Science.gov

Sample records for air supply method

  1. Air supply distributor for fireplaces

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, H.A.

    1984-09-18

    An air supply distributor for fireplaces having an opening in the hearth for the supply of relatively cold air is used in combination with means, such as a log holder or grate, for supporting combustible products and comprises a pair of side walls and a top cover. The distributor is adapted to be positioned under the log holder or grate to overlie the hearth opening so that relatively cold air passing through the hearth opening is directed toward the front opening of the fireplace from which it passes to the fire for supporting combustion thereof thereby minimizing the amount of air drawn from the room.

  2. Fireplace having outside air supply

    SciTech Connect

    Hempel, R.A.

    1981-07-28

    An outside air system and combustion chamber closure assembly for use with a fireplace which provides means for supplying sufficient amounts of cooling air between the burning fuel and the closure assembly is disclosed. The closure assembly includes a frame surrounding the combustion chamber opening and at least one door operably mounted thereto. A grille is formed in the bottom rail of the frame for introduction of air into the combustion chamber. The outside air system includes an outside air duct which is coupled to a chamber defining an air plenum formed below the hearth of the fireplace and air cap assembly. The air cap assembly is positioned against the bottom rail of the frame and extends across the combustion chamber opening. The assembly includes a duct which communicates with the chamber defining the air plenum formed below the hearth and an air discharge housing positioned adjacent the bottom rail. A damper means is operably mounted in the air discharge housing and is adjustable between an outside air mode or a room air mode so that when said at least one door is closed, only outside air or room air will pass into the combustion chamber at hearth level in sufficient volume for fuel combustion as well as providing an excess of air to prevent overheating of the fireplace assembly and said at least one door.

  3. Development of a method for the regeneration of an alkaline electrolyte in an air-aluminum chemical power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, K. V.; Sevruk, S. D.; Suvorova, E. V.; Farmakovskaya, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of studying the development of a regeneration technology for the spent alkaline electrolyte in an air-aluminum chemical power supply are presented. The application of this technology is a component of the wasteless and friendly environmental operation of an energy installation based on an air-aluminum chemical power supply. The operability of the energy installation based on the air-aluminum chemical power supply using regenerated alkaline electrolytes is experimentally confirmed. Technical requirements for the technological equipment for alkaline electrolyte regeneration are developed on the basis of the obtained results.

  4. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  5. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  6. Comparison of various methods to distribute supply air in industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Strobel, K.

    1999-07-01

    The evaluation of the ventilation effectiveness and thermal comfort for various industrial ventilation schemes has been carried out by scale model experimentation. Forty experiments involving ten ventilation arrangements, each with three supply airflow rates and two possible industrial process heat loads, were performed. Measurements of airspeed, temperature, and contaminant concentration allowed the thermal comfort and contaminant removal to be quantified using the ISO Comfort Standard ISO-7730 and the ventilation effectiveness indices, respectively. Archimedes number scaling was used to convert the small-scale measurements to full-scale conditions. The largest ventilation effectiveness occurred for a low supply/high return configuration, with values above 1.6, followed by a high supply/high return configuration with values in the range from 1.0 to 1.2. A low supply/low return configuration had values of about 1.0. The ventilation efficiency generally increased when the heat load was increased and/or the flow rate decreased. Increasing the number of diffusers in the occupied zone increased the ventilation effectiveness. The thermal comfort results depended on the diffuser configuration and the activity level of the worker. Most of the configurations produced acceptable thermal comfort results for a seated worker and unacceptable conditions at an increased activity and clothing level.

  7. Fluid-bed air-supply system

    DOEpatents

    Atabay, Keramettin

    1979-01-01

    The air-supply system for a fluidized-bed furnace includes two air conduits for the same combustion zone. The conduits feed separate sets of holes in a distributor plate through which fluidizing air flows to reach the bed. During normal operation, only one conduit and set of holes is used, but the second conduit and set of holes is employed during start-up.

  8. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  9. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432...-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is conducted... space; and (f) The surface-supplied air diver has the equipment required by § 197.346 (b) or (d)....

