Science.gov

Sample records for air spray gun

  1. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  2. Miniature paint-spray gun for recessed areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasse, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature spray gun regulates paints and other liquids to spray at close range, facilitating spraying of remote or recessed areas. Individual valves for regulating air pressure and paint maximizes atomization for low pressure spraying.

  3. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  4. Comparison of a laboratory and a production coating spray gun with respect to scale-up.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-01-19

    A laboratory spray gun and a production spray gun were investigated in a scale-up study. Two Schlick spray guns, which are equipped with a new antibearding cap, were used in this study. The influence of the atomization air pressure, spray gun-to tablet bed distance, polymer solution viscosity, and spray rate were analyzed in a statistical design of experiments. The 2 spray guns were compared with respect to the spray width and height, droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density. The droplet size, velocity, and spray density were measured with a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. A successful scale-up of the atomization is accomplished if similar droplet sizes, droplet velocities, and spray densities are achieved in the production scale as in the laboratory scale. This study gives basic information for the scale-up of the settings from the laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun. Both spray guns are highly comparable with respect to the droplet size and velocity. The scale-up of the droplet size should be performed by an adjustment of the atomization air pressure. The scale-up of the droplet velocity should be performed by an adjustment of the spray gun to tablet bed distance. The presented statistical model and surface plots are convenient and powerful tools for scaling up the spray settings if the spray gun is changed from laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun.

  5. Water gun vs air gun: A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Detrick, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The water gun is a relatively new marine seismic sound source that produces an acoustic signal by an implosive rather than explosive mechanism. A comparison of the source characteristics of two different-sized water guns with those of conventional air guns shows the the water gun signature is cleaner and much shorter than that of a comparable-sized air gun: about 60-100 milliseconds (ms) for an 80-in3. (1.31-liter (I)) water gun compared with several hundred ms for an 80-in3. (1.31-1) air gun. The source spectra of water guns are richer in high frequencies (>200 Hz) than are those of air guns, but they also have less energy than those of air guns at low frequencies. A comparison between water gun and air gun reflection profiles in both shallow (Long Island Sound)-and deep (western Bermuda Rise)-water settings suggests that the water gun offers a good compromise between very high resolution, limited penetration systems (e.g. 3.5-kHz profilers and sparkers) and the large volume air guns and tuned air gun arrays generally used where significant penetration is required. ?? 1984 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  6. Experimental evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting transfer efficiency of a high volume-low pressure air spray gun.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y M; Flynn, M R

    2000-10-01

    The transfer efficiency of a spray-painting gun is defined as the amount of coating applied to the workpiece divided by the amount sprayed. Characterizing this transfer process allows for accurate estimation of the overspray generation rate, which is important for determining a spray painter's exposure to airborne contaminants. This study presents an experimental evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting the transfer efficiency of a high volume-low pressure spray gun. The effects of gun-to-surface distance and nozzle pressure on the agreement between the transfer efficiency measurement and prediction were examined. Wind tunnel studies and non-volatile vacuum pump oil in place of commercial paint were used to determine transfer efficiency at nine gun-to-surface distances and four nozzle pressure levels. The mathematical model successfully predicts transfer efficiency within the uncertainty limits. The least squares regression between measured and predicted transfer efficiency has a slope of 0.83 and an intercept of 0.12 (R2 = 0.98). Two correction factors were determined to improve the mathematical model. At higher nozzle pressure settings, 6.5 psig and 5.5 psig, the correction factor is a function of both gun-to-surface distance and nozzle pressure level. At lower nozzle pressures, 4 psig and 2.75 psig, gun-to-surface distance slightly influences the correction factor, while nozzle pressure has no discernible effect. PMID:11036729

  7. Modifications Of A Commercial Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial spray gun modified to increase spray rate and make sprayed coats more nearly uniform. Consists of gun head and pneumatic actuator. Actuator opens valves for two chemical components, called "A" and "B," that react to produce foam. Components flow through orifices, into mixing chamber in head. Mixture then flows through control orifice to spray tip. New spray tip tapered to reduce area available for accumulation of foam and makes tip easier to clean.

  8. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  9. Alignment Fixtures For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Fixtures for alignment of vacuum-plasma-spray guns built. Each fixture designed to fit specific gun and holds small, battery-powered laser on centerline of gun. Laser beam projects small red dot where centerline intersects surface of workpiece to be sprayed. After laser beam positioned on surface of workpiece, fixture removed from gun and spraying proceeds.

  10. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  11. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  12. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  13. Comparison of the performance between a spray gun and a spray boom in ornamentals.

    PubMed

    Foqué, D; Nuyttens, D

    2011-01-01

    Flemish greenhouse growers predominantly use handheld spray guns and spray lances for their crop protection purposes although these techniques are known for their heavy workload and their high operator exposure risks. Moreover, when these techniques are compared with spray boom equipment, they are often found to be less effective. On the other hand, handheld spraying techniques are less expensive and more flexible to use. Additionally, many Flemish growers are convinced that a high spray volume and spray pressure is needed to assure a good plant protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the spray deposition, penetration and uniformity between a manually pulled horizontal spray boom and a spray gun under controlled laboratory conditions. In total, six different spray application techniques were evaluated. In general, the total deposition results were comparable between the spray boom and the spray gun applications but the boom applications resulted in a more uniform spray distribution over the crop. On a plant level, the spray distribution was not uniform for the different techniques with highest deposits on the upper side of the top leaves. Using spray guns at a higher spray pressure did not improve spray penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves. From the different nozzle types, the XR 80 03 gave the best results. Plant density clearly affected crop penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves.

  14. Preventing Clogging In A Vacuum Plasma Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.; Davis, William M.

    1994-01-01

    Modification of powder-injection ports enables lengthy, high-temperature deposition operations. Graphite inserts prevent clogging of ports through which copper powder injected into vacuum plasma spray (VPS) gun. Graphite liners eliminate need to spend production time refurbishing VPS gun, reducing cost of production and increasing productivity. Concept also applied to other material systems used for net-shape fabrication via VPS.

  15. Pediatric air gun shot injury

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ubaid U.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Mirza, Shazia J.; Sherief, Laila M.

    2014-01-01

    Air guns (AGs) use air or another compressed gas to propel a projectile. Different injuries may occur in children due to their body structure, which is less-resistant with thin soft tissue coverage that can be easily penetrated by an AG shot. We present 3 cases of pediatric AG shot injury. The first-case had right lumber deep tissue penetration of AG pallet without internal damage, the second-case had a complex course of pellet into the perineum, and the third-case was shot in the left shoulder. All cases were accidentally shot. The shooters were all children, and relatives of the victims. All patients were generally stable on arrival. Two cases were operated, and one received conservative management. On follow up, no complications were noted. At first sight, AGs and air rifles may appear relatively harmless, but they are potentially lethal and children should not be allowed to play with them. PMID:25491217

  16. Pediatric air gun shot injury.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ubaid U; Kamal, Naglaa M; Mirza, Shazia J; Sherief, Laila M

    2014-12-01

    Air guns (AGs) use air or another compressed gas to propel a projectile. Different injuries may occur in children due to their body structure, which is less-resistant with thin soft tissue coverage that can be easily penetrated by an AG shot. We present 3 cases of pediatric AG shot injury. The first-case had right lumber deep tissue penetration of AG pallet without internal damage, the second-case had a complex course of pellet into the perineum, and the third-case was shot in the left shoulder. All cases were accidentally shot. The shooters were all children, and relatives of the victims. All patients were generally stable on arrival. Two cases were operated, and one received conservative management. On follow up, no complications were noted.  At first sight, AGs and air rifles may appear relatively harmless, but they are potentially lethal and children should not be allowed to play with them.  PMID:25491217

  17. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  18. Development of spray guns for the application of rigid foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the activities initiated to improve the existing spray gun system used for spraying insulating foam on the External Tank of the Space Shuttle, due to the quality variations of the applied foam noted in the past. Consideration is given to the two tasks of the project: (1) investigations of possible improvements, as an interim measure, to the spray gun currently used to apply the large acreage spray-on-foam insulation and the evaluation of other commercial equipment; and (2) the design and fabrication of a new automatic spray gun. The design and operation of the currently used Binks 43 PA spray gun are described together with several new breadboard spray guns designed and fabricated and the testing procedures developed. These new guns include the Modular Automatic Foam spray gun, the Ball Valve spray gun, and the Tapered Plug Valve (TPV) gun. As a result of tests, the TPV spray gun is recommended to replace the currently used automatic spray gun.

  19. In vitro fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    2001-06-01

    The fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) and detonation gun sprayed (DGUN) hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates has been compared in air and in buffered Ringer's solution. There was an increase in the surface microcracking and bulk porosity of both types of coating tested in air. After 1 million cycles in Ringer's solution the VPS coatings had completely delaminated from their substrates. In contrast the DGUN coatings retained their integrity when tested up to 10 million cycles but were beginning to show signs of delamination at the interface.

  20. Influence of the Spray Gun Type on Microstructure and Properties of HVAF Sprayed Fe-Based Corrosion Resistant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructural details and corrosion properties of novel Fe-based coatings prepared using two different generations of HVAF spray guns. These two generations of HVAF guns are Activated Combustion HVAF (AC-HVAF, 2nd generation) M2 gun and Supersonic Air Fuel HVAF (SAF, 3rd generation) M3 gun. Structural details were analysed using x-ray diffractometry and field-emission scanning electron microscope. Higher denseness with homogeneous microstructure was achieved for Fe-based coating deposited by the M3 process. Such coatings exhibit higher particle deformation and lower oxide content compared to coatings manufactured with M2 gun. Corrosion properties were studied by open-cell potential measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The lower porosity and higher interlamellar cohesion of coating manufactured with M3 gun prevent the electrolyte from penetrating through the coating and arriving to the substrate, enhancing the overall corrosion resistance. This can be explained by the improved microstructures and coating performance.

  1. Controlled-Temperature Hot-Air Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Materials that find applications in wind tunnels first tested in laboratory. Hot-Air Gun differs from commercial units in that flow rate and temperature monitored and controlled. With typical compressed-airsupply pressure of 25 to 38 psi (170 to 260 kPa), flow rate and maximum temperature are 34 stdft3/min (0.96 stdm3/min) and 1,090 degrees F (590 degrees C), respectively. Resembling elaborate but carefully regulated hot-air gun, setup used to apply blasts of air temperatures above 1,500 degrees F (815 degrees C) to test specimens.

  2. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5755 How do I demonstrate compliance with the...

  3. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5755 How do I demonstrate compliance with the...

  4. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5755 How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational...

  5. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5755 How do I demonstrate compliance with the...

  6. 40 CFR 63.5755 - How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards? 63.5755... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5755 How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational...

  7. Understanding air-gun bubble behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.T. )

    1994-11-01

    An air-gun bubble behaves approximately as a spherical bubble of an ideal gas in an infinite volume of practically incompressible water. With this simplification, the equation of bubble motion and its far-field signature is more understandable than with the more exact theory commonly cited in the literature. The terms of the equation of bubble motion are explained using elementary physics and mathematics, computation of numerical results is outlined, and an example signature is shown. An air-gun bubble is analogous to a simple harmonic oscillator consisting of a mass on a spring, with an equivalent mass equal three times that of the water displaced by the bubble, and air pressure following an ideal gas law corresponding to a spring. With this understanding, one is prepared to deal with the effects of interactions among air guns and with the high-order terms and other features that must be included to model the air-gun signature of actual seismic source arrays.

  8. Pneumatic colon injury following high pressure blow gun dust cleaner spray to the perineum

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Edgar D.; Chiu, Yin-I.; Shan, Yan-Shen; Ong, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A pneumatic tool or air tool such as blow gun dust cleaner is a tool driven by compressed air and spraying of the perineum can insufflate the colon due to its high pressure and high flow rate. Presentation of case We present a case of 4 year old boy who developed sudden onset of tense abdominal distention and developed peritonitis. Patient’s family initially denied a history of trauma. Radiologic examination showed pneumoperitoneum and colon dilatation. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a tension pneumoperitoneum, bloody ascitic fluid, multiple site of ecchymosis and serosal tear of the colon and a minute perforation of transverse colon. Postoperative reinvestigation revealed that the patient’s perineum was sprayed, using blow gun dust cleaner. Discussion Air from pneumatic tools produces column of air at pressure of 3.5–8.8 kg/cm2 and pressure greater than the resting anal pressure of 0.109 kg/cm2 force air to enter the colon when the perineum is sprayed. Different degree of colon injury results when airflow is greater than 1.46 L/m, and/or intraluminal pressure greater than 0.109 kg/cm2. In most children, initial anxiety to tell the truth result in difficulty to obtain good history. Conclusion Spraying of the perianal with excessive pneumatic force of greater than the resting anal pressure and high air flow rate causes multiple site colon injury and tension pneumoperitoneum due to colon perforation. Parent should be caution in children playing with high pressure pneumatic tool, and the importance of history is emphases for early correct diagnosis. PMID:25544492

  9. ENVIORNMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: ANEST IWATA CORPORATION LPH400-LV HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Enviornmental Technology Verification reports on the characteristics of a paint spray gun. The research showed that the spray gun provided absolute and relative increases in transfer efficiency over the base line and provided a reduction in the use of paint.

  10. Nozzle Extension for Safety Air Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbrun, H. N.; Croom, Delwin R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    New nozzle-extension design overcomes problems and incorporates original commercial nozzle, retaining intrinsic safety features. Components include extension tube, length of which made to suit application; adaptor fitting, and nozzle adaptor repinned to maintain original safety features. Design moves conical airstream to end of extension to blow machine chips away from operator. Nozzle-extension modification allows safe and efficient operation of machine tools while maintaining integrity of orginial safety-air-gun design.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, SHARPE MANUFACTURING TITANIUM T1-CG SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program, which provides objective and scientific third party analysis of new technology that can benefit the environment, the pollution prevention capabilities of a high transfer efficiency liquid spray gun was tested. This ...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, ANEST IWATA CORPORATION W400-LV SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program, which provides objective and scientific third party analysis of new technology that can benefit the environment, the pollution prevention capabilities of a high transfer efficiency liquid spray gun was tested. This ...

  13. Air gun pellet injuries: the safety of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C; Kabala, J

    1997-04-01

    The ferromagnetism, and therefore the safety in a magnetic resonance (MR) examination, of the most widely available air gun pellets has been tested. While many are made of lead and are not ferromagnetic, some contain steel and are deflected strongly in a magnetic field. There must therefore be careful consideration before undertaking MR examinations of patients with embedded air gun pellets.

  14. Air pollution: a smoking gun for cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Qian, Chao-Nan; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2014-04-01

    Once considered a taboo topic or stigma, cancer is the number one public health enemy in the world. Once a product of an almost untouchable industry, tobacco is indisputably recognized as a major cause of cancer and a target for anticancer efforts. With the emergence of new economic powers in the world, especially in highly populated countries such as China, air pollution has rapidly emerged as a smoking gun for cancer and has become a hot topic for public health debate because of the complex political, economic, scientific, and technologic issues surrounding the air pollution problem. This editorial and the referred articles published in this special issue of the Chinese Journal of Cancer discuss these fundamental questions. Does air pollution cause a wide spectrum of cancers? Should air pollution be considered a necessary evil accompanying economic transformation in developing countries? Is an explosion of cancer incidence coming to China and how soon will it arrive? What must be done to prevent this possible human catastrophe? Finally, the approaches for air pollution control are also discussed.

  15. Quick-hardening problems are eliminated with spray gun modification which mixes resin and accelerator liquids during application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, O. W.

    1964-01-01

    A modified spray gun, with separate containers for resin and additive components, solves the problems of quick hardening and nozzle clogging. At application, separate atomizers spray the liquids in front of the nozzle face where they blend.

  16. The Internal Ballistics of an Air Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The internal ballistics of a firearm or artillery piece considers the pellet, bullet, or shell motion while it is still inside the barrel. In general, deriving the muzzle speed of a gunpowder firearm from first principles is difficult because powder combustion is fast and it very rapidly raises the temperature of gas (generated by gunpowder deflagration, or burning), which greatly complicates the analysis. A simple case is provided by air guns, for which we can make reasonable approximations that permit a derivation of muzzle speed. It is perhaps surprising that muzzle speed depends upon barrel length (artillerymen debated this dependence for centuries, until it was established experimentally and, later, theoretically ). Here we see that a simple physical analysis, accessible to high school or freshmen undergraduate physics students, not only derives realistic muzzle speed but also shows how it depends upon barrel length.

  17. The effect of heat treatment on the morphology of D-Gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Erkmen, Z E

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the morphology of the Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings sprayed on Ti alloy samples by Detonation Gun Spray (D-Gun) and the effect of aging before and after heat treatment in physiological solution were observed. Cross-sectional porosity and percentages of amorphous and crystal phase were measured using optical, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. Differential Thermogravimetric Analysis (DTA) was performed to estimate the glass-crystalline phase transformation temperatures. Heat-treatment at 300, 500, 700, 800 and 1200 degrees C were carried out to confirm DTA results. As a final analysis, the aging effect using Ringer's solution for 1 week on heat-treated and non-heat-treated samples was measured. It was observed that, in D-Gun sprayed samples, the cross-sectional porosity stayed in the accepted 5% range as reported for other spraying techniques.(1-5) On the other hand, surface porosity measured using the water immersion method remained in the conventional porosity limit of 15% for non-heat-treated samples. Heat-treatment had a small influence on the porosity while the crystallinity increased considerably; in addition, aging had little effect on HA crystallinity for heat treated samples. This work showed that D-gun sprayed HA coatings had lower porosity and better integrity than other coatings, due to which we can expect better performance during in vivo applications.

  18. Air gun pellet: cardiac penetration and peripheral embolization.

    PubMed

    Işık, Onur; Engin, Çağatay; Daylan, Ahmet; Şahutoğlu, Cengiz

    2016-05-01

    Use of high-velocity air guns can to lead to serious injuries. Management options of cardiac pellet gun injuries are based on patient stability, and course and location of the pellet. Presently reported is the case of a boy who was shot with an air gun pellet. Following right ventricular entry, the pellet lodged in the left atrium and embolized to the right iliac and femoral artery. Following pellet localization, right ventricular injury was repaired, and the pellet was removed successfully. PMID:27598599

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: DEVILBISS JGHV-531-46FF HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the DeVilbiss JGHV-531-46FF high-volume, low-pressure pressure-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the DeVilbiss JGHV, which is designed for use in industrial finishing. The test coating chosen by ITW Industrial Fi...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, HVLP COATING EQUIPMENT, SHARPE MANUFACTURING COMPANY PLATINUM 2012 HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the Sharpe Platinum 2013 high-volume, low-pressure gravity-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the Sharpe Platinum, which is designed for use in automotive refinishing. The test coating chosen by Sharpe Manufacturi...

  1. Modeling breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M R; Gatano, B L; McKernan, J L; Dunn, K H; Blazicko, B A; Carlton, G N

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to predict breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting in cross-flow ventilated booths. The model focuses on characterizing the generation and transport of overspray mist. It extends previous work on conventional spray guns to include exposures generated by HVLP guns. Dimensional analysis and scale model wind-tunnel studies are employed using non-volatile oils, instead of paint, to produce empirical equations for estimating exposure to total mass. Results indicate that a dimensionless breathing zone concentration is a nonlinear function of the ratio of momentum flux of air from the spray gun to the momentum flux of air passing through the projected area of the worker's body. The orientation of the spraying operation within the booth is also very significant. The exposure model requires an estimate of the contaminant generation rate, which is approximated by a simple impactor model. The results represent an initial step in the construction of more realistic models capable of predicting exposure as a mathematical function of the governing parameters. PMID:10028895

  2. Microencapsulation of Bioactive Principles with an Airless Spray-Gun Suitable for Processing High Viscous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cocchietto, Moreno; Blasi, Paolo; Lapasin, Romano; Moro, Chiara; Gallo, Davide; Sava, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: to design, assemble and test a prototype of a novel production plant, suitable for producing microparticles (MPs) by processing highly viscous feed solutions (FSs). Methods: the prototype has been built using a commercial air compressor, a piston pump, an airless spray-gun, a customized air-treatment section, a timer, a rotating base, and a filtration section. Preliminary prototype parameter setting was carried out to individuate the best performing nozzle’s dimension, the nebulization timing, and the CaCl2 concentration in the gelation fluid. In addition, prototype throughput (1 L to 5 L) and the range of practicable feed solution (FS) viscosities were assayed. A set of four batches was prepared in order to characterize the MPs, in terms of mean particle size and distribution, flow properties, swelling, encapsulation efficiency and release. Results: according to a qualitative scoring, the large nozzle was suitable to nebulize FSs at a higher alginate concentration. Conversely, the small nozzle performed better in the processing of FSs with an alginate concentration up to 2% w/v. Only at the highest degree of viscosity, corresponding to 5% w/v of alginate, the FS processing was not technically possible. Among the CaCl2 concentrations considered, 15% w/v was recognized as the most versatile. The prototype appears to be convenient and suitable to grant a high yield starting from 2 L of FS. The flow behavior of the FSs assayed can be satisfactorily described with the Carreau-Yasuda equation and the throughput begins to slightly decrease for FSs at alginate concentrations exceeding 3% w/v. MP morphology was irregular with crumpled shape. The angle of repose indicates a good flowability and the release studies showed gastro-resistance and potential prolonged release applications. Conclusions: the novel prototype of production plant is suitable to process large amounts (2 L or more) of FSs, characterized by a high viscosity, to produce MPs suitable for

  3. Ultrasonic spray evaporative air coolers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the development of an energy-efficient evaporative air cooling device employing ultrasonic spray nozzles is discussed. The following works were performed during the project period: (1) Feasibility study of a breadboard model of the evaporative cooler, (2) design of a prototype cooling unit for laboratory and field studies, and (3) preliminary survey of potential applications.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: EXEL INDUSTRIAL AIRMIX SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification Program has partnered with Concurrent Technologies Corp. to verify innovative coatings and coating equipment technologies for reducing air emissions. This report describes the performance of EXEL Industrial's Kremlin Airmix high transfer ...

  5. Air gun injury with deadly aftermath--case report.

    PubMed

    Stankov, Aleksandar; Jakovski, Zlatko; Pavlovski, Goran; Muric, Nedzat; Dwork, Andrew J; Cakar, Zdravko

    2013-01-01

    In Republic of Macedonia the use of air guns is quite widespread. They are used mainly for target practice. They are regulated by the Law of Arms, where they are defined as pneumatic weapons. There is no legal limit on type or quantity of ammunition that one may possess. Our Institute performs at least 90% of the forensic autopsies in Macedonia. In this report we describe the only fatality by pneumatic weapon to come to our attention over the past 10 years. A 6-year-old girl was accidentally wounded by her brother when he and his father were trying a new air gun, a 4.5mm single shot, break barrel, spring piston air rifle manufactured in China under the brand "Westlake". She died within minutes. Autopsy showed cardiac tamponade due to penetration of the aorta. A 0.5g metal projectile, 4.5mm in diameter, with a pointed, conical shape, was recovered from the pericardial sac.

  6. Serious air gun injuries in children: update of injury statistics and presentation of five cases.

    PubMed

    Myre, L E; Black, R E

    1987-09-01

    There were over 70,000 injuries to children caused by air guns reported from 1981 to 1984. The majority of these injuries were minor; however, serious injury resulted in eight deaths. Reported injuries include corneal perforation, liver laceration, stomach and intestinal perforation, intracranial bleeding, cardiac perforation, and hemopneumothorax. Primary care physicians must be aware of the potentially serious or lethal nature of air gun injury and educate their patients accordingly. Legislation is also needed to restrict the sale of these guns, or increase the safety of air gun use. We report five cases of potentially life-threatening injury caused by air guns, three of which required emergency laparotomy. PMID:3313302

  7. A comparative study of tribological behavior of plasma and D-gun sprayed coatings under different wear modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, G.; Rao, D.S.; Prasad, K.U.M.; Joshi, S.V.

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, thermal sprayed protective coatings have gained widespread acceptance for a variety of industrial applications. A vast majority of these applications involve the use of thermal sprayed coatings to combat wear. While plasma spraying is the most versatile variant of all the thermal spray processes, the detonation gun (D-gun) coatings have been a novelty until recently because of their proprietary nature. The present study is aimed at comparing the tribological behavior of coatings deposited using the two above techniques by focusing on some popular coating materials that are widely adopted for wear resistant applications, namely, WC-12% Co, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr. To enable a comprehensive comparison of the above indicated thermal spray techniques as well as coating materials, the deposited coatings were extensively characterized employing microstructural evaluation, microhardness measurements, and XRD analysis for phase constitution. The behavior of these coatings under different wear modes was also evaluated by determining their tribological performance when subjected to solid particle erosion tests, rubber wheel sand abrasion tests, and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests. Among all the coating materials studied, D-gun sprayed WC-12% Co, in general, yields the best performance under different modes of wear, whereas plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows least wear resistance to every wear mode.

  8. Quality optimization of thermally sprayed coatings produced by the JP-5000 (HVOF) gun using mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1994-01-01

    Currently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of gas-turbine blades and similar applications have centered around the use of zirconia as a protective coating for high thermal applications. The advantages of zirconia include low thermal conductivity and good thermal shock resistance. Thermally sprayed tungsten carbide hardface coatings are used for a wide range of applications spanning both the aerospace and other industrial markets. Major aircraft engine manufacturers and repair facilities use hardface coatings for original engine manufacture (OEM), as well as in the overhaul of critical engine components. The principle function of these coatings is to resist severe wear environments for such wear mechanisms as abrasion, adhesion, fretting, and erosion. The (JP-5000) thermal spray gun is the most advanced in the High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) systems. Recently, it has received considerable attention because of its relative low cost and its production of quality coatings that challenge the very successful but yet very expensive Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) system. The quality of thermal spray coatings is enhanced as porosity, oxidation, residual stress, and surface roughness are reduced or minimized. Higher densification, interfacial bonding strength, hardness and wear resistance of coating are desirable features for quality improvement.

  9. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  10. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: HVLP COATING EQUIPMENT, ITW AUTOMOTIVE REFINISHING, DEVILBISS GTI-600G, HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the DeVilbiss GTi-600G high-volume, low-pressure gravity-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the DeVilbiss GTi, which is designed for use in automotive refinishing. The test coating chosen by ITW Automotive Refinis...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: HVLP COATING EQUIPMENT, ITW AUTOMOTIVE REFINISHING, DEVILBISS FLG-631-318 HVLP SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the verification test of the DeVilbiss FLG-631-318 high-volume, low-pressure gravity-feed spray gun, hereafter referred to as the DeVilbiss FLG, which is designed for use in automotive refinishing. The test coating chosen by ITW Automotive Refi...

  13. Effects of Seismic Air Guns on Pallid Sturgeon and Paddlefish.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Carlson, Thomas J; Gross, Jackson A; Hawkins, Anthony D; Zeddies, David; Powell, Lynwood; Young, John

    2016-01-01

    Pallid sturgeon and paddlefish were placed at different distances from a seismic air gun array to determine the potential effects on mortality and nonauditory body tissues from the sound from a single shot. Fish were held 7 days postexposure and then necropsied. No fish died immediately after sound exposure or over the postexposure period. Statistical analysis of injuries showed no differences between the experimental and control animals in either type or severity of injuries. There was also no difference in injuries between fish exposed closest to the source compared with those exposed furthest from the source. PMID:26611044

  14. Effects of Seismic Air Guns on Pallid Sturgeon and Paddlefish.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Carlson, Thomas J; Gross, Jackson A; Hawkins, Anthony D; Zeddies, David; Powell, Lynwood; Young, John

    2016-01-01

    Pallid sturgeon and paddlefish were placed at different distances from a seismic air gun array to determine the potential effects on mortality and nonauditory body tissues from the sound from a single shot. Fish were held 7 days postexposure and then necropsied. No fish died immediately after sound exposure or over the postexposure period. Statistical analysis of injuries showed no differences between the experimental and control animals in either type or severity of injuries. There was also no difference in injuries between fish exposed closest to the source compared with those exposed furthest from the source.

  15. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  16. Air gun wounding and current UK laws controlling air weapons.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Chwatt, Robert Michael

    2010-04-01

    Air weapons whether rifles or pistols are, potentially, lethal weapons. The UK legislation is complex and yet little known to the public. Hunting with air weapons and the laws controlling those animals that are permitted to be shot with air weapons is even more labyrinthine due to the legal power limitations on the possession of air weapons. Still relatively freely available by mail order or on the Internet, an increasing number of deaths have been reported from the misuse of air weapons or accidental discharges. Ammunition for air weapons has become increasingly sophisticated, effective and therefore increasingly dangerous if misused, though freely available being a mere projectile without a concomitant cartridge containing a propellant and an initiator.

  17. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-09-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 {mm} square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3. Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ }) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  18. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 mm square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3 . Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ } ) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  19. Comparative High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Ni-20Cr Coatings on T22 Boiler Steel Produced by HVOF, D-Gun, and Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Gagandeep; Bala, Niraj; Kaur, Narinder; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    To protect materials from surface degradations such as wear, corrosion, and thermal flux, a wide variety of materials can be deposited on the materials by several spraying processes. This paper examines and compares the microstructure and high-temperature corrosion of Ni-20Cr coatings deposited on T22 boiler steel by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF), detonation gun spray, and cold spraying techniques. The coatings' microstructural features were characterized by means of XRD and FE-SEM/EDS analyses. Based upon the results of mass gain, XRD, and FE-SEM/EDS analyses it may be concluded that the Ni-20Cr coating sprayed by all the three techniques was effective in reducing the corrosion rate of the steel. Among the three coatings, D-gun spray coating proved to be better than HVOF-spray and cold-spray coatings.

  20. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  1. Phase characteristic analysis of continuous depth air-gun source wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Liu, Huaishan; Zheng, Xilai; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Linfei; Zou, Zhihui; Xu, Yiming

    2016-10-01

    Air guns are important sources for marine seismic exploration. Far-field wavelet of air gun arrays, as a necessary parameter for pre-stack processing and source models, plays an important role during marine seismic data processing and interpretation. When an air gun fires, it generates a series of air bubbles. Similar to onshore seismic exploration, the water forms a plastic fluid near the bubble; the farther the air gun is located from the measurement, the more steady and more accurately represented the wavelet will be. In practice, hydrophones should be placed more than 100 m from the air gun; however, traditional seismic cables cannot meet this requirement. On the other hand, vertical cables provide a viable solution to this problem. This study uses a vertical cable to receive wavelets from 38 air guns and data are collected offshore Southeast Qiong, where the water depth is over 1000 m. In this study, the wavelets measured using this technique coincide very well with the simulated wavelets and can therefore represent the real shape of the wavelets. This experiment fills a technology gap in China.

  2. Impact of air gun noise on the behaviour of marine fish and squid.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, J L; McCauley, R D

    2012-05-01

    In this study various species of captive marine fish and one species of squid were exposed to the noise from a single air gun. Six trials were conducted off the coast of Western Australia with each trial using a different noise exposure regime. Noise levels received by the animals ranged between 120 and 184 dB re 1 μPa(2).s (SEL). Behavioural observations of the fish and squid were made before, during and after air gun noise exposure. Results indicate that as air gun noise levels increase, fish respond by moving to the bottom of the water column and swimming faster in more tightly cohesive groups. Significant increases in alarm responses were observed in fish and squid to air gun noise exceeding 147-151 dB re 1 μPa SEL. An increase in the occurrence of alarm responses was also observed as noise level increased.

  3. Retained periorbital and intracranial air-gun pellets causing sclopetaria and visual loss☆

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amry, Mohammad; Al-Taweel, Hassan; Al-Enazi, Nawaf; Alrobaian, Malek; Al-Othaimeen, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Three healthy males presented on separate occasions to the emergency room at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) after sustaining trauma by air-gun pellets. Clinical examination indicated sclopetaria in all the cases. The foreign bodies (air-gun pellets) were imbedded in different locations (subconjunctival, intraorbital, and intracranial). All cases resulted in a profound and permanent visual loss. The management of this traumatic injury is discussed and concurs with the published literature. PMID:25278803

  4. Exposures to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate during polyurethane spray painting in the U.S. Air Force.

    PubMed

    Carlton, G N; England, E C

    2000-09-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) exposures were measured during polyurethane enamel spray painting at four Air Force bases. Breathing zone samples were collected for HDI monomer and polyisocyanates (oligomers) using three sampling methods: NIOSH Method 5521, the Iso-Chek sampler, and the total aerosol mass method (TAMM). Exposures to HDI monomer are low when compared to current occupational exposure limits; the highest 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) exposure found was 3.5 micrograms/m3, below the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 34 micrograms/m3. HDI oligomer levels were higher; mean task exposures indicated by either the Iso-Chek sampler or TAMM are above the Oregon ceiling limit of 1 mg/m3. Eight-hour TWA exposures, however, were much lower, with only one exceeding the Oregon standard of 0.5 mg/m3. Poor worker practices commonly observed during this study included: standing in downwind positions so paint overspray passed through breathing zones; spraying toward other painters; and using excessive paint spray gun air cap pressures. Workers should stand in upwind orientation relative to the aircraft being painted, causing overspray to move away from the painter's breathing zone; adjust their position to prevent spraying other painters or limit paint application to one worker at a time; and use air cap pressure gauges prior to spraying to limit spray gun air cap pressures and reduce paint overspray generation rates. These improved techniques will result in reduced worker exposures to isocyanates. PMID:10983405

  5. Effect of atomization air on droplet dynamics of spray flames

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, C.; Semerjian, H.G. . Center for Chemical Technology); Gupta, A.K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Fuel spray combustions is an important part of a wide variety of propulsion and power systems such as furnaces and gas turbine combustors, afterburners, fuel-injection internal combustion engines, liquid rocket engines, etc. Recent studies using air-assist nozzles have shown that the design and fabrication of these nozzles can directly influence spray circumferential uniformity, i.e., the presence of asymmetrical fuel flux profiles in combustors. The practical implications of these fuel flux nonuniformities are that they seriously alter the spray structure, which subsequently affects droplet/air interactions, local fuel/air mixing, overall flame characteristics and combustor performance, and pollutant emission levels. In addition, the effect of aerodynamic factors on spray characteristics has been investigated. This paper discusses the effect of atomization air on the droplet dynamics of spray flames formed by an air-assist nozzle. Presented are spatial distributions of mean droplet velocity and their probability distributions, which provide quantitative information for examination of the observed spray flame features.

