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Sample records for air spray manifold

  1. LCD OF AIR INTAKE MANIFOLDS PHASE 2: FORD F250 AIR INTAKE MANIFOLD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The life cycle design methodology was applied to the design analysis of three alternatives for the lower plehum of the air intake manifold for us with a 5.4L F-250 truck engine: a sand cast aluminum, a lost core molded nylon composite, and a vibration welded nylon composite. The ...

  2. Engine Air Intake Manifold Having Built In Intercooler

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles E.

    2000-09-12

    A turbocharged V type engine can be equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler integrated into the intake manifold, so as to achieve efficiency, cost reductions and space economization improvements. The cooler can take the form of a tube-shell heat exchanger that utilizes a cylindrical chamber in the air intake manifold as the heat exchanger housing. The intake manifold depends into the central space formed by the two banks of cylinders on the V type engine, such that the central space is effectively utilized for containing the manifold and cooler.

  3. LIFE CYCLE DESIGN OF AIR INTAKE MANIFOLDS; PHASE I: 2.0 L FORD CONTOUR AIR INTAKE MANIFOLD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project team applied the life cycle design methodology to the design analysis of three alternative air intake manifolds: a sand cast aluminum, brazed aluminum tubular, and nylon composite. The design analysis included a life cycle inventory analysis, environmental regulatory...

  4. Brazing retort manifold design concept may minimize air contamination and enhance uniform gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing retort manifold minimizes air contamination, prevents gas entrapment during purging, and provides uniform gas flow into the retort bell. The manifold is easily cleaned and turbulence within the bell is minimized because all manifold construction lies outside the main enclosure.

  5. A Method for Reducing the Temperature of Exhaust Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1931-01-01

    This report describes tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory on an "air-inducting" exhaust manifold for aircraft engines. The exhaust gases from each cylinder port are discharged into the throat of an exhaust pipe which has a frontal bellmouth. Cooling air is drawn into the pipe, where it surrounds and mixes with the exhaust gases. Temperatures of the manifold shell and of the exhaust gases were obtained in flight for both a conventional manifold and the air-inducting manifold. The air-inducting manifold was installed on an engine which was placed on a test stand. Different fuels were sprayed on and into the manifold to determine whether the use of this manifold reduced the fire hazard. The flight tests showed reductions in manifold temperatures of several hundred degrees, to values below the ignition point of aviation gasoline. On the test stand when the engine was run at idling speeds fuels sprayed into the manifold ignited. It is believed that at low engine speeds the fuel remained in the manifold long enough to become thoroughly heated, and was then ignited by the exhaust gas which had not mixed with cooling air. The use of the air-inducting exhaust manifold must reduce the fire hazard by virtue of its lower operating temperature, but it is not a completely satisfactory solution of the problem.

  6. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 mm square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3 . Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ } ) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  7. Effect of atomization air on droplet dynamics of spray flames

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, C.; Semerjian, H.G. . Center for Chemical Technology); Gupta, A.K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Fuel spray combustions is an important part of a wide variety of propulsion and power systems such as furnaces and gas turbine combustors, afterburners, fuel-injection internal combustion engines, liquid rocket engines, etc. Recent studies using air-assist nozzles have shown that the design and fabrication of these nozzles can directly influence spray circumferential uniformity, i.e., the presence of asymmetrical fuel flux profiles in combustors. The practical implications of these fuel flux nonuniformities are that they seriously alter the spray structure, which subsequently affects droplet/air interactions, local fuel/air mixing, overall flame characteristics and combustor performance, and pollutant emission levels. In addition, the effect of aerodynamic factors on spray characteristics has been investigated. This paper discusses the effect of atomization air on the droplet dynamics of spray flames formed by an air-assist nozzle. Presented are spatial distributions of mean droplet velocity and their probability distributions, which provide quantitative information for examination of the observed spray flame features.

  8. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  9. Comparison of Space Shuttle Hot Gas Manifold analysis to air flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes several recent analyses of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Hot Gas Manifold and compares predicted flow environments to air flow data. Codes used in these analyses include INS3D, PAGE, PHOENICS, and VAST. Both laminar (Re = 250, M = 0.30) and turbulent (Re = 1.9 million, M = 0.30) results are discussed, with the latter being compared to data for system losses, outer wall static pressures, and manifold exit Mach number profiles. Comparison of predicted results for the turbulent case to air flow data shows that the analysis using INS3D predicted system losses within 1 percent error, while the PHOENICS, PAGE, and VAST codes erred by 31, 35, and 47 percent, respectively. The INS3D, PHOENICS, and PAGE codes did a reasonable job of predicting outer wall static pressure, while the PHOENICS code predicted exit Mach number profiles with acceptable accuracy. INS3D was approximately an order of magnitude more efficient than the other codes in terms of code speed and memory requirements. In general, it is seen that complex internal flows in manifold-like geometries can be predicted with a limited degree of confidence, and further development is necessary to improve both efficiency and accuracy of codes if they are to be used as design tools for complex three-dimensional geometries.

  10. An experimental study of air-assist atomizer spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chien-Pei; Wang, Geng; Chigier, Norman

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that air-assisted atomizer spray flames encountered in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine combustors possess a more complex structure than homogeneous turbulent diffusion flames, due to the swirling motion introduced into the fuel and air flows for the control of flame stability, length, combustion intensity, and efficiency. Detailed comparisons are presented between burning and nonburning condition measurements of these flames obtained by nonintrusive light scattering phase/Doppler detection. Spray structure is found to be drastically changed within the flame reaction zone, with changes in the magnitude and shape of drop number density, liquid flux, mean drop size diameter, and drop mean axial velocity radial distributions.

  11. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  12. Air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for nanoparticles synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Song, Yu L.; Chen, C. Y.; Tseng, T. K.; Tsai, Chen S.

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents new findings regarding the effects of precursor drop size and concentration on product particle size and morphology in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of zirconium hydroxyl acetate solutions. Large precursor drops (diameter >30μm) generated by ultrasonic atomization at 120kHz yielded particles with holes. Precursor drops 6-9 μm in diameter, generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer at 1.65MHz and 23.5W electric drive power, yielded uniform spherical particles 150nm in diameter under proper control of heating rate and precursor concentration. Moreover, air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at 120kHz and 2.3W yielded spherical particles of which nearly half were smaller than those produced by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of the 6-9 μm precursor drops, desprite the much larger precursor drop sizes (28 μm peak diameter versus 7 μm mean diameter). These particles are much smaller than those predicted by the conventional one particle per drop mechanism, suggesting that a vapor condensation mechanism may also be involved in spray pyrolysis. It may be concluded that through this new mechanism air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis can become a viable process for mass production of nanoparticles.

  13. Impact of Sea Spray on Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Mueller, James

    2013-11-01

    The contributions of sea spray drops to the total air-sea exchanges of momentum, heat, and mass remain an open question. A number of factors obscure any simple quantification of their contribution: the number of drops formed at the ocean surface and the per-drop contribution to the fluxes. To estimate these per-droplet fluxes, we present results from a large number of drop trajectories, which are simulated with a recently developed Lagrangian Stochastic model adapted for the heavy drop transport and evaporation within the marine boundary layer. Then, using commonly accepted spray generation functions we present estimates of spray fluxes which account for the mediating feedback effects from the droplets on the atmosphere. The results suggest that common simplifications in previous sea spray models, such as the residence time in the marine boundary layer, may not be appropriate. We further show that the spray fluxes may be especially sensitive to the size distribution of the drops. The total effective air-sea fluxes lead to drag and enthalpy coefficients that increase modestly with wind speed. The rate of increase for the drag coefficient is greatest at moderate wind speeds, while the rate of increase for the enthalpy coefficient is greatest at higher wind speeds. Funded by grants OCE-0850663 and OCE-0748767 from the National Science Foundation.

  14. Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John Timothy; Hollenbeck, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of

  15. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  16. Optical observation of ultrafine droplets and air flows from newly designed supersonic air assist spray nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashiro, Seiji S.; Mori, H.; Takechi, H.

    2001-04-01

    One of the authors developed a new spray drying nozzle (special quadruplet fluid spray nozzle) for drug manufacturing and it has succeeded in manufacturing fine particles of 2 micrometer diameter of 1/15 ratios to those currently in use. The flow visualization results show that the two air jets become under-expanded on both edge sides of the nozzle, generate shock and expansion waves alternately on each side and reach the edge tip, where they collide, unite, and spout out while shock and expansion waves are again formed in the mixed jet. When the edge surfaces are supplied with water, the water is extended into thin film by the air jet and intensely disturbed. At the nozzle tip it is torn into droplets, which are further atomized afterwards in shock waves. At the spray tip, the friction with ambient air shears the droplets furthermore, and they decrease further in size.

  17. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler; Kulkarni, Anand

    2009-04-15

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  18. Air and spray mixture temperature effects on atomization of agricultural sprays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray drift associated with agrochemical operations is highly dependent upon the physical properties of the spray solution with respect to how they influence atomization. This study examined effects on spray atomization with two spray solutions across a wide range of solution temperatures for two n...

  19. Atmospheric loss of pesticides above an artificial vineyard during air-assisted spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Yvan; Sinfort, Carole; Brunet, Yves; Polveche, Vincent; Bonicelli, Bernard

    A procedure to assess pesticide emission to the air and characterise possible air pollution sources was carried out using a tracer dye and 2 mm PVC lines during air-assisted spraying of an artificial vineyard. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the method feasibility, quantify upward movements of sprayed droplets and investigate the influence of microclimatic variables on pesticide emission. During each experiment two test series were carried out with two droplet size distributions (very fine and fine spray, according to the BCPC classification). The amount of sprayed liquid collected at 2.5 m above ground varied between 9.0% and 10.7% of the total dose applied for very fine spray and between 5.6% and 7.3% for fine spray. In stable atmospheric conditions the spray drifted along the mean wind direction over the crop whereas in unstable conditions the sprayed liquid plume was larger, with a greater amount of material sent to higher levels. A statistical model based on a simple multiple regression featuring droplet characteristics and microclimatic variables (wind speed, temperature, stability parameter and relative humidity) provided a robust estimate of spray loss just above the crop, with an acceptable determination coefficient ( R2=0.84). This method is therefore suitable for quantifying spray drift and provides a way to study the influence of several variables on the amount of pesticide released into the atmosphere by air-assisted spraying, with suitable accuracy.

  20. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  1. Air Assisted Sprayer for Improved Spray Penetration in Greenhouse Floriculture Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandkar, Sachin V.; Mathur, Shailendra M.; Dhande, Kishor G.; Jadhav, Pravin P.; Gholap, Babasaheb S.

    2015-03-01

    Air assisted spraying is considered as one of the better pesticide application technique. Incorporation of air assistance in the spraying system improves the deposition uniformity in the entire plant canopy structure and spray deposition on the lower part of the plant leaves. In the view of this, an air assisted sleeve boom sprayer was developed for greenhouse floricultural crops. The developed sprayer consisted of air delivery system and spray delivery system. Air delivery system consisted of blower, lance assembly and a tapered air sleeve. Spray delivery system consisted of a pesticide tank, horizontal triplex pump, pressure hose and nozzles. Blower and pump were operated by 5 HP electric motor. Air sleeve and nozzles were supported on horizontal boom. The whole assembly of the sprayer was mounted on the trolley. The developed sprayer was tested in the laboratory to study the effect of different air velocity (9, 12, 16 and 20 m/s) and pump discharge (2.5, 4.5, 7 and 9 L/min) levels on droplet size (VMD), droplet density and uniformity coefficient at six different positions of the artificial plant canopy. Test results revealed that an increase in air velocity resulted in better spray penetration and uniform spray coverage. The optimum results of droplet size (100-150 µm), droplet density (25-35 droplets per cm2) and uniformity coefficient at all plant positions were observed for air velocity of 20 m/s and pump discharge of 2.5 L/min.

  2. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks' air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection. PMID:26817981

  3. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks’ air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection. PMID:26817981

  4. Mixing of an Airblast-atomized Fuel Spray Injected into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; McDonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The injection of a spray of fuel droplets into a crossflow of air provides a means of rapidly mixing liquid fuel and air for combustion applications. Injecting the liquid as a spray reduces the mixing length needed to accommodate liquid breakup, while the transverse injection of the spray into the air stream takes advantage of the dynamic mixing induced by the jet-crossflow interaction. The structure of the spray, formed from a model plain-jet airblast atomizer, is investigated in order to determine and understand the factors leading to its dispersion. To attain this goal, the problem is divided into the following tasks which involve: (1) developing planar imaging techniques that visualize fuel and air distributions in the spray, (2) characterizing the airblast spray without a crossflow, and (3) characterizing the airblast spray upon injection into a crossflow. Geometric and operating conditions are varied in order to affect the atomization, penetration, and dispersion of the spray into the crossflow. The airblast spray is first characterized, using imaging techniques, as it issues into a quiescent environment. The spray breakup modes are classified in a liquid Reynolds number versus airblast Weber number regime chart. This work focuses on sprays formed by the "prompt" atomization mode, which induces a well-atomized and well-dispersed spray, and which also produces a two-lobed liquid distribution corresponding to the atomizing air passageways in the injector. The characterization of the spray jet injected into the crossflow reveals the different processes that control its dispersion. Correlations that describe the inner and outer boundaries of the spray jet are developed, using the definition of a two-phase momentum-flux ratio. Cross-sections of the liquid spray depict elliptically-shaped distributions, with the exception of the finely-atomized sprays which show kidney-shaped distributions reminiscent of those obtained in gaseous jet in crossflow systems. A droplet

  5. Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal-Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlik, K.; Sugama, T.; Jung, D.

    2002-08-01

    Researchers are developing polymer-based coating systems to reduce scaling and corrosion of air-cooled condensers that use a geothermal fluid spray for heat transfer augmentation. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect aluminum fins and steel tubing; they are formulated to resist the strong attachment of scale. Field tests have been done to determine the corrosion and scaling issues related to brine spraying and a promising organometallic polymer has been evaluated in salt spray tests.

  6. Spray droplet sizes with additives discharged from an air-assisted variable-rate nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding droplet size distributions is essential to achieve constant spray quality for real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes were measured for a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse width modulated (...

  7. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  8. Comparison of cooling criteria with a cryogen spray and water/air spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exley, Jonathan; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Charlton, Andrew; Falder, Sian; Kenealy, John

    1999-06-01

    Skin cooling using a cryogen spray (tetrafluoroethane) has been shown to dramatically reduce the skin surface temperature whilst predictions show that the underlying dermal tissue is unaffected. This technique is repeated with a chilled water spray, along with a continuous airflow to enhance evaporation. Radiometric skin surface temperature measurements are recorded during trials utilizing this technique and the results are compared with theoretical predictions in order to determine the mechanism by which the heat is removed from the skin. The optimum spray conditions are achieved when the water is chilled to around 2 degrees Celsius with a continuous airflow of 50 liters/minute. Under these conditions skin surface temperature reduction is about 8 degrees Celsius - 10 degrees Celsius. The measured radiometric skin surface temperature change indicates that the mechanism by which this process removes heat from the skin is predominantly evaporation. Predictions of skin temperature change with varying skin depth indicate that the optimum spray time is around 100 ms.

  9. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-03-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  10. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  11. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  12. Spray drift and off-target loss reduction with a precision air-assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray drift and off-target losses are inherent problems of conventional air-assisted sprayers. Their low efficiencies cause environmental pollutions resulting in public anxieties. A new drift reduction technology incorporating laser scanning capabilities with a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer w...

  13. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  14. Surface modification of air plasma spraying WC-12%Co cermet coating by laser melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, M.; Ajmal, M.; Nusair Khan, A.; Hussain, A.; Akhter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Tungsten carbide cermet powder with 12%Co was deposited on stainless steel substrate by air plasma spraying method. Two types of coatings were produced i.e. thick (430 µm) and thin (260 µm) with varying porosity and splat morphology. The coated samples were treated with CO2 laser under the shroud of inert atmosphere. A series of experimentation was done in this regard, to optimize the laser parameters. The plasma sprayed coated surfaces were then laser treated on the same parameters. After laser melting the treated surfaces were characterized and compared with as-sprayed surfaces. It was observed that the thickness of the sprayed coatings affected the melt depth and the achieved microstructures. It was noted that phases like Co3W3C, Co3W9C4 and W were formed during the laser melting in both samples. The increase in hardness was attributed to the formation of these phases.

  15. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions,...

  16. Spray deposition inside tree canopies from a newly developed variable-rate air assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries are not target-oriented, resulting in significant waste of pesticides and contamination of the environment. To address this problem, a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer implementing laser scanning technology was developed to apply...

  17. Investigation of spray characteristics for flashing injection of fuels containing dissolved air and superheated fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Chen, L. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The flow, atomization and spreading of flashing injector flowing liquids containing dissolved gases (jet/air) as well as superheated liquids (Freon II) were considered. The use of a two stage expansion process separated by an expansion chamber, ws found to be beneficial for flashing injection particularly for dissolved gas systems. Both locally homogeneous and separated flow models provided good predictions of injector flow properties. Conventional correlations for drop sizes from pressure atomized and airblast injectors were successfully modified, using the separated flow model to prescribe injector exit conditions, to correlate drop size measurements. Additional experimental results are provided for spray angle and combustion properties of sprays from flashing injectors.

  18. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  19. Symmetry assessment of an air-blast atomizer spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, V. G.; Cameron, C. D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1990-01-01

    This study represents an evaluation of the extent to which conventional and recently introduced modern diagnostics can assess the symmetry of sprays formed by three atomizers of identical design. The conventional diagnostics include sheet-lit photography, patternation, and laser diffraction. The modern diagnostic is laser interferometry (phase Doppler). Symmetry is assessed in ambient conditions for four atomizer orientations, and comparisons are made between the diagnostic techniques. The results demonstrate that conventional and modern diagnostics are consistent in the assessment of symmetry, patternation and phase Doppler are most effective in establishing symmetry of mass flux, and phase Doppler, although more tedious to employ, provides the additional information necessary to establish the sources of detected asymmetries in terms of nonuniformities in droplet velocities, size distributions, volume flux, and concentration.

  20. Effect of Moderate Air Flow on the Distribution of Fuel Sprays After Injection Cut-0ff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Spencer, R C

    1935-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken of fuel sprays with the NACA spray-photographic apparatus to study the distribution of the liquid fuel from the instant of injection cut-off until about 0.05 second later. The fuel was injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 1 to 13 times atmospheric air density (0.0765 to 0.99 pound per cubic foot) and in which the air was at room temperature. The air in the chamber was set in motion by means of a fan, and was directed counter to the spray at velocities up to 27 feet per second. The injection pressure was varied from 2,000 to 6,000 pounds per square inch. A 0.20-inch single-orifice nozzle, an 0.008-inch single-orifice nozzle, a multiorifice nozzle, and an impinging-jets nozzle were used. The best distribution was obtained by the use of air and a high-dispersion nozzle.

  1. Dust Control with Use of Air-Water Spraying System / Redukcja Zapylenia Powietrza Z Wykorzystaniem Zraszania Powietrzno-Wodnego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prostański, Dariusz

    2012-12-01

    Results from testing the dust control efficiency, when using air-water spraying system in comparison to the typical water spraying system are presented in the paper. The tests were carried out in conditions of longwall mining and at the places of run-of-mine transportation. Also the results of stand tests of different types of nozzles both for air-water and for water spaying systems carried out at KOMAG's laboratory and in real conditions are presented. The benefits resulting from air-water spraying system have been determined.

  2. Development of a new modular aerial spray system and night application capability for the U.S. Air Force

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Air Force maintains a capability with the C130 aircraft to conduct aerial spray operations over large areas for controlling insects of medical importance. The current modular aerial spray system (MASS) is custom designed to support a variety of configurations from ultralow volume space spra...

  3. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  4. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  5. Inflence of air shear and adjuvants on spray atomization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Droplet size is critical to maximizing pesticide efficacy and mitigating off-target movement and correct selection and adjustment of nozzles and application equipment, as well as the use of adjuvants can aid in this process. However, in aerial applications air shear tends to be the dominate factor ...

  6. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  7. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  8. Crystallization of spray-dried lactose/protein mixtures in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawqi Barham, A.; Kamrul Haque, Md.; Roos, Yrjö H.; Kieran Hodnett, B.

    2006-10-01

    An in situ crystallization technique with X-ray diffraction analysis complemented by ex situ scanning electron microscopy and chromatographic analysis of the α/( α+ β) solid-state anomeric ratios has been developed to study the crystallization of lactose/protein mixtures in humid air. This technique was used to determine changes in phase composition and morphology during crystallization. Following an induction period during which water is sorbed, crystallization is rapid and the predominant phase observed using the in situ method in spray-dried lactose/sodium-caseinate, albumin and gelatin is α-lactose monohydrate. However, in the case of spray-dried lactose/whey protein isolate (WPI) the predominant phase that appears is the α/ β mixed phase with smaller amounts of α-lactose monohydrate. With pure lactose the α/ β mixed phase appears as a transient shortly after the onset of crystallization and α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose both appear as stable crystalline phases at longer times. Another transient phase with 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8° was observed in spray-dried lactose/albumin. This phase decomposed as α-lactose monohydrate developed. Three phases seem to persist in the case of spray-dried lactose/gelatin, namely the phase with peaks at 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8°, α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose for the duration of the in situ experiment.

  9. Measurements and predictions of a liquid spray from an air-assist nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Daniel L.; Lavy, Yeshayahou; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Chitre, Susheel

    1991-01-01

    Droplet size and gas velocity were measured in a water spray using a two-component Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer. A complete set of measurements was obtained at axial locations from 5 to 50 cm downstream of the nozzle. The nozzle used was a simple axisymmetric air-assist nozzle. The sprays produced, using the atomizer, were extremely fine. Sauter mean diameters were less than 20 microns at all locations. Measurements were obtained for droplets ranging from 1 to 50 microns. The gas phase was seeded with micron sized droplets, and droplets having diameters of 1.4 microns and less were used to represent gas-phase properties. Measurements were compared with predictions from a multi-phase computer model. Initial conditions for the model were taken from measurements at 5 cm downstream. Predictions for both the gas phase and the droplets showed relatively good agreement with the measurements.

  10. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  11. Two-Phase PIV: Fuel-Spray Interaction with Surrounding Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankers, Stefan; Gotthardt, Mark; Stengler, Thomas; Ohmstede, Gerhard; Hentschel, Werner

    The demand for improvement of combustion-engine processes leads to a great need for detailed experimental information about the complicated processes of injection, breakup and propagation of the fuel jet and the vaporization of the fuel. Thus, in the presented work it was the aim to visualize the air flow that is induced by the injected fuel jet and also to explore the air entrainment into the fuel spray. This was done using two-phase PIV (particle image velocimetry). The fuel jet was illuminated with a Nd:YAG PIV-laser and PIV analysis was done by simply measuring the elastically scattered light of the fuel droplets. For the investigation of the surrounding air propylene-carbonate doped with DCM-dye was dispersed and the droplets were added to the continuous gas flow upstream of the chamber. Scattered and fluorescence signals, respectively, were detected perpendicular to the laser sheet with a CCD camera. To detect the gas flow, the scattered light from the liquid fuel was suppressed by an OG 590 longpass filter glass that transmits the fluorescence signal of the DCM-dye. It was possible to measure both the fuel jet and the gas flow in the presence of the fuel spray and a clear separation of the two phases could be achieved. In both (fuel and air) vector pictures corresponding vortices could be identified near the air/fuel boundary layer. Maximum velocities in the jet are depending on the operation conditions up to 150ms-1 and the gas flow has typically a velocity of 1 to 10ms-1. In the region next to the injector the air was pressed away during the injection. After the end of the injection a strong fast air entrainment flow into this region can be observed that compensates the pressure difference.

  12. Cold-air performance of compressor-drive turbine of Department of Energy upgraded automobile gas turbine engine. 1: Volute-manifold and stator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, R. J.; Haas, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of the inlet manifold and stator assembly of the compressor drive turbine was experimentally determined with cold air as the working fluid. The investigation included measurements of mass flow and stator-exit fluid torque as well as radial surveys of total pressure and flow angle at the stator inlet and annulus surveys of total pressure and flow angle at the stator exit. The stator-exit aftermixed flow conditions and overall stator efficiency were obtained and compared with their design values and the experimental results from three other stators. In addition, an analysis was made to determine the constituent aerodynamic losses that made up the stator kinetic energy loss.

  13. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  14. Microorganism levels in air near spray irrigation of municipal waste water: The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study

    SciTech Connect

    Camann, D.E.; Moore, B.E.; Harding, H.J.; Sorber, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study (LISS) investigated possible adverse effects on human health from slow-rate land application of municipal wastewater. Extensive air sampling was conducted to characterize the irrigation site as a source of infectious microbial aerosols. Spray irrigation of poor-quality waste water received directly from the treatment plant significantly elevated air densities of fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, mycobacteria, and coliphage above ambient background levels for at least 200 m downwind. Enteroviruses were repeatedly recovered at 44 to 60 m downwind at a higher level (geometric mean = 0.05 pfu/m3) than observed at other waste water aerosol sites in the U.S. and in Israel. Waste water storage in reservoirs reduced downwind air densities of indicator organisms by two orders of magnitude.

  15. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  16. An investigation of particle trajectories and melting in an air plasma sprayed zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The partially stabilized zirconia powders used to plasma spray thermal barrier coatings typically exhibit broad particle-size distributions. There are conflicting reports in the literature about the extent of injection-induced particle-sizing effects in air plasma-sprayed materials. If significant spatial separation of finer and coarser particles in the jet occurs, then one would expect it to play an important role in determining the microstructure and properties of deposits made from powders containing a wide range of particle sizes. This paper presents the results of a study in which a commercially available zirconia powder was fractionated into fine, medium, and coarse cuts and sprayed at the same torch conditions used for the ensemble powder. Diagnostic measurements of particle surface temperature, velocity, and number-density distributions in the plume for each size-cut and for the ensemble powder are reported. Deposits produced by traversing the torch back and forth to produce a raised bead were examined metallographically to study their shape and location with respect to the torch centerline and to look at their internal microstructure. The results show that, for the torch conditions used in this study, the fine, medium, and coarse size-cuts all followed the same mean trajectory. No measureable particle segregation effects were observed. Considerable differences in coatings microstructure were observed. These differences can be explained by the different particle properties measured in the plume.

  17. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe/Mo composite amorphous coatings prepared by air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-ping; Xing, Ya-zhe; Zhang, Feng-ying; Hao, Jian-min

    2012-07-01

    Fe/Mo composite coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS) using Fe-based and Mo-based amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed powders. Microstructural studies show that the composite coatings present a layered structure with low porosity due to adding the self-bonded Mo-based alloy. Corrosion behaviors of the composite coatings, the Fe-based coatings and the Mo-based coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurements and salt spray tests. Electrochemical results show that the composite coatings exhibit a lower polarization current density and higher corrosion potentials than the Fe-based coating when tested in 3.5wt% NaCl solutions, indicating superior corrosion resistance compared with the Fe-based coating. Also with the increase in addition of the Mo-based alloy, a raised corrosion resistance, inferred by an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in polarization current density, can be found. The results of salt spray tests again show that the corrosion resistance is enhanced by adding the Mo-based alloy, which helps to reduce the porosity of the composite coatings and enhance the stability of the passive films.

  18. Dimensionality estimate of the manifold in chemical composition space for a turbulent premixed H2+air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, Shaheen R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-02-26

    The dimensionality (D) of manifolds of active chemical composition space has been measured using three different approaches: the Hausdorff geometrical binning method, Principal Component Analysis, and the Grassberger-Procaccia cumulative distribution method. A series of artificial manifolds is also generated using a Monte Carlo approach to discern the advantages and limitations of the three methods. Dimensionality is quantified for different levels of turbulent intensity in a simulation of the interactions of a 2D premixed hydrogen flame with a localized region of turbulence superimposed over the cold region upstream of the flame front. The simulations are conducted using an adaptive mesh refinement code for low Mach number reacting flows. By treating the N{sub s} species and temperature of the local thermo-chemical state as a point in multi-dimensional chemical composition space, a snapshot of a flame region is mapped into chemical composition space to generate the manifold associated with the 2-D flame system. An increase in D was observed with increasing turbulent intensity for all three methods. Although each method provides useful information, the Grassberger-Procaccia method is subject to fewer artifacts than the other two thereby providing the most reliable quantification of D.

  19. Effect of Electrolytes on the Decomposition of Dye by Pulsed Discharge in Air Spraying Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Taisuke; Yokoyama, Yuzo; Minamitani, Yasushi

    Effect of electrolytes on the decolorization of indigo carmine and on the production of H2O2 by pulsed discharge in air spraying water droplets was performed in sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate solutions. Peak voltage of the discharge decreased with increasing solution conductivity, but peak current and discharge energy increased. Decolorization rate and decolorization efficiency of indigo carmine and the yield of H2O2 decreased with increasing chloride and sulfate ion concentrations. It was found that the decolorization of indigo carmine and the production of H2O2 are affected by the ion concentration even in the case of discharge in air spraying water droplets. However it was less effective than that of discharge in water. Chloride ion was more effective than sulfate ion regarding the decrease of decolorization rate and the production of H2O2. Decolorization rate of indigo carmine was strongly related to the production of H2O2. These results also indicated that decolorization of indigo carmine depends on the production of hydroxyl radical.

  20. Air monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons during automobile spray painting for developing change schedule of respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of End of Service Life Indicator (ESLI), a cartridge change schedule should be established for ensuring that cartridges are changed before their end of service life. Factors effecting service life of cartridges were evaluated, including the amount of atmospheric contamination with aromatic hydrocarbon vapors in the workplace, temperature, and relative humidity of the air. A new change schedule was established based on comparing the results of air monitoring and workplace conditions, laboratory experiment, and the NIOSH MultiVapor software. Spray painters were being exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in a range exceeding occupational exposure limits. The cartridge change schedule was not effective and could no longer provide adequate protection against organic contaminants for sprayers. Change schedules for respirator cartridges should be reduced from 16–24 hours to 4 hours. NIOSH’s service life software program could be applied to developing cartridge change schedules. PMID:24468234

  1. [Effect of air humidity on traditional Chinese medicine extract of spray drying process and prediction of its powder stability].

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Xie, Yin; Zheng, Long-jin; Liu, Wei; Rao, Xiao-yong; Luo, Xiao-jian

    2015-02-01

    In order to solve the adhesion and the softening problems of traditional Chinese medicine extract during spray drying, a new method of adding dehumidified air into spray drying process was proposed, and the storage stability conditions of extract powder could be predicted. Kouyanqing extract was taken as model drug to investigate on the wet air (RH = 70%) and dry air conditions of spray drying. Under the dry air condition, the influence of the spray drying result with different air compression ratio and the spray-dried powder properties (extract powder recovery rate, adhesion percentage, water content, angle of repose, compression ratio, particle size and distribution) with 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 °C inlet temperature were studied. The hygroscopic investigation and Tg value with different moisture content of ideal powder were determined. The water activity-equilibrium moisture content (aw-EMC) and the equilibrium moisture content-Tg (EMC-Tg) relationships were fitted by GAB equation and Gordon-Taylor model respectively, and the state diagram of kouyanqing powder was obtained to guide the rational storage conditions. The study found that in the condition of dry air, the extract powder water content decreased with the increase of air compression ratio and the spray drying effect with air compression ratio of 100% was the best performance; in the condition of wet air, the extract powder with high water content and low yield, and the value were 4.26% and 16.73 °C, while, in the dry air condition the values were 2.43% and 24.86 °C with the same other instru- ment parameters. From the analysis of kouyanqing powder state diagram, in order to keep the stability, the critical water content of 3.42% and the critical water content of 0.188. As the water decreased Tg value of extract powder is the major problem of causing adhesion and softening during spray drying, it is meaningful to aid dehumidified air during the process. PMID:26084164

  2. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:20088030

  3. Superior Performance of High-Velocity Oxyfuel-Sprayed Nanostructured TiO2 in Comparison to Air Plasma-Sprayed Conventional Al2O3-13TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2005-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania (Al2O3-13wt.%TiO2) coatings have been used for many years in the thermal spray industry for antiwear applications, mainly in the paper, printing, and textile industries. This work proposes an alternative to the traditional air plasma spraying of conventional aluminatitania by high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) spraying of nanostructured titania (TiO2). The microstructure, porosity, hardness (HV 300 g), crack propagation resistance, abrasion behavior (ASTM G65), and wear scar characteristics of these two types of coatings were analyzed and compared. The HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania coating is nearly pore-free and exhibits higher wear resistance when compared with the air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania coating. The nanozones in the nanostructured coating act as crack arresters, enhancing its toughness. By comparing the wear scar of both coatings (via SEM, stereoscope microscopy, and roughness measurements), it is observed that the wear scar of the HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania is very smooth, indicating plastic deformation characteristics, whereas the wear scar of the air plasma-sprayed alumina-titania coating is very rough and fractured. This is considered to be an indication of a superior machinability of the nanostructured coating.

  4. Effect of antimicrobials applied on the surface of beef subprimals via an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system(ESS)or the Sprayed Lethality in Container(SLIC)method to control Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system (ESS) and/or the Sprayed Lethality in Container (SLIC®) method to deliver antimicrobials onto the surface of beef subprimals to reduce levels of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC). In brief, beef subprimal...

  5. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  6. Droplet size distributions of adjuvant-amended sprays from an air-assisted five-port PWM nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verification of droplet size distributions is essential for the development of real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes from a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse-width-modulated (PWM) solenoid valve were m...

