systematically gathered data on the use of natural remedies (phytotherapeutic, homeopathic, anthroposophic, spagyric, Bach and Schussler remedies) during pregnancy and lactation. The aim of this non-representative pilot study on 139 women, who came for delivery to three institutions between mid-1997 and the beginning of 1998, was to receive data about how often and within which spectrum natural remedies are used during pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy 96% and within the lactation period 84% of the women consumed at least 1 natural remedy. Phytotherapeutic drugs were used most frequently. In contrast to the widespread use of natural remedies by pregnant women and nursing mothers in this study, little information on the effectiveness and possible risks is available. Therefore it seems necessary to examine and evaluate natural remedies used during pregnancy and lactation.

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (ECRTS) - IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Innovative Technology Evaulation Report summarizes the results of the evaluation of the Electrochemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) process, developed by P2-Soil Remediation, Inc. (in partnership with Weiss Associates and Electro-Petroleum, Inc.). This evaluation was co...

  18. Geostatistical applications in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.N.; Purucker, S.T.; Lyon, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Geostatistical analysis refers to a collection of statistical methods for addressing data that vary in space. By incorporating spatial information into the analysis, geostatistics has advantages over traditional statistical analysis for problems with a spatial context. Geostatistics has a history of success in earth science applications, and its popularity is increasing in other areas, including environmental remediation. Due to recent advances in computer technology, geostatistical algorithms can be executed at a speed comparable to many standard statistical software packages. When used responsibly, geostatistics is a systematic and defensible tool can be used in various decision frameworks, such as the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. At every point in the site, geostatistics can estimate both the concentration level and the probability or risk of exceeding a given value. Using these probability maps can assist in identifying clean-up zones. Given any decision threshold and an acceptable level of risk, the probability maps identify those areas that are estimated to be above or below the acceptable risk. Those areas that are above the threshold are of the most concern with regard to remediation. In addition to estimating clean-up zones, geostatistics can assist in designing cost-effective secondary sampling schemes. Those areas of the probability map with high levels of estimated uncertainty are areas where more secondary sampling should occur. In addition, geostatistics has the ability to incorporate soft data directly into the analysis. These data include historical records, a highly correlated secondary contaminant, or expert judgment. The role of geostatistics in environmental remediation is a tool that in conjunction with other methods can provide a common forum for building consensus.

  19. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  20. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  1. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    PubMed

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions.

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  3. Synergistic application of four remedial techniques at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect

    Dasch, J.M.; Abdul, A.S.; Rai, D.N.; Gibson, T.L.; Grosvenor, N.

    1997-12-01

    The soil and ground water at a General Motors plant site were contaminated with petroleum products from leaking underground storage tanks. Based on the initial assessment, the site was complex from the standpoint of geology, hydrology, and contaminant. After a thorough study of remedial alternatives, a synergistic remedial approach was adopted including pump and treat, product removal, vapor extraction, and bioventing. The system was designed and implemented at the site through 22 dual-extraction wells. Over a 21-month period, 4400 gallons of gasoline and oil were removed from the system, including 59% by vapor extraction, 28% by bioventing, and 13% by pump and treat. Synergism between the various remedial methods was demonstrated clearly. Ground water pump and treat lowered the water table, allowing air to flow for vapor extraction. The vacuum applied for vapor extraction increased the ground water removal rate and the efficiency of pump and treat. The vapor extraction system also added oxygen to the soil to stimulate aerobic biodegradation.

  4. Growth of the Obligate Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough under Continuous Low Oxygen Concentration Sparging: Impact of the Membrane-Bound Oxygen Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Brasseur, Gael; Pieulle, Laetitia; Valette, Odile; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Fardeau, Marie Laure; Dolla, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Although obligate anaerobe, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) exhibits high aerotolerance that involves several enzymatic systems, including two membrane-bound oxygen reductases, a bd-quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase. Effect of constant low oxygen concentration on growth and morphology of the wild-type, single (Δbd, Δcox) and double deletion (Δcoxbd) mutant strains of the genes encoding these oxygen reductases was studied. When both wild-type and deletion mutant strains were cultured in lactate/sulfate medium under constant 0.02% O2 sparging, they were able to grow but the final biomasses and the growth yield were lower than that obtained under anaerobic conditions. At the end of the growth, lactate was not completely consumed and when conditions were then switched to anaerobic, growth resumed. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that a large majority of the cells were then able to divide (over 97%) but the time to recover a complete division event was longer for single deletion mutant Δbd than for the three other strains. Determination of the molar growth yields on lactate suggested that a part of the energy gained from lactate oxidation was derived toward cells protection/repairing against oxidative conditions rather than biosynthesis, and that this part was higher in the single deletion mutant Δbd and, to a lesser extent, Δcox strains. Our data show that when DvH encounters oxidative conditions, it is able to stop growing and to rapidly resume growing when conditions are switched to anaerobic, suggesting that it enters active dormancy sate under oxidative conditions. We propose that the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) plays a central role in this phenomenon by reversibly switching from an oxidative-sensitive fully active state to an oxidative-insensitive inactive state. The oxygen reductases, and especially the bd-quinol oxidase, would have a crucial function by maintaining reducing conditions

  5. Growth of the obligate anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough under continuous low oxygen concentration sparging: impact of the membrane-bound oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Fanny; Brasseur, Gael; Pieulle, Laetitia; Valette, Odile; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Fardeau, Marie Laure; Dolla, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Although obligate anaerobe, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) exhibits high aerotolerance that involves several enzymatic systems, including two membrane-bound oxygen reductases, a bd-quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase. Effect of constant low oxygen concentration on growth and morphology of the wild-type, single (Δbd, Δcox) and double deletion (Δcoxbd) mutant strains of the genes encoding these oxygen reductases was studied. When both wild-type and deletion mutant strains were cultured in lactate/sulfate medium under constant 0.02% O2 sparging, they were able to grow but the final biomasses and the growth yield were lower than that obtained under anaerobic conditions. At the end of the growth, lactate was not completely consumed and when conditions were then switched to anaerobic, growth resumed. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that a large majority of the cells were then able to divide (over 97%) but the time to recover a complete division event was longer for single deletion mutant Δbd than for the three other strains. Determination of the molar growth yields on lactate suggested that a part of the energy gained from lactate oxidation was derived toward cells protection/repairing against oxidative conditions rather than biosynthesis, and that this part was higher in the single deletion mutant Δbd and, to a lesser extent, Δcox strains. Our data show that when DvH encounters oxidative conditions, it is able to stop growing and to rapidly resume growing when conditions are switched to anaerobic, suggesting that it enters active dormancy sate under oxidative conditions. We propose that the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) plays a central role in this phenomenon by reversibly switching from an oxidative-sensitive fully active state to an oxidative-insensitive inactive state. The oxygen reductases, and especially the bd-quinol oxidase, would have a crucial function by maintaining reducing conditions

  6. Night Blindness and Ancient Remedy

    PubMed Central

    Al Binali, H.A. Hajar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to briefly review the history of night blindness and its treatment from ancient times until the present. The old Egyptians, the Babylonians, the Greeks and the Arabs used animal liver for treatment and successfully cured the disease. The author had the opportunity to observe the application of the old remedy to a patient. Now we know what the ancients did not know, that night blindness is caused by Vitamin A deficiency and the animal liver is the store house for Vitamin A. PMID:25774260

  7. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy. 300.430 Section 300.430 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... human health and the environment. Remedial actions are to be implemented as soon as site data...

  8. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy. 300.430 Section 300.430 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... human health and the environment. Remedial actions are to be implemented as soon as site data...

  9. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS AND SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Permeable Reactive Barriers for treatment of organic and inorganic contaminants and remediation of DNAPL source zones.

  10. Draft Final Ambient Air Monitoring Plan July 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This work plan describes the ambient air sampling program for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site and presents the locations, sampling strategies, and exposure limits for monitoring remedial activities in the Harbor.

  11. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed by an industrial consortium consisting of Monsanto, E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Inc. (DuPont), and General Electric, with participation from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (EM-50), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (Figure 1). Lasagna{trademark} remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured or decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration.

  12. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed which remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured and decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration. Major features of the technology are electrodes energized by direct current, which causes water and soluble contaminants to move into or through the treatment layers and also heats the soil; treatment zones containing reagents that decompose the soluble organic contaminants or adsorb contaminants for immobilization or subsequent removal and disposal; and a water management system that recycles the water that accumulates at the cathode (high pH) back to the anode (low pH) for acid-base neutralization. Alternatively, electrode polarity can be reversed periodically to reverse electroosmotic flow and neutralize pH.

  13. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.