  10. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  11. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  12. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied air...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with...

  14. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  15. Engine powered auxiliary air supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Lean, J.R.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes an auxiliary air supply system comprising: an engine; at least one exhaust driven turbocharger including a turbine and a compressor associated therewith for supply of compressed air to the engine; a low pressure compressor including means for powering the low pressure compressor utilizing the engine exhaust gas and flow connected to receive a portion of the compressed air exiting the engine turbocharger compressor; a high pressure compressor including means for powering the high pressure compressor utilizing the engine exhaust gas and flow connected to receive the compressed air exiting the low pressure compressor; and means for directing engine exhaust gases between at least one engine turbocharger and the means for powering the low and high pressure compressors.

  16. 42 CFR 84.142 - Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.142 Section 84.142 Public....142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air...

  17. 42 CFR 84.142 - Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.142 Section 84.142 Public....142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air...

  18. 42 CFR 84.142 - Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.142 Section 84.142 Public....142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air...

  19. 42 CFR 84.142 - Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.142 Section 84.142 Public....142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air...

  20. 42 CFR 84.142 - Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.142 Section 84.142 Public....142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air...

  1. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.432 Surface-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  10. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  11. 42 CFR 84.147 - Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum... DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.147 Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. No Type B supplied-air respirator shall be approved for use with a blower or with connection to an air supply...

  12. 42 CFR 84.147 - Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum... DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.147 Type B supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. No Type B supplied-air respirator shall be approved for use with a blower or with connection to an air supply...

  13. 42 CFR 84.150 - Air-supply line tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Respirators § 84.150 Air-supply line tests; minimum requirements. Air supply lines employed on Type A, Type B, and Type C supplied-air respirators shall meet the minimum test requirements set forth in Table 8...

  14. 42 CFR 84.150 - Air-supply line tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Respirators § 84.150 Air-supply line tests; minimum requirements. Air supply lines employed on Type A, Type B, and Type C supplied-air respirators shall meet the minimum test requirements set forth in Table 8...

  15. Control of an Isolated Table's Fluctuation Caused by Supplied Air Pressure Using a Voice Coil Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Habiburahman; Wakui, Shinji

    Pneumatic type anti-vibration apparatuses are used in the field of semiconductor manufacturing and precision measurement. The variation of the supplied air pressure from the air compressor causes the position fluctuation of the isolated table. A control method using a voice coil motor (VCM) as the actuator is proposed in this study to control the position fluctuation of the isolated table caused by the supplied air pressure. The feedforward compensator control scheme is used to provide a proper controlled signal to the VCM. According to the controlled signal, VCM exerts driving force in the opposite direction of the air spring expansion or compression to suppress the vibration of the isolated table.

  16. 42 CFR 84.139 - Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.139 Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. Type AE, BE, and CE supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed...

  17. 42 CFR 84.139 - Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.139 Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. Type AE, BE, and CE supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed...

  18. 42 CFR 84.131 - Supplied-air respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; required components. 84... Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.131 Supplied-air respirators; required components. (a) Each supplied-air respirator described in § 84.130 shall, where its design requires, contain the following component parts:...

  19. 42 CFR 84.131 - Supplied-air respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; required components. 84... Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.131 Supplied-air respirators; required components. (a) Each supplied-air respirator described in § 84.130 shall, where its design requires, contain the following component parts:...

  20. Energy and air emission effects of water supply.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-15

    Life-cycle air emission effects of supplying water are explored using a hybrid life-cycle assessment For the typically sized U.S. utility analyzed, recycled water is preferable to desalination and comparable to importation. Seawater desalination has an energy and air emission footprint that is 1.5-2.4 times larger than that of imported water. However, some desalination modes fare better; brackish groundwater is 53-66% as environmentally intensive as seawater desalination. The annual water needs (326 m3) of a typical Californian that is met with imported water requires 5.8 GJ of energy and creates 360 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. With seawater desalination, energy use would increase to 14 GJ and 800 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. Meeting the water demand of California with desalination would consume 52% of the state's electricity. Supply options were reassessed using alternative electricity mixes, including the average mix of the United States and several renewable sources. Desalination using solar thermal energy has lower greenhouse gas emissions than that of imported and recycled water (using California's electricity mix), but using the U.S. mix increases the environmental footprint by 1.5 times. A comparison with a more energy-intensive international scenario shows that CO2 equivalent emissions for desalination in Dubai are 1.6 times larger than in California. The methods, decision support tool (WEST), and results of this study should persuade decision makers to make informed water policy choices by including energy consumption and material use effects in the decision-making process.