  7. Updating Sea Spray Aerosol Emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Bash, J. O.; Kelly, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions, include sea surface temperature (SST) dependency, and revise surf zone emissions. Based on evaluation with several regional and national observational datasets in the continental U.S., the updated emissions generally improve surface concentrations predictions of primary aerosols composed of sea-salt and secondary aerosols affected by sea-salt chemistry in coastal and near-coastal sites. Specifically, the updated emissions lead to better predictions of the magnitude and coastal-to-inland gradient of sodium, chloride, and nitrate concentrations at Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) sites near Tampa, FL. Including SST-dependency to the SSA emission parameterization leads to increased sodium concentrations in the southeast U.S. and decreased concentrations along the Pacific coast and northeastern U.S., bringing predictions into closer agreement with observations at most Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) and Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites. Model comparison with California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) observations will also be discussed, with particular focus on the South Coast Air Basin where clean marine air mixes with anthropogenic pollution in a complex environment. These SSA emission updates enable more realistic simulation of chemical processes in coastal environments, both in clean marine air masses and mixtures of clean marine and polluted conditions.

  8. Atomization from agricultural spray nozzles: Effects of air shear and tank mix adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray adjuvants can have a substantial impact on spray atomization from agricultural nozzles; however, this process is also affected by the nozzle type, operating pressure and, for aerial application, the airspeed of application. Different types of ground spray nozzle can dramatically affect the im...

  9. Spatial Characteristics of Water Spray Formed by Two Impinging Jets at Several Jet Velocities in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Hampton H.; Heidmann, Marcus F.

    1960-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of a spray formed by two impinging water jets in quiescent air were studied over a range of nominal jet velocities of 30 to 74 feet per second. The total included angle between the 0.089-inch jets was 90 deg. The jet velocity, spray velocity, disappearance of the ligaments just before drop formation, mass distribution, and size and position of the largest drops were measured in a circumferential survey around the point of jet impingement. Photographic techniques were used in the evaluations. The distance from the point of jet impingement to ligament breakup into drops was about 4 inches on the spray axis and about 1.3 inches in the radial position +/-90 deg from the axis. The distance tended to increase slightly with increase in jet velocity. The spray velocity varied from about 99 to about 72 percent of the jet velocity for a change in circumferential position from the spray axis to the +/-80 deg positions. The percentages tended to increase slightly with an increase in jet velocity. Fifty percent of the mass was distributed about the spray axis in an included angle of slightly less than 40 deg. The effect of jet velocity was small. The largest observed drops (2260-micron or 0.090-in. diam.) were found on and about the spray axis. The size of the largest drops decreased for an increase in radial angular position, being about 1860 microns (0.074 in.) at the +/-90 deg positions. The largest drop sizes tended to decrease for an increase in jet velocity, although the velocity effect was small. A drop-size distribution analysis indicated a mass mean drop size equal to 54 percent of an extrapolated maximum drop size.

  10. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  11. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  12. The surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system incorporating interface roughness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Fan, X. L.; Wang, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the effect of interface roughness on the strain energy release rate and surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system. This is achieved by a parameter investigation of the interfacial shapes, in which the extended finite element method (XFEM) and periodic boundary condition are used. Predictions for the stress field and driving force of multiple surface cracks in the film/substrate system are presented. It is seen that the interface roughness has significant effects on the strain energy release rate, the interfacial stress distribution, and the crack propagation patterns. One can see the completely different distributions of stress and strain energy release rate in the regions of convex and concave asperities of the substrate. Variation of the interface asperity is responsible for the oscillatory characteristics of strain energy release rate, which can cause the local arrest of surface cracks. It is concluded that artificially created rough interface can enhance the durability of film/substrate system with multiple cracks.

  13. Evaluation of control parameters for Spray-In-Air (SIA) aqueous cleaning for shuttle RSRM hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. J.; Deweese, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    HD-2 grease is deliberately applied to Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) D6AC steel hardware parts as a temporary protective coating for storage and shipping. This HD-2 grease is the most common form of surface contamination on RSRM hardware and must be removed prior to subsequent surface treatment. Failure to achieve an acceptable level of cleanliness (HD-2 calcium grease removal) is a common cause of defect incidence. Common failures from ineffective cleaning include poor adhesion of surface coatings, reduced bond performance of structural adhesives, and failure to pass cleanliness inspection standards. The RSRM hardware is currently cleaned and refurbished using methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane). This chlorinated solvent is mandated for elimination due to its ozone depleting characteristics. This report describes an experimental study of an aqueous cleaning system (which uses Brulin 815 GD) as a replacement for methyl chloroform. Evaluation of process control parameters for this cleaner are discussed as well as cleaning mechanisms for a spray-in-air process.

  14. Water-Air Spray Cooling of Extruded Profiles: Process Integrated Heat Treatment of the Alloy EN AW-6082

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Golovko, O.; Nürnberger, F.; Frolov, I.; Schaper, M.

    2013-09-01

    Quenching by spray cooling in the press line is a promising way to harden Al-Mg-Si alloys with regard to reducing profile distortion. For alloys such as EN AW-6082, high cooling rates are required. A device for spray cooling by means of water and compressed air was integrated into a 10 MN horizontal, hydraulic, short-stroke extrusion press. Various spray parameters were investigated. By using 32 water-air nozzles having a total water deposition rate of about 15 L/min and extruding with a profile velocity of 2.5 m/min, high mechanical properties were imparted to 30 mm diameter extruded rods. This arrangement ensures the extruded alloy is cooled to almost room temperature. Comparable properties can be achieved by water quenching, although the water consumption will be tenfold higher. The distribution of water deposition density on the profiles' surfaces was determined. It was shown that an adjustment of the water-air pressure ratio allows the final temperature of the profiles to be controlled over a wide range. Minimization of temperature gradients in the cross section of complex profiles allows profile distortions to be reduced.

  15. Gas distribution through injection manifolds in vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theil, Jeremy A.

    1995-03-01

    When injecting gas into a vacuum system, quite often the gas is distributed through a gas injection manifold. However, designs normally rely upon practical experience. By considering the manifold arrangement as a network of flow restrictions it is possible to optimize the distribution of gas throughout the manifold. The methodology for determining the flow distribution through the two simplest topologies of gas manifold, single- and double-opening manifolds from a single-gas injection point, is derived in this article. It is shown that the double-opening manifold topology tends to provide more uniform flow distribution than the single-opening manifold topology for similar conductance ratios. The results of this work include a summation formula for the single-opening manifold. In addition, guidelines for one type of tailored flow manifold are given. Finally, three basic design rules are presented: (1) use as few holes in the manifold as possible; (2) use a double opening manifold when possible; and (3) specify tube dimensions such that the tube/spray hole conductance ratio is maximized.

  16. Toric Vaisman manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilca, Mihaela

    2016-09-01

    Vaisman manifolds are strongly related to Kähler and Sasaki geometry. In this paper we introduce toric Vaisman structures and show that this relationship still holds in the toric context. It is known that the so-called minimal covering of a Vaisman manifold is the Riemannian cone over a Sasaki manifold. We show that if a complete Vaisman manifold is toric, then the associated Sasaki manifold is also toric. Conversely, a toric complete Sasaki manifold, whose Kähler cone is equipped with an appropriate compatible action, gives rise to a toric Vaisman manifold. In the special case of a strongly regular compact Vaisman manifold, we show that it is toric if and only if the corresponding Kähler quotient is toric.

  17. Development of Air Force aerial spray night operations: High altitude swath characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple trials were conducted from 2006 to 2014 in an attempt to validate aerial spray efficacy at altitudes conducive to night spray operations using night vision goggles (NVG). Higher altitude application of pesticide (>400 feet above ground level [AGL]) suggested that effective vector control mi...

  18. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  19. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  20. COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

    2006-07-01

    A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 μm thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

  1. An experimental investigation on the spray flow exhausted from a co-swirling air-blast nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Daniel Dean

    The velocity field for a spray produced by an air-blast atomizer is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). These measurements are conducted at a variety of input liquid and air mass flow rates producing many different air to liquid mass flow ratios (ALR). The experiment is repeated with two different liquids, water and a hydrocarbon based fuel substitute. It is found that the velocity field depends heavily on the type of fluid used as opposed to the ALR. The experiments are repeated using a Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurement technique. These results are compared to the 2D PIV results, and the differences are discussed. Finally, the 2D PIV and SPIV results are compared to existing Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) results. It is seen that the results from the two different techniques are not well correlated.

  2. Effect excess air as an oxidizer in the flame assisted spray dryer using computational fluid dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Eka Lutfi; Widiyastuti, W.; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of silica particles as a model material from colloidal silica solution precursor in the flame assisted spray dryer method were studied numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). CFD has ability to solve the momentum, energy and mass transfer equation well. k-ɛ model was used to describe the turbulence model and non-premixed combustion model was used to combustion model. Collision and break-up model were also considered to predict the final particles size distribution. For validation, LPG with flow rate of 0.5 L/minute LPG and 200% excess air were used as energy sources. At this condition, numerical solution agreed well to the experimental work resulting in polydisperse size distribution. Therefore, others excess air, 100% and 150% were also observed using CFD and evaluated their contribution to their particles size distribution. Monodisperse particles size distribution were obtained when the combustion used 150% excess air.

  3. Causes for "ghost" manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borok, S.; Goldfarb, I.; Gol'dshtein, V.

    2009-05-01

    The paper concerns intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (ILDM) method suggested in [Maas U, Pope SB. Simplifying chemical kinetics: intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds in composition space, combustion and flame 1992;88:239-64] for dimension reduction of models describing kinetic processes. It has been shown in a number of publications [Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. Comparative analysis of two asymptotic approaches based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2004;69:353-74; Kaper HG, Kaper TJ, Asymptotic analysis of two reduction methods for systems of chemical reactions. Phys D 2002;165(1-2):66-93; Rhodes C, Morari M, Wiggins S. Identification of the low order manifolds: validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope. Chaos 1999;9(1):108-23] that the ILDM-method works successfully and the intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds belong to a small vicinity of invariant slow manifolds. The ILDM-method has a number of disadvantages. One of them is appearance of so-called "ghost"-manifolds, which do not have connection to the system dynamics [Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. "Ghost" ILDM - manifolds and their discrimination. In: Twentieth Annual Symposium of the Israel Section of the Combustion Institute, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 2004. p. 55-7; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. About non-coincidence of invariant manifolds and intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds (ILDM). CNSNS 2008;71:1029-38; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. In: Gorban AN, Kazantzis N, Kevrekidis YG, Ottinger HC, Theodoropoulos C, editors. "Ghost" ILDM-manifolds and their identification: model reduction and coarse-graining approaches for multiscale phenomena. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer; 2006. p. 55-80; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. On a modified version of ILDM method and its asymptotic analysis. IJPAM 2008; 44(1): 125-50; Bykov V, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. On a modified version of ILDM approach: asymptotic analysis based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2006

  4. Efficacy of aerial spray applications using fuselage booms on Air Force C-130H aircraft against mosquitoes and biting midges.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Wojcik, George M; De Szalay, Ferenc A

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of a novel fuselage boom configuration was tested with flat-fan nozzles on U.S. Air Force C-130H aircraft to create ultra-low volume sprays to control mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae). The mortality of mosquitoes and biting midges in bioassay cages and natural populations, using the organophosphate adulticide, naled, was measured. Mosquitoes in bioassay cages had 100% mortality at 639 m downwind in all single-pass spray trials, and most trials had >90% mortality up to 1491 m downwind. Mosquito mortality was negatively correlated with distance from the spray release point (r2 = 0.38, P < 0.001). The volume median diam of droplets collected was 44 tm at 213 m and decreased to 11 microm at 2130 m downwind of the release point. Droplet density decreased from an average of 18.4 drops/cm2 at 213 m to 2 drops/cm2 at 2130 m. Droplet densities of 10-18 droplets/cm2 were recorded at sampling stations with high mosquito mortality rates (>90%). In wide-area operational applications, numbers of mosquitoes from natural populations 1 wk postspray were 83% (range 55%-95%), lower than prespray numbers (P < 0.05). Biting midge numbers were reduced by 86% (range 53%-97%) on average (P = 0.051) after 7 days. The results of these field trials indicate that the fuselage boom configuration on C-130H aircraft are an effective method to conduct large-scale aerial sprays during military operations and public health emergencies. PMID:20099594

  5. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  6. Wide-swath Spray Application in Ornamental Nurseries with Cannon Air Jet Sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticide spray applications in nurseries are usually implemented in the very early morning to avoid chemical exposures to regular workers and to prevent potential drift to nearby residential areas. Conventional sprayers cannot efficiently apply pesticides to many container ornamental crops due to ...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE SPRAY DISPENSER TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water, and...

  8. Use of Oriented Spray Nozzles to Set the Vapor-Air Flow in Rotary Motion in the Superspray Space of the Evaporative Chimney-Type Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrego, K. V.; Davydenko, V. F.; Koznacheev, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper considers the problem of upgrading the thermal efficiency of chimney-type evaporative cooling towers due to the rotary motion of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space. To set the vapor-air flow in rotary motion, we propose to use the momentum of the sprayed water. It has been shown that the existing parameters of spray nozzles permit setting up to 30% of the water flow momentum in translatory motion, which is enough for changing considerably the aerodynamics of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space and improving the operation of the cooling tower. The optimal angle of axial inclination of the spray cone has been estimated. Recommendations are given and problems have been posed for engineering realization of the proposed technologies in a chimney-type cooling tower.

  9. Analyses of Kolmogorov's model of breakup and its application into Lagrangian computation of liquid sprays under air-blast atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorokhovski, M. A.; Saveliev, V. L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the breakup of liquid drops at the large Weber number within the framework of Kolmogorov's scenario of breakup. The population balances equation for droplet radius distribution is written to be an invariant under the group of scaling transformations. It is shown that due to this symmetry, the long-time limit solution of this equation is a power function. When the standard deviation of droplet radius strongly increases and, consequently, the characteristic length scale disappears, the power asymptotic solution can be viewed as a further evolution of Kolmogorov's log-normal distribution. This new universality appears to be consistent with the experimental observation of fractal properties of droplets produced by air-blast breakup. The scaling properties of Kolmogorov's model at later times are also demonstrated in the case where the breakup frequency is a power function of instantaneous radius. The model completes the Liouville equation for distribution function of liquid particles in the phase space of droplet position, velocity, and radius. The numerical scheme is proposed for stochastic modeling of droplets production. Lagrangian simulation of the spray under air-blast atomization is performed using KIVA II code, which is a frequently used code for computation of turbulent flows with sprays. The qualitative agreement of simulation with measurements is demonstrated.

  10. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through the shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.

  11. Compressed gas manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  12. Adaptive manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyue; Wang, Jing; Zha, Hongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning algorithms seek to find a low-dimensional parameterization of high-dimensional data. They heavily rely on the notion of what can be considered as local, how accurately the manifold can be approximated locally, and, last but not least, how the local structures can be patched together to produce the global parameterization. In this paper, we develop algorithms that address two key issues in manifold learning: 1) the adaptive selection of the local neighborhood sizes when imposing a connectivity structure on the given set of high-dimensional data points and 2) the adaptive bias reduction in the local low-dimensional embedding by accounting for the variations in the curvature of the manifold as well as its interplay with the sampling density of the data set. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for improving the performance of manifold learning algorithms using both synthetic and real-world data sets. PMID:21670485

  13. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-02-27

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  14. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2004-12-21

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  15. Assessment of residual heat removal and containment spray pump performance under air and debris ingesting conditions. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, P.S.; Tantillo, T.J.; Swift, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents an assessment of the performance of Residual Heat Removal (RHR) and Containment Spray (CS) pumps during the recirculation phase of reactor core and containment cooldown following a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The pumped fluid is expected to contain debris such as insulation and may ingest air depending on sump conditions. Findings are based on information collected from the literature and from interviews with pump and seal manufacturers. These findings show that for pumps at normal flow rates operating with sufficient Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH), pump performance degradation is negligible if air ingestion quantities are less than 2% by volume. For air ingestion between 3% and 15% by volume, head degradation depends on individual pump design and operating conditions and for air quantities greater than 15% performance of most pumps will be fully degraded. Also, small quantities of air will increase NPSH requirements for these pumps. For the types and quantities of debris likely to be present in the recirculating fluid, pump performance degradation is expected to be negligible.

  16. Advanced Vapor-Supply Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, I. O.; Debnam, William J., Jr.; Fripp, Archibald L., Jr.; Crouch, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced vapor-supply manifold solves problem of manifold purging. Design virtually eliminates dead gas volumes in manifold system. System incorporates special valve into manifold in way that leaks and contamination problems of previous systems, which use tees and three-port valves, are minimized or eliminated in both main manifold line and in supply line. Of considerable use in gas manifold systems where even small amounts of gaseous impurities constitute problem or where more than one gaseous material used in single system.

  17. Development of Air Force Aerial Spray Night Operations: High Altitude Swath Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Haagsma, Karl A; Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Aldridge, Robert L; Britch, Seth C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trials were conducted from 2006 to 2014 in an attempt to validate aerial spray efficacy at altitudes conducive to night spray operations using night vision goggles (NVGs). Higher altitude application of pesticide (more than 400 ft (121.9 m) above ground level (AGL)) suggested that effective vector control might be possible under ideal meteorological conditions. A series of lower altitude daytime applications (300 ft (91.4 m) AGL) demonstrated effective and repeatable mortality of target sentinel insects more than 5,000 ft (1,524 m) downwind, and control of natural vector populations. From these results we believe further pursuit of aerial night applications of pesticide using NVGs at 300 ft (91.4 m) AGL by this group is warranted. PMID:26276945

  18. Tribological Properties of Hard Metal Coatings Sprayed by High-Velocity Air Fuel Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, C.; Sato, K.; Houdkova, S.; Smazalova, E.; Lusvarghi, L.; Bolelli, G.; Sassatelli, P.

    2016-01-01

    Lowering the thermal energy and increasing the kinetic energy of hard metal particles sprayed by the newly developed HVAF systems can significantly reduce their decarburization, and increases the sliding wear and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings, making the HVAF technique attractive, both economically and environmentally, over its HVOF predecessors. Two agglomerated and sintered feedstock powder chemistries, WC-Co (88/12) and WC-CoCr (86/10/4), respectively, with increasing primary carbides grain size from 0.2 to 4.0 microns, have been deposited by the latest HVAF-M3 process onto carbon steel substrates. Their dry sliding wear behaviors and friction coefficients were evaluated at room temperature via Ball-on-disk (ASTM G99-90) wear tests against Al2O3 counterparts, and via Pin-on-disk (ASTM G77-05) wear tests against modified martensitic steel counterparts in both dry and lubricated conditions. Sliding wear mechanisms, with the formation of wavy surface morphology and brittle cracking, are discussed regarding the distribution and size of primary carbides. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated via standard Neutral Salt Spray, Acetic Acid Salt Spray, accelerated corrosion test, and electrochemical polarization test at room temperature. The optimization of the tribological properties of the coatings is discussed, focusing on the suitable selection of primary carbide size for different working load applications.

  19. Miniature paint-spray gun for recessed areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasse, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature spray gun regulates paints and other liquids to spray at close range, facilitating spraying of remote or recessed areas. Individual valves for regulating air pressure and paint maximizes atomization for low pressure spraying.

  20. Constructions of contact manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiges, Hansjörg

    1997-05-01

    1. IntroductionIt has been known for some time that contact structures show a high degree of topological flexibility in the sense that many topological operations can be performed on contact manifolds while preserving the contact property. For instance, Martinet [14] used a surgery description of 3-manifolds to show that every closed, oriented 3-manifold admits a contact structure, and alternative proofs of this result were given later by Thurston and Winkelnkemper [18], who based their proof on an open book decomposition, and Gonzalo [8], who used branched covers. These, however, are all strictly 3-dimensional constructions.

  1. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  2. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-05-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  3. Air-Fed Visors Used for Isocyanate Paint Spraying--Potential Exposure When the Visor Is Lifted.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Mike; Baxter, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Continuous-flow air-supplied breathing apparatus with a visor is the respiratory protective equipment (RPE) of choice within the motor vehicle repair trade for protection against exposure to isocyanate paints. Whilst these devices are capable of providing adequate protection, a common workplace practice of sprayers lifting up the visor of their RPE immediately after spraying when checking the quality of the paint finish is thought to have an impact on the protection afforded. While the visor lift may be only for a few seconds, this action, especially if repeated numerous times during a work shift, could potentially result in a significant increase in exposure.Informal interviews with paint sprayers were conducted to understand the reasons for this behaviour followed by a series of laboratory tests to quantify the potential degree of exposure as a result of a visor lift.The majority of the paint sprayers interviewed explained their reasons for lifting their visors immediately after spraying and before the spray booth had been adequately cleared by ventilation. The main reasons given for a visor lift included a combination of habit, poor visibility due to poor visual clarity of the visor screen material, over spray, scratched visor screens, internal visor reflections, and poor booth lighting.The findings of the tests showed that the degree of protection provided by the visor when in the lifted position is in the approximate range of 1-3.7 (mean 1.7) and over the whole of the exposure period (from start of the lift to recovery of protection after refitting) is in the approximate range of 1.4-9.0 (mean 2.7). This is a significant reduction when compared to the assigned protection factor of 40 for this class of device and the measured protection factors of 5000-10 000 when worn correctly.These results clearly demonstrate that lifting the visor whilst still within a contaminated atmosphere considerably increases the wearer's exposure and that this is an example where

  4. Measurement of spray combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Arman, E. F.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Farmer, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    A free jet configuration was chosen for measuring noncombusting spray fields and hydrocarbon-air spray flames in an effort to develop computational models of the dynamic interaction between droplets and the gas phase and to verify and refine numerical models of the entire spray combustion process. The development of a spray combustion facility is described including techniques for laser measurements in spray combustion environments and methods for data acquisition, processing, displaying, and interpretation.

  5. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOEpatents

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  6. Effect of Water Spray Evaporative Cooling at the Inlet of Regeneration Air Stream on the Performance of an Adsorption Desiccant Cooling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Kosuke; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Goto, Motonobu; Okano, Hiroshi

    This paper shows an influence of evaporative cooler at the inlet of regeneration air stream of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process on the cooling/dehumidifying performance. This evaporative cooling was expected to cause humidity increase in regeneration air reducing the dehumidifying performance of the honeycomb absorber, while the evaporative cooling plays an important role to produce a lower temperature in supply air. Two different airs to be used for the regeneration of the desiccant wheel were considered. One was fresh outside air (OA mode) and the other was air ventilated from the room (RA mode). Experimental results showed that the amount of dehumidified water obtained at the process without water spray evaporative cooler was actually larger than that of process with water spray evaporative cooler. This behavior was mainly due to increase of humidity or relative humidity in the regeneration air as expected. However, temperature of supply air produced by the process with the evaporator was rather lower than that of the other because of the cooled return air, resulting higher CE value. Regarding the operating mode, the evaporative cooler at the OA-mode was no longer useful at higher ambient humidity because of the difficulty of the evaporation of the water in such high humidity. It was also found that its dehumidifying performance was remarkably decreased at higher ambient humidity and lower regeneration temperature since the effective adsorption capacity at the resulting high relative humidity of the regeneration air decreased.

  7. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  8. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  9. Endoscopic video manifolds.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Lallemand, Joe; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Postprocedural analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic videos is a difficult task because the videos often suffer from a large number of poor-quality frames due to the motion or out-of-focus blur, specular highlights and artefacts caused by turbid fluid inside the GI tract. Clinically, each frame of the video is examined individually by the endoscopic expert due to the lack of a suitable visualisation technique. In this work, we introduce a low dimensional representation of endoscopic videos based on a manifold learning approach. The introduced endoscopic video manifolds (EVMs) enable the clustering of poor-quality frames and grouping of different segments of the GI endoscopic video in an unsupervised manner to facilitate subsequent visual assessment. In this paper, we present two novel inter-frame similarity measures for manifold learning to create structured manifolds from complex endoscopic videos. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method yields high precision and recall values for uninformative frame detection (90.91% and 82.90%) and results in well-structured manifolds for scene clustering. PMID:20879345

  10. Phase Evolution upon Aging of Air-Plasma Sprayed t'-Zirconia Coatings: I-Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, Don M; Krogstad, Jessica A; Gao, Yan; Johnson, Curtis A; Nelson, Warren A; Levi, Carlos G

    2012-10-08

    Phase evolution accompanying the isothermal aging of free-standing air-plasma sprayed (APS) 7–8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is described. Aging was carried out at temperatures ranging from 982°C to 1482°C in air. The high-temperature kinetics of the phase evolution from the metastable t' phase into a mixture of transformable Y-rich (cubic) and Y-lean (tetragonal) phases are documented through ambient temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization. A Hollomon–Jaffe parameter (HJP), T[27 + ln(t)], was used to satisfactorily normalize the extent of phase decomposition over the full range of times and temperatures. Comparison to vapor deposited TBCs reveal potential differences in the destabilization mechanism in APS coatings. Furthermore, the lattice parameters extracted from Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns were used to deduce the stabilizer concentrations of the respective phases, which suggest a retrograde tetragonal solvus over the temperature range studied. In concert with a complementary microstructural study presented in Part II, this effort offers new insights into the mechanisms governing the phase evolution and raises implications for the high-temperature use of 8YSZ ceramics.

  11. Manifold tool guide

    DOEpatents

    Djordjevic, Aleksandar

    1983-12-27

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  12. Manifold tool guide

    DOEpatents

    Djordjevic, A.

    1983-12-27

    A tool guide is described that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into the cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc. 3 figs.

  13. Manifold tool guide

    DOEpatents

    Djordjevic, A.

    1982-07-08

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  14. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Kelly, J. T.; Bash, J. O.

    2015-11-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Model evaluations of SSA emissions have mainly focused on the global scale, but regional-scale evaluations are also important due to the localized impact of SSAs on atmospheric chemistry near the coast. In this study, SSA emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were updated to enhance the fine-mode size distribution, include sea surface temperature (SST) dependency, and reduce surf-enhanced emissions. Predictions from the updated CMAQ model and those of the previous release version, CMAQv5.0.2, were evaluated using several coastal and national observational data sets in the continental US. The updated emissions generally reduced model underestimates of sodium, chloride, and nitrate surface concentrations for coastal sites in the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) near Tampa, Florida. Including SST dependency to the SSA emission parameterization led to increased sodium concentrations in the southeastern US and decreased concentrations along parts of the Pacific coast and northeastern US. The influence of sodium on the gas-particle partitioning of nitrate resulted in higher nitrate particle concentrations in many coastal urban areas due to increased condensation of nitric acid in the updated simulations, potentially affecting the predicted nitrogen deposition in sensitive ecosystems. Application of the updated SSA emissions to the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study period resulted in a modest improvement in the predicted surface concentration of sodium and nitrate at several central and southern California coastal sites. This update of SSA emissions enabled a more realistic simulation of the atmospheric chemistry in coastal environments where marine air mixes with urban pollution.

  15. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  16. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Rawlinson, K. Scott

    1994-01-01

    An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

  17. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  18. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  19. Hashing on nonlinear manifolds.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fumin; Shen, Chunhua; Shi, Qinfeng; van den Hengel, Anton; Tang, Zhenmin; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-06-01

    Learning-based hashing methods have attracted considerable attention due to their ability to greatly increase the scale at which existing algorithms may operate. Most of these methods are designed to generate binary codes preserving the Euclidean similarity in the original space. Manifold learning techniques, in contrast, are better able to model the intrinsic structure embedded in the original high-dimensional data. The complexities of these models, and the problems with out-of-sample data, have previously rendered them unsuitable for application to large-scale embedding, however. In this paper, how to learn compact binary embeddings on their intrinsic manifolds is considered. In order to address the above-mentioned difficulties, an efficient, inductive solution to the out-of-sample data problem, and a process by which nonparametric manifold learning may be used as the basis of a hashing method are proposed. The proposed approach thus allows the development of a range of new hashing techniques exploiting the flexibility of the wide variety of manifold learning approaches available. It is particularly shown that hashing on the basis of t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding outperforms state-of-the-art hashing methods on large-scale benchmark data sets, and is very effective for image classification with very short code lengths. It is shown that the proposed framework can be further improved, for example, by minimizing the quantization error with learned orthogonal rotations without much computation overhead. In addition, a supervised inductive manifold hashing framework is developed by incorporating the label information, which is shown to greatly advance the semantic retrieval performance. PMID:25826800

  20. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  1. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-12-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  2. Quantitative fuel vapor/air mixing imaging in droplet/gas regions of an evaporating spray flow using filtered Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patton M; McManus, Thomas A; Sutton, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-15

    This Letter demonstrates the application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for quantitative two-dimensional fuel vapor/air mixing measurements in an evaporating hydrocarbon fuel spray flow. Using the FRS approach, gas-phase measurements are made in the presence of liquid-phase droplets without interference. Effective suppression of the liquid-phase droplet scattering using FRS is enabled by the high spectral purity of the current Nd:YAG laser system. Simultaneous Mie-scattering imaging is used to visualize the droplet field and illustrate the droplet loading under which the FRS imaging is applied in the current spray flows. The initial quantification of the FRS imaging is based on calibration measurements from a flow cell of known fuel vapor/air mixtures, while future work targets the utilization of a Rayleigh-Brillouin spectral model for quantification of the FRS signals. PMID:26977637

  3. Three-phase Coupling of Air, Droplets and Fibers for the Spray Molding Manufacturing Process of Polyurethane-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffo, P.; Wulf, P.; Breuer, M.

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper the authors present a multiphase flow simulation model of the interaction of a droplet-laden air flow with flexible fibers. This highly complex flow is occurring during a manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polyurethane based composites, where the liquid plastic polyurethane (PUR) is sprayed with air assistance in a tool form or on a substrate. Simultaneously chopped fibers are laterally inserted in the polyurethane-air spray cone for wetting before the entire mixture deposits on the substrate, where it starts curing. This investigation aims to compute the statistical fiber orientation and density distribution in the final composite, which will help modeling its anisotropic material properties. It is presumed that the final position and orientation of a fiber on a substrate results from its dynamics and coupled interactions with air, PUR-droplets and other fibers within the spray cone. Therefore, we present a new approach simplifying the multiply coupled interaction of the three phases. In this paper a model of the process is built, that computes the transient, 4-way-coupled behavior of the air-liquid droplets mixture with the CFD code ANSYS Fluent and the 1-way-air- and 1-way-droplet-coupled dynamics of the fibers with an extra code called FIDYST. Two approaches for the coupling of fibers with the air-droplets-mixture are presented: One considers the mixture as a pseudo-fluid ("homogenization"), the other computes a force for each of the phases separately, wherein the average momentum transfer for the fiber-droplet collision is estimated based on the probability of local collision events.

  4. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  5. Invariant manifolds and global bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Guckenheimer, John; Krauskopf, Bernd; Osinga, Hinke M; Sandstede, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Invariant manifolds are key objects in describing how trajectories partition the phase spaces of a dynamical system. Examples include stable, unstable, and center manifolds of equilibria and periodic orbits, quasiperiodic invariant tori, and slow manifolds of systems with multiple timescales. Changes in these objects and their intersections with variation of system parameters give rise to global bifurcations. Bifurcation manifolds in the parameter spaces of multi-parameter families of dynamical systems also play a prominent role in dynamical systems theory. Much progress has been made in developing theory and computational methods for invariant manifolds during the past 25 years. This article highlights some of these achievements and remaining open problems. PMID:26428557

  6. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  7. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  8. Heat determinant on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidi, Ivan G.; Buckman, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce and study new invariants associated with Laplace type elliptic partial differential operators on manifolds. These invariants are constructed by using the off-diagonal heat kernel; they are not pure spectral invariants, that is, they depend not only on the eigenvalues but also on the corresponding eigenfunctions in a non-trivial way. We compute the first three low-order invariants explicitly.

  9. a Study of Liquid - of Atomization Droplet Size Velocity and Temperature Distribution via Information Theory Spray Interaction with Ambient Air Motion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianguo

    Linear temporal instability analysis of a moving thin viscous liquid sheet of uniform thickness in an inviscid gas medium shows that surface tension always opposes, while surrounding gas and relative velocity between the sheet and gas favour the onset and development of instability. For gas Weber number smaller than the density ratio of gas to liquid, liquid viscosity enhances instability; If gas Weber number is slightly larger, aerodynamic and viscosity -induced instabilities interact with each other, displaying complicated effects of viscosity via Ohnesorge number; For much larger values of gas Weber numbers, aerodynamic instability dominates, liquid viscosity reduces disturbance growth rate and increases the dominant wavelength. Droplet probability distribution function (PDF) in sprays is formulated through information theory without resorting to the details of atomization processes. The derived analytical droplet size PDF is Nukiyama-Tanasawa type if conservation of mass is considered alone. If conservation of mass, momentum and energy is all taken into account, the joint droplet size and velocity PDF depends on Weber number, and compares favourably with measurements. Droplet velocity PDF is truncated Gaussian for any specific droplet size. Mean velocity approaches a constant value and velocity variance decreases as droplet size increases. Mean droplet diameters calculated agree well with observations. The computation indicates that atomization efficiency is very low, usually less than 1%. Droplet size, velocity and temperature PDF in sprays under combusting environment has also been derived. Effects of combustion on PDF occur mainly through the heat transferred into liquid sheet prior to its breakup. Experimental studies identify three modes of spray behaviours due to its interaction with various annular air flows, and show that bluff-body type of combustor has ability and easement to control aerodynamically spray angle, shape and droplet trajectories. It is

  10. Albacora Manifold -- The deepest subsea manifold installed to date

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, P.; Moreira, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Dantas, S.; Waskoviak, R.