  14. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate

  15. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION AND MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Enhanced Bioremediation and Monitored Natural Attenuation research for the remediation of organic and inorganic contamina...

  16. Air Remedial Investigation. Version 3.1. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Those compounds included: 5 acetone, siloxane, 1-ethyl-2-heptylcyclopropane, n-butyl-l-l-butanamine, 2- beta - pinene , limonene, 2,5,6-trimethyloctane...butanamine is also known as di-n- 3 butylamine. The compound 2- beta - pinene is a pine oil derivative and may be 3 4-10 I _- c b." I -’u+ U. >. I6 i~.4...1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1 3 1.1 SITE RACKCROUND TNFORMATION I-1 1.2 NATURE AND EXTENT OF THE PROBLEM 1-3 1.2.1 CONTAMINANT SOURCES 1-3 1.2.1.1 qt Plant 1

  17. Green and Sustainable Remediation: Application Within the Air National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-11

    vapor treatment • Bioventing System • Pump and Treat (discharge to the City of Burlington Treatment Works) • Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) Burlington...4,400 • Site 2 SVE ~ 276 • Site 3 MPE ~ 256 • Site 4 Bioventing ~ 63 • Site 5B MPE ~ 400 – Electricity consumption • 946 mega-watt hours annually (20

  18. 14 CFR 17.23 - Protest remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the circumstances surrounding the procurement or proposed procurement including, but not limited to... feasibility of any proposed remedy; the urgency of the procurement; the cost and impact of the recommended remedy; and the impact on the Agency's mission. (c) Attorney's fees of a prevailing protester...

  19. 14 CFR 17.23 - Protest remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the circumstances surrounding the procurement or proposed procurement including, but not limited to... feasibility of any proposed remedy; the urgency of the procurement; the cost and impact of the recommended remedy; and the impact on the Agency's mission. (c) Attorney's fees of a prevailing protester...

  20. 14 CFR 17.23 - Protest remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the circumstances surrounding the procurement or proposed procurement including, but not limited to... feasibility of any proposed remedy; the urgency of the procurement; the cost and impact of the recommended remedy; and the impact on the Agency's mission. (c) Attorney's fees of a prevailing protester...

  1. Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This document describes how to investigate and evaluate moisture and mold problems in educational facilities, and presents the key steps for implementing a remediation plan. A checklist is provided for conducting mold remediation efforts along with a resource list of helpful organizations and governmental agencies. Appendices contain a glossary,…

  2. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  3. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  4. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  5. 14 CFR 1212.800 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Civil remedies. 1212.800 Section 1212.800... Comply With Requirements of This Part § 1212.800 Civil remedies. Failure to comply with the requirements of the Privacy Act and this part could subject NASA to civil suit under the provisions of 5...

  6. 10 CFR 1008.15 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1008.15 Section 1008.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) RECORDS MAINTAINED ON INDIVIDUALS (PRIVACY ACT) Requests for Access or Amendment § 1008.15 Civil remedies. Subsection (g) of the Act provides that an individual may bring...

  7. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  8. 40 CFR 13.4 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other remedies. 13.4 Section 13.4... Other remedies. (a) This regulation does not supersede or require omission or duplication of administrative proceedings required by contract, statute, regulation or other Agency procedures, e.g.,...

  9. An Honors Approach to Remedial Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, L. Clark

    A rationale is presented for an honors approach to remedial algebra instruction. Beginning with questions to be considered in the initial placement of students, the paper suggests that remedial students be enrolled at a level low enough to provide them with a reasonable chance to be good, even honors, students. It goes on to identify and contrast…

  10. Laboratory Experiment on Electrokinetic Remediation of Soil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed-Ali, Alya H.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is a method of decontaminating soil containing heavy metals and polar organic contaminants by passing a direct current through the soil. An undergraduate chemistry laboratory is described to demonstrate electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with copper. A 30 cm electrokinetic cell with an applied voltage of 30…

  11. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan Programs by a Guaranty Agency § 682.413 Remedial actions. (a)(1) The... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413...

  12. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan Programs by a Guaranty Agency § 682.413 Remedial actions. (a)(1) The... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413...

  13. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan Programs by a Guaranty Agency § 682.413 Remedial actions. (a)(1) The... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413...

  14. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan Programs by a Guaranty Agency § 682.413 Remedial actions. (a)(1) The... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413...

  15. Remedial Testing and Placement in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Catherine; McCoy, Zoe; Campbell, Lea; Brock, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Almost half of students who enter college require some sort of remedial coursework. Further, states are increasingly moving the responsibility of postsecondary remediation away from four-year campuses to two-year institutions. Scholars and policymakers have grappled with best practice for successfully filling in academic gaps and moving students…

  16. 24 CFR 81.46 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... jurisdiction. The Secretary shall direct the GSE to take remedial action(s) against a lender charged with.... The Secretary shall direct the GSEs to take one or more remedial actions, including suspension, probation, reprimand or settlement, against lenders found to have engaged in discriminatory...

  17. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  18. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  19. 18 CFR 706.103 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remedial action. 706.103 Section 706.103 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE... penalty prescribed by law; or (4) Disqualification for a particular assignment. (b) Remedial...

  20. Remedial Reading Students at Moraine Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In an effort to assess the effectiveness of their remedial reading courses, Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in Palos Hills, Illinois, undertook a study of the retention, course completion, and graduation rates of students who completed one of three remedial reading courses: RDG-040, basic skills for students reading below the 7th grade…

  1. Remedial Online Teaching on a Summer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienties, Bart; Tempelaar, Dirk; Waterval, Dominique; Rehm, Martin; Gijselaers, Wim

    2006-01-01

    This paper is based on experiences with remedial online learning from a national collaboration initiative in the Netherlands involving the University of Amsterdam, Erasmus Rotterdam University and Maastricht University (www.web-spijkeren.nl). The central question is how prior knowledge tests and online remedial summer courses can contribute to…

  2. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  3. 10 CFR 1008.15 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1008.15 Section 1008.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) RECORDS MAINTAINED ON INDIVIDUALS (PRIVACY ACT) Requests for Access or Amendment § 1008.15 Civil remedies. Subsection (g) of the Act provides that an individual may bring...

  4. 14 CFR 1212.800 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1212.800 Section 1212.800... Comply With Requirements of This Part § 1212.800 Civil remedies. Failure to comply with the requirements of the Privacy Act and this part could subject NASA to civil suit under the provisions of 5...

  5. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  6. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  7. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  8. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  9. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  10. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  11. Greener and sustainable remediation using iron nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main goal of remediation is to protect humans and the environment. Unfortunately, many remedial actions in the past concentrated more on site-specific environmental risks and conditions completely ignoring external social and economic impacts. Thus, new approach called green ...

  12. 10 CFR 205.199I - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 205.199I Section 205.199I Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Notice of Probable Violation, Remedial Order, Notice... person to whom it is directed to roll back prices, to make refunds equal to the amount (plus...

  13. 10 CFR 205.199I - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 205.199I Section 205.199I Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Notice of Probable Violation, Remedial Order, Notice... person to whom it is directed to roll back prices, to make refunds equal to the amount (plus...

  14. READING AND WRITING, THE REMEDIAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euclid English Demonstration Center, OH.

    THE PAPERS IN THIS COLLECTION EXPLAIN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL REMEDIAL PROGRAM IN READING AND WRITING DEVELOPED BY THE EUCLID ENGLISH DEMONSTRATION CENTER, THEY ARE (1) "REMEDIAL CLASSES AND THE TOTAL ENGLISH PROGRAM," BY GEORGE HILLOCKS, (2) "DEFINITION, ORIGIN, AND TREATMENT OF UNDERACHIEVEMENT," BY JANE W. KESSLER, (3)…

  15. 22 CFR 213.4 - Other remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other remedies. 213.4 Section 213.4 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION General § 213.4 Other remedies. (a) This part does not supersede or require omission or duplication of administrative proceedings required...

  16. Bioventing and vapor extraction: Innovative technologies for contaminated site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G. )

    1992-03-01

    Bioventing and Vapor Extraction are two technologies which are finding increasing use in performing soil cleanup at hazardous and nonhazardous waste sites. Both processes are characterized by the controlled use of air as a carrier to either remove contaminants from soil or to supply oxygen for aerobic bioremediation of the compounds in the unsaturated zone into less toxic materials. These topics are the focus of a unique Bioventing Satellite Seminar broadcast on April 15, 1992. The seminar, a joint venture between the Air and Waste Management Association (A and WMA) and the Hazardous Waste Action Coalition (HWAC), is the second in a series of satellite seminars that will deal with innovative hazardous waste remediation technologies.