  1. Power supply with air core transformer and seperated power supplies for high dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A power supply for a quadrupole mass spectrometer which operates using an RF signal. The RF signal is controllable via a feedback loop. The feedback loop is from the output, through a comparator, and compared to a digital signal. An air core transformer is used to minimize the weight. The air core transformer is driven via two out of phase sawtooth signals which drive opposite ends of the transformer.

  2. Air supply system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Eftink, A.J.

    1991-03-12

    This patent describes a reciprocating piston internal combustion engine having a crankshaft and at least two cylinders, each cylinder having a displacement volume V{sub 1}, the improved means for supplying air to each cylinder. It comprises: a rotary, trochoidal chamber air pump defining at least one pair of pumping chambers, the number of pumping chambers being equal to the number of cylinders in the engine; air intake conduits connecting each pumping chamber to one cylinder of the engine; a rotor rotatable in each pair of pumping chambers, the rotor having three faces such that passage of a face of the rotor through a pumping chamber forces air in the pumping chamber into the associated air intake conduit and, consequently, into the engine cylinder; and means interconnecting the rotor and the crankshaft so as to rotate the rotor approximately one revolution for every three revolutions of the crankshaft.

  3. Apparatus for supplying conditioned air at a substantially constant temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The apparatus includes a supply duct coupled to a source of supply air for carrying the supply air therethrough. A return duct is coupled to the supply duct for carrying return conditioned air therethrough. A temperature reducing device is coupled to the supply duct for decreasing the temperature of the supply and return conditioned air. A by-pass duct is coupled to the supply duct for selectively directing portions of the supply and return conditioned air around the temperature reducing device. Another by-pass duct is coupled to the return duct for selectively directing portions of the return conditioned air around the supply duct and the temperature reduction device. Controller devices selectively control the flow and amount of mixing of the supply and return conditioned air.

  4. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.148 Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements. (a) Respirators tested under this section shall be approved only...

  5. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E. H.

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The higher the supply flow rates the easier to reach good mixing in the space. In high performance homes, however, the flow rates required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space. The objective of this study is to resolve this issue and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. We used computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply for residential applications in heating and cooling modes. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions, and room dimensions. Laboratory experiments supported the study of thermal mixing in heating mode; we used the results to develop a correlation to predict high sidewall diffuser performance. For cooling mode, numerical analysis is presented. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes. It is proven that these systems can achieve good mixing and provide acceptable comfort levels. Recommendations are given on the operating conditions to guarantee occupant comfort.

  6. Tracing global supply chains to air pollution hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Daniel; Kanemoto, Keiichiro

    2016-09-01

    While high-income countries have made significant strides since the 1970s in improving air quality, air pollution continues to rise in many developing countries and the world as a whole. A significant share of the pollution burden in developing countries can be attributed to production for export to consumers in high-income nations. However, it remains a challenge to quantify individual actors’ share of responsibility for pollution, and to involve parties other than primary emitters in cleanup efforts. Here we present a new spatially explicit modeling approach to link SO2, NO x , and PM10 severe emissions hotspots to final consumers via global supply chains. These maps show developed countries reducing their emissions domestically but driving new pollution hotspots in developing countries. This is also the first time a spatially explicit footprint inventory has been established. Linking consumers and supply chains to emissions hotspots creates opportunities for other parties to participate alongside primary emitters and local regulators in pollution abatement efforts.

  7. Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, El Hassan

    2011-09-01

    Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The objective of the study outlined in this report is to resolve the issue that the flow rates that are required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space.and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes.