    1996-12-31

    The installation of the two Albacora Manifolds made them the deepest Subsea Production Manifolds ever installed. These Manifolds are designed for installation and operation at 1,000 meters water depth and were installed at 620 meters in the Albacora field, Campos Basin offshore Brazil, on December `95 and April `96. Each Manifold is connected to eight satellite wells via a Vertical Flowline Connection System. The export of the crude to the FPS is made via a 10 in. flexible line along with a 4 in. line for production test and another 10 in. service line for pigging purposes; gas lift is made through a 4 in. line. All these flexible lines are also connected via a Vertical Connection System. These manifolds are comprised of four guidelineless retrievable Valve and Choke Modules that include all isolation gate valves and subsea chokes. The controls are made by a Multiplex Control System. The control pods can be installed or retrieved using guidelineless techniques. The Control System is able to function and acquire data from the Manifold valves as well as the satellite Trees valves. The Manifolds consist of two structures, a sub base that is used as a shallow foundation and the Manifold Structure that houses the Valve and Choke Modules, Control Systems Pods, Vertical Connection Systems and all the plumbing. The total weight of the whole system is 450 tons.

  11. Sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H. D.

    1980-03-01

    Thermal spraying is shown to be an efficient means for the protection of surface areas against elevated temperature, wear, corrosion, hot gas corrosion, and erosion in structural aircraft components. Particularly in jet engines, numerous parts are coated by flame, detonation, or plasma spraying techniques. The applied methods of flame, detonation, and plasma spraying are explained, as well as electric arc spraying. Possibilities for spray coatings which meet aircraft service requirements are discussed, as well as methods for quality control, especially nondestructive test methods. In particular, coating characteristics and properties obtained by different spray methods are described, and special attention is paid to low pressure plasma spraying.

  12. Fundamental Study of a Single Point Lean Direct Injector. Part I: Effect of Air Swirler Angle and Injector Tip Location on Spray Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Lean direct injection (LDI) is a combustion concept to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) for next generation aircraft gas turbine engines. These newer engines have cycles that increase fuel efficiency through increased operating pressures, which increase combustor inlet temperatures. NOx formation rates increase with higher temperatures; the LDI strategy avoids high temperature by staying fuel lean and away from stoichiometric burning. Thus, LDI relies on rapid and uniform fuel/air mixing. To understand this mixing process, a series of fundamental experiments are underway in the Combustion and Dynamics Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. This first set of experiments examines cold flow (non-combusting) mixing using air and water. Using laser diagnostics, the effects of air swirler angle and injector tip location on the spray distribution, recirculation zone, and droplet size distribution are examined. Of the three swirler angles examined, 60 degrees is determined to have the most even spray distribution. The injector tip location primarily shifts the flow without changing the structure, unless the flow includes a recirculation zone. When a recirculation zone is present, minimum axial velocity decreases as the injector tip moves downstream towards the venturi exit; also the droplets become more uniform in size and angular distribution.

  13. Fundamental Study of a Single Point Lean Direct Injector. Part I: Effect of Air Swirler Angle and Injector Tip Location on Spray Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Lean direct injection (LDI) is a combustion concept to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) for next generation aircraft gas turbine engines. These newer engines have cycles that increase fuel efficiency through increased operating pressures, which increase combustor inlet temperatures. NOx formation rates increase with higher temperatures; the LDI strategy avoids high temperature by staying fuel lean and away from stoichiometric burning. Thus, LDI relies on rapid and uniform fuel/air mixing. To understand this mixing process, a series of fundamental experiments are underway in the Combustion and Dynamics Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. This first set of experiments examines cold flow (non-combusting) mixing using air and water. Using laser diagnostics, the effects of air swirler angle and injector tip location on the spray distribution, recirculation zone, and droplet size distribution are examined. Of the three swirler angles examined, 60 deg is determined to have the most even spray distribution. The injector tip location primarily shifts the flow without changing the structure, unless the flow includes a recirculation zone. When a recirculation zone is present, minimum axial velocity decreases as the injector tip moves downstream towards the venturi exit; also the droplets become more uniform in size and angular distribution.

  14. LOX manifold tee analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Anderson, Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    A 4000 Hz vibration phenomena was observed during the test firings of several space shuttle main engines (SSME). Experimental studies of this phenomena suggest that the problem might be associated with vortex shedding from the vanes within the LOX tee manifold. The objective of this study was to determine the unsteady, 3-D flow associated with these vanes by computational methods to identify and better understand the 4000 Hz vibration phenomena. A flow solver, FDNS, for the turbulent conservation equations was validated for predicting high frequency vortex dynamics and used to predict 2-D and 3-D flows within the LOX tee. 4000 Hz excitation oscillations were predicted for some flows and the entire 3-D flow structure was predicted for LOX tee flow. The complexity of the flow was revealed by this analysis, and computational methods for predicting these high frequency oscillations in future engine systems were established.

  15. Learning Deformable Shape Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Samuel; Martinez, Aleix

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach to shape detection of highly deformable shapes in images via manifold learning with regression. Our method does not require shape key points be defined at high contrast image regions, nor do we need an initial estimate of the shape. We only require sufficient representative training data and a rough initial estimate of the object position and scale. We demonstrate the method for face shape learning, and provide a comparison to nonlinear Active Appearance Model. Our method is extremely accurate, to nearly pixel precision and is capable of accurately detecting the shape of faces undergoing extreme expression changes. The technique is robust to occlusions such as glasses and gives reasonable results for extremely degraded image resolutions. PMID:22308002

  16. Fuel cell manifold sealing system

    DOEpatents

    Grevstad, Paul E.; Johnson, Carl K.; Mientek, Anthony P.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold-to-stack seal and sealing method for fuel cell stacks. This seal system solves the problem of maintaining a low leak rate manifold seal as the fuel cell stack undergoes compressive creep. The seal system eliminates the problem of the manifold-to-stack seal sliding against the rough stack surface as the stack becomes shorter because of cell creep, which relative motion destroys the seal. The seal system described herein utilizes a polymer seal frame firmly clamped between the manifold and the stack such that the seal frame moves with the stack. Thus, as the stack creeps, the seal frame creeps with it, and there is no sliding at the rough, tough to seal, stack-to-seal frame interface. Here the sliding is on a smooth easy to seal location between the seal frame and the manifold.

  17. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Model evaluations of SSA emissions have mainly focused on the global scale, but regional-scale evaluations are...

  18. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-15

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×10{sup 4} S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m{sup 2}/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT–rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of −64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications. - Graphical abstract: Flexible and highly conductive carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanohybrid. - Highlights: • Direct growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper. • Two-dimensional carbon nanohybrid with excellent conductivity and mechanical flexibility. • Supercapacitor with excellent performance stability upon mechanical deformation for flexible electronics applications. • Supercapacitor with high impedance phase angle for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  19. Antistatic sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Antistatic sprays from several different manufacturers are examined. The sprays are examined for contamination potential (i.e., outgassing and nonvolatile residue), corrosiveness on an aluminum mirror surface, and electrostatic effectiveness. In addition, the chemical composition of the antistatic sprays is determined by infrared spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The results show that 12 of the 17 antistatic sprays examined have a low contamination potential. Of these sprays, 7 are also noncorrosive to an aluminum surface. And of these, only 2 demonstrate good electrostatic properties with respect to reducing voltage accumulation; these sprays did not show a fast voltage dissipation rate however. The results indicate that antistatic sprays can be used on a limited basis where contamination potential, corrosiveness, and electrostatic effectiveness is not critical. Each application is different and proper evaluation of the situation is necessary. Information on some of the properties of some antistatic sprays is presented in this document to aid in the evaluation process.

  20. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  1. Folded Symplectic Toric Four-Manifolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    A folded symplectic form on an even-dimensional manifold is a closed two-form that degenerates in a suitably controlled way along a smooth hypersurface. When a torus having half the dimension of the manifold acts in a way preserving the folded symplectic form and admitting a moment map, the manifold is called a folded symplectic toric manifold.…

  2. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a few times. Hold the bottle with your thumb at the bottom and the first two fingers at the top on either side of the nozzle. Tilt your head slightly forward. Gently insert the ...

  3. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    Using Nasal Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a ... Breathe in quickly while squeezing down on the pump bottle one time. Repeat in other nostril. Do ...

  4. Manifold-valued Dirichlet Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunwoo J.; Xu, Jia; Vemuri, Baba C.; Singh, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Statistical models for manifold-valued data permit capturing the intrinsic nature of the curved spaces in which the data lie and have been a topic of research for several decades. Typically, these formulations use geodesic curves and distances defined locally for most cases — this makes it hard to design parametric models globally on smooth manifolds. Thus, most (manifold specific) parametric models available today assume that the data lie in a small neighborhood on the manifold. To address this ‘locality’ problem, we propose a novel nonparametric model which unifies multivariate general linear models (MGLMs) using multiple tangent spaces. Our framework generalizes existing work on (both Euclidean and non-Euclidean) general linear models providing a recipe to globally extend the locally-defined parametric models (using a mixture of local models). By grouping observations into sub-populations at multiple tangent spaces, our method provides insights into the hidden structure (geodesic relationships) in the data. This yields a framework to group observations and discover geodesic relationships between covariates X and manifold-valued responses Y, which we call Dirichlet process mixtures of multivariate general linear models (DP-MGLM) on Riemannian manifolds. Finally, we present proof of concept experiments to validate our model. PMID:26973982

  5. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  6. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  7. Star product and contact Weyl manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Contact algebra is introduced, which is a Lie algebra given as a one-dimesional exrention of a Weyl algebra. A contact Lie algebra bundle called a contact Weyl manifold is considered over a symplectic manifold which contains a Weyl manifold as a subbundle. A relationship is discussed between deformation quantization on s symplectic manifold and a Weyl manifold over the symplectic manifold. The contact Weyl manifold has a canonical connection which gives rise the relation, and is regarded as an extension of Fedosov connection.

  8. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  9. LIFE CYCLE DESIGN OF AIR INTAKE MANIFOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This life cycle design project was a collaborative effort between the Center for Sustainable Systems (formerly National Pollution Prevention Center) at the University of Michigan, a cross functional team at Ford, and the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of the U.S. En...

  10. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  11. Development of a Thermal Transport Database for Air Plasma Sprayed ZrO2 ? Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Diffusivities of Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are measured by the laser flash method. The data are used to calculate thermal conductivity of TBCs when provided with density and specific heat data. Due to the complicated microstructure and other processing related parameters, thermal diffusivity of TBCs can vary as much as three to four fold. Data collected from over 200 free-standing ZrO2 7-8 wt%Y2O3 TBCs are presented. The large database gives a clear picture of the expected band of thermal diffusivity values. When this band is used as reference for thermal diffusivity of a specific TBC, the thermal transport property of TBC can be more precisely described. The database is intended to serve researchers and manufacturers of TBCs as a valuable source for evaluating their coatings.

  12. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  13. Flowfield visualization for SSME hot gas manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roger, Robert P.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research, as defined by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, was two-fold: (1) to numerically simulate viscous subsonic flow in a proposed elliptical two-duct version of the fuel side Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), and (2) to provide analytical support for SSME related numerical computational experiments, being performed by the Computational Fluid Dynamics staff in the Aerophysics Division of the Structures and Dynamics Laboratory at NASA-MSFC. Numerical results of HGM were calculations to complement both water flow visualization experiments and air flow visualization experiments and air experiments in two-duct geometries performed at NASA-MSFC and Rocketdyne. In addition, code modification and improvement efforts were to strengthen the CFD capabilities of NASA-MSFC for producing reliable predictions of flow environments within the SSME.

  14. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Afrin® Nasal Spray ... Anefrin® Nasal Spray ... Dristan® Nasal Spray ... Mucinex® Nasal Spray ... Nostrilla® Nasal Spray ... Vicks Sinex® Nasal Spray ... Zicam® Nasal Spray ... Oxymetazoline nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to ...

  15. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  16. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and of one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  17. Generalized graph manifolds and their effective recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, S V

    1998-10-31

    A generalized graph manifold is a three-dimensional manifold obtained by gluing together elementary blocks, each of which is either a Seifert manifold or contains no essential tori or annuli. By a well-known result on torus decomposition each compact three-dimensional manifold with boundary that is either empty or consists of tori has a canonical representation as a generalized graph manifold. A short simple proof of the existence of a canonical representation is presented and a (partial) algorithm for its construction is described. A simple hyperbolicity test for blocks that are not Seifert manifolds is also presented.

  18. Linear readout of object manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SueYeon; Lee, Daniel D.; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2016-06-01

    Objects are represented in sensory systems by continuous manifolds due to sensitivity of neuronal responses to changes in physical features such as location, orientation, and intensity. What makes certain sensory representations better suited for invariant decoding of objects by downstream networks? We present a theory that characterizes the ability of a linear readout network, the perceptron, to classify objects from variable neural responses. We show how the readout perceptron capacity depends on the dimensionality, size, and shape of the object manifolds in its input neural representation.

  19. ZnO-based thin film transistors employing aluminum titanate gate dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Mazzocco, Riccardo; Vourlias, Georgios; Livesley, Peter J; Krier, Anthony; Milne, William I; Kolosov, Oleg; Adamopoulos, George

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of SiO2 gate dielectrics with metal oxides of higher dielectric constant has led to the investigation of a wide range of materials with superior properties compared with SiO2. Despite their attractive properties, these high-k dielectrics are usually manufactured using costly vacuum-based techniques. To overcome this bottleneck, research has focused on the development of alternative deposition methods based on solution-processable metal oxides. Here we report the application of spray pyrolysis for the deposition and investigation of Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics as a function of the [Ti(4+)]/[Ti(4+)+2·Al(3+)] ratio and their implementation in thin film transistors (TFTs) employing spray-coated ZnO as the active semiconducting channels. The films are studied by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, impedance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field-effect measurements. Analyses reveal amorphous Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics that exhibit a wide band gap (∼4.5 eV), low roughness (∼0.9 nm), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 13), Schottky pinning factor S of ∼0.44 and very low leakage currents (<5 nA/cm(2)). TFTs employing stoichiometric Al2O3·TiO2 gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with low operating voltages (∼10 V), negligible hysteresis, high on/off current modulation ratio of ∼10(6), subthreshold swing (SS) of ∼550 mV/dec and electron mobility of ∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). PMID:25774574

  20. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  1. The Microstructure Stability of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed MnCo2O4 Coating Under Dual-Atmosphere (H2/Air) Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ying-Zhen; Li, Cheng-Xin; Zhang, Shan-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Luo, Xiao-Tao; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    Based on the specific structure of tubular solid oxide fuel cells, good chemical, microstructural, and phase stabilities for the protective coating are required in both the oxidizing and reducing environments. In this work, MnCo2O4 coatings were deposited onto porous Ni50Cr50-Al2O3 substrate by atmospheric plasma spray. The coated samples were tested at 800 °C with the coating exposed in air environment and the substrate in H2 environment. Reducing and pre-oxidizing treatments were performed prior to the stability test. The microstructural stability, phase composition, and electrical properties of the tested coatings were investigated. The surface morphology exhibited an excellent surface stability, and no obvious crystal coarsening was observed. With enhancement of the testing duration, the area-specific resistance presented a decreasing trend attributed to increase in the contact interface and densification of the upper layer. The cross-section views presented a dense upper layer and a relatively porous bottom layer. The x-ray diffraction results also indicated a single MnCo2O4 phase in the upper layer exposed to air environment and a reduced phase structure in the bottom layer from the substrate side. The evolution mechanism between the oxidation frontier and the reduction interface was then discussed.

  2. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  3. Investigation of Optimum Applied Voltage for Water Treatment by Pulsed Streamer Discharge in Air Spraying Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Taichi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Minamitani, Yasushi; Nose, Taisuke

    In this study, we investigated a water treatment method spraying the droplets of wastewater into pulse discharge space. The water treatment was carried out by applying voltage with different pulse widths to determine the optimum pulse width, and the optimum pulse voltage determined on the basis of the results of the study was analyzed. The rise time of the voltages with pulse widths of 40, 60, and 80 ns was about 12, 19, and 32 ns, respectively, and the discharge current in the case of the faster rise time was higher. The number of streamer discharges is believed to increase with a decrease in the rise time. The energy efficiency in the case of the pulse width of 40 ns is higher than that in the case of the other pulse widths. This is because almost all of active species are generated by early streamer discharge, and longer discharging time by longer pulse width makes more ineffectual energy by thermal loss. These results show that the pulsed voltage of faster rise time and shorter pulse width is optimum for the treatment.

  4. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

  5. Experiments on the Distribution of Fuel in Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1932-01-01

    The distribution of the fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays produced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of Plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high-velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side.

  6. Flexible fuel cell gas manifold system

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, Michael; Shah, Jagdish; Hayes, Richard P.; Kelley, Dana A.

    2005-05-03

    A fuel cell stack manifold system in which a flexible manifold body includes a pan having a central area, sidewall extending outward from the periphery of the central area, and at least one compound fold comprising a central area fold connecting adjacent portions of the central area and extending between opposite sides of the central area, and a sidewall fold connecting adjacent portions of the sidewall. The manifold system further includes a rail assembly for attachment to the manifold body and adapted to receive pins by which dielectric insulators are joined to the manifold assembly.

  7. Hermitian metrics on F-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Liana; Hertling, Claus

    2016-09-01

    An F-manifold is complex manifold with a multiplication on the holomorphic tangent bundle, which satisfies a certain integrability condition. Important examples are Frobenius manifolds and especially base spaces of universal unfoldings of isolated hypersurface singularities. This paper reviews the construction of hermitian metrics on F-manifolds from tt∗ geometry. It clarifies the logic between several notions. It also introduces a new canonical hermitian metric. Near irreducible points it makes the manifold almost hyperbolic. This holds for the singularity case and will hopefully lead to applications there.

  8. Geodesic Monte Carlo on Embedded Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Simon; Girolami, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods explicitly defined on the manifold of probability distributions have recently been established. These methods are constructed from diffusions across the manifold and the solution of the equations describing geodesic flows in the Hamilton-Jacobi representation. This paper takes the differential geometric basis of Markov chain Monte Carlo further by considering methods to simulate from probability distributions that themselves are defined on a manifold, with common examples being classes of distributions describing directional statistics. Proposal mechanisms are developed based on the geodesic flows over the manifolds of support for the distributions, and illustrative examples are provided for the hypersphere and Stiefel manifold of orthonormal matrices. PMID:25309024

  9. Geodesic Monte Carlo on Embedded Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Simon; Girolami, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods explicitly defined on the manifold of probability distributions have recently been established. These methods are constructed from diffusions across the manifold and the solution of the equations describing geodesic flows in the Hamilton–Jacobi representation. This paper takes the differential geometric basis of Markov chain Monte Carlo further by considering methods to simulate from probability distributions that themselves are defined on a manifold, with common examples being classes of distributions describing directional statistics. Proposal mechanisms are developed based on the geodesic flows over the manifolds of support for the distributions, and illustrative examples are provided for the hypersphere and Stiefel manifold of orthonormal matrices. PMID:25309024

  10. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... attacks. Your doctor will probably tell you to sit down and use one dose of nitroglycerin when ... dose.To use the spray, follow these steps: Sit down if possible, and hold the container without ...

  11. Point-based manifold harmonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Prabhakaran, Balakrishnan; Guo, Xiaohu

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to build a set of orthogonal Point-Based Manifold Harmonic Bases (PB-MHB) for spectral analysis over point-sampled manifold surfaces. To ensure that PB-MHB are orthogonal to each other, it is necessary to have symmetrizable discrete Laplace-Beltrami Operator (LBO) over the surfaces. Existing converging discrete LBO for point clouds, as proposed by Belkin et al., is not guaranteed to be symmetrizable. We build a new point-wisely discrete LBO over the point-sampled surface that is guaranteed to be symmetrizable, and prove its convergence. By solving the eigen problem related to the new operator, we define a set of orthogonal bases over the point cloud. Experiments show that the new operator is converging better than other symmetrizable discrete Laplacian operators (such as graph Laplacian) defined on point-sampled surfaces, and can provide orthogonal bases for further spectral geometric analysis and processing tasks. PMID:22879345

  12. Symmetries from the solution manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Víctor; Guerrero, Julio; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco F.; Cossío, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    We face a revision of the role of symmetries of a physical system aiming at characterizing the corresponding Solution Manifold (SM) by means of Noether invariants as a preliminary step towards a proper, non-canonical, quantization. To this end, "point symmetries" of the Lagrangian are generally not enough, and we must resort to the more general concept of contact symmetries. They are defined in terms of the Poincaré-Cartan form, which allows us, in turn, to find the symplectic structure on the SM, through some sort of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) transformation. These basic symmetries are realized as Hamiltonian vector fields, associated with (coordinate) functions on the SM, lifted back to the Evolution Manifold through the inverse of this HJ mapping, that constitutes an inverse of the Noether Theorem. The specific examples of a particle moving on S3, at the mechanical level, and nonlinear SU(2)-sigma model in field theory are sketched.

  13. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Collins, William P.

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  14. Computing Slow Manifolds of Saddle Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckenheimer, John; Kuehn, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Slow manifolds are important geometric structures in the state spaces of dynamical systems with multiple time scales. This paper introduces an algorithm for computing trajectories on slow manifolds that are normally hyperbolic with both stable and unstable fast manifolds. We present two examples of bifurcation problems where these manifolds play a key role and a third example in which saddle-type slow manifolds are part of a traveling wave profile of a partial differential equation. Initial value solvers are incapable of computing trajectories on saddle-type slow manifolds, so the slow manifold of saddle type (SMST) algorithm presented here is formulated as a boundary value method. We take an empirical approach here to assessing the accuracy and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  15. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  16. Model reduction by manifold boundaries.

    PubMed

    Transtrum, Mark K; Qiu, Peng

    2014-08-29

    Understanding the collective behavior of complex systems from their basic components is a difficult yet fundamental problem in science. Existing model reduction techniques are either applicable under limited circumstances or produce "black boxes" disconnected from the microscopic physics. We propose a new approach by translating the model reduction problem for an arbitrary statistical model into a geometric problem of constructing a low-dimensional, submanifold approximation to a high-dimensional manifold. When models are overly complex, we use the observation that the model manifold is bounded with a hierarchy of widths and propose using the boundaries as submanifold approximations. We refer to this approach as the manifold boundary approximation method. We apply this method to several models, including a sum of exponentials, a dynamical systems model of protein signaling, and a generalized Ising model. By focusing on parameters rather than physical degrees of freedom, the approach unifies many other model reduction techniques, such as singular limits, equilibrium approximations, and the renormalization group, while expanding the domain of tractable models. The method produces a series of approximations that decrease the complexity of the model and reveal how microscopic parameters are systematically "compressed" into a few macroscopic degrees of freedom, effectively building a bridge between the microscopic and the macroscopic descriptions. PMID:25216014

  17. Manifold learning for robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Keeratipranon, Narongdech; Maire, Frederic; Huang, Henry

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we introduce methods to build a SOM that can be used as an isometric map for mobile robots. That is, given a dataset of sensor readings collected at points uniformly distributed with respect to the ground, we wish to build a SOM whose neurons (prototype vectors in sensor space) correspond to points uniformly distributed on the ground. Manifold learning techniques have already been used for dimensionality reduction of sensor space in navigation systems. Our focus is on the isometric property of the SOM. For reliable path-planning and information sharing between several robots, it is desirable that the robots build an internal representation of the sensor manifold, a map, that is isometric with the environment. We show experimentally that standard Non-Linear Dimensionality Reduction (NLDR) algorithms do not provide isometric maps for range data and bearing data. However, the auxiliary low dimensional manifolds created can be used to improve the distribution of the neurons of a SOM (that is, make the neurons more evenly distributed with respect to the ground). We also describe a method to create an isometric map from a sensor readings collected along a polygonal line random walk. PMID:17117499

  18. Model Reduction by Manifold Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the collective behavior of complex systems from their basic components is a difficult yet fundamental problem in science. Existing model reduction techniques are either applicable under limited circumstances or produce “black boxes” disconnected from the microscopic physics. We propose a new approach by translating the model reduction problem for an arbitrary statistical model into a geometric problem of constructing a low-dimensional, submanifold approximation to a high-dimensional manifold. When models are overly complex, we use the observation that the model manifold is bounded with a hierarchy of widths and propose using the boundaries as submanifold approximations. We refer to this approach as the manifold boundary approximation method. We apply this method to several models, including a sum of exponentials, a dynamical systems model of protein signaling, and a generalized Ising model. By focusing on parameters rather than physical degrees of freedom, the approach unifies many other model reduction techniques, such as singular limits, equilibrium approximations, and the renormalization group, while expanding the domain of tractable models. The method produces a series of approximations that decrease the complexity of the model and reveal how microscopic parameters are systematically “compressed” into a few macroscopic degrees of freedom, effectively building a bridge between the microscopic and the macroscopic descriptions. PMID:25216014

  19. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×104 S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m2/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT-rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of -64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  20. Studying the Effect of the Air-Cap Configuration in Twin-Wire Arc-Spraying Process on the Obtained Flow Characteristics Using Design of Experiment Oriented Fluid Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics approach is adopted in this work using the design of experiments to reveal the effect of the air-cap configurations on the obtained gas velocity, the shear stresses, the high velocity zone, and the convergence of the obtained spraying plume in the twin-wire arc-spraying process. The parameters, which are revealed to optimize the air-cap configuration, are the throat diameter, the convergence angle of the throat inlet, the throat length, and the distance between the throat outlet and the intersection point of the approaching wires. The throat length is dependent upon the other configuration parameters. Outlet gas velocity, the turbulence in the flow, and the exerted shear stresses at wire tips are directly affected by the dominating flow regimes near the intersection point of the approaching wires. The presence of wires and the contact tips in the gas flow has enormous impact on the obtained flow characteristics. Air-cap throat diameter and the distance between throat outlet and intersection point determine the shape and length of the obtained high velocity zone in the spraying plum.

  1. Influence of Spray Volume on Spray Deposition and Coverage Within Nursery Trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on better utilizing air blast sprayers to obtain high pesticide spray application efficiency in nursery tree production is needed. Foliar spray deposition and coverage at different heights inside crabapple tree canopies were investigated for an air blast sprayer with four different appl...

  2. Experimental Analysis of Spray Dryer Used in Hydroxyapatite Thermal Spray Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Q.; Stokes, J.; Ardhaoui, M.

    2012-09-01

    The spray drying process of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder used as a plasma spray powder on human hip implants was examined. The Niro-Minor mixed spray dryer was studied because it incorporates both co-current and counter-current air mixing systems. The process parameters of the spray drying were investigated: temperature, flow rate of the inlet hot air in the spray dryer, viscosity of feed/HA slurry, and responses (chamber and cyclone powder size, deposition of powder on the wall of spray dryer, and overall thermal efficiency). The statistical analysis (ANOVA test) showed that for the chamber particle size, viscosity was the most significant parameter, while for the cyclone particle size, the main effects were temperature, viscosity, and flow rate, but also their interaction effects were significant. The spray dried HA powder showed the two main shapes were a doughnut and solid sphere shape as a result of the different input.

  3. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-23

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  4. Hair spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) hair spray or sprays it down their throat or ... The harmful ingredients in hair spray are: Carboxymethylcellulose ... Polyvinyl alcohol Propylene glycol Polyvinylpyrrolidone

  5. Wire Whip Keeps Spray Nozzle Clean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Air-turbine-driven wire whip is clamped near spray-gun mount. When spray gun is installed, wire whip is in position to remove foam buildup from nozzle face. Two lengths of wire 1 to 2 inches long and about 0.03 inch in thickness are used. Foam spray would be prevented from accumulating on nozzle face by increasing purge flow and cutting vortex-generating grooves inside cap and on nozzle flats.

  6. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  7. High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of a Nanoceria Spray-Coated 316L Stainless Steel Under Short-Term Air Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hugo F.; Mendoza, Humberto; Church, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Nanoceria coatings using a spray method were implemented on a 316L stainless steel (SS). Coated and uncoated coupons were exposed to dry air at 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C) for short time periods (up to 24 hours) and in situ measurements of oxidation were carried out using a highly sensitive thermogravimetric balance. From the experimental outcome, activation energies were determined in both, coated and uncoated 316 SS coupons. The estimated exhibited activation energies for oxidation in the coated and uncoated conditions were 174 and 356 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, the developed scales were significantly different. In the coated steel, the dominant oxide was an oxide spinel (Fe, Mn)3O4 and the presence of Fe2O3 was sharply reduced, particularly at 1273 K (1000 °C). In contrast, no spinel was found in the uncoated 316L SS, and Fe2O3 was always present in the scale at all the investigated oxidation temperatures. The coated steels developed a highly adherent fine-grained scale structure. Apparently, the nanoceria particles enhanced nucleation of the newly formed scale while restricting coarsening. Coarse grain structures were found in the uncoated steels with scale growth occurring at grain ledges. Moreover, the oxidation rates for the coated 316L SS were at least an order of magnitude lower than those exhibited by the steel in the uncoated condition. The reduction in oxidation rates is attributed to a shift in the oxidation mechanism from outward cation diffusion to inward oxygen diffusion.

  8. Characterizing humans on Riemannian manifolds.

    PubMed

    Tosato, Diego; Spera, Mauro; Cristani, Marco; Murino, Vittorio

    2013-08-01

    In surveillance applications, head and body orientation of people is of primary importance for assessing many behavioral traits. Unfortunately, in this context people are often encoded by a few, noisy pixels so that their characterization is difficult. We face this issue, proposing a computational framework which is based on an expressive descriptor, the covariance of features. Covariances have been employed for pedestrian detection purposes, actually a binary classification problem on Riemannian manifolds. In this paper, we show how to extend to the multiclassification case, presenting a novel descriptor, named weighted array of covariances, especially suited for dealing with tiny image representations. The extension requires a novel differential geometry approach in which covariances are projected on a unique tangent space where standard machine learning techniques can be applied. In particular, we adopt the Campbell-Baker-Hausdorff expansion as a means to approximate on the tangent space the genuine (geodesic) distances on the manifold in a very efficient way. We test our methodology on multiple benchmark datasets, and also propose new testing sets, getting convincing results in all the cases. PMID:23787347

  9. GLSMs for partial flag manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donagi, Ron; Sharpe, Eric

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we outline some aspects of nonabelian gauged linear sigma models. First, we review how partial flag manifolds (generalizing Grassmannians) are described physically by nonabelian gauged linear sigma models, paying attention to realizations of tangent bundles and other aspects pertinent to (0, 2) models. Second, we review constructions of Calabi-Yau complete intersections within such flag manifolds, and properties of the gauged linear sigma models. We discuss a number of examples of nonabelian GLSMs in which the Kähler phases are not birational, and in which at least one phase is realized in some fashion other than as a complete intersection, extending previous work of Hori-Tong. We also review an example of an abelian GLSM exhibiting the same phenomenon. We tentatively identify the mathematical relationship between such non-birational phases, as examples of Kuznetsov's homological projective duality. Finally, we discuss linear sigma model moduli spaces in these gauged linear sigma models. We argue that the moduli spaces being realized physically by these GLSMs are precisely Quot and hyperquot schemes, as one would expect mathematically.

  10. VERIFYING THE PERFORMANCE OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of pesticide sprays usually results in formation of small spray droplets which can drift with air currents to nearby sensitive sites. A number of technologies offer the potential to reduce the amount of spray drift from pesticide applications. Acceptance and use of ...

  11. Sasaki-like almost contact complex Riemannian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Stefan; Manev, Hristo; Manev, Mancho

    2016-09-01

    A Sasaki-like almost contact complex Riemannian manifold is defined as an almost contact complex Riemannian manifold whose complex cone is a holomorphic complex Riemannian manifold. Explicit compact and non-compact examples are given. A canonical construction producing a Sasaki-like almost contact complex Riemannian manifold from a holomorphic complex Riemannian manifold is provided as an S1-solvable extension.

  12. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the hole, the container will no longer dispense full doses of medication. Do not try to open the container of nitroglycerin spray. This product may catch fire, so do not use near an open flame, and do not allow the container to be burned after use.

  13. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A ground test facility is being established at NASA Lewis Research Center to simulate the environmental and flight conditions needed to study adverse weather effects. One of the most important components is the water spray system which consists of many nozzles fitted on spray bars. Water is injected through air-assisted atomizers to generate uniform size drops to simulate icing in clouds. The primary objective is to provide experimental data on drop size distribution over a wide range of operating conditions. Correlation equations for mean drop size and initial injection parameters are being determined to assist in the design and modification of the Altitude Wind Tunnel. Special emphasis is being placed on the study of the aerodynamic structure of the air-assisted atomizer sprays. Detailed measurements of the variation of drop size distribution and velocity as a function of time and space are being made. Accurate initial and boundary conditions are being provided for computer model evaluation.

  14. Manifold Coal-Slurry Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Estus, J. M.; Lavin, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding several slurry pipes into main pipeline reduces congestion in coal mines. System based on manifold concept: feeder pipelines from each working entry joined to main pipeline that carries coal slurry out of panel and onto surface. Manifold concept makes coal-slurry haulage much simpler than existing slurry systems.

  15. Sasakian manifolds and M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Santi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We extend the link between Einstein Sasakian manifolds and Killing spinors to a class of η-Einstein Sasakian manifolds, both in Riemannian and Lorentzian settings, characterizing them in terms of generalized Killing spinors. We propose a definition of supersymmetric M-theory backgrounds on such a geometry and find a new class of such backgrounds, extending previous work of Haupt, Lukas and Stelle.

  16. Heisenberg symmetry and hypermultiplet manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Marios Petropoulos, P.; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We study the emergence of Heisenberg (Bianchi II) algebra in hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces. This is motivated by the rôle these spaces with this symmetry play in N = 2 hypermultiplet scalar manifolds. We show how to construct related pairs of hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces under general symmetry assumptions, the former being a zooming-in limit of the latter at vanishing scalar curvature. We further apply this method for the two hyper-Kähler spaces with Heisenberg algebra, which is reduced to U (1) × U (1) at the quaternionic level. We also show that no quaternionic spaces exist with a strict Heisenberg symmetry - as opposed to Heisenberg ⋉ U (1). We finally discuss the realization of the latter by gauging appropriate Sp (2 , 4) generators in N = 2 conformal supergravity.