  17. Groundwater remediation: the next 30 years.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Paul W; Newell, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater remediation technologies are designed, installed, and operated based on the conceptual models of contaminant hydrogeology that are accepted at that time. However, conceptual models of remediation can change as new research, new technologies, and new performance data become available. Over the past few years, results from multiple-site remediation performance studies have shown that achieving drinking water standards (i.e., Maximum Contaminant Levels, MCLs) at contaminated groundwater sites is very difficult. Recent groundwater research has shown that the process of matrix diffusion is one key constraint. New developments, such as mass discharge, orders of magnitude (OoMs), and SMART objectives are now being discussed more frequently by the groundwater remediation community. In this paper, the authors provide their perspectives on the existing "reach MCLs" approach that has historically guided groundwater remediation projects, and advocate a new approach built around the concepts of OoMs and mass discharge.

  18. Waste site characterization and remediation: Problems in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Kalavapudi, M.; Iyengar, V.

    1996-12-31

    Increased industrial activities in developing countries have degraded the environment, and the impact on the environment is further magnified because of an ever-increasing population, the prime receptors. Independent of the geographical location, it is possible to adopt effective strategies to solve environmental problems. In the United States, waste characterization and remediation practices are commonly used for quantifying toxic contaminants in air, water, and soil. Previously, such procedures were extraneous, ineffective, and cost-intensive. Reconciliation between the government and stakeholders, reinforced by valid data analysis and environmental exposure assessments, has allowed the {open_quotes}Brownfields{close_quotes} to be a successful approach. Certified reference materials and standard reference materials from the National Institute of Standards (NIST) are indispensable tools for solving environmental problems and help to validate data quality and the demands of legal metrology. Certified reference materials are commonly available, essential tools for developing good quality secondary and in-house reference materials that also enhance analytical quality. This paper cites examples of environmental conditions in developing countries, i.e., industrial pollution problems in India, polluted beaches in Brazil, and deteriorating air quality in countries, such as Korea, China, and Japan. The paper also highlights practical and effective approaches for remediating these problems. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of using alfalfa and buffalo grass for remediation of trichloroethylene from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Caravello, V.

    1998-06-03

    Phytoremediation is receiving increasing attention due to the potential for vegetation to play a significant role in bioremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study to determine if buffalo grass would enhance the remediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). A mass-balance experiment was designed and executed to determine the extent of TCE remediation/degradation occurring through buffalo grass. Measurements for TCE in air, water, and soil were completed for three treatments: (1) buffalo grass, (2) alfalfa, and (3) soil following challenge with a water-TCE mixture. In total, 267 air samples, 43 water samples, 85 soil samples, and 40 vegetative samples were collected and analyzed. The analysis identified two important facts. First, there were no significant differences detected between TCE concentrations in soil, water, and air between groups. Second, there is a significant difference in the amount of the TCE-water mixture consumed in chambers with plants versus chambers without plants. The mass balance of the experiment was not achieved due to unaccountable losses of TCE from the chambers. The major loss mechanism for TCE appears to be from the breakthrough of air sampling media during the experiment. Thus, the data are insufficient to determine if remediation occurred via plants or by preferential pathways through the soil. Future experiments should be designed to include daily monitoring of the aquifer, humidity tolerant air sampling protocol, and relief from the build-up of humidity and transpiration inside the chambers.

  20. Biological Remediation of Petroleum Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are generated in the form of oily sludges and contaminated soils during crude oil transportation and processing. Although many physical, chemical and biological treatment technologies are available for petroleum contaminants petroleum contaminants in soil, biological methods have been considered the most cost-effective. Practical biological remediation methods typically involve direct use of the microbes naturally occurring in the contaminated environment and/or cultured indigenous or modified microorganisms. Environmental and nutritional factors, including the properties of the soil, the chemical structure of the hydrocarbon(s), oxygen, water, nutrient availability, pH, temperature, and contaminant bioavailability, can significantly affect the rate and the extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation hydrocarbon biodegradation by microorganisms in contaminated soils. This chapter concisely discusses the major aspects of bioremediation of petroleum contaminants.

  1. Novel sorbents for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Werner, David

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, one of the major environmental problems is the pollution of aquatic systems and soil by persistent pollutants. Persistent pollutants have been found widespread in sediments, surface waters, and drinking water supplies. The removal of pollutants can be accomplished prior to their discharge to receiving bodies or by immobilizing them onto soil. Sorption is the most commonly applied process, and activated carbons have been widely used. Rapid progress in nanotechnology and a new focus on biomass-based instead of non-renewable starting materials have produced a wide range of novel engineered sorbents including biosorbents, biochars, carbon-based nanoparticles, bio-nano hybrid materials, and iron-impregnated activated carbons. Sorbent materials have been used in environmental remediation processes and especially in agricultural soil, sediments and contaminated soil, water treatment, and industrial wastewater treatment. Furthermore, sorbents may enhance the synergistic action of other processes, such as volatilization and biodegradation. Novel sorbents have been employed for the removal or immobilization of persistent pollutants such as and include heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg), halogenated organic compounds, endocrine disrupting chemicals, metalloids and non-metallic elements, and other organic pollutants. The development and evaluation of novel sorbents requires a multidisciplinary approach encompassing environmental, nanotechnology, physical, analytical, and surface chemistry. The necessary evaluations encompass not only the efficiency of these materials to remove pollutants from surface waters and groundwater, industrial wastewater, polluted soils and sediments, etc., but also the potential side-effects of their environmental applications. The aim of this work is to present the results of the use of biochar and impregnated carbon sorbents for the removal of organic pollutants and metals. Furthermore, the new findings from the forthcoming session

  2. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  3. Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2007-07-25

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

  4. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air

    PubMed Central

    Germani, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100 μm), air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters. Best results were obtained with the simple medium supernatant by combining the stepwise addition of small amounts of the surfactant with the variation of the air flow rates along the separation. Inert proteins were foamed out first, and the subsequent foamate was enriched in the enzymes, showing estimated activity recovery (R), enrichment ratio (E), and purification factor (P) of 45%, 34.7, and 2.9, respectively. Lipases were present in the enriched foamate. PMID:23738054

  5. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: Missouri Air National Guard, Lambert-St. Louis IAP, St. Louis, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    select the most appropriate remedial action. The FS may include individual sites, grups of sites, or all sites on an installation. Remedial...selected field studies. Personnel directly supervised included chemists, engineers, medical entomologist, and specialized technicians in each functional ...chromatography, x-ray diffraction, and wet chemistry methods of both air and water pollution problem. Designed methods of determining air pollutants using optics

  6. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  7. In-Well Air Stripping/Bioventing Study at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    to determine the feasibility of incorporating in-well air stripping systems into the design of bioventing systems to effectively extend bioventing to...Force. This final report describes the Coupled In-Well Air Stripping/Bioventing Study conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; the designs of the...the design of bioventing systems to effectively extend bioventing and simultaneously remediate hydrocarbon contamination in both the vadose and

  8. Foam, a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Shen, X.; Zhong, L.; Zhao, L.; Ding, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ immobilization that involves delivering remedial amendments to contaminated locales is an attractive remediation strategy for deep vadose zone contamination. Foam delivery of remedial amendments can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoparticles in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex microspheres were used as surrogates for nanoparticles of remediation purposes. The microsphere concentrations in the foams generated from the solutions of six commonly available surfactants were nearly the same as in the original foaming solutions, indicating the foams had excellent abilities to carry the microspheres. The presence of the microspheres did not reduce the stabilities of the foams. When microsphere-laden foam was injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of microsphere exiting the column were much higher than that when the microsphere water suspensions were injected through the columns. The enhanced microsphere transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Reduced tension at air-water interfaces by the surfactant and increased driving forces imparted on the microspheres at the interfaces by the flowing foam bubbles may have both contributed to the enhanced transport. Preliminary tests also demonstrated that foam can carry significant fractions of zero valent iron nanoparticles (foam concentrations >70% of the concentrations in the stock foaming suspensions) at stock suspension concentrations relevant to field remediation conditions. As such, this study demonstrates that surfactant foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation.

  9. Dynamic of Air Invasion in an Immersed Granular Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varas, G.; Ramos, G.; Géminard, J. C.; Vidal, V.