  8. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  9. Direct current uninterruptible power supply method and system

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Gautam

    2003-12-02

    A method and system are described for providing a direct current (DC) uninterruptible power supply with the method including, for example: continuously supplying fuel to a turbine; converting mechanical power from the turbine into alternating current (AC) electrical power; converting the AC electrical power to DC power within a predetermined voltage level range; supplying the DC power to a load; and maintaining a DC load voltage within the predetermined voltage level range by adjusting the amount of fuel supplied to the turbine.

  10. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  11. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  12. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  13. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  14. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... be approved only when used to supply respirable air at the pressures and quantities required. (b) The manufacturer shall specify the range of air pressure at the point of attachment of the air-supply hose to...

  15. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... be approved only when used to supply respirable air at the pressures and quantities required. (b) The manufacturer shall specify the range of air pressure at the point of attachment of the air-supply hose to...

  16. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... be approved only when used to supply respirable air at the pressures and quantities required. (b) The manufacturer shall specify the range of air pressure at the point of attachment of the air-supply hose to...

  17. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... be approved only when used to supply respirable air at the pressures and quantities required. (b) The manufacturer shall specify the range of air pressure at the point of attachment of the air-supply hose to...

  18. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... be approved only when used to supply respirable air at the pressures and quantities required. (b) The manufacturer shall specify the range of air pressure at the point of attachment of the air-supply hose to...

  19. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  20. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  1. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  2. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.156 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  3. 42 CFR 84.143 - Terminal fittings or chambers; Type B supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Terminal fittings or chambers; Type B supplied-air... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.143 Terminal fittings or chambers; Type B... positive pressures shall not be approved for use on Type B supplied-air respirators. (b) Terminal...

  4. 42 CFR 84.143 - Terminal fittings or chambers; Type B supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators; minimum requirements. 84.143 Section 84.143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.143 Terminal fittings or chambers; Type B supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Blowers or connections to air supplies...

  5. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); Tang, Shoou-yu (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing air outside a moving aircraft are presented. In one embodiment, a system includes a laser for generating laser energy. The system also includes one or more transceivers for projecting the laser energy as laser radiation to the air. Subsequently, each transceiver receives laser energy as it is backscattered from the air. A computer processes signals from the transceivers to distinguish molecular scattered laser radiation from aerosol scattered laser radiation and determines one or more air parameters based on the scattered laser radiation. Such air parameters may include air speed, air pressure, air temperature and aircraft orientation angle, such as yaw, angle of attack and sideslip.

  6. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin J. (Inventor); Weimer, Carl S. (Inventor); Nelson, Loren D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing air outside a moving aircraft are presented. In one embodiment, a system includes a laser for generating laser energy. The system also includes one or more transceivers for projecting the laser energy as laser radiation to the air. Subsequently, each transceiver receives laser energy as it is backscattered from the air. A computer processes signals from the transceivers to distinguish molecular scattered laser radiation from aerosol scattered laser radiation and determines one or more air parameters based on the scattered laser radiation. Such air parameters may include air speed, air pressure, air temperature and aircraft orientation angle, such as yaw, angle of attack and sideslip.

  7. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin J. (Inventor); Weimer, Carl S. (Inventor); Nelson, Loren D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing air outside a moving aircraft are presented. In one embodiment, a system includes a laser for generating laser energy. The system also includes one or more transceivers for projecting the laser energy as laser radiation to the air. Subsequently, each transceiver receives laser energy as it is backscattered from the air. A computer processes signals from the transceivers to distinguish molecular scattered laser radiation from aerosol scattered laser radiation and determines one or more air parameters based on the scattered laser radiation. Such air parameters may include air speed, air pressure, air temperature and aircraft orientation angle, such as yaw, angle of attack and sideslip.

  8. Frequency response of a jet engine test facility air supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, M. E.; Ross, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency response of a laboratory scale model of a portion of the air supply system of an engine test facility is obtained both experimentally and using one-dimensional, small-signal, distributed parameter theory. The effects of line terminations and mean flow are considered. Good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. Predictions are extended to a full scale test facility air supply system operating under several possible test conditions.