  17. Heterotic model building: 16 special manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Lee, Seung-Joo; Lukas, Andre; Sun, Chuang

    2014-06-01

    We study heterotic model building on 16 specific Calabi-Yau manifolds constructed as hypersurfaces in toric four-folds. These 16 manifolds are the only ones among the more than half a billion manifolds in the Kreuzer-Skarke list with a non-trivial first fundamental group. We classify the line bundle models on these manifolds, both for SU(5) and SO(10) GUTs, which lead to consistent supersymmetric string vacua and have three chiral families. A total of about 29000 models is found, most of them corresponding to SO(10) GUTs. These models constitute a starting point for detailed heterotic model building on Calabi-Yau manifolds in the Kreuzer-Skarke list. The data for these models can be downloaded from http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/projects/CalabiYau/toricdata/index.html.

  18. Agricultural Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    AGDISP, a computer code written for Langley by Continuum Dynamics, Inc., aids crop dusting airplanes in targeting pesticides. The code is commercially available and can be run on a personal computer by an inexperienced operator. Called SWA+H, it is used by the Forest Service, FAA, DuPont, etc. DuPont uses the code to "test" equipment on the computer using a laser system to measure particle characteristics of various spray compounds.

  19. Comparison of a laboratory and a production coating spray gun with respect to scale-up.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory spray gun and a production spray gun were investigated in a scale-up study. Two Schlick spray guns, which are equipped with a new antibearding cap, were used in this study. The influence of the atomization air pressure, spray gun-to tablet bed distance, polymer solution viscosity, and spray rate were analyzed in a statistical design of experiments. The 2 spray guns were compared with respect to the spray width and height, droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density. The droplet size, velocity, and spray density were measured with a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. A successful scale-up of the atomization is accomplished if similar droplet sizes, droplet velocities, and spray densities are achieved in the production scale as in the laboratory scale. This study gives basic information for the scale-up of the settings from the laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun. Both spray guns are highly comparable with respect to the droplet size and velocity. The scale-up of the droplet size should be performed by an adjustment of the atomization air pressure. The scale-up of the droplet velocity should be performed by an adjustment of the spray gun to tablet bed distance. The presented statistical model and surface plots are convenient and powerful tools for scaling up the spray settings if the spray gun is changed from laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun. PMID:17408226

  20. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  1. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve sneezing and a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is ... comes as a liquid to spray in the nose. Olopatadine nasal spray is usually sprayed in each ...

  2. Loops in Reeb Graphs of 2-Manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-McLaughlin, K; Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V

    2004-12-16

    Given a Morse function f over a 2-manifold with or without boundary, the Reeb graph is obtained by contracting the connected components of the level sets to points. We prove tight upper and lower bounds on the number of loops in the Reeb graph that depend on the genus, the number of boundary components, and whether or not the 2-manifold is orientable. We also give an algorithm that constructs the Reeb graph in time O(n log n), where n is the number of edges in the triangulation used to represent the 2-manifold and the Morse function.

  3. Loops in Reeb Graphs of 2-Manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-McLaughlin, K; Edelsbrunner, H; Harer, J; Natarajan, V; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-11

    Given a Morse function f over a 2-manifold with or without boundary, the Reeb graph is obtained by contracting the connected components of the level sets to points. We prove tight upper and lower bounds on the number of loops in the Reeb graph that depend on the genus, the number of boundary components, and whether or not the 2-manifold is orientable. We also give an algorithm that constructs the Reeb graph in time O(n log n), where n is the number of edges in the triangulation used to represent the 2-manifold and the Morse function.

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIRCULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME II. APPENDICES D-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  5. Spray Drying of Mosambi Juice in Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Verma, A.

    2014-01-01

    The studies on spray drying of mosambi juice were carried out with Laboratory spray dryer set-up (LSD-48 MINI SPRAY DRYER-JISL). Inlet and outlet air temperature and maltodextrin (drying agent) concentration was taken as variable parameters. Experiments were conducted by using 110 °C to 140 °C inlet air temperature, 60 °C to 70 °C outlet air temperature and 5-7 % maltodextrin concentration. The free flow powder of mosambi juice was obtained with 7 % maltodextrin at 140 °C inlet air temperature and 60 °C outlet air temperature. Fresh and reconstituted juices were evaluated for vitamin C, titrable acidity and sensory characteristics. The reconstituted juice was found slightly acceptable by taste panel.

  6. ESTIMATING MICROORGANISM DENSITIES IN AEROSOLS FROM SPRAY IRRIGATION OF WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes current knowledge about estimating the density of microorganisms in the air near wastewater management facilities, with emphasis on spray irrigation sites. One technique for modeling microorganism density in air is provided and an aerosol density estimati...

  7. Agrochemical spray drift; assessment and mitigation--a review.

    PubMed

    Felsot, Allan S; Unsworth, John B; Linders, Jan B H J; Roberts, Graham; Rautman, Dirk; Harris, Caroline; Carazo, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    During application of agrochemicals spray droplets can drift beyond the intended target to non-target receptors, including water, plants and animals. Factors affecting this spray drift include mode of application, droplet size, which can be modified by the nozzle types, formulation adjuvants, wind direction, wind speed, air stability, relative humidity, temperature and height of released spray relative to the crop canopy. The rate of fall of spray droplets depends upon the size of the droplets but is modified by entrainment in a mobile air mass and is also influenced by the rate of evaporation of the liquid constituting the aerosol. The longer the aerosol remains in the air before falling to the ground (or alternatively striking an object above ground) the greater the opportunity for it to be carried away from its intended target. In general, all size classes of droplets are capable of movement off target, but the smallest are likely to move the farthest before depositing on the ground or a non-target receptor. It is not possible to avoid spray drift completely but it can be minimized by using best-management practices. These include using appropriate nozzle types, shields, spray pressure, volumes per area sprayed, tractor speed and only spraying when climatic conditions are suitable. Field layout can also influence spray drift, whilst crop-free and spray-free buffer zones and windbreak crops can also have a mitigating effect. Various models are available to estimate the environmental exposure from spray drift at the time of application. PMID:20981606

  8. IS-321-312-001 TEP-to-HTEP manifold interface sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan J; Coons, James E; Kubic, William L

    2008-01-01

    The Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) receives hydrogen-like and air-like gas streams from the High Tritium Exhaust Processing (HTEP) manifold. Gases from the torus roughing pump are pumped into the HTEP manifold before entering TEP. This interface sheet describes the TEP-HTEP material stream interface, both the physical elements that make up the interface as well as the gas streams that will flow through the interface. The functions of this interface are to: Provide a physical connection for the transport of hydrogen-like and air-like gases from the HTEP manifold to TEP. Provide seals to prevent the unncessary release of tritium to the surrounding environment. Provide valves that can be actuated to stop or prevent the flow of gas into TEP.

  9. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  10. Glassy dynamics of driven elastic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, V.M.

    1996-12-31

    We study the low-temperature dynamics of an elastic manifold driven through a random medium. For driving forces well below the zero- temperature depinning force, the manifold advances via thermally activated hops over the energy barriers separating favorable metastable states. We develop a scaling theory of the thermally activated dynamics (creep) and find a nonlinear glassy response for the driven manifold, {upsilon}{approximately}exp(-const{times}F{sup - {mu}}). We consider an exactly solvable 1-D model for random driven dynamics which exhibits a creep-like velocity-force characteristic. We discuss a microscopic mechanism for the creep motion and show that the distribution of waiting times for the hopping processes scales as a power law. This power-law distribution naturally yields an exponential response for the creep of the manifold.

  11. K-theory of noncommutative Bieberbach manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczykowski, P.; Sitarz, A.

    2015-07-01

    We compute the K-theory of noncommutative Bieberbach manifolds, which are fixed point C* subalgebras of a three-dimensional noncommutative torus by a free action of a cyclic group ℤ N , N = 2, 3, 4, 6.

  12. A Comparison of Fuel Sprays from Several Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the tests results of a series of tests made of the sprays from 14 fuel injection nozzles of 9 different types, the sprays being injected into air at atmospheric density and at 6 and 14 times atmospheric density. High-speed spark photographs of the sprays from each nozzle at each air density were taken at the rate of 2,000 per second, and from them were obtained the dimensions of the sprays and the rates of spray-tip penetration. The sprays were also injected against plasticine targets placed at different distances from the nozzles, and the impressions made in the plasticine were used as an indication of the distribution of the fuel within the spray. Cross-sectional sketches of the different types of sprays are given showing the relative sizes of the spray cores and envelopes. The characteristics of the sprays are compared and discussed with respect to their application to various types of engines.

  13. Multiply manifolded molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.F.; Geyer, H.K.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    This study consists of research and development activities related to the concept of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with multiple manifolds. Objective is to develop an MCFC having a higher power density and a longer life than other MCFC designs. The higher power density will result from thinner gas flow channels; the extended life will result from reduced temperature gradients. Simplification of the gas flow channels and current collectors may also significantly reduce cost for the multiply manifolded MCFC.

  14. Computer calculation of Witten's 3-manifold invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel S.; Gompf, Robert E.

    1991-10-01

    Witten's 2+1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory is exactly solvable. We compute the partition function, a topological invariant of 3-manifolds, on generalized Seifert spaces. Thus we test the path integral using the theory of 3-manifolds. In particular, we compare the exact solution with the asymptotic formula predicted by perturbation theory. We conclude that this path integral works as advertised and gives an effective topological invariant.

  15. L2-cohomology and complete Hamiltonian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Rafe; Pelayo, Álvaro; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2015-01-01

    A classical theorem of Frankel for compact Kähler manifolds states that a Kähler S1-action is Hamiltonian if and only if it has fixed points. We prove a metatheorem which says that when the Hodge theory holds on non-compact manifolds, Frankel's theorem still holds. Finally, we present several concrete situations in which the assumptions of the metatheorem hold.

  16. Calabi-Yau manifolds and their degenerations.

    PubMed

    Tosatti, Valentino

    2012-07-01

    Calabi-Yau manifolds are geometric objects of central importance in several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and mathematical physics. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the subject aimed at a general mathematical audience and present some of our results that shed some light on the possible ways in which families of Calabi-Yau manifolds can degenerate. PMID:22257362

  17. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  18. Development of a system for determining collection efficiency of spray samplers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low speed spray dispersion tunnel was constructed and evaluated for use in passive spray collector efficiency studies. The dispersion tunnel utilizes an air-assisted nozzle to generate a spray cloud with a volume median diameter of about 20 um. The air velocities in the testing section of the di...

  19. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  20. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Daniel L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339±29mW/m(2)), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444±8mW/m(2)) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use. PMID:25260178

  1. A variational problem on Stiefel manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Anthony M.; Crouch, Peter E.; Sanyal, Amit K.

    2006-10-01

    In their paper on discrete analogues of some classical systems such as the rigid body and the geodesic flow on an ellipsoid, Moser and Veselov introduced their analysis in the general context of flows on Stiefel manifolds. We consider here a general class of continuous time, quadratic cost, optimal control problems on Stiefel manifolds, which in the extreme dimensions again yield these classical physical geodesic flows. We have already shown that this optimal control setting gives a new symmetric representation of the rigid body flow and in this paper we extend this representation to the geodesic flow on the ellipsoid and the more general Stiefel manifold case. The metric we choose on the Stiefel manifolds is the same as that used in the symmetric representation of the rigid body flow and that used by Moser and Veselov. In the extreme cases of the ellipsoid and the rigid body, the geodesic flows are known to be integrable. We obtain the extremal flows using both variational and optimal control approaches and elucidate the structure of the flows on general Stiefel manifolds.

  2. A Light-Activated Reaction Manifold.

    PubMed

    Hiltebrandt, Kai; Elies, Katharina; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    We introduce an efficient reaction manifold where the rate of a thermally induced ligation can be controlled by a photonic field via two competing reaction channels. The effectiveness of the reaction manifold is evidenced by following the transformations of macromolecular chain termini via high-resolution mass spectrometry and subsequently by selective block copolymer formation. The light-controlled reaction manifold consists of a so-called o-quinodimethane species, a photocaged diene, that reacts in the presence of light with suitable enes in a Diels-Alder reaction and undergoes a transformation into imines with amines in the absence of light. The chemical selectivity of the manifold is controlled by the amount of ene present in the reaction and can be adjusted from 100% imine formation (0% photo product) to 5% imine formation (95% photo product). The reported light-controlled reaction manifold is highly attractive because a simple external field is used to switch the selectivity of specific reaction channels. PMID:27151599

  3. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  4. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description. PMID:27116566

  5. Characteristics of MCrAlY coatings sprayed by high velocity oxygen-fuel spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying system in open air has been established for producing the coatings that are extremely clean and dense. It is thought that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY (M is Fe, Ni and/or Co) coatings can be applied to provide resistance against oxidation and corrosion to the hot parts of gas turbines. Also, it is well known that the thicker coating can be sprayed in comparison with any other thermal spraying systems due to improved residual stresses. However, thermal and mechanical properties of HVOF coatings have not been clarified. Especially, the characteristics of residual stress, that are the most important property from the view point of production technique, have not been made clear. In this paper, the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings were measured in both the case of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in comparison with a vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings could be improved by a diffusion heat treatment to equate the vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. Also, the residual stress characteristics were analyzed using a deflection measurement technique and a X-ray technique. The residual stress of HVOF coating was reduced by the shot-peening effect comparable to that of a plasma spray system in open air. This phenomena could be explained by the reason that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coating was built up by poorly melted particles.

  6. Normal hyperbolicity and unbounded critical manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This work is motivated by mathematical questions arising in differential equation models for autocatalytic reactions. We extend the local theory of singularities in fast-slow polynomial vector fields to classes of unbounded manifolds which lose normal hyperbolicity due to an alignment of the tangent and normal bundles. A projective transformation is used to localize the unbounded problem. Then the blow-up method is employed to characterize the loss of normal hyperbolicity for the transformed slow manifolds. Our analysis yields a rigorous scaling law for all unbounded manifolds which exhibit a power-law decay for the alignment with a fast subsystem domain. Furthermore, the proof also provides a technical extension of the blow-up method itself by augmenting the analysis with an optimality criterion for the blow-up exponents.

  7. Geometric proof for normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiński, Maciej J.; Zgliczyński, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    We present a new proof of the existence of normally hyperbolic manifolds and their whiskers for maps. Our result is not perturbative. Based on the bounds on the map and its derivative, we establish the existence of the manifold within a given neighborhood. Our proof follows from a graph transform type method and is performed in the state space of the system. We do not require the map to be invertible. From our method follows also the smoothness of the established manifolds, which depends on the smoothness of the map, as well as rate conditions, which follow from bounds on the derivative of the map. Our method is tailor made for rigorous, interval arithmetic based, computer assisted validation of the needed assumptions.

  8. Exponential estimates of symplectic slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, K. U.; Wulff, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we prove the existence of an almost invariant symplectic slow manifold for analytic Hamiltonian slow-fast systems with finitely many slow degrees of freedom for which the error field is exponentially small. We allow for infinitely many fast degrees of freedom. The method we use is motivated by a paper of MacKay from 2004. The method does not notice resonances, and therefore we do not pose any restrictions on the motion normal to the slow manifold other than it being fast and analytic. We also present a stability result and obtain a generalization of a result of Gelfreich and Lerman on an invariant slow manifold to (finitely) many fast degrees of freedom.

  9. Infinitely many singular interactions on noncompact manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik Turgut, O. Teoman

    2015-05-15

    We show that the ground state energy is bounded from below when there are infinitely many attractive delta function potentials placed in arbitrary locations, while all being separated at least by a minimum distance, on two dimensional non-compact manifold. To facilitate the reading of the paper, we first present the arguments in the setting of Cartan–Hadamard manifolds and then subsequently discuss the general case. For this purpose, we employ the heat kernel techniques as well as some comparison theorems of Riemannian geometry, thus generalizing the arguments in the flat case following the approach presented in Albeverio et al. (2004). - Highlights: • Schrödinger-operator for infinitely many singular interactions on noncompact manifolds. • Proof of the finiteness of the ground-state energy.

  10. Slow Manifolds and Multiple Equilibria in Stratocumulus-Capped Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Uchida, Junya; Blossey, Peter N.

    2010-04-01

    In marine stratocumulus-capped boundary layers under strong inversions, the timescale for thermodynamic adjustment is roughly a day, much shorter than the multiday timescale for inversion height adjustment. Slow-manifold analysis is introduced to exploit this timescale separation when boundary layer air columns experience only slow changes in their boundary conditions. Its essence is that the thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer remains approximately slaved to its inversion height and the instantaneous boundary conditions; this slaved structure determines the entrainment rate and hence the slow evolution of the inversion height and can be regarded as a one-dimensional slow manifold. Slow-manifold analysis is applied to mixed-layer model and large-eddy simulations of an idealized nocturnal stratocumulus-capped boundary layer. Both models are found to have multiple equilibria; depending on the initial inversion height, the simulations slowly evolve toward a shallow thin-cloud boundary layer or a deep, well-mixed thick cloud boundary layer. In the mixed-layer model, this can be described using a single slow manifold bifurcated by an unstable equilibrium inversion height which separates a branch that evolves toward a deep steady state from a branch which shallows indefinitely. In the large-eddy simulations, there are two separate slow manifolds (one of which becomes unstable if cloud droplet concentration is reduced). On one, the boundary layer is well-mixed and deepens to a thick-cloud steady state. On the other, the boundary layer is decoupled and shallows to a thin-cloud steady state. If the initial inversion height supports an optically thick but nearly nondrizzling cloud, it evolves onto the well-mixed manifold; if the initial cloud layer is either too thin to efficiently radiatively cool, or thick enough to heavily drizzle, it evolves onto the decoupled manifold. Applications to analysis of stratocumulus observations and to pockets of open cells and ship

  11. Comparison of the Failures during Cyclic Oxidation of Yttria-Stabilized (7 to 8 Weight Percent) Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Fabricated via Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition and Air Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanar, N. M.; Helminiak, M.; Meier, G. H.; Pettit, F. S.

    2011-04-01

    The failures during oxidation of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) and air plasma spray (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on different bond coats, namely, platinum-modified aluminide and NiCoCrAlY, are described. It is shown that oxidation of the bond coats, along with defects existing near the TBC/bond coat interface, plays a very important role in TBC failures. Procedures to improve TBC performance via modifying the oxidation characteristics of the bond coats and removing the as-processed defects are discussed. The influence of exposure conditions on TBC lives is described and factors such as cycle frequency and thermal gradients are discussed.

  12. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  13. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  14. Manifolds for pose tracking from monocular video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saurav; Poulin, Joshua; Acton, Scott T.

    2015-03-01

    We formulate a simple human-pose tracking theory from monocular video based on the fundamental relationship between changes in pose and image motion vectors. We investigate the natural embedding of the low-dimensional body pose space into a high-dimensional space of body configurations that behaves locally in a linear manner. The embedded manifold facilitates the decomposition of the image motion vectors into basis motion vector fields of the tangent space to the manifold. This approach benefits from the style invariance of image motion flow vectors, and experiments to validate the fundamental theory show reasonable accuracy (within 4.9 deg of the ground truth).

  15. Isoperimetric inequality on conformally hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Kesel'man, V M

    2003-04-30

    It is shown that on an arbitrary non-compact Riemannian manifold of conformally hyperbolic type the isoperimetric inequality can be taken by a conformal change of the metric to the same canonical linear form as in the case of the standard hyperbolic Lobachevskii space. Both the absolute isoperimetric inequality and the relative one (for manifolds with boundary) are obtained. This work develops the results and methods of a joint paper with Zorich, in which the absolute isoperimetric inequality was obtained under a certain additional condition; the resulting statements are definitive in a certain sense.

  16. Floer type cohomology on cosymplectic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong Seung; Chai, Young Do

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a Floer type cohomology on cosymplectic manifolds M. To do this, we study a symplectic type action functional on the universal covering space of the loop space of contractible loops in M and the moduli space of gradient flow lines of the functional. The cochain complex induced by the critical points of the functional produces Floer type cohomology of M which is naturally isomorphic to a quantum type cohomology of M. We have an Arnold type theorem for Hamiltonian cosymplectomorphisms on compact semipositive cosymplectic manifolds. As an example, we consider the product of a Calabi-Yau 3-fold and the unit circle.

  17. Unraveling Flow Patterns through Nonlinear Manifold Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tauro, Flavia; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    From climatology to biofluidics, the characterization of complex flows relies on computationally expensive kinematic and kinetic measurements. In addition, such big data are difficult to handle in real time, thereby hampering advancements in the area of flow control and distributed sensing. Here, we propose a novel framework for unsupervised characterization of flow patterns through nonlinear manifold learning. Specifically, we apply the isometric feature mapping (Isomap) to experimental video data of the wake past a circular cylinder from steady to turbulent flows. Without direct velocity measurements, we show that manifold topology is intrinsically related to flow regime and that Isomap global coordinates can unravel salient flow features. PMID:24614890

  18. Approaching Moons from Resonance via Invariant Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the approach phase from the final resonance of the endgame scenario in a tour design is examined within the context of invariant manifolds. Previous analyses have typically solved this problem either by using numerical techniques or by computing a catalog of suitable trajectories. The invariant manifolds of a selected set of libration orbits and unstable resonant orbits are computed here to serve as guides for desirable approach trajectories. The analysis focuses on designing an approach phase that may be tied into the final resonance in the endgame sequence while also targeting desired conditions at the moon.

  19. Mobile zone, spray booth ventilation system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-26

    This concept endeavors to reduce the volume of air (to be treated) from spray paint booths, thereby increasing efficiency and improving air pollution abatement (VOC emissions especially). Most of the ventilation air is recycled through the booth to maintain laminar flow; the machinery is located on the supply side of the booth rather than on the exhaust side. 60 to 95% reduction in spray booth exhaust rate should result. Although engineering and production prototypes have been made, demand is low.

  20. Fuel spray diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Several laser measurement methods are being studied to provide the capability to make droplet size and velocity measurements under a variety of spray conditions. The droplet sizing interferometer (DSI) promises to be a successful technique because of its capability for rapid data acquisition, compilation and analysis. Its main advantage is the ability to obtain size and velocity measurements in air-fuel mixing studies and hot flows. The existing DSI at NASA Lewis is a two-color, two-component system. Two independent orthogonal measurements of size and velocity components can be made simultaneously. It also uses an off-axis large-angle light scatter detection. The fundamental features of the system are optics, signal processing and data management system. The major component includes a transmitter unit, two receiver units, two signal processors, two data management systems, two Bragg cell systems, two printer/plotters, a laser, power supply and color monitor.

  1. Localised manifold learning for cardiac image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Kanwal K.; Price, Anthony N.; Hajnal, Jo V.; Rueckert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning is increasingly being used to discover the underlying structure of medical image data. Traditional approaches operate on whole images with a single measure of similarity used to compare entire images. In this way, information on the locality of differences is lost and smaller trends may be masked by dominant global differences. In this paper, we propose the use of multiple local manifolds to analyse regions of images without any prior knowledge of which regions are important. Localised manifolds are created by partitioning images into regular subsections with a manifold constructed for each patch. We propose a framework for incorporating information from the neighbours of each patch to calculate a coherent embedding. This generates a simultaneous dimensionality reduction of all patches and results in the creation of embeddings which are spatially-varying. Additionally, a hierarchical method is presented to enable a multi-scale embedding solution. We use this to extract spatially-varying respiratory and cardiac motions from cardiac MRI. Although there is a complex interplay between these motions, we show how they can be separated on a regional basis. We demonstrate the utility of the localised joint embedding over a global embedding of whole images and over embedding individual patches independently.

  2. Quantum Rigidity of Negatively Curved Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirvasitu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    We show that an isometric action of a compact quantum group on the underlying geodesic metric space of a compact connected Riemannian manifold ( M, g) with strictly negative curvature is automatically classical, in the sense that it factors through the action of the isometry group of ( M, g). This partially answers a question by D. Goswami.

  3. Holomorphic Parabolic Geometries and Calabi-Yau Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    We prove that the only complex parabolic geometries on Calabi-Yau manifolds are the homogeneous geometries on complex tori. We also classify the complex parabolic geometries on homogeneous compact Kähler manifolds.

  4. Calabi-Yau manifolds from noncommutative Hermitian U (1 ) instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2015-05-01

    We show that Calabi-Yau manifolds are emergent from the commutative limit of six-dimensional noncommutative Hermitian U (1 ) instantons. Therefore, we argue that the noncommutative Hermitian U (1 ) instantons correspond to quantized Calabi-Yau manifolds.

  5. Distance approximating dimension reduction of Riemannian manifolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyou; Zhang, Junping; Fleischer, Rudolf

    2010-02-01

    We study the problem of projecting high-dimensional tensor data on an unspecified Riemannian manifold onto some lower dimensional subspace We note that, technically, the low-dimensional space we compute may not be a subspace of the original high-dimensional space. However, it is convenient to envision it as a subspace when explaining the algorithms. without much distorting the pairwise geodesic distances between data points on the Riemannian manifold while preserving discrimination ability. Existing algorithms, e.g., ISOMAP, that try to learn an isometric embedding of data points on a manifold have a nonsatisfactory discrimination ability in practical applications such as face and gait recognition. In this paper, we propose a two-stage algorithm named tensor-based Riemannian manifold distance-approximating projection (TRIMAP), which can quickly compute an approximately optimal projection for a given tensor data set. In the first stage, we construct a graph from labeled or unlabeled data, which correspond to the supervised and unsupervised scenario, respectively, such that we can use the graph distance to obtain an upper bound on an objective function that preserves pairwise geodesic distances. Then, we perform some tensor-based optimization of this upper bound to obtain a projection onto a low-dimensional subspace. In the second stage, we propose three different strategies to enhance the discrimination ability, i.e., make data points from different classes easier to separate and make data points in the same class more compact. Experimental results on two benchmark data sets from the University of South Florida human gait database and the Face Recognition Technology face database show that the discrimination ability of TRIMAP exceeds that of other popular algorithms. We theoretically show that TRIMAP converges. We demonstrate, through experiments on six synthetic data sets, its potential ability to unfold nonlinear manifolds in the first stage. PMID:19622439

  6. Fluid manifold design for a solar energy storage tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Hewitt, H. C.; Griggs, E. I.

    1975-01-01

    A design technique for a fluid manifold for use in a solar energy storage tank is given. This analytical treatment generalizes the fluid equations pertinent to manifold design, giving manifold pressures, velocities, and orifice pressure differentials in terms of appropriate fluid and manifold geometry parameters. Experimental results used to corroborate analytical predictions are presented. These data indicate that variations in discharge coefficients due to variations in orifices can cause deviations between analytical predictions and actual performance values.

  7. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide nasal spray is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... Ciclesonide comes as a solution (liquid) to spray in the nose. It is usually sprayed in each nostril once daily. Use ciclesonide at around the same time every day. Follow the ...

  8. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  9. Collection efficiency of various airborne spray flux samplers used in aerial application research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low air speed, spray dispersion tunnel was constructed and used to evaluate the collection efficiency of passive spray flux collectors. The dispersion tunnel utilizes an air-assisted nozzle to generate a spray cloud with a DV0.5 of 18.5 (±0.4) µm at air speeds ranging from 0.45-4.0 m/sec. A samp...

  10. SPRAY CHARGING AND TRAPPING SCRUBBER FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental evaluation of the control of fugitive particle emissions (FPE) with a Spray Charging and Trapping (SCAT) Scrubber that uses an air curtain and/or jets to contain, convey, and divert the FPE into a charged spray scrubber. ...

  11. Three-dimensional manifolds with special Cotton tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calviño-Louzao, E.; García-Río, E.; Seoane-Bascoy, J.; Vázquez-Lorenzo, R.

    2015-10-01

    The Cotton tensor of three-dimensional Walker manifolds is investigated. A complete description of all locally conformally flat Walker three-manifolds is given, as well as that of Walker manifolds whose Cotton tensor is either a Codazzi or a Killing tensor.

  12. Special-holonomy manifolds and quartic-curvature string corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelle, K. S.

    2004-06-01

    The quartic-curvature corrections derived from string theory have a very specific impact on the geometry of target-space manifolds of special holonomy. In the cases of Calabi-Yau manifolds and D = 7 manifolds of G2 holonomy, we show how the corrections conspire to preserve the unbroken supersymmetry of these backgrounds.

  13. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  14. Effects of Spray Release Height and Nozzle/Atomizer Configuration on Penetration of Spray in a Soybean Canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary experiments were conducted using three nozzle/atomizer configurations to determine spray characteristics and relative penetration in a soybean canopy. Water was applied at three different spray release heights in a random sequence using an Air Tractor 402-B agricultural aircraft. Sample...

  15. Gleason grading of prostate histology utilizing manifold regularization via statistical shape model of manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Rachel; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-03-01

    Gleason patterns of prostate cancer histopathology, characterized primarily by morphological and architectural attributes of histological structures (glands and nuclei), have been found to be highly correlated with disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. Gleason patterns 4 and 5 are highly correlated with more aggressive disease and poorer patient outcome, while Gleason patterns 1-3 tend to reflect more favorable patient outcome. Because Gleason grading is done manually by a pathologist visually examining glass (or digital) slides, subtle morphologic and architectural differences of histological attributes may result in grading errors and hence cause high inter-observer variability. Recently some researchers have proposed computerized decision support systems to automatically grade Gleason patterns by using features pertaining to nuclear architecture, gland morphology, as well as tissue texture. Automated characterization of gland morphology has been shown to distinguish between intermediate Gleason patterns 3 and 4 with high accuracy. Manifold learning (ML) schemes attempt to generate a low dimensional manifold representation of a higher dimensional feature space while simultaneously preserving nonlinear relationships between object instances. Classification can then be performed in the low dimensional space with high accuracy. However ML is sensitive to the samples contained in the dataset; changes in the dataset may alter the manifold structure. In this paper we present a manifold regularization technique to constrain the low dimensional manifold to a specific range of possible manifold shapes, the range being determined via a statistical shape model of manifolds (SSMM). In this work we demonstrate applications of the SSMM in (1) identifying samples on the manifold which contain noise, defined as those samples which deviate from the SSMM, and (2) accurate out-of-sample extrapolation (OSE) of newly acquired samples onto a manifold constrained by the SSMM. We

  16. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors' knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  17. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors’ knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  18. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  19. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  20. A novel manifold-manifold distance index applied to looseness state assessment of viscoelastic sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhousuo; Guo, Ting; Luo, Xue; Qu, Jinxiu; Zhang, Chenxuan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Bing

    2014-06-01

    Viscoelastic sandwich structures (VSS) are widely used in mechanical equipment; their state assessment is necessary to detect structural states and to keep equipment running with high reliability. This paper proposes a novel manifold-manifold distance-based assessment (M2DBA) method for assessing the looseness state in VSSs. In the M2DBA method, a manifold-manifold distance is viewed as a health index. To design the index, response signals from the structure are firstly acquired by condition monitoring technology and a Hankel matrix is constructed by using the response signals to describe state patterns of the VSS. Thereafter, a subspace analysis method, that is, principal component analysis (PCA), is performed to extract the condition subspace hidden in the Hankel matrix. From the subspace, pattern changes in dynamic structural properties are characterized. Further, a Grassmann manifold (GM) is formed by organizing a set of subspaces. The manifold is mapped to a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), where support vector data description (SVDD) is used to model the manifold as a hypersphere. Finally, a health index is defined as the cosine of the angle between the hypersphere centers corresponding to the structural baseline state and the looseness state. The defined health index contains similarity information existing in the two structural states, so structural looseness states can be effectively identified. Moreover, the health index is derived by analysis of the global properties of subspace sets, which is different from traditional subspace analysis methods. The effectiveness of the health index for state assessment is validated by test data collected from a VSS subjected to different degrees of looseness. The results show that the health index is a very effective metric for detecting the occurrence and extension of structural looseness. Comparison results indicate that the defined index outperforms some existing state-of-the-art ones.

  1. Spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X. F.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, J.

    1988-01-01

    The spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer are examined using water as the working fluid. Measurements of mean drop size, drop size distribution, spray cone angle, and circumferential liquid distinction, are carried out over wide ranges of liquid injection pressures and atomizing air velocities. Generally, it is found that an increase in nozzle bypass ratio worsens the atomization quality and widens the spray cone angle. Increase in airblast air velocity may improve or impair atomization quality depending on whether it increases or decreases the relative velocity between the liquid and the surrounding air. Airblast air can also be used to modify the change in spray cone angle that normally accompanies a change in bypass ratio.

  2. Spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X. F.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The spray characteristics of a spill-return airblast atomizer are examined using water as the working fluid. Measurements of mean drop size, drop size distribution, spray cone angle, and circumferential liquid distinction, are carried out over wide ranges of liquid injection pressures and atomizing air velocities. Generally, it is found that an increase in nozzle bypass ratio worsens the atomization quality and widens the spray cone angle. Increase in airblast air velocity may improve or impair atomization quality depending on whether it increases or decreases the relative velocity between the liquid and the surrounding air. Airblast air can also be used to modify the change in spray cone angle that normally accompanies a change in bypass ratio.

  3. A Further Examination of Manifold Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuthardt, Patrick; Grouchy, Rebecca

    2015-08-01

    Manifold theory, an alternative to density wave theory, proposes that the spiral structure found in disk galaxies is the result of chaotic orbits guided by invariant manifolds. One prediction by this theory is that galaxies with stronger bars have more open spiral arms (i.e. larger pitch angles, P) compared to galaxies with weaker bars. A study by Martínez-García examined a limited sample of 27 galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Galaxy Survey (OSUBGS) and found a trend between the overall perturbation strength in a galaxy, Qt(r), and P. While Qt(r) is a good measure of bar strength, it is affected by spiral arm torques. Our analysis advances that of Martínez-García by studying approximately 100 galaxies from the OSUBGS that have separate bar and spiral perturbation strength calculations and comparing these values to robust measurements of P via an algorithm developed by Davis et al.