  6. Influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters of spring-piston air guns.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    In firearm examiners' and forensic specialists' casework as well as in air gun proof testing, reliable measurement of the weapon's muzzle velocity is indispensable. While there are standardized and generally accepted procedures for testing the performance of air guns, the method of seating the diabolo pellets deeper into the breech of break barrel spring-piston air guns has not found its way into standardized test procedures. The influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters was investigated using ten different break barrel spring-piston air guns. Test shots were performed with the diabolo pellets seated 2 mm deeper into the breech using a pellet seater. The results were then compared to reference shots with conventionally loaded diabolo pellets. Projectile velocity was measured with a high-precision redundant ballistic speed measurement system. In eight out of ten weapons, the muzzle energy increased significantly when the pellet seater was used. The average increase in kinetic energy was 31 % (range 9-96 %). To conclude, seating the pellet even slightly deeper into the breech of spring-piston air guns might significantly alter the muzzle energy. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this effect is taken into account when accurate and reliable measurements of air gun muzzle velocity are necessary. PMID:27448569

  7. Influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters of spring-piston air guns.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    In firearm examiners' and forensic specialists' casework as well as in air gun proof testing, reliable measurement of the weapon's muzzle velocity is indispensable. While there are standardized and generally accepted procedures for testing the performance of air guns, the method of seating the diabolo pellets deeper into the breech of break barrel spring-piston air guns has not found its way into standardized test procedures. The influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters was investigated using ten different break barrel spring-piston air guns. Test shots were performed with the diabolo pellets seated 2 mm deeper into the breech using a pellet seater. The results were then compared to reference shots with conventionally loaded diabolo pellets. Projectile velocity was measured with a high-precision redundant ballistic speed measurement system. In eight out of ten weapons, the muzzle energy increased significantly when the pellet seater was used. The average increase in kinetic energy was 31 % (range 9-96 %). To conclude, seating the pellet even slightly deeper into the breech of spring-piston air guns might significantly alter the muzzle energy. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this effect is taken into account when accurate and reliable measurements of air gun muzzle velocity are necessary.

  8. Country made scare gun vs. air gun--a comparative study of terminal ballistics using gelatine blocks.

    PubMed

    Hallikeri, Vinay R; Gouda, Hareesh S; Kadagoudar, Shivanand A

    2012-01-10

    Country made scare gun also called as bandook in the vernacular language designed with an intention of scaring away the menacing animals is not only unique and effective but also potentially lethal and has found wide spread usage in the rural parts of India. Here an attempt has been made to study the characteristic features such as physical dimensions, mechanism of action of this weapon and to compare its penetrating ability with that of air gun, whose potential lethality is a well-documented fact, using the ballistic gelatine blocks at various ranges. It is hoped that keeping the existence of such firearms in mind by the forensic experts might help to solve the unexplained and bizarre firearm injuries encountered in day to day practice.

  9. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  10. Air rifles are more than toys: BB gun-related traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Klopotek, Blaine; Weibley, Richard; Chapados, Rene

    2014-12-01

    Gunshot wounds are traumatic events that emergency departments around the country treat on a daily basis. An increasing number of these wounds are being caused by air rifles that shoot ball bearings (ie, BB guns) and, although uncommon, the results can be fatal. The general public and most practitioners may not realize the damage these "toys" can inflict. This article highlights an unfortunate event involving a BB gun accidentally discharged at close range and the consequences. Data from recent and older studies are discussed regarding the firepower of these guns and their potential for injury. PMID:25486035

  11. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the performance of supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray (Warm Spray) gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, H.; Morita, H.; Komatsu, M.; Kuroda, S.

    2011-03-01

    The water-cooled supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun was developed to make a coating of temperature-sensitive material, such as titanium, on a substrate. The gun has a combustion chamber (CC) followed by a mixing chamber (MC), in which the combustion gas is mixed with the nitrogen gas at room temperature. The mixed gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle followed by a straight passage called the barrel. This paper proposes an experimental procedure to estimate the cooling rate of CC, MC and barrel separately. Then, the mathematical model is presented to predict the pressure and temperature in the MC for the specific mass flow rates of fuel, oxygen and nitrogen by assuming chemical equilibrium with water-cooling in the CC and MC, and frozen flow with constant specific heat from stagnant condition to the throat in the CC and MC. Finally, the present mathematical model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured stagnant pressures of the CC of the two-stage HVOF gun.

  12. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  13. An experimental study of air-assist atomizer spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chien-Pei; Wang, Geng; Chigier, Norman

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that air-assisted atomizer spray flames encountered in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine combustors possess a more complex structure than homogeneous turbulent diffusion flames, due to the swirling motion introduced into the fuel and air flows for the control of flame stability, length, combustion intensity, and efficiency. Detailed comparisons are presented between burning and nonburning condition measurements of these flames obtained by nonintrusive light scattering phase/Doppler detection. Spray structure is found to be drastically changed within the flame reaction zone, with changes in the magnitude and shape of drop number density, liquid flux, mean drop size diameter, and drop mean axial velocity radial distributions.

  14. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  15. Effect of High Air Velocities on the Distribution and Penetration of a Fuel Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1931-01-01

    By means of the NACA Spray Photography Equipment high speed moving pictures were taken of the formation and development of fuel sprays from an automatic injection valve. The sprays were injected normal to and counter to air at velocities from 0 to 800 feet per second. The air was at atmosphere temperature and pressure. The results show that high air velocities are an effective means of mixing the fuel spray with the air during injection.

  16. Spray and dust hang in the air, as the demolition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Spray and dust hang in the air, as the demolition is completed. Only the southeast pier remains standing at right. View is to southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  17. Auditory Effects of Multiple Impulses from a Seismic Air Gun on Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schlundt, Carolyn E; Finneran, James J; Branstetter, Brian K; Trickey, Jennifer S; Bowman, Victoria; Jenkins, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Auditory thresholds were measured in three bottlenose dolphins before and after exposure to ten impulses from a seismic air gun. Thresholds were measured using behavioral and electrophysiological methods to determine the amount of temporary threshold shift induced. The results suggest that the potential for seismic surveys using air guns to cause auditory effects on dolphins may be lower than previously predicted; however, two of the three dolphins exhibited "anticipatory" behavioral changes at the highest exposure condition that suggested they were attempting to mitigate the effects of the exposures.

  18. Penetrated sigmoid colon by air gun pellet could be life threatening: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Krasniqi, Avdyl S.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Zejnullahu, Valon A.; Sada, Fatos E.; Bicaj, Besnik X.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Air and paintball guns have been in existence for over 400 year. Although serious injury or death can result from the use of such guns, previous literature has not mentioned the issue of the penetration of the sigmoid colon by an air gun pellet. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of a 44-year-old Caucasian woman referred to abdominal surgery after an accidental small wound had occurred in the lower left abdominal quadrant that was caused by an air gun pellet. The blood and biochemical analyses were normal but the CT scan revealed the presence of a foreign body – an air gun pellet in the left iliac region of the abdomen. Clinically, during the initial 24 h significant changes were not noticed. After 42 h, however, pain and local tenderness in the lower left abdominal quadrant was expressed. A laparotomy revealed a retained pellet in the wall of the sigmoid colon and a small leak with colonic content with consecutive local peritonitis also occurred. The foreign body was removed and the opening edges in the colon were excised and closed with the primary suture. DISCUSSION The hollow organs of the digestive tract, albeit very rarely penetrated by an air gun pellet, do not typically show all signs of an acute abdomen in the early posttraumatic phase. Such injuries can lead to a pronounced infection, which may cause septic shock if not appropriately treated. CONCLUSION For correct diagnosis, a careful approach and several daily clinical observations are required. PMID:25437671

  19. Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John Timothy; Hollenbeck, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of

  20. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  1. Two-channel telemeter for use in a 3-inch spin air gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, F.

    1981-06-01

    A special two-channel telemeter-projectile system designed and built for use in a 3-in. spin air gun is described. The system allows batteries to be tested at a far lower cost than field testing. The telemeter projectile is unusually gun rugged an reusable in a simulated artillery environment. Test-battery current and voltage is continuously monitored by subcarrier oscillators. The fuze simulator contains logic components for controlling the battery land program, rather than using steady-state loads for the full flight. This telemeter system has potential applications in remote voltage monitoring over long periods of time.

  2. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment.

  3. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment. PMID:20685717

  4. Carbon dioxide capture from atmospheric air using sodium hydroxide spray.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Keith, David W; Lowry, Gregory V

    2008-04-15

    In contrast to conventional carbon capture systems for power plants and other large point sources, the system described in this paper captures CO2 directly from ambient air. This has the advantages that emissions from diffuse sources and past emissions may be captured. The objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of a NaOH spray-based contactor for use in an air capture system by estimating the cost and energy requirements per unit CO2 captured. A prototype system is constructed and tested to measure CO2 absorption, energy use, and evaporative water loss and compared with theoretical predictions. A numerical model of drop collision and coalescence is used to estimate operating parameters for a full-scale system, and the cost of operating the system per unit CO2 captured is estimated. The analysis indicates that CO2 capture from air for climate change mitigation is technically feasible using off-the-shelf technology. Drop coalescence significantly decreases the CO2 absorption efficiency; however, fan and pump energy requirements are manageable. Water loss is significant (20 mol H2O/mol CO2 at 15 degrees C and 65% RH) but can be lowered by appropriately designing and operating the system. The cost of CO2 capture using NaOH spray (excluding solution recovery and CO2 sequestration, which may be comparable) in the full-scale system is 96 $/ton-CO2 in the base case, and ranges from 53 to 127 $/ton-CO2 under alternate operating parameters and assumptions regarding capital costs and mass transfer rate. The low end of the cost range is reached by a spray with 50 microm mean drop diameter, which is achievable with commercially available spray nozzles.

  5. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  6. The study on the interdependence of spray characteristics and evaporation history of fuel spray in high temperature air crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Chin, J. S.

    1986-06-01

    A numerical calculation method is used to predict the variation of the characteristics of fuel spray moving in a high temperature air crossflow, mainly, Sauter mean diameter SMD, droplet size distribution index N of Rosin-Rammler distribution and evaporation percentage changing with downstream distance X from the nozzle. The effect of droplet heat-up period evaporation process and forced convection are taken into full account; thus, the calculation model is a very good approximation to the process of spray evaporation in a practical combustor, such as ramjet, aero-gas turbine, liquid propellant rocket, diesel and other liquid fuel-powered combustion devices. The changes of spray characteristics N, SMD and spray evaporation percentage with air velocity, pressure, temperature, fuel injection velocity, and the initial spray parameters are presented.

  7. Development of a Model to Assess Masking Potential for Marine Mammals by the Use of Air Guns in Antarctic Waters.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Dietrich; Tougaard, Jakob; Stilz, Peter; Dähne, Michael; Clark, Christopher W; Lucke, Klaus; von Benda-Beckmann, Sander; Ainslie, Michael A; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the long-range effects of air gun array noise on marine mammal communication ranges in the Southern Ocean. Air gun impulses are subject to significant distortion during propagation, potentially resulting in a quasi-continuous sound. Propagation modeling to estimate the received waveform was conducted. A leaky integrator was used as a hearing model to assess communication masking in three species due to intermittent/continuous air gun sounds. Air gun noise is most probably changing from impulse to continuous noise between 1,000 and 2,000 km from the source, leading to a reduced communication range for, e.g., blue and fin whales up to 2,000 km from the source.

  8. Development of a Model to Assess Masking Potential for Marine Mammals by the Use of Air Guns in Antarctic Waters.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Dietrich; Tougaard, Jakob; Stilz, Peter; Dähne, Michael; Clark, Christopher W; Lucke, Klaus; von Benda-Beckmann, Sander; Ainslie, Michael A; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the long-range effects of air gun array noise on marine mammal communication ranges in the Southern Ocean. Air gun impulses are subject to significant distortion during propagation, potentially resulting in a quasi-continuous sound. Propagation modeling to estimate the received waveform was conducted. A leaky integrator was used as a hearing model to assess communication masking in three species due to intermittent/continuous air gun sounds. Air gun noise is most probably changing from impulse to continuous noise between 1,000 and 2,000 km from the source, leading to a reduced communication range for, e.g., blue and fin whales up to 2,000 km from the source. PMID:26611093

  9. Use of a seismic air gun to reduce survival of nonnative lake trout embryos: A tool for conservation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, B.S.; Dux, A.M.; Quist, M.C.; Guy, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    The detrimental impacts of nonnative lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in the western USA have prompted natural resource management agencies in several states to implement lake trout suppression programs. Currently, these programs rely on mechanical removal methods (i.e., gill nets, trap nets, and angling) to capture subadult and adult lake trout. We conducted a study to explore the potential for using high-intensity sound from a relatively small (655.5 cm3 [40 in3]) seismic air gun to reduce survival of lake trout embryos. Lake trout embryos at multiple stages of development were exposed to a single discharge of the seismic air gun at two depths (5 and 15 m) and at two distances from the air gun (0.1 and 2.7 m). Control groups for each developmental stage, distance, and depth were treated identically except that the air gun was not discharged. Mortality in lake trout embryos treated at 0.1 m from the air gun was 100% at 74 daily temperature units in degrees Celsius (TU°C) at both depths. Median mortality in lake trout embryos treated at 0.1 m from the air gun at 207 TU°C (93%) and 267 °C (78%) appeared to be higher than that of controls (49% and 48%, respectively) at 15-m depth. Among the four lake trout developmental stages, exposure to the air gun at 0.1 m resulted in acute mortality up to 60% greater than that of controls. Mortality at a distance of 2.7 m did not appear to differ from that of controls at any developmental stage or at either depth. Our results indicate that seismic air guns have potential as an alternative tool for controlling nonnative lake trout, but further investigation is warranted.

  10. Parametric Study of Slurry-Erosion of Hydroturbine Steels with and without Detonation Gun Spray Coatings using Taguchi Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewal, Harpreet Singh; Bhandari, Sanjeev; Singh, Harpreet

    2012-09-01

    WC-Co-Cr coatings were deposited on some hydroturbine 13Cr4Ni and 16Cr5Ni steels by the detonation-gun spray process. An in-depth characterization of the as-sprayed coating was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. Microhardness and porosity measurements were also made. The coating was found to have a typical splat-like morphology with some indications of unmelted carbide particles. The XRD results showed the presence of WC as the primary phase along with W2C and Co6W6C as secondary phases. Furthermore, the slurry erosion behavior of the coatings was investigated to ascertain the usefulness of the coatings to reduce the slurry erosion of the steels. The effect of four operating factors viz. the velocity, impact angle, concentration, and particle size on the slurry erosion of coated and bare steels has been studied using a high-speed jet-type test rig. The sand used as an erodent was collected from a power plant to replicate the actual turbine conditions. It has been observed that the given cermet coating can enhance the erosion resistance of the steel. Velocity was found to be the most significant factor affecting the erosion behavior of the coating, whereas it was the erodent particle size in the case of uncoated steel. As evidenced from the SEM images, the platelet mechanism of erosion seemed to be the prominent one, causing the removal of material from the surface of the steel, whereas for the coating, the formation and interlinking of cracks resulted in the removal of material.

  11. First assessment of effects of air-gun seismic shooting on marine resources in the central Adriatic sea

    SciTech Connect

    La Bella, G.; Cannata, S.; Froglia, C.

    1996-11-01

    A series of investigations were carried out to test the effects of air-gun seismic shooting on main fishery resources of the Adriatic Sea during summer 1995. The energy source used for the trial was formed by one air-gun array made up by two sub-arrays consisting in 8 air-guns each developing a total volume of c.a. 2500 i{sup 3} at 2000 psi with an amplitude of 60 bar/m. The interval between two was of 25 s. The intensity was of 210 dB re 1 mPa-m/Hz. Acoustical and spectral analysis were performed simultaneously in the surveyed areas to correlate fishery and behavior observations with sound pattern of the energization. Main results were: (1) Analysis of trawl catch data evidenced no significant changes before and after the air-gun seismic profiling. (2) Echosurvey relative estimate of pelagic biomass, performed simultaneously to trawling operations, failed to evidence any significant change in the pelagic biomass subsequent to the seismic shooting. (3) Small differences were observed in the trammel net catch composition, but one single set of pre-post fishing operations could be done in the study period. (4) Similar density estimate were obtained from dredge surveys performed by an hydraulic dredger before and after air-gun seismic profiling over a clam bed in 14 in depth. (5) Video recording of captive fish, kept into cages moored on the sea bottom at 12 in depth, evidenced a Behavioral response to the approach of the sound source; but no lethal event was recorded on captive sea-bass immediately after the seismic shooting. (6) Biochemical and histological analysis were performed to verify if it is to be related to the captive condition or is somewhat consequent to the air-gun energization. These results confirm that no relevant effects are induced on fishery resources by seismic air-gun shooting.

  12. Air Assisted Sprayer for Improved Spray Penetration in Greenhouse Floriculture Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandkar, Sachin V.; Mathur, Shailendra M.; Dhande, Kishor G.; Jadhav, Pravin P.; Gholap, Babasaheb S.

    2015-03-01

    Air assisted spraying is considered as one of the better pesticide application technique. Incorporation of air assistance in the spraying system improves the deposition uniformity in the entire plant canopy structure and spray deposition on the lower part of the plant leaves. In the view of this, an air assisted sleeve boom sprayer was developed for greenhouse floricultural crops. The developed sprayer consisted of air delivery system and spray delivery system. Air delivery system consisted of blower, lance assembly and a tapered air sleeve. Spray delivery system consisted of a pesticide tank, horizontal triplex pump, pressure hose and nozzles. Blower and pump were operated by 5 HP electric motor. Air sleeve and nozzles were supported on horizontal boom. The whole assembly of the sprayer was mounted on the trolley. The developed sprayer was tested in the laboratory to study the effect of different air velocity (9, 12, 16 and 20 m/s) and pump discharge (2.5, 4.5, 7 and 9 L/min) levels on droplet size (VMD), droplet density and uniformity coefficient at six different positions of the artificial plant canopy. Test results revealed that an increase in air velocity resulted in better spray penetration and uniform spray coverage. The optimum results of droplet size (100-150 µm), droplet density (25-35 droplets per cm2) and uniformity coefficient at all plant positions were observed for air velocity of 20 m/s and pump discharge of 2.5 L/min.

  13. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  14. MODE IDENTIFICATION OF AN ARCH DAM BY A DYNAMIC AIR-GUN TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Fedock, Joseph J.; Fletcher, Jon B.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen natural frequencies of a concrete arch dam (Monticello Dam near Sacramento, California) have been identified by using a dynamic testing method which employs an air gun firing in the reservoir as the excitation source. These vibrations modes are determined from the peak responses in the Fourier amplitude spectra of the free-vibration data recorded at three crest locations using three-component geophones. Comparisons of the first five natural frequencies with results obtained by forced vibration tests using rotating mass shakers show good agreement. The next eight higher-frequency modes, not previously identified, are determined from data of the present tests.

  15. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  16. Microstructure of Suspension Plasma Spray and Air Plasma Spray Al2O3-ZrO2 Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dianying; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice

    2009-09-01

    Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings were deposited by the suspension plasma spray (SPS) molecularly mixed amorphous powder and the conventional air plasma spray (APS) Al2O3-ZrO2 crystalline powder. The amorphous powder was produced by heat treatment of molecularly mixed chemical solution precursors below their crystallization temperatures. Phase composition and microstructure of the as-synthesized and heat-treated SPS and APS coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. XRD analysis shows that the as-sprayed SPS coating is composed of α-Al2O3 and tetragonal ZrO2 phases, while the as-sprayed APS coating consists of tetragonal ZrO2, α-Al2O3, and γ-Al2O3 phases. Microstructure characterization revealed that the Al2O3 and ZrO2 phase distribution in SPS coatings is much more homogeneous than that of APS coatings.

  17. Mixing of an Airblast-atomized Fuel Spray Injected into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; McDonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The injection of a spray of fuel droplets into a crossflow of air provides a means of rapidly mixing liquid fuel and air for combustion applications. Injecting the liquid as a spray reduces the mixing length needed to accommodate liquid breakup, while the transverse injection of the spray into the air stream takes advantage of the dynamic mixing induced by the jet-crossflow interaction. The structure of the spray, formed from a model plain-jet airblast atomizer, is investigated in order to determine and understand the factors leading to its dispersion. To attain this goal, the problem is divided into the following tasks which involve: (1) developing planar imaging techniques that visualize fuel and air distributions in the spray, (2) characterizing the airblast spray without a crossflow, and (3) characterizing the airblast spray upon injection into a crossflow. Geometric and operating conditions are varied in order to affect the atomization, penetration, and dispersion of the spray into the crossflow. The airblast spray is first characterized, using imaging techniques, as it issues into a quiescent environment. The spray breakup modes are classified in a liquid Reynolds number versus airblast Weber number regime chart. This work focuses on sprays formed by the "prompt" atomization mode, which induces a well-atomized and well-dispersed spray, and which also produces a two-lobed liquid distribution corresponding to the atomizing air passageways in the injector. The characterization of the spray jet injected into the crossflow reveals the different processes that control its dispersion. Correlations that describe the inner and outer boundaries of the spray jet are developed, using the definition of a two-phase momentum-flux ratio. Cross-sections of the liquid spray depict elliptically-shaped distributions, with the exception of the finely-atomized sprays which show kidney-shaped distributions reminiscent of those obtained in gaseous jet in crossflow systems. A droplet

  18. Experimental effect of shots caused by projectiles fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J.

    PubMed

    Smędra-Kaźmirska, Anna; Barzdo, Maciej; Kędzierski, Maciej; Antoszczyk, Łukasz; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Pursuant to the Polish Weapons and Ammunitions Law (Legal Gazette No 53/1999 item 549 with subsequent amendments), air guns with kinetic energy of the fired projectiles below 17 J are not regarded as weapons. The aim of the study was to assess the potential effect of shots caused by projectiles of various mass and structure fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J on human soft tissues. As a model of soft tissue, we used 20% gelatin blocks. After shooting, we measured the depth of gelatin block penetration by pellets fired from various distances and compared these results with autopsy findings. The results demonstrated that examined pneumatic guns may cause serious injuries, including damage to the pleura, pericardium, liver, spleen, kidneys, femoral artery, and thoracic and abdominal aorta. Experiment shown that gelatin blocks do not reflect fully the properties of the human body.

  19. Experimental effect of shots caused by projectiles fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J.

    PubMed

    Smędra-Kaźmirska, Anna; Barzdo, Maciej; Kędzierski, Maciej; Antoszczyk, Łukasz; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Pursuant to the Polish Weapons and Ammunitions Law (Legal Gazette No 53/1999 item 549 with subsequent amendments), air guns with kinetic energy of the fired projectiles below 17 J are not regarded as weapons. The aim of the study was to assess the potential effect of shots caused by projectiles of various mass and structure fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J on human soft tissues. As a model of soft tissue, we used 20% gelatin blocks. After shooting, we measured the depth of gelatin block penetration by pellets fired from various distances and compared these results with autopsy findings. The results demonstrated that examined pneumatic guns may cause serious injuries, including damage to the pleura, pericardium, liver, spleen, kidneys, femoral artery, and thoracic and abdominal aorta. Experiment shown that gelatin blocks do not reflect fully the properties of the human body. PMID:23919403

  20. Microstructural study of as sprayed and heat treated Ni3Al coatings deposited by air plasma spraying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Rauf, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Air plasma spraying system was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI 321 steel samples. After plasma spraying the coatings were heat treated at different temperatures i.e. 500 °C to 800 °C for 10 to 100 hours. The characterization tools such as, X-Ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy were used. By comparing the XRD scan data of as sprayed and heat treated coating, it was observed that the formation of NiO increases drastically with time and temperature. Due to the formation of NiO, hardness was also enhanced. The oxidation behavior was observed by using optical microscope and when it was studied that the oxidation was increasing with time and temperature. Further, the SEM tool was utilized to study the detail microstructural behavior such as shrinkage cavity and oxide particles. The other phases like alumina and spinel phases were determined by using Energy dispersive spectrometer method.

  1. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  2. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  3. Entrapment of an air gun pellet between the thyroid cartilage and the lining mucosa in a patient with a penetrating neck injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Air guns, either modern or traditional models, are powerful weapons that are capable of causing serious or life-threatening injuries. Case presentation Here, we present a case of an air gun pellet injury, with the pellet trapped between the thyroid cartilage and the lining mucosa of a 58-year-old Iranian man. Conclusion Entrapment of air gun pellet between thyroid cartilage and the lining mucosa, as presented in our case, may cause diagnostic challenges through the clinical presentation of slight odynophagia. PMID:22759623

  4. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  5. Titanium Dioxide Coatings Sprayed by a Water-Stabilized Plasma Gun (WSP) with Argon and Nitrogen as the Powder Feeding Gas: Differences in Structural, Mechanical and Photocatalytic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctibor, P.; Pala, Z.; Sedláček, J.; Štengl, V.; Píš, I.; Zahoranová, T.; Nehasil, V.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were sprayed by a water-stabilized plasma gun to form robust self-supporting bodies with a photocatalytically active surface. Agglomerated nanometric powder was used as a feedstock. In one case argon was used as a powder-feeding as well as coating-cooling gas whereas in the other case nitrogen was used. Stainless steel was used as a substrate and the coatings were released after the cooling. Over one millimeter thick self-supporting bodies were studied by XRD, HR-TEM, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and photocatalytic tests. Selected tests were done at the surface as well as at the bottom side representing the contact surface with the substrate during the spray process. Porosity was studied by image analysis on polished cross sections where also microhardness was measured. The dominant phase present in the sprayed samples was rutile, whereas anatase was only a minor component. The hydrogen content in the nitrogen-assisted coating was higher, but the character of the optical absorption edge remained the same for both samples. Photoelectron spectroscopy revealed differences in the character of the O1s peak between both samples. The photocatalytic activity was tested by decomposition of acetone at UV illumination, whereas also the end products—CO and CO2—were monitored. The nitrogen-assisted coating was revealed as a more efficient photocatalyst. Certain aspects of a thermal post-treatment on the coatings are discussed as well. Color and electrical conductivity are markedly changed at annealing at 760 °C, whereas only very small changes of the as-sprayed coating character correspond to annealing at 500 °C.

  6. PTV analysis of the entrained air into the diesel spray at high-pressure injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Naoki; Yamashita, Hayato; Mashida, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    In order to clarify the effect of high-pressure injection on soot reduction in terms of the air entrainment into spray, the air flow surrounding the spray and set-off length indicating the distance from the nozzle tip to the flame region in diffusion diesel combustion were investigated using 300MPa injection of a multi-hole injector. The measurement of the air entrainment flow was carried out at non-evaporating condition using consecutive PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) method with a high-speed camera and a high-frequency pulse YAG laser. The set-off length was measured at highpressure and high-temperature using the combustion bomb of constant volume and optical system of shadow graph method. And the amount of air entrainment into spray until reaching set-off length in diffusion combustion was studied as a factor of soot formation.

  7. Spray drift and off-target loss reduction with a precision air-assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray drift and off-target losses are inherent problems of conventional air-assisted sprayers. Their low efficiencies cause environmental pollutions resulting in public anxieties. A new drift reduction technology incorporating laser scanning capabilities with a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer w...

  8. The inner ears of Northern Canadian freshwater fishes following exposure to seismic air gun sounds.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiakun; Mann, David A; Cott, Peter A; Hanna, Bruce W; Popper, Arthur N

    2008-08-01

    An earlier study examined the effects of exposure to seismic air guns on the hearing of three species of fish from the Mackenzie River Delta in Northern Canada [Popper et al. (2005). "Effects of exposure to seismic airgun use on hearing of three fish species," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 3958-3971]. The sound pressure levels to which the fishes were exposed were a mean received level of 205-209 dB re 1 microPa (peak) per shot and an approximate received mean SEL of 176-180 dB re 1 microPa(2) s per shot. In this report, the same animals were examined to determine whether there were effects on the sensory cells of the inner ear as a result of the seismic exposure. No damage was found to the ears of the fishes exposed to seismic sounds despite the fact that two of the species, adult northern pike and lake chub, had shown a temporary threshold shift in hearing studies.

  9. Effects of multiple impulses from a seismic air gun on bottlenose dolphin hearing and behavior.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Schlundt, Carolyn E; Branstetter, Brian K; Trickey, Jennifer S; Bowman, Victoria; Jenkins, Keith

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the auditory effects of multiple underwater impulses, hearing thresholds were measured in three bottlenose dolphins before and after exposure to 10 impulses produced by a seismic air gun. Thresholds were measured at multiple frequencies using both psychophysical and electrophysiological (auditory evoked potential) methods. Exposures began at relatively low levels and gradually increased over a period of several months. The highest exposures featured peak sound pressure levels from 196 to 210 dB re 1 μPa, peak-peak sound pressure levels of 200-212 dB re 1 μPa, and cumulative (unweighted) sound exposure levels from 193 to 195 dB re 1 μPa(2)s. At the cessation of the study, no significant increases were observed in psychophysical thresholds; however, a small (9 dB) shift in mean auditory evoked potential thresholds, accompanied by a suppression of the evoked potential amplitude function, was seen in one subject at 8 kHz. At the highest exposure condition, two of the dolphins also exhibited behavioral reactions indicating that they were capable of anticipating and potentially mitigating the effects of impulsive sounds presented at fixed time intervals.

  10. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  11. Homemade Firearm Suicide With Dumbbell Pipe Triggering by an Air-Compressed Gun: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Le Garff, Erwan; Delannoy, Yann; Mesli, Vadim; Berthezene, Jean Marie; Morbidelli, Philippe; Hédouin, Valéry

    2015-12-01

    Firearm suicides are frequent and well described in the forensic literature, particularly in Europe and the United States. However, the use of homemade and improvised firearms is less well described. The present case reports a suicide with an original improvised gun created using an air-compressed pellet gun and a dumbbell pipe. The aims of this study were to describe the scene, the external examination of the corpse, the body scan, and the autopsy; to understand the mechanism of death; and to compare the results with a review of the forensic literature to highlight the epidemiology of homemade firearm use, the tools used for homemade and improvised firearms in suicides versus homicides, and the manners in which homemade firearms are used (homicide or suicide, particularly in complex suicide cases).

  12. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions,...

  13. Symmetry assessment of an air-blast atomizer spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, V. G.; Cameron, C. D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1990-01-01

    This study represents an evaluation of the extent to which conventional and recently introduced modern diagnostics can assess the symmetry of sprays formed by three atomizers of identical design. The conventional diagnostics include sheet-lit photography, patternation, and laser diffraction. The modern diagnostic is laser interferometry (phase Doppler). Symmetry is assessed in ambient conditions for four atomizer orientations, and comparisons are made between the diagnostic techniques. The results demonstrate that conventional and modern diagnostics are consistent in the assessment of symmetry, patternation and phase Doppler are most effective in establishing symmetry of mass flux, and phase Doppler, although more tedious to employ, provides the additional information necessary to establish the sources of detected asymmetries in terms of nonuniformities in droplet velocities, size distributions, volume flux, and concentration.

  14. Investigation of spray characteristics for flashing injection of fuels containing dissolved air and superheated fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Chen, L. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The flow, atomization and spreading of flashing injector flowing liquids containing dissolved gases (jet/air) as well as superheated liquids (Freon II) were considered. The use of a two stage expansion process separated by an expansion chamber, ws found to be beneficial for flashing injection particularly for dissolved gas systems. Both locally homogeneous and separated flow models provided good predictions of injector flow properties. Conventional correlations for drop sizes from pressure atomized and airblast injectors were successfully modified, using the separated flow model to prescribe injector exit conditions, to correlate drop size measurements. Additional experimental results are provided for spray angle and combustion properties of sprays from flashing injectors.

  15. Dislodgeable azinphosmethyl residues from air blast spraying of apple foliage in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Hall, F R; Reichard, D L; Krueger, H R

    1975-01-01

    The distribution and decay rates of dislodgeable residues of azinphosmethyl applied by two types of air blast sprayers on apple foliage in Ohio were investigated. Leaf discs were taken from nine sites located on the periphery of Cortland apple trees at five dates after spraying. The sprayer delivering the higher airflow rate, but lower velocity, deposited the pesticide much more uniformly over the trees and applied more in the top of the tree. The other sprayer deposited the greatest proportion of pesticide on the site nearest the sprayer. The residue decreased at all sites and ranged from 42 to near 100% decrease at 14 days after spraying.