    2014-12-01

    Displacement processes (typically, grains displaced by a fluid) are the driving mechanism which control the dynamics of many geological processes (e.g. oil extraction, air sparging, piercement structures). They also play an important role in a wide range of industrial applications, from ground water hydrology and soil mechanics to agricultural engineering. The interaction between one or more moving fluids (e.g. rising gas immersed in a granular medium) and grains control the dynamics of these phenomena. Due to their economic and ecological importance, it is essential to understand the variety and potentiality of these phenomena. When an ascending air passes trough an immersed granular bed its fluidized producing the grains to start to move. When this process is repeated, its created a fluidized zone that evolves over time. Here, we investigate the morphology and dynamics of the region invaded by air as a function of a dimensionless parameter χ which accounts for the relative effects of the gravity and the capillarity. We propose new experimental observations on the air invasion regimes and on the morphology of the fluidized zone, in particular its growth dynamics.

  10. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Low Permeability Zones in Subsurface Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T.; Cantrell, K.

    2006-12-01

    Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low- permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. An experimental and numerical study has been completed to demonstrate the capability of Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology to enhance the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones. This technology, developed in the petroleum industry, has been demonstrated to significantly improve the sweeping efficiency in heterogeneous petroleum reservoirs. Xanthan gum, a water-soluble bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-added remedial solutions. Surfactants and (poly)phosphate were the remedial amendments for non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and uranium remediation, respectively. Batch and column experiments were conducted to select the polymer-amendment solutions. The enhanced delivery of the remedial solutions was demonstrated in two- dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems, as a function of polymer concentration and injection flow rate. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. The results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a density difference between the fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid

  11. Foam, a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Zhao, Lin; Ding, Yuanzhao; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Hui; Zhong, Lirong; Li, Xiqing

    2011-02-28

    Foam delivery of remedial amendments for in situ immobilization of deep vadose zone contaminants can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoparticles in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex microspheres were used as surrogates for nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Foams generated from the solutions of six commonly available surfactants all had excellent abilities to carry the microspheres. The presence of the microspheres did not reduce the stabilities of the foams. When microsphere-laden foam was injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of microspheres exiting the column were much higher than that when the microsphere water suspensions were injected through the columns. The enhanced microsphere transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Reduced tension at air-water interfaces by the surfactant and increased driving forces imparted on the microspheres at the interfaces by the flowing foam bubbles may have both contributed to the enhanced transport. Preliminary tests also demonstrated that foam can carry significant fractions of zero valent iron nanoparticles at concentrations relevant to field remediation conditions (up to 5.3 g L(-1)). As such, this study demonstrates that surfactant foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation.

  12. Foam, a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xin; Zhao, Lin; Ding, Yuanzhao; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Hui; Zhong, Lirong; Li, Xiqing

    2011-02-23

    Foam delivery of remedial amendments for in-situ immobilization of deep vadose zone contaminants can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoparticles in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex microspheres were used as surrogates for nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Foams generated from the solutions of six commonly available surfactants all had excellent abilities to carry the microspheres. The presence of the microspheres did not reduce the stabilities of the foams. When microsphere-laden foam was injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of microspheres exiting the column were much higher than that when the microsphere water suspensions were injected through the columns. The enhanced microsphere transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Reduced tension at air-water interfaces by the surfactant and increased driving forces imparted on the microspheres at the interfaces by the flowing foam bubbles may have both contributed to the enhanced transport. Preliminary tests also demonstrated that foam can carry significant fractions of zero valent iron nanoparticles at concentrations relevant to field remediation conditions (up to 5.3 g L-1). As such, this study demonstrates that surfactant foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation.

  13. Green and sustainable remediation (GSR) evaluation: framework, standards, and tool. A case study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Hung, Weiteng; Vu, Chi Thanh; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lai, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chitsan

    2016-11-01

    Taiwan has a large number of poorly managed contaminated sites in need of remediation. This study proposes a framework, a set of standards, and a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool for implementing green and sustainable principles into remediation projects and evaluating the projects from this perspective. We performed a case study to understand how the framework would be applied. For the case study, we used a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool (SEFA) and performed field scale cultivation tests on a site contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). The site was divided into two lots: one treated by chemical oxidation and the other by bioremediation. We evaluated five core elements of green and sustainable remediation (GSR): energy, air, water resources, materials and wastes, and land and ecosystem. The proposed evaluation tool and field scale cultivation test were found to efficiently assess the effectiveness of the two remediation alternatives. The framework and related tools proposed herein can potentially be used to support decisions about the remediation of contaminated sites taking into account engineering management, cost effectiveness, and social reconciliation.

  14. Praying for Change: The Ignatian Examen in the "Remedial" Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehner, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Contradictions abound in remedial higher education. While 40% of American undergraduate students take remedial coursework (Attewell et al., 2006), remediation represents just one percent of the national higher education budget (Handel & Williams, 2011). Furthermore, the status quo in remedial teaching and learning in American higher education…

  15. The Long-Term Effects of Remedial Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightbill, Mary

    The long-term effects (after 3 to 5 years) of remedial reading instruction were examined. Comparison was made on reading achievement scores and on achievement ratios between a group of 16 former remedial reading clinic students, aged 12 to 20, and a matched group which did not receive remedial instruction. In addition, 45 former remedial readers…

  16. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Mining Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet describes best management practices (BMPs) that can be used to reduce the environmental footprint of cleanup activities associated with common project components, cleanup phases, and implementation of remediation technologies.

  17. Herbal remedies and supplements for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous. Before using an over-the-counter or herbal diet remedy, talk with your health care provider. Nearly all over-the-counter supplements with claims of weight-loss properties contain some ...

  18. Remediation Evaluation Model for Chlorinated Solvents (REMChlor)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new analytical solution has been developed for simulating the transient effects of groundwater source and plume remediation. This development was performed as part of a Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) research project, which was a joint effort ...

  19. List of Contractors to Support Anthrax Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2010-05-14

    This document responds to a need identified by private sector businesses for information on contractors that may be qualified to support building remediation efforts following a wide-area anthrax release.

  20. Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies? Page Content Article Body ​Medicines Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines can cause serious side effects ...

  1. REAL TIME DATA FOR REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES [11505

    SciTech Connect

    BROCK CT

    2011-01-13

    Health physicists from the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company collaborated with Berkeley Nucleonics Corporation to modify the SAM 940 isotope identifier instrument to be used for nuclear waste remediation. These modifications coupled with existing capabilities of the SAM 940 have proven to be invaluable during remediation activities, reducing disposal costs by allowing swift remediation of targeted areas that have been identified as having isotopes of concern (IOC), and eliminating multiple visits to sites by declaring an excavation site clear of IOCs before demobilizing from the site. These advantages are enabled by accumulating spectral data for specific isotopes that is nearly 100 percent free of false positives, which are filtered out in 'real time.'

  2. Libra: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dexter; Lamdin, Lois

    1974-01-01

    Describes a program at a community college in Bronx, New York in which English instructors and content area teachers work together to improve the writing of students needing remedial instruction. (RB)

  3. DNAPL Remediation: Selected Projects Approaching Regulatory Closure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper is a status update on the use of DNAPL source reduction remedial technologies, and provides information about recent projects where regulatory closure has been reached or projects are approaching regulatory closure, following source reduction.

  4. ELECTROKINETIC REMEDIATION: BASICS AND TECHNOLOGY STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrokinetic remediation, variably named as electrochemical soil processing, electromigration, electrokinetic decontamination or electroreclamation uses electric currents to extract radionuclides, heavy metals, certain organic compounds, or mixed inorganic species and some orga...

  5. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  6. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND WATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  7. Nanotechnology for Site Remediation: Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet presents a snapshot of nanotechnology and its current uses in remediation. It presents information to help site project managers understand the potential applications of this group of technologies at their sites.

  8. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  9. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  10. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  11. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  12. Natural Remediation at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C. M.; Van Pelt, R.