  4. Natural cutoffs via compact symplectic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, K.; Gorji, M. A.; Hosseinzadeh, V.; Vakili, B.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of phenomenological models of quantum gravity, it is claimed that ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) natural cutoffs can be realized from local deformations of the Hamiltonian systems. In this paper, we scrutinize this hypothesis and formulate a cutoff-regularized Hamiltonian system. The results show that while local deformations are necessary to have cutoffs, they are not sufficient. In fact, the cutoffs can be realized from globally-deformed Hamiltonian systems that are defined on compact symplectic manifolds. By taking the universality of quantum gravity effects into account, we then conclude that quantum gravity cutoffs are global (topological) properties of the symplectic manifolds. We justify our results by considering three well-known examples: the Moyal, Snyder and polymer-deformed Hamiltonian systems.

  5. Modular categories and 3-manifold invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Tureav, V.G. )

    1992-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a concise introduction to the theory of knot invariants and 3-manifold invariants which generalize the Jones polynomial and which may be considered as a mathematical version of the Witten invariants. Such a theory was introduced by N. Reshetikhin and the author on the ground of the theory of quantum groups. here we use more general algebraic objects, specifically, ribbon and modular categories. Such categories in particular arise as the categories of representations of quantum groups. The notion of modular category, interesting in itself, is closely related to the notion of modular tensor category in the sense of G. Moore and N. Seiberg. For simplicity we restrict ourselves in this paper to the case of closed 3-manifolds.

  6. Manifold Learning by Preserving Distance Orders

    PubMed Central

    Akcakaya, Murat; Orhan, Umut; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear dimensionality reduction is essential for the analysis and the interpretation of high dimensional data sets. In this manuscript, we propose a distance order preserving manifold learning algorithm that extends the basic mean-squared error cost function used mainly in multidimensional scaling (MDS)-based methods. We develop a constrained optimization problem by assuming explicit constraints on the order of distances in the low-dimensional space. In this optimization problem, as a generalization of MDS, instead of forcing a linear relationship between the distances in the high-dimensional original and low-dimensional projection space, we learn a non-decreasing relation approximated by radial basis functions. We compare the proposed method with existing manifold learning algorithms using synthetic datasets based on the commonly used residual variance and proposed percentage of violated distance orders metrics. We also perform experiments on a retinal image dataset used in Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) diagnosis. PMID:25045195

  7. Convex nonnegative matrix factorization with manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjun; Choi, Kup-Sze; Wang, Peiliang; Jiang, Yunliang; Wang, Shitong

    2015-03-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been extensively applied in many areas, including computer vision, pattern recognition, text mining, and signal processing. However, nonnegative entries are usually required for the data matrix in NMF, which limits its application. Besides, while the basis and encoding vectors obtained by NMF can represent the original data in low dimension, the representations do not always reflect the intrinsic geometric structure embedded in the data. Motivated by manifold learning and Convex NMF (CNMF), we propose a novel matrix factorization method called Graph Regularized and Convex Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (GCNMF) by introducing a graph regularized term into CNMF. The proposed matrix factorization technique not only inherits the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold structure, but also allows the processing of mixed-sign data matrix. Clustering experiments on nonnegative and mixed-sign real-world data sets are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25523040

  8. Potts-model critical manifolds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullard, Christian R.; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We compute critical polynomials for the q-state Potts model on the Archimedean lattices, using a parallel implementation of the algorithm of Jacobsen (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor 47 135001) that gives us access to larger sizes than previously possible. The exact polynomials are computed for bases of size 6 × 6 unit cells, and the root in the temperature variable v={{{e}}}K-1 is determined numerically at q = 1 for bases of size 8 × 8. This leads to improved results for bond percolation thresholds, and for the Potts-model critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane. In the two most favourable cases, we find now the kagome-lattice threshold to eleven digits and that of the (3,{12}2) lattice to thirteen. Our critical manifolds reveal many interesting features in the antiferromagnetic region of the Potts model, and determine accurately the extent of the Berker-Kadanoff phase for the lattices studied.

  9. Incremental nonlinear dimensionality reduction by manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Law, Martin H C; Jain, Anil K

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the structure of multidimensional patterns, especially in unsupervised cases, is of fundamental importance in data mining, pattern recognition, and machine learning. Several algorithms have been proposed to analyze the structure of high-dimensional data based on the notion of manifold learning. These algorithms have been used to extract the intrinsic characteristics of different types of high-dimensional data by performing nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Most of these algorithms operate in a "batch" mode and cannot be efficiently applied when data are collected sequentially. In this paper, we describe an incremental version of ISOMAP, one of the key manifold learning algorithms. Our experiments on synthetic data as well as real world images demonstrate that our modified algorithm can maintain an accurate low-dimensional representation of the data in an efficient manner. PMID:16526424

  10. Echocardiogram enhancement using supervised manifold denoising.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Huynh, Toan T; Souvenir, Richard

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents data-driven methods for echocardiogram enhancement. Existing denoising algorithms typically rely on a single noise model, and do not generalize to the composite noise sources typically found in real-world echocardiograms. Our methods leverage the low-dimensional intrinsic structure of echocardiogram videos. We assume that echocardiogram images are noisy samples from an underlying manifold parametrized by cardiac motion and denoise images via back-projection onto a learned (non-linear) manifold. Our methods incorporate synchronized side information (e.g., electrocardiography), which is often collected alongside the visual data. We evaluate the proposed methods on a synthetic data set and real-world echocardiograms. Quantitative results show improved performance of our methods over recent image despeckling methods and video denoising methods, and a visual analysis of real-world data shows noticeable image enhancement, even in the challenging case of noise due to dropout artifacts. PMID:26072166

  11. Swelling of particle-encapsulating random manifolds.

    PubMed

    Haleva, Emir; Diamant, Haim

    2008-08-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a closed random manifold of fixed area and fluctuating volume, encapsulating a fixed number of noninteracting particles. Scaling analysis yields a unified description of such swollen manifolds, according to which the mean volume gradually increases with particle number, following a single scaling law. This is markedly different from the swelling under fixed pressure difference, where certain models exhibit criticality. We thereby indicate when the swelling due to encapsulated particles is thermodynamically inequivalent to that caused by fixed pressure. The general predictions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of two particle-encapsulating model systems: a two-dimensional self-avoiding ring and a three-dimensional self-avoiding fluid vesicle. In the former the particle-induced swelling is thermodynamically equivalent to the pressure-induced one, whereas in the latter it is not. PMID:18850811

  12. Kernel Methods on Riemannian Manifolds with Gaussian RBF Kernels.

    PubMed

    Jayasumana, Sadeep; Hartley, Richard; Salzmann, Mathieu; Li, Hongdong; Harandi, Mehrtash

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to exploiting kernel methods with manifold-valued data. In many computer vision problems, the data can be naturally represented as points on a Riemannian manifold. Due to the non-Euclidean geometry of Riemannian manifolds, usual Euclidean computer vision and machine learning algorithms yield inferior results on such data. In this paper, we define Gaussian radial basis function (RBF)-based positive definite kernels on manifolds that permit us to embed a given manifold with a corresponding metric in a high dimensional reproducing kernel Hilbert space. These kernels make it possible to utilize algorithms developed for linear spaces on nonlinear manifold-valued data. Since the Gaussian RBF defined with any given metric is not always positive definite, we present a unified framework for analyzing the positive definiteness of the Gaussian RBF on a generic metric space. We then use the proposed framework to identify positive definite kernels on two specific manifolds commonly encountered in computer vision: the Riemannian manifold of symmetric positive definite matrices and the Grassmann manifold, i.e., the Riemannian manifold of linear subspaces of a Euclidean space. We show that many popular algorithms designed for Euclidean spaces, such as support vector machines, discriminant analysis and principal component analysis can be generalized to Riemannian manifolds with the help of such positive definite Gaussian kernels. PMID:26539851

  13. Stress rupture and creep behavior of a low pressure plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The creep behavior of a NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum at 660 and 850 C is studied. The microstructure of the coating alloy is described. Analysis of the creep curves reveal that the secondary creep rates, the transition from secondary to tertiary creep, and the strain-to-failure are affected by the environment, preexposure, stress, and temperature. It is observed that the rupture lives of the NiCoCrAlY alloy at 660 and 850 C are greater in air than in vacuum. Several mechanisms that may explain the lack of crack growth from surface-connected pores during tests in air are proposed.

  14. Manifold learning-based subspace distance for machinery damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhousuo; He, Zhengjia; Shen, Zhongjie; Chen, Binqiang

    2016-03-01

    Damage assessment is very meaningful to keep safety and reliability of machinery components, and vibration analysis is an effective way to carry out the damage assessment. In this paper, a damage index is designed by performing manifold distance analysis on vibration signal. To calculate the index, vibration signal is collected firstly, and feature extraction is carried out to obtain statistical features that can capture signal characteristics comprehensively. Then, manifold learning algorithm is utilized to decompose feature matrix to be a subspace, that is, manifold subspace. The manifold learning algorithm seeks to keep local relationship of the feature matrix, which is more meaningful for damage assessment. Finally, Grassmann distance between manifold subspaces is defined as a damage index. The Grassmann distance reflecting manifold structure is a suitable metric to measure distance between subspaces in the manifold. The defined damage index is applied to damage assessment of a rotor and the bearing, and the result validates its effectiveness for damage assessment of machinery component.

  15. Fuel Manifold Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T.

    1986-01-01

    Completely-cast hydrogen-compatible alloy preferable to protective plating. Complexity of plating, welding, and brazing unnecessary if hydrogen-compatible alloy used for entire casting instead of protective overlay. Parts exposed to high-pressure hydrogen made immune to hydrogen embrittlement if fabricated from new alloy, Incoly 903 (or equivalent). Material strong and compatible with hydrogen at all temperatures and adapted for outlet manifold of Space Shuttle main combustion chamber.

  16. Excitable neurons, firing threshold manifolds and canards.

    PubMed

    Mitry, John; McCarthy, Michelle; Kopell, Nancy; Wechselberger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We investigate firing threshold manifolds in a mathematical model of an excitable neuron. The model analyzed investigates the phenomenon of post-inhibitory rebound spiking due to propofol anesthesia and is adapted from McCarthy et al. (SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 11(4):1674-1697, 2012). Propofol modulates the decay time-scale of an inhibitory GABAa synaptic current. Interestingly, this system gives rise to rebound spiking within a specific range of propofol doses. Using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory, we identify geometric structures, known as canards of folded saddle-type, which form the firing threshold manifolds. We find that the position and orientation of the canard separatrix is propofol dependent. Thus, the speeds of relevant slow synaptic processes are encoded within this geometric structure. We show that this behavior cannot be understood using a static, inhibitory current step protocol, which can provide a single threshold for rebound spiking but cannot explain the observed cessation of spiking for higher propofol doses. We then compare the analyses of dynamic and static synaptic inhibition, showing how the firing threshold manifolds of each relate, and why a current step approach is unable to fully capture the behavior of this model. PMID:23945278

  17. Practical experience applied to the design of injection and sample manifolds to perform in-place surveillance tests according to ANSI/ASME N-510

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.; Shaffer, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    At the current level of maturity and experience in the nuclear industry, regarding testing of air treatment systems, it is now possible to design and qualify injection and sample manifolds for most applications. While the qualification of sample manifolds is still in its infancy, injection manifolds have reached a mature stage that helps to eliminate the {open_quotes}hit or miss{close_quotes} type of design. During the design phase, manifolds can be adjusted to compensate for poor airflow distribution, laminar flow conditions, and to take advantage of any system attributes. Experience has shown that knowing the system attributes before the design phase begins is an essential element to a successful manifold design. The use of a spreadsheet type program commonly found on most personal computers can afford a greater flexibility and a reduction in time spent in the design phase. The experience gained from several generations of manifold design has culminated in a set of general design guidelines. Use of these guidelines, along with a good understanding of the type of testing (theoretical and practical), can result in a good manifold design requiring little or no field modification. The requirements for manifolds came about because of the use of multiple banks of components and unconventional housing inlet configurations. Multiple banks of adsorbers and pre and post HEPA`s required that each bank be tested to insure that each one does not exceed a specific allowable leakage criterion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Influence of handpiece maintenance sprays on resin bonding to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Toyotarou; Kameyama, Atsushi; Haruyama, Akiko; Oishi, Takumi; Kukidome, Nobuyuki; Takase, Yasuaki; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of maintenance spray on resin bonding to dentin. Materials and methods The crown of extracted, caries-free human molars was transversally sectioned with a model trimmer to prepare the dentin surfaces from mid-coronal sound dentin, and then uniformly abraded with #600 silicon carbide paper. The dentin surfaces were randomly divided into three groups: oil-free spray group where maintenance cleaner for air bearing handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; oil-containing spray group where maintenance cleaner for micro motor handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; and control group where the surface was rinsed with water spray for 30 s and then air-dried. These surfaces were then bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical), and resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray Medical) build-up crowns were incrementally constructed on the bonded surfaces. After storage for 24 h in 37°C water, the bonded teeth were sectioned into hour-glass shaped slices (0.7-mm thick) perpendicular to the bonded surfaces. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test. Results Maintenance spray-contaminated specimens (oil-free and oil-containing spray groups) showed significantly lower μTBS than control specimens (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the spray-contaminated groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion Maintenance spray significantly reduces the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to dentin. PMID:23662078

  19. Spray drift reduction test method correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ASTM Standard E609 Terminology Relating to Pesticides defines drift as “The physical movement of an agrochemical through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter to any non or off target site.” Since there are many commercial tank mix adjuvants designed to reduce spray drift, ASTM esta...

  20. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH MODIFICATIONS FOR RECIRCULATION VENTILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The control of emissions from spray painting operations has historically been cost prohibitive, due to the high exhaust flow rates coupled with low volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) Concentrations. Past studies, conducted by the U.S. EPA and U.S. ...

  1. Correlation of Mixture Temperature Data Obtained from Bare Intake-manifold Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, H. Jack; Gammon, Goldie L

    1946-01-01

    A relatively simple equation has been found to express with fair accuracy, variation in manifold-charge temperature with charge in engine operating conditions. This equation and associated curves have been checked by multi cylinder-engine data, both test stand and flight, over a wide range of operating conditions. Average mixture temperatures, predicted by the equations of this report, agree reasonably well with results within the same range of carburetor-air temperatures from laboratories and test stands other than the NACA.

  2. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  3. Comparative Performance of Engines Using a Carburetor, Manifold Injection, and Cylinder Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Clark, J Denny

    1939-01-01

    The comparative performance was determined of engines using three methods of mixing the fuel and the air: the use of a carburetor, manifold injection, and cylinder injection. The tests were made of a single-cylinder engine with a Wright 1820-G air-cooled cylinder. Each method of mixing the fuel and the air was investigated over a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.10 to the limit of stable operation and at engine speeds of 1,500 and 1,900 r.p.m. The comparative performance with a fuel-air ratio of 0.08 was investigated for speeds from 1,300 to 1,900 r.p.m. The results show that the power obtained with each method closely followed the volumetric efficiency; the power was therefore the highest with cylinder injection because this method had less manifold restriction. The values of minimum specific fuel consumption obtained with each method of mixing of fuel and air were the same. For the same engine and cooling conditions, the cylinder temperatures are the same regardless of the method used for mixing the fuel and the air.

  4. Hydroxide absorption heat pumps with spray absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Summerer, F.; Alefeld, G.; Zeigler, F.; Riesch, P.

    1996-11-01

    The absorber is one of the most expensive components of an absorption heat pump or chiller, respectively. In order to reduce the cost of a heat exchanger, much effort is invested into searching for additives for heat transfer enhancement. Another way to reduce heat exchanger cost, especially for machines with low capacities, is to use an adiabatic spray absorber. The basic principles of the spray absorber is to perform heat and mass transfer separated from each other in two different components. In this way the heat can be rejected effectively in a liquid-liquid heat exchanger, whereas the mass transfer occurs subsequently in a simple vessel. The spray technique can not only save heat exchanger cost in conventional absorption systems working with water and lithium bromide, it also allows the use of quite different working fluids such as hydroxides, which have lower heat transfer coefficients in falling films. Moreover, the separated heat transfer can easily be performed in a liquid-to-air heat exchanger. Hence it is obvious to use hydroxides that allow for a high temperature lift for building an air-cooled chiller with spray absorber. In this presentation theoretical and experimental investigations of the spray absorber as well as the setup will be described. Finally, possible applications will be outlined.

  5. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  6. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  7. Evaluation of effervescent atomizer internal design on the spray unsteadiness using a phase/Doppler particle analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Meng; Duan, YuFeng; Zhang, TieNan

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the dependence of effervescent spray unsteadiness on operational conditions and atomizer internal design by the ideal spray theory of Edwards and Marx. The convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer spraying water with air as atomizing medium in the ''outside-in'' gas injection was used in this study. Results demonstrated that droplet formation process at various air to liquid ratio (ALR) led to the spray unsteadiness and all droplet size classes exhibited unsteadiness behavior in spray. The spray unsteadiness reduced quickly at ALR of 3% and decreased moderately at ALR of other values as the axial distance increased. When the axial distance was 200 mm, the spray unsteadiness reduced dramatically with the increase in radial distance, but lower spray unsteadiness at the center of spray and higher spray unsteadiness at the edge of spray were shown as the axial distance increased. The spray unsteadiness at the center region of spray increased with the injection pressure. Low spray unsteadiness and good atomization performance can be obtained when the diameter of incline aeration holes increased at ALR of 10%. Although short mixing chamber with large discharge orifice diameter for convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer produced good atomization, the center region of spay showed high spray unsteadiness and maybe formed the droplet clustering. (author)

  8. Computer modelling of the meteorological and spraying parameters that influence the aerial dispersion of agrochemical sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokeba, M. L.; Salt, D. W.; Lee, B. E.; Ford, M. G.

    An insight into the nature of prevailing meteorological conditions and the manner in which they interact with spraying parameters is an important prerequisite in the analysis of the dynamics of agrochemical sprays. Usually, when these sprays are projected from hydraulic nozzles, their initial velocity is greater than that of the ambient wind speed. The flowfield therefore experiences changes in speed and direction which are felt upstream as well as downstream of the spray droplets. The pattern of the droplet flow, i.e. the shape of the streamlines marking typical trajectories, will be determined by a balance of viscous forces related to wind speed, inertial forces resulting from the acceleration of the airstream and pressure forces which can be viewed in terms of the drag forces exerted on the spray droplets themselves. At a certain distance in the ensuing motion, when the initial velocity of the spray droplets has decreased sufficiently for there to be no acceleration, their trajectories will be controlled entirely by the random effects of turbulence. These two transport processes in the atmosphere can be modelled mathematically using computers. This paper presents a model that considers the velocity of spray droplets to consist of a ballistic velocity component superimposed by a random-walk velocity component. The model is used to study the influence of meteorological and spraying parameters on the three-dimensional dynamics of spray droplets projected in specified directions in neutral and unstable weather conditions. The ballistic and random-walk velocity components are scaled by factors of (1-ξ) and ξ respectively, where ξ is the ratio of the sedimentation velocity and the relative velocity between the spray droplets and the surrounding airstream. This ratio increases progressively as the initial velocity of the spray droplet decreases with air resistance and attains a maximum when the sedimentation velocity has been reached. As soon as this occurs, the

  9. SSME hot gas manifold flow comparison test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Dill, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFT) component of NASA's Alternate Turbopump Development effort, which is aimed at the proper aerodynamic integration of the current Phase II three-duct SSME Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) and the future 'Phase II-plus' two-duct HGM. Half-scale water flow tests of both HGM geometries were conducted to provide initial design data for the HPFT. The results reveal flowfield results and furnish insight into the performance differences between the two HGM flowpaths. Proper design of the HPFT can potentially secure significant flow improvements in either HGM configuration.

  10. The Design-To-Cost Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1990-01-01

    Design-to-cost is a popular technique for controlling costs. Although qualitative techniques exist for implementing design to cost, quantitative methods are sparse. In the launch vehicle and spacecraft engineering process, the question whether to minimize mass is usually an issue. The lack of quantification in this issue leads to arguments on both sides. This paper presents a mathematical technique which both quantifies the design-to-cost process and the mass/complexity issue. Parametric cost analysis generates and applies mathematical formulas called cost estimating relationships. In their most common forms, they are continuous and differentiable. This property permits the application of the mathematics of differentiable manifolds. Although the terminology sounds formidable, the application of the techniques requires only a knowledge of linear algebra and ordinary differential equations, common subjects in undergraduate scientific and engineering curricula. When the cost c is expressed as a differentiable function of n system metrics, setting the cost c to be a constant generates an n-1 dimensional subspace of the space of system metrics such that any set of metric values in that space satisfies the constant design-to-cost criterion. This space is a differentiable manifold upon which all mathematical properties of a differentiable manifold may be applied. One important property is that an easily implemented system of ordinary differential equations exists which permits optimization of any function of the system metrics, mass for example, over the design-to-cost manifold. A dual set of equations defines the directions of maximum and minimum cost change. A simplified approximation of the PRICE H(TM) production-production cost is used to generate this set of differential equations over [mass, complexity] space. The equations are solved in closed form to obtain the one dimensional design-to-cost trade and design-for-cost spaces. Preliminary results indicate that cost

  11. M-theory and G2 manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Robbins, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we report on recent progress in describing compactifications of string theory and M-theory on G2 and Spin(7) manifolds. We include the infinite set of α’-corrections and describe the entire tower of massless and massive Kaluza-Klein modes resulting from such compactifications. Contribution to the ‘Focus Issue on Gravity, Supergravity and Fundamental Physics: the Richard Arnowitt Symposium’, to be published in Physica Scripta. Based on a talk delivered by Becker at the workshop ‘Superstring Perturbation Theory’ at the Perimeter Institute, 22-24 April 2015.

  12. Optical manifold for light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Parkyn, Jr., William A.; Alvarez, Roberto; Dross, Oliver

    2008-06-03

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  13. Singular parabolic equations of second order on manifolds with singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yuanzhen

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to establish an Lp-theory for elliptic operators on manifolds with singularities. The particular class of differential operators discussed herein may exhibit degenerate or singular behavior near the singular ends of the manifolds. Such a theory is of importance for the study of elliptic and parabolic equations on non-compact, or even incomplete manifolds, with or without boundary.

  14. Fungicide spray coverage from ground-based sprayers in mature pecan trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air-blast sprayers are widely used to control pecan scab (Fusicladium effusum) on pecan trees. Good spray coverage is critical to ensure disease control and to minimize risk of fungicide resistance. Spray coverage from an air-blast sprayer, typical of the sprayer used by commercial producers, was me...

  15. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  16. SPRAY ATOMIZATION MODELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop protection product labels are now being written with spray droplet spectra classification terms that have specific definitions. Some of these terms are the same as previously used for generic descriptions such as fine or coarse sprays, but these terms used on new product labels have very speci...

  17. Spray momentum measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Technique enables accurate prediction of erosion and cavitation produced by fluid spray. Method measures high velocity sprays produced by small orifices. Originally designed to determine oxidizer-injection patterns of liquid fueled rocket engines, technique is used with other liquids, or, with appropriate modification, with gases.

  18. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  19. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  20. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path

    PubMed Central

    Babaeian, Amir; Bayestehtashk, Alireza; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering. PMID:26375819

  1. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  2. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  3. Potential hazard of volatile organic compounds contained in household spray products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    To assess the exposure levels of hazardous volatile pollutants released from common household spray products, a total of 10 spray products consisting of six body spray and four air spray products have been investigated. The body spray products included insect repellents (two different products), medicated patch, deodorant, hair spray, and humectant, whereas the air spray products included two different insecticides (mosquito and/or cockroach), antibacterial spray, and air freshener. The main objective of this study was to measure concentrations of 15 model volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using GC/MS coupled with a thermal desorber. In addition, up to 34 ‘compounds lacking authentic standards or surrogates (CLASS)' were also quantified based on the effective carbon number (ECN) theory. According to our analysis, the most common indoor pollutants like benzene, toluene, styrene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl acetate have been detected frequently in the majority of spray products with the concentration range of 5.3-125 mg L-1. If one assumes that the amount of spray products released into air reaches the 0.3 mL level for a given space size of 5 m3, the risk factor is expected to exceed the carcinogenic risk level set for benzene (10-5) by the U.S. EPA.

  4. Some Characteristics of Sprays Obtained from Pintle-type Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, E. T.; Waldron, C. D.

    1933-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made with the pintle-type injection nozzles, one having a pintle angle of 8 degrees, the other a pintle angle of 30 degrees. The fuel was injected into a glass-windowed pressure chamber and the spray photographed by means of the N.A.C.A. spray photography apparatus. Curves are presented that give the penetration of the spray tips when fuel oil is injected by pressures of 1,500 to 4,000 pounds per square inch into air at room temperature and densities of 11 to 18 atmospheres. High-speed spark photographs show the appearance of the sprays in air at a density of 18 atmospheres. The results indicate that the pintle angles have little effect on the size of the spray cone angle, which is about the same as that of sprays from plain round hole orifices. The penetration of the spray from the nozzle with an 8 degree pintle is slightly higher than that of the spray from the nozzle with a 30 degree pintle. The penetration of the sprays from the pintle nozzles, for comparable conditions of injection pressure and air density, is about the same as that of sprays from round-hole orifices. Increase in air density decreases the penetration in about the same ratio with all the injection pressures.

  5. Quality and bacteriological consequences of beef carcass spray-chilling: Effects of spray duration and boxed beef storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Greer, G G; Jones, S D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of water spray-chilling on beef carcass traits and muscle quality, bacteriology and retail case life were determined in a research abattoir. Chilling treatments were compared using 10 crossbred steer carcasses (280 ± 4 kg) at each spray duration (4, 8, 12 and 16 h) and each vacuum storage temperature (1, 4, 8 and 12 °C). Control sides were air-chilled (1 °C, 24 h) while spray-chilled sides were sprayed with an intermittent water mist at 1 °C in four, 60 s cycles/h for the initial 4-16 h of chilling. The effects of storage temperature were evaluated using vacuum packaged longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle at post-chill intervals of 2, 16, 30 and 44 days. Chilling treatment effects were similar at all spray-chill durations and LT vacuum storage times and temperatures. Carcass spray-chilling did not effect pH, lean colour, % moisture, sarcomere length, shear value or weight loss during the vacuum storage of LT muscle. Carcass fat colour tended to brighten as spray duration was extended up to 12 h, but there was a grey discoloration of fat at spray durations beyond 12 h. Chilling treatment had only marginal effects on anaerobic bacteria during the vacuum storage of LT muscles, or aerobic bacteria during the retail display of rib-eye steaks, and the retail case life of steaks was largely unaffected by spray-chilling. A linear relationship between spray-chill duration and carcass weight loss was determined and carcass shrinkage was reduced by 0.08 g/100 g for every hour of spray-chilling. It was estimated that a major beef processing abattoir could utilize spray-chilling to save more than 2000 kg daily in carcass shrinkage, without compromising quality or increasing spoilage losses. PMID:22061138

  6. Influence of drop size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiroutu, Sridhar Venkatabojji

    Premixed spray combustion is affected by fuel and oxidizer properties, mixture equivalence ratio and spray quality. The spray quality is characterized by a mean droplet diameter (SMD) and a droplet size distribution (DSD). Prior experimental studies have considered only the influence of SMD, in part due to the difficulty in controlling the DSD independently. The present work provides experimental evidence demonstrating the effect of the fuel droplet size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion. Combustion experiments were performed in a pilot-ignited, continuous flow, tubular, vertical test rig wherein fuel sprays were injected into an air stream. A novel twin-atomizer technique that allowed control over overall equivalence ratio, SMD, DSD, and fuel vapor fraction of the premixed spray was used to generate test sprays. A line-of-sight, infrared (IR) extinction technique was developed to quantify the fuel vapor fraction in premixed sprays. Radial distributions of fuel vapor were evaluated using an 'onion peeling' deconvolution technique. Combustion of test sprays indicated flame propagation among regions of high fuel vapor fraction to generate a high rate of combustion. In lean premixed sprays, the presence of a low fuel vapor concentration does not impact the combustion process. Experimental evidence demonstrating the enhancement of flame propagation velocity for optimal SMDs of ethanol sprays has been found. It was observed that test sprays with narrower DSDs have faster burning rates and more complete combustion. The DSD of the sprays were characterized with a droplet surface-area-based standard deviation of the DSD.

  7. Containment atmosphere response to external sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.; Almenas, K.

    1995-09-01

    The application of external sprays to a containment steel shell can be an effective energy removal method and has been proposed in the passive AP-600 design. Reduction of the steel shell temperature in contact with the containment atmosphere enhances both heat and mass transfer driving forces. Large scale experimental data in this area is scarce, therefore the measurements obtained from the E series tests conducted at the German HDR facility deserve special attention. These long term tests simulated various severe accident conditions, including external spraying of the hemispherical steel shell. This investigation focuses upon the integral response of the HDR containment atmosphere during spray periods and upon methods by which lumped parameter system codes, like CONTAIN, model the underlying condensation phenomena. Increases in spray water flowrates above a minimum value were ineffective at improving containment pressure reduction since the limiting resistance for energy transfer lies in the noncondensable-vapor boundary layer at the inner condensing surface. The spray created an unstable condition by cooling the upper layers of a heated atmosphere and thus inducing global natural circulation flows in the facility and subsequently, abrupt changes in lighter-than-air noncondensable (J{sub 2}/He) concentrations. Modeling results using the CONTAIN code are outlined and code limitations are delineated.

  8. Investigation on the suitability of plasma sprayed Fe Cr Al coatings as tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Stein-Fechner, K.; Serra, E.; Glasbrenner, H.; Benamati, G.

    1999-08-01

    Results on the fabrication of a tritium permeation barrier by spraying Fe-Cr-Al powders are described. The sprayed coatings were deposited at temperatures below the Ac1 temperature of the ferritic-martensitic steel substrate and no post-deposition heat treatment was applied. The aim of the investigation was the determination of the efficiency of the coatings to act as tritium permeation barrier. Metallurgical investigations as well as hydrogen isotope permeation measurements were carried out onto the produced coatings. The depositions were performed on ferritic-martensitic steels by means of three types of spray techniques: high velocity oxy fuel, air plasma spray and vacuum plasma spray.

  9. Spray drift mitigation with spray mix adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  10. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  11. Current implications of past DDT indoor spraying in Oman.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan; Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jiří; Dvorská, Alice; Magulová, Katarína; Al-Zadjali, Said; Čupr, Pavel

    2016-04-15

    In Oman, DDT was sprayed indoors during an intensive malaria eradication program between 1976 and 1992. DDT can remain for years after spraying and is associated with potential health risk. This raises the concern for human exposure in areas where DDT was used for indoor spraying. Twelve houses in three regions with a different history of DDT indoor spraying were chosen for a sampling campaign in 2005 to determine p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD) levels in indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil. Although DDT was only sprayed indoor, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were also found in outdoor soil. The results indicate that release and exposure continue for years after cessation of spraying. The predicted cancer risk based on concentrations determined in 2005, indicate that there was still a significant cancer risk up to 13 to 16years after indoor DDT spraying. A novel approach, based on region-specific half-lives, was used to predict concentrations in 2015 and showed that more than 21years after spraying, cancer risk for exposure to indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil are acceptable in Oman for adults and young children. The model can be used for other locations and countries to predict prospective exposure of contaminants based on indoor experimental measurements and knowledge about the spraying time-schedule to extrapolate region-specific half-lives and predict effects on the human population years after spraying. PMID:26820926

  12. 46 CFR 95.16-25 - Manifold and cylinder arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Clean Agent Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-25 Manifold... accordance with 46 CFR 147.60(b) and 49 CFR part 180. (d) The cylinders in a common manifold must be: (1) Of... pressure....

  13. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  14. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  15. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  16. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  17. 46 CFR 153.285 - Valving for cargo pump manifolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valving for cargo pump manifolds. 153.285 Section 153... Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.285 Valving for cargo pump manifolds. (a) When cargo lines serving different tanks enter a pumproom and connect to the same pump: (1) Each cargo line...

  18. Interference evaluation between manifold and wet Christmas tree CP systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brasil, S.L.D.C.; Baptista, W.

    2000-05-01

    Offshore production wells are controlled by valves installed in the marine soil, called wet Christmas trees (WCTs). A manifold receives the production of several wells and transports it to the platform. The manifold is cathodically protected by Al anodes and the WCT by Zn anodes. A computer simulation was carried out to evaluate the interference between the equipment cathodic protection systems.

  19. Manifold to uniformly distribute a solid-liquid slurry

    DOEpatents

    Kern, Kenneth C.

    1983-01-01

    This invention features a manifold that divides a stream of coal particles and liquid into several smaller streams maintaining equal or nearly equal mass compositions. The manifold consists of a horizontal, variable area header having sharp-edged, right-angled take-offs which are oriented on the bottom of the header.