  9. Recirculating Molten Metal Supply System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Kinosz, Michael J.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2003-07-01

    The melter furnace includes a heating chamber (16), a pump chamber (18), a degassing chamber (20), and a filter chamber (22). The pump chamber (18) is located adjacent the heating chamber (16) and houses a molten metal pump (30). The degassing chamber (20) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the pump chamber (18), and houses a degassing mechanism (36). The filter chamber (22) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the degassing chamber (20). The filter chamber (22) includes a molten metal filter (38). The melter furnace (12) is used to supply molten metal to an externally located holder furnace (14), which then recirculates molten metal back to the melter furnace (12).

  10. Secondary air injection system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ko-Jen; Walter, Darrell J.

    2014-08-19

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a secondary air injection system includes a first conduit in fluid communication with at least one first exhaust passage of the internal combustion engine and a second conduit in fluid communication with at least one second exhaust passage of the internal combustion engine, wherein the at least one first and second exhaust passages are in fluid communication with a turbocharger. The system also includes an air supply in fluid communication with the first and second conduits and a flow control device that controls fluid communication between the air supply and the first conduit and the second conduit and thereby controls fluid communication to the first and second exhaust passages of the internal combustion engine.

  11. GIS Method for Developing Wind Supply Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, D.; Heimiller, D.; Cowlin, S.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes work conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the Wind Technology Partnership (WTP) sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This project has developed methods that the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) intends to use in the planning and development of China's 30 GW of planned capacity. Because of China's influence within the community of developing countries, the methods and the approaches here may help foster wind development in other countries.

  12. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  13. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  14. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  15. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  16. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall be... diameter. (b) Airflow resistance shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height to air...

  17. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type... shall not exceed 25 mm. (1 inch) of water-column height when the air flow into the...

  18. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2012-06-01

    The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically. PMID:22788100

  19. Downhole steam generator using low pressure fuel and air supply

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a spiral, tubular heat exchanger is used in the combustion chamber to isolate the combustion process from the water being superheated for conversion into steam. The isolation allows combustion of a relatively low pressure oxidant and fuel mixture for generating high enthalpy steam. The fuel is preheated by feedback of combustion gases from the top of the combustion chamber through a fuel preheater chamber. The hot exhaust gases of combustion at the bottom of the combustion chamber, after flowing over the heat exchanger enter an exhaust passage and pipe. The exhaust pipe is mounted inside the water supply line heating the water flowing into the heat exchanger. After being superheated in the heat exchanger, the water is ejected through an expansion nozzle and converts into steam prior to penetration into the earth formation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at a steam outlet downstream of the nozzle and close when the steam pressure is lost due to flameout.

  20. Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2012-06-01

    The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically.

  1. Wearable air supply for pneumatic artificial hearts and ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Sipin, A J; Fabrey, W J; Smith, S H; Doussourd, J D; Olsen, D B

    1992-08-01

    An experimental wearable air supply for pneumatic artificial hearts and ventricular assist devices has been built and tested. The unit eliminates the need for tethering to a large, stationery driver. The miniaturized air supply is designed for ambulatory patients with implanted pulsatile pneumatic total artificial hearts (TAH) or pneumatic left-ventricular assist devices (LVAD), to permit mobility in clinical and home settings. The device has major short-term utility as a supply for pneumatic TAH or VAD bridges in patients awaiting heart transplants. The system design for the wearable driver includes a novel, fast rotary compressor, driven by a brushless direct current (DC) motor to supply air to the ventricle through an electromagnetically actuated directional valve, all controlled by a microcomputer. Stroke volume from 0 to 200 cc; pulse rate from 60 to 160 bpm, and duty cycle from 33% to 50% are selected on a keyboard, and the selected or measured parameters can be shown on a liquid crystal display. For control of delivery from a single ventricular assist device, stroke volume is controlled by variation of compressor speed. In the wearable air supply for a TAH, a single compressor drives both ventricles alternately through a double-acting directional valve. Air volume delivered to the left ventricle is adjusted by variation of compressor speed, and air volume to the right ventricle by variation of ejection time. The effect on blood flow rate of the lower impedance to the right ventricle is compensated by provision of a two-stage compressor, in which a single stage drives the right ventricle, and both stages connected in parallel drive the left ventricle. The overall dimensions of the prototype air supply for driving either a TAH or LVAD are 4.5 by 7.8 by 4.5 inches, including an emergency battery with a duration of 15 to 30 min depending on load. The weight is presently 5.5 lb, but this will be reduced in a production design and for a dedicated LVAD air supply