  16. Hot Corrosion Studies of Detonation-Gun-Sprayed NiCrAlY + 0.4 wt.% CeO2 Coated Superalloys in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Subhash; Jayaganthan, R.; Prakash, Satya

    2011-08-01

    Rare earth oxide (CeO2) has been incorporated in NiCrAlY alloy and hot corrosion resistance of detonation-gun-sprayed NiCrAlY + 0.4 wt.% CeO2 coatings on superalloys, namely, superni 75, superni 718, and superfer 800H in molten 40% Na2SO4-60% V2O5 salt environment were investigated at 900 °C for 100 cycles. The coatings exhibited characteristic splat globular dendritic structure with diameter similar to the original powder particles. The weight change technique was used to establish corrosion kinetics. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (FE-SEM/EDAX), and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyze the corrosion products. Coated superfer 800H alloy showed the highest corrosion resistance among the examined superalloys. CeO2 was found to be distributed in the coating along the splat boundaries, whereas Al streaks distributed non-uniformly. The main phases observed for the coated superalloys are oxides of Ni, Cr, Al, and spinels, which are suggested to be responsible for developing corrosion resistance.

  17. Experimental Study on Electrostatic Hazards in Sprayed Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwang Seok; Yamaguma, Mizuki; Ohsawa, Atsushi

    2007-12-01

    In this study, to evaluate ignition hazards in a paint process, electrostatic sparks in the sprayed area and the amount of charge while spraying were observed. With the objective of preventing accidents involving fires and/or explosions, we deal also with the ignitability due to an electrostatic spark of a sprayed liquid relative to the percentage of nitrogen (N2), including compression in an air cylinder. For this study, an air-spray-type handheld gun with a 1-mm-internal-diameter orifice and a supply of air pressure in the range of 0.1 to 1 MPa were used. With regard to the materials, water, including some sodium chloride, was used to investigate the charge amount of the sprayed liquid, and kerosene was selected for ignition tests while spraying. Several electrostatic sparks in the sprayed region were observed while spraying. Some values of the electrostatic charge observed in the course of this study would be unsafe in the painting industry. Thus, if any of the conductive parts of the equipment are not grounded, incendiary electrostatic sparks can result. The ignitability of sprayed liquid was markedly reduced; the percentage of N2 in the air was substituted for pressurized pure air, and its efficiency increased with air pressure.

  18. Shipboard assessment of hearing sensitivity of tropical fishes immediately after exposure to seismic air gun emissions at Scott Reef.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Mardi C; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the potential effects of emissions from an air gun array on hearing of tropical reef fish using AEP thresholds measured in the field. Over 7 days, 51 Chromis viridis,47 Lutjanus kasmira, 20 Myripristis murdjan, and 10 Sargocentron spiniferum were tested. AEP thresholds were determined before and after exposure to emissions from one or two passes of an airgun array. Temporary threshold shift resulting from sound exposure was not found in any species,even when cumulative sound exposure levels reached 190 dB re 1 μPa2-s.

  19. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  20. Gun Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Biology and the particular gun culture of the United States come together to explain the persistent and powerful attraction of American boys to both real guns and toy guns. The 1990s saw adults begin to conflate "the gun problem" with "the boy problem," sparking attempts (largely failed) to banish toy guns from homes and…

  1. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  2. Development of a new modular aerial spray system and night application capability for the U.S. Air Force

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Air Force maintains a capability with the C130 aircraft to conduct aerial spray operations over large areas for controlling insects of medical importance. The current modular aerial spray system (MASS) is custom designed to support a variety of configurations from ultralow volume space spra...

  3. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  4. Quantifying the uncertainty of geoacoustic parameter estimates for the New Jersey shelf by inverting air gun data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Min; Chapman, N Ross; Badiey, Mohsen

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes geoacoustic inversion of low frequency air gun data acquired during an experiment on the New Jersey shelf. Hybrid optimization and Bayesian inversion techniques based on matched field processing were applied to multiple shots from three air gun data sets recorded by a vertical line array in a long-range shallow water geometry. For the Bayesian inversions, full data error covariance matrix was estimated from a set of consecutive shots that had high temporal coherence and small spatial variation in source position. The effect of different data error information on the geoacoustic parameter uncertainty estimates was investigated by using the full data error covariance matrix, a diagonalized version of the full error covariance, and a diagonal matrix with identical variances. The comparison demonstrated that inversion using the full data error information provided the most reliable parameter uncertainty estimates. The inversions were highly sensitive to the near sea floor geoacoustic parameters, including sediment attenuation, of a simple single-layer geoacoustic model. The estimated parameter values of the model were consistent with depth averaged values (over wavelength scales) of a high resolution geoacoustic model developed from extensive ground truth information. The interpretation of the frequency dependence of the estimated attenuation is also discussed. PMID:17471704

  5. Parametric study of Al and Al 2O 3 ceramic coatings deposited by air plasma spray onto polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanhong, Sun; Xiaodong, He; Jiuxing, Jiang; Yue, Sun

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum and ceramic (Al 2O 3) coatings were deposited onto the polymer substrate by air plasma spray (APS) to improve the mechanical properties of the polymer surface. The effect of spray parameters (current and spray distance in this paper) on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated. Shear adhesion strength between the coatings and the substrates was also examined. The results indicate that the deposition parameters have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of as-spayed coatings. The maximum shear adhesion strength of the bond coats was 5.21 MPa with the current of 180 A and 190 mm spray distance.

  6. Aerodynamic study on supersonic flows in high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Kazuyasu

    2005-06-01

    To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  7. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  8. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  9. Crystallization of spray-dried lactose/protein mixtures in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawqi Barham, A.; Kamrul Haque, Md.; Roos, Yrjö H.; Kieran Hodnett, B.

    2006-10-01

    An in situ crystallization technique with X-ray diffraction analysis complemented by ex situ scanning electron microscopy and chromatographic analysis of the α/( α+ β) solid-state anomeric ratios has been developed to study the crystallization of lactose/protein mixtures in humid air. This technique was used to determine changes in phase composition and morphology during crystallization. Following an induction period during which water is sorbed, crystallization is rapid and the predominant phase observed using the in situ method in spray-dried lactose/sodium-caseinate, albumin and gelatin is α-lactose monohydrate. However, in the case of spray-dried lactose/whey protein isolate (WPI) the predominant phase that appears is the α/ β mixed phase with smaller amounts of α-lactose monohydrate. With pure lactose the α/ β mixed phase appears as a transient shortly after the onset of crystallization and α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose both appear as stable crystalline phases at longer times. Another transient phase with 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8° was observed in spray-dried lactose/albumin. This phase decomposed as α-lactose monohydrate developed. Three phases seem to persist in the case of spray-dried lactose/gelatin, namely the phase with peaks at 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8°, α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose for the duration of the in situ experiment.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Amorphous Alumina-Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuemei; Suhonen, Tomi; Varis, Tommi; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Almost fully amorphous coatings of near-eutectic alumina-yttria-stabilized zirconia (Al2O3-YSZ) were prepared by air plasma spraying using Al2O3 and 8 mol.% YSZ crystalline-mixed powders. The coatings consist of mostly an amorphous phase with a small amount of nanocrystals. Various characterization techniques were used to understand coating formation and the origins of the different phases within the coatings. The formation of the mostly amorphous structure is attributed to the high glass-forming ability of Al2O3-YSZ and the appropriate plasma spraying conditions. A small number of nanocrystals are produced during crystallization of the incoming molten droplets or by recrystallization of the solidified splats by accumulated heat. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the coatings have a dense, layered structure with low porosity, and bright-field transmission electron microscopy images indicate sharp interface rather than grit-blasted wavy surface between splats and substrates in the coatings. The as-sprayed amorphous coatings crystallized at around 920 °C and micro-hardness of the as-sprayed amorphous coatings was 8.12 GPa.

  11. Seismic air gun exposure during early-stage embryonic development does not negatively affect spiny lobster Jasus edwardsii larvae (Decapoda:Palinuridae)

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan D.; McCauley, Robert D.; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P.; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic surveys are used to explore for sub-seafloor oil and gas deposits. These surveys are conducted using air guns, which release compressed air to create intense sound impulses, which are repeated around every 8–12 seconds and can travel large distances in the water column. Considering the ubiquitous worldwide distribution of seismic surveys, the potential impact of exposure on marine invertebrates is poorly understood. In this study, egg-bearing female spiny lobsters (Jasus edwardsii) were exposed to signals from three air gun configurations, all of which exceeded sound exposure levels (SEL) of 185 dB re 1 μPa2·s. Lobsters were maintained until their eggs hatched and the larvae were then counted for fecundity, assessed for abnormal morphology using measurements of larval length and width, tested for larval competency using an established activity test and measured for energy content. Overall there were no differences in the quantity or quality of hatched larvae, indicating that the condition and development of spiny lobster embryos were not adversely affected by air gun exposure. These results suggest that embryonic spiny lobster are resilient to air gun signals and highlight the caution necessary in extrapolating results from the laboratory to real world scenarios or across life history stages. PMID:26947006

  12. Seismic air gun exposure during early-stage embryonic development does not negatively affect spiny lobster Jasus edwardsii larvae (Decapoda: Palinuridae).

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan D; McCauley, Robert D; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Semmens, Jayson M

    2016-03-07

    Marine seismic surveys are used to explore for sub-seafloor oil and gas deposits. These surveys are conducted using air guns, which release compressed air to create intense sound impulses, which are repeated around every 8-12 seconds and can travel large distances in the water column. Considering the ubiquitous worldwide distribution of seismic surveys, the potential impact of exposure on marine invertebrates is poorly understood. In this study, egg-bearing female spiny lobsters (Jasus edwardsii) were exposed to signals from three air gun configurations, all of which exceeded sound exposure levels (SEL) of 185 dB re 1 μPa(2) · s. Lobsters were maintained until their eggs hatched and the larvae were then counted for fecundity, assessed for abnormal morphology using measurements of larval length and width, tested for larval competency using an established activity test and measured for energy content. Overall there were no differences in the quantity or quality of hatched larvae, indicating that the condition and development of spiny lobster embryos were not adversely affected by air gun exposure. These results suggest that embryonic spiny lobster are resilient to air gun signals and highlight the caution necessary in extrapolating results from the laboratory to real world scenarios or across life history stages.

  13. Seismic air gun exposure during early-stage embryonic development does not negatively affect spiny lobster Jasus edwardsii larvae (Decapoda: Palinuridae).

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan D; McCauley, Robert D; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Semmens, Jayson M

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic surveys are used to explore for sub-seafloor oil and gas deposits. These surveys are conducted using air guns, which release compressed air to create intense sound impulses, which are repeated around every 8-12 seconds and can travel large distances in the water column. Considering the ubiquitous worldwide distribution of seismic surveys, the potential impact of exposure on marine invertebrates is poorly understood. In this study, egg-bearing female spiny lobsters (Jasus edwardsii) were exposed to signals from three air gun configurations, all of which exceeded sound exposure levels (SEL) of 185 dB re 1 μPa(2) · s. Lobsters were maintained until their eggs hatched and the larvae were then counted for fecundity, assessed for abnormal morphology using measurements of larval length and width, tested for larval competency using an established activity test and measured for energy content. Overall there were no differences in the quantity or quality of hatched larvae, indicating that the condition and development of spiny lobster embryos were not adversely affected by air gun exposure. These results suggest that embryonic spiny lobster are resilient to air gun signals and highlight the caution necessary in extrapolating results from the laboratory to real world scenarios or across life history stages. PMID:26947006

  14. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  15. Parameterization of Sea-Spray Impact on Air-Sea Momentum and Heat Fluxes in Hurricane Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jian-Wen; Fairall, Chris; Michelson, Sara; Bianco, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Although it is widely recognized that sea spray under hurricane-strength winds is omnipresent in the marine surface boundary layer (MSBL), how to parameterize the effects of sea spray on the air-sea momentum and heat fluxes at hurricane-strength winds in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models still remains a subject of research. This paper focuses on how the effects of sea spray on the momentum and heat fluxes are parameterized in NWP models using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In this scheme, the effects of sea spray can be considered as an additional modification to the stratification of the near surface profiles of wind, temperature and moisture in the MSBL. The overall impact of sea-spray droplets on the mean profiles of wind, temperature and moisture depends on the wind speed at the level of sea-spray generation (or wave state if available). As the wind speed increases, the droplet size increases, rendering an increase in the spray-mediated total enthalpy flux from the sea to the air and leveling off of the surface drag. When the wind is below 35 ms-1, the droplets are small in size and tend to evaporate substantially and thus cool the spray-filled layer. When the wind is above 50 ms-1, the size of droplets is so big that they do not have enough time to evaporate that much before falling back into the sea. Furthermore, the scheme includes the physics of the suspended sea-spray droplets reducing the buoyancy of the MSBL air, therefore making the surface layer more stable. Results from testing the scheme in a numerical weather prediction model are presented along with a dynamical interpretation of the impact of sea spray on the intensification of tropical cyclones.

  16. Measurements and predictions of a liquid spray from an air-assist nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Daniel L.; Levy, Yeshayahou; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Chitre, Susheel

    1991-01-01

    Droplet size and gas velocity were measured in a water spray using a two-component Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer. A complete set of measurements was obtained at axial locations from 5 to 50 cm downstream of the nozzle. The nozzle used was a simple axisymmetric air-assist nozzle. The sprays produced, using the atomizer, were extremely fine. Sauter mean diameters were less than 20 microns at all locations. Measurements were obtained for droplets ranging from 1 to 50 microns. The gas phase was seeded with micron sized droplets, and droplets having diameters of 1.4 microns and less were used to represent gas-phase properties. Measurements were compared with predictions from a multi-phase computer model. Initial conditions for the model were taken from measurements at 5 cm downstream. Predictions for both the gas phase and the droplets showed relatively good agreement with the measurements.

  17. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  18. Environment and air pollution like gun and bullet for low-income countries: war for better health and wealth.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Azam, Muhammad; Islam, Talat; Zaman, Khalid

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the impact of environmental indicators and air pollution on "health" and "wealth" for the low-income countries. The study used a number of promising variables including arable land, fossil fuel energy consumption, population density, and carbon dioxide emissions that simultaneously affect the health (i.e., health expenditures per capita) and wealth (i.e., GDP per capita) of the low-income countries. The general representation for low-income countries has shown by aggregate data that consist of 39 observations from the period of 1975-2013. The study decomposes the data set from different econometric tests for managing robust inferences. The study uses temporal forecasting for the health and wealth model by a vector error correction model (VECM) and an innovation accounting technique. The results show that environment and air pollution is the menace for low-income countries' health and wealth. Among environmental indicators, arable land has the largest variance to affect health and wealth for the next 10-year period, while air pollution exerts the least contribution to change health and wealth of low-income countries. These results indicate the prevalence of war situation, where environment and air pollution become visible like "gun" and "bullet" for low-income countries. There are required sound and effective macroeconomic policies to combat with the environmental evils that affect the health and wealth of the low-income countries.

  19. Environment and air pollution like gun and bullet for low-income countries: war for better health and wealth.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Azam, Muhammad; Islam, Talat; Zaman, Khalid

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the impact of environmental indicators and air pollution on "health" and "wealth" for the low-income countries. The study used a number of promising variables including arable land, fossil fuel energy consumption, population density, and carbon dioxide emissions that simultaneously affect the health (i.e., health expenditures per capita) and wealth (i.e., GDP per capita) of the low-income countries. The general representation for low-income countries has shown by aggregate data that consist of 39 observations from the period of 1975-2013. The study decomposes the data set from different econometric tests for managing robust inferences. The study uses temporal forecasting for the health and wealth model by a vector error correction model (VECM) and an innovation accounting technique. The results show that environment and air pollution is the menace for low-income countries' health and wealth. Among environmental indicators, arable land has the largest variance to affect health and wealth for the next 10-year period, while air pollution exerts the least contribution to change health and wealth of low-income countries. These results indicate the prevalence of war situation, where environment and air pollution become visible like "gun" and "bullet" for low-income countries. There are required sound and effective macroeconomic policies to combat with the environmental evils that affect the health and wealth of the low-income countries. PMID:26493298

  20. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  1. Microorganism levels in air near spray irrigation of municipal waste water: The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study

    SciTech Connect

    Camann, D.E.; Moore, B.E.; Harding, H.J.; Sorber, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study (LISS) investigated possible adverse effects on human health from slow-rate land application of municipal wastewater. Extensive air sampling was conducted to characterize the irrigation site as a source of infectious microbial aerosols. Spray irrigation of poor-quality waste water received directly from the treatment plant significantly elevated air densities of fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, mycobacteria, and coliphage above ambient background levels for at least 200 m downwind. Enteroviruses were repeatedly recovered at 44 to 60 m downwind at a higher level (geometric mean = 0.05 pfu/m3) than observed at other waste water aerosol sites in the U.S. and in Israel. Waste water storage in reservoirs reduced downwind air densities of indicator organisms by two orders of magnitude.

  2. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  3. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  4. Gas and drop behavior in reacting and non-reacting air-blast atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of the two-phase flow produced by a gas-turbine air-blast atomizer is performed with the goal of identifying the interaction between the two phases for both nonreacting and reacting conditions. A two-component phase Doppler interferometry is utilized to characterize three flowfields produced by the atomizer: (1) the single-phase flow, (2) the two-phase nonreacting spray, and (3) the two-phase reacting spray. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating axial and azimuthal velocities for each phase are obtained. In addition, the droplet size distribution, volume flux, and concentration are measured. The results reveal the strong influence of the dispersed phase on the gas, and the influence of reaction on both the gas and the droplet field. The presence of the spray significantly alters the inlet condition of the atomizer. With this alteration quantified, it is possible to deduce that the inertia associated with the dispersed phase damps the fluctuating velocities of the gas. Reaction reduces the volume flux of the droplets, broadens the local volume distribution of the droplets in the region of the reaction zone, increases the axial velocities and radial spread of the gas, and increases the anisotropy in the region of the reaction zone.

  5. An investigation of particle trajectories and melting in an air plasma sprayed zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The partially stabilized zirconia powders used to plasma spray thermal barrier coatings typically exhibit broad particle-size distributions. There are conflicting reports in the literature about the extent of injection-induced particle-sizing effects in air plasma-sprayed materials. If significant spatial separation of finer and coarser particles in the jet occurs, then one would expect it to play an important role in determining the microstructure and properties of deposits made from powders containing a wide range of particle sizes. This paper presents the results of a study in which a commercially available zirconia powder was fractionated into fine, medium, and coarse cuts and sprayed at the same torch conditions used for the ensemble powder. Diagnostic measurements of particle surface temperature, velocity, and number-density distributions in the plume for each size-cut and for the ensemble powder are reported. Deposits produced by traversing the torch back and forth to produce a raised bead were examined metallographically to study their shape and location with respect to the torch centerline and to look at their internal microstructure. The results show that, for the torch conditions used in this study, the fine, medium, and coarse size-cuts all followed the same mean trajectory. No measureable particle segregation effects were observed. Considerable differences in coatings microstructure were observed. These differences can be explained by the different particle properties measured in the plume.

  6. Spray-on electrodes enable EKG monitoring of physically active subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Easily applied EKG electrodes monitor the heart signals of human subjects engaged in various physical exercises. The electrodes are formed from an air drying, electrically conductive cement mixture that can be applied to the skin by means of a modified commercially available spray gun.

  7. Structure of a methanol/air coaxial reacting spray near the stabilization region

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Edwards, C.F.; Dunsky, C.M. ); Cessou, A.; Stepowski, D. )

    1994-08-01

    Planar laser Mie scattering, planar laser-induced fluorescence and two component phase-doppler interferometry have been used to study the reaction zone structure near the stabilization region of a coaxial methanol/air spray flame. The configuration of the experiment was chosen to approximate the atomizer geometry, surface tension and Weber number of a single coaxial rocket injector. The measurements are made in a water-cooled, optically accessible confinement chamber at a pressure of 1 atm. Data are reported for two atomizing air velocity conditions. One yields a flame length of approximately 1 m, the other, half that value. Both the Weber number (characterizing the atomization process) and the Reynolds number (characterizing the gas-phase mixing process) vary between the cases, but the data suggest that it is the Weber number which has the dominant effect. In both cases OH imaging shows that the reaction zone is confined to a narrow region, with the OH field being similar in appearance to that of a single-phase turbulent mixing-controlled (diffusion) flame. Size-classified mean velocity vectors derived from the phase-doppler data show striking differences in the flow pattern for low and high Stokes number droplets. Droplets 5 [mu]m in diameter and below (Stokes number less than 3) appear to follow the recirculating eddies that provide flame stabilization while droplets of large Stokes number travel ballistically through the flow. Increasing the Weber number by a factor of 2.5 decreased the Sauter mean diameter of the spray by as much as one-third, and the arithmetic mean diameter by as much as one-half. The authors believe that it is this decrease in the spray droplet diameter that is primarily responsible for the very different flame lengths in the two cases.

  8. Air monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons during automobile spray painting for developing change schedule of respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of End of Service Life Indicator (ESLI), a cartridge change schedule should be established for ensuring that cartridges are changed before their end of service life. Factors effecting service life of cartridges were evaluated, including the amount of atmospheric contamination with aromatic hydrocarbon vapors in the workplace, temperature, and relative humidity of the air. A new change schedule was established based on comparing the results of air monitoring and workplace conditions, laboratory experiment, and the NIOSH MultiVapor software. Spray painters were being exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in a range exceeding occupational exposure limits. The cartridge change schedule was not effective and could no longer provide adequate protection against organic contaminants for sprayers. Change schedules for respirator cartridges should be reduced from 16–24 hours to 4 hours. NIOSH’s service life software program could be applied to developing cartridge change schedules. PMID:24468234

  9. Gun Safety

    MedlinePlus

    Many U.S. households have guns, but they can cause harm if not handled properly. Here are some things you can do to keep yourself and ... safe: Teach children that they shouldn't touch guns and that if they see a gun, to ...

  10. [Effect of air humidity on traditional Chinese medicine extract of spray drying process and prediction of its powder stability].

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Xie, Yin; Zheng, Long-jin; Liu, Wei; Rao, Xiao-yong; Luo, Xiao-jian

    2015-02-01

    In order to solve the adhesion and the softening problems of traditional Chinese medicine extract during spray drying, a new method of adding dehumidified air into spray drying process was proposed, and the storage stability conditions of extract powder could be predicted. Kouyanqing extract was taken as model drug to investigate on the wet air (RH = 70%) and dry air conditions of spray drying. Under the dry air condition, the influence of the spray drying result with different air compression ratio and the spray-dried powder properties (extract powder recovery rate, adhesion percentage, water content, angle of repose, compression ratio, particle size and distribution) with 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 °C inlet temperature were studied. The hygroscopic investigation and Tg value with different moisture content of ideal powder were determined. The water activity-equilibrium moisture content (aw-EMC) and the equilibrium moisture content-Tg (EMC-Tg) relationships were fitted by GAB equation and Gordon-Taylor model respectively, and the state diagram of kouyanqing powder was obtained to guide the rational storage conditions. The study found that in the condition of dry air, the extract powder water content decreased with the increase of air compression ratio and the spray drying effect with air compression ratio of 100% was the best performance; in the condition of wet air, the extract powder with high water content and low yield, and the value were 4.26% and 16.73 °C, while, in the dry air condition the values were 2.43% and 24.86 °C with the same other instru- ment parameters. From the analysis of kouyanqing powder state diagram, in order to keep the stability, the critical water content of 3.42% and the critical water content of 0.188. As the water decreased Tg value of extract powder is the major problem of causing adhesion and softening during spray drying, it is meaningful to aid dehumidified air during the process. PMID:26084164

  11. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:20088030

  12. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

  13. Effect of antimicrobials applied on the surface of beef subprimals via an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system(ESS)or the Sprayed Lethality in Container(SLIC)method to control Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system (ESS) and/or the Sprayed Lethality in Container (SLIC®) method to deliver antimicrobials onto the surface of beef subprimals to reduce levels of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC). In brief, beef subprimal...

  14. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  15. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  16. Modeling of air-droplet interaction, substrate melting and coating buildup in thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanghua

    particle feeding velocity. In this thesis, the level set method is used to study the interaction between the droplet and the surrounding air. The level set function is used to track the deformation of the free surface. The capability of this model on accurately and efficiently simulating the droplet deformation and oscillation is demonstrated. The droplet deformation during in-flight caused by the air-droplet interaction and the droplet-substrate interaction are considered here. Particles with different surface tension and morphologies are studied as well. Droplet substrate interaction is studied to understand the substrate melting behavior. A numerical model is developed to investigate the droplet solidification, substrate melting and re-solidification. A dimensionless parameter, "temperature factor", is proposed from analysis and it can be used as an indicator to predict whether substrate melting will occur for a certain combination of the droplet and substrate. This parameter can be correlated with the maximum melting depth of the substrate. The possibility of heating up the substrate by plasma flame, and attaching a temperature-control device on the backside of the substrate to achieve substrate melting is studied. The substrate front surface temperature can be controlled at a sufficient high temperature. With additional heating from superheated molten droplets and the latent heat of droplet solidification, a thin liquid layer of the substrate can be obtained and epitaxy growth of the splats is possible. This could expand thermal spray technology to the applications of semiconductor and solar energy, both of which need epitaxy crystal with big sizes. To better control the existing thermal spray process, it is important to develop the quantitative relationships between spray parameters and coating characteristics. Until recently, the simulation studies have been focused on two-dimensional models and prediction of the cross-section structure of deposited layers; although

  17. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  18. Quo vadis thermal spraying?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, A.; Dussoubs, B.

    2001-03-01

    This paper is devoted to thermal spraying and presents the state of our current knowledge, as well as the following research or development needs: spraying heat sources, i.e., flame, high-velocity oxifuel flame (HVOF), detonation gun (D-Gun), and plasma torches; particle heat and momentum transfer (measurements and modeling), process on-line control, powder morphologies, and injection within the hot jet and reactions with environment; coating formation, i.e., particle flattening and solidification, splat layering, residual stresses, coating microstructure, and properties; and reliability and reproducibility of coatings.

  19. Effect of the entrained air and initial droplet velocity on the release height parameter of a Gaussian spray drift model.

    PubMed

    Stainier, C; Destain, M F; Schiffers, B; Lebeau, F

    2006-01-01

    The increased concern about environmental effect of off-target deposits of pesticides use has resulted in the development of numerous spray drift models. Statistical models based on experimental field studies are used to estimate off-target deposits for different sprayers in various environmental conditions. Random-walk and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been used to predict the effect of operational parameters and were extensively validated in wind tunnel. A third group, Gaussian dispersion models have been used for several years for the environmental assessment of the pesticide spray drift, mainly for aerial application. When these models were used for the evaluation of boom sprayer spray drift, their predictions were found unreliable in the short range, were the initial release conditions of the droplets have a significant effect on the spray deposits. For longer ranges, the results were found consistent with the field measurements as the characteristics of the source have a reduced influence on the small droplets drift. Three major parameters must be taken into account in order to define realistic initial conditions of the droplets in a spray drift model: the spray pattern of the nozzle, the boom movements and the effect of entrained air and droplet velocities. To take theses parameters into account in a Gaussian model, the nozzle droplet size distribution measured with a PIV setup to divide the nozzle output into several size classes. The spray deposits of each diameter class was computed for each successive position of the nozzle combining the nozzle spray distribution with drift computed with a Gaussian tilting plume model. The summation of these footprints resulted in the global drift of the nozzle. For increasing droplet size, the release height used in the Gaussian model was decreased from nozzle height to ground level using an experimental law to take into account the effect of entrained air and droplet initial velocity. The experimental

  20. Evaluation of control parameters for Spray-In-Air (SIA) aqueous cleaning for shuttle RSRM hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. J.; Deweese, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    HD-2 grease is deliberately applied to Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) D6AC steel hardware parts as a temporary protective coating for storage and shipping. This HD-2 grease is the most common form of surface contamination on RSRM hardware and must be removed prior to subsequent surface treatment. Failure to achieve an acceptable level of cleanliness (HD-2 calcium grease removal) is a common cause of defect incidence. Common failures from ineffective cleaning include poor adhesion of surface coatings, reduced bond performance of structural adhesives, and failure to pass cleanliness inspection standards. The RSRM hardware is currently cleaned and refurbished using methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane). This chlorinated solvent is mandated for elimination due to its ozone depleting characteristics. This report describes an experimental study of an aqueous cleaning system (which uses Brulin 815 GD) as a replacement for methyl chloroform. Evaluation of process control parameters for this cleaner are discussed as well as cleaning mechanisms for a spray-in-air process.

  1. The surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system incorporating interface roughness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Fan, X. L.; Wang, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the effect of interface roughness on the strain energy release rate and surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system. This is achieved by a parameter investigation of the interfacial shapes, in which the extended finite element method (XFEM) and periodic boundary condition are used. Predictions for the stress field and driving force of multiple surface cracks in the film/substrate system are presented. It is seen that the interface roughness has significant effects on the strain energy release rate, the interfacial stress distribution, and the crack propagation patterns. One can see the completely different distributions of stress and strain energy release rate in the regions of convex and concave asperities of the substrate. Variation of the interface asperity is responsible for the oscillatory characteristics of strain energy release rate, which can cause the local arrest of surface cracks. It is concluded that artificially created rough interface can enhance the durability of film/substrate system with multiple cracks.

  2. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  3. Water-Air Spray Cooling of Extruded Profiles: Process Integrated Heat Treatment of the Alloy EN AW-6082

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Golovko, O.; Nürnberger, F.; Frolov, I.; Schaper, M.

    2013-09-01

    Quenching by spray cooling in the press line is a promising way to harden Al-Mg-Si alloys with regard to reducing profile distortion. For alloys such as EN AW-6082, high cooling rates are required. A device for spray cooling by means of water and compressed air was integrated into a 10 MN horizontal, hydraulic, short-stroke extrusion press. Various spray parameters were investigated. By using 32 water-air nozzles having a total water deposition rate of about 15 L/min and extruding with a profile velocity of 2.5 m/min, high mechanical properties were imparted to 30 mm diameter extruded rods. This arrangement ensures the extruded alloy is cooled to almost room temperature. Comparable properties can be achieved by water quenching, although the water consumption will be tenfold higher. The distribution of water deposition density on the profiles' surfaces was determined. It was shown that an adjustment of the water-air pressure ratio allows the final temperature of the profiles to be controlled over a wide range. Minimization of temperature gradients in the cross section of complex profiles allows profile distortions to be reduced.

  4. Development of Air Force aerial spray night operations: High altitude swath characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple trials were conducted from 2006 to 2014 in an attempt to validate aerial spray efficacy at altitudes conducive to night spray operations using night vision goggles (NVG). Higher altitude application of pesticide (>400 feet above ground level [AGL]) suggested that effective vector control mi...

  5. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  6. Gun Control, Gun Ownership, and Suicide Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1988-01-01

    Explored relationship between the extent of gun ownership and the strictness of gun control laws to suicide and homicide rates in the nine major geographic regions of the United States. Found gun ownership, rather than the strictness of gun control laws, was the strongest correlate of the rates of suicide and homicide by guns. (Author)

  7. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  8. COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

    2006-07-01

    A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 μm thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

  9. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  10. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTHNORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH, (with scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH, (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Small Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  12. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Small Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH - NORTHEAST (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF GUN MOUNT ON TERRACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF GUN MOUNT ON TERRACE, LOOKING EAST (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 22, Armament Laboratory & Gun Range, On flightline between Tenth & Eleventh Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  18. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  19. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Effect excess air as an oxidizer in the flame assisted spray dryer using computational fluid dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Eka Lutfi; Widiyastuti, W.; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of silica particles as a model material from colloidal silica solution precursor in the flame assisted spray dryer method were studied numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). CFD has ability to solve the momentum, energy and mass transfer equation well. k-ɛ model was used to describe the turbulence model and non-premixed combustion model was used to combustion model. Collision and break-up model were also considered to predict the final particles size distribution. For validation, LPG with flow rate of 0.5 L/minute LPG and 200% excess air were used as energy sources. At this condition, numerical solution agreed well to the experimental work resulting in polydisperse size distribution. Therefore, others excess air, 100% and 150% were also observed using CFD and evaluated their contribution to their particles size distribution. Monodisperse particles size distribution were obtained when the combustion used 150% excess air.

  1. An experimental investigation on the spray flow exhausted from a co-swirling air-blast nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Daniel Dean

    The velocity field for a spray produced by an air-blast atomizer is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). These measurements are conducted at a variety of input liquid and air mass flow rates producing many different air to liquid mass flow ratios (ALR). The experiment is repeated with two different liquids, water and a hydrocarbon based fuel substitute. It is found that the velocity field depends heavily on the type of fluid used as opposed to the ALR. The experiments are repeated using a Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurement technique. These results are compared to the 2D PIV results, and the differences are discussed. Finally, the 2D PIV and SPIV results are compared to existing Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) results. It is seen that the results from the two different techniques are not well correlated.

  2. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  3. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  4. "Teaching" an Industrial Robot To Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. R.; Sweet, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching device, consisting of spacer rod or tube with three-pointed tip and line level, is used during pattern "teach-in" to make sure that robot manipulator holds spray gun perpendicular to surface to be sprayed and at right distance from it. For slanted surfaces angle adapter is added between spacer rod and line-level indicator. Angle is determined by slope of surface to be sprayed, thus allowing a perpendicular spray pattern against even slanted surfaces.