  20. Simulation of a turbulent spray flame using coupled PDF gas phase and spray flamelet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Gutheil, Eva

    2008-04-15

    A joint mixture fraction-enthalpy probability density function (PDF) is proposed for the simulation of turbulent spray flames. The PDF transport equation is deduced and modeled. The interaction-by-exchange-with-the-mean (IEM) model that has been developed for gas-phase flows is extended to describe molecular mixing in nonreactive and reactive spray flows. The joint PDF transport equation is solved by a hybrid finite-volume and Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. Standard spray and turbulence models are used to describe the gas phase and the liquid phase. A turbulent methanol/air spray flame is simulated using the present method. Detailed chemistry is implemented through the spray flamelet model. The precalculated spray flamelet library for methanol/air combustion comprises 23 species and 168 elementary reactions. Thus, the model is capable of predicting the formation of radicals and of pollutants. Different values for the model constant C{sub {phi}} in the IEM model are tested. The numerical results for the gas velocity, the gas temperature, and the mass fraction of methanol vapor are compared with experimental data in the literature. Good agreement with experiment is obtained when C{sub {phi}}=2.0. Marginal PDFs of mixture fraction, enthalpy, and gas temperature are presented. The computed PDFs of mixture fraction are compared with the presumed standard {beta} function and modified {beta} function. The results show that the standard {beta} function fails to reproduce bimodal shapes observed in transported PDF computation, while the modified {beta} function, fits the computed PDFs very well. Moreover, joint PDFs of mixture fraction and enthalpy are presented and analyzed. The enthalpy and mixture fraction are strongly correlated. The samples that deviate from the linear correlation are due to the energy consumption of local spray evaporation. (author)

  1. Plasma Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Computer aided, fully-automatic TRW system sprays very hot plasma onto a turbine blade. Composed of gas into which metallic and ceramic powders have been injected, the plasma forms a two-layer coating which insulates the blade. Critical part of operation is controlling the thickness of the deposit which is measured in thousandths of an inch. This is accomplished by an optical detector which illuminates spots at various locations on the blade and determines thickness by measuring the light reflections. Optical sensor monitors spraying process until precise thickness is attained, then computer halts the spraying.

  2. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  3. Pizzetti Formulae for Stiefel Manifolds and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulembier, Kevin; Kieburg, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Pizzetti's formula explicitly shows the equivalence of the rotation invariant integration over a sphere and the action of rotation invariant differential operators. We generalize this idea to the integrals over real, complex, and quaternion Stiefel manifolds in a unifying way. In particular, we propose a new way to calculate group integrals and try to uncover some algebraic structures which manifest themselves for some well-known cases like the Harish-Chandra integral. We apply a particular case of our formula to an Itzykson-Zuber integral for the coset . This integral naturally appears in the calculation of the two-point correlation function in the transition of the statistics of the Poisson ensemble and the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble in random matrix theory.

  4. Consistent Pauli reduction on group manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguet, A.; Pope, C. N.; Samtleben, H.

    2016-01-01

    We prove an old conjecture by Duff, Nilsson, Pope and Warner asserting that the NSsbnd NS sector of supergravity (and more general the bosonic string) allows for a consistent Pauli reduction on any d-dimensional group manifold G, keeping the full set of gauge bosons of the G × G isometry group of the bi-invariant metric on G. The main tool of the construction is a particular generalised Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz in double field theory which we explicitly construct in terms of the group's Killing vectors. Examples include the consistent reduction from ten dimensions on S3 ×S3 and on similar product spaces. The construction is another example of globally geometric non-toroidal compactifications inducing non-geometric fluxes.

  5. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-01

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  6. Moduli of Vortices and Grassmann Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indranil; Romão, Nuno M.

    2013-05-01

    We use the framework of Quot schemes to give a novel description of the moduli spaces of stable n-pairs, also interpreted as gauged vortices on a closed Riemann surface Σ with target {Mat_{r × n}({C})}, where n ≥ r. We then show that these moduli spaces embed canonically into certain Grassmann manifolds, and thus obtain natural Kähler metrics of Fubini-Study type. These spaces are smooth at least in the local case r = n. For abelian local vortices we prove that, if a certain "quantization" condition is satisfied, the embedding can be chosen in such a way that the induced Fubini-Study structure realizes the Kähler class of the usual L 2 metric of gauged vortices.

  7. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Bryan, William Louis; Kress, Reid

    2003-05-27

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  8. MOCVD manifold switching effects on growth and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ivan O.; Fripp, Archibald L.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-02-01

    A combined modeling and experimental approach is used to quantify the effects of various manifold components on the switching speed in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In particular, two alternative vent-run high-speed switching manifold designs suitable for either continuous or interrupted growth have been investigated. Both designs are incorporated in a common manifold, instrumented with a mass spectrometer. The experiments have been performed using nitrogen as the transport gas and argon as the simulated source gas. The advantages and limitations of two designs are discussed. It is found that while constant flow manifold switching systems may have fluid dynamic advantages, care must be taken to minimize sections of the supply manifold with low flow rates if rapid changes in alloy composition are required.

  9. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Bryan, William Louis; Kress, Reid

    2003-09-30

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  10. Method for producing a fuel cell manifold seal

    DOEpatents

    Grevstad, Paul E.; Johnson, Carl K.; Mientek, Anthony P.

    1982-01-01

    A manifold-to-stack seal and sealing method for fuel cell stacks. This seal system solves the problem of maintaining a low leak rate manifold seal as the fuel cell stack undergoes compressive creep. The seal system eliminates the problem of the manifold-to-stack seal sliding against the rough stack surface as the stack becomes shorter because of cell creep, which relative motion destroys the seal. The seal system described herein utilizes a polymer seal frame firmly clamped between the manifold and the stack such that the seal frame moves with the stack. Thus, as the stack creeps, the seal frame creeps with it, and there is no sliding at the rough, tough to seal, stack-to-seal frame interface. Here the sliding is on a smooth easy to seal location between the seal frame and the manifold.

  11. Endoscopic video manifolds for targeted optical biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2012-03-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy is a widely used clinical procedure for screening and surveillance of digestive tract diseases ranging from Barrett's Oesophagus to oesophageal cancer. Current surveillance protocol consists of periodic endoscopic examinations performed in 3-4 month intervals including expert's visual assessment and biopsies taken from suspicious tissue regions. Recent development of a new imaging technology, called probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), enabled the acquisition of in vivo optical biopsies without removing any tissue sample. Besides its several advantages, i.e., noninvasiveness, real-time and in vivo feedback, optical biopsies involve a new challenge for the endoscopic expert. Due to their noninvasive nature, optical biopsies do not leave any scar on the tissue and therefore recognition of the previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance endoscopy becomes very challenging. In this work, we introduce a clustering and classification framework to facilitate retargeting previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance upper GI-endoscopies. A new representation of endoscopic videos based on manifold learning, "endoscopic video manifolds" (EVMs), is proposed. The low dimensional EVM representation is adapted to facilitate two different clustering tasks; i.e., clustering of informative frames and patient specific endoscopic segments, only by changing the similarity measure. Each step of the proposed framework is validated on three in vivo patient datasets containing 1834, 3445, and 1546 frames, corresponding to endoscopic videos of 73.36, 137.80, and 61.84 s, respectively. Improvements achieved by the introduced EVM representation are demonstrated by quantitative analysis in comparison to the original image representation and principal component analysis. Final experiments evaluating the complete framework demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method as a promising step for assisting the endoscopic expert in retargeting the

  12. Supersonic-Spray Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Lin, Feng-Nan; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    Spraying system for cleaning mechanical components uses less liquid and operates at pressures significantly lower. Liquid currently used is water. Designed to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent-based cleaning and cleanliness verification methods. Consists of spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, source of gas at regulated pressure, pressurized liquid tank, and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. Parameters of nozzles set so any of large variety of liquids and gases combined in desired ratio and rate of flow. Size and number of nozzles varied so system built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. Also used to verify part adequately cleaned. Runoff liquid from spray directed at part collected. Liquid analyzed for presence of contaminants, and part recleaned if necessary.

  13. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... death. References Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ...

  14. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Mometasone nasal spray is in a class of ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  15. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray ...

  16. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to relieve sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused ... treat symptoms (e.g., sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Budesonide nasal spray ...

  17. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone nasal spray should not be used to ...

  18. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon ... of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  19. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is in a class of ... Olopatadine nasal spray controls the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, but does not cure these condition. Continue to ...

  20. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  1. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bottle in front of a tissue or paper towel. Pump the spray bottle six to eight times ... up the spill immediately with a cloth or paper towel. Avoid touching the liquid. Throw away the used ...

  2. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  3. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... prescribed by your doctor.Ciclesonide nasal spray is only for use in the nose. Do not swallow ...

  4. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl sublingual spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  5. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  6. Spray applicator for spraying coatings and other fluids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuminecz, J. F.; Lausten, M. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A self contained spray application is developed for one handed operation in a zero gravity vacuum environment by a free flying astronaut not attached to any spacecraft. This spray applicator eliminates contamination of the operator by back spray. This applicator includes a rigid accumulator containment of a fluid within a flexible bladder the fluid being urged out of the accumulator under pressure through a spray gun. The spray gun includes a spring loaded lockable trigger which controls a valve. When in an open position, the fluid passes through the valve into the ambient environment in the form of a spray. A spray shield is provided which directs the flow of the spray from the applicator by trapping errant particles of spray yet allowing the passage of escaping gases through its material.

  7. Diffusion Harmonics and Dual Geometry on Carnot Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Sarah

    The "curse of dimensionality" motivates the importance of techniques for computing low-dimensional approximations of high-dimensional data. It is often necessary to use nonlinear techniques to recover a low-dimensional manifold embedded via a nonlinear map in a high-dimensional space; this family of techniques is referred to as "manifold learning." The accuracy of manifold-learning-based approximations is founded on asymptotic results that assume the data is drawn from a low-dimensional Riemannian manifold. However, in natural datasets, this assumption is often overly restrictive. In the first part of this thesis we examine a more general class of manifolds known as Carnot manifolds, a type of sub-Riemannian manifold that governs natural phenomena such as chemical kinetics and configuration spaces of jointed objects. We find that diffusion maps can be generalized to Carnot manifolds and that the projection onto diffusion harmonics gives an almost isometric embedding; as a side effect, the diffusion distance is a computationally fast estimate for the shortest distance between two points on a Carnot manifold. We apply this theory to biochemical network data and observe that the chemical kinetics of the EGFR network are governed by a Carnot, but not Riemannian, manifold. In the second part of this thesis we examine the Heisenberg group, a classical example of a Carnot manifold. We obtain a representation-theoretic proof that the eigenfunctions of the sub-Laplacian on SU(2) approach the eigenfunctions of the sub-Laplacian on the Heisenberg group, in the limit as the radius of the sphere becomes large, in analogy with the limiting relationship between the Fourier series on the circle and the Fourier transform on the line. This result also illustrates how projecting onto the sub-Laplacian eigenfunctions of a non-compact Carnot manifold can be locally approximated by projecting onto the sub-Laplacian eigenfunctions of a tangent compact Carnot manifold. In the third part

  8. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  9. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  10. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  11. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  12. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  13. Spray nozzle designs for agricultural aviation applications. [relation of drop size to spray characteristics and nozzle efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. W.; Putnam, A. A.; Gieseke, J. A.; Golovin, M. N.; Hale, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques of generating monodisperse sprays and information concerning chemical liquids used in agricultural aviation are surveyed. The periodic dispersion of liquid jet, the spinning disk method, and ultrasonic atomization are the techniques discussed. Conceptually designed spray nozzles for generating monodisperse sprays are assessed. These are based on the classification of the drops using centrifugal force, on using two opposing liquid laden air jets, and on operating a spinning disk at an overloaded flow. Performance requirements for the designs are described and estimates of the operational characteristics are presented.

  14. Spray-drying performance of a bench-top spray dryer for protein aerosol powder preparation.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Nguyen, P A; Sit, K; Hsu, C C

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this work was to improve a bench-top spray dryer's efficiency in both production recovery and throughput for preparing protein aerosol powders. A Büchi mini-spray dryer was used to prepare the powders of recombinant humanized anti-IgE antibody. The resulting powder's physical properties such as particle size, residual moisture, and morphology, along with its recovery and production rate was the basis of this development work. Mass balance suggests that approximately 10-20% of powder was lost in the exhaust air, consisting primarily of particles less than 2 micrometer. Also, significant loss (20-30%) occurred in the cyclone. Attempts were made to improve product recovery in the receiving vessel using dual-cyclone configurations, different cyclone designs, cyclones with anti-static treatment, and different receiver designs. System modifications such as replacing the original bag-filter unit with a vacuum system effectively reduced drying air flow resistance, allowing the protein to be dried at a lower inlet air temperature and the production scale to be increased. We concluded that the modified spray-drying system is advantageous over the original bench-top spray dryer. This improvement will be beneficial to early-stage research and development involving high-valued protein powders. PMID:10099432

  15. Modeling of gas turbine fuel nozzle spray

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, N.K.; Chin, J.S.; Razdan, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Satisfactory performance of the gas turbine combustor relies on the careful design of various components, particularly the fuel injector. It is, therefore, essential to establish a fundamental basis for fuel injection modeling that involves various atomization processes. A two-dimensional fuel injection model has been formulated to simulate the airflow within and downstream of the atomizer and address the formation and breakup of the liquid sheet formed at the atomizer exit. The sheet breakup under the effects of airblast, fuel pressure, or the combined atomization mode of the air-assist type is considered in the calculation. The model accounts for secondary breakup of drops and the stochastic Lagrangian treatment of spray. The calculation of spray evaporation addresses both droplet heat-up and steady-state mechanisms, and fuel vapor concentration is based on the partial pressure concept. An enhanced evaporation model has been developed that accounts for multicomponent, finite mass diffusivity and conductivity effects, and addresses near-critical evaporation. The present investigation involved predictions of flow and spray characteristics of two distinctively different fuel atomizers under both nonreacting and reacting conditions. The predictions of the continuous phase velocity components and the spray mean drop sizes agree well with the detailed measurements obtained for the two atomizers, which indicates the model accounts for key aspects of atomization. The model also provides insight into ligament formation and breakup at the atomizer exit and the initial drop sizes formed in the atomizer near field region where measurements are difficult to obtain. The calculations of the reacting spray show the fuel-rich region occupied most of the spray volume with two-peak radial gas temperature profiles. The results also provided local concentrations of unburned hydrocarbon and CO in atomizer flowfield.

  16. Complete manifolds with bounded curvature and spectral gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, Richard; Tran, Hung

    2016-08-01

    We study the spectrum of complete noncompact manifolds with bounded curvature and positive injectivity radius. We give general conditions which imply that their essential spectrum has an arbitrarily large finite number of gaps. In particular, for any noncompact covering of a compact manifold, there is a metric on the base so that the lifted metric has an arbitrarily large finite number of gaps in its essential spectrum. Also, for any complete noncompact manifold with bounded curvature and positive injectivity radius we construct a metric uniformly equivalent to the given one (also of bounded curvature and positive injectivity radius) with an arbitrarily large finite number of gaps in its essential spectrum.

  17. Infinity Manifold in Popovici's Photogravitational Two-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile

    The two-body problem associated to the modified photogravitational law proposed by the Romanian astronomer Constantin Popovici is being resumed. After studying the equilibria and the collision manifold (Mioc and Blaga 2001) via the powerful tools of the qualitative analysis, here we tackle the escape/capture orbits. We start from the equations of motion established in the quoted paper, then we apply a mixed sequence of McGehee-type transformations of the first and second kind, obtaining new regular motion equations. In this way the infinity singularity is replaced by the infinity manifold, pasted on the phase space. The flow on this manifold is entirely described, pointing out special features.

  18. An analytical solution for flow in a manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, A. W.; Yitayew, M.

    An analytical solution is developed for flow in a manifold. The interest is primarily for trickle irrigation laterals, but the solution has broader applications including those for which pressure increases in the direction of flow and for intake manifolds. Both velocity head losses and variable discharge along the manifold are considered in the fundamental analysis. The appropriate second order, nonlinear equation is solved for two flow regimes, laminar and fully turbulent. Results indicate that for most trickle irrigation laterals the velocity head loss is negligible, but for an example from a chemical processing system the effect is important.

  19. Collision and Infinity Manifolds for the Schwarzschild Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Stoica, Cristina

    The Schwarzschild problem (i.e. the two-body problem associated to a potential of the form A/r + B/rl, where r = distance between particles, and A, B = real constants) is qualitatively tackled. The equations of motion are written in Hamiltonian formalism, and the first integrals of energy and angular momentum are pointed out. Using McGehee's transformations, the motion equations are regularized, and the collision singularity is replaced by the collision manifold. The flow on this manifold is described. Analogously, one introduces the infinity manifold (corresponding to r tending to infinity), and one characterizes the respective flow.

  20. Detailed investigation of a vaporising fuel spray. Part 1: Experimental investigation of time averaged spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Boulderstone, R.; Ungut, A.; Felton, P. G.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser tomographic light scattering technique provides rapid and accurate high resolution measurements of droplet sizes, concentrations, and vaporization. Measurements using a computer interfaced thermocouple are presented and it is found that the potential exists for separating gas and liquid temperature measurements and diagnosing local spray density by in situ analysis of the response characteristics of the thermocouple. The thermocouple technique provides a convenient means for measuring mean gas velocity in both hot and cold two phase flows. The experimental spray is axisymmetric and has carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. The flow is designed to give relatively insignificant transfer of momentum and mass from spray to air flow. The effects of (1) size-dependent droplet dispersion by the turbulence, (2) the initial spatial segregation of droplet sizes during atomization, and (3) the interaction between droplets and coherent large eddies are diagnosed.

  1. Denoising-enhancing images on elastic manifolds.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Zeevi, Yehoshua Y

    2011-08-01

    The conflicting demands for simultaneous low-pass and high-pass processing, required in image denoising and enhancement, still present an outstanding challenge, although a great deal of progress has been made by means of adaptive diffusion-type algorithms. To further advance such processing methods and algorithms, we introduce a family of second-order (in time) partial differential equations. These equations describe the motion of a thin elastic sheet in a damping environment. They are also derived by a variational approach in the context of image processing. The new operator enables better edge preservation in denoising applications by offering an adaptive lowpass filter, which preserves high-frequency components in the pass-band better than the adaptive diffusion filter, while offering slower error propagation across edges. We explore the action of this powerful operator in the context of image processing and exploit for this purpose the wealth of knowledge accumulated in physics and mathematics about the action and behavior of this operator. The resulting methods are further generalized for color and/or texture image processing, by embedding images in multidimensional manifolds. A specific application of the proposed new approach to superresolution is outlined. PMID:21342847

  2. TESTING DISTANCE ESTIMATORS WITH THE FUNDAMENTAL MANIFOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2012-03-20

    We demonstrate how the Fundamental Manifold (FM) can be used to cross-calibrate distance estimators even when those 'standard candles' are not found in the same galaxy. Such an approach greatly increases the number of distance measurements that can be utilized to check for systematic distance errors and the types of estimators that can be compared. Here we compare distances obtained using Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), Cepheids, surface brightness fluctuations, the luminosity of the tip of the red giant branch, circumnuclear masers, eclipsing binaries, RR Lyrae stars, and the planetary nebulae luminosity functions. We find no significant discrepancies (differences are <2{sigma}) between distance methods, although differences at the {approx}10% level cannot yet be ruled out. The potential exists for significant refinement because the data used here are heterogeneous B-band magnitudes that will soon be supplanted by homogeneous, near-infrared magnitudes. We illustrate the use of FM distances to (1) revisit the question of the metallicity sensitivity of various estimators, confirming the dependence of SN Ia distances on host galaxy metallicity, and (2) provide an alternative calibration of H{sub 0} that replaces the classical ladder approach in the use of extragalactic distance estimators with one that utilizes data over a wide range of distances simultaneously.

  3. Crowd Event Detection on Optical Flow Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aravinda S; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Marusic, Slaven; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2016-07-01

    Analyzing crowd events in a video is key to understanding the behavioral characteristics of people (humans). Detecting crowd events in videos is challenging because of articulated human movements and occlusions. The aim of this paper is to detect the events in a probabilistic framework for automatically interpreting the visual crowd behavior. In this paper, crowd event detection and classification in optical flow manifolds (OFMs) are addressed. A new algorithm to detect walking and running events has been proposed, which uses optical flow vector lengths in OFMs. Furthermore, a new algorithm to detect merging and splitting events has been proposed, which uses Riemannian connections in the optical flow bundle (OFB). The longest vector from the OFB provides a key feature for distinguishing walking and running events. Using a Riemannian connection, the optical flow vectors are parallel transported to localize the crowd groups. The geodesic lengths among the groups provide a criterion for merging and splitting events. Dispersion and evacuation events are jointly modeled from the walking/running and merging/splitting events. Our results show that the proposed approach delivers a comparable model to detect crowd events. Using the performance evaluation of tracking and surveillance 2009 dataset, the proposed method is shown to produce the best results in merging, splitting, and dispersion events, and comparable results in walking, running, and evacuation events when compared with other methods. PMID:26219100

  4. Killing superalgebras for Lorentzian four-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Paul; Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Santi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We determine the Killing superalgebras underpinning field theories with rigid unextended supersymmetry on Lorentzian four-manifolds by re-interpreting them as filtered deformations of mathbb{Z} -graded subalgebras with maximum odd dimension of the N = 1 Poincaré superalgebra in four dimensions. Part of this calculation involves computing a Spencer cohomology group which, by analogy with a similar result in eleven dimensions, prescribes a notion of Killing spinor, which we identify with the defining condition for bosonic supersymmetric backgrounds of minimal off-shell supergravity in four dimensions. We prove that such Killing spinors always generate a Lie superalgebra, and that this Lie superalgebra is a filtered deformation of a subalgebra of the N = 1 Poincaré superalgebra in four dimensions. Demanding the flatness of the connection defining the Killing spinors, we obtain equations satisfied by the maximally supersymmetric backgrounds. We solve these equations, arriving at the classification of maximally supersymmetric backgrounds whose associated Killing superalgebras are precisely the filtered deformations we classify in this paper.

  5. Testing Distance Estimators with the Fundamental Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate how the Fundamental Manifold (FM) can be used to cross-calibrate distance estimators even when those "standard candles" are not found in the same galaxy. Such an approach greatly increases the number of distance measurements that can be utilized to check for systematic distance errors and the types of estimators that can be compared. Here we compare distances obtained using Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), Cepheids, surface brightness fluctuations, the luminosity of the tip of the red giant branch, circumnuclear masers, eclipsing binaries, RR Lyrae stars, and the planetary nebulae luminosity functions. We find no significant discrepancies (differences are <2σ) between distance methods, although differences at the ~10% level cannot yet be ruled out. The potential exists for significant refinement because the data used here are heterogeneous B-band magnitudes that will soon be supplanted by homogeneous, near-infrared magnitudes. We illustrate the use of FM distances to (1) revisit the question of the metallicity sensitivity of various estimators, confirming the dependence of SN Ia distances on host galaxy metallicity, and (2) provide an alternative calibration of H 0 that replaces the classical ladder approach in the use of extragalactic distance estimators with one that utilizes data over a wide range of distances simultaneously.

  6. Learning the manifold of quality ultrasound acquisition.

    PubMed

    El-Zehiry, Noha; Yan, Michelle; Good, Sara; Fang, Tong; Zhou, S Kevin; Grady, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound acquisition is a challenging task that requires simultaneous adjustment of several acquisition parameters (the depth, the focus, the frequency and its operation mode). If the acquisition parameters are not properly chosen, the resulting image will have a poor quality and will degrade the patient diagnosis and treatment workflow. Several hardware-based systems for autotuning the acquisition parameters have been previously proposed, but these solutions were largely abandoned because they failed to properly account for tissue inhomogeneity and other patient-specific characteristics. Consequently, in routine practice the clinician either uses population-based parameter presets or manually adjusts the acquisition parameters for each patient during the scan. In this paper, we revisit the problem of autotuning the acquisition parameters by taking a completely novel approach and producing a solution based on image analytics. Our solution is inspired by the autofocus capability of conventional digital cameras, but is significantly more challenging because the number of acquisition parameters is large and the determination of "good quality" images is more difficult to assess. Surprisingly, we show that the set of acquisition parameters which produce images that are favored by clinicians comprise a 1D manifold, allowing for a real-time optimization to maximize image quality. We demonstrate our method for acquisition parameter autotuning on several live patients, showing that our system can start with a poor initial set of parameters and automatically optimize the parameters to produce high quality images. PMID:24505657

  7. Thermal spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.

    1995-03-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC`s for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  8. Thermal spray processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC's for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  9. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  10. Unstable manifolds for the MacKay approximate renormalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Jaroslav

    1989-01-01

    For a renormalisation of a critical phenomenon in some class of dynamical systems, it is the unstable manifolds of the critical set which give the universal families which describe the critical transition. In this paper, we study such manifolds for the MacKay [1988] approximate renormalisation scheme which models the breakup of invariant circles of arbitrary rotation number in area-preserving twist maps. We derive a number of properties of the unstable manifolds and then discuss the implications of these to the full renormalisation. In particular a) we suggest the importance of continuity in the definition of unstable manifolds, and b) show that their structure is similar to that observed numerically by MacKay and Percival [1987] in a related renormalisation. Finally we show that the residues of approximating periodic orbits are bounded above on the critical set.

  11. Identifying manifolds underlying group motion in Vicsek agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajamannage, K.; Butail, S.; Porfiri, M.; Bollt, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Collective motion of animal groups often undergoes changes due to perturbations. In a topological sense, we describe these changes as switching between low-dimensional embedding manifolds underlying a group of evolving agents. To characterize such manifolds, first we introduce a simple mapping of agents between time-steps. Then, we construct a novel metric which is susceptible to variations in the collective motion, thus revealing distinct underlying manifolds. The method is validated through three sample scenarios simulated using a Vicsek model, namely, switching of speed, coordination, and structure of a group. Combined with a dimensionality reduction technique that is used to infer the dimensionality of the embedding manifold, this approach provides an effective model-free framework for the analysis of collective behavior across animal species.

  12. Supervised learning for neural manifold using spatiotemporal brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Po-Chih; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Determining the means by which perceived stimuli are compactly represented in the human brain is a difficult task. This study aimed to develop techniques for the construction of the neural manifold as a representation of visual stimuli. Approach. We propose a supervised locally linear embedding method to construct the embedded manifold from brain activity, taking into account similarities between corresponding stimuli. In our experiments, photographic portraits were used as visual stimuli and brain activity was calculated from magnetoencephalographic data using a source localization method. Main results. The results of 10 × 10-fold cross-validation revealed a strong correlation between manifolds of brain activity and the orientation of faces in the presented images, suggesting that high-level information related to image content can be revealed in the brain responses represented in the manifold. Significance. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is applicable to investigation into the inherent patterns of brain activity.

  13. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael

    2009-10-27

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple ''weather regimes.'' To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, ''bred vectors'' and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemblemore » forecasts issued from clouds (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.« less

  14. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael

    2009-10-27

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple ''weather regimes.'' To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, ''bred vectors'' and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from clouds (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

  15. Heterotic string compactified on half-flat manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Sebastien; Lukas, Andre; Micu, Andrei

    2004-12-15

    We study the effective action of the heterotic string compactified on particular half-flat manifolds which arise in the context of mirror symmetry with Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz flux. We explicitly derive the superpotential and Kaehler potential at lowest order in {alpha}{sup '} by a reduction of the bosonic action. The superpotential contains new terms depending on the Kaehler moduli which originate from the intrinsic geometrical flux of the half-flat manifolds. A generalized Gukov formula, valid for all manifolds with SU(3) structure, is derived from the gravitino mass term. For the half-flat manifolds it leads to a superpotential in agreement with our explicit bosonic calculation. We also discuss the inclusion of gauge fields.

  16. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  17. A statistical approach to optimize the spray drying of starch particles: application to dry powder coating.

    PubMed

    Bilancetti, Luca; Poncelet, Denis; Loisel, Catherine; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2010-09-01

    This article describes the preparation of starch particles, by spray drying, for possible application to a dry powder coating process. Dry powder coating consists of spraying a fine powder and a plasticizer on particles. The efficiency of the coating is linked to the powder morphological and dimensional characteristics. Different experimental parameters of the spray-drying process were analyzed, including type of solvent, starch concentration, rate of polymer feeding, pressure of the atomizing air, drying air flow, and temperature of drying air. An optimization and screening of the experimental parameters by a design of the experiment (DOE) approach have been done. Finally, the produced spray-dried starch particles were conveniently tested in a dry coating process, in comparison to the commercial initial starch. The obtained results, in terms of coating efficiency, demonstrated that the spray-dried particles led to a sharp increase of coating efficiency value. PMID:20706878

  18. Covariant Star Product for Exterior Differential Forms on Symplectic Manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, Shannon; Zumino, Bruno

    2010-02-10

    After a brief description of the Z-graded differential Poisson algebra, we introduce a covariant star product for exterior differential forms and give an explicit expression for it up to second order in the deformation parameter h, in the case of symplectic manifolds. The graded differential Poisson algebra endows the manifold with a connection, not necessarily torsion-free, and places upon the connection various constraints.

  19. Minimal Φ-LAGRANGIAN Surfaces in almost Hermitian Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khong Van, Le

    1990-02-01

    A general method of calibrations is developed for the study of minimal Φ-Lagrangian surfaces in almost-Hermitian manifolds. A criterion for minimality of Φ-Lagrangian surfaces is given, along with a lower bound for the second variation of the volume functional on minimal Φ-Lagrangian surfaces in Hermitian manifolds. The generalized Maslov index of these surfaces is shown to be trivial. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  20. On Lightlike Geometry of Para-Sasakian Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Acet, Bilal Eftal; Kılıç, Erol

    2014-01-01

    We study lightlike hypersurfaces of para-Sasakian manifolds tangent to the characteristic vector field. In particular, we define invariant lightlike hypersurfaces and screen semi-invariant lightlike hypersurfaces, respectively, and give examples. Integrability conditions for the distributions on a screen semi-invariant lightlike hypersurface of para-Sasakian manifolds are investigated. We obtain a para-Sasakian structure on the leaves of an integrable distribution of a screen semi-invariant lightlike hypersurface. PMID:24892072

  1. Acoustic effects of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Maciej Z.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, it has been known that realistic combustion models for liquid fuel rocket engines should contain at least a rudimentary treatment of atomization and spray physics. This is of particular importance in transient operations. It has long been recognized that spray characteristics and droplet vaporization physics play a fundamental role in determining the stability behavior of liquid fuel rocket motors. This paper gives an overview of work in progress on design of a numerical algorithm for practical studies of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket motors. For flexibility, the algorithm is composed of semi-independent solution modules, accounting for different physical processes. Current findings are report and future work is indicated. The main emphasis of this research is the development of an efficient treatment to interactions between acoustic fields and liquid fuel/oxidizer sprays.

  2. Dimensionality reduction of collective motion by principal manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajamannage, Kelum; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio; Bollt, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    While the existence of low-dimensional embedding manifolds has been shown in patterns of collective motion, the current battery of nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods is not amenable to the analysis of such manifolds. This is mainly due to the necessary spectral decomposition step, which limits control over the mapping from the original high-dimensional space to the embedding space. Here, we propose an alternative approach that demands a two-dimensional embedding which topologically summarizes the high-dimensional data. In this sense, our approach is closely related to the construction of one-dimensional principal curves that minimize orthogonal error to data points subject to smoothness constraints. Specifically, we construct a two-dimensional principal manifold directly in the high-dimensional space using cubic smoothing splines, and define the embedding coordinates in terms of geodesic distances. Thus, the mapping from the high-dimensional data to the manifold is defined in terms of local coordinates. Through representative examples, we show that compared to existing nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods, the principal manifold retains the original structure even in noisy and sparse datasets. The principal manifold finding algorithm is applied to configurations obtained from a dynamical system of multiple agents simulating a complex maneuver called predator mobbing, and the resulting two-dimensional embedding is compared with that of a well-established nonlinear dimensionality reduction method.

  3. Semisupervised Support Vector Machines With Tangent Space Intrinsic Manifold Regularization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiliang; Xie, Xijiong

    2016-09-01

    Semisupervised learning has been an active research topic in machine learning and data mining. One main reason is that labeling examples is expensive and time-consuming, while there are large numbers of unlabeled examples available in many practical problems. So far, Laplacian regularization has been widely used in semisupervised learning. In this paper, we propose a new regularization method called tangent space intrinsic manifold regularization. It is intrinsic to data manifold and favors linear functions on the manifold. Fundamental elements involved in the formulation of the regularization are local tangent space representations, which are estimated by local principal component analysis, and the connections that relate adjacent tangent spaces. Simultaneously, we explore its application to semisupervised classification and propose two new learning algorithms called tangent space intrinsic manifold regularized support vector machines (TiSVMs) and tangent space intrinsic manifold regularized twin SVMs (TiTSVMs). They effectively integrate the tangent space intrinsic manifold regularization consideration. The optimization of TiSVMs can be solved by a standard quadratic programming, while the optimization of TiTSVMs can be solved by a pair of standard quadratic programmings. The experimental results of semisupervised classification problems show the effectiveness of the proposed semisupervised learning algorithms. PMID:26277005

  4. Manifold learning of brain MRIs by deep learning.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Manifold learning of medical images plays a potentially important role for modeling anatomical variability within a population with pplications that include segmentation, registration, and prediction of clinical parameters. This paper describes a novel method for learning the manifold of 3D brain images that, unlike most existing manifold learning methods, does not require the manifold space to be locally linear, and does not require a predefined similarity measure or a prebuilt proximity graph. Our manifold learning method is based on deep learning, a machine learning approach that uses layered networks (called deep belief networks, or DBNs) and has received much attention recently in the computer vision field due to their success in object recognition tasks. DBNs have traditionally been too computationally expensive for application to 3D images due to the large number of trainable parameters. Our primary contributions are (1) a much more computationally efficient training method for DBNs that makes training on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128 x 128 x 128 practical, and (2) the demonstration that DBNs can learn a low-dimensional manifold of brain volumes that detects modes of variations that correlate to demographic and disease parameters. PMID:24579194

  5. Controlled overspray spray nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A spray system for a multi-ingredient ablative material wherein a nozzle A is utilized for suppressing overspray is described. The nozzle includes a cyclindrical inlet which converges to a restricted throat. A curved juncture between the cylindrical inlet and the convergent portion affords unrestricted and uninterrupted flow of the ablative material. A divergent bell-shaped chamber and adjustable nozzle exit B is utilized which provides a highly effective spray pattern in suppressing overspray to an acceptable level and producing a homogeneous jet of material that adheres well to the substrate.

  6. Spray combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results concerning high pressure droplet gasification model, droplet turbulent dispersion model, and spray atomization model will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines.