  2. Method and apparatus for supplying fuel to internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, T.

    1986-03-25

    An apparatus is described for supplying fuel to a two-cycle internal combustion engine having a rotating crankshaft in a crank chamber, comprising an intake port provided in the engine and open to the crank chamber of the engine, a single intake passage connected at one end to the intake port and at an opposite end leading to atmosphere, and means connected to an intermediate portion of the intake passage for supplying fuel to the latter and suspending fuel supply thereto. The means consists of: a carburetor disposed in the intermediate portion of the intake passage, the carburetor having a venturi portion, a float chamber and a fuel injection nozzle connecting between the venturi portion and the float chamber; a stop valve for controlling injection of fuel into the intake passage through the fuel injection nozzle; a valve actuator operatively connected to the stop valve; and a switch means disposed in a circuit connecting the stop valve and the valve actuator, the switch means being operatively connected to the crankshaft of the engine to actuate the stop valve in accordance with revolution speed of the engine, such that the means acts to alternately admit air-fuel mixture and fresh air only, respectively, during alternate revolutions of the engine.

  3. Dynamic investigation of PEFC stacks in interaction with the air supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipps, F.; Simons, G.; Schiefer, K.

    This paper explores the behaviour of a dynamically operated fuel cell system regarding to an automotive application, examining the air supply and their interaction with the fuel cell stacks. The dynamic limits of stack operation are also discussed. Finally, the paper provides a description of the test facility used in these investigations. The research of dynamically operated fuel cell stacks shows that in order to achieve high energy efficiency, a power-dependent modulation of the pressure and flow rate of the air supply is necessary. A test facility designed for energy management and power train research (up to 42 kW) was used for the experiment. A number of 11.5 kW fuel cell stacks was examined experimentally with respect to performance in interaction with the air supply in stationary and dynamic operation. The stacks were tested individually and in parallel. All of them were operated "dead-end" on the hydrogen side. Experimental results varying the parameters and load curves applied to the air supply system are given in the paper. The results show different dynamic behaviours between the stacks and a substantial difference in efficiency and dynamic response of the fuel cell system operated with different strategies. The results of different operating strategies for fuel cell systems, with respect to the interaction between the fuel cell stack and the air supply and in their dependency on air mass flow and pressure level are presented. The examinations were done with the test facility using real current demand profile of the experimental car HyLite ® from zero to full load and the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC).

  4. Assessing Security of Supply: Three Methods Used in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivonen, Hannu

    Public Private Partnership (PPP) has an important role in securing supply in Finland. Three methods are used in assessing the level of security of supply. First, in national expert groups, a linear mathematical model has been used. The model is based on interdependency estimates. It ranks societal functions or its more detailed components, such as items in the food supply chain, according to the effect and risk pertinent to the interdependencies. Second, the security of supply is assessed in industrial branch committees (clusters and pools) in the form of indicators. The level of security of supply is assessed against five generic factors (dimension 1) and tens of business branch specific functions (dimension 2). Third, in two thousand individual critical companies, the maturity of operational continuity management is assessed using Capability Maturity Model (CMM) in an extranet application. The pool committees and authorities obtain an anonymous summary. The assessments are used in allocating efforts for securing supply. The efforts may be new instructions, training, exercising, and in some cases, investment and regulation.

  5. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); Tang, Shoou-yu (Inventor); Acott, Phillip E. (Inventor); Spaeth, Lisa G. (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing air includes at least one, and in some embodiments three, transceivers for projecting the laser energy as laser radiation to the air. The transceivers are scanned or aligned along several different axes. Each transceiver receives laser energy as it is backscattered from the air. A computer processes signals from the transceivers to distinguish molecular scattered laser radiation from aerosol scattered laser radiation and determines air temperatures, wind speeds, and wind directions based on the scattered laser radiation. Applications of the system to wind power site evaluation, wind turbine control, traffic safety, general meteorological monitoring and airport safety are presented.