  5. Efficacy of aerial spray applications using fuselage booms on Air Force C-130H aircraft against mosquitoes and biting midges.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Wojcik, George M; De Szalay, Ferenc A

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of a novel fuselage boom configuration was tested with flat-fan nozzles on U.S. Air Force C-130H aircraft to create ultra-low volume sprays to control mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae). The mortality of mosquitoes and biting midges in bioassay cages and natural populations, using the organophosphate adulticide, naled, was measured. Mosquitoes in bioassay cages had 100% mortality at 639 m downwind in all single-pass spray trials, and most trials had >90% mortality up to 1491 m downwind. Mosquito mortality was negatively correlated with distance from the spray release point (r2 = 0.38, P < 0.001). The volume median diam of droplets collected was 44 tm at 213 m and decreased to 11 microm at 2130 m downwind of the release point. Droplet density decreased from an average of 18.4 drops/cm2 at 213 m to 2 drops/cm2 at 2130 m. Droplet densities of 10-18 droplets/cm2 were recorded at sampling stations with high mosquito mortality rates (>90%). In wide-area operational applications, numbers of mosquitoes from natural populations 1 wk postspray were 83% (range 55%-95%), lower than prespray numbers (P < 0.05). Biting midge numbers were reduced by 86% (range 53%-97%) on average (P = 0.051) after 7 days. The results of these field trials indicate that the fuselage boom configuration on C-130H aircraft are an effective method to conduct large-scale aerial sprays during military operations and public health emergencies. PMID:20099594

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE SPRAY DISPENSER TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water, and...

  7. Use of Oriented Spray Nozzles to Set the Vapor-Air Flow in Rotary Motion in the Superspray Space of the Evaporative Chimney-Type Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrego, K. V.; Davydenko, V. F.; Koznacheev, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper considers the problem of upgrading the thermal efficiency of chimney-type evaporative cooling towers due to the rotary motion of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space. To set the vapor-air flow in rotary motion, we propose to use the momentum of the sprayed water. It has been shown that the existing parameters of spray nozzles permit setting up to 30% of the water flow momentum in translatory motion, which is enough for changing considerably the aerodynamics of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space and improving the operation of the cooling tower. The optimal angle of axial inclination of the spray cone has been estimated. Recommendations are given and problems have been posed for engineering realization of the proposed technologies in a chimney-type cooling tower.

  8. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through the shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.

  9. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  10. Evaluation of innovative volatile organic compound and hazardous air-pollutant-control technologies for U. S. Air Force paint spray booths. Final report, Aug 88-Aug 89

    SciTech Connect

    Ritts, D.H.; Garretson, C.; Hyde, C.; Lorelli, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-10-01

    Significant quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants are released into the atmosphere during USAF maintenance operations. Painting operations conducted in paint spray booths are major sources of these pollutants. Solvent based epoxy primers and solvent-based polyurethane coatings are typically used by the Air Force for painting aircraft and associated equipment. Solvents used in these paints include methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, lacquer thinner, and other solvents involved in painting and component cleaning. In this report, carbon paper adsorption/catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) were evaluated as control technologies to destroy VOC emissions from paint spray booths. Simultaneous testing of pilot-scale units was performed to evaluate the technical performance of both technologies. Results showed that each technology maintained greater than 99 percent Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs). Particulate emissions from both pilot-scale units were less than 0.08 grains/dry standard cubic foot. Emissions of the criteria pollutants--sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide--were also below general regulatory standards for incinerators. Economic evaluations were based on a compilation of manufacturer-supplied data and energy consuption data gathered during the pilot scale testing. CPACM and FBCI technologies are less expensive than standard VOC control technologies when net present costs for a 15-year equipment life are compared.

  11. Development of Air Force Aerial Spray Night Operations: High Altitude Swath Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Haagsma, Karl A; Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Aldridge, Robert L; Britch, Seth C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trials were conducted from 2006 to 2014 in an attempt to validate aerial spray efficacy at altitudes conducive to night spray operations using night vision goggles (NVGs). Higher altitude application of pesticide (more than 400 ft (121.9 m) above ground level (AGL)) suggested that effective vector control might be possible under ideal meteorological conditions. A series of lower altitude daytime applications (300 ft (91.4 m) AGL) demonstrated effective and repeatable mortality of target sentinel insects more than 5,000 ft (1,524 m) downwind, and control of natural vector populations. From these results we believe further pursuit of aerial night applications of pesticide using NVGs at 300 ft (91.4 m) AGL by this group is warranted. PMID:26276945

  12. Spot-Welding Gun Is Easy To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Nguyen, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical-resistance spot-welding gun designed to produce more welds per unit time by decreasing technician's effort and fatigue. Vacuum cups on frame secure welding gun to workpiece while compressed air drives welding tip against workpiece to make spot resistance weld. When weld completed, vacuum in frame cups released so frame and gun moved to position of next spot weld.

  13. Tribological Properties of Hard Metal Coatings Sprayed by High-Velocity Air Fuel Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, C.; Sato, K.; Houdkova, S.; Smazalova, E.; Lusvarghi, L.; Bolelli, G.; Sassatelli, P.

    2016-01-01

    Lowering the thermal energy and increasing the kinetic energy of hard metal particles sprayed by the newly developed HVAF systems can significantly reduce their decarburization, and increases the sliding wear and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings, making the HVAF technique attractive, both economically and environmentally, over its HVOF predecessors. Two agglomerated and sintered feedstock powder chemistries, WC-Co (88/12) and WC-CoCr (86/10/4), respectively, with increasing primary carbides grain size from 0.2 to 4.0 microns, have been deposited by the latest HVAF-M3 process onto carbon steel substrates. Their dry sliding wear behaviors and friction coefficients were evaluated at room temperature via Ball-on-disk (ASTM G99-90) wear tests against Al2O3 counterparts, and via Pin-on-disk (ASTM G77-05) wear tests against modified martensitic steel counterparts in both dry and lubricated conditions. Sliding wear mechanisms, with the formation of wavy surface morphology and brittle cracking, are discussed regarding the distribution and size of primary carbides. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated via standard Neutral Salt Spray, Acetic Acid Salt Spray, accelerated corrosion test, and electrochemical polarization test at room temperature. The optimization of the tribological properties of the coatings is discussed, focusing on the suitable selection of primary carbide size for different working load applications.

  14. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  15. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  16. Air-Fed Visors Used for Isocyanate Paint Spraying--Potential Exposure When the Visor Is Lifted.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Mike; Baxter, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Continuous-flow air-supplied breathing apparatus with a visor is the respiratory protective equipment (RPE) of choice within the motor vehicle repair trade for protection against exposure to isocyanate paints. Whilst these devices are capable of providing adequate protection, a common workplace practice of sprayers lifting up the visor of their RPE immediately after spraying when checking the quality of the paint finish is thought to have an impact on the protection afforded. While the visor lift may be only for a few seconds, this action, especially if repeated numerous times during a work shift, could potentially result in a significant increase in exposure.Informal interviews with paint sprayers were conducted to understand the reasons for this behaviour followed by a series of laboratory tests to quantify the potential degree of exposure as a result of a visor lift.The majority of the paint sprayers interviewed explained their reasons for lifting their visors immediately after spraying and before the spray booth had been adequately cleared by ventilation. The main reasons given for a visor lift included a combination of habit, poor visibility due to poor visual clarity of the visor screen material, over spray, scratched visor screens, internal visor reflections, and poor booth lighting.The findings of the tests showed that the degree of protection provided by the visor when in the lifted position is in the approximate range of 1-3.7 (mean 1.7) and over the whole of the exposure period (from start of the lift to recovery of protection after refitting) is in the approximate range of 1.4-9.0 (mean 2.7). This is a significant reduction when compared to the assigned protection factor of 40 for this class of device and the measured protection factors of 5000-10 000 when worn correctly.These results clearly demonstrate that lifting the visor whilst still within a contaminated atmosphere considerably increases the wearer's exposure and that this is an example where

  17. Air-Fed Visors Used for Isocyanate Paint Spraying--Potential Exposure When the Visor Is Lifted.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Mike; Baxter, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Continuous-flow air-supplied breathing apparatus with a visor is the respiratory protective equipment (RPE) of choice within the motor vehicle repair trade for protection against exposure to isocyanate paints. Whilst these devices are capable of providing adequate protection, a common workplace practice of sprayers lifting up the visor of their RPE immediately after spraying when checking the quality of the paint finish is thought to have an impact on the protection afforded. While the visor lift may be only for a few seconds, this action, especially if repeated numerous times during a work shift, could potentially result in a significant increase in exposure.Informal interviews with paint sprayers were conducted to understand the reasons for this behaviour followed by a series of laboratory tests to quantify the potential degree of exposure as a result of a visor lift.The majority of the paint sprayers interviewed explained their reasons for lifting their visors immediately after spraying and before the spray booth had been adequately cleared by ventilation. The main reasons given for a visor lift included a combination of habit, poor visibility due to poor visual clarity of the visor screen material, over spray, scratched visor screens, internal visor reflections, and poor booth lighting.The findings of the tests showed that the degree of protection provided by the visor when in the lifted position is in the approximate range of 1-3.7 (mean 1.7) and over the whole of the exposure period (from start of the lift to recovery of protection after refitting) is in the approximate range of 1.4-9.0 (mean 2.7). This is a significant reduction when compared to the assigned protection factor of 40 for this class of device and the measured protection factors of 5000-10 000 when worn correctly.These results clearly demonstrate that lifting the visor whilst still within a contaminated atmosphere considerably increases the wearer's exposure and that this is an example where

  18. Encyclopedia of Gun Control and Gun Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utter, Glenn H.

    This reference volume provides information on gun control and gun rights, including resources on the debate surrounding the Second Amendment and individuals and organizations focused on gun issues, along with statutes, court cases, events, and publications surrounding this current topic. Highlighted are the important organizations and their…

  19. Gun ownership and social gun culture.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; Villarreal, Marcos D; Keyes, Katherine M; Galea, Sandro

    2016-06-01

    We assessed gun ownership rates in 2013 across the USA and the association between exposure to a social gun culture and gun ownership. We used data from a nationally representative sample of 4000 US adults, from 50 states and District of Columbia, aged >18 years to assess gun ownership and social gun culture performed in October 2013. State-level firearm policy information was obtained from the Brady Law Center and Injury Prevention and Control Center. One-third of Americans reported owning a gun, ranging from 5.2% in Delaware to 61.7% in Alaska. Gun ownership was 2.25-times greater among those reporting social gun culture (PR=2.25, 95% CI 2.02 to 2.52) than those who did not. In conclusion, we found strong association between social gun culture and gun ownership. Gun cultures may need to be considered for public health strategies that aim to change gun ownership in the USA.

  20. Measurement of spray combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Arman, E. F.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Farmer, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    A free jet configuration was chosen for measuring noncombusting spray fields and hydrocarbon-air spray flames in an effort to develop computational models of the dynamic interaction between droplets and the gas phase and to verify and refine numerical models of the entire spray combustion process. The development of a spray combustion facility is described including techniques for laser measurements in spray combustion environments and methods for data acquisition, processing, displaying, and interpretation.

  1. ION GUN

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  2. ELECTRON GUN

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1960-04-01

    A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

  3. Low friction stainless steel coatings graphite doped elaborated by air plasma sprayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harir, A.; Ageorges, H.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.; Platon, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new process has been developed to incorporate graphite particles into a stainless steel coating during its formation. Four means have been tested to inject the graphite particles outside the plasma jet and its plume: graphite suspension, a graphite rod rubbed on the rotating sample, powder injection close to the substrate with an injector, or a specially designed guide. The last process has been shown to be the most versatile and the most easily controllable. It allows the incorporation of between 2 and 12 vol.% of graphite particles (2 15 µm) within the plasma sprayed stainless steel coatings. A volume fraction of 2% seems to give the best results with a slight decrease (6%) of the coating hardness. This volume fraction also gave the best results in dry friction on the pin-on-disk apparatus. Depending on the sliding velocity (0.1 0.5 m/s) and loads (3.7 28 N), the dry friction coefficient against a 100C6 pin is reduced by between 1.5 and 4 compared with that obtained with plasma sprayed stainless steel.

  4. The Gun Dispute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the debate over gun ownership and gun control in the United States, focusing on the historic place of guns in U.S. society. The current national mood is more receptive than ever to restricting and regulating adolescent access to guns in light of recent school shootings. (SLD)

  5. Gun Sales. Firearm Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Minimal federal regulations on firearm sales have facilitated the proliferation of guns, gun owners, and gun dealers in the United States. This fact sheet offers data on the growing number of firearm dealers, the relative ease of obtaining and keeping a license to sell guns from the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, the lack of…

  6. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  7. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  8. The role of sea spray in cleansing air pollution over ocean via cloud processes.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Lahav, Ronen; Khain, Alexander; Pinsky, Mark

    2002-09-01

    Particulate air pollution has been shown to strongly suppress precipitation from convective clouds over land. New observations show that precipitation from similar polluted clouds over oceans is much less affected, because large sea salt nuclei override the precipitation suppression effect of the large number of small pollution nuclei. Raindrops initiated by the sea salt grow by collecting small cloud droplets that form on the pollution particles, thereby cleansing the air. Therefore, sea salt helps cleanse the atmosphere of the air pollution via cloud processes. This implies that over oceans, the climatic aerosol indirect effects are significantly smaller than current estimates.

  9. Phase Evolution upon Aging of Air-Plasma Sprayed t'-Zirconia Coatings: I-Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, Don M; Krogstad, Jessica A; Gao, Yan; Johnson, Curtis A; Nelson, Warren A; Levi, Carlos G

    2012-10-08

    Phase evolution accompanying the isothermal aging of free-standing air-plasma sprayed (APS) 7–8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is described. Aging was carried out at temperatures ranging from 982°C to 1482°C in air. The high-temperature kinetics of the phase evolution from the metastable t' phase into a mixture of transformable Y-rich (cubic) and Y-lean (tetragonal) phases are documented through ambient temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization. A Hollomon–Jaffe parameter (HJP), T[27 + ln(t)], was used to satisfactorily normalize the extent of phase decomposition over the full range of times and temperatures. Comparison to vapor deposited TBCs reveal potential differences in the destabilization mechanism in APS coatings. Furthermore, the lattice parameters extracted from Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns were used to deduce the stabilizer concentrations of the respective phases, which suggest a retrograde tetragonal solvus over the temperature range studied. In concert with a complementary microstructural study presented in Part II, this effort offers new insights into the mechanisms governing the phase evolution and raises implications for the high-temperature use of 8YSZ ceramics.

  10. Process-Property Relationship for Air Plasma-Sprayed Gadolinium Zirconate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Tan, Yang; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    The continuous need of elevating operating temperature of gas turbine engines has introduced several challenges with the current state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), requiring examination of new TBC material with high temperature phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to environmental ash particles. Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7) (GDZ) has been shown to meet many of these requirements, and has, in fact, been successfully implemented in to engine components. However, several fundamental issues related to the process-ability, toughness, and microstructural differences for GDZ when compared to equivalent YSZ coating. This study seeks to critically address the process-structure-property correlations for plasma-sprayed GDZ coating subjected to controlled parametric exploration. Use of in-flight diagnostics coupled with in situ and ex situ coating property monitoring allows examination and comparison of the process-property interplay and the resultant differences between the two TBC compositions. The results indicate that it is feasible to retain material chemistry and fabricate relevant microstructures of interest with GDZ with concomitant performance advantages such as low conductivity, mechanical compliance, sintering resistance, and suppression of environmentally induced damage from ash particles. This study provides a framework for optimal design and manufacturing of emergent multi-layer and multi-material TBCs.

  11. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Kelly, J. T.; Bash, J. O.

    2015-11-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Model evaluations of SSA emissions have mainly focused on the global scale, but regional-scale evaluations are also important due to the localized impact of SSAs on atmospheric chemistry near the coast. In this study, SSA emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were updated to enhance the fine-mode size distribution, include sea surface temperature (SST) dependency, and reduce surf-enhanced emissions. Predictions from the updated CMAQ model and those of the previous release version, CMAQv5.0.2, were evaluated using several coastal and national observational data sets in the continental US. The updated emissions generally reduced model underestimates of sodium, chloride, and nitrate surface concentrations for coastal sites in the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) near Tampa, Florida. Including SST dependency to the SSA emission parameterization led to increased sodium concentrations in the southeastern US and decreased concentrations along parts of the Pacific coast and northeastern US. The influence of sodium on the gas-particle partitioning of nitrate resulted in higher nitrate particle concentrations in many coastal urban areas due to increased condensation of nitric acid in the updated simulations, potentially affecting the predicted nitrogen deposition in sensitive ecosystems. Application of the updated SSA emissions to the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study period resulted in a modest improvement in the predicted surface concentration of sodium and nitrate at several central and southern California coastal sites. This update of SSA emissions enabled a more realistic simulation of the atmospheric chemistry in coastal environments where marine air mixes with urban pollution.

  12. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  13. Plasma gun with coaxial powder feed and adjustable cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, Isidor (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved plasma gun coaxially injects particles of ceramic materials having high melting temperatures into the central portion of a plasma jet. This results in a more uniform and higher temperature and velocity distribution of the sprayed particles. The position of the cathode is adjustable to facilitate optimization of the performance of the gun wherein grains of the ceramic material are melted at lower power input levels.

  14. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  15. Catalytic ignitor for regenerative propellant gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Ferraro, Ned W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ignitor initiates combustion of liquid propellant in a gun by utilizing a heated catalyst onto which the liquid propellant is sprayed in a manner which mitigates the occurrence of undesirable combustion chamber oscillations. The heater heats the catalyst sufficiently to provide the activation necessary to initiate combustion of the liquid propellant sprayed thereonto. Two embodiments of the ignitor and three alternative mountings thereof within the combustion chamber are disclosed. The ignitor may also be utilized to dispose of contaminated, excess, or waste liquid propellant in a safe, controlled, simple, and reliable manner.

  16. Catalytic Ignitor for Regenerative Propellant Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Ferraro, Ned W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An ignitor initiates combustion of liquid propellant in a gun by utilizing a heated catalyst onto which the liquid propellant is sprayed in a manner which mitigates the occurrence of undesirable combustion chamber oscillations. The heater heats the catalyst sufficiently to provide the activation necessary to initiate combustion of the liquid propellant sprayed thereonto. Two embodiments of the igniter and three alternative mountings thereof within the combustion chamber are disclosed. The ignitor may also be utilized to dispose of contaminated, excess, or waste liquid propellant in a safe, controlled, simple, and reliable manner.

  17. Electro-aerodynamic instability of a thin dielectric liquid sheet sprayed with an air stream.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, M F

    1999-12-01

    The instability of a thin sheet of dielectric liquid moving in the same direction as an air stream in the presence of a uniform horizontal electric field is studied theoretically. It is found that aerodynamic-enhanced instability occurs if the Weber number is much less than a critical value related to the ratio of the air and liquid stream velocities, the electric field, and the dielectric constant values. The electric field is found to have a stabilizing effect, and there exists a critical Weber number above which instability is suppressed by the surface tension effect. The condition for disintegrating the sheet is obtained in terms of the electric field values, and some limiting cases are recovered.

  18. Easy dual-mode ambient mass spectrometry with Venturi self-pumping, canned air, disposable parts and voltage-free sonic-spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Nicolas V; Porcari, Andreia M; Coelho, Mirela B; Schmidt, Eduardo M; Jara, Jose L; Visentainer, Jesui V; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2012-06-01

    An exceptionally easy to assemble source for ambient mass spectrometry is described. Based on Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI), the source was further simplified by the use of a can of compressed air which simultaneously provides solution or solvent Venturi self-pumping and continuous, stable and abundant low-noise ion signal via voltage-free sonic-spraying. Further simplification was also attained by the use of inexpensive and readily commercially available parts: a surgical 2-way catheter, an aerosol can of compressed air, a 30 cm long fused-silica capillary and a hypodermic needle. This "Spartan" V-EASI source seems to offer one of the easiest and cheapest ways to make ions for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis of both liquid and solid samples. PMID:22349120

  19. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  20. Guns and Violence. Current Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Henny H., Ed.

    This book focuses on gun violence and gun control, presenting both sides of arguments about firearms ownership and gun control. Each of five chapters poses a question about gun control and provides answers for both sides of the question. The following essays are included: (1) "Gun Violence Is Becoming an Epidemic" (Bob Herbert); (2) "Gun Violence…

  1. Gun Safety (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... guns are featured in many television shows, video games, computer games, and movies, it's important to know that real ... only happen on TV, in movies, or video games. A real gun is never a toy, and ...

  2. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Manufacture of SOFC electrodes by wet powder spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkenhoener, R.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.P.

    1996-12-31

    The reproducible and commercial manufacturing of electrodes with enhanced electrochemical performance is of central importance for a successful technical realization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems. The route of electrode fabrication for the SOFC by Wet Powder Spraying (WPS) is presented. Stabilized suspensions of the powder materials for the electrodes were sprayed onto a substrate by employing a spray gun. After drying of the layers, binder removal and sintering are performed in one step. The major advantage of this process is its applicability for a large variety of materials and its flexibility with regard to layer shape and thickness. Above all, flat or curved substrates of any size can be coated, thus opening up the possibility of {open_quotes}up-scaling{close_quotes} SOFC technology. Electrodes with an enhanced electrochemical performance were developed by gradually optimizing the different process steps. For example an optimized SOFC cathode of the composition La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with 40% 8YSZ showed a mean overpotential of about -50 mV at a current density of -0.8 A/cm{sup 2}, with a standard deviation amounting to 16 mV (950{degrees}C, air). Such optimized electrodes can be manufactured with a high degree of reproducibility, as a result of employing a computer-controlled X-Y system for moving the spray gun. Several hundred sintered composites, comprising the substrate anode and the electrolyte, of 100x 100 mm{sup 2} were coated with the cathode by WPS and used for stack integration. The largest manufactured electrodes were 240x240 mm{sup 2}, and data concerning their thickness homogeneity and electrochemical performance are given.

  4. Rail gun program

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1980-12-01

    Rail guns are devices that drive projectiles by electromagnetic forces. Ultimate projectile speeds therefore are not limited by hydrodynamic velocities, as is the case with conventional guns. The two-phase rail gun program is described. In both phases, explosively driven flux compression generators (FCGs) are used to supply power to the guns. In the Los Alamos phase, part of the gun itself is explosively compressed and thus serves as a second-stage FCG. Factors affecting gun performance and projectile acceleration and integrity are discussed. The first experiment in the joint phase of the programs is described. Here, a 12.7-mm lexan cube was accelerated to speed about 3 km/s in a 0.9-m-long gun by currents reaching nearly 600 kA over a time of several hundred microseconds. Although the projectile was stressed to several times its static yield strength during acceleration, it was recovered intact.

  5. Thermal spray: Advances in coatings technology; Proceedings of the National Thermal Spray Conference, Orlando, FL, Sept. 14-17, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on particle injection in plasma spraying, cored tube wires for arc and flame spraying, new plasma gun technology, and grit-blasting as a surface preparation before plasma spraying. Also considered are hypervelocity applications of tribological coatings, the variability in strength of thermally sprayed coatings, automated powder mass flow monitoring and control, and coated abrasive superfinishing. Other topics include wire-sprayed aluminum coating services in a SIMA corrosion-control shop, cerium oxide stabilized thermal barrier coatings, and strength enhancement of plasma sprayed coatings.

  6. Sensors in Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents what is our actual knowledge about sensors, used in the harsh environment of spray booths, to improve the reproducibility and reliability of coatings sprayed with hot or cold gases. First are described, with their limitations and precisions, the different sensors following the in-flight hot particle parameters (trajectories, temperatures, velocities, sizes, and shapes). A few comments are also made about techniques, still under developments in laboratories, to improve our understanding of coating formation such as plasma jet temperature measurements in non-symmetrical conditions, hot gases heat flux, particles flattening and splats formation, particles evaporation. Then are described the illumination techniques by laser flash of either cold particles (those injected in hot gases, or in cold spray gun) or liquid injected into hot gases (suspensions or solutions). The possibilities they open to determine the flux and velocities of cold particles or visualize liquid penetration in the core of hot gases are discussed. Afterwards are presented sensors to follow, when spraying hot particles, substrate and coating temperature evolution, and the stress development within coatings during the spray process as well as the coating thickness. The different uses of these sensors are then described with successively: (i) Measurements limited to particle trajectories, velocities, temperatures, and sizes in different spray conditions: plasma (including transient conditions due to arc root fluctuations in d.c. plasma jets), HVOF, wire arc, cold spray. Afterwards are discussed how such sensor data can be used to achieve a better understanding of the different spray processes, compare experiments to calculations and improve the reproducibility and reliability of the spray conditions. (ii) Coatings monitoring through in-flight measurements coupled with those devoted to coatings formation. This is achieved by either maintaining at their set point both in-flight and

  7. Survey of SRF guns

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.

    2011-07-25

    Developing Superconducting RF (SRF) electron guns is an active field with several laboratories working on different gun designs. While the first guns were based on elliptic cavity geometries, Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) option is gaining popularity. QWRs are especially well suited for producing beams with high charge per bunch. In this talk we will describe recent progress in developing both types of SRF guns. SRF guns made excellent progress in the last two years. Several guns generated beams and one, at HZDR, injected beam into an accelerator. By accomplishing this, HZDR/ELBE gun demonstrated feasibility of the SRF gun concept with a normal-conducting Cs{sub 2}Te cathode. The cathode demonstrated very good performance with the lifetime of {approx}1 year. However, for high average current/high bunch charge operation CsK{sub 2}Sb is preferred as it needs green lasers, unlike UV laser for the Cs{sub 2}Te, which makes it easier to build laser/optics systems. Other high QE photocathodes are being developed for SRF guns, most notably diamond-amplified photocathode. Several QWR guns are under development with one producing beam already. They are very promising for high bunch charge operation. The field is very active and we should expect more good results soon.

  8. Thermal Shock Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited Using Low-Energy Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been frequently used as a thermal protective layer on the metal or alloy component surfaces. In the present study, ZrO2-7%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were successfully deposited by DC (direct current) plasma spray process under very low pressure conditions (less than 1 mbar) using low-energy plasma guns F4-VB and F100. The experiments were performed to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of different TBC specimens which were heated to 1373 K at a high-temperature cycling furnace and held for 0.5 h, followed by air cooling at room temperature for 0.2 h. For comparison, a corresponding atmospheric plasma spray (APS) counterpart was also elaborated to carry out the similar experiments. The results indicated that the very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) coatings displayed better thermal shock resistance. Moreover, the failure mechanism of the coatings was elucidated.

  9. Women and Guns. Firearm Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Many gun manufacturers market guns to women claiming a gun can provide protection. Statistics provided in this fact sheet indicate gun ownership may provide a false sense of security that can be fatal, since the greatest threat to a woman comes from the people and guns within her own home. Contrary to "typical" scenarios created by advertisers,…

  10. Borehole-explosion and air-gun data acquired in the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), southern California: description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Elizabeth J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Kell, Annie M.; Kent, Graham; Driscoll, Neal W.; Goldman, Mark; Reusch, Angela M.; Han, Liang; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Criley, Coyn J.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Slayday-Criley, Coye J.; Murphy, Janice M.; Jensen, Edward G.; McClearn, Robert; Ferguson, Alex J.; Butcher, Lesley A.; Gardner, Max A.; Emmons, Iain; Loughran, Caleb L.; Svitek, Joseph R.; Bastien, Patrick C.; Cotton, Joseph A.; Croker, David S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Harder, Steven H.; Rosa, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    detailed images we need for earthquake hazard assessment. Air gun bursts, generated in the Salton Sea along extensions of our onshore seismic lines, also were utilized as sound-wave sources. Temporary deployments of portable land seismometers, as well as ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) on the floor of the Salton Sea, recorded the energy from the land shots and air gun bursts. SSIP is similar to the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiments of 1994 and 1999 (LARSE I and II, respectively; Murphy and others, 1996; Fuis and others, 2001). The LARSE surveys demonstrated that the USGS and collaborators can safely and effectively conduct seismic imaging surveys in urban and nonurban areas, on lands owned and/or managed by many different types of agencies and entities. Information was produced that could not have been obtained any other way, and this information was key to changing the leading ideas about earthquake hazards at that time in the Los Angeles region. These surveys produced no significant environmental impact or damage to structures, and they did not trigger earthquakes.

  11. EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR U.S. AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of an evaluation of carbon paper adsorption catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) as control technologies to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paint spray booths.

  12. Interior of southeast gun chamber (labeled "Gun Turret No. Two), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of southeast gun chamber (labeled "Gun Turret No. Two), showing gun mounting pad, wall rings, small niche, and opening to outside - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Battery Adair, Princeton Place, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. 14. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), LOOKING EAST AT SOUTHWEST END OF BUILDING. HVAC EQUIPMENT LOCATED OUTDOORS IN FOREGROUND. DUCTS CONDUCT HOT OR COLD AIR INDOORS. ROUND PIPES ARE INSULATED STEAM LINES. BUILDING NO. 448, ORDNANCE FACILITY, IN BACKGROUND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  14. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, ARMCO HUT (FEATURE 4) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, ARMCO HUT (FEATURE 4) IN BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING NORTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  17. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  18. Fundamental Study of a Single Point Lean Direct Injector. Part I: Effect of Air Swirler Angle and Injector Tip Location on Spray Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Lean direct injection (LDI) is a combustion concept to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) for next generation aircraft gas turbine engines. These newer engines have cycles that increase fuel efficiency through increased operating pressures, which increase combustor inlet temperatures. NOx formation rates increase with higher temperatures; the LDI strategy avoids high temperature by staying fuel lean and away from stoichiometric burning. Thus, LDI relies on rapid and uniform fuel/air mixing. To understand this mixing process, a series of fundamental experiments are underway in the Combustion and Dynamics Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. This first set of experiments examines cold flow (non-combusting) mixing using air and water. Using laser diagnostics, the effects of air swirler angle and injector tip location on the spray distribution, recirculation zone, and droplet size distribution are examined. Of the three swirler angles examined, 60 deg is determined to have the most even spray distribution. The injector tip location primarily shifts the flow without changing the structure, unless the flow includes a recirculation zone. When a recirculation zone is present, minimum axial velocity decreases as the injector tip moves downstream towards the venturi exit; also the droplets become more uniform in size and angular distribution.

  19. Fundamental Study of a Single Point Lean Direct Injector. Part I: Effect of Air Swirler Angle and Injector Tip Location on Spray Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Lean direct injection (LDI) is a combustion concept to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) for next generation aircraft gas turbine engines. These newer engines have cycles that increase fuel efficiency through increased operating pressures, which increase combustor inlet temperatures. NOx formation rates increase with higher temperatures; the LDI strategy avoids high temperature by staying fuel lean and away from stoichiometric burning. Thus, LDI relies on rapid and uniform fuel/air mixing. To understand this mixing process, a series of fundamental experiments are underway in the Combustion and Dynamics Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. This first set of experiments examines cold flow (non-combusting) mixing using air and water. Using laser diagnostics, the effects of air swirler angle and injector tip location on the spray distribution, recirculation zone, and droplet size distribution are examined. Of the three swirler angles examined, 60 degrees is determined to have the most even spray distribution. The injector tip location primarily shifts the flow without changing the structure, unless the flow includes a recirculation zone. When a recirculation zone is present, minimum axial velocity decreases as the injector tip moves downstream towards the venturi exit; also the droplets become more uniform in size and angular distribution.

  20. The Effect of Spray Distance and Scanning Step on the Coating Thickness Uniformity in Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Deng, Sihao; Liao, Hanlin; Zeng, Chunnian; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-02-01

    In the process of cold spray applications, robot kinematic parameters represent significant influences on the coating quality. Those parameters include: spray distance, spray angle, gun relative velocity to substrate, scanning step, and cycle numbers. The combined effects which are caused by their interactions determine the coating thickness. The increasing requirements of coating productivity lead to the objectivity of analyzing the effect of robot kinematic parameters. So it becomes necessary to optimize the robot trajectory for spraying process in order to obtain a desired coating thickness. This study aims at investigating the relationship between the coating profile and the spray distance, scanning step, and introducing the basic principle of a software toolkit named thermal spray toolkit (TST) developed in our laboratory to generate the optimized robot trajectories in spray processes including thermal spray and cold spray. Experiments have been carried out to check the reliability of the simulated coating profile and the calculated coating thickness by TST.

  1. Borehole-explosion and air-gun data acquired in the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), southern California: description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Elizabeth J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Kell, Annie M.; Kent, Graham; Driscoll, Neal W.; Goldman, Mark; Reusch, Angela M.; Han, Liang; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Criley, Coyn J.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Slayday-Criley, Coye J.; Murphy, Janice M.; Jensen, Edward G.; McClearn, Robert; Ferguson, Alex J.; Butcher, Lesley A.; Gardner, Max A.; Emmons, Iain; Loughran, Caleb L.; Svitek, Joseph R.; Bastien, Patrick C.; Cotton, Joseph A.; Croker, David S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Harder, Steven H.; Rosa, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    detailed images we need for earthquake hazard assessment. Air gun bursts, generated in the Salton Sea

  2. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  3. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur. PMID:26239103

  4. ''Smart Gun'' Technology Update

    SciTech Connect

    WIRSBINSKI, JOHN W.

    2001-11-01

    This report is an update to previous ''smart gun'' work and the corresponding report that were completed in 1996. It incorporates some new terminology and expanded definitions. This effort is the product of an open source look at what has happened to the ''smart gun'' technology landscape since the 1996 report was published.

  5. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Model evaluations of SSA emissions have mainly focused on the global scale, but regional-scale evaluations are...