  7. New techniques for spraying dust

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S.K.

    1984-06-01

    Two recent developments for reducing airborne dust on longwall faces are described. One flushes foam through the drums of a shearer and also sprays foam onto the cutting drum. The other modifies the spray-head to produce different water spray patterns on continuous miners.

  8. Programable Plasma-Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.; Toth, I.

    1982-01-01

    NASA-funded research led to development of automated plasma-spray system programable and reproducible. System utilizes standard plasma-spray equipment with noncoherent light-measuring system and microprocessor. System monitors and controls surface contours and coating thickness. Other advantages of system are consistant coating reproducibility, exact blending and feathering operations, ability to handle complex shapes and ease of changing spray parameters.

  9. STAR CLUSTERS, GALAXIES, AND THE FUNDAMENTAL MANIFOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Gonzalez, Anthony H. E-mail: azabludoff@as.arizona.edu

    2011-02-01

    We explore whether global observed properties, specifically half-light radii, mean surface brightness, and integrated stellar kinematics, suffice to unambiguously differentiate galaxies from star clusters, which presumably formed differently and lack dark matter halos. We find that star clusters lie on the galaxy scaling relationship referred to as the fundamental manifold (FM), on the extension of a sequence of compact galaxies, and so conclude that there is no simple way to differentiate star clusters from ultracompact galaxies. By extending the validity of the FM over a larger range of parameter space and a wider set of objects, we demonstrate that the physics that constrains the resulting baryon and dark matter distributions in stellar systems is more general than previously appreciated. The generality of the FM implies (1) that the stellar spatial distribution and kinematics of one type of stellar system do not arise solely from a process particular to that set of systems, such as violent relaxation for elliptical galaxies, but are instead the result of an interplay of all processes responsible for the generic settling of baryons in gravitational potential wells, (2) that the physics of how baryons settle is independent of whether the system is embedded within a dark matter halo, and (3) that peculiar initial conditions at formation or stochastic events during evolution do not ultimately disturb the overall regularity of baryonic settling. We also utilize the relatively simple nature of star clusters to relate deviations from the FM to the age of the stellar population and find that stellar population models systematically and significantly overpredict the mass-to-light ratios of old, metal-rich clusters. We present an empirical calibration of stellar population mass-to-light ratios with age and color. Finally, we use the FM to estimate velocity dispersions for the low surface brightness, outer halo clusters that lack such measurements.

  10. Comparison of the characteristics of HVOF and plasma thermal spray

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    In spraying oxygen sensitive materials, such as WC:Co it is often observed that the carbide fraction present in the deposit is significantly less than in the original particles. This lowers the hardness of the coating, resulting in inferior wear resistance. The cause is the in-flight, high temperature decomposition of carbides by reaction with entrained oxygen. The degree of decomposition is determined by a combination of particle temperature, residence time and entrainment characteristics of the jet. The fundamental differences between HVOF and plasma thermal spray are examined in this context. Even though the HVOF process may actually subject a particle to greater oxygen exposure than plasma spraying, the lower particle temperatures experienced lead to coatings which exhibit less carbide loss than plasma sprayed coatings fabricated in air.

  11. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays from Open Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1930-01-01

    The penetration and cone-angle of fuel sprays from open nozzles were recorded with the NACA Spray Photography Equipment. The results show that for injection systems in which the rate of pressure rise at the discharge orifice is high, open nozzles give spray-tip velocities and penetrations which compare favorably with those of closed nozzles. The spray cone-angle was the same for all tests, although open nozzles having different orifice diameters were used, and one nozzle was used both as an open and as a closed nozzle. In designing a fuel system using open nozzles, particular care must be taken to avoid air pockets. The check valve should be placed close to the discharge orifice.

  12. The characteristics of sprays produced by coaxial airblast atomisers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of droplet size, velocity, liquid flux and concentration were made in sprays produced by a coaxial airblast atomizer using a phase Doppler anemometer. The atomizer comprised a liquid jet with exit diameter varied between 1.1 and 2.3 mm positioned in the center of a gaseous annular stream. The characteristics of the preburner sprays of the main engine of the space shuttle were simulated by using water and air respectively replacing liquid oxygen and hydrogen. Reduction of the diameter of the liquid tube was found to improve the atomization and reduce the rate of spread of sprays with similar gas-to-liquid velocity ratio. The presence of a converging nozzle at the exit of the gaseous jet improved the atomization and increased the rate of spread of sprays with gas-to-liquid velocity ratio up to around 45, but had no effect for higher velocity ratios.

  13. Current Status and Future Prospects of Warm Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Seiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kim, Keehyun; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    A modification of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process named as warm spray (WS) has been developed. By injecting room temperature inert gas into the combustion gas jet of HVOF, the temperature of the propellant gas can be controlled in a range approximately from 2300 to 1000 K so that many powder materials can be deposited in thermally softened state at high impact velocity. In this review, the characteristics of WS process were analyzed by using gas dynamic simulation of the flow field and heating/acceleration of powder particles in comparison with HVOF, cold spray (CS), and high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spray. Transmission electron microscopy of WS and CS titanium splats revealed marked differences in the microstructures stemming from the different impact temperatures. Mechanical properties of several metallic coatings formed under different WS and CS conditions were compared. Characteristics of WC-Co coatings made by WS were demonstrated for wear resistant applications.

  14. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays at Low-injection Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Va., to determine some of the characteristics of the fuel sprays obtained from an 0.008-inch and a 0.020-inch open nozzle when injection pressures from 100 to 500 pounds per square inch were used. Fuel oil and gasoline were injected into air at densities of atmospheric land 0.325 pound per cubic foot. It was found that the penetration rate at these low pressures was about the same as the rate obtained with higher pressures. Spray cone-angles were small and individual oil drops were visible in all the sprays. Gasoline and fuel oil sprays had similar characteristics.

  15. Spray-ice islands evaluated for Arctic-drilling structures

    SciTech Connect

    Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1986-04-21

    Comparisons of spray-ice drilling structures for the Beaufort Sea with drilling structures presently in use there show that over a wide range of water depths drilling from spray-ice islands offers significant benefits over the existing alternatives. Both technical and economic comparisons were made. In a water depth of 50 ft, a gravel island for drilling an exploration hole would likely cost between $40 and $60 million. A spray-ice island in the same location would cost less than $10 million. ''Spray-ice'' as used in this article refers to ice made by pumping sea water high up into the air for rapid heat transfer and freezing. The resulting ice has a granular structure and is quite porous.

  16. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous model of spray evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model of spray evaporation which employs a second-order turbulence model in conjunction with the locally homogeneous flow approximation, which implies infinitely fast interphase transport rates is presented. Measurements to test the model were completed for single phase constant and variable density jets, as well as an evaporating spray in stagnant air. Profiles of mean velocity, composition, temperature and drop size distribution as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured within the spray. Predictions were in agreement with measurements in single phase flows and also with many characteristics of the spray, e.g. flow width, radial profiles of mean and turbulent quantities, and the axial rate of decay of mean velocity and mixture fraction.

  17. STRATIFICATION OF PARTICULATE AND VOC POLLUTANTS IN HORIZONTAL FLOW PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U. S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in this...

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIR CULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME I. MAIN REPORT, APPENDICES A-C

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  19. Manifold alignment for classification of multitemporal hyperspectral image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiu-Han

    Analyzing remotely sensed images to obtain land cover classification maps is an effective approach for acquiring information over landscapes that can be accomplished over extended areas with limited ground surveys. Further, with advances in remote sensing technology, spaceborne hyperspectral sensors provide the capability to acquire a set of images that have both high spectral and temporal resolution. These images are suitable for monitoring and analyzing environmental changes with subtle spectral characteristics. However, inherent characteristics of multitemporal hyperspectral images, including high dimensionality, nonlinearity, and nonstationarity phenomena over time and across large areas, pose several challenges for classification. This research addresses the issues of classification tasks in the presence of spectral shifts within multitemporal hyperspectral images by leveraging the concept of the data manifold. Although manifold learning has been applied successfully in single image hyperspectral data classification to address high dimensionality and nonlinear spectral responses, research related to manifold learning for multitemporal classification studies is limited. The proposed approaches utilize spectral signatures and spatial proximity to construct similar "local" geometries of temporal images. By aligning these underlying manifolds optimally, the impacts of nonstationary effects are mitigated and classification is accomplished in a representative temporal data manifold. "Global" manifolds learned from temporal hyperspectral images have a major advantage in faithful representation of the data in an image, such as retaining relationships between different classes. Local manifolds are favored in discriminating difficult classes and for computation efficiency. A new hybrid global-local manifold alignment method that combines the advantages of global and local manifolds for effective multitemporal image classification is also proposed. Results illustrate the

  20. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  1. The world problem: on the computability of the topology of 4-manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanMeter, J. R.

    2005-01-01

    Topological classification of the 4-manifolds bridges computation theory and physics. A proof of the undecidability of the homeomorphy problem for 4-manifolds is outlined here in a clarifying way. It is shown that an arbitrary Turing machine with an arbitrary input can be encoded into the topology of a 4-manifold, such that the 4-manifold is homeomorphic to a certain other 4-manifold if and only if the corresponding Turing machine halts on the associated input. Physical implications are briefly discussed.

  2. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous flow model of spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C. P.; Szekely, G. A., Jr.; Faeth, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of spray combustion which employs a second-order turbulence model was developed. The assumption of locally homogeneous flow is made, implying infinitely fast transport rates between the phase. Measurements to test the model were completed for a gaseous n-propane flame and an air atomized n-pentane spray flame, burning in stagnant air at atmospheric pressure. Profiles of mean velocity and temperature, as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured in the flames. The predictions for the gas flame were in excellent agreement with the measurements. The predictions for the spray were qualitatively correct, but effects of finite rate interphase transport were evident, resulting in a overstimation of the rate development of the flow. Predictions of spray penetration length at high pressures, including supercritical combustion conditions, were also completed for comparison with earlier measurements. Test conditions involved a pressure atomized n-pentane spray, burning in stagnant air at pressures of 3, 5, and 9 MPa. The comparison between predictions and measurements was fair. This is not a very sensitive test of the model, however, and further high pressure experimental and theoretical results are needed before a satisfactory assessment of the locally homogeneous flow approximation can be made.

  3. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort to date so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology.

  4. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  5. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  6. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ... and herbal products you are taking, or have recently taken, or ...

  7. Titanium Cold Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaja, Jihane; Goldbaum, Dina; Chromik, Richard; Yue, Stephen; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Wong, Wilson; Irissou, Eric; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    Titanium Cold Spray Coatings Cold Spray is an emerging technology used for the deposition of coatings for many industries including aerospace. This technique allows the deposition of metallic materials at low temper-atures below their melting point. The aim of this research was to develop a test technique that can measure the degree to which a cold spray coating achieves mechanical properties similar to a traditional bulk material. Vickers hardness testing and nanoindentation were used as micro-and nano-scale measurement techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of titanium coatings, deposited at different deposition conditions, and bulk Ti. The mechanical properties of bulk titanium and titanium coatings were measured over a range of length scales, with the indentation size effect examined with Meyer's law. Hardness measurements are shown to be affected by material porosity, microstructure and coating particle bonding mechanism. Hard-ness measurements showed that Ti coatings deposited at higher gas pressures and temperatures demonstrate an indentation load response similar to bulk Ti. Key words: titanium, cold spray, Vickers hardness, nanoindentation, indentation size effect, microstructure, mechanical properties

  8. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and stomach pain caused by decreased blood flow to the intestines). Your doctor may tell you not to use zolmitriptan nasal spray.tell your doctor if you smoke or are overweight; if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or liver or ...

  9. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, he or she should give you your first naloxone dose and then call 911 immediately. After receiving the naloxone nasal spray, ... the person on their side (recovery position) and call for emergency medical ... after giving the first naloxone dose. If the person does not respond ...

  10. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  11. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  12. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  13. Modeling of Plasma Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chong H.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive computational model for thermal plasma processes is being developed with sufficient generality and flexibility to apply to a wide variety of present and proposed plasma processing concepts and devices. In our model for gas-particle flows, the gas is represented as a continuous multicomponent chemically reacting gas with temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. Ions and electrons are considered as separate components or species of the mixture, while ionization and dissociation reactions are treated as chemical reactions. Entrained particles interacting with the plasma are represented by a stochastic particle model in which the velocities, temperatures, sizes, and other characteristics of typical particles are computed simultaneously with the plasma flow. The model in its present form can simulate particle injection, heating, and melting, but not evaporation and condensation. This model is embodied in the LAVA computer code, which has previously been applied to simulate plasma spraying, mixing and demixing of plasma gases, and departures from chemical (ionization/dissociation), thermal, and excitation equilibrium in plasmas. A transient simulation has been performed of stainless steel particles injected into a swirling high-velocity nitrogen-hydrogen plasma jet in air under typical operating conditions for a newly developed high-velocity high-power (HVHP) torch, which produces plasma jets with peak velocities in excess of 3000 m/s. The calculational results show that strong departures from ionization and dissociation equilibrium develop in the downstream region as the chemical reactions freeze out at lower temperatures. The calculational results also show good agreement with experimental data on particle temperature, velocity, and spray pattern, together with important statistical effects associated with distributions in particle properties and injection conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S

  14. Optimisation of a vertical spray boom for greenhouse spraying applications.

    PubMed

    Nuyttens, D; Windey, S; Braekman, P; De Moor, A; Sonck, B

    2003-01-01

    The European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) and CLO-DVL joined forces in a project to stimulate a safe use of pesticides in Southern European countries. CLO-DVL optimised a method with mineral chelates to evaluate deposition tests. This quantitative method to evaluate spray deposits and to check spray distributions is used to assess two novel spraying techniques. Deposition tests with water-sensitive paper and mainly with the manganese and molybdenum chelates as tracer elements were performed with a manually pulled trolley and a motorised vehicle both equipped with vertical spray booms. Filter papers were attached to the tomato and pepper plants at several heights to obtain an indication of the spray distribution in the crop. Particular attention was paid to the effect on the spray distribution of the vertical nozzle distance (35 cm vs. 50 cm) and the spray distance to the crop. The tests proved that a nozzle spacing of 35 cm delivers a much better spray distribution than one of 50 cm. The optimal spray distance for flat fan nozzles with a spray angle of 80 degrees and a nozzle spacing of 35 cm is about 30 cm. PMID:15151329

  15. Note: Automatic layer-by-layer spraying system for functional thin film coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seongmin; Lee, Sangmin; Park, Yong Tae

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have constructed an automatic spray machine for producing polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing various functional materials on wide substrates via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. The proposed machine exhibits advantages in terms of automation, process speed, and versatility. Furthermore, it has several features that allow a fully automated spraying operation, such as various two-dimensional spraying paths, control of the flow rate and operating speed, air-assist fan-shaped twin-fluid nozzles, and an optical display. The robot uniformly sprays aqueous mixtures containing complementary (e.g., oppositely charged, capable of hydrogen bonding, or capable of covalent bonding) species onto a large-area substrate. Between each deposition of opposite species, samples are spray-rinsed with deionized water and blow-dried with air. The spraying, rinsing, and drying areas and times are adjustable by a computer program. Twenty-bilayer flame-retardant thin films were prepared in order to compare the performance of the spray-assisted LbL assembly with a sample produced by conventional dipping. The spray-coated film exhibited a reduction of afterglow time in vertical flame tests, indicating that the spray-LbL technique is a simple method to produce functional thin film coatings.

  16. Note: Automatic layer-by-layer spraying system for functional thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seongmin; Lee, Sangmin; Park, Yong Tae

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have constructed an automatic spray machine for producing polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing various functional materials on wide substrates via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. The proposed machine exhibits advantages in terms of automation, process speed, and versatility. Furthermore, it has several features that allow a fully automated spraying operation, such as various two-dimensional spraying paths, control of the flow rate and operating speed, air-assist fan-shaped twin-fluid nozzles, and an optical display. The robot uniformly sprays aqueous mixtures containing complementary (e.g., oppositely charged, capable of hydrogen bonding, or capable of covalent bonding) species onto a large-area substrate. Between each deposition of opposite species, samples are spray-rinsed with deionized water and blow-dried with air. The spraying, rinsing, and drying areas and times are adjustable by a computer program. Twenty-bilayer flame-retardant thin films were prepared in order to compare the performance of the spray-assisted LbL assembly with a sample produced by conventional dipping. The spray-coated film exhibited a reduction of afterglow time in vertical flame tests, indicating that the spray-LbL technique is a simple method to produce functional thin film coatings. PMID:27036843

  17. Locally isometric and conformal parameterization of image manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, A. V.; Kuleshov, A. P.; Yanovich, Yu. A.

    2015-12-01

    Images can be represented as vectors in a high-dimensional Image space with components specifying light intensities at image pixels. To avoid the `curse of dimensionality', the original high-dimensional image data are transformed into their lower-dimensional features preserving certain subject-driven data properties. These properties can include `information-preserving' when using the constructed low-dimensional features instead of original high-dimensional vectors, as well preserving the distances and angles between the original high-dimensional image vectors. Under the commonly used Manifold assumption that the high-dimensional image data lie on or near a certain unknown low-dimensional Image manifold embedded in an ambient high-dimensional `observation' space, a constructing of the lower-dimensional features consists in constructing an Embedding mapping from the Image manifold to Feature space, which, in turn, determines a low-dimensional parameterization of the Image manifold. We propose a new geometrically motivated Embedding method which constructs a low-dimensional parameterization of the Image manifold and provides the information-preserving property as well as the locally isometric and conformal properties.

  18. Target detection performed on manifold approximations recovered from hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Messinger, David W.; Albano, James A.

    2013-05-01

    In high dimensional data, manifold learning seeks to identify the embedded lower-dimensional, non-linear mani- fold upon which the data lie. This is particularly useful in hyperspectral imagery where inherently m-dimensional data is often sparsely distributed throughout the d-dimensional spectral space, with m << d. By recovering the manifold, inherent structures and relationships within the data - which are not typically apparent otherwise - may be identified and exploited. The sparsity of data within the spectral space can prove challenging for many types of analysis, and in particular with target detection. In this paper, we propose using manifold recovery as a preprocessing step for spectral target detection algorithms. A graph structure is first built upon the data and the transformation into the manifold space is based upon that graph structure. Then, the Adaptive Co- sine/Coherence Estimator (ACE) algorithm is applied. We present an analysis of target detection performance in the manifold space using scene-derived target spectra from two different hyperspectral images.

  19. Analysis on singular spaces: Lie manifolds and operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, Victor

    2016-07-01

    We discuss and develop some connections between analysis on singular spaces and operator algebras, as presented in my sequence of four lectures at the conference Noncommutative geometry and applications, Frascati, Italy, June 16-21, 2014. Therefore this paper is mostly a survey paper, but the presentation is new, and there are included some new results as well. In particular, Sections 3 and 4 provide a complete short introduction to analysis on noncompact manifolds that is geared towards a class of manifolds-called "Lie manifolds" -that often appears in practice. Our interest in Lie manifolds is due to the fact that they provide the link between analysis on singular spaces and operator algebras. The groupoids integrating Lie manifolds play an important background role in establishing this link because they provide operator algebras whose structure is often well understood. The initial motivation for the work surveyed here-work that spans over close to two decades-was to develop the index theory of stratified singular spaces. Meanwhile, several other applications have emerged as well, including applications to Partial Differential Equations and Numerical Methods. These will be mentioned only briefly, however, due to the lack of space. Instead, we shall concentrate on the applications to Index theory.

  20. A short- time beltrami kernel for smoothing images and manifolds.

    PubMed

    Spira, Alon; Kimmel, Ron; Sochen, Nir

    2007-06-01

    We introduce a short-time kernel for the Beltrami image enhancing flow. The flow is implemented by "convolving" the image with a space dependent kernel in a similar fashion to the solution of the heat equation by a convolution with a Gaussian kernel. The kernel is appropriate for smoothing regular (flat) 2-D images, for smoothing images painted on manifolds, and for simultaneously smoothing images and the manifolds they are painted on. The kernel combines the geometry of the image and that of the manifold into one metric tensor, thus enabling a natural unified approach for the manipulation of both. Additionally, the derivation of the kernel gives a better geometrical understanding of the Beltrami flow and shows that the bilateral filter is a Euclidean approximation of it. On a practical level, the use of the kernel allows arbitrarily large time steps as opposed to the existing explicit numerical schemes for the Beltrami flow. In addition, the kernel works with equal ease on regular 2-D images and on images painted on parametric or triangulated manifolds. We demonstrate the denoising properties of the kernel by applying it to various types of images and manifolds. PMID:17547140

  1. Vibration signal classification by wavelet packet energy flow manifold learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo

    2013-04-01

    This paper proposes a new study to explore the wavelet packet energy (WPE) flow characteristics of vibration signals by using the manifold learning technique. This study intends to discover the nonlinear manifold information from the WPE flow map of vibration signals to characterize and discriminate different classes. A new feature, called WPE manifold feature, is achieved by three main steps: first, the wavelet packet transform (WPT) is conducted to decompose multi-class signals into a library of time-frequency subspaces; second, the WPE is calculated in each subspace to produce a feature vector for each signal; and finally, low-dimensional manifold features carrying class information are extracted from the WPE library for either training or testing samples by using the manifold learning algorithm. The new feature reveals the nonlinear WPE flow structure among various redundant time-frequency subspaces. It combines the benefits of time-frequency characteristics and nonlinear information, and hence exhibits valuable properties for vibration signal classification. The effectiveness and the merits of the proposed method are confirmed by case studies on vibration analysis-based machine fault classification.

  2. Hierarchical discriminant manifold learning for dimensionality reduction and image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Zhao, Changchen; Ding, Kai; Wu, Xingming; Chen, Peter C. Y.

    2015-09-01

    In the field of image classification, it has been a trend that in order to deliver a reliable classification performance, the feature extraction model becomes increasingly more complicated, leading to a high dimensionality of image representations. This, in turn, demands greater computation resources for image classification. Thus, it is desirable to apply dimensionality reduction (DR) methods for image classification. It is necessary to apply DR methods to relieve the computational burden as well as to improve the classification accuracy. However, traditional DR methods are not compatible with modern feature extraction methods. A framework that combines manifold learning based DR and feature extraction in a deeper way for image classification is proposed. A multiscale cell representation is extracted from the spatial pyramid to satisfy the locality constraints for a manifold learning method. A spectral weighted mean filtering is proposed to eliminate noise in the feature space. A hierarchical discriminant manifold learning is proposed which incorporates both category label and image scale information to guide the DR process. Finally, the image representation is generated by concatenating dimensionality reduced cell representations from the same image. Extensive experiments are conducted to test the proposed algorithm on both scene and object recognition datasets in comparison with several well-established and state-of-the-art methods with respect to classification precision and computational time. The results verify the effectiveness of incorporating manifold learning in the feature extraction procedure and imply that the multiscale cell representations may be distributed on a manifold.

  3. Manifold Learning for Biomarker Discovery in MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, Robin; Aljabar, Paul; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Rueckert, Daniel

    We propose a framework for the extraction of biomarkers from low-dimensional manifolds representing inter- and intra-subject brain variation in MR image data. The coordinates of each image in such a low-dimensional space captures information about structural shape and appearance and, when a phenotype exists, about the subject's clinical state. A key contribution is that we propose a method for incorporating longitudinal image information in the learned manifold. In particular, we compare simultaneously embedding baseline and follow-up scans into a single manifold with the combination of separate manifold representations for inter-subject and intra-subject variation. We apply the proposed methods to 362 subjects enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and classify healthy controls, subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Learning manifolds based on both the appearance and temporal change of the hippocampus, leads to correct classification rates comparable with those provided by state-of-the-art automatic segmentation estimates of hippocampal volume and atrophy. The biomarkers identified with the proposed method are data-driven and represent a potential alternative to a-priori defined biomarkers derived from manual or automated segmentations.

  4. A critical review on the spray drying of fruit extract: effect of additives on physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Duduku; Nithyanandam, Rajesh; Sarbatly, Rosalam

    2014-01-01

    Spray drying accomplishes drying while particles are suspended in the air and is one method in the family of suspended particle processing systems, along with fluid-bed drying, flash drying, spray granulation, spray agglomeration, spray reaction, spray cooling, and spray absorption. This drying process is unique because it involves both particle formation and drying. The present paper reviews spray drying of fruit extracts, such as acai, acerola pomace, gac, mango, orange, cactus pear, opuntia stricta fruit, watermelon, and durian, and the effects of additives on physicochemical properties such as antioxidant activity, total carotenoid content, lycopene and β-carotene content, hygroscopy, moisture content, volatile retention, stickiness, color, solubility, glass transition temperature, bulk density, rehydration, caking, appearance under electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. The literature clearly demonstrates that the effect of additives and encapsulation play a vital role in determining the physicochemical properties of fruit extract powder. The technical difficulties in spray drying of fruit extracts can be overcome by modifying the spray dryer design. It also reveals that spray drying is a novel technology for converting fruit extract into powder form. PMID:24236997

  5. Turbulent dispersion of the icing cloud from spray nozzles used in icing tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Olsen, W. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    To correctly simulate flight in natural icing conditions, the turbulence in an icing simulator must be as low as possible. But some turbulence is required to mix the droplets from the spray nozzles and achieve an icing cloud of uniform liquid water content. The goal for any spray system is to obtain the widest possible spray cloud with the lowest possible turbulence in the test section of a icing tunnel. This investigation reports the measurement of turbulence and the three-dimensional spread of the cloud from a single spray nozzle. The task was to determine how the air turbulence and cloud width are affected by spray bars of quite different drag coefficients, by changes in the turbulence upstream of the spray, the droplet size, and the atomizing air. An ice accretion grid, located 6.3 m downstream of the single spray nozzle, was used to measure cloud spread. Both the spray bar and the grid were located in the constant velocity test section. Three spray bar shapes were tested: the short blunt spray bar used in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, a thin 14.6 cm chord airfoil, and a 53 cm chord NACA 0012 airfoil. At the low airspeed (56 km/hr) the ice accretion pattern was axisymmetric and was not affected by the shape of the spray bar. At the high airspeed (169 km/hr) the spread was 30 percent smaller than at the low airspeed. For the widest cloud the spray bars should be located as far upstream in the low velocity plenum of the icing tunnel. Good comparison is obtained between the cloud spread data and predicitons from a two-dimensional cloud mixing computer code using the two equation turbulence (k epsilon g) model.

  6. Field experiment on spray drift: deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop.

    PubMed

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; van de Zande, Jan C; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-11-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done according to good agricultural practice. Deposition was measured by horizontal collectors in various arrangements in and outside the treated area. Airborne spray drift was measured both with a passive and an active air collecting system. Spray deposits on top of the treated canopy ranged between 68 and 71% of the applied dose and showed only small differences for various arrangements of the collectors. Furthermore, only small variations were measured within the various groups of collectors used for these arrangements. Generally, the highest spray deposition outside the treated area was measured close to the sprayed plot and was accompanied by a high variability of values, while a rapid decline of deposits was detected in more remote areas. Estimations of spray deposits with the IMAG Drift Calculator were in accordance with experimental findings only for areas located at a distance of 0.5-4.5 m from the last nozzle, while there was an overestimation of a factor of 4 at a distance of 2.0-3.0 m, thus revealing a high level of uncertainty of the estimation of deposition for short distances. Airborne spray drift measured by passive and active air collecting systems was approximately at the same level, when taking into consideration the collector efficiency of the woven nylon wire used as sampling material for the passive collecting system. The maximum value of total airborne spray drift for both spray applications (0.79% of the applied dose) was determined by the active collecting system. However, the comparatively high variability of measurements at various heights above the soil by active and passive collecting systems revealed need for further studies to elucidate the spatial

  7. ENTRAINMENT BY LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZER-PRODUCED SPRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Entrainment of ambient air into sprays produced by a new type of effervescent atomizer is reported. Entrainment data were obtained using a device similar to that described by Ricou & Spalding (1961). Entrainment data were analyzed using the model of Bush & Sojka (1994), in concer...

  8. STRATIFICATION OF PARTICULATE AND VOC POLLUTANTS IN PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. he goal of the program is to identify and develop efficienct and economical emissions control concepts for this source. low management is one potential solution...

  9. Expansion of the USDA ARS Aerial Application spray atomization models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An effort is underway to update the USDA ARS aerial spray nozzle models using new droplet sizing instrumen-tation and measurement techniques. As part of this effort, the applicable maximum airspeed is being increased from 72 to 80 m/s to provide guidance to applicators when using new high speed air...

  10. Light transport on path-space manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Wenzel Alban

    -stepping limitations of the theory, they often suffer from unusably slow convergence; improvements to this situation have been hampered by the lack of a thorough theoretical understanding. We address these problems by developing a new theory of path-space light transport which, for the first time, cleanly incorporates specular scattering into the standard framework. Most of the results obtained in the analysis of the ideally smooth case can also be generalized to rendering of glossy materials and volumetric scattering so that this dissertation also provides a powerful new set of tools for dealing with them. The basis of our approach is that each specular material interaction locally collapses the dimension of the space of light paths so that all relevant paths lie on a submanifold of path space. We analyze the high-dimensional differential geometry of this submanifold and use the resulting information to construct an algorithm that is able to "walk" around on it using a simple and efficient equation-solving iteration. This manifold walking algorithm then constitutes the key operation of a new type of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) rendering method that computes lighting through very general families of paths that can involve arbitrary combinations of specular, near-specular, glossy, and diffuse surface interactions as well as isotropic or highly anisotropic volume scattering. We demonstrate our implementation on a range of challenging scenes and evaluate it against previous methods.

  11. Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Haller, George; Baik, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Young-Hee

    2009-04-01

    Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

  12. On conformally recurrent manifolds of dimension greater than 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantica, Carlo Alberto; Molinari, Luca Guido

    2016-03-01

    Conformally recurrent pseudo-Riemannian manifolds of dimension n ≥ 5 are investigated. The Weyl tensor is represented as a Kulkarni-Nomizu product. If the square of the Weyl tensor is non-zero, a covariantly constant symmetric tensor is constructed, that is quadratic in the Weyl tensor. Then, by Grycak’s theorem, the explicit expression of the traceless part of the Ricci tensor is obtained, up to a scalar function. The Ricci tensor has at most two distinct eigenvalues, and the recurrence vector is an eigenvector. Lorentzian conformally recurrent manifolds are then considered. If the square of the Weyl tensor is non-zero, the manifold is decomposable. A null recurrence vector makes the Weyl tensor of algebraic type IId or higher in the Bel-Debever-Ortaggio classification, while a time-like recurrence vector makes the Weyl tensor purely electric.

  13. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  14. Flame spraying of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs.

  15. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology. Therefore, this report does not elaborate on many of the detailed technical aspects of the research program.

  16. Nondimensional scaling laws for controlling pharmaceutical spray uniformity: understanding and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Muliadi, Ariel R; Sojka, Paul E

    2012-06-01

    Spatially resolved drop size, drop velocity, and spray volume flux measurements for sprays produced by a commonly used pharmaceutical coating nozzle were performed in this study. Results showed three distinctive spray patterns: Gaussian, homogeneous, and dumbbell shaped. We found that transition from a dumbbell-shaped to a homogeneous pattern is related to the shaping air-induced breakup of already formed drops: depending on the drop size upstream of the location where the shaping air flows meet (i.e., the "junction" point), the drop viscosity, and the magnitude of the shaping air velocity, the shaping air can either pinch the spray or cause additional drop breakup. When the former outweighs the latter, the dumbbell-shaped pattern occurs; the homogeneous pattern is present when the opposite occurs. A corollary to this experimental interpretation is that whether additional drop breakup homogenizes the sprays or pinches, it is related to a Weber number (We) that is calculated using drop sizes upstream of the junction point, drop viscosity and surface tension, and the shaping air velocity at the junction point. With this idea in mind, we propose a We-based scaling method for optimizing the uniformity of air-assist spray patterns. PMID:22418943

  17. Manifold learning techniques for the analysis of hyperspectral ocean data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, David; Bowles, Jeffrey; Lamela, Gia M.; Rhea, William J.; Bachmann, Charles M.; Montes, Marcos; Ainsworth, Tom

    2005-06-01

    A useful technique in hyperspectral data analysis is dimensionality reduction, which replaces the original high dimensional data with low dimensional representations. Usually this is done with linear techniques such as linear mixing or principal components (PCA). While often useful, there is no a priori reason for believing that the data is actually linear. Lately there has been renewed interest in modeling high dimensional data using nonlinear techniques such as manifold learning (ML). In ML, the data is assumed to lie on a low dimensional, possibly curved surface (or manifold). The goal is to discover this manifold and therefore find the best low dimensional representation of the data. Recently, researchers at the Naval Research Lab have begun to model hyperspectral data using ML. We continue this work by applying ML techniques to hyperspectral ocean water data. We focus on water since there are underlying physical reasons for believing that the data lies on a certain type of nonlinear manifold. In particular, ocean data is influenced by three factors: the water parameters, the bottom type, and the depth. For fixed water and bottom types, the spectra that arise by varying the depth will lie on a nonlinear, one dimensional manifold (i.e. a curve). Generally, water scenes will contain a number of different water and bottom types, each combination of which leads to a distinct curve. In this way, the scene may be modeled as a union of one dimensional curves. In this paper, we investigate the use of manifold learning techniques to separate the various curves, thus partitioning the scene into homogeneous areas. We also discuss ways in which these techniques may be able to derive various scene characteristics such as bathymetry.

  18. On pseudo-Riemannian manifolds with many Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseevsky, D. V.; Cortes, V.