    2002-02-25

    Natural remediation is a general term that includes any technology or strategy that takes advantage of natural processes to remediate a contaminated media to a condition that is protective of human health and the environment. Natural remediation techniques are often passive and minimally disruptive to the environment. They are generally implemented in conjunction with traditional remedial solutions for source control (i.e., capping, stabilization, removal, soil vapor extraction, etc.). Natural remediation techniques being employed at Savannah River Site (SRS) include enhanced bio-remediation, monitored natural attenuation, and phytoremediation. Enhanced bio-remediation involves making nutrients available and conditions favorable for microbial growth. With proper precautions and feeding, the naturally existing microbes flourish and consume the contaminants. Case studies of enhanced bio-remediation include surface soils contaminated with PCBs and pesticides, and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) contamination in both the vadose zone and groundwater. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been selected as the preferred alternative for groundwater clean up at several SRS waste units. Successful implementation of MNA has been based on demonstration that sources have been controlled, groundwater modeling that indicates that plumes will not expand or reach surface water discharge points at levels that exceed regulatory limits, and continued monitoring. Phytoremediation is being successfully utilized at several SRS waste units. Phytoremediation involves using plants and vegetation to uptake, break down, or manage contaminants in groundwater or soils. Case studies at SRS include managing groundwater plumes of tritium and VOCs with pine trees that are native to the area. Significant decreases in tritium discharge to a site stream have been realized in one phytoremediation project. Studies of other vegetation types, methods of application, and other target contaminants are

  13. California seeks new technologies for site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Innovative new technologies for site remediation will be sought by the California Department of Health Services (Department), Toxic Substances Control Division, Alternative Technology Section, for assessment in the field as full-scale demonstration projects. The Remedial Technology Assessment Program (RTAP) fosters emerging technologies, which have been successfully tested in the laboratory, at bench scale, or at pilot scale and are ready for field or full-scale demonstration project testing. The Department will solicit interest from companies to conduct full-scale demonstrations of remedial treatment technologies for site remediation. The solicitation responses will be used to compile a list of treatment technologies which can be considered during the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) process for implementation at State-lead Bond Expenditure Plan sites and possibly responsible party sites. RTAP will attempt to match submitted remedial technologies to specific hazardous waste sites via the RAP process. A technical report, including an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility, will be prepared after each demonstration project.

  14. Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  16. 77 FR 76072 - Notice of Extension to Public Comment Period for Remedial Design/Remedial Action Consent Decree...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... of Extension to Public Comment Period for Remedial Design/ Remedial Action Consent Decree under the... Justice lodged a proposed Remedial Design/Remedial Action Consent Decree (``RD/RA Consent Decree'') with... West End Landfill and an Alabama Power Company substation, and to the south by and including the...

  17. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  18. Time-Lapse Geophysics for Aquifer Characterization and Remediation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of subsurface processes is an emerging and promising area of hydrogeophysics. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive geophysical methods to indirectly measure time-varying fluid saturation, solute concentration, and other hydraulic and geochemical conditions facilitates cost-effective aquifer characterization and remediation. The USGS Office of Ground Water, Branch of Geophysics, in cooperation with USEPA, DOD, and university researchers, has applied time-lapse geophysics for site characterization and remediation monitoring at a number of sites. This talk presents recent examples of applied research, including: (1) application of cross-borehole and surface-to-borehole radar methods to monitor vegetable-oil emulsion injections for biostimulation at a Navy site in Fridley, MN; (2) application of borehole and cross-borehole radar methods to monitor steam injections for remediation of VOCs at the former Loring Air Force Base, ME; (3) application of electrical resistivity tomography to monitor saline tracer tests at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, MA; (4) use of borehole and cross-borehole flowmeter and a discrete-zone packer system to characterize bedrock aquifer hydraulics and water quality at the University of Connecticut landfill, Storrs, CT; and (5) application of crosshole radar methods to monitor a saline tracer in fractured bedrock at the USGS Mirror Lake Site, NH. The goals of these studies are (1) to provide increasingly quantitative information about the subsurface, critical for developing models of aquifer structure, dynamics, and processes, and (2) identification of the spatial and temporal distributions of tracers, contamination, and fluids injected to enhance degradation of contaminants.

  19. Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkin, Thomas J.; Favara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this

  20. Space Debris Environent Remediation Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Johnson, N. L.

    2009-03-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also at sizes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. A collisional cascading may ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention.The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities, and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an on-going activity, an IAA study group looks into methods of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial castastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electro-dynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be discussed.

  1. [Characteristics of gaseous pollutants distribution during remedial excavation at a volatile organic compound contaminated site].

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Yang, Yue-Wei; Fang, Zeng-Qiang; Guo, Shu-Qian; Yu, Yan; Jia, Jian-Li

    2013-12-01

    Volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs/SVOCs) are commonly identified contaminants in industrial contaminated sites in China. VOCs migrate easily in the environment due to their relatively high volatilities. When disturbed during excavation, for example, VOCs in the soil release to the air in high concentrations within relatively short period of time, joepodizing the health of the sorrounding population, if not appropriately protected. In this study, distribution of gas phase VOCs was monitored during excavation of a site remediation project, using a combined method of field testing instrument and gas phase sampling tubes. Monitoring results indicated that gas phase concentration decreased with distance, exhibiting an alternating peak-and-valley pattern in the down-wind direction. The monitoring results could be stimulated using Gaussian Puff Model. Remediation site health and safety zoning method was developed combining appropriate workplace health and safety air limits and site monitoring results. Personal protection measures deemed appropriated for each safety zone were proposed.

  2. HEPA/Vaccine Plan for Indoor Anthrax Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  3. Remediation of mercury-polluted soils using artificial wetlands.

    PubMed

    García-Mercadoa, Héctor Daniel; Fernándezb, Georgina; Garzón-Zúñigac, Marco Antonio; Durán-Domínguez-de-Bazúaa, María Del Carmen

    2017-01-02

    Mexico's mercury mining industry is important for economic development, but has unfortunately contaminated soils due to open-air disposal. This case was seen at two sites in the municipality of Pinal de Amoles, State of Queretaro, Mexico. This paper presents an evaluation of mercury dynamics and biogeochemistry in two soils (mining waste soil) using ex-situ wetlands over 36 weeks. In soils sampled in two former mines of Pinal de Amoles, initial mercury concentrations were 424 ± 29 and 433 ± 12 mg kg(-1) in La Lorena and San Jose, former mines, respectively. Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis were used and 20 reactors were constructed (with and without plants). The reactors were weekly amended with a nutrient solution (NPK), for each plant, at a pH of 5.0. For remediation using soils from San Jose 70-78% of mercury was removed in T. latifolia reactors and 76-82% in P. australis reactors, and for remediation of soils from La Lorena, mercury content was reduced by 55-71% using T. latifolia and 58-66% in P. australis reactors. Mercury emissions into the atmosphere were estimated to be 2-4 mg m(-2) h(-1) for both soils.

  4. MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION, SIX-PHASE HEATING, AND STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of microbial responses to three in situ source removal remedial technologies including permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), six-phase heating (SPH), and steam injection (SI) was performed at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Florida. The investigatio...

  5. A Common Framework for Remedial Reporting: Response to Remedial Reporting Task Force Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianneschi, Matt; Fulton, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In December 2013, the Education Commission of the States (ECS) convened a steering committee of state education policy leaders from throughout the nation to discuss the implications of the inconsistent remedial education reporting practices in the states. After the conversation, the Remedial Reporting Steering Committee--which included elected…

  6. The Aftermath of Remedial Math: Investigating the Low Rate of Certificate Completion among Remedial Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, a majority of community college students require remedial assistance with mathematics, but comparatively few students who begin the remedial math sequence ultimately complete it and achieve college-level math competency. The academic outcomes of students who begin the sequence but do not complete it are disproportionately unfavorable:…

  7. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  8. Prompt remedial action at Canadian tire fire mitigates environmental damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In February of 1990 about 20 percent of an estimated 14 million tires were burned during a fire at a tire yard in Canada sending clouds of fumes over the surrounding rural area and forcing the evacuation of area residents. Since tens of thousands of gallons of oil were released each day during the 17-day-long fire, one of the first of the actions by the remediation team was to contain the oils. In addition, it was necessary to capture the fire water and other surface water run-off caused by the fire. Oil released by the fire was sold to a major oil company to be re-used as fuel in combustion chambers. Since fumes from the fire were presumed to be toxic, field crews required special procedures and physicians provided guidance for protecting worker health and safety. The team also advised on air quality monitoring and community involvement programs.

  9. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program environmental compliance assessment checklists

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.B.; Sigmon, C.F.

    1989-09-29

    The purpose of the Environmental Compliance Assessment Program is to assess the compliance of Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites with applicable environmental regulations and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The mission is to identify, assess, and decontaminate sites utilized during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s to process and store uranium and thorium ores in support of the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. To conduct the FUSRAP environmental compliance assessment, checklists were developed that outline audit procedures to determine the compliance status of the site. The checklists are divided in four groups to correspond to these regulatory areas: Hazardous Waste Management, PCB Management, Air Emissions, and Water Discharges.

  10. CONCURRENT INJECTION OF COSOLVENT AND AIR FOR ENHANCED PCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to use preferential flow of air to improve the dynamics of cosolvent displacement in order to enhance DNAPL displacement and dissolution. The concurrent injection of cosolvent and air was evaluated in a glass micromodel for a DNAPL remediation technolog...