  6. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  7. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-15

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×10{sup 4} S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m{sup 2}/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT–rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of −64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications. - Graphical abstract: Flexible and highly conductive carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanohybrid. - Highlights: • Direct growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper. • Two-dimensional carbon nanohybrid with excellent conductivity and mechanical flexibility. • Supercapacitor with excellent performance stability upon mechanical deformation for flexible electronics applications. • Supercapacitor with high impedance phase angle for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  8. Antistatic sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Antistatic sprays from several different manufacturers are examined. The sprays are examined for contamination potential (i.e., outgassing and nonvolatile residue), corrosiveness on an aluminum mirror surface, and electrostatic effectiveness. In addition, the chemical composition of the antistatic sprays is determined by infrared spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The results show that 12 of the 17 antistatic sprays examined have a low contamination potential. Of these sprays, 7 are also noncorrosive to an aluminum surface. And of these, only 2 demonstrate good electrostatic properties with respect to reducing voltage accumulation; these sprays did not show a fast voltage dissipation rate however. The results indicate that antistatic sprays can be used on a limited basis where contamination potential, corrosiveness, and electrostatic effectiveness is not critical. Each application is different and proper evaluation of the situation is necessary. Information on some of the properties of some antistatic sprays is presented in this document to aid in the evaluation process.

  9. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  10. Portable air pollution control equipment for the control of toxic particulate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaurushia, A.; Odabashian, S.; Busch, E.

    1997-12-31

    Chromium VI (Cr VI) has been identified by the environmental regulatory agencies as a potent carcinogen among eleven heavy metals. A threshold level of 0.0001 lb/year for Cr VI emissions has been established by the California Air Resources Board for reporting under Assembly Bill 2588. A need for an innovative control technology to reduce fugitive emissions of Cr VI was identified during the Air Toxic Emissions Reduction Program at Northrop Grumman Military Aircraft Systems Division (NGMASD). NGMASD operates an aircraft assembly facility in El Segundo, CA. Nearly all of the aircraft components are coated with a protective coating (primer) prior to assembly. The primer has Cr VI as a component for its excellent corrosion resistance property. The complex assembly process requires fasteners which also need primer coating. Therefore, NGMASD utilizes High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) guns for the touch-up spray coating operations. During the touch-up spray coating operations, Cr VI particles are atomized and transferred to the aircraft surface. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has determined that the HVLP gun transfers 65% of the paint particles onto the substrate and the remaining 35% are emitted as an overspray if air pollution controls are not applied. NGMASD has developed the Portable Air Pollution Control Equipment (PAPCE) to capture and control the overspray in order to reduce fugitive Cr VI emissions from the touch-up spray coating operations. A source test was performed per SCAQMD guidelines and the final report has been approved by the SCAQMD.

  11. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  12. Structure of a methanol/air coaxial reacting spray near the stabilization region by OH fluorescence imaging and two-component phase-Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Cessou, A.; Stepowski, D. , 230 - Mont-Saint-Aignan . URA CORIA); Edwards, C.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence and two component phase-Doppler interferometry have been used to study the reaction zone structure near the stabilization region of a coaxial methanol/air spray flame. The configuration of the experiment was chosen to simulate the atomizer geometry, surface tension and Weber number of a single coaxial hydrogen/oxygen rocket injector. The measurements are made in a water-cooled, optically-accessible confinement chamber at a pressure of 1 atm. Data are reported for two operating conditions, one yielding a flame length of approximately 1 meter, the other, half that value. Both the Weber number (characterizing the atomization process) and the Reynolds number (characterizing the gas phase mixing process) vary between the two cases, but the data suggest that it is the Weber number which has the dominant effect. In both cases OH imaging shows that the reaction zone is confined to a narrow region, with the OH field being similar in appearance to that of a single-phase turbulent mixing-controlled (diffusion) flame. Size-classified mean velocity vectors derived from the phase-Doppler data show striking differences in the flow pattern for low and high Stokes number droplets. Droplets 10 {mu}m in diameter and below (Stokes number less than 10) appear to follow the recirculating eddies that provide flame stabilization. Increasing the Weber number by a factor of 2.5 decreased the Sauter mean diameter of the spray by as much as one-third, and the arithmetic mean diameter by as much as one-half. We believe that it is this decrease in the spray droplet diameter that is primarily responsible for the very different flame length in the two cases.

  13. Structure of a methanol/air coaxial reacting spray near the stabilization region by OH fluorescence imaging and two-component phase-Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Cessou, A.; Stepowski, D.; Edwards, C.F.

    1991-12-31

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence and two component phase-Doppler interferometry have been used to study the reaction zone structure near the stabilization region of a coaxial methanol/air spray flame. The configuration of the experiment was chosen to simulate the atomizer geometry, surface tension and Weber number of a single coaxial hydrogen/oxygen rocket injector. The measurements are made in a water-cooled, optically-accessible confinement chamber at a pressure of 1 atm. Data are reported for two operating conditions, one yielding a flame length of approximately 1 meter, the other, half that value. Both the Weber number (characterizing the atomization process) and the Reynolds number (characterizing the gas phase mixing process) vary between the two cases, but the data suggest that it is the Weber number which has the dominant effect. In both cases OH imaging shows that the reaction zone is confined to a narrow region, with the OH field being similar in appearance to that of a single-phase turbulent mixing-controlled (diffusion) flame. Size-classified mean velocity vectors derived from the phase-Doppler data show striking differences in the flow pattern for low and high Stokes number droplets. Droplets 10 {mu}m in diameter and below (Stokes number less than 10) appear to follow the recirculating eddies that provide flame stabilization. Increasing the Weber number by a factor of 2.5 decreased the Sauter mean diameter of the spray by as much as one-third, and the arithmetic mean diameter by as much as one-half. We believe that it is this decrease in the spray droplet diameter that is primarily responsible for the very different flame length in the two cases.

  14. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    Using Nasal Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a ... Breathe in quickly while squeezing down on the pump bottle one time. Repeat in other nostril. Do ...

  15. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  16. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  17. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  18. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  19. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  20. Creativity under the gun.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Teresa M; Hadley, Constance N; Kramer, Steven J

    2002-08-01

    If you're like most managers, you've worked with people who swear they do their most creative work under tight deadlines. You may use pressure as a management technique, believing it will spur people on to great leaps of insight. You may even manage yourself this way. If so, are you right? Not necessarily, these researchers say. There are instances where ingenuity flourishes under extreme time pressure--for instance, a NASA team within hours comes up with a primitive but effective fix for the failing air filtration system aboard Apollo 13. But when creativity is under the gun, it usually ends up getting killed, the authors say. They recently took a close look at how people experience time pressure, collecting and analyzing more than 9,000 daily diary entries from individuals who were working on projects that required high levels of creativity and measuring their ability to innovate under varying levels of time pressure. The authors describe common characteristics of time pressure and outline four working environments under which creativity may or may not flourish. High-pressure days that still yield creativity are full of focus and meaningful urgency--people feel like they are on a mission. High-pressure days that yield no creativity lack such focus--people feel like they are on a treadmill, forced to switch gears often. On low-pressure days that yield creativity, people feel like they are on an expedition--exploring ideas rather than just identifying problems. And on low-pressure days that yield no creative thinking, people work on autopilot--doing their jobs without engaging too deeply. Managers should avoid extreme time pressure when possible; after all, complex cognitive processing takes time. For when they can't, the authors suggest ways to mollify its effects. PMID:12195920

  1. Creativity under the gun.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Teresa M; Hadley, Constance N; Kramer, Steven J

    2002-08-01

    If you're like most managers, you've worked with people who swear they do their most creative work under tight deadlines. You may use pressure as a management technique, believing it will spur people on to great leaps of insight. You may even manage yourself this way. If so, are you right? Not necessarily, these researchers say. There are instances where ingenuity flourishes under extreme time pressure--for instance, a NASA team within hours comes up with a primitive but effective fix for the failing air filtration system aboard Apollo 13. But when creativity is under the gun, it usually ends up getting killed, the authors say. They recently took a close look at how people experience time pressure, collecting and analyzing more than 9,000 daily diary entries from individuals who were working on projects that required high levels of creativity and measuring their ability to innovate under varying levels of time pressure. The authors describe common characteristics of time pressure and outline four working environments under which creativity may or may not flourish. High-pressure days that still yield creativity are full of focus and meaningful urgency--people feel like they are on a mission. High-pressure days that yield no creativity lack such focus--people feel like they are on a treadmill, forced to switch gears often. On low-pressure days that yield creativity, people feel like they are on an expedition--exploring ideas rather than just identifying problems. And on low-pressure days that yield no creative thinking, people work on autopilot--doing their jobs without engaging too deeply. Managers should avoid extreme time pressure when possible; after all, complex cognitive processing takes time. For when they can't, the authors suggest ways to mollify its effects.

  2. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  3. Demonstration of split-flow ventilation and recirculation as flow-reduction methods in an Air Force paint spray booth. Final technical report, February 1991-October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.; Ayer, J.; Sutay, R.

    1994-07-01

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and inside and outside the respirator in the painter`s breathing zone (BZ). The resulting data were analyzed and used to design a modified ventilation system that (1) separates a portion of the exhaust exiting the lower portion of the booth, which contains a concentration of toxic pollutants greater than the average at the exhaust plane (split-flow); and (2) provides an option to return the flow from the upper portion of the exhaust to the intake plenum for mixing with fresh air and recirculation through the booth (recirculation). After critical review by cognizant Air Force offices and an experimental demonstration showing that a flame ionization detector monitoring the air entering the booth is able to detect excursions above the equivalent exposure limit for the solvents in the paint, the exhaust duct was reconfigured for split-flow and recirculating ventilation. A volunteer painter was briefed on the increased risk of exposure during recirculation, and on the purposes and possible benefits of this study. He then signed an informed consent form before participating in the recirculation tests. A series of tests generally equivalent to the baseline series was conducted during split-flow and recirculating ventilation, and three tests were performed during only split-flow ventilation.

  4. Electromagnetic configurations of rail guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Ostashev, V. E.; Lopyrev, A. N.; Ul'Yanov, A. V.

    1993-06-01

    Some problems associated with the electromagnetic acceleration of macrobodies in a rail gun are examined. An approach to the design of rail gun configurations is proposed, and some basic rail gun schemes are synthesized. The alternative rail gun schemes are compared in terms of electrode potential and stability of the electrode gap with respect to parasitic current shunting. The effect of the ohmic resistance of the electrodes and of the additional magnetization field on the spatial structure of the discharge in the rail gun channel is discussed. A classification of rail gun modifications is presented.

  5. On the gas dynamics of HVOF thermal sprays. [HVOF (High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel)

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, C.M.; Settles, G.S.; Miller, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed on the gas dynamic aspects of the HVOF thermal spray process. A commercially-available HVOF gun (Hobart Tafa JP-5000) is used in this study. Optical diagnostic techniques including microsecond-exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging are applied to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced by this equipment without any particle injection. Rapid turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere is observed, which is an issue of concern in coating quality because of the possibility of oxidation of the sprayed particles. This mixing appears principally to be a function of the density ratio between the hot jet and the cold atmosphere, rather than depending upon the combustion-chamber pressure or barrel length. The supersonic core of the HVOF jet dissipates rapidly due to the, mixing, so that the jet is no longer supersonic when it impinges upon the target surface being sprayed. Secondary issues also observed in this study include strong jet-noise radiation from the HVOF plume and the entrainment and induced bulk motion of the surrounding air. All these issues have a background in the field of gas dynamics which has not been previously applied to thermal spray technology.

  6. Electronic properties of ZnO field-effect transistors fabricated by spray pyrolysis in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamopoulos, George; Bashir, Aneeqa; Wöbkenberg, Paul H.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2009-09-01

    We report the application of spray pyrolysis (SP) for the deposition of high quality zinc oxide (ZnO) films and the fabrication of thin-film transistors. The chemical, structural, optical, and electronic properties of as-deposited ZnO films are studied using infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and field-effect measurements. SP ZnO films are found to be uniform and polycrystalline with a band gap of 3.32 eV. ZnO transistors exhibit n-channel characteristics with electron mobility in the range 10-22 cm2/Vs. Device performance is found to depend on the work function of source/drain metal electrodes and on the device architecture employed.

  7. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and of one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  8. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  9. Self-bunching electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, Frederick M.; Len, L. K.

    1999-05-01

    We report on three electron gun projects that are aimed at power tube and injector applications. The purpose of the work is to develop robust electron guns which produce self-bunched, high-current-density beams. We have demonstrated, in a microwave cavity, self-bunching, cold electron emission, long life, and tolerance to contamination. The cold process is based on secondary electron emission. FMT has studied using simulation codes the resonant bunching process which gives rise to high current densities (0.01-5 kA/cm2), high charge bunches (up to 500 nC/bunch), and short pulses (1-100 ps) for frequencies from 1 to 12 GHz. The beam pulse width is nominally ˜5% of the rf period. The first project is the L-Band Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). Measurements show ˜40 ps long micro-bunches at ˜20 A/cm2 without contamination due to air exposure. Lifetime testing has been carried out for about 18 months operating at 1.25 GHz for almost 24 hours per day at a repetition rate of 300 Hz and 5 μs-long macro-pulses. Approximately 5.8×1013 micro-bunches or 62,000 coulombs have passed through this gun and it is still working fine. The second project, the S-Band MPG, is now operational. It is functioning at a frequency of 2.85 GHz, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, with a 2 μs-long macro-pulse. It produces about 45 A in the macro-pulse. The third project is a 34.2 GHz frequency-multiplied source driven by an X-Band MPG. A point design was performed at an rf output power of 150 MW at 34.2 GHz. The resulting system efficiency is 53% and the gain is 60 dB. The system efficiency includes the input cavity efficiency, input driver efficiency (a 50 MW klystron at 11.4 GHz), output cavity efficiency, and the post-acceleration efficiency.

  10. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  11. Quantitative x-ray phase-contrast imaging of air-assisted water sprays with high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W. K.; Wang, Jin; Micheli, P.; Laub, C.

    2006-10-01

    X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging along with a single-image phase retrieval reconstruction was used to visualize the near-nozzle breakup of optically dense water jets atomized by a high-speed, annular air flow. The influence of the atomizing air on water mass distribution was investigated to reveal the complex air/liquid interactions at various breakup stages. Unlike low-Weber-number jets, the breakup of high-Weber-number jets can occur in the liquid core, which causes sudden decreases in liquid volume fraction.

  12. Injuries due to firearms and air guns among U.S. military members not participating in overseas combat operations, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2011, active component U.S. service members sustained 4,657 firearm-related injuries in circumstances other than deployment to the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan; 35 percent of the injuries were fatal. The highest firearm-related injury rates reflected service members in law enforcement/security and combat occupations. Of fatal injuries, 28 percent and 24 percent were suicides and homicides, respectively; among service members 30 and older, 84 percent of noncombat firearm-related deaths were suicides and 14 percent were homicides. In circumstances other than war, rates of both fatal and nonfatal firearm- related injuries are much lower among military members than civilian males aged 18-44. During the period, rates of nonfatal firearm-related injuries among non-deployed military members increased sharply, peaking in 2008. The trend reflects that among U.S. civilian males aged 18-44. However, firearm-related fatality rates were stable among civilians but increased among military members. The increase in rates of firearm-related fatalities among non-deployed military members reflects the increase in rates of suicides by firearms. Rates of injuries due to BB, pellet or paintball guns also increased during the period.

  13. The Mystery of the Gun Turret in the Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2015-11-30

    The mystery of the gun turret in the desert began with an ingenious idea: to develop a reusable open-air line of sight diagnostic device to support LLNL’s early nuclear weapons development efforts. Obtained from the Mare Island Navy Shipyard (MINS) in January 1957, the gun turret traveled by ship to the Naval Construction Battalion base at Port Hueneme, California, and then by truck to Area 2 in the Yucca Flats valley at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS).

  14. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  15. Mole gun injury.

    PubMed

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds. PMID:23746826

  16. Mole gun injury.

    PubMed

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds.

  17. Where the guns come from: the gun industry and gun commerce.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J

    2002-01-01

    Under federal law, it is illegal for youth under age 18 to purchase rifles or shotguns, and for those under age 21 to purchase handguns. However, fatality and injury statistics clearly show that guns are finding their way into young people's hands. Many of these youth obtain guns through illegal gun markets. This article focuses on how guns in the United States are manufactured, marketed, and sold. The article shows how the legal and illegal gun markets are intimately connected and make guns easily accessible to youth. Although the domestic gun manufacturing industry is relatively small and has experienced declining sales in recent years, it has significant political clout and a large market for its products, and has engaged in aggressive marketing to youth. Lax oversight of licensed firearms dealers, combined with little or no regulation of private sales between gun owners, mean that guns can quickly moved from the legal gun market into the illegal market, where they can be acquired by young people. Certain guns, especially inexpensive, poorly made small handguns, are particularly attractive to criminals and youth. The author observes that several policy innovations--including increased regulation of licensed firearms dealers, intensified screening of prospective buyers, regulation of private sales, gun licensing and registration, and bans on some types of weapons--hold promise for decreasing the flow of guns into the hands of youth.

  18. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  19. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  20. Children, Youth, and Gun Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of articles summarizes knowledge and research about how gun violence affects children and youth and discusses which policies hold promise for reducing youth gun violence. The papers are: (1) "Statement of Purpose" (Richard E. Behrman); "Children, Youth, and Gun Violence: Analysis and Recommendations" (Kathleen Reich, Patti L.…

  1. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  2. Glue Guns: Aiming for Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    While glue guns are very useful, there are safety issues. Regardless of the temperature setting, glue guns can burn skin. The teacher should demonstrate and supervise the use of glue guns and have a plan should a student get burned. There should be an initial first aid protocol in place, followed by a visit to the school nurse. An accident report…

  3. Effects of arc current on the life in burner rig thermal cycling of plasma sprayed ZrOsub2-Ysub2Osub3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of thermal cycle life data for four sets of eight thermal barrier coated specimens representing arc currents (plasma gun power) of 525, 600, 800, or 950 amps is presented. The ZrO2-8Y2O3/NiCrAlY plasma spray coated Rene 41 rods were thermal cycled to 1040 C in a Mach 0.3-Jet A/air burner flame. The experimental results indicate the existance of a minimum or threshold power level which coating life expectancy is less than 500 cycles. Above the threshold power level, coating life expectancy more than doubles and increases with arc current.

  4. Thermal Shock Behavior of Air Plasma Sprayed CoNiCrAlY/YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi Wei; Wu, Wei; Hua, Jia Jie; Lin, Chu Cheng; Zheng, Xue Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The structural changes and failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during thermal shock cycling were investigated. TBCs consisting of CoNiCrAlY bond coat and partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) on a nickel-based alloy substrate and its thermal shock resistance performance was evaluated. TBCs were heated at 1100°C for 15 min followed by cold water quenching to ambient temperature. Microstructural evaluation and elemental analysis of TBCs were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The crack features of YSZ coatings in TBCs during thermal shock cycling, including those of horizontal (parallel to the substrate) and vertical cracks (perpendicular to the substrate), were particularly investigated by means of SEM and image analysis. Results show that horizontal and vertical cracks have different influences on the thermal shock resistance of the coatings. Horizontal cracks that occur at the interface of YSZ and thermally growth oxidation (TGO) cause partial or large-area spalling of coatings. When vertical and horizontal cracks encounter, network segments are formed which lead to partial spalling of the coatings.

  5. Giving Up the Gun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a model lesson from the book "Science/Technology/Society: Model Lessons for Secondary Social Studies Classes." Outlines Japan's campaign in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to rid itself of guns and return to swords. Provides background information and student handouts. (RW)

  6. Gyrotron gun study report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J. M.; Attard, A. C.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of the program was to explore new gyrotron gun configurations and to design a low velocity spread replacement gun for the NRL 35 GHz gyro-TWT. The specific beam forming techniques which were studied were magnetic field reversal, transverse magnetic field kicker, and single anode (diode-like) Magnetron Injection Guns (MIGs). This report contains a summary of our work in each of these areas as well as a description of the new MIG design for the gyro-TWT. Gyrotron oscillators and amplifiers require an entirely different type of electron gun design than those normally used in conventional tube designs. The ideal beam must not only have the proper geometry to maximize the rf interaction with the selected waveguide circuit mode, but also, for maximum efficiency, there are two additional requirements: (1) the transverse velocity of the electrons must exceed the longitudinal velocity by a typical factor of 1.5 to 2 (intermixed helical electron trajectories are allowed); and (2) the spread in the longitudinal velocities must be small (on the order of 10-20% for oscillators, 2-5% for amplifiers). Several methods for producing gyrotron beams have been investigated, and most likely different approaches will be necessary for differing power levels and velocity spread requirements.

  7. Gun Dealers, USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie; And Others

    In the United States, more than 11,500 adolescents' and young adults' lives are taken each year by firearms. Although Federal law prohibits minors from purchasing handguns, they typically get them by asking someone of legal age (18 years or older) to purchase them from one of the 256,771 Federally licensed gun dealers. This pamphlet answers…

  8. Gun control saves lives.

    PubMed

    Matzopoulos, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Reducing firearm mortality by means of stricter gun control is one of the most important short- to medium-term measures to address the burden of violence in South Africa, while longer-term interventions and policy measures take effect. PMID:27245735

  9. Radar gun hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    Radar guns - hand-held units used by the law to nail speeders - have been in use since the early '60s. Now they've been accused of causing cancer. Police officers in several states have so far filed eight suits against the manufacturer, claiming that they have contracted rare forms of cancer, such as of the eyelid and the testicle, from frequent proximity to the devices. Spurred by concerns expressed by police groups, researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology are conducting what they believe to be the first research of its kind in the nation. Last month psychologist John Violanti, an expert in policy psychology and health, sent out a one-page survey to 6,000 active and retired police officers in New York State, asking them about their health and their use of radar guns. Violanti says melanoma, leukemia, and lymph node cancer may be linked to these as well as other electromagnetic devices. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year issued a warning about radar guns, telling users not to operate them closer than 6 inches from the body. But this may not be a sufficient safeguard since the instruments can give off crisscrossing wave emissions within a police vehicle. The survey will be used to help determine if it would be safer to mount the guns, which are currently either hand-held or mounted on dashboards, outside troopers' cars.

  10. The Rail Gun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a rail gun demonstration that addresses a broad group of educational goals in introductory electricity and magnetism. Uses a battery-powered circuit consisting of a movable conductor placed across two conducting rails in a magnetic field to review mechanics, foster approximate reasoning and lateral class discussion, and demonstrate the…

  11. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart). The spray may also ... Innopran XL), sotalol (Betapace, Sorine), and timolol; calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine (Norvasc, in Tekamlo), diltiazem ( ...

  12. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

  13. Experiments on the Distribution of Fuel in Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1932-01-01

    The distribution of the fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays produced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of Plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high-velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side.

  14. The polarized SRF gun experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Grover, R.; Todd, R.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

    2007-09-10

    RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

  15. Gun Attitudes and Fear of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Linda; Weeks, Kyle; Murphy, Marie Mackay

    1997-01-01

    Using three studies, examined the relationship between attitudes toward guns and fear of crime. Findings indicate a connection between fear of crime and attitudes toward guns: people higher in fear of crime favored gun control. Results also established a relationship between stereotypical beliefs about gun victims and support for gun control. (RJM)

  16. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-07-03

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  17. Studying the Effect of the Air-Cap Configuration in Twin-Wire Arc-Spraying Process on the Obtained Flow Characteristics Using Design of Experiment Oriented Fluid Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics approach is adopted in this work using the design of experiments to reveal the effect of the air-cap configurations on the obtained gas velocity, the shear stresses, the high velocity zone, and the convergence of the obtained spraying plume in the twin-wire arc-spraying process. The parameters, which are revealed to optimize the air-cap configuration, are the throat diameter, the convergence angle of the throat inlet, the throat length, and the distance between the throat outlet and the intersection point of the approaching wires. The throat length is dependent upon the other configuration parameters. Outlet gas velocity, the turbulence in the flow, and the exerted shear stresses at wire tips are directly affected by the dominating flow regimes near the intersection point of the approaching wires. The presence of wires and the contact tips in the gas flow has enormous impact on the obtained flow characteristics. Air-cap throat diameter and the distance between throat outlet and intersection point determine the shape and length of the obtained high velocity zone in the spraying plum.

  18. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  19. Tapered plug foam spray apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two-component foam spray gun is readily disassembled for cleaning. It includes a body (1) with reactant (12, 14) and purge gas (16) inlet ports. A moldable valve packing (32) inside the body has a tapered conical interior surface (142), and apertures which match the reactant ports. A valve/tip (40) has a conical outer surface (48) which mates with the valve packing (32). The valve/tip (40) is held in place by a moldable packing washer (34), held at non-constant pressure by a screw (36, 38). The interior of the valve/tip (40) houses a removable mixing chamber (50). The mixing chamber (50) has direct flow orifices (60) and an auxiliary flow path (58, 60) which ameliorate pressure surges. The spray gun can be disassembled for cleaning without disturbing the seal, by removing the valve/tip (40) to the rear, thereby breaking it free of the conical packing. Rotation of the valve/tip (40) relative to the body (1) shuts off the reactant flow, and starts the purge gas flow.

  20. Magnetron injection gun scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W.

    1988-04-01

    A set of tradeoff equations was simplified to obtain scaling laws for magnetron injection guns (MIGs). The constraints are chosen to examine the maximum-peak-power capabilities of MIGs. The scaling laws are compared with exact solutions of the design equations and are supported by MIG simulations in which each MIG is designed to double the beam power of an existing design by adjusting one of the four fundamental parameters.

  1. Friction in rail guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  2. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-23

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  3. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph J.; Bissen, M.; Bosch, R.; Efremov, M.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.; Jacobs, K.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Rogers, G.; Severson, M.; Yavuz, D. D.; Legg, Robert A.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Hovater, J. Curtis; Plawski, Tomasz; Powers, Thomas J.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  4. Performance of air plasma spraying parameters in the fabrication of ZrO2-10%Y2O3-18% TiO2 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Gil, L.

    2013-11-01

    In this research, ZrO2-10%Y2O3-18% TiO2 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were sprayed by employing an air plasma thermal spray (APS) technique following a 23 factorial design experiment in order to obtain the best favorable spraying conditions able to enhance their properties. The effect of the spraying parameters on the porosity, microhardness, microstructure and morphology were determined by using different techniques such as optical microscopy (OP), image analysis, Vickers indentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique, this latter coupled with X-Ray microanalysis (EDS). It was found that both the arc voltage and the powder feed rate, as well as their interaction had a significant effect on the values of the reported hardness and these results were related to the existing level of porosity in the coatings. It was concluded that the best coatings properties, for the level of the variables studied in this work, could be obtained if the arc voltage is maintained at 36 V, the arc current at 900 A and the powder feed rate to 24 g/min.

  5. Process maps for plasma spray: Part 1: Plasma-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A.; WAN,YUEPENG; SAMPATH,SANJAY

    2000-01-26

    This is the first paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at Sandia National Laboratories and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The aim of the study is to develop a more fundamental understanding of plasma-particle interactions, droplet-substrate interactions, deposit formation dynamics and microstructural development as well as final deposit properties. The purpose is to create models that can be used to link processing to performance. Process maps have been developed for air plasma spray of molybdenum. Experimental work was done to investigate the importance of such spray parameters as gun current, auxiliary gas flow, and powder carrier gas flow. In-flight particle diameters, temperatures, and velocities were measured in various areas of the spray plume. Samples were produced for analysis of microstructures and properties. An empirical model was developed, relating the input parameters to the in-flight particle characteristics. Multi-dimensional numerical simulations of the plasma gas flow field and in-flight particles under different operating conditions were also performed. In addition to the parameters which were experimentally investigated, the effect of particle injection velocity was also considered. The simulation results were found to be in good general agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  7. Particle Velocity and Deposition Efficiency in the Cold Spray Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-11-12

    Copper powder was sprayed by the cold-gas dynamic method. In-flight particle velocities were measured with a laser-two-focus system as a function of process parameters such as gas temperature, gas pressure, and powder feed rate. Particle velocities were uniform in a relatively large volume within the plume and agreed with theoretical predictions. The presence of the substrate was found to have no significant effect on particle velocities. Cold-spray deposition efficiencies were measured on aluminum substrates as a function of particle velocity and incident angle of the plume. Deposition efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved. The critical velocity for deposition was determined to be about 640 meters per second. This work investigates both the in-flight characteristics of copper particles in a supersonic cold-spray plume and the build-up of the subsequent coating on aluminum substrates. Velocities were found to be relatively constant within a large volume of the plume. Particle counts dropped off sharply away from the central axis. The presence of a substrate was found to have no effect on the velocity of the particles. A substantial mass-loading effect on the particle velocity was observed; particle velocities begin to drop as the mass ratio of powder to gas flow rates exceeds 3%. The measured variation of velocity with gas pressure and pre-heat temperature was in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions. Helium may be used as the driving gas instead of air in order to achieve higher particle velocities for a given temperature and pressure. Coating deposition efficiencies were found to increase with particle velocity and decrease with gun- substrate angle. There did not appear to be any dependence of the deposition efficiency on coating thickness. A critical velocity for deposition of about 640 mk appears to fit the data well. The cold-spray technique shows promise as a method for the deposition of materials which are thermally sensitive or may

  8. High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of a Nanoceria Spray-Coated 316L Stainless Steel Under Short-Term Air Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hugo F.; Mendoza, Humberto; Church, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Nanoceria coatings using a spray method were implemented on a 316L stainless steel (SS). Coated and uncoated coupons were exposed to dry air at 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C) for short time periods (up to 24 hours) and in situ measurements of oxidation were carried out using a highly sensitive thermogravimetric balance. From the experimental outcome, activation energies were determined in both, coated and uncoated 316 SS coupons. The estimated exhibited activation energies for oxidation in the coated and uncoated conditions were 174 and 356 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, the developed scales were significantly different. In the coated steel, the dominant oxide was an oxide spinel (Fe, Mn)3O4 and the presence of Fe2O3 was sharply reduced, particularly at 1273 K (1000 °C). In contrast, no spinel was found in the uncoated 316L SS, and Fe2O3 was always present in the scale at all the investigated oxidation temperatures. The coated steels developed a highly adherent fine-grained scale structure. Apparently, the nanoceria particles enhanced nucleation of the newly formed scale while restricting coarsening. Coarse grain structures were found in the uncoated steels with scale growth occurring at grain ledges. Moreover, the oxidation rates for the coated 316L SS were at least an order of magnitude lower than those exhibited by the steel in the uncoated condition. The reduction in oxidation rates is attributed to a shift in the oxidation mechanism from outward cation diffusion to inward oxygen diffusion.

  9. Gun Concerns Personal for Duncan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2013-01-01

    As U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan works with other Obama administration officials on policy responses to the shootings at a Connecticut elementary school, he brings a personal and professional history that has acquainted him with the impact of gun violence. As schools chief in Chicago from 2001 to 2008, he was affected by the gun deaths…

  10. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective.

  11. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, John

    2010-12-10

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  12. VERIFYING THE PERFORMANCE OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of pesticide sprays usually results in formation of small spray droplets which can drift with air currents to nearby sensitive sites. A number of technologies offer the potential to reduce the amount of spray drift from pesticide applications. Acceptance and use of ...

  13. Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, Katie; Smith, Barton; Archibald, Reid; West, Brian

    2009-11-01

    An overview of research on a flow control technique called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM uses a high-momentum control jet under the influence of the Coanda effect to vector a high volume-flow jet or spray. Actuators provide the capability of moving the location of applied control flow making rotary or arbitrary motion of the vectored flow possible. The presented work includes a fundamental isothermal study on the effects of rotation speed and Reynolds number on a vectored jet using a belt-driven CSM actuator. Three-component velocity data were acquired for three Reynolds numbers and three rotation speeds using timed resolved high-speed stereo Particle Image Velocimetry. A second CSM system with 16 pneumatically-driven control ports has been retrofitted to a flame spray gun. This combination provides the capability to rapidly alter the direction of applied metal powders. High speed video of this process will also be presented. Finally, a fundamental study on the pneumatic system's response to minor losses and connection lines of varying lengths is presented.

  14. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  15. Investigating the Link Between Gun Possession and Gun Assault

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Therese S.; Culhane, Dennis P.; Ten Have, Thomas R.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the possible relationship between being shot in an assault and possession of a gun at the time. Methods. We enrolled 677 case participants that had been shot in an assault and 684 population-based control participants within Philadelphia, PA, from 2003 to 2006. We adjusted odds ratios for confounding variables. Results. After adjustment, individuals in possession of a gun were 4.46 (P < .05) times more likely to be shot in an assault than those not in possession. Among gun assaults where the victim had at least some chance to resist, this adjusted odds ratio increased to 5.45 (P < .05). Conclusions. On average, guns did not protect those who possessed them from being shot in an assault. Although successful defensive gun uses occur each year, the probability of success may be low for civilian gun users in urban areas. Such users should reconsider their possession of guns or, at least, understand that regular possession necessitates careful safety countermeasures. PMID:19762675

  16. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A ground test facility is being established at NASA Lewis Research Center to simulate the environmental and flight conditions needed to study adverse weather effects. One of the most important components is the water spray system which consists of many nozzles fitted on spray bars. Water is injected through air-assisted atomizers to generate uniform size drops to simulate icing in clouds. The primary objective is to provide experimental data on drop size distribution over a wide range of operating conditions. Correlation equations for mean drop size and initial injection parameters are being determined to assist in the design and modification of the Altitude Wind Tunnel. Special emphasis is being placed on the study of the aerodynamic structure of the air-assisted atomizer sprays. Detailed measurements of the variation of drop size distribution and velocity as a function of time and space are being made. Accurate initial and boundary conditions are being provided for computer model evaluation.