    2009-02-02

    Let M be a pseudo-Riemannian spin manifold of dimension n and signature s and denote by N the rank of the real spinor bundle. We prove that M is locally homogeneous if it admits more than (3/4)N independent Killing spinors with the same Killing number, unless n {identical_to} 1(mod 4) and s {identical_to} 3(mod 4). We also prove that M is locally homogeneous if it admits k{sub +} independent Killing spinors with Killing number {lambda} and k{sub -} independent Killing spinors with Killing number -{lambda} such that k{sub +}+k{sub -}>(3/2)N, unless n {identical_to} s {identical_to} 3(mod 4). Similarly, a pseudo-Riemannian manifold with more than (3/4)N independent conformal Killing spinors is conformally locally homogeneous. For (positive or negative) definite metrics, the bounds (3/4)N and (3/2)N in the above results can be relaxed to (1/2)N and N, respectively. Furthermore, we prove that a pseudo-Riemannnian spin manifold with more than (3/4)N parallel spinors is flat and that (1/4)N parallel spinors suffice if the metric is definite. Similarly, a Riemannnian spin manifold with more than (3/8)N Killing spinors with the Killing number {lambda}(set-membership sign)R has constant curvature 4{lambda}{sup 2}. For Lorentzian or negative definite metrics the same is true with the bound (1/2)N. Finally, we give a classification of (not necessarily complete) Riemannian manifolds admitting Killing spinors, which provides an inductive construction of such manifolds.

  19. Spray combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, S. M.; Litchford, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort in the project is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results garnered from this work will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines. The specific objectives of the research effort include identifying and evaluating physical submodels which pertain to spray combustion stability with the idea of enhancing or refining existing submodels with a more comprehensive approach. In particular, any refinements to the spray combustion physical submodels which are achieved during the project will be channeled back to Rocketdyne for incorporation in their ARICC liquid rocket combustor code as second generation improvements. Also, as the ARICC code forms the basis or future CFD development, some effort is devoted to an evaluation of the code's capability for modeling oscillating pressure waves within the combustor.

  20. Rotation vectors for homeomorphisms of non-positively curved manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessa, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    Rotation vectors, as defined for homeomorphisms of the torus that are isotopic to the identity, are generalized to such homeomorphisms of any complete Riemannian manifold with non-positive sectional curvature. These generalized rotation vectors are shown to exist for almost every orbit of such a dynamical system with respect to any invariant measure with compact support. The concept is then extended to flows and, as an application, it is shown how non-null rotation vectors can be used to construct a measurable semi-conjugacy between a given flow and the geodesic flow of a manifold.

  1. Geometry and physics of pseudodifferential operators on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Napolitano, George M.

    2016-09-01

    A review is made of the basic tools used in mathematics to define a calculus for pseudodifferential operators on Riemannian manifolds endowed with a connection: existence theorem for the function that generalizes the phase; analogue of Taylor's theorem; torsion and curvature terms in the symbolic calculus; the two kinds of derivative acting on smooth sections of the cotangent bundle of the Riemannian manifold; the concept of symbol as an equivalence class. Physical motivations and applications are then outlined, with emphasis on Green functions of quantum field theory and Parker's evaluation of Hawking radiation.

  2. Distributed mean curvature on a discrete manifold for Regge calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboye, Rory; Miller, Warner A.; Ray, Shannon

    2015-09-01

    The integrated mean curvature of a simplicial manifold is well understood in both Regge Calculus and Discrete Differential Geometry. However, a well motivated pointwise definition of curvature requires a careful choice of the volume over which to uniformly distribute the local integrated curvature. We show that hybrid cells formed using both the simplicial lattice and its circumcentric dual emerge as a remarkably natural structure for the distribution of this local integrated curvature. These hybrid cells form a complete tessellation of the simplicial manifold, contain a geometric orthonormal basis, and are also shown to give a pointwise mean curvature with a natural interpretation as the fractional rate of change of the normal vector.

  3. Clogging of Manifolds with Evaporatively Frozen Propellants. Part 2; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmon, J. A.; Gift, R. D.; Spurlock, J. M.

    1966-01-01

    The mechanisms of evaporative freezing of leaking propellant and the creation of flow stoppages within injector manifolds is discussed. A quantitative analysis of the conditions, including the existence of minimum and maximum leak rates, for the accumulation of evaporatively frozen propellant is presented. Clogging of the injector manifolds of the Apollo SPS and the Gemini OAMS engines by the freezing of leaking propellant is predicted and the seriousness of the consequences are discussed. Based on the analysis a realistic evaluation of selected techniques to eliminate flow stoppages by frozen propellant is made.

  4. Experimental studies on effervescent atomizers with wide spray angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, J. D.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1993-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the operating and spray characteristics of two internal-mixing twin-fluid atomizers that were designed to produce effervescent atomization at low air/liquid mass ratios (ALR's). These two experimental atomizers ejected the two phase flow so as to produce a wide spray angle. One atomizer was a plain orifice design that used a four-hole exit orifice which divided and turned the two phase flow just prior to ejection. The other atomizer, called the conical sheet atomizer, ejected the two phase flow through an annular passage in such a way as to form a hollow cone spray. The atomizer operating parameters varied during this investigation were the air/liquid mass ratio, atomizer operating pressure, and, in the case of the conical sheet atomizer, the exit gap width. Studies of spray characteristics included measurements of the spray Sauter mean diameter (SMD), drop size distribution, and, for the conical sheet atomizer, circumferential distribution of the liquid mass within the spray. For both atomizers it was found that SMD decreases with an increase in either ALR or operating pressure. The effect of ALR on SMD diminishes as the value of ALR increases. For the conical sheet atomizer, when operating at low values of pressure and ALR, SMD increases with increase in gap width, but the influence of gap width on SMD diminishes with an increase in either pressure or ALR. At the highest operating pressure of the conical sheet atomizer (552 kPa), SMD is independent of gap width at all ALR's. For both atomizers, changes in operating pressure and ALR have little effect on the distribution of drop sizes in the spray.

  5. Gaussian weighted neighborhood connectivity of nonlinear line attractor for learning complex manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspiras, Theus H.; Asari, Vijayan K.; Sakla, Wesam

    2015-03-01

    The human brain has the capability to process high quantities of data quickly for detection and recognition tasks. These tasks are made simpler by the understanding of data, which intentionally removes redundancies found in higher dimensional data and maps the data onto a lower dimensional space. The brain then encodes manifolds created in these spaces, which reveal a specific state of the system. We propose to use a recurrent neural network, the nonlinear line attractor (NLA) network, for the encoding of these manifolds as specific states, which will draw untrained data towards one of the specific states that the NLA network has encoded. We propose a Gaussian-weighted modular architecture for reducing the computational complexity of the conventional NLA network. The proposed architecture uses a neighborhood approach for establishing the interconnectivity of neurons to obtain the manifolds. The modified NLA network has been implemented and tested on the Electro-Optic Synthetic Vehicle Model Database created by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), which contains a vast array of high resolution imagery with several different lighting conditions and camera views. It is observed that the NLA network has the capability for representing high dimensional data for the recognition of the objects of interest through its new learning strategy. A nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme based on singular value decomposition has found to be very effective in providing a low dimensional representation of the dataset. Application of the reduced dimensional space on the modified NLA algorithm would provide fast and more accurate recognition performance for real time applications.

  6. The lifetime of evaporating dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, Alois; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    We study the processes by which a set of nearby liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a gas phase whose relative humidity (vapor concentration) is controlled at will. A dense spray of micron-sized water droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer and conveyed through a nozzle in a closed chamber whose vapor concentration has been pre-set to a controlled value. The resulting plume extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. When the spray plume is straight and laminar, droplets evaporate at its edge where the vapor is saturated, and diffuses through a boundary layer developing around the plume. We quantify the shape and length of the plume as a function of the injecting, vapor diffusion, thermodynamic and environment parameters. For higher injection Reynolds numbers, standard shear instabilities distort the plume into stretched lamellae, thus enhancing the diffusion of vapor from their boundary towards the diluting medium. These lamellae vanish in a finite time depending on the intensity of the stretching, and relative humidity of the environment, with a lifetime diverging close to the equilibrium limit, when the plume develops in an medium saturated in vapor. The dependences are described quantitatively.

  7. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  8. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM

  9. Numerical analysis of flow in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Singhal, A. K.; Przekwas, A. J.; Glynn, D. R.; Costes, N. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model and results of analyses carried out to characterize the flow through the two duct configuration of the Hot Gas Manifold of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Three dimensional computations have been performed for a half-scale air test model using a nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate system. The calculation domain is extended from the inlet of the turnaround duct to the exit of the transfer duct. Three test cases, one for laminar flow and two for turbulent flow, have been considered. For turbulent flows, constant eddy viscosity and the k-epsilon model of turbulence were employed. As expected, laminar flow calculation predicts much larger pressure drop than turbulent flow cases. The turbulent flow results are in good agreement with the available flow-visualization data. This study and experimental data indicate that the two-transfer duct design will significantly improve the flow distribution in the Hot Gas Manifold and thereby enhance the overall performance of the SSME.

  10. 92. STARBOARD CATAPULT HYDRAULIC MANIFOLD FORWARD LOOKING AFT SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. STARBOARD CATAPULT HYDRAULIC MANIFOLD - FORWARD LOOKING AFT SHOWING THE SEVEN (7) DISCHARGE LINES FROM THE SEVEN (7) HYDRAULIC PUMPS THROUGH SHUT-OFF VALVES TO ACCUMULATOR TANKS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  11. Infinitesimal generators and the Loewner equation on complete hyperbolic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Leandro; Bracci, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    We characterize infinitesimal generators on complete hyperbolic complex manifolds without any regularity assumption on the Kobayashi distance. This allows to prove a general Loewner type equation with regularity of any order {d in [1, +infty]} . Finally, based on these results, we focus on some open problems naturally arising.

  12. Comparative analysis of two asymptotic approaches based on integral manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Igor; Gol'Dshtein, Vladimir; Maas, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    A comparative analysis of the two powerful asymptotic methods, ILDM and MIM (intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds; method of invariant manifold), is presented in the paper. The two methods are based on the general theory of integral manifolds. The ILDM method is able to handle large systems of ODEs, whereas the MIM method treats systems with a limited number of unknown variables. The MIM method allows one to conduct analytical exploration of the original system and to obtain final expressions in compact form, whereas the ILDM method is a numerical approach that yields the numerical form of the desired surface. The ILDM method works well in a region where a rough splitting of the initial system exists. Regions of the phase space where splitting does not exist are problematic for the ILDM method. In these regions the MIM method provides additional information regarding the dynamical behaviour of the system. A number of simple examples are considered and analysed. It is shown that for the Semenov model (singularly perturbed system of ODEs) the ILDM method gives a surface which appears close to the first order (with respect to the corresponding small parameter) approximation of the stable (attracting) invariant manifolds. The complementary properties of the two asymptotic approaches suggests a feasible combination of the two methods, which is the subject of a future work.

  13. Special geometries associated to quaternion-Kähler 8-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambioli, A.; Nagatomo, Y.; Salamon, S.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a calculus of differential forms on a quaternion-Kähler manifold M4n admitting an isometric circle action. This is used to study three fundamental examples of such actions on the quaternionic projective plane and the construction of G2 and half-flat structures on quotients of M8 and its hypersurfaces.

  14. Multiscale envelope manifold for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-02-01

    The wavelet transform has been widely used in the field of machinery fault diagnosis for its good property of band-pass filtering. However, the filtered signal still faces the contamination of in-band noise. This paper focuses on wavelet enveloping, and proposes a new method, called multiscale envelope manifold (MEM), to extract the envelope information of fault impacts with in-band noise suppression. The MEM addresses manifold learning on the wavelet envelopes at multiple scales. Specifically, the proposed method is conducted by three following steps. First, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with complex Morlet wavelet base is introduced to obtain the wavelet envelopes at all scales. Second, the wavelet envelopes are restricted in one or more narrow scale bands to simply include the envelope information of fault impacts. The scale band is determined through a smoothness index-based (SI-based) selection method by considering the impulsiveness inside the power spectrum. Third, the manifold learning algorithm is conducted on the wavelet envelopes at selected scales to extract the intrinsic envelope manifold of fault-related impulses. The MEM combines the envelope information at multiple scales in a nonlinear approach, and may thus preserve the factual envelope structure of machinery fault. Simulation studies and experimental verifications confirm that the new method is effective for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines.

  15. Analytical and numerical manifolds in a symplectic 4-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, N.; Contopoulos, G.

    2016-05-01

    We study analytically the orbits along the asymptotic manifolds from a complex unstable periodic orbit in a symplectic 4-D Froeschlé map. The orbits are given as convergent series. We compare the analytic results by truncating the series at various orders with the corresponding numerical results and we find agreement along a more extended length, as the order of truncation increases. The agreement is improved when the parameters approach those of the stability domain. Along the manifolds no terms with small divisors appear in the series. The same result is found if we use a parametrization method along the asymptotic curves. In the case of orbits starting close to the manifolds small divisors appear, but the orbits remain close to the manifolds for an extended period of time. If the parameters of the map are close to the stable domain the orbits recede and approach the origin several times and remain confined in a certain volume around the origin for a long time before escaping to large distances. For special sets of parameters we see resonance phenomena and the orbits take particular forms near every resonance.

  16. Manifold learning for object tracking with multiple nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Silva, Jorge G; Marques, Jorge S; Lemos, Joao M

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel manifold learning algorithm for high-dimensional data sets. The scope of the application focuses on the problem of motion tracking in video sequences. The framework presented is twofold. First, it is assumed that the samples are time ordered, providing valuable information that is not presented in the current methodologies. Second, the manifold topology comprises multiple charts, which contrasts to the most current methods that assume one single chart, being overly restrictive. The proposed algorithm, Gaussian process multiple local models (GP-MLM), can deal with arbitrary manifold topology by decomposing the manifold into multiple local models that are probabilistic combined using Gaussian process regression. In addition, the paper presents a multiple filter architecture where standard filtering techniques are integrated within the GP-MLM. The proposed approach exhibits comparable performance of state-of-the-art trackers, namely multiple model data association and deep belief networks, and compares favorably with Gaussian process latent variable models. Extensive experiments are presented using real video data, including a publicly available database of lip sequences and left ventricle ultrasound images, in which the GP-MLM achieves state of the art results. PMID:24577194

  17. Analysis of twisted supercharge families on product manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, Antti J.

    2015-04-01

    Twisted supercharge families on product manifolds 𝕋 × M have been applied in the analysis of the odd twisted K-theory. We shall suspend these families to the even twisted K-theory and solve their twisted families index problem. This is applied to give analytic representatives of the twisted K-theory classes on tori—including all the torsion classes.

  18. A new construction of Calabi-Yau manifolds: Generalized CICYs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Apruzzi, Fabio; Gao, Xin; Gray, James; Lee, Seung-Joo

    2016-05-01

    We present a generalization of the complete intersection in products of projective space (CICY) construction of Calabi-Yau manifolds. CICY three-folds and four-folds have been studied extensively in the physics literature. Their utility stems from the fact that they can be simply described in terms of a 'configuration matrix', a matrix of integers from which many of the details of the geometries can be easily extracted. The generalization we present is to allow negative integers in the configuration matrices which were previously taken to have positive semi-definite entries. This broadening of the complete intersection construction leads to a larger class of Calabi-Yau manifolds than that considered in previous work, which nevertheless enjoys much of the same degree of calculational control. These new Calabi-Yau manifolds are complete intersections in (not necessarily Fano) ambient spaces with an effective anticanonical class. We find examples with topology distinct from any that has appeared in the literature to date. The new manifolds thus obtained have many interesting features. For example, they can have smaller Hodge numbers than ordinary CICYs and lead to many examples with elliptic and K3-fibration structures relevant to F-theory and string dualities.

  19. Bounding the heat trace of a Calabi-Yau manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiset, Marc-Antoine; Walcher, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The SCHOK bound states that the number of marginal deformations of certain two-dimensional conformal field theories is bounded linearly from above by the number of relevant operators. In conformal field theories defined via sigma models into Calabi-Yau manifolds, relevant operators can be estimated, in the point-particle approximation, by the low-lying spectrum of the scalar Laplacian on the manifold. In the strict large volume limit, the standard asymptotic expansion of Weyl and Minakshisundaram-Pleijel diverges with the higher-order curvature invariants. We propose that it would be sufficient to find an a priori uniform bound on the trace of the heat kernel for large but finite volume. As a first step in this direction, we then study the heat trace asymptotics, as well as the actual spectrum of the scalar Laplacian, in the vicinity of a conifold singularity. The eigenfunctions can be written in terms of confluent Heun functions, the analysis of which gives evidence that regions of large curvature will not prevent the existence of a bound of this type. This is also in line with general mathematical expectations about spectral continuity for manifolds with conical singularities. A sharper version of our results could, in combination with the SCHOK bound, provide a basis for a global restriction on the dimension of the moduli space of Calabi-Yau manifolds.

  20. Conceptual development of the Laser Beam Manifold (LBM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.; Owen, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The laser beam manifold, a device for transforming a single, narrow, collimated beam of light into several beams of desired intensity ratios is described. The device consists of a single optical substrate with a metallic coating on both optical surfaces. By changing the entry point, the number of outgoing beams can be varied.

  1. Nonparametric Bayes Classification and Hypothesis Testing on Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Dunson, David

    2012-01-01

    Our first focus is prediction of a categorical response variable using features that lie on a general manifold. For example, the manifold may correspond to the surface of a hypersphere. We propose a general kernel mixture model for the joint distribution of the response and predictors, with the kernel expressed in product form and dependence induced through the unknown mixing measure. We provide simple sufficient conditions for large support and weak and strong posterior consistency in estimating both the joint distribution of the response and predictors and the conditional distribution of the response. Focusing on a Dirichlet process prior for the mixing measure, these conditions hold using von Mises-Fisher kernels when the manifold is the unit hypersphere. In this case, Bayesian methods are developed for efficient posterior computation using slice sampling. Next we develop Bayesian nonparametric methods for testing whether there is a difference in distributions between groups of observations on the manifold having unknown densities. We prove consistency of the Bayes factor and develop efficient computational methods for its calculation. The proposed classification and testing methods are evaluated using simulation examples and applied to spherical data applications. PMID:22754028

  2. Experimental investigation of a manifold heat-pipe heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Konev, S.V.; Wang Tszin` Lyan`; D`yakov, I.I.

    1995-12-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a heat exchanger on a manifold water heat pipe are given. An analysis is made of the temperature distribution along the heat-transfer agent path as a function of the transferred heat power. The influence of the degree of filling with the heat transfer agent on the operating characteristics of the construction is considered.

  3. Comparison of physical and inhalation properties of spray-dried and micronized terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Thi, Thanh Huong Hoang; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc; Flament, Marie-Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Terbutaline sulphate particles, for use in dry powder inhaler formulations, were prepared by spray-drying, using a Büchi 190 mini spray dryer. Spray-drying conditions were chosen to allow the production of spray-dried terbutaline sulphate with a size similar to micronized terbutaline sulphate, that is to say about 2.9 microm of volume mean diameter. The physical properties and in vitro inhalation behaviour of micronized and spray-dried terbutaline sulphate were compared. X-ray diffraction, DSC, SEM and laser size analysis were investigated. Spray-dying produced spherically shaped particles with amorphous structure. After blending with different lactoses, adhesion and aerodynamic properties were investigated. Evaluation of adhesion was carried out with a mechanical sieve and an Alpine air-jet sieve. The adhesion of terbutaline sulphate on the lactoses tested was lower in the case of the spray-dried drug. Aerodynamic evaluation of fine particle dose and emitted dose was conducted using a twin stage impactor. The emitted doses and the fine particle doses were higher with the spray-dried terbutaline sulphate. The Alpine air-jet sieve assays showed that there was a correlation between drug separation from a carrier by sieving and that obtained from longer in vitro deposition studies. There was a linear relationship between the adhesion characteristics and the fine particle dose. PMID:18504120

  4. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  5. FeAI and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright; W. David Swank

    2004-12-01

    FeAl and Mo–Si–B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe–24Al (wt%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 to 700 m/s. Mo–13.4Si–2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo–Si–B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity. For Mo–Si–B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and a-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  6. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  7. Numerical Analysis of the Effects of Wind and Sprayer Type on Spray Distribution in Different Orchard Training Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duga, Ashenafi T.; Dekeyser, Donald; Ruysen, Kris; Bylemans, Dany; Nuyttens, David; Nicolai, Bart M.; Verboven, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of airflow and spray application in orchards was validated using field trials and used to assess the effect of wind and sprayer type on spray distribution in different orchard training systems. Three air-assisted orchard sprayer designs (a cross-flow sprayer, an axial sprayer and a sprayer with individual spouts) and four different training systems of apple and pear trees were used for this analysis. The CFD model integrates the tree architecture into the model geometry, rather than using a generalized canopy profile approach. Predicted vertical on-tree deposition profiles agreed well with measurements. The lower airflow rate generated by the sprayer with individual spouts resulted in a significantly larger deflection of the spray particles under the same wind conditions. A detailed assessment was made on the most common axial sprayer. An increase in the magnitude of the wind speed for flow across the tree row resulted in an increase in the amount of spray detected in the air around the trees and in the ground deposition in front of the tree row. Environmental airflow in the direction of spraying gave the largest deposition on the tree, constraining the spray in the canopy region. A wind direction opposite to the spraying direction, however, resulted in an increase of the ground deposition and the amount of spray remaining in air. The model can be used to analyze the effects of implementation of more sustainable spray application procedures taking into account wind conditions, tree and machine characteristics.

  8. Spray-formed tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K. M.; Key, J. F.

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be designed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  9. Spray-formed tooling

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be de signed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  10. Characterization of Liquid Fuel Evaporation of a Lifted Methanol Spray Flame in a Vitiated Coflow Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, Ricardo; Dibble, Robert W.; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation of lifted spray flames in a coflow of hot, vitiated gases is presented. The vitiated coflow burner is a spray flame that issues into a coaxial flow of hot combustion products from a lean, premixed H2/Air flame. The spray flame in a vitiated coflow emulates the combustion that occurs in many advanced combustors without the detailed fluid mechanics. Two commercially available laser diagnostic systems are used to characterize the spray flame and to demonstrate the vitiated coflow burner's amenability to optical investigation. The Ensemble Particle Concentration and Size (EPCS) system is used to measure the path-average droplet size distribution and liquid volume fraction at several axial locations while an extractive probe instrument named the Real-time Fuel-air Analyzer (RFA) is used to measure the air to fuel ratio downstream of the spray nozzle with high temporal and spatial resolution. The effect of coflow conditions (stoichiometry) and dilution of the fuel with water was studied with the EPCS optical system. As expected, results show that water retards the evaporation and combustion of fuels. Measurements obtained by the RFA extractive probe show that while the Delavan manufactured nozzle does distribute the fuel over the manufacturer specified spray angle, it unfortunately does not distribute the fuel uniformly, providing conditions that may result in the production of unwanted NOx. Despite some limitations due to the inherent nature of the experimental techniques, the two diagnostics can be readily applied to spray flames in the vitiated coflow environment.

  11. A New Way to Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract provided the funding for a new nozzle shape to be used in plasma spray techniques. The new design, a bell shape, reduces overspray. The result is a significant decrease in the cost of plasma spraying and a higher quality, more pure coating.

  12. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  13. 30 CFR 250.444 - What are the choke manifold requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the choke manifold requirements? 250... Gas Drilling Operations Blowout Preventer (bop) System Requirements § 250.444 What are the choke manifold requirements? (a) Your BOP system must include a choke manifold that is suitable for...

  14. 30 CFR 250.444 - What are the choke manifold requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the choke manifold requirements? 250... Blowout Preventer (bop) System Requirements § 250.444 What are the choke manifold requirements? (a) Your BOP system must include a choke manifold that is suitable for the anticipated surface...

  15. 30 CFR 250.444 - What are the choke manifold requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the choke manifold requirements? 250... Drilling Operations Blowout Preventer (bop) System Requirements § 250.444 What are the choke manifold requirements? (a) Your BOP system must include a choke manifold that is suitable for the anticipated...

  16. 30 CFR 250.444 - What are the choke manifold requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the choke manifold requirements? 250... Drilling Operations Blowout Preventer (bop) System Requirements § 250.444 What are the choke manifold requirements? (a) Your BOP system must include a choke manifold that is suitable for the anticipated...

  17. 30 CFR 250.444 - What are the choke manifold requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the choke manifold requirements? 250... Drilling Operations Blowout Preventer (bop) System Requirements § 250.444 What are the choke manifold requirements? (a) Your BOP system must include a choke manifold that is suitable for the anticipated...

  18. 33 CFR 149.110 - What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? 149.110 Section 149.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 149.110 What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? Each pipeline end manifold must have a shutoff valve capable of operating both...

  19. 33 CFR 149.110 - What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? 149.110 Section 149.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 149.110 What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? Each pipeline end manifold must have a shutoff valve capable of operating both...

  20. 33 CFR 149.110 - What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? 149.110 Section 149.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 149.110 What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? Each pipeline end manifold must have a shutoff valve capable of operating both...

  1. 33 CFR 149.110 - What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? 149.110 Section 149.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 149.110 What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? Each pipeline end manifold must have a shutoff valve capable of operating both...

  2. 33 CFR 149.110 - What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? 149.110 Section 149.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 149.110 What are the requirements for pipeline end manifold shutoff valves? Each pipeline end manifold must have a shutoff valve capable of operating both...

  3. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  4. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  5. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  6. Microstructure and wear behavior of quasicrystalline thermal sprayed

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Krotz, P.D.; Daniel, R.L.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    An Al-Cu-Fe alloy coating which forms a quasicrystalline phase is a potential candidate for replacing electro-deposited chromium on various components in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Coatings were deposited by air and vacuum plasma spraying and by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. Finer starting powders tended to lose Al during spraying, which affected the phase equilibrium of the coatings. Coatings which retained the starting powder composition were richer in the desired quasicrystalline phase. Ball-on-disk wear tests between 440 C stainless steel ball and the Al-Cu-Fe coatings were performed. Coefficients of friction ranged from 0.60 to 1.2 for the different coatings.

  7. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  8. Pollution control by spray dryer and electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, J.R.

    1983-02-08

    A combination spray drying and electron beam treatment for effluent gases provides air pollution control for even high sulfur coals. Liquid and a reagent are injected into the effluent gas in the spray dryer, thereby cleansing the effluent gas, decreasing its temperature, and increasing its moisture content. The spray drying decreases the temperature at least to below 100/sup 0/ C and, most preferably, to between 60 and 70/sup 0/ C. The decreased temperature, increased moisture content effluent gas including both reacted compounds and unreacted reagent is conveyed into an irradiation chamber, whereat radiation causes the gaseous sulfur oxides and/or nitrogen oxides to convert into mist and/or solid particles. The unreacted reagent may then react with the acid mist. The effluent gases are then subjected to dry particular collection.

  9. USERS GUIDE FOR THE CONVERSION OF NAVY PAINT SPRAY BOOTH PARTICULATE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEMS FROM WET TO DRY OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a guide or convrting U.S. Navy paint spray booth particulate emission control systems from wet to dry operation. The use of water curtains for air pollution control of paint spray booths is considered a major source of water and solid waste pol-lution from industria...

  10. Development of variable-rate sprayer with laser scanning sensor to synchronize spray outputs to tree structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient and effective precision spray equipment and strategies have been constantly demanded to reduce pesticide use in tree crop productions. An experimental variable-rate air-assisted sprayer implemented with a high-speed laser scanning sensor was developed to control the spray output of individ...

  11. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  12. Removal of carbon dioxide by a spray dryer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Cherng; Fang, Guor-Cheng; Tang, Jun-Tian; Liu, Li-Ping

    2005-03-01

    With the global warming due to greenhouse effects becoming serious, many efforts are carried out to decrease the emissions of CO2 from the combustion of carbonaceous materials. In Taiwan, there are 19 large-scale municipal solid waste incinerators running and their total emission of CO2 is about 16,950 kton y-1. Spray dryer is the most prevailing air pollution control devise for removing acid gas in waste incineration; however, the performance of spray dryer on the removal of CO2 is seldom studied. This study employs a laboratory-scale spray dryer to investigate the removal efficiency of CO2 under different operating conditions. The evaluated parameters include different absorbents mixed with CaOH2, operating temperature, the concentration of absorbent, and the inlet concentration of CO2. Experimental results show that the best removal efficiency of CO2 by a spray dryer is 48% as the absorbent is 10%NaOH+5%CaOH2 and the operating temperature is 150 degrees C. Comparing this result with previous study shows that the performance of spray dryer is better than traditional NaOH wet scrubber. For NaOH+CaOH2 spray dryer, the removal efficiency of CO2 is decreased with the inlet concentration of CO2 increased and the optimum operating temperature is 150 degrees C. Except NaOH+CaOH2, absorbents DEA+CaOH2, TEA+CaOH2, and single CaOH2 are not effective in removing CO2 by a spray dryer. PMID:15698650

  13. Prediction of pressure fluctuation in sounding rockets and manifolded recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudadio, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The determination of altitude by means of barometric sensors in sounding rocket applications is discussed. A method for predicting the performance of such sensing systems is needed. A method is developed for predicting the pressure-time response of a volume subjected to subsonic air flow through from one to four passages. The pressure calculation is based on one-dimensional gas flow with friction. A computed program has been developed which solves the differential equations using a self-starting predictor-corrector integration technique. The input data required are the pressure sensing system dimensions, pressure forcing function(s) at the inlet port(s), and a trajectory over the time of analysis (altitude-velocity-time), if the forcing function is trajectory dependent. The program then computes the pressure-temperature history of the gas in the manifold over the time interval specified.

  14. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  15. Experimental testing of spray dryer for control of incineration emissions.

    PubMed

    Wey, M Y; Wu, H Y; Tseng, H H; Chen, J C

    2003-05-01

    The research investigated the absorption/adsorption efficiency of sulfur dioxide (SO2), heavy metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with different Ca-based sorbents in a spray dryer during incineration process. For further improving the adsorption capacity of Ca-based sorbents, different spraying pressure and additives were carried out in this study. Experimental results showed that CaO could be used as an alternative sorbent in the spray dryer at an optimal initial particle size distribution of spraying droplet. In the spray dryer, Ca-based sorbents provided a lot of sites for heavy metals and PAHs condensing and calcium and alkalinity to react with metals to form merged species. As a result, heavy metals and PAHs could be removed from the flue gas simultaneously by condensation and adsorption. The additions of additives NaHCO3, SiO2, and KMnO4 were also found to be effective in improving the removal efficiency of these air pollutants. PMID:12744446

  16. Crystallization Evolution of Cold-Sprayed Pure Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold spraying is a coating technology on the basis of aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. Spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (preheated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval type nozzle. The coating forms through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on the substrate at temperatures well below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper, the main processing parameters affecting the crystallization behavior of pure Ni cold spray deposits on IN718 alloy are described. Various experimental conditions have been analyzed: gas temperature and pressure, nozzle to substrate distance. In particular, the study deals with those conditions leading to a strong grain refinement, with an acceptable level of the deposits mechanical properties. In precise spray conditions, a shift toward amorphous phases has been observed and studied. A systematic analysis of microstructural evolution, performed through TEM observations, as a function of processing parameters is presented.

  17. Crystallization Evolution of Cold-Sprayed Pure Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-07-01

    Cold spraying is a coating technology on the basis of aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. Spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (preheated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval type nozzle. The coating forms through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on the substrate at temperatures well below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper, the main processing parameters affecting the crystallization behavior of pure Ni cold spray deposits on IN718 alloy are described. Various experimental conditions have been analyzed: gas temperature and pressure, nozzle to substrate distance. In particular, the study deals with those conditions leading to a strong grain refinement, with an acceptable level of the deposits mechanical properties. In precise spray conditions, a shift toward amorphous phases has been observed and studied. A systematic analysis of microstructural evolution, performed through TEM observations, as a function of processing parameters is presented.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Spray Atomization in Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangfeng; Liu, Chen; Wu, Yizhao

    With the rapid development of the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle design, an accurate description of the combustion properties becomes more and more important, where one of the key techniques is the procedure of the liquid fuel mixing, atomizing and burning coupled with the supersonic crossflow in the combustion chamber. The movement and distribution of the liquid fuel droplets in the combustion chamber will influence greatly the combustion properties, as well as the propulsion performance of the ramjet/scramjet engine. In this paper, numerical simulation methods on unstructured hybrid meshes were carried out for liquid spray atomization in supersonic crossflows. The Kelvin-Helmholtz/Rayleigh-Taylor hybrid model was used to simulate the breakup process of the liquid spray in a supersonic crossflow with Mach number 1.94. Various spray properties, including spray penetration height, droplet size distribution, were quantitatively compared with experimental results. In addition, numerical results of the complex shock wave structure induced by the presence of liquid spray were illustrated and discussed.

  19. Spray Characteristics of a Hybrid Twin-Fluid Pressure-Swirl Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, M. J.; Sojka, P. E.; Ashmore, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    The spray performance of a fuel injection system applicable for use in main combustion chamber of an oxidizer-rich staged combustion (ORSC) cycles is presented. The experimental data reported here include mean drop size and drop size distribution, spray cone half-angle, and momentum rate (directly related to spray penetration). The maximum entropy formalism, MEF, method to predict drop size distribution is applied and compared to the experimental data. Geometric variables considered include the radius of the injector inlet orifice plate through which oxidizer flows (&) and the exposed length from the fuel inlet to the injector exit plane (L2). Operating conditions that were varied include the liquid mass flow rate and air mass flow rate. For orifices B and C there is a significant dependence of D3Z on both the air and liquid mass flow rates, as well as on L2. For the A orifice, the momentum rate of the air flow appears to exceed a threshold value above which a constant D32 is obtained. Using the MEF method, a semi-analytical process was developed to model the spray distribution using two input parameters (q = 0.4 and Dso). The momentum rate of the spray is directly related to the air and liquid mass flow rates. The cone half angle of the spray ranges from 25 to 17 degrees. The data resulting from this project will eventually be used to develop advanced rocket systems.

  20. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters. PMID:27369140