  11. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  12. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  13. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  14. Report urges research on climate remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. federal government should initiate a coordinated research program on climate remediation so that such measures—defined as intentional actions to counter climate effects of past greenhouse gas emissions on the atmosphere—could be modeled and evaluated, according to a task force of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D. C., think tank. During a 4 October briefing to release the report, task force members said that some climate remediation measures, which also have been referred to as geoengineering, may need to be considered in an emergency if the climate system undergoes rapid change or experiences a tipping point that presents severe threats. The report by the center's Task Force on Climate Remediation Research pointedly does not recommend deployment of climate remediation technologies, noting that "far more research is needed to understand the potential impacts, risks, and costs associated with specific technologies." In addition, the task force argues that climate remediation measures should not be considered as a substitute for controlling risk through climate mitigation measures.

  15. Electrokinetic soil remediation--critical overview.

    PubMed

    Virkutyt, Jurate; Sillanpää, Mika; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2002-04-22

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in finding new and innovative solutions for the efficient removal of contaminants from soils to solve groundwater, as well as soil, pollution. The objective of this review is to examine several alternative soil-remediating technologies, with respect to heavy metal remediation, pointing out their strengths and drawbacks and placing an emphasis on electrokinetic soil remediation technology. In addition, the review presents detailed theoretical aspects, design and operational considerations of electrokinetic soil-remediation variables, which are most important in efficient process application, as well as the advantages over other technologies and obstacles to overcome. The review discusses possibilities of removing selected heavy metal contaminants from clay and sandy soils, both saturated and unsaturated. It also gives selected efficiency rates for heavy metal removal, the dependence of these rates on soil variables, and operational conditions, as well as a cost-benefit analysis. Finally, several emerging in situ electrokinetic soil remediation technologies, such as Lasagna, Elektro-Klean, electrobioremediation, etc., are reviewed, and their advantages, disadvantages and possibilities in full-scale commercial applications are examined.

  16. EDTA retention and emissions from remediated soil.

    PubMed

    Jez, Erika; Lestan, Domen

    2016-05-01

    EDTA-based remediation is reaching maturity but little information is available on the state of chelant in remediated soil. EDTA soil retention was examined after extracting 20 soil samples from Pb contaminated areas in Slovenia, Austria, Czech Republic and USA with 120 mM kg(-1) Na2H2EDTA, CaNa2EDTA and H4EDTA for 2 and 24 h. On average, 73% of Pb was removed from acidic and 71% from calcareous soils (24 h extractions). On average, 15% and up to 64% of applied EDTA was after remediation retained in acidic soils. Much less; in average 1% and up to the 22% of EDTA was retained in calcareous soils. The secondary emissions of EDTA retained in selected remediated soil increased with the acidity of the media: the TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) solution (average pH end point 3.6) released up to 36% of EDTA applied in the soil (28.1 mmol kg(-1)). Extraction with deionised water (pH > 6.0) did not produce measurable EDTA emissions. Exposing soil to model abiotic (thawing/freezing cycles) and biotic (ingestion by earthworms Lumbricus rubellus) ageing factors did not induce additional secondary emissions of EDTA retained in remediated soil.

  17. Remediation of contaminated lands in the Niger Delta, Nigeria: Prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zabbey, Nenibarini; Sam, Kabari; Onyebuchi, Adaugo Trinitas

    2017-05-15

    Contamination of the total environment (air, soil, water and biota) by crude oil has become a paramount interest in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Studies have revealed variable impacts of oil toxicity on the environment and exposed populations. The revelation gained much international attention in 2011 with the release of Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland report by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). This has up scaled local and international pressures for urgent clean-up and restoration of degraded bio-resource rich environments of the Niger Delta, starting from Ogoniland. Previous remediation attempts in the area had failed due to erroneous operational conclusions (such as conclusions by oil industry operators that the Niger Delta soil is covered by a layer of clay and as such oil percolation remains within the top soil and makes remediation by enhanced natural attenuation (RENA) suitable for the region) and the adoption of incompatible and ineffective approaches (i.e. RENA) for the complex and dynamic environments. Perennial conflicts, poor regulatory oversights and incoherent standards are also challenges. Following UNEP recommendations, the Federal Government of Nigeria recently commissioned the clean-up and remediation of Ogoniland project; it would be novel and trend setting. While UNEP outlined some measures of contaminated land remediation, no specific approach was identified to be most effective for the Niger Delta region. Resolving the technical dilemma and identified social impediments is the key success driver of the above project. In this paper, we reviewed the socio-economic and ecological impacts of contaminated land in the Niger Delta region and the global state-of-the-art remediation approaches. We use coastal environment clean-up case studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of bioremediation (sometimes in combination with other technologies) for remediating most of the polluted sites in the Niger Delta. Bioremediation

  18. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  19. Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Githens, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Environmental remediation options range from various offsite disposal methods to onsite concentration, treatment or storage. Onsite treatment using mobile carbon adsorption treatment systems has long been a favored option for remedial actions because of its proven performance in the clean-up of transportation spills, waste sites, runoff from chemical warehouse fires and many types of groundwater pollution. Carbon adsorption is fundamentally a concentration technology. It will, for example, preferentially concentrate organics. Following its use, the carbon is usually transported offsite for thermal regeneration (mobile regeneration is not generally available) or landfilled if certain contaminants such as PCBs are on the carbon. Most remediation projects are temporary in nature and involve removing contamination from finite areas to attain specific pollutant limits. The best way to approach these circumstances is to utilize mobile, rapidly deployed, modular units. With mobile pretreatment equipment, the field engineer can solve problems with control over cost and system performance.

  20. Implementation of Electrokinetic-ISCO Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. Z.; Reynolds, D.; Fourie, A.; Prommer, H.; Thomas, D.

    2011-12-01

    Significant challenges remain in the remediation of low-permeability porous media (e.g. clays, silts) contaminated with dissolved and sorbed organic contaminants. Current remediation technologies, such as in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), are often ineffective and the treatment region is limited by very slow rates of groundwater flow (advection) or molecular diffusion. At the laboratory-scale several studies (e.g. Reynolds et al. 2008) have highlighted the potential for utilising electrokinetic transport, as induced by the application of an electric field, to deliver a remediation compound (e.g. permanganate, persulfate) within heterogeneous and low-permeability sediments for ISCO (termed EK-ISCO) or other treatments. Process-based numerical modelling of the coupled flow, transport and reaction processes can provide important insights into the prevailing controls and feedback mechanisms and therefore guide the optimisation of EK-ISCO remediation efficacy. In this study, a numerical model was developed that simulates groundwater flow and multi-species reactive transport under both hydraulic and electric gradients (Wu et al. 2010). Coupled into the existing, previously verified reactive transport model PHT3D (Prommer et al. 2003), the model was verified against analytical solutions and data from experimental studies. Using the newly developed model, the sensitivity of electrokinetic, hydraulic and engineering parameters as well as alternative configurations of the EK-ISCO treatment process were investigated. The duration and energy required for remediation was most dependent upon the applied voltage gradient and the natural oxidant demand and all investigated parameters affected the remediation process to some extent. Investigated variants of treatment configurations included several alternative locations for oxidant injection and a series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional electrode configurations.

  1. Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated by Nuclear Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack; Palumbo, Anthony

    2008-07-01

    A Workshop on Accelerating Development of Practical Field-Scale Bioremediation Models; An Online Meeting, 23 January to 20 February 2008; A Web-based workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (DOE/ERSP) was organized in early 2008 to assess the state of the science and knowledge gaps associated with the use of computer models to facilitate remediation of groundwater contaminated by wastes from Cold War era nuclear weapons development and production. Microbially mediated biological reactions offer a potentially efficient means to treat these sites, but considerable uncertainty exists in the coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes and their mathematical representation.

  2. PETRO-SAFE '92 conference papers: Volume 7 (Processing and Refining 2), Volume 8 (Transportation and storage), Volume 9 (Spill control, disposal and remedial treatment 1) and Volume 10 (Spill control, disposal and remedial treatment 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This conference presents papers on a wide range of petroleum and petrochemical industry issues which pertain to waste disposal, waste processing, and safety issues. It presents specific papers on waste reduction and processing;fire prevention and suppression of oil and gas fires in storage and processing facilities; safety engineering and monitoring and plants and facilities;transportation and storage issues as they relate to safety and leak detection; and oil spill remediation and disposal. Spill topics include sorption techniques, bioremediation, dispersions, and air stripping. The remediation papers include both on and offshore sites and approach the topic from both safety and environmental aspects.