  17. Gun shows and gun violence: fatally flawed study yields misleading results.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J; Hemenway, David; Webster, Daniel; Pierce, Glenn; Braga, Anthony A

    2010-10-01

    A widely publicized but unpublished study of the relationship between gun shows and gun violence is being cited in debates about the regulation of gun shows and gun commerce. We believe the study is fatally flawed. A working paper entitled "The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas" outlined this study, which found no association between gun shows and gun-related deaths. We believe the study reflects a limited understanding of gun shows and gun markets and is not statistically powered to detect even an implausibly large effect of gun shows on gun violence. In addition, the research contains serious ascertainment and classification errors, produces results that are sensitive to minor specification changes in key variables and in some cases have no face validity, and is contradicted by 1 of its own authors' prior research. The study should not be used as evidence in formulating gun policy.

  18. Agricultural Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    AGDISP, a computer code written for Langley by Continuum Dynamics, Inc., aids crop dusting airplanes in targeting pesticides. The code is commercially available and can be run on a personal computer by an inexperienced operator. Called SWA+H, it is used by the Forest Service, FAA, DuPont, etc. DuPont uses the code to "test" equipment on the computer using a laser system to measure particle characteristics of various spray compounds.

  19. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  20. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-11-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance.

  1. Reduction of Gun Erosion and Correlation of Gun Erosion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, Dave; Wercinski, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gun barrel erosion is serious problem with two-stage light gas guns. Excessive barrel erosion can lead to poor or failed launches and frequent barrel changes, with the corresponding down time. Also, excessive barrel erosion can limit the maximum velocity obtainable by loading down the hydrogen working gas with eroded barrel material. Guided by a CFD code, the operating conditions of the Ames 0.5-inch gun were modified to reduce barrel erosion. The changes implemented included: (1) reduction in the piston mass, powder mass and hydrogen fill pressure; and (2) reduction in pump tube volume, while maintaining hydrogen mass. The latter change was found, in particular, to greatly reduce barrel erosion. For muzzle velocity ranges of 6.1 - 6.9 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 10. Even for the higher muzzle velocity range of 7.0 - 8.2 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 4. Gun erosion data from the Ames 0.5-inch, 1.0-inch, and 1.5-inch guns operated over a wide variety of launch conditions was examined and it was found that this data could be correlated using four different parameters: normalized powder charge energy, normalized hydrogen energy density, normalized pump tube volume and barrel diameter. The development of the correlation and the steps used to collapse the experimental data are presented. Over a certain parameter range in the correlation developed, the barrel erosion per shot is found to increase very rapidly. The correlation should prove useful in the selection of gun operating conditions and the design of new guns. Representative shapes of eroded gun barrels are also presented.

  2. Design, Construction and Operation of a Light Gas Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, John

    2005-11-01

    In order to conduct Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments in shock accelerated thin liquid sheets, a light gas gun was designed and constructed at Marquette University. This paper contains the basic predictions and construction techniques utilized in the design and operation of a double diaphragm light gas gun. The compressed air gas gun is used to accelerate a nylon projectile up to a velocity of 300 m/s. Pretest simulations were performed using two different hydrodynamic computational codes in order to simulate the inboard gas dynamics and projectile velocity. These simulations are compared with post test projectile velocity data. The simulations compare favorably to the data, including the one-dimensional calculations which do not account for frictional losses or diameter changes between the breech and barrel. Finally, both the computational simulations and the experimental measurements are compared to simple analytical predictions of the projectile velocity.

  3. The Internal Ballistics of an Air Gun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The internal ballistics of a firearm or artillery piece considers the pellet, bullet, or shell motion while it is still inside the barrel. In general, deriving the muzzle speed of a gunpowder firearm from first principles is difficult because powder combustion is fast and it very rapidly raises the temperature of gas (generated by gunpowder…

  4. Temporal association between federal gun laws and the diversion of guns to criminals in Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel W; Vernick, Jon S; Bulzacchelli, Maria T; Vittes, Katherine A

    2012-02-01

    The practices of licensed gun dealers can threaten the safety of urban residents by facilitating the diversion of guns to criminals. In 2003, changes to federal law shielded gun dealers from the release of gun trace data and provided other protections to gun dealers. The 14-month period during which the dealer did not sell junk guns was associated with a 68% reduction in the diversion of guns to criminals within a year of sale by the dealer and a 43% increase in guns diverted to criminals following sales by other dealers. The laws were associated with a 203% increase in the number of guns diverted to criminals within a year of sale by the gun store, which was the focus of this study. Policies which affect gun dealer accountability appeared to influence the diversion of guns to criminals.

  5. Electrostatic Spraying With Conductive Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Dawn, Frederic S.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Atkins, Loren E.

    1989-01-01

    Thin, uniform polymer coatings applied in water base normally impossible to charge. Electrostatic sprayer modified so applies coatings suspended or dissolved in electrically conductive liquids. Nozzle and gun constructed of nonconductive molded plastic. Liquid passageway made long enough electrical leakage through it low. Coaxial hose for liquid built of polytetrafluoroethylene tube, insulating sleeve, and polyurethane jacket. Sprayer provided with insulated seal at gun-to-hose connection, nonconductive airhose, pressure tank electrically isolated from ground, and special nozzle electrode. Supply of atomizing air reduced so particle momentum controlled by electrostatic field more effectively. Developed to apply water-base polyurethane coating to woven, shaped polyester fabric. Coating provides pressure seal for fabric, which is part of spacesuit. Also useful for applying waterproof, decorative, or protective coatings to fabrics for use on Earth.

  6. The polarized SRF gun experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Shultheiss, T.

    2008-10-01

    An experiment is under way to prove the feasibility of a super-conducting RF gun for the production of polarized electrons. We report on the progress of the experiment and on simulations predicting the possibility of success.

  7. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  8. High-solids paint overspray aerosols in a spray painting booth: particle size analysis and scrubber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.L.; D'arcy, J.B.; Schreck, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Particle size distributions of high-solids acrylic-enamel paint overspray aerosols were determined isokinetically in a typical downdraft spray painting booth in which a 7-stage cascade impactor was used. Three different industrial paint atomizers were used, and the paint aerosols were characterized before and after a paint both scrubber. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of a metallic basecoat and an acrylic clearcoat paint aerosol from air-atomized spray guns ranged from 4-12 ..mu..m and was dependent on atomization pressure. When the paint booth was operated under controlled conditions simulating those in a plant, the collection efficiency of paint overspray aerosols by a paint scrubber was found to be size dependent and decreased sharply for particles smaller than 2 ..mu..m to as low as 64% for clearcoat paint particles of 0.6 ..mu..m. Improvement in the overall particulate removal efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the spray painting operations so as to produce the least amount of fine overspray paint aerosols less than 2 ..mu..m. Maintaining a higher static pressure drop across the paint both scrubber also will improve scrubber performance.

  9. Spray nozzles reduce furnace emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    When the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) told an Illinois wood pallet manufacturer to reduce emissions of heavy smoke from its twice-weekly incineration of old pallets, the company didn't find many options. The company applied spray nozzles to enhance the efficiency of the furnaces, and scrub the smoke and gas, removing toxins and particulates before they could reach the furnace chimney and be emitted into the atmosphere. Three types of spray nozzles were installed in the incinerator. Six UniJet air blow-off nozzles, fed by a compressed air line, were installed in the fire box. These nozzles target a flat spray of pressured air to intensify the heat of the fire. As a result, the pallets burn more efficiently and completely. Eight standard FullJet nozzles also were installed in the fire box. Since the smoke concentration is heaviest in this area, the nozzles provide the large drops and the heavy spray distribution needed to clean carbon particulates from the smoke.

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIRCULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME II. APPENDICES D-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  11. Spray Drying of Mosambi Juice in Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Verma, A.

    2014-01-01

    The studies on spray drying of mosambi juice were carried out with Laboratory spray dryer set-up (LSD-48 MINI SPRAY DRYER-JISL). Inlet and outlet air temperature and maltodextrin (drying agent) concentration was taken as variable parameters. Experiments were conducted by using 110 °C to 140 °C inlet air temperature, 60 °C to 70 °C outlet air temperature and 5-7 % maltodextrin concentration. The free flow powder of mosambi juice was obtained with 7 % maltodextrin at 140 °C inlet air temperature and 60 °C outlet air temperature. Fresh and reconstituted juices were evaluated for vitamin C, titrable acidity and sensory characteristics. The reconstituted juice was found slightly acceptable by taste panel.

  12. The case for moderate gun control.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2014-03-01

    In addressing the shape of appropriate gun policy, this essay assumes for the sake of discussion that there is a legal and moral right to private gun ownership. My thesis is that, against the background of this right, the most defensible policy approach in the United States would feature moderate gun control. The first section summarizes the American gun control status quo and characterizes what I call "moderate gun control." The next section states and rebuts six leading arguments against this general approach to gun policy. The section that follows presents a positive case for moderate gun control that emphasizes safety in the home and society as well as rights whose enforcement entails some limits or qualifications on the right to bear arms. A final section shows how the recommended gun regulations address legitimate purposes, rather than imposing arbitrary restrictions on gun rights, and offers concluding reflections. PMID:24783322

  13. The case for moderate gun control.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2014-03-01

    In addressing the shape of appropriate gun policy, this essay assumes for the sake of discussion that there is a legal and moral right to private gun ownership. My thesis is that, against the background of this right, the most defensible policy approach in the United States would feature moderate gun control. The first section summarizes the American gun control status quo and characterizes what I call "moderate gun control." The next section states and rebuts six leading arguments against this general approach to gun policy. The section that follows presents a positive case for moderate gun control that emphasizes safety in the home and society as well as rights whose enforcement entails some limits or qualifications on the right to bear arms. A final section shows how the recommended gun regulations address legitimate purposes, rather than imposing arbitrary restrictions on gun rights, and offers concluding reflections.

  14. Experiments on the Distribution of Fuel in Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1933-01-01

    The distribution of fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays reproduced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side. The results showed that the distribution of the fuel within the sprays was very uneven.

  15. Agrochemical spray drift; assessment and mitigation--a review.

    PubMed

    Felsot, Allan S; Unsworth, John B; Linders, Jan B H J; Roberts, Graham; Rautman, Dirk; Harris, Caroline; Carazo, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    During application of agrochemicals spray droplets can drift beyond the intended target to non-target receptors, including water, plants and animals. Factors affecting this spray drift include mode of application, droplet size, which can be modified by the nozzle types, formulation adjuvants, wind direction, wind speed, air stability, relative humidity, temperature and height of released spray relative to the crop canopy. The rate of fall of spray droplets depends upon the size of the droplets but is modified by entrainment in a mobile air mass and is also influenced by the rate of evaporation of the liquid constituting the aerosol. The longer the aerosol remains in the air before falling to the ground (or alternatively striking an object above ground) the greater the opportunity for it to be carried away from its intended target. In general, all size classes of droplets are capable of movement off target, but the smallest are likely to move the farthest before depositing on the ground or a non-target receptor. It is not possible to avoid spray drift completely but it can be minimized by using best-management practices. These include using appropriate nozzle types, shields, spray pressure, volumes per area sprayed, tractor speed and only spraying when climatic conditions are suitable. Field layout can also influence spray drift, whilst crop-free and spray-free buffer zones and windbreak crops can also have a mitigating effect. Various models are available to estimate the environmental exposure from spray drift at the time of application. PMID:20981606

  16. Agrochemical spray drift; assessment and mitigation--a review.

    PubMed

    Felsot, Allan S; Unsworth, John B; Linders, Jan B H J; Roberts, Graham; Rautman, Dirk; Harris, Caroline; Carazo, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    During application of agrochemicals spray droplets can drift beyond the intended target to non-target receptors, including water, plants and animals. Factors affecting this spray drift include mode of application, droplet size, which can be modified by the nozzle types, formulation adjuvants, wind direction, wind speed, air stability, relative humidity, temperature and height of released spray relative to the crop canopy. The rate of fall of spray droplets depends upon the size of the droplets but is modified by entrainment in a mobile air mass and is also influenced by the rate of evaporation of the liquid constituting the aerosol. The longer the aerosol remains in the air before falling to the ground (or alternatively striking an object above ground) the greater the opportunity for it to be carried away from its intended target. In general, all size classes of droplets are capable of movement off target, but the smallest are likely to move the farthest before depositing on the ground or a non-target receptor. It is not possible to avoid spray drift completely but it can be minimized by using best-management practices. These include using appropriate nozzle types, shields, spray pressure, volumes per area sprayed, tractor speed and only spraying when climatic conditions are suitable. Field layout can also influence spray drift, whilst crop-free and spray-free buffer zones and windbreak crops can also have a mitigating effect. Various models are available to estimate the environmental exposure from spray drift at the time of application.

  17. Large Bore Powder Gun Qualification (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, Donald A.; Valdiviez, Robert

    2012-04-02

    A Large Bore Powder Gun (LBPG) is being designed to enable experimentalists to characterize material behavior outside the capabilities of the NNSS JASPER and LANL TA-55 PF-4 guns. The combination of these three guns will create a capability to conduct impact experiments over a wide range of pressures and shock profiles. The Large Bore Powder Gun will be fielded at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a Complex. The Complex is nearly 1000 ft below ground with dedicated drifts for testing, instrumentation, and post-shot entombment. To ensure the reliability, safety, and performance of the LBPG, a qualification plan has been established and documented here. Requirements for the LBPG have been established and documented in WE-14-TR-0065 U A, Large Bore Powder Gun Customer Requirements. The document includes the requirements for the physics experiments, the gun and confinement systems, and operations at NNSS. A detailed description of the requirements is established in that document and is referred to and quoted throughout this document. Two Gun and Confinement Systems will be fielded. The Prototype Gun will be used primarily to characterize the gun and confinement performance and be the primary platform for qualification actions. This gun will also be used to investigate and qualify target and diagnostic modifications through the life of the program (U1a.104 Drift). An identical gun, the Physics Gun, will be fielded for confirmatory and Pu experiments (U1a.102D Drift). Both guns will be qualified for operation. The Gun and Confinement System design will be qualified through analysis, inspection, and testing using the Prototype Gun for the majority of process. The Physics Gun will be qualified through inspection and a limited number of qualification tests to ensure performance and behavior equivalent to the Prototype gun. Figure 1.1 shows the partial configuration of U1a and the locations of the Prototype and Physics Gun/Confinement Systems.

  18. Gravity's Smoking Gun?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaztañaga, Enrique; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    2001-09-01

    We present a new constraint on the biased galaxy formation picture. Gravitational instability theory predicts that the two-point mass density correlation function, ξ(r), has an inflection point at the separation r=r0, corresponding to the boundary between the linear and nonlinear regime of clustering, ξ~=1. We show how this feature can be used to constrain the biasing parameter b2≡ξg(r)/ξ(r) on scales r~=r0, where ξg is the galaxy-galaxy correlation function, which is allowed to differ from ξ. We apply our method to real data: the ξg(r), estimated from the Automatic Plate Measuring (APM) galaxy survey. Our results suggest that the APM galaxies trace the mass at separations r>~5 h-1 Mpc, where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s-1 Mpc-1. The present results agree with earlier studies, based on comparing higher order correlations in the APM with weakly nonlinear perturbation theory. Both approaches constrain the b factor to be within 20% of unity. If the existence of the feature that we identified in the APM ξg(r)-the inflection point near ξg=1-is confirmed by more accurate surveys, we may have discovered gravity's smoking gun: the long-awaited ``shoulder'' in ξ, predicted by Gott and Rees 25 years ago.

  19. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albers, James; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Summary Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry. PMID:26366020

  20. [Suicide with home-made gun].

    PubMed

    Safr, M; Hejna, P; Zátopková, L

    2009-04-01

    Three cases of suicide by single bullet injury to head by home-made guns with immediate incapacitation are reported in following article. Zip gun (home-made gun) is a improvised firearm, usually a handgun. Home-made guns are almost always single-shot, as the improvised construction sometimes makes them weak enough to be destroyed by the act of firing. Zip guns are mostly smoothbore. Zip gun injuries, although unique today, represent a special category of missile injury with atypical low velocity terminal ballistics.

  1. A Comparison of Fuel Sprays from Several Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the tests results of a series of tests made of the sprays from 14 fuel injection nozzles of 9 different types, the sprays being injected into air at atmospheric density and at 6 and 14 times atmospheric density. High-speed spark photographs of the sprays from each nozzle at each air density were taken at the rate of 2,000 per second, and from them were obtained the dimensions of the sprays and the rates of spray-tip penetration. The sprays were also injected against plasticine targets placed at different distances from the nozzles, and the impressions made in the plasticine were used as an indication of the distribution of the fuel within the spray. Cross-sectional sketches of the different types of sprays are given showing the relative sizes of the spray cores and envelopes. The characteristics of the sprays are compared and discussed with respect to their application to various types of engines.

  2. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  3. [The chemical action of gun powder gases on biological tissues in a point-blank shot].

    PubMed

    Popov, V L; Isakov, V D; Babakhanian, R V; Karnasevich, Iu A

    1992-01-01

    Chemical effect of gun powder gas on the biologic tissues manifests by red-brown staining of the tissues, mainly at the expense of methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin. Scarlet staining of the tissues at the edges of gun-shot wounds is not a specific marker of a shot made from a short distance; it may emerge several hours after wounding at the expense of hydroxy-hemoglobin and is not at all related to the chemical effect of gun powder gas. The conditions conducive to scarlet staining are an open wound permitting free oxygenation by air oxygen and hemoglobin transfer from the injured red cells into blood plasma and adjacent tissues.

  4. Method and apparatus for the application of thermal spray coatings onto aluminum engine cylinder bores

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.; Kramer, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents background and detail information concerning the application of thermally sprayed metal alloy coatings onto the I.D. surfaces of aluminum block engine cylinder bores using a rotating extension HVOF spray gun. A fixturing method that provides block temperature stabilization and the elimination of fixture cleaning and part masking is described. A new approach and technique that replaces grit blasting for surface preparation is also discussed.

  5. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Daniel L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339±29mW/m(2)), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444±8mW/m(2)) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use.

  6. High brightness picosecond electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Collin, S.; Renucci, P.; Gatri, M.; Sonderegger, S.; Crottini, A.; Ganiere, J.D.; Deveaud, B.

    2005-08-15

    We have developed a high brightness picosecond electron gun. We have used it to replace the thermionic electron gun of a commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to perform time-resolved cathodoluminescence experiments. Picosecond electron pulses are produced, at a repetition rate of 80.7 MHz, by femtosecond mode-locked laser pulses focused on a metal photocathode. This system has a normalized axial brightness of 93 A/cm{sup 2} sr kV, allowing for a spatial resolution of 50 nm in the secondary electron imaging mode of the SEM. The temporal width of the electron pulse is 12 ps.

  7. Unintentional Gun Deaths among Children. Firearm Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Children are at risk of being killed or injured by a gun if their parents own a gun because many guns obtained for self-defense are kept loaded and within reach of children. This brief fact sheet presents statistical information relating to accidental deaths involving young people and firearms. Safety measures are suggested for preventing…

  8. Advances in light-gas gun technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, P. L.; Murphy, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Constant-area accelerator used with light-gas guns increases the velocity of accelerating projectiles. A disposable accelerator on the muzzle of the gun uses the energy and momentum of a primary projectile, launched by the gun, to achieve high velocities of a light secondary projectile accelerated from rest in the accelerator.

  9. Understanding of Guns, Gun Play, and Aggressivity Among 5-9 Year Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVoie, Joseph C.; Adams, Gerald R.

    Knowledge about guns and the relation between play with guns and aggressivity was assessed in a group of 5-9 year old children. Each child was questioned about his gun play and his understanding of guns after he was shown a display of two toy and two real guns. This data was then correlated with a teacher rating of aggression for each child.…

  10. The Smoking Gun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Alice

    1994-01-01

    Examines the complex public debate over the risks of passive smoking that includes the issues of individual choice, personal space, community, social norms, and morality. Discusses the composition of ETS (gases and particulates that disperse into the air when a smoker smokes) and the efforts of tobacco lobbies. (LZ)

  11. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 2×10⁻⁹ torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  12. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-01

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV /m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 2 ×10-9 torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  13. Characteristics of MCrAlY coatings sprayed by high velocity oxygen-fuel spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying system in open air has been established for producing the coatings that are extremely clean and dense. It is thought that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY (M is Fe, Ni and/or Co) coatings can be applied to provide resistance against oxidation and corrosion to the hot parts of gas turbines. Also, it is well known that the thicker coating can be sprayed in comparison with any other thermal spraying systems due to improved residual stresses. However, thermal and mechanical properties of HVOF coatings have not been clarified. Especially, the characteristics of residual stress, that are the most important property from the view point of production technique, have not been made clear. In this paper, the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings were measured in both the case of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in comparison with a vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings could be improved by a diffusion heat treatment to equate the vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. Also, the residual stress characteristics were analyzed using a deflection measurement technique and a X-ray technique. The residual stress of HVOF coating was reduced by the shot-peening effect comparable to that of a plasma spray system in open air. This phenomena could be explained by the reason that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coating was built up by poorly melted particles.

  14. Interaction of surface laser treatment upon ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic coating structure obtained by means of air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobylanska-Szkaradek, Krystyna

    2003-10-01

    The subject of the analysis and examination is the structure and utilitarian properties of thin ceramic layers placed on the nickel base heat-resistant alloy by plasma spraying method, which later on underwent laser remelting. Examined materials consisting of outer coating ZrO2+8%wt.Y2O3 and NiCrAlY laser are to be used as thermal barriers and protection against high temperature corrosion of heating-resisting alloy on nickel base, applied in internal combustion turbine blades and other construction elements working under stress in high temperature conditions.

  15. Keeping Guns Out of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGiboney, Garry W.

    1995-01-01

    The DeKalb County (Georgia) School System has reduced the number of gun-toting students by over 65% by piecing together a program combining education, community involvement, mandatory expulsion, and video technology. Kids do their part by learning the school's discipline policy, discussing nonviolent alternatives, and carrying clear bookbags. (MLH)

  16. Youth, guns, and violent crime.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Young people are overrepresented as both victims and perpetrators of violence. Indeed, some commentators have suggested that recent cohorts of youth have been composed of "superpredators" who have little regard for human life. The evidence, however, suggests that other factors are responsible for recent increases in youth gun violence. This article analyzes the extent and causes of youth violence in the United States, paying particular attention to the late 1980s and early 1990s, when rates of homicide and robbery committed by youth rose to extremely high levels. Examination of trends for these crimes shows that: The increase in violence in the United States during the late 1980s and early 1990s was due primarily to an increase in violent acts committed by people under age 20. Similarly, dramatic declines in homicide and robbery in recent years are attributable primarily to a decline in youth violence. The increase in youth homicide was predominantly due to a significant increase in the use of handguns, which converted ordinary teenage fights and other violent encounters into homicides. Several other interrelated factors also fueled the rise in youth violence, including the rise of illegal drug markets, particularly for crack cocaine, the recruitment of youth into those markets, and an increase in gun carrying among young people. The author points out that youth violence diminished as the crack markets shrank, law enforcement increased efforts to control youth access to guns, youth gun carrying declined, and the robust economy provided legitimate jobs for young people.

  17. Guns in Schools. Firearm Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Common reasons that young people choose to carry firearms outside of school--protection, intimidation of others, or to be like their peers--are the same reasons they carry guns into the school. This fact sheet presents statistics regarding the prevalence of firearms amongst students in American schools, including: shooting fatalities and woundings…

  18. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  19. Mobile zone, spray booth ventilation system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-26

    This concept endeavors to reduce the volume of air (to be treated) from spray paint booths, thereby increasing efficiency and improving air pollution abatement (VOC emissions especially). Most of the ventilation air is recycled through the booth to maintain laminar flow; the machinery is located on the supply side of the booth rather than on the exhaust side. 60 to 95% reduction in spray booth exhaust rate should result. Although engineering and production prototypes have been made, demand is low.

  20. Demonstration of split-flow ventilation and recirculation as flow-reduction methods in an Air Force paint spray booth. Final report, 15 February 1991-9 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.; Ayer, J.; Sutay, R.

    1994-07-27

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and inside and outside the respirator in the painter`s breathing zone (BZ). The resulting data were analyzed and used to design a modified ventilation system that (1) separates a portion of the exhaust exiting the lower portion of the booth, which contains a concentration of toxic pollutants greater than the average at the exhaust plane (split-flow); and (2) provides an option to return the flow from the upper portion of the exhaust to the intake plenum for mixing with fresh air and recirculation through the booth (recirculation). After critical review by cognizant Air Force offices and an experimental demonstration showing that a flame ionization detector monitoring the air entering the booth is able to detect excursions above the equivalent exposure limit for the solvents in the paint, the exhaust duct was reconfigured for split-flow and recirculating ventilation. A volunteer painter was briefed on the increased risk of exposure during recirculation, and on the purposes and possible benefits of this study. He then signed an informed consent form before participating in the recirculation tests. A series of tests generally equivalent to the baseline series was conducted during split-flow and recirculating ventilation, and three tests were performed during only split-flow ventilation.

  1. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  2. Gun carrying by high school students in Boston, MA: does overestimation of peer gun carrying matter?

    PubMed

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1,700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a gun, 9% of boys and 2% of girls. Students substantially overestimated the percentage of their peers who carried guns; the likelihood that a respondent carried a gun was strongly associated with their perception of the level of peer gun carrying. Most respondents believed it was easier for other youth to obtain guns than it was for them. Social marketing campaigns designed to lower young people's perceptions about the prevalence of peer gun carrying may be a promising strategy for reducing actual gun carrying among youth.

  3. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) to spray sublingually (under the tongue). It is used as needed to treat breakthrough ... the nozzle into your mouth and under your tongue. Squeeze your fingers and thumb together to spray ...

  4. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergies. It is also used to treat nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone ... are using mometasone nasal spray to treat nasal polyps, it is usually sprayed in each nostril once ...

  5. Spray drying of fruit and vegetable juices--a review.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anjali; Singh, Satya Vir

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of spray drying is to increase the shelf life and easy handling of juices. In the present paper, the studies carried out so far on spray drying of various fruits and vegetables are reported. The major fruit juices dried are mango, banana, orange, guava, bayberry, watermelon, pineapple, etc. However, study on vegetable juices is limited. In spray drying, the major optimized parameters are inlet air temperature, relative humidity of air, outlet air temperature, and atomizer speed that are given for a particular study. The juices in spray drying require addition of drying agents that include matlodextrin, liquid glucose, etc. The drying agents are added to increase the glass transition temperature. Different approaches for spray dryer design have also been discussed in the present work. PMID:24915356

  6. Spray drying of fruit and vegetable juices--a review.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anjali; Singh, Satya Vir

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of spray drying is to increase the shelf life and easy handling of juices. In the present paper, the studies carried out so far on spray drying of various fruits and vegetables are reported. The major fruit juices dried are mango, banana, orange, guava, bayberry, watermelon, pineapple, etc. However, study on vegetable juices is limited. In spray drying, the major optimized parameters are inlet air temperature, relative humidity of air, outlet air temperature, and atomizer speed that are given for a particular study. The juices in spray drying require addition of drying agents that include matlodextrin, liquid glucose, etc. The drying agents are added to increase the glass transition temperature. Different approaches for spray dryer design have also been discussed in the present work.

  7. Azelastine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... and replace with the pump unit. Prime the delivery system (pump unit) with four sprays or until a fine mist appears. If 3 days or more have elapsed since your last use of the nasal spray, reprime the pump with two sprays or until a fine mist appears.

  8. Flow characteristic of in-flight particles in supersonic plasma spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Wei, Zhengying; Zhao, Guangxi; Du, Jun; Bai, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a computational model based on supersonic plasma spraying (SAPS) is developed to describe the plasma jet coupled with the injection of carrier gas and particles for SAPS. Based on a high-efficiency supersonic spraying gun, the 3D computational model of spraying gun was built to study the features of plasma jet and its interactions with the sprayed particles. Further the velocity and temperature of in-flight particles were measured by Spray Watch 2i, the shape of in-flight particles was observed by scanning electron microscope. Numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements and a good agreement has been achieved. The flight process of particles in plasma jet consists of three stages: accelerated stage, constant speed stage and decelerated stage. Numerical and experimental indicates that the H2 volume fraction in mixture gas of Ar + H2 should keep in the range of 23-26 %, and the distance of 100 mm is the optimal spraying distance in Supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying. Particles were melted and broken into small child particles by plasma jet and the diameters of most child particles were less than 30 μm. In general, increasing the particles impacting velocity and surface temperature can decrease the coating porosity.

  9. A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shizhong; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation was developed to address the disadvantages of the insufficient driving capability of high-pressure gas and the constraints of gunpowder. The performance of this gasdynamic gun was investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. Much more powerful launching capability was achieved by this gun relative to a conventional high-pressure gas gun, owing to the use of the chemical energy of the driver gas. To achieve the same launching condition, the initial pressure required for this gun was an order of magnitude lower than that for a gun driven by high-pressure H2. Because of the presence of the detonation, however, a more complex internal ballistic process of this gun was observed. Acceleration of projectiles for this gun was accompanied by a series of impulse loads, in contrast with the smooth acceleration for a conventional one, which indicates that this gun should be used conditionally. The practical feasibility of this gun was verified by experiments. The experiments demonstrated the convenience of taking advantage of the techniques developed for detonation-driven shock tubes and tunnels. PMID:26827358

  10. A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shizhong; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation was developed to address the disadvantages of the insufficient driving capability of high-pressure gas and the constraints of gunpowder. The performance of this gasdynamic gun was investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. Much more powerful launching capability was achieved by this gun relative to a conventional high-pressure gas gun, owing to the use of the chemical energy of the driver gas. To achieve the same launching condition, the initial pressure required for this gun was an order of magnitude lower than that for a gun driven by high-pressure H2. Because of the presence of the detonation, however, a more complex internal ballistic process of this gun was observed. Acceleration of projectiles for this gun was accompanied by a series of impulse loads, in contrast with the smooth acceleration for a conventional one, which indicates that this gun should be used conditionally. The practical feasibility of this gun was verified by experiments. The experiments demonstrated the convenience of taking advantage of the techniques developed for detonation-driven shock tubes and tunnels.

  11. A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shizhong; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation was developed to address the disadvantages of the insufficient driving capability of high-pressure gas and the constraints of gunpowder. The performance of this gasdynamic gun was investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. Much more powerful launching capability was achieved by this gun relative to a conventional high-pressure gas gun, owing to the use of the chemical energy of the driver gas. To achieve the same launching condition, the initial pressure required for this gun was an order of magnitude lower than that for a gun driven by high-pressure H2. Because of the presence of the detonation, however, a more complex internal ballistic process of this gun was observed. Acceleration of projectiles for this gun was accompanied by a series of impulse loads, in contrast with the smooth acceleration for a conventional one, which indicates that this gun should be used conditionally. The practical feasibility of this gun was verified by experiments. The experiments demonstrated the convenience of taking advantage of the techniques developed for detonation-driven shock tubes and tunnels.

  12. Effects of a gun dealer's change in sales practices on the supply of guns to criminals.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel W; Vernick, Jon S; Bulzacchelli, Maria T

    2006-09-01

    Licensed gun dealers are a major conduit for gun trafficking. Prior to May 1999, a single gun store sold more than half of the guns recovered from criminals in Milwaukee, WI, shortly following retail sale. On May 10, 1999, the store stopped selling small, inexpensive handguns popular with criminals, often called "Saturday night specials." The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of this gun store's changed sales practices on criminals' acquisition of new guns. We used an interrupted time-series design with comparisons to test for changes in the number of guns that police recovered from criminals within a year of retail sale following the gun dealer's new sales policy. The dealer's changed sales policy was associated with a 96% decrease in recently sold, small, inexpensive handguns use in crime in Milwaukee, a 73% decrease in crime guns recently sold by this dealer, and a 44% decrease in the flow of all new, trafficked guns to criminals in Milwaukee. The findings demonstrate the substantial impact that a single gun store's sales practices can have on the supply of new guns to criminals. Proposed anti-gun-trafficking efforts in other cities could benefit from targeting problem retail outlets.

  13. Effects of a Gun Dealer's Change in Sales Practices on the Supply of Guns to Criminals

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Jon S.; Bulzacchelli, Maria T.

    2006-01-01

    Licensed gun dealers are a major conduit for gun trafficking. Prior to May 1999, a single gun store sold more than half of the guns recovered from criminals in Milwaukee, WI, shortly following retail sale. On May 10, 1999, the store stopped selling small, inexpensive handguns popular with criminals, often called “Saturday night specials.” The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of this gun store's changed sales practices on criminals' acquisition of new guns. We used an interrupted time-series design with comparisons to test for changes in the number of guns that police recovered from criminals within a year of retail sale following the gun dealer's new sales policy. The dealer's changed sales policy was associated with a 96% decrease in recently sold, small, inexpensive handguns use in crime in Milwaukee, a 73% decrease in crime guns recently sold by this dealer, and a 44% decrease in the flow of all new, trafficked guns to criminals in Milwaukee. The findings demonstrate the substantial impact that a single gun store's sales practices can have on the supply of new guns to criminals. Proposed anti-gun-trafficking efforts in other cities could benefit from targeting problem retail outlets. PMID:16937085

  14. Ballistics of space launch by a rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    The idea of using a big gun to launch objects to space has been around for years -- even Isaac Newton considered the concept. However the technology of accelerating a payload with a gun only recently began approaching orbital velocity (8 km/sec). NASA is currently experimenting with a rail gun which utilizes a magnetic field powered by electricity to accelerate a projectile along a set of rails, similar to train rails. Velocities up to 3 km/sec have been reported for small projectiles, and it seems that orbital velocities can soon become a reality too. We model a launch of various projectiles from Earth surface into the elevation corresponding to the low Earth orbit (about 200-250 km above Earth's surface). The goal of this modeling is to study feasibility of such launch (and accelerations induced), and the ballistics of the flight via Earth's atmosphere (the trajectory, air drag induced, pressure and temperature generated by air drag, etc) and thus the requirements for a mass, size, strength, heat shield, and general design of a payload capsule.