  6. Method for controlling the fuel supply of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yamato, A.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a method for controlling the fuel supply of an internal combustion engine having a throttle valve in an intake air system comprising the steps of: detecting that an angular position of a crankshaft of the engine as in coincidence with a predetermined crankshaft angular position; detecting, at each detection of the coincidence, a pressure in an intake air passage downstream of the throttle valve; and an engine rotating speed of the engine or a value in inverse proportion to the engine rotating speed on the basis of an interval between the detections of the predetermined crankshaft angular position.

  7. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  8. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  9. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will be... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type...

  10. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  11. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  12. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  13. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC...

  14. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.153 Section 84.153 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  15. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84.153 Section 84.153 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  16. Experimental investigation of personal air supply nozzle use in aircraft cabins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhaosong; Liu, Hong; Li, Baizhan; Baldwin, Andrew; Wang, Jian; Xia, Kechao

    2015-03-01

    To study air passengers' use of individual air supply nozzles in aircraft cabins, we constructed an experimental chamber which replicated the interior of a modern passenger aircraft. A series of experiments were conducted at different levels of cabin occupancy. Survey data were collected focused on the reasons for opening the nozzle, adjusting the level of air flow, and changing the direction of the air flow. The results showed that human thermal and draft sensations change over time in an aircraft cabin. The thermal sensation response was highest when the volunteers first entered the cabin and decreased over time until it stablized. Fifty-one percent of volunteers opened the nozzle to alleviate a feeling of stuffiness, and more than 50% adjusted the nozzle to improve upper body comfort. Over the period of the experiment the majority of volunteers chose to adjust their the air flow of their personal system. This confirms airline companies' decisions to install the individual aircraft ventilation systems in their aircraft indicates that personal air systems based on nozzle adjustment are essential for cabin comfort. These results will assist in the design of more efficient air distribution systems within passenger aircraft cabins where there is a need to optimize the air flow in order to efficiently improve aircraft passengers' thermal comfort and reduce energy use. PMID:25479988

  17. Experimental investigation of personal air supply nozzle use in aircraft cabins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhaosong; Liu, Hong; Li, Baizhan; Baldwin, Andrew; Wang, Jian; Xia, Kechao

    2015-03-01

    To study air passengers' use of individual air supply nozzles in aircraft cabins, we constructed an experimental chamber which replicated the interior of a modern passenger aircraft. A series of experiments were conducted at different levels of cabin occupancy. Survey data were collected focused on the reasons for opening the nozzle, adjusting the level of air flow, and changing the direction of the air flow. The results showed that human thermal and draft sensations change over time in an aircraft cabin. The thermal sensation response was highest when the volunteers first entered the cabin and decreased over time until it stablized. Fifty-one percent of volunteers opened the nozzle to alleviate a feeling of stuffiness, and more than 50% adjusted the nozzle to improve upper body comfort. Over the period of the experiment the majority of volunteers chose to adjust their the air flow of their personal system. This confirms airline companies' decisions to install the individual aircraft ventilation systems in their aircraft indicates that personal air systems based on nozzle adjustment are essential for cabin comfort. These results will assist in the design of more efficient air distribution systems within passenger aircraft cabins where there is a need to optimize the air flow in order to efficiently improve aircraft passengers' thermal comfort and reduce energy use.