  3. DESCRIPTION OF MODELING ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF THE 200-ZP-1 REMEDIAL DESIGN/REMEDIAL ACTION

    SciTech Connect

    VONGARGEN BH

    2009-11-03

    The Feasibility Study/or the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-28) and the Proposed Plan/or Remediation of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-33) describe the use of groundwater pump-and-treat technology for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) as part of an expanded groundwater remedy. During fiscal year 2008 (FY08), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport (flow and transport) model was developed to support remedy design decisions at the 200-ZP-1 OU. This model was developed because the size and influence of the proposed 200-ZP-1 groundwater pump-and-treat remedy will have a larger areal extent than the current interim remedy, and modeling is required to provide estimates of influent concentrations and contaminant mass removal rates to support the design of the aboveground treatment train. The 200 West Area Pre-Conceptual Design/or Final Extraction/Injection Well Network: Modeling Analyses (DOE/RL-2008-56) documents the development of the first version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS model of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau, as well as the initial application of that model to simulate a potential well field for the 200-ZP-1 remedy (considering only the contaminants carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99). This document focuses on the use of the flow and transport model to identify suitable extraction and injection well locations as part of the 200 West Area 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOEIRL-2008-78). Currently, the model has been developed to the extent necessary to provide approximate results and to lay a foundation for the design basis concentrations that are required in support of the remedial design/remediation action (RD/RA) work plan. The discussion in this document includes the following: (1) Assignment of flow and transport parameters for the model; (2) Definition of initial conditions for the transport model for each simulated contaminant of concern (COC) (i.e., carbon

  4. Single-Concept Videotapes for College Remedial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utz, Peter

    1973-01-01

    More than 100 videotapes form part of a new remedial algebra program developed by Kingsborough Community College at Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn. Project aim was to improve remedial education in a difficult subject during a budget crisis. (Author)

  5. Improving Hazardous Waste Remediation and Restoration Decisions Using Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous site management in the US includes remediation of contaminated environmental media and restoration of injured natural resources. Site remediation decisions are informed by ecological risk assessment (ERA), while restoration and compensation decisions are informed by the...

  6. Federal Remediation Technology Roundtable: Five Years of Cooperation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An overview of the activities of the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable--a working group seeking to build a more collaborative atmosphere among the federal agencies involved in hazardous waste site remediation.

  7. Printable Version of Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools and commercial buildings; these guidelines include measures designed to protect the health of building occupants and remediators.

  8. SADA: Ecological Risk Based Decision Support System for Selective Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is freeware that implements terrestrial ecological risk assessment and yields a selective remediation design using its integral geographical information system, based on ecological and risk assessment inputs. Selective remediation ...

  9. Beneficial reuse of treated media from remediation at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, D.E.; Weston, A.F.; Morrissey, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    Remediation at an active PVC resin manufacturing plant in southeastern Pennsylvania has involved closure of lagoons under a RCRA plan and design of a groundwater pump and treat program under CERCLA. Both the CERCLA and RCRA programs involve beneficial reuse of the treated media, which in effect has offset some costs of the remediation. The lagoons were used to settle the PVC residual material from wastewater generated by the facility. Analysis of the residual material showed that the polymer content would allow it to be used as a low-grade PVC resin after drying. The treatment process selected for the RCRA lagoon closure involved indirect steam stripping and filter pressing which produced a filter cake that was both nonhazardous and marketable. Approximately 6,000 tons of product was sent to market from the lagoons. The groundwater, which will be remediated at the site, contains trichlorethylene (TCE), vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), and other volatile organic compounds. An average 400 gpm of groundwater will be extracted and treated by carbon absorbents and an air stripper. The groundwater will be used by the plant in the production process after it is treated by the CERCLA remediation system.

  10. Functional remediation components: A conceptual method of evaluating the effects of remediation on risks to ecological receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Bunn, Amoret; Downs, Janelle; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Salisbury, Jennifer

    2016-08-30

    Governmental agencies, regulators, health professionals, tribal leaders, and the public are faced with understanding and evaluating the effects of cleanup activities on species, populations, and ecosystems. While engineers and managers understand the processes involved in different remediation types such as capping, pump and treat, and natural attenuation, there is often a disconnect between (1) how ecologists view the influence of different types of remediation, (2) how the public perceives them, and (3) how engineers understand them. The overall goal of the present investigation was to define the components of remediation types (= functional remediation). Objectives were to (1) define and describe functional components of remediation, regardless of the remediation type, (2) provide examples of each functional remediation component, and (3) explore potential effects of functional remediation components in the post-cleanup phase that may involve continued monitoring and assessment. Functional remediation components include types, numbers, and intensity of people, trucks, heavy equipment, pipes, and drill holes, among others. Several components may be involved in each remediation type, and each results in ecological effects, ranging from trampling of plants, to spreading invasive species, to disturbing rare species, and to creating fragmented habitats. In some cases remediation may exert a greater effect on ecological receptors than leaving the limited contamination in place. A goal of this conceptualization is to break down functional components of remediation such that managers, regulators, and the public might assess the effects of timing, extent, and duration of different remediation options on ecological systems.

  11. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... category of locomotives or locomotive engines, although properly maintained and used, do not conform to the... engine to be recalled including the year(s) of manufacture or remanufacture, the make, the model,...

  12. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  13. Comparing Alternative Algebraic Modalities for Remedial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, Marie; McArdle, Michele

    This paper reports that the student population enrolled in remedial mathematics is rapidly increasing, while funding for these classes in Florida is declining. The Math Department at the Winter Park Campus (WPC) of Florida's Valencia Community College (VCC) has developed a curriculum that offers a variety of instructional formats to its remedial…

  14. GENERAL METHODS FOR REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document was developed by an EPA-funded project to explain technical considerations and principles necessary to evaluated the performance of ground-water contamination remediations at hazardous waste sites. This is neither a "cookbook", nor an encyclopedia of recommended fi...

  15. The running athlete: Roentgenograms and remedies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, H.; Torg, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have put together an atlas of radiographs of almost every conceivable running injury to the foot, ankle, leg, knee, femur, groin, and spine. Text material is limited to legends which describe the figures, and the remedies listed are brief. The text indicates conservative versus surgical treatment and, in some instances, recommends a surgical procedure.

  16. Some aspects of remediation of contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Korobova, Elena; Abreu, Manuela; Bini, Claudio; Chon, Hyo-Taek; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Roca, Núria

    2014-05-01

    Soils are essential components of the environment, a limited precious and fragile resource, the quality of which should be preserved. The concentration, chemical form and distribution of potential harmful elements in soils depends on parent rocks, weathering, soil type and soil use. However, their concentration can be altered by mismanagement of industrial and mining activities, energy generation, traffic increase, overuse of agrochemicals, sewage sludge and waste disposal, causing contamination, environmental problems and health concerns. Heavy metals, some metalloids and radionuclides are persistent in the environment. This persistence hampers the cost/efficiency of remediation technologies. The choice of the most appropriate soil remediation techniques depends of many factors and essentially of the specific site. This contribution aims to offer an overview of the main remediation methods in contaminated soils. There are two main groups of technologies: the first group dealing with containment and confinement, minimizing their toxicity, mobility and bioavailability. Containment measures include covering, sealing, encapsulation and immobilization and stabilization. The second group, remediation with decontamination, is based on the remotion, clean up and/or destruction of contaminants. This group includes mechanical procedures, physical separations, chemical technologies such as soil washing with leaching or precipitation of harmful elements, soil flushing, thermal treatments and electrokinetic technologies. There are also two approaches of biological nature: bioremediation and phytoremediation. Case studies from Chile, Ecuador, Italy, Korea, Peru, Portugal, Russia and Spain, will be discussed in accordance with the time available.

  17. 43 CFR 4770.3 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.3... issuance or on a date established in the decision so as to allow repossession of wild horses or burros from... this title, the authorized officer may provide that decisions to remove wild horses or burros...

  18. 49 CFR 228.333 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.333 Remedial action. A railroad shall, within 24 hours after receiving a good faith notice from a camp car occupant or an employee labor organization representing camp car occupants or notice from a...

  19. 49 CFR 228.333 - Remedial action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.333 Remedial action. A railroad shall, within 24 hours after receiving a good faith notice from a camp car occupant or an employee labor organization representing camp car occupants or notice from a...

  20. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal...

  1. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  2. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  3. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  4. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  5. Contextualized Learning May Redefine Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Paul Fain (2011), cited community college leaders who overwhelmingly voted at the Reimagining Community Colleges invitation-only conference held September 23, 2011 in New York City, for team teaching and other innovations as the most important fix for remedial education in community colleges. Team teaching is not common in postsecondary education…

  6. Proceedings: Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fea, Henry R., Ed.; And Others

    This document presents the papers and discussions from the Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education. The contents include: "Institutional Programs for the Low Achievers" by Joan G. Roloff; "Communication in Compensatory Education" by Henry R. Fea; "Seminar: Special Programs for Minorities" by Constance Acholonu; "Seminar: Special Programs for…

  7. Remediation System Evaluation, Ellis Property Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ellis Property Superfund Site is located in a rural area of Burlington County, New Jersey. Most ofthe land at the site has not been developed. However, there is a building in a fenced area that is used tohouse the remedial system..