  15. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  16. Particle Acceleration in a High Enthalpy Nozzle Flow with a Modified Detonation Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

    2014-04-01

    The quality of thermal sprayed coatings depends on many factors which have been investigated and are still in scientific focus. Mostly, the coating material is inserted into the spray device as solid powder. The particle condition during the spray process has a strong effect on coating quality. In some cases, higher particle impact energy leads to improved coating quality. Therefore, a computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension with a nozzle transforms the detonation gun process into an intermittent shock tunnel process in which the particles are accelerated in a high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation with nozzle in which the device generates very high particle velocities up to a frequency of 5 Hz. A variable particle injection system allows injection of the powder at any point along the nozzle axis to control particle temperature and velocity. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture is used in the experiments. Operation performance and nozzle outflow are characterized by time resolved pressure measurements. The particle conditions inside the nozzle and in the nozzle exit plane are calculated with a quasi-one-dimensional WENO-code of high order. For the experiments, particle velocity is obtained by particle image velocimetry, and particle concentration is qualitatively determined by a laser extinction method. The powders used are WC-Co(88/12), NiCr(80/20), Al2O3, and Cu. Different substrate/powder combinations for varying particle injection positions have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

  17. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  18. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  19. Have guns, will travel

    SciTech Connect

    Khripunov, I.

    1997-05-01

    In the latter decades of the Cold War, defense industries were at the heart of the Soviet economy, absorbing one-third of the country`s industrial force; 60 percent of the machine-building industry; 80 percent of all research and development personnel; and 20 percent of Soviet energy output. Today, the Russian defense economy is near collapse. In 1996, Russia`s air force could not buy a single combat plane. President Boris Yeltsin admitted in his State of the Union address on March 6 that {open_quotes}the Russian armed forces are five to 10 years, sometimes 15 years, behind the world`s most powerful armies in the general level of {open_quote}technical equipment.{close_quote}{close_quotes} The only {open_quotes}bright{close_quotes} spot in the Russian military-industrial complex-the arms trade. Russia is desperately pushing weapons in the international market in an attempt to salvage its defense industrial base. Russia`s enormous arms complex includes about 2,000 enterprises directly engaged in military production, a host of subcontractors, 920 research organizations, and a work force of roughly 5 million.

  20. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user fa­cil­i­ties such as syn­chrotron ra­di­a­tion light sources and free elec­tron lasers re­quire ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures that sup­port elec­tric fields of 10-100 MV/m, es­pe­cial­ly at the start of the ac­cel­er­a­tor chain where ce­ram­ic in­su­la­tors are used for very high gra­di­ent DC guns. These in­su­la­tors are dif­fi­cult to man­u­fac­ture, re­quire long com­mis­sion­ing times, and often ex­hib­it poor re­li­a­bil­i­ty. Two tech­ni­cal ap­proach­es to solv­ing this prob­lem will be in­ves­ti­gat­ed. First­ly, in­vert­ed ce­ram­ics offer so­lu­tions for re­duced gra­di­ents be­tween the elec­trodes and ground. An in­vert­ed de­sign will be pre­sent­ed for 350 kV, with max­i­mum gra­di­ents in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Sec­ond­ly, novel ce­ram­ic man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cess­es will be stud­ied, in order to pro­tect triple junc­tion lo­ca­tions from emis­sion, by ap­ply­ing a coat­ing with a bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty. The pro­cess­es for cre­at­ing this coat­ing will be op­ti­mized to pro­vide pro­tec­tion as well as be used to coat a ce­ram­ic with an ap­pro­pri­ate gra­di­ent in bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty from the vac­u­um side to the air side of an HV stand­off ce­ram­ic cylin­der. Ex­am­ple in­su­la­tor de­signs are being com­put­er mod­elled, and in­su­la­tor sam­ples are being man­u­fac­tured and test­ed

  1. Racism, Gun Ownership and Gun Control: Biased Attitudes in US Whites May Influence Policy Decisions

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kerry; Forrest, Walter; Lynott, Dermot; Daly, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Racism is related to policies preferences and behaviors that adversely affect blacks and appear related to a fear of blacks (e.g., increased policing, death penalty). This study examined whether racism is also related to gun ownership and opposition to gun controls in US whites. Method The most recent data from the American National Election Study, a large representative US sample, was used to test relationships between racism, gun ownership, and opposition to gun control in US whites. Explanatory variables known to be related to gun ownership and gun control opposition (i.e., age, gender, education, income, conservatism, anti-government sentiment, southern vs. other states, political identification) were entered in logistic regression models, along with measures of racism, and the stereotype of blacks as violent. Outcome variables included; having a gun in the home, opposition to bans on handguns in the home, support for permits to carry concealed handguns. Results After accounting for all explanatory variables, logistic regressions found that for each 1 point increase in symbolic racism there was a 50% increase in the odds of having a gun at home. After also accounting for having a gun in the home, there was still a 28% increase in support for permits to carry concealed handguns, for each one point increase in symbolic racism. The relationship between symbolic racism and opposition to banning handguns in the home (OR1.27 CI 1.03,1.58) was reduced to non-significant after accounting for having a gun in the home (OR1.17 CI.94,1.46), which likely represents self-interest in retaining property (guns). Conclusions Symbolic racism was related to having a gun in the home and opposition to gun control policies in US whites. The findings help explain US whites’ paradoxical attitudes towards gun ownership and gun control. Such attitudes may adversely influence US gun control policy debates and decisions. PMID:24204867

  2. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  3. The polarized electron gun for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.C.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Hoyt, E.; Klaisner, L.; Woods, M.; Wright, D.; Zolotorev, M.

    1992-03-01

    A new polarized electron gun for use on the SLC at SLAC has been built and tested. It is a diode gun with a laser driven GaAs photocathode. It is designed to provide short (2ns) pulses of 10 A at 160 kV at 120 Hz. The design features of the gun and results from a testing program on a new and dedicated beam line are presented. Early results from operation on the SLC will also be shown.

  4. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2 x 10/sup 16/ barium ions with energy 10--20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  5. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength. PMID:18647050

  6. Health and Gun Violence. Guns as a Public-Health Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Victoria

    1994-01-01

    Violence in all settings has reached epidemic proportions. Most shootings are committed by friends or relatives following an argument or when playing with guns. The public needs education about nonviolent ways of coping with anger and about the high cost of gun violence. Suggestions for avoiding gun violence and the PTA position on firearms are…

  7. Community gun safety in Central Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Erdman, Deborah A; Smith, Jill Gray; Widom, Kenneth; Reardon, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Firearm-related injuries are a public health issue in the United States. In rural Pennsylvania, it is a familiar way of life to have a gun or guns in the home. Safety behaviors along with gun storage in the home, specifically where there are young children (aged 6 years and younger), are a concern for this level I regional resource center in rural Pennsylvania. Head Start families were surveyed regarding gun safety habits before and after safety educational activities. A noteworthy number of families reported changing behaviors regarding better safety habits for storing and use of firearms in the home postsurvey.

  8. Stress rupture and creep behavior of a low pressure plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The creep behavior of a NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum at 660 and 850 C is studied. The microstructure of the coating alloy is described. Analysis of the creep curves reveal that the secondary creep rates, the transition from secondary to tertiary creep, and the strain-to-failure are affected by the environment, preexposure, stress, and temperature. It is observed that the rupture lives of the NiCoCrAlY alloy at 660 and 850 C are greater in air than in vacuum. Several mechanisms that may explain the lack of crack growth from surface-connected pores during tests in air are proposed.

  9. Spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X. F.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer are examined using water as the working fluid. Measurements of mean drop size, drop size distribution, spray cone angle, and circumferential liquid distinction, are carried out over wide ranges of liquid injection pressures and atomizing air velocities. Generally, it is found that an increase in nozzle bypass ratio worsens the atomization quality and widens the spray cone angle. Increase in airblast air velocity may improve or impair atomization quality depending on whether it increases or decreases the relative velocity between the liquid and the surrounding air. Airblast air can also be used to modify the change in spray cone angle that normally accompanies a change in bypass ratio.

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF THE SOUND SUPPRESSION SPRAY NOZZLE POSITIONED BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THE SOUND SUPPRESSION SPRAY NOZZLE POSITIONED BETWEEN THE TWO SRB EXHAUST OPENINGS - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. A structural investigation of a plasma sprayed Ni--Cr based alloy coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, S.; Neiser, R.A.; Herman, H. ); Kirkland, J.P.; Elam, W.T. )

    1993-01-01

    A Ni--Cr based hardfacing alloy has been plasma sprayed in ambient and low pressure atmospheres onto mild steel substrates. These coatings exhibit excellent wear and corrosion resistance; however, the significance of microstructure on properties has not been reported. This study relates the structure of the sprayed coatings to the processing conditions. X-ray diffraction results indicate phase separation in air plasma sprayed deposits, while low pressure plasma sprayed deposits exhibit a single supersaturated solid solution. Annealing of the air plasma sprayed coating shows dissolution of the bcc chromium phase, confirming its metastable nature. These results were confirmed using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which further suggests a highly disordered structure, with partial oxidation of selected alloying elements, such as chromium. Transmission electron microscopy indicates a wide variety of microstructures in the air plasma sprayed deposit. In the case of low pressure sprayed deposit, the microstructures are homogeneous and uniform.

  12. Spray drift reduction test method correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ASTM Standard E609 Terminology Relating to Pesticides defines drift as “The physical movement of an agrochemical through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter to any non or off target site.” Since there are many commercial tank mix adjuvants designed to reduce spray drift, ASTM esta...

  13. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH MODIFICATIONS FOR RECIRCULATION VENTILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The control of emissions from spray painting operations has historically been cost prohibitive, due to the high exhaust flow rates coupled with low volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) Concentrations. Past studies, conducted by the U.S. EPA and U.S. ...

  14. From gun politics to self-defense politics: a feminist critique of the great gun debate.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jennifer D

    2014-03-01

    This article calls attention to a problematic binary produced by public debates surrounding gun rights and gun control-namely, that women must choose armed self-protection or no self-protection at all. I argue that both anti- and pro-gun discourses, drawing on and reproducing race and class privileges, use assumptions about women's physical inferiority to further their agendas. I highlight how both sides have used guns as the proxy for self-defense and conclude by calling for a shift in public discourse to focus on the broader question of the right to self-defense rather than the narrower question of gun rights. PMID:24686128

  15. From gun politics to self-defense politics: a feminist critique of the great gun debate.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jennifer D

    2014-03-01

    This article calls attention to a problematic binary produced by public debates surrounding gun rights and gun control-namely, that women must choose armed self-protection or no self-protection at all. I argue that both anti- and pro-gun discourses, drawing on and reproducing race and class privileges, use assumptions about women's physical inferiority to further their agendas. I highlight how both sides have used guns as the proxy for self-defense and conclude by calling for a shift in public discourse to focus on the broader question of the right to self-defense rather than the narrower question of gun rights.

  16. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  17. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  18. Crafting a Gauss Gun Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Matthew E.; Blodgett, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    A Gauss Gun launches a ferromagnetic projectile using a pulsed electromagnet. This demonstration provides a nice counterpoint to the popular Thompson's jumping ring demonstration, which launches a nonferromagnetic ring via repulsion of an induced current. The pulsed current must be short enough in duration so that the projectile is not retarded by lingering current in the launch solenoid, but also large enough to provide a suitably impressive velocity. This project involved an iterative design process, as we worked through balancing all the different design criteria. We recommend it as a very nice electronics design project which will produce a very portable and enjoyable demonstration. AAPT sponsor Earl Blodgett.

  19. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  20. The Xygra gun simulation tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Lamppa, Derek C.; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Shirley, David Noyes; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Russo, Thomas V.

    2008-12-01

    Inductive electromagnetic launchers, or coilguns, use discrete solenoidal coils to accelerate a coaxial conductive armature. To date, Sandia has been using an internally developed code, SLINGSHOT, as a point-mass lumped circuit element simulation tool for modeling coilgun behavior for design and verification purposes. This code has shortcomings in terms of accurately modeling gun performance under stressful electromagnetic propulsion environments. To correct for these limitations, it was decided to attempt to closely couple two Sandia simulation codes, Xyce and ALEGRA, to develop a more rigorous simulation capability for demanding launch applications. This report summarizes the modifications made to each respective code and the path forward to completing interfacing between them.

  1. Action alters object identification: wielding a gun increases the bias to see guns.

    PubMed

    Witt, Jessica K; Brockmole, James R

    2012-10-01

    Stereotypes, expectations, and emotions influence an observer's ability to detect and categorize objects as guns. In light of recent work in action-perception interactions, however, there is another unexplored factor that may be critical: The action choices available to the perceiver. In five experiments, participants determined whether another person was holding a gun or a neutral object. Critically, the participant did this while holding and responding with either a gun or a neutral object. Responding with a gun biased observers to report "gun present" more than did responding with a ball. Thus, by virtue of affording a perceiver the opportunity to use a gun, he or she was more likely to classify objects in a scene as a gun and, as a result, to engage in threat-induced behavior (raising a firearm to shoot). In addition to theoretical implications for event perception and object identification, these findings have practical implications for law enforcement and public safety.

  2. Guns and High Gas Output Devices Panel: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Ronald L.; Kaste, Pamela J.

    2000-01-01

    A new panel known as the Guns and High Gas Output Panel was organized in 1999 under the auspices of the JANNAF Propellant and Characterization SubCommittee (PDCS). This is an introduction to our first meeting, purpose of the panel, and the scope of activities to be covered. The primary purpose of the panel is very simple: to provide a single focal point for interfacing Government Laboratories (Department of Defense and Department of Energy) and commercial industry researchers to share R&D activities and findings (i.e. facilitate the exchange of information) specifically aimed at gun-launched propulsion and high-gas output devices (gas generators and air bag inflators). Specific areas of interest included in the Panel's scope (and the Technical Data Base) are the following: (1) new propellant formulations and chemistry, (2) new ingredients, (3) ballistic effects of the new formulations and ingredients, (4) new processing methods unique to gun propellants, (5) thermochemistry of new ingredients, (6) unique physical and mechanical properties, (7) burning rates of new propellants and small scale closed bomb testing, (8) plasma effects on the propellant, and (9) unique safety and insensitive munitions properties.

  3. Gun Control: The Debate and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Christine

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview and background information on the debate over gun control, as well as several teaching ideas. Handouts include a list of related topics drawn from various disciplines (economics, U.S. history), seven arguments for and against gun control, and a set of policy evaluation guidelines. (MJP)

  4. Superconducting 112 MHz QWR electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Rao, T.; Siegel, B.; Skaritka, J.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.; Xue, L.

    2011-07-25

    Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed and fabricated a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) electron gun. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper describes the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule. Future experiments include studies of different photocathodes and use for the coherent electron cooling proof-of-principle experiment. Two cathode stalk options, one for multi-alkali photocathodes and the other one for a diamond-amplified photocathode, are discussed. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling hadron beams in RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline our plans. This gun will also serve as a prototype for a future SRF gun to be used for coherent electron cooling of hadrons in eRHIC.

  5. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  6. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, Gary W.; Funk, David J.; Asay, Blaine W.

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  7. Protect Children Instead of Guns, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    Beginning with statistics pertaining to children and gun violence in a single year in the United States, this report details trends in child and youth gun deaths. Tables present information on the following: (1) number of firearms deaths by manner and by race from 1979 to 2000; (2) number of firearms deaths by manner for each state and nationwide,…

  8. Experiments and Demonstrations with Soldering Guns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Dennis C.; Danielson, Sarah A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the essential electrical characteristics of a particular model of soldering gun. Presents four classroom demonstrations that utilize the soldering gun to test the following geometrics of wire loops as electromagnets: (1) the original tip; (2) a single circular loop; (3) a Helmholtz coil; and (4) the solenoid. (MDH)

  9. Youth Homicide and Guns. Firearm Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Laurie, Ed.

    Young Americans are killed with guns at rates far higher than young people in other countries and than older Americans, with young, urban African-American males being most at risk. This fact sheet presents data on gun-related homicides among teenagers in the United States. The high rate of youth homicide in the United States is unique in the…

  10. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  11. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment.

  12. Gun shows across a multistate American gun market: observational evidence of the effects of regulatory policies

    PubMed Central

    Wintemute, Garen J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe gun shows and assess the impact of increased regulation on characteristics linked to their importance as sources of guns used in crime. Design Cross‐sectional, observational. Subjects Data were collected at a structured sample of 28 gun shows in California, which regulates these events and prohibits undocumented private party gun sales; and in Arizona, Nevada, Texas and Florida—all leading sources of California's crime guns—where these restrictions do not exist. Main outcome measures Size of shows, measured by numbers of gun vendors and people in attendance; number and nature of guns for sale by gun vendors; measures of private party gun sales and illegal surrogate (“straw”) gun purchases. Results Shows in comparison states were larger, but the number of attendees per gun vendor was higher in California. None of these differences was statistically significant. Armed attendees were more common in other states (median 5.7%, interquartile range (IQR) 3.9–10.0%) than in California (median 1.1%, IQR 0.5–2.2%), p = 0.0007. Thirty percent of gun vendors both in California and elsewhere were identifiable as licensed firearm retailers. There were few differences in the types or numbers of guns offered for sale; vendors elsewhere were more likely to sell assault weapons (34.9% and 13.3%, respectively; p = 0.001). Straw purchases were more common in the comparison states (rate ratio 6.6 (95% CI 0.9 to 49.1), p = 0.06). Conclusions California's regulatory policies were associated with a decreased incidence of anonymous, undocumented gun sales and illegal straw purchases at gun shows. No significant adverse effects of these policies were observed. PMID:17567968

  13. Interpreting the empirical evidence on illegal gun market dynamics.

    PubMed

    Braga, Anthony A; Wintemute, Garen J; Pierce, Glenn L; Cook, Philip J; Ridgeway, Greg

    2012-10-01

    Thousands of Americans are killed by gunfire each year, and hundreds of thousands more are injured or threatened with guns in robberies and assaults. The burden of gun violence in urban areas is particularly high. Critics suggest that the results of firearm trace data and gun trafficking investigation studies cannot be used to understand the illegal supply of guns to criminals and, therefore, that regulatory and enforcement efforts designed to disrupt illegal firearms markets are futile in addressing criminal access to firearms. In this paper, we present new data to address three key arguments used by skeptics to undermine research on illegal gun market dynamics. We find that criminals rely upon a diverse set of illegal diversion pathways to acquire guns, gun traffickers usually divert small numbers of guns, newer guns are diverted through close-to-retail diversions from legal firearms commerce, and that a diverse set of gun trafficking indicators are needed to identify and shut down gun trafficking pathways.

  14. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  15. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  16. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  17. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  18. A Practical Example Aiding Understanding Momentum in 1D: The Water Gun Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Katarin

    2007-01-01

    The law of conservation of momentum is one that students often have difficulties understanding. This experiment allows students to use childhood toys to examine and calculate the muzzle velocity of their favourite water gun by using an air track, a spark timer or data logger and the law of conservation of momentum in a one-dimensional case, a…

  19. Evaluation of effervescent atomizer internal design on the spray unsteadiness using a phase/Doppler particle analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Meng; Duan, YuFeng; Zhang, TieNan

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the dependence of effervescent spray unsteadiness on operational conditions and atomizer internal design by the ideal spray theory of Edwards and Marx. The convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer spraying water with air as atomizing medium in the ''outside-in'' gas injection was used in this study. Results demonstrated that droplet formation process at various air to liquid ratio (ALR) led to the spray unsteadiness and all droplet size classes exhibited unsteadiness behavior in spray. The spray unsteadiness reduced quickly at ALR of 3% and decreased moderately at ALR of other values as the axial distance increased. When the axial distance was 200 mm, the spray unsteadiness reduced dramatically with the increase in radial distance, but lower spray unsteadiness at the center of spray and higher spray unsteadiness at the edge of spray were shown as the axial distance increased. The spray unsteadiness at the center region of spray increased with the injection pressure. Low spray unsteadiness and good atomization performance can be obtained when the diameter of incline aeration holes increased at ALR of 10%. Although short mixing chamber with large discharge orifice diameter for convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer produced good atomization, the center region of spay showed high spray unsteadiness and maybe formed the droplet clustering. (author)

  20. Characterization of a new ultra-low volume fuselage spray configuration on Air Force C-130H airplane used for adult mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl; Latham, Mark; de Szalay, Ferenc

    2009-01-01

    The US Air Force (USAF) tested a new fuselage boom configuration on the C-130H airplane. We used into-the-wind and crosswind field trials to characterize a BVA oil (BVA Inc, Wixom, MI) droplet spectra produced by fuselage booms with flat-fan nozzles (8001, 8005) at the Air Force Range at Avon Park, FL. Across all trials, median droplet diameter (DV50) for 8001 and 8005 nozzles were 11.4 microm and 54.3 microm, respectively. For 8005 nozzles 22% of droplets collected were 7 microm to 25 microm size range while 75% of droplets from 8001 nozzles were < 7 microm. Fuselage configuration parameters and field data were also used as input variables into the Agricultural Dispersal (AGDISP) computer model to predict aerosol deposition and droplet fate. AGDISP predictions were compared with field data from crosswind tests and the model was found to fit reasonably well to empirical data. However, AGDISP predictions were better correlated with empirical findings for larger droplets than smaller droplets and for locations closer to the release point than further downwind.

  1. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Easter, Michele M; Robertson, Allison G; Swartz, Marvin S; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-06-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations.

  2. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Easter, Michele M; Robertson, Allison G; Swartz, Marvin S; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-06-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:27269024

  3. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  4. Quality characteristic of spray-drying egg white powders.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang; Zhao, Songning; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yiding; Liu, Jingbo; Xu, Menglei

    2013-10-01

    Spray drying is a useful method for developing egg process and utilization. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects on spray drying condition of egg white. The optimized conditions were spraying flow 22 mL/min, feeding temperature 39.8 °C and inlet-air temperature 178.2 °C. Results of sulfydryl (SH) groups measurement indicated conformation structure have changed resulting in protein molecule occur S-S crosslinking phenomenon when heating. It led to free SH content decreased during spray drying process. There was almost no change of differential scanning calorimetry between fresh egg white and spray-drying egg white powder (EWP). For a given protein, the apparent SH reactivity is in turn influenced by the physico-chemical characteristics of the reactant. The phenomenon illustrated the thermal denaturation of these proteins was unrelated to their free SH contents. Color measurement was used to study browning level. EWP in optimized conditions revealed insignificant brown stain. Swelling capacity and scanning electron micrograph both proved well quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP. Results suggested spray drying under the optimized conditions present suitable and alternative method for egg processing industrial implementation. Egg food industrialization needs new drying method to extend shelf-life. The purpose of the study was to provide optimal process of healthy and nutritional instant spray-drying EWP and study quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP.

  5. Comparison of Oxidation and Microstructure of Warm-Sprayed and Cold-Sprayed Titanium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KeeHyun; Kuroda, Seiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Huang, RenZhong; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Thick titanium coatings were prepared by the warm spraying (WS) and cold spraying (CS) processes to investigate the oxidation and microstructure of the coating layers. Prior to the coating formations, the temperature and velocity of in-flight titanium powder particles were numerically calculated. Significant oxidation occurred in the WS process using higher gas temperature conditions with low nitrogen flow rate, which is mixed to the flame jet of a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray gun in order to control the temperature of the propellant gas. Oxidation, however, decreased strikingly as the nitrogen flow rate increased. In the CS process using nitrogen or helium as a propellant gas, little oxidation was observed. Even when scanning electron microscopy or an x-ray diffraction method did not detect oxides in the coating layers produced by WS using a high nitrogen flow rate or by CS using helium, the inert gas fusion method revealed minor increases of oxygen content from 0.01 to 0.2 wt.%. Most of the cross-sections of the coating layers prepared by conventional mechanical polishing looked dense. However, the cross-sections prepared by an ion-milling method revealed the actual microstructures containing small pores and unbounded interfaces between deposited particles.

  6. Fungicide spray coverage from ground-based sprayers in mature pecan trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air-blast sprayers are widely used to control pecan scab (Fusicladium effusum) on pecan trees. Good spray coverage is critical to ensure disease control and to minimize risk of fungicide resistance. Spray coverage from an air-blast sprayer, typical of the sprayer used by commercial producers, was me...

  7. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  8. Ready, Fire, Aim: The College Campus Gun Fight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether guns should be permitted on college and university campuses in the United States reflects the tension between two competing perspectives. America has both a robust gun culture and an equally robust (if less well known) gun-control culture. The gun culture is as American as apple pie: There may be as many as 300 million…

  9. Homopolar Gun for Pulsed Spheromak Fusion Reactors II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2004-06-14

    A homopolar gun is discussed that could produce the high currents required for pulsed spheromak fusion reactors even with unit current amplification and open field lines during injection, possible because close coupling between the gun and flux conserver reduces gun losses to acceptable levels. Example parameters are given for a gun compatible with low cost pulsed reactors and for experiments to develop the concept.

  10. Correlates of Gun Involvement and Aggressiveness among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Cody S.; Nelsen, Edward A.; Lassonde, Cynthia T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated adolescents' aggressiveness in relation to their experiences, beliefs, and attitudes concerning gun use, also noting family composition, relationships with parents, and emotionality as correlates of gun involvement and aggression. Student surveys indicated links between gun ownership and recreational use, beliefs about gun use, and…

  11. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  12. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  13. Establishing reliable good initial quantum efficiency and in-situ laser cleaning for the copper cathodes in the RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Sheppard, J. C.; Vecchione, T.; Jongewaard, E.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Weathersby, S.

    2015-05-01

    Establishing good initial quantum efficiency (QE) and reliable in-situ cleaning for copper cathode in the RF gun is of critical importance for the RF gun operations. Recent studies on the SLAC RF gun test bed indicated that the pre-cleaning (plasma cleaning) in the test chamber followed by copper cathode exposure to air for cathode change leads to a very low initial QE in the RF gun, and also demonstrated that without the pre-cleaning good initial QE >4×10-5 can be routinely achieved in the RF gun with the cathodes of QE <1×10-7 measured in the test chamber. QE can decay over the time in the RF gun. The in-situ laser cleaning technique for copper cathodes in the RF gun is established and refined in comparison to previous cleaning at the linac coherent light source, resulting in an improved QE and emittance evolutions. The physics of the laser cleaning process is discussed. It is believed that the reflectivity change is one of the major factors for the QE boost with the laser cleaning.

  14. Gun Violence, mental health, and Connecticut physicians.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter R; Anderson, Caitlyn O; Dodds, Jon H

    2014-01-01

    While there is a public perception that gun violence is associated with mental illness we present evidence that it is a complex public health problem which defies simple characterizations and solutions. Only a small percentage of individuals with mental illness are at risk for extreme violence and they account for only a small percentage of gun-related homicides. Individuals who are at risk for gun violence are difficult to identify and successfully treat. The incidence, and perhaps the demographics, of gun violence vary substantially from state to state. We make a case for Connecticut physicians to study gun violence at the state level. We recommend that Connecticut physicians promote and expand upon the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation for creating a "safe home environment. "We suggest that guns be secured in all homes in which there are children. In addition we suggest that guns be voluntarily removed from homes in which there are individuals with a history of violence, threats of violence, depression, drug and/or alcohol abuse, and individuals with major mental illnesses who are not cooperating with therapy. PMID:25745735

  15. Nail-Gun Injuries to the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Pappas-Politis, Effie; Naidu, Deepak K.; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The nail gun is a commonly utilized tool in carpentry and construction. When used properly with appropriate safety precautions, it can facilitate production and boost efficiency; however, this powerful tool also has the potential to cause serious injury. The most common site of nail-gun injuries in both industrial and nonoccupational settings is the hand. Materials and Methods: We report on two patients with nail-gun injuries to the hand. A review of the literature and discussion of clinical evaluation and treatment of nail-gun injuries to the hand are presented. Results: Two patients present with soft tissue injuries to the hand with the nail embedded and intact at the injury site. Operative removal of the nail and wound care resulted in successful treatment in both cases. Nail-gun injuries to the hand vary in severity on the basis of the extent of structural damage. Treatment is based on the severity of injury and the presence and location of barbs on the penetrating nail. Conclusion: Healthcare providers must understand and educate patients on the prevention mechanics of nail-gun injuries. Nail-gun injuries to the hand necessitate appropriate evaluation techniques, understanding of surgical management versus nonsurgical management, and awareness of potential pitfalls in treatment. PMID:19079574

  16. Gun Violence, mental health, and Connecticut physicians.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter R; Anderson, Caitlyn O; Dodds, Jon H

    2014-01-01

    While there is a public perception that gun violence is associated with mental illness we present evidence that it is a complex public health problem which defies simple characterizations and solutions. Only a small percentage of individuals with mental illness are at risk for extreme violence and they account for only a small percentage of gun-related homicides. Individuals who are at risk for gun violence are difficult to identify and successfully treat. The incidence, and perhaps the demographics, of gun violence vary substantially from state to state. We make a case for Connecticut physicians to study gun violence at the state level. We recommend that Connecticut physicians promote and expand upon the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation for creating a "safe home environment. "We suggest that guns be secured in all homes in which there are children. In addition we suggest that guns be voluntarily removed from homes in which there are individuals with a history of violence, threats of violence, depression, drug and/or alcohol abuse, and individuals with major mental illnesses who are not cooperating with therapy.

  17. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  18. Different spreading regimes of spray-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suard, Sylvain; Haldenwang, Pierre; Nicoli, Colette

    2004-05-01

    We present a minimal model of spray combustion to investigate a flame front propagating through a fuel-lean mixture of fuel vapor, droplets and air. The model relies on a main control parameter, Da, named the Damkoehler number, which allows us to take into account a large variety of fuel sprays. Numerical results reveal, as a function of Da, a wide range of spray-flame structures, including the classical gaseous premixed flame, a specific regime controlled by vaporisation, and a pulsating mode of propagation. The latter appears when the vaporisation is smaller than (or equal to) the reaction time, and it occurs even with a unit Lewis number. To cite this article: S. Suard et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  19. Drag Measurements of a Protruding .50-caliber Machine Gun with Barrel Jacket Removed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luoma, Arvo A.

    1943-01-01

    Tests were made in 8-ft high-speed wind tunnel to determine the drag reduction possible by eliminating the barrel jacket of a protruding 50-caliber aircraft gun. It was found that the drag of a standard aircraft gun protruding into the air stream at right angles to the flow can be reduced by 23% by discarding the barrel jacket. At 300 mph and sea-level conditions, this amounts to a decrease in drag of from 83 to 64 pounds. A rough surface finish on the barrel was found to have no adverse effects on the drag of the barrel, the drag being actually less at high Mach Numbers.

  20. What Do We Know, What are the Current Limitations of Suspension HVOF Spraying?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killinger, A.; Müller, P.; Gadow, R.

    2015-10-01

    Suspension spraying has evolved during the past decades and now is at the threshold of a commercial utilization. Compared to standard powder spray methods, mainly DC plasma spraying and (high velocity) flame spraying, it is quite clear that suspension spraying will not replace these well-established technologies but can extend them by adding new coating properties. Still there remain many issues to be solved. Suspension interaction with the hot gas stream is much more complex than in ordinary powder spray processes. In case of HVOF when axial injection into the combustion chamber is used, a direct observation of the liquid flame interaction is not possible. This paper discusses the present status of suspension HVOF-spraying (high velocity suspension flame spraying) including torch concepts, torch configuration in case of a TopGun system as well as different injector concepts and their influence on suspension atomization. The role of suspensions is discussed regarding their rheological and thermodynamical properties, mainly given by the solvent type and the solid content. An overview of different available diagnostic methods and systems and the respective applicability is given. Coating properties are shown and discussed for several oxide ceramics in respect to their possible applications.

  1. Gun safety management with patients at risk for suicide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Robert I

    2007-10-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person responsible for removing guns from the home. A call-back to the clinician from the designated person is required confirming that guns have been removed and secured according to plan. The principle of gun safety management applies to outpatients, inpatients, and emergency patients, although its implementation varies according to the clinical setting.

  2. Plasma-sprayed coating of hydroxyapatite on metal implants--a review.

    PubMed

    Talib, R J; Toff, M R M

    2004-05-01

    Metal implants such as titanium, stainless steel and Co-Cr-Mo are used for load bearing purposes such as hip joint prostheses, fixing plates and dental root implants. For practical application, plasma-sprayed coatings of hydroxyapatite (HA) on metal implants are applied to promote early formation of strong bonds between metal implant and living bone. Plasma spray coating involves heating of HA material to a semi-molten or molten state and then propels its to a metal substrate. The plasma flame temperature is in the range of 6,000 degrees C to 16,000 degrees C but the surface temperature of the substrate rarely exceeds 150 degrees C. The HA materials are feed into the spray gun in the form of powders. Furthermore, this paper will discuss the processes of plasma-sprayed coating of HA on various types of metal implants.

  3. "Is there a gun in the home?" Assessing the risks of gun ownership in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pinholt, Ellen M; Mitchell, Joshua D; Butler, Jane H; Kumar, Harjinder

    2014-06-01

    An important ethical and safety concern that geriatricians, primary care providers, and home health professionals need to address is gun ownership by elderly adults. Those aged 65 and older now have the highest rate of gun ownership in America, and they also have a high prevalence of depression and suicide. Dementia can add additional layers of risk. Even older gun owners who are otherwise intellectually intact may benefit from information about gun safety with the increasing numbers of children being cared for by grandparents. Health professionals should ask patients, "Is there a gun in the home?" in the clinic and during home visits. Healthcare professionals must have knowledge and skills to address safe gun ownership in elderly adults. The 5 L's (Locked, Loaded, Little children, feeling Low, Learned owner) will assist professionals in addressing all aspects of safe ownership.

  4. Advances in DC photocathode electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce M. Dunham; P. Heartmann; Reza Kazimi; Hongxiu Liu; B. M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; Charles K. Sinclair

    1998-07-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a DC photoemission gun using GaAs and GaAs-like cathodes provides a source of polarized electrons for the main accelerator. The gun is required to produce high average current with long operational lifetimes and high system throughout. Recent work has shown that careful control of the parameters affecting cathode lifetime lead to dramatic improvements in source operation. These conditions include vacuum and the related effect of ion backbombardment, and precise control of all of the electrons emitted from the cathode. In this paper, the authors will review recent results and discuss implications for future photocathode guns.

  5. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  6. Evaluation of Smart Gun Technologies preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Gun Technology Project has a goal to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing {open_quote}smart{close_quote} technologies. Smart technologies are those that can in some manner identify an officer. This report will identify, describe, and grade various technologies as compared to the requirements that were obtained from officers. This report does not make a final recommendation for a smart gun technology, nor does it give the complete design of a smart gun system.

  7. Rossendorf SRF-Gun Cavity Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, A.; Buettig, H.; Janssen, D.; Justus, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Moeller, K.; Murcek, P.; Schamlott, A.; Schneider, Ch.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Kamps, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Klemz, G.; Will, I.; Volkov, V.

    2009-08-04

    At the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf the development and the setup of the 2nd superconducting radio frequency photo electron injector (SRF-Photo-Gun) is finished. This new injector is placed next to the existing thermionic gun of the superconducting linear accelerator ELBE. A connection between the accelerator and the SRF-Gun will provide improved beam parameters for the users at the second half of 2009. At the moment the commissioning is fully under way. We will report on important results concerning cavity commissioning like measurements of: Q vs. E, microphonics, Lorentz detuning, tuner parameters, pressure sensibility and in-situ fundamental mode field distribution calculated from measured pass band.

  8. Potential hazard of volatile organic compounds contained in household spray products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    To assess the exposure levels of hazardous volatile pollutants released from common household spray products, a total of 10 spray products consisting of six body spray and four air spray products have been investigated. The body spray products included insect repellents (two different products), medicated patch, deodorant, hair spray, and humectant, whereas the air spray products included two different insecticides (mosquito and/or cockroach), antibacterial spray, and air freshener. The main objective of this study was to measure concentrations of 15 model volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using GC/MS coupled with a thermal desorber. In addition, up to 34 ‘compounds lacking authentic standards or surrogates (CLASS)' were also quantified based on the effective carbon number (ECN) theory. According to our analysis, the most common indoor pollutants like benzene, toluene, styrene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl acetate have been detected frequently in the majority of spray products with the concentration range of 5.3-125 mg L-1. If one assumes that the amount of spray products released into air reaches the 0.3 mL level for a given space size of 5 m3, the risk factor is expected to exceed the carcinogenic risk level set for benzene (10-5) by the U.S. EPA.

  9. Some Characteristics of Sprays Obtained from Pintle-type Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, E. T.; Waldron, C. D.

    1933-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made with the pintle-type injection nozzles, one having a pintle angle of 8 degrees, the other a pintle angle of 30 degrees. The fuel was injected into a glass-windowed pressure chamber and the spray photographed by means of the N.A.C.A. spray photography apparatus. Curves are presented that give the penetration of the spray tips when fuel oil is injected by pressures of 1,500 to 4,000 pounds per square inch into air at room temperature and densities of 11 to 18 atmospheres. High-speed spark photographs show the appearance of the sprays in air at a density of 18 atmospheres. The results indicate that the pintle angles have little effect on the size of the spray cone angle, which is about the same as that of sprays from plain round hole orifices. The penetration of the spray from the nozzle with an 8 degree pintle is slightly higher than that of the spray from the nozzle with a 30 degree pintle. The penetration of the sprays from the pintle nozzles, for comparable conditions of injection pressure and air density, is about the same as that of sprays from round-hole orifices. Increase in air density decreases the penetration in about the same ratio with all the injection pressures.

  10. Quality and bacteriological consequences of beef carcass spray-chilling: Effects of spray duration and boxed beef storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Greer, G G; Jones, S D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of water spray-chilling on beef carcass traits and muscle quality, bacteriology and retail case life were determined in a research abattoir. Chilling treatments were compared using 10 crossbred steer carcasses (280 ± 4 kg) at each spray duration (4, 8, 12 and 16 h) and each vacuum storage temperature (1, 4, 8 and 12 °C). Control sides were air-chilled (1 °C, 24 h) while spray-chilled sides were sprayed with an intermittent water mist at 1 °C in four, 60 s cycles/h for the initial 4-16 h of chilling. The effects of storage temperature were evaluated using vacuum packaged longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle at post-chill intervals of 2, 16, 30 and 44 days. Chilling treatment effects were similar at all spray-chill durations and LT vacuum storage times and temperatures. Carcass spray-chilling did not effect pH, lean colour, % moisture, sarcomere length, shear value or weight loss during the vacuum storage of LT muscle. Carcass fat colour tended to brighten as spray duration was extended up to 12 h, but there was a grey discoloration of fat at spray durations beyond 12 h. Chilling treatment had only marginal effects on anaerobic bacteria during the vacuum storage of LT muscles, or aerobic bacteria during the retail display of rib-eye steaks, and the retail case life of steaks was largely unaffected by spray-chilling. A linear relationship between spray-chill duration and carcass weight loss was determined and carcass shrinkage was reduced by 0.08 g/100 g for every hour of spray-chilling. It was estimated that a major beef processing abattoir could utilize spray-chilling to save more than 2000 kg daily in carcass shrinkage, without compromising quality or increasing spoilage losses.

  11. Thorium-Free Versus Thoriated Plasma Gun Electrodes: Statistical Evaluation of Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenares-Angulo, Jose; Molz, Ronald; Hawley, David; Seshadri, Ramachandran Chidambaram

    2016-04-01

    Industries throughout the world today have an increased awareness of environmental, health, and safety issues. This, together with recent Nuclear Regulatory Commission changes concerning source material (e.g., thorium) has added complexity in the supply chain of thoriated tungsten commonly used in plasma spray gun spares. In the interest of a safer and more sustainable work environment, Oerlikon Metco has developed thorium-free material solutions proven to have longer service life than conventional thoriated spares. This work reports on the effect, if any, caused by tungsten compositional changes and extended service life in coating properties. Microstructure, coating efficiency parameters, hardness, particle state, in situ coating stress, and ex situ modulus are evaluated over the service life duration of the nozzle, comparing coatings with thoriated and non-thoriated nozzles and electrodes with the same spray parameters.

  12. Containment atmosphere response to external sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.; Almenas, K.

    1995-09-01

    The application of external sprays to a containment steel shell can be an effective energy removal method and has been proposed in the passive AP-600 design. Reduction of the steel shell temperature in contact with the containment atmosphere enhances both heat and mass transfer driving forces. Large scale experimental data in this area is scarce, therefore the measurements obtained from the E series tests conducted at the German HDR facility deserve special attention. These long term tests simulated various severe accident conditions, including external spraying of the hemispherical steel shell. This investigation focuses upon the integral response of the HDR containment atmosphere during spray periods and upon methods by which lumped parameter system codes, like CONTAIN, model the underlying condensation phenomena. Increases in spray water flowrates above a minimum value were ineffective at improving containment pressure reduction since the limiting resistance for energy transfer lies in the noncondensable-vapor boundary layer at the inner condensing surface. The spray created an unstable condition by cooling the upper layers of a heated atmosphere and thus inducing global natural circulation flows in the facility and subsequently, abrupt changes in lighter-than-air noncondensable (J{sub 2}/He) concentrations. Modeling results using the CONTAIN code are outlined and code limitations are delineated.

  13. Influence of drop size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiroutu, Sridhar Venkatabojji

    Premixed spray combustion is affected by fuel and oxidizer properties, mixture equivalence ratio and spray quality. The spray quality is characterized by a mean droplet diameter (SMD) and a droplet size distribution (DSD). Prior experimental studies have considered only the influence of SMD, in part due to the difficulty in controlling the DSD independently. The present work provides experimental evidence demonstrating the effect of the fuel droplet size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion. Combustion experiments were performed in a pilot-ignited, continuous flow, tubular, vertical test rig wherein fuel sprays were injected into an air stream. A novel twin-atomizer technique that allowed control over overall equivalence ratio, SMD, DSD, and fuel vapor fraction of the premixed spray was used to generate test sprays. A line-of-sight, infrared (IR) extinction technique was developed to quantify the fuel vapor fraction in premixed sprays. Radial distributions of fuel vapor were evaluated using an 'onion peeling' deconvolution technique. Combustion of test sprays indicated flame propagation among regions of high fuel vapor fraction to generate a high rate of combustion. In lean premixed sprays, the presence of a low fuel vapor concentration does not impact the combustion process. Experimental evidence demonstrating the enhancement of flame propagation velocity for optimal SMDs of ethanol sprays has been found. It was observed that test sprays with narrower DSDs have faster burning rates and more complete combustion. The DSD of the sprays were characterized with a droplet surface-area-based standard deviation of the DSD.

  14. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  15. Separating batterers and guns: a review and analysis of gun removal laws in 50 States.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Vernick, Jon S

    2006-06-01

    Firearms play an important role in lethal domestic violence incidents. The authors review state laws regarding two policies to separate batterers from firearms: laws authorizing police to remove firearms when responding to a domestic violence complaint ("police gun removal laws") and laws authorizing courts to order guns removed from batterers through a protective order ("court-ordered removal laws"). As of April 2004, 18 states had police gun removal laws; 16 states had court-ordered removal laws. The authors examine relevant characteristics of the laws and recommend that these laws be mandatory, apply to all guns and ammunition possessed by an abuser, and include clear procedures to enhance implementation. PMID:16679498

  16. Shock Interaction with Substrate in a Shock Induced Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, Kevin

    To further the knowledge of the Shock Induced Spray Process (SISP), an experimental apparatus which simulates Centerline's Waverider thermal spray gun was created which uses an unsteady flow to propel solid particles onto a substrate by the use of a shock wave to produce a coating. Experiments were conducted at a variety of operating supply pressures, firing frequencies, and stand off distances. A qualitative analysis was done using a custom Schlieren system along with a high speed camera. Insight into the flow behaviour in the SISP was established with the definition of six distinct phases. The formation of a bow shock, which is known to be detrimental to the SISP operation, is shown to be more prominent in the cases with higher supply pressure and close proximity of the apparatus exit to the substrate than with changes in firing frequency.

  17. Investigation on the suitability of plasma sprayed Fe Cr Al coatings as tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Stein-Fechner, K.; Serra, E.; Glasbrenner, H.; Benamati, G.

    1999-08-01

    Results on the fabrication of a tritium permeation barrier by spraying Fe-Cr-Al powders are described. The sprayed coatings were deposited at temperatures below the Ac1 temperature of the ferritic-martensitic steel substrate and no post-deposition heat treatment was applied. The aim of the investigation was the determination of the efficiency of the coatings to act as tritium permeation barrier. Metallurgical investigations as well as hydrogen isotope permeation measurements were carried out onto the produced coatings. The depositions were performed on ferritic-martensitic steels by means of three types of spray techniques: high velocity oxy fuel, air plasma spray and vacuum plasma spray.

  18. Thermally Sprayed Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of SiC Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Nistal, A.; Martín de la Escalera, F.; Khalifa, A.; Sainz, M. A.; Osendi, M. I.; Miranzo, P.

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of certain glass compositions in the Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) system as protecting coatings for silicon carbide components has been prospected. One particular YAS composition was formulated considering its glass formation ability and subsequent crystallization during service. Round-shaped and homogeneous granules of the selected composition were prepared by spray drying the corresponding homogeneous oxide powder mixture. Glassy coatings (197 µm thick) were obtained by oxyacetylene flame spraying the YAS granules over SiC substrates, previously grit blasted and coated with a Si bond layer (56 µm thick). Bulk glass of the same composition was produced by the conventional glass casting method and used as reference material for comparative evaluation of the characteristic glass transition temperatures, crystallization behavior, mechanical, and thermal coating properties. The mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of the coating were lower than those of the bulk glass owing to its lower density, higher porosity, and characteristic lamellar structure. The crystallization of both bulk glass and coating occurred during isothermal treatments in air at 1100-1350 °C. Preliminary data on ablation tests at 900 °C using the oxyacetylene gun indicated that the YAS glassy coating was a viable protective shield for the SiC substrate during 150 s.

  19. Air Plasma-Sprayed Yttria and Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Subjected to Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshuai; Zhao, Huayu; Zhong, Xinghua; Wang, Liang; Tao, Shunyan

    2014-08-01

    Yttria (Y2O3) and zirconia (ZrO2) stabilized by 8 and 20 wt.%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) subjected to calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) have been investigated. Free-standing Y2O3, 8 and 20 wt.%YSZ coatings covered with synthetic CMAS slurry were heated at 1300 °C in air for 24 h in order to assess the effect of Y2O3 on the corrosion resistance of the coatings subjected to CMAS. The microstructures and phase compositions of the coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD, RS, and TEM. TBCs with higher Y2O3 content exhibited better CMAS corrosion resistance. Phase transformation of ZrO2 from tetragonal (t) to monoclinic (m) occurred during the interaction of 8YSZ TBCs and CMAS, due to the depletion of Y2O3 in the coating. Some amounts of original c-ZrO2 still survived in 20YSZ TBCs along with a small amount of m-ZrO2 that appeared after reaction with CMAS. Furthermore, Y2O3 coating was found to be particularly highly effective in resisting the penetration of molten CMAS glass at high temperature (1300 °C). This may be ascribed to the formation of sealing layers composed of Y-apatite phase [based on Ca4Y6 (SiO4)6O and Y4.67(SiO4)3O] by the high-temperature chemical interactions of Y2O3 coating and CMAS glass.

  20. Direct launch using the electric rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The concept explored involves using a large single stage electric rail gun to achieve orbital velocities. Exit aerodynamics, launch package design and size, interior ballistics, system and component sizing and design concepts are treated. Technology development status and development requirements are identified and described. The expense of placing payloads in Earth orbit using conventional chemical rockets is considerable. Chemical rockets are very inefficient in converting chemical energy into payload kinetic energy. A rocket motor is relatively expensive and is usually expended on each launch. In addition specialized and expensive forms of fuel are required. Gun launching payloads directly to orbit from the Earth's surface is a possible alternative. Guns are much more energy efficient than rockets. The high capital cost of the gun installation can be recovered by reusing it over and over again. Finally, relatively inexpensive fuel and large quantities of energy are readily available to a fixed installation on the Earth's surface.

  1. Arc Plasma Gun With Coaxial Powder Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, Isidor

    1988-01-01

    Redesigned plasma gun provides improved metallic and ceramic coatings. Particles injected directly through coaxial bore in cathode into central region of plasma jet. Introduced into hotter and faster region of plasma jet.

  2. Arc-driven rail gun research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The equations describing the performance of an inductively-driven rail gun are analyzed numerically. Friction between the projectile and rails is included through an empirical formulation. The equations are applied to the experiment of Rashleigh and Marshall to obtain an estimate of energy distribution in rail guns as a function of time. The effect of frictional heat dissipation on the bore of the gun is calculated. The mechanism of plasma and projectile acceleration in a dc rail gun is described from a microscopic point of view through the establishment of the Hall field. The plasma conductivity is shown to be a tensor indicating that there is a small component of current parallel to the direction of acceleration. The plasma characteristics are evaluated as a function of plasma mass through a simple fluid mechanical analysis of the plasma. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the properties of the plasma are determined.

  3. Lightweight, High-Current Welding Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    Lighweight resistance-welding, hand-held gun supplies alternating or direct current over range of 600 to 4,000 A and applies forces from 40 to 60 lb during welding. Used to weld metal sheets in multilayered stacks.

  4. Toroid Joining Gun For Fittings And Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Buckley, John D.; Copeland, Carl E.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Johnston, David F.; Phillips, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Hand-held gun used to join metal heat-to-shrink couplings. Uses magnetic induction (eddy currents) to produce heat in metal coupling, and thermocouple to measure temperature and signals end of process. Gun, called "toroid joining gun" concentrates high levels of heat in localized areas. Reconfigured for use on metal heat-to-shrink fitting and coupling applications. Provides rapid heating, operates on low power, lightweight and portable. Safe for use around aircraft fuel and has no detrimental effects on surrounding surfaces or objects. Reliable in any environment and under all weather conditions. Gun logical device for taking full advantage of capabilities of new metal heat-to-shrink couplings and fittings.

  5. The electric rail gun for space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Barber, J. P.; Vahlberg, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytic feasibility investigation of an electric propulsion concept for space application is described. In this concept, quasistatic thrust due to inertial reaction to repetitively accelerated pellets by an electric rail gun is used to propel a spacecraft. The study encompasses the major subsystems required in an electric rail gun propulsion system. The mass, performance, and configuration of each subsystem are described. Based on an analytic model of the system mass and performance, the electric rail gun mission performance as a reusable orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) is analyzed and compared to a 30 cm ion thruster system (BIMOD) and a chemical propulsion system (IUS) for payloads with masses of 1150 kg and 2300 kg. For system power levels in the range from 25 kW(e) to 100 kW(e) an electric rail gun OTV is more attractive than a BIMOD system for low Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit transfer durations in the range from 20 to 120 days.

  6. Current implications of past DDT indoor spraying in Oman.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan; Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jiří; Dvorská, Alice; Magulová, Katarína; Al-Zadjali, Said; Čupr, Pavel

    2016-04-15

    In Oman, DDT was sprayed indoors during an intensive malaria eradication program between 1976 and 1992. DDT can remain for years after spraying and is associated with potential health risk. This raises the concern for human exposure in areas where DDT was used for indoor spraying. Twelve houses in three regions with a different history of DDT indoor spraying were chosen for a sampling campaign in 2005 to determine p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD) levels in indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil. Although DDT was only sprayed indoor, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were also found in outdoor soil. The results indicate that release and exposure continue for years after cessation of spraying. The predicted cancer risk based on concentrations determined in 2005, indicate that there was still a significant cancer risk up to 13 to 16years after indoor DDT spraying. A novel approach, based on region-specific half-lives, was used to predict concentrations in 2015 and showed that more than 21years after spraying, cancer risk for exposure to indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil are acceptable in Oman for adults and young children. The model can be used for other locations and countries to predict prospective exposure of contaminants based on indoor experimental measurements and knowledge about the spraying time-schedule to extrapolate region-specific half-lives and predict effects on the human population years after spraying.

  7. Simulation of a turbulent spray flame using coupled PDF gas phase and spray flamelet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Gutheil, Eva

    2008-04-15

    A joint mixture fraction-enthalpy probability density function (PDF) is proposed for the simulation of turbulent spray flames. The PDF transport equation is deduced and modeled. The interaction-by-exchange-with-the-mean (IEM) model that has been developed for gas-phase flows is extended to describe molecular mixing in nonreactive and reactive spray flows. The joint PDF transport equation is solved by a hybrid finite-volume and Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. Standard spray and turbulence models are used to describe the gas phase and the liquid phase. A turbulent methanol/air spray flame is simulated using the present method. Detailed chemistry is implemented through the spray flamelet model. The precalculated spray flamelet library for methanol/air combustion comprises 23 species and 168 elementary reactions. Thus, the model is capable of predicting the formation of radicals and of pollutants. Different values for the model constant C{sub {phi}} in the IEM model are tested. The numerical results for the gas velocity, the gas temperature, and the mass fraction of methanol vapor are compared with experimental data in the literature. Good agreement with experiment is obtained when C{sub {phi}}=2.0. Marginal PDFs of mixture fraction, enthalpy, and gas temperature are presented. The computed PDFs of mixture fraction are compared with the presumed standard {beta} function and modified {beta} function. The results show that the standard {beta} function fails to reproduce bimodal shapes observed in transported PDF computation, while the modified {beta} function, fits the computed PDFs very well. Moreover, joint PDFs of mixture fraction and enthalpy are presented and analyzed. The enthalpy and mixture fraction are strongly correlated. The samples that deviate from the linear correlation are due to the energy consumption of local spray evaporation. (author)

  8. Electron gun control of smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, John A.; Nelson, George C.; Martin, Jeffrey W.

    1998-07-01

    Smart material patches are currently an impractical choice in applications requiring fine spatial resolution or control of complex areas. The static nature of electrodes, the conventional choice for control signal application to many smart materials, makes them unsuitable in these instances. To address this issue the use of electron guns as charge sources for smart material control is investigated in this paper. In the electron gun control method the need for separate electrodes and wire leads is eliminated by depositing the control charges directly on the surface of the piezoelectric material. Since piezoelectric materials are dielectrics the charges remain where deposited by the electron gun. The spatial resolution of this control method is as small as the spot size of the electron beam, which in a focused beam can be as small as tens of microns. Large areas can be covered by a single electron gun simply by scanning the beam using deflection plates. Some practical aspects of electron gun control are presented in this paper. A description of an experimental test bed assembled to evaluate electron gun control of PZT-5H is presented, as are results and conceptual models of the system behavior.

  9. NPS Gas Gun for Planar Impact Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong Ho, Chien; Hixson, Robert

    2009-11-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) commissioned a Gas Gun for shock wave studies on 9^th October 2009, by performing the first experiment. The Gas Gun is the key element of NPS Shock Wave Research Program within the Physics Department, where well-characterized planar impacts are essential for obtaining high quality data, to characterize a solid material. This first experiment was very successful, and returned key data on the quality of the impact conditions created. The Gas Gun is designed by SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, and the NPS spent twelve months fabricating the components of the Gas Gun and six months assembling the Gas Gun. Three inch projectile are launched at velocities up to 0.5 km/s, creating high pressure and temperature states that can be used to characterize the fundamental response of relevant materials to dynamic loading. The projectile is launched from a `wrap around' gas breech where helium gas is pressurized to relatively low pressure. This gas is used to accelerate the projectile down a 3m barrel. Upon impact, the speed of the projectile and the flatness of the impact is measured, via a stepped circular pin array circuit. The next stage of development for the Gas Gun is to integrate a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR). The VISAR sees all the waves that flow through the target plate as a result of the impact. This is a key diagnostic for determining material properties under dynamic loading conditions.

  10. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavior change techniques. Nicotine nasal spray is in ... bottles at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Discard used ...

  11. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Nasacort® Allergy 24HR ... watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies. Triamcinolone nasal spray should not be used to ... the release of certain natural substances that cause allergy symptoms.

  12. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used along with emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or ... this date passes.Naloxone nasal spray may not reverse the effects of certain opiates such as buprenorphine ( ...

  13. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).Unneeded medications should be ...

  14. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... older who are taking regularly scheduled doses of another narcotic (opiate) pain medication, and who are tolerant ( ... spray, your doctor may tell you to use another pain medication to relieve that pain, and may ...

  15. Supersonic-Spray Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Lin, Feng-Nan; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    Spraying system for cleaning mechanical components uses less liquid and operates at pressures significantly lower. Liquid currently used is water. Designed to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent-based cleaning and cleanliness verification methods. Consists of spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, source of gas at regulated pressure, pressurized liquid tank, and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. Parameters of nozzles set so any of large variety of liquids and gases combined in desired ratio and rate of flow. Size and number of nozzles varied so system built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. Also used to verify part adequately cleaned. Runoff liquid from spray directed at part collected. Liquid analyzed for presence of contaminants, and part recleaned if necessary.

  16. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  17. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ingredients.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking, or ...

  18. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour period. Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... prescribed by your doctor or directed on the label.If you use oxymetazoline nasal spray for more ...

  19. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  20. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  1. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  2. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  3. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  4. Scramjet Testing in a Gun Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, C.; Cain, T. M.

    2005-02-01

    A gun tunnel has been converted to run as a direct-connect facility for supersonic combustion experiments. To achieve the required stagnation temperature of 1800K, a flammable mixture was added to the barrel that ignited during the shock compression process. The advantage of this method is that the test gas has a much smaller fraction of water vapour than conventional vitiated facilities, since shock compression alone can raise the stagnation temperature to 900K. The test time of 20ms is an order of magnitude longer than a conventional shock tunnel due to the fact that the pressure waves that terminate the test, travel in the cold driver gas behind the piston. The tunnel is run at high pressure to provide sufficient air mass for the duration of the test. A throttle placed between the end of the barrel and the entrance to the supersonic nozzle reduces stagnation pressure to the appropriate level for the combustor. A hydrogen fueled combustor tested in this facility demonstrated an oscillatory supersonic combustion. Wall static pressure measurements showed the development of a strong pressure rise at the rear of the combustor that was observed to move upstream into the isolator. Once this occurred, pressure at the front of the combustor dropped and that at the rear began to rise again until once again the wave moved upstream and into the isolator. Three cycles of this oscillatory combustion process were observed before the end of the test. The combination of cold walls allowing high frequency measurement and a relatively long test time provided a clear advantage over shock-tunnels or vitiated facilities when observing this unsteady combustion process.

  5. Spray nozzle designs for agricultural aviation applications. [relation of drop size to spray characteristics and nozzle efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. W.; Putnam, A. A.; Gieseke, J. A.; Golovin, M. N.; Hale, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques of generating monodisperse sprays and information concerning chemical liquids used in agricultural aviation are surveyed. The periodic dispersion of liquid jet, the spinning disk method, and ultrasonic atomization are the techniques discussed. Conceptually designed spray nozzles for generating monodisperse sprays are assessed. These are based on the classification of the drops using centrifugal force, on using two opposing liquid laden air jets, and on operating a spinning disk at an overloaded flow. Performance requirements for the designs are described and estimates of the operational characteristics are presented.

  6. Separating Batterers and Guns: A Review and Analysis of Gun Removal Laws in 50 States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Vernick, Jon S.

    2006-01-01

    Firearms play an important role in lethal domestic violence incidents. The authors review state laws regarding two policies to separate batterers from firearms: laws authorizing police to remove firearms when responding to a domestic violence complaint ("police gun removal laws") and laws authorizing courts to order guns removed from batterers…

  7. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  8. The supply and demand for guns to juveniles: Oakland's gun tracing project.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Deane; Dodge, Andrea Craig; Journel, Coraline S; Zahnd, Elaine

    2005-12-01

    In response to Oakland, California's high level of gun violence affecting young people, the East Oakland Partnership to Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence, a citywide collaboration, was formed in 1997. In 1999, the Partnership established the Oakland Gun Tracing Project to develop evidence-based policy recommendations aimed at reducing the supply of and demand for gun acquisition among urban youth. The advocacy project involved gathering, analyzing, and using police record and gun sale/registration data to inform policy and practice. Such data were collected for all gun crimes committed in Oakland, California between 1998 and 1999 in which a juvenile was either the suspect or the victim. The 213 cases involved 263 juveniles of which 170 were suspects/perpetrators and 93 were victims. Suspects as well as victims were predominantly male and African American. The 213 cases involved 132 recovered guns. Only 55% of the cases were traced to a federally licensed dealer. Three-quarters of the guns were purchased near Oakland, California. Successful traces, defined as the ability to identify federally licensed dealers and initial purchasers, were completed on only 52 of the 132 guns, demonstrating systemic tracing difficulties. Data gathered for the project was used to advocate for numerous policy changes. Recommended policy strategies include initiating a comprehensive gun tracing program so police can track all secondary sales, new laws requiring federal handgun registration which would track ownership changes, required reporting of stolen firearms, and providing effective intervention services to all juveniles the first time they enter the criminal justice system. PMID:16269532

  9. Detailed investigation of a vaporising fuel spray. Part 1: Experimental investigation of time averaged spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Boulderstone, R.; Ungut, A.; Felton, P. G.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser tomographic light scattering technique provides rapid and accurate high resolution measurements of droplet sizes, concentrations, and vaporization. Measurements using a computer interfaced thermocouple are presented and it is found that the potential exists for separating gas and liquid temperature measurements and diagnosing local spray density by in situ analysis of the response characteristics of the thermocouple. The thermocouple technique provides a convenient means for measuring mean gas velocity in both hot and cold two phase flows. The experimental spray is axisymmetric and has carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. The flow is designed to give relatively insignificant transfer of momentum and mass from spray to air flow. The effects of (1) size-dependent droplet dispersion by the turbulence, (2) the initial spatial segregation of droplet sizes during atomization, and (3) the interaction between droplets and coherent large eddies are diagnosed.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determined from gun on times and fluid flow rates or from direct measurements of coating usage. ER26AP04.033... compounds (VOC) associated with the coating solids deposited on a part (or panel) in a controlled spray... zone. For solvent-borne coatings essentially all of the VOC associated with the coating...

  11. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  12. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Zu Q.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    1993-01-01

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10) having an electron gun (52) for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber (18) of the ion source (10). The ion source (10) has a injection enclosure (12) and a plasma chamber tank (14). The plasma chamber (18) is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets (16). The electron gun (52) injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber (18) such that ionization within the plasma chamber (18) occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun (52). The electron gun (52) has a cathode (116) for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply (96) while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply (118). A concentric inner conductor (60) and Outer conductor (62) carry heating current to a carbon chuck (104) and carbon pusher (114) Which hold the cathode (116) in place and also heat the cathode (16). In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10), the electron gun (52) replaces the conventional first stage used in prior art electron cyclotron resonance ion generators.

  13. Electron gun system for NSC KIPT linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zu-Sheng; He, Da-Yong; Chi, Yun-Long

    2014-06-01

    In the NSC KIPT linac, a neutron source based on a subcritical assembly driven by a 100 MeV/100 kW electron linear accelerator is under design and development. The linear accelerator needs a new high current electron gun. In this paper, the physical design, mechanical fabrication and beam test of this new electron gun are described. The emission current is designed to be higher than 2 A for the pulse width of 3 μs with repetition rate of 50 Hz. The gun will operate with a DC high voltage power supply that can provide a high voltage up to 150 kV. Computer simulations and optimizations have been carried out in the design stage, including the gun geometry and beam transport line. The test results of high voltage conditioning and beam test are presented. The operation status of the electron gun system is also included. The basic test results show that the design, manufacture, and operation of the new electron system are basically successful.

  14. Thermal spray processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC's for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  15. Theoretical analysis on spray performance of centrifugal spray nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Meng; Zhuang, Fengchen

    1991-08-01

    The relationships between spray characteristics and the configurational parameters of a centrifugal spray nozzle are presently explored via the theory of momentum conservation. Predicted mean spray angles are substantially in accord with the experimental data obtained; the predicted nozzle discharge coefficients are slightly lower than experimental data, due to the ignoring of fluid viscosity effects.

  16. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  17. 2 of 3 Americans OK with Doctors Discussing Gun Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States in 2014. Most gun deaths (59 percent) are suicide, the report noted. However, unsafe gun storage practices can also result in deaths, the study authors said in a journal news ...

  18. 13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), VIEW NORTH AT SOUTH END OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  19. The Real Costs of Gun Violence

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Philip J.

    2001-03-14

    I will report some of the results in my new book, 'Gun Violence: The Real Costs' (Oxford University Press, 2000; with Jens Ludwig). The problem of gun violence is usually summarized by statistics on deaths and injuries. Those statistics tell only part of the story. All of us bear some of the burden of gun violence, at least in the form of higher taxes and waiting to go through the airport security checks. But that's just the beginning. The extraordinary reductions in lethal violence that occurred during the 1990s help account for rising property values and urban renewal; further reductions are possible and would do still more to enhance the average standard of living. This talk will explain why the economic perspective provides a fresh, useful point of view on violence, and will discuss the technique used to arrive at an estimate of the magnitude of the burden.

  20. Pulser for the Tevatron electron lens gun

    SciTech Connect

    Iouri Terechkine et al.

    2004-05-18

    To compensate for beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, an ''electron lens'' is considered to be an effective instrument. When a bunch of electrons with energy in the range (10-16) kV is overlapping with a bunch of antiprotons, the resulting focusing force for antiprotons can be adjusted by changing the electron beam current and by profiling its radial distribution. There exist several scenarios of how the system must function. According to one of them, an electron gun that supplies electrons must be fed by voltage pulses that follow with the frequency of antiproton bunches circulating in the Tevatron, which is about 2.5 MHz. To provide focusing tailored for each individual antiproton bunch, a modulator of the gun (pulser) must allow pulse-to-pulse voltage change. This report will cover main approaches to a design of a pulser for use with the gun of the Tevatron Electron Lens.