  8. Community College Presidents' Attitudes toward Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzarelli, Carla L.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are the primary providers of remedial/developmental education. The cost, an ongoing values debate and varied institutional ideologies have led to a standard array of programs and services whose administration and efficacy vary from institution to institution. While leadership can be exercised at all levels of an institution, the…

  9. 42 CFR 50.606 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... clinical research whose purpose is to evaluate the safety or effectiveness of a drug, medical device, or... Promoting Objectivity in Research § 50.606 Remedies. (a) If the failure of an Investigator to comply with an... appears to have biased the design, conduct, or reporting of the PHS-funded research, the Institution...

  10. 42 CFR 50.606 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... clinical research whose purpose is to evaluate the safety or effectiveness of a drug, medical device, or... Promoting Objectivity in Research § 50.606 Remedies. (a) If the failure of an Investigator to comply with an... appears to have biased the design, conduct, or reporting of the PHS-funded research, the Institution...

  11. 42 CFR 50.606 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clinical research whose purpose is to evaluate the safety or effectiveness of a drug, medical device, or... Promoting Objectivity in Research § 50.606 Remedies. (a) If the failure of an Investigator to comply with an... appears to have biased the design, conduct, or reporting of the PHS-funded research, the Institution...

  12. 42 CFR 50.606 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... clinical research whose purpose is to evaluate the safety or effectiveness of a drug, medical device, or... Promoting Objectivity in Research § 50.606 Remedies. (a) If the failure of an Investigator to comply with an... appears to have biased the design, conduct, or reporting of the PHS-funded research, the Institution...

  13. COSTS TO REMEDIATE MTBE-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extensive contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluate these costs, cost information for 311 sites wa...

  14. Probabilistic risk analysis of groundwater remediation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, D.; Barahona, M.; Dentz, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Trinchero, P.; Valhondo, C.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2009-06-01

    Heterogeneity of subsurface environments and insufficient site characterization are some of the reasons why decisions about groundwater exploitation and remediation have to be made under uncertainty. A typical decision maker chooses between several alternative remediation strategies by balancing their respective costs with the probability of their success or failure. We conduct a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to determine the likelihood of the success of a permeable reactive barrier, one of the leading approaches to groundwater remediation. While PRA is used extensively in many engineering fields, its applications in hydrogeology are scarce. This is because rigorous PRA requires one to quantify structural and parametric uncertainties inherent in predictions of subsurface flow and transport. We demonstrate how PRA can facilitate a comprehensive uncertainty quantification for complex subsurface phenomena by identifying key transport processes contributing to a barrier's failure, each of which is amenable to uncertainty analysis. Probability of failure of a remediation strategy is computed by combining independent and conditional probabilities of failure of each process. Individual probabilities can be evaluated either analytically or numerically or, barring both, can be inferred from expert opinion.

  15. 24 CFR 4.38 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative remedies. 4.38 Section 4.38 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.38...

  16. California Community Colleges as Providers of Remediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Mary Ann

    Described in this paper is a proposal concerning the responsibility of the California community colleges in providing remediation services and programs. The first part of the paper concerns the proposal itself. After a brief statement of the major issues under consideration, the conditions under which student success can be ensured in open access…

  17. 7 CFR 4288.136 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 4288.136 Section 4288.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PAYMENT PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program...

  18. 7 CFR 4288.136 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies. 4288.136 Section 4288.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PAYMENT PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program...

  19. 7 CFR 4288.136 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies. 4288.136 Section 4288.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PAYMENT PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  1. Regulatory Aspects Of Implementing Electrokinetic Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better understanding of the environmental impact of hazardous waste management practices has led to new environmental laws and a comprehensive regulatory program. This program is designed to address remediation of past waste management practices and to ensure that the hazardou...

  2. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  3. Remediation technologies for heavy metal contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Hashim, M A; Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Sengupta, Bhaskar

    2011-10-01

    The contamination of groundwater by heavy metal, originating either from natural soil sources or from anthropogenic sources is a matter of utmost concern to the public health. Remediation of contaminated groundwater is of highest priority since billions of people all over the world use it for drinking purpose. In this paper, thirty five approaches for groundwater treatment have been reviewed and classified under three large categories viz chemical, biochemical/biological/biosorption and physico-chemical treatment processes. Comparison tables have been provided at the end of each process for a better understanding of each category. Selection of a suitable technology for contamination remediation at a particular site is one of the most challenging job due to extremely complex soil chemistry and aquifer characteristics and no thumb-rule can be suggested regarding this issue. In the past decade, iron based technologies, microbial remediation, biological sulphate reduction and various adsorbents played versatile and efficient remediation roles. Keeping the sustainability issues and environmental ethics in mind, the technologies encompassing natural chemistry, bioremediation and biosorption are recommended to be adopted in appropriate cases. In many places, two or more techniques can work synergistically for better results. Processes such as chelate extraction and chemical soil washings are advisable only for recovery of valuable metals in highly contaminated industrial sites depending on economical feasibility.

  4. The Call for Colloquialisms: Origins and Remedies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salah, Reem

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at discovering the gap between Standard Arabic and the current spoken varieties of Arabic due to social, educational, political, colonial, and media factors. The researcher will try to also analyse the causes of the current gap and suggest remedies. Standard Arabic (SA) or FuSha (the Arabic term for "standard Arabic")…

  5. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial actions. 51.10 Section 51.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10...

  6. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial actions. 51.10 Section 51.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10...

  7. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial actions. 51.10 Section 51.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10...

  8. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial actions. 51.10 Section 51.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10...

  9. 42 CFR 51.10 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial actions. 51.10 Section 51.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.10...

  10. Vocabulary Instruction in a Remedial Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Peter J.; Blachowicz, Camille L. Z.

    2005-01-01

    Six evidence-based principles for remedial vocabulary instruction are developed and described. Implementation of the principles was undertaken by twenty tutors, all of who were experienced classroom teachers, in a university clinical reading program that used one-to-one instruction. Successful strategies and the tutor's reactions are described…

  11. Optimizing multiphase aquifer remediation using ITOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

    1994-06-01

    The T2VOC computer model for simulating the transport of organic chemical contaminants in non-isothermal multiphase systems has been coupled to the ITOUGH2 code which solves parameter optimization problems. This allows one to use nonlinear programming and simulated annealing techniques to solve groundwater management problems, i.e. the optimization of multiphase aquifer remediation. This report contains three illustrative examples to demonstrate the optimization of remediation operations by means of simulation-minimization techniques. The code iteratively determines an optimal remediation strategy (e.g. pumping schedule) which minimizes, for instance, pumping and energy costs, the time for cleanup, and residual contamination. While minimizing the objective function is straightforward, the relative weighting of different performance measures--e.g. pumping costs versus cleanup time versus residual contaminant content--is subject to a management decision process. The intended audience of this report is someone who is familiar with numerical modeling of multiphase flow of contaminants, and who might actually use T2VOC in conjunction with ITOUGH2 to optimize the design of aquifer remediation operations.

  12. Nonverbal Learning Disabilities and Remedial Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foss, Jean M.

    1991-01-01

    Adolescents with nonverbal learning disabilities are characterized by poor fine graphomotor skills, poor organization, and inaccurate perceptions of social situations. Effective remedial interventions include training students in study skills, writing skills, organizational skills, and social skills, and in ways to plan, risk, and act on their own…

  13. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary will notify...

  14. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  15. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  16. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... covered equipment does not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary...

  17. 10 CFR 431.386 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 431.386 Section 431.386 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT... not comply with an applicable energy conservation standard: (a) The Secretary will notify...

  18. Acid mine drainage prediction and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, G.; Robinson, J.

    1996-12-31

    The use of constructed wetlands for treatment of acid mine drainage is discussed in the article. Drainage characteristics and mine water flow rate are identified as important predictors of remediation success. Aerobic and anaerobic chemical reaction processes are described. Problems and potential uses of wetlands are briefly described.

  19. 12 CFR 3.14 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE OF DIRECTIVES Enforcement § 3.14 Remedies. A bank that does not have or maintain the minimum capital ratios applicable to it... application, or a bank that has failed to submit or comply with an acceptable plan to attain those...

  20. 12 CFR 3.14 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE OF DIRECTIVES Enforcement § 3.14 Remedies. A bank that does not have or maintain the minimum capital ratios applicable to it... application, or a bank that has failed to submit or comply with an acceptable plan to attain those...