  18. Airing method-specific advertisements.

    PubMed

    Yaser, Y

    1992-06-01

    The Turkish Family Health and Planning Foundation initiated the commercial marketing of contraceptives in 1989 as part of a Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) program to make available low-cost contraceptives. In 1988 modern methods were used by 31% and traditional methods by 32.3%, while 36.6% used no contraceptives. Only 6.2% were current pill users mainly because of health reasons since high-dose pills dominated the market. A 1990 survey among urban consumers indicated a 94% awareness of contraceptive methods, 76.1% of current use, and preference for the IUD. The side effects of the pill were cited for disliking it, and the condom was rated higher. The CSM project aims at popularizing low-dose pills by explaining the differences and benefits regarding high-dose pills. It collaborated with manufacturers: Schering, Wyeth, Organon, and Eczacibasi Ilac. In 1991 a TV and radio advertisement campaign started that involves the low-dose products Microgynon, Triquilar, Desolet, Lo-Ovral, and Tri-Nordial. The introduction of the Okey condom by Eczacibasi Ilac. In June 1991 also entailed extensive promotion with newspaper ads and TV spots after getting official permission. 1.3 million condoms were sold in the 1st 2 months in 13,000 retail outlets, and 4 million more were projected to be sold. A shift of the attitude of supermarket owners allowing stocking of condoms and the support of the Turkish Ministry of Health, USAID, and the Turkish Radio and Television Bureau has facilitated the CSM project implementation that will profoundly affect family planning in Turkey.

  19. Airing method-specific advertisements.

    PubMed

    Yaser, Y

    1992-06-01

    The Turkish Family Health and Planning Foundation initiated the commercial marketing of contraceptives in 1989 as part of a Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) program to make available low-cost contraceptives. In 1988 modern methods were used by 31% and traditional methods by 32.3%, while 36.6% used no contraceptives. Only 6.2% were current pill users mainly because of health reasons since high-dose pills dominated the market. A 1990 survey among urban consumers indicated a 94% awareness of contraceptive methods, 76.1% of current use, and preference for the IUD. The side effects of the pill were cited for disliking it, and the condom was rated higher. The CSM project aims at popularizing low-dose pills by explaining the differences and benefits regarding high-dose pills. It collaborated with manufacturers: Schering, Wyeth, Organon, and Eczacibasi Ilac. In 1991 a TV and radio advertisement campaign started that involves the low-dose products Microgynon, Triquilar, Desolet, Lo-Ovral, and Tri-Nordial. The introduction of the Okey condom by Eczacibasi Ilac. In June 1991 also entailed extensive promotion with newspaper ads and TV spots after getting official permission. 1.3 million condoms were sold in the 1st 2 months in 13,000 retail outlets, and 4 million more were projected to be sold. A shift of the attitude of supermarket owners allowing stocking of condoms and the support of the Turkish Ministry of Health, USAID, and the Turkish Radio and Television Bureau has facilitated the CSM project implementation that will profoundly affect family planning in Turkey. PMID:12285550

  20. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); Tang, Shoou-Yu (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for remotely sensing air outside a moving aircraft includes generating laser radiation within a swept frequency range. A portion of the laser radiation is projected from the aircraft into the air to induce scattered laser radiation. Filtered scattered laser radiation, filtered laser radiation, and unfiltered laser radiation are detected. At least one actual ratio is determined from data corresponding to the filtered scattered laser radiation and the unfiltered laser radiation. One or more air parameters are determined by correlating the actual ratio to at least one reference ratio.

  1. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); Tang, Shoou-Yu (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for remotely sensing air outside a moving aircraft includes generating laser radiation within a swept frequency range. A portion of the laser radiation is projected from the aircraft into the air to induce scattered laser radiation. Filtered scattered laser radiation, filtered laser radiation, and unfiltered laser radiation are detected. At least one actual ratio is determined from data corresponding to the filtered scattered laser radiation and the unfiltered laser radiation. One or more air parameters are determined by correlating the actual ratio to at least one reference ratio.

  2. Respirator protection factors: Part II-protection factors of supplied-air respirators.

    PubMed

    Hack, A L; Bradley, O D; Trujillo, A

    1980-05-01

    Protection Factors provided by 25 NIOSH approved supplied-air respirators were determined while the devices were worn by a panel of test subjects anthropometrically selected to represent adult facial sizes. Polydispersed DOP aerosol was used for respirator fit tests on continuous flow, demand, and pressure-demand respirators. Based on facepiece leakage measurements it appears that demand-type respirators should neither be used nor approved. The highest level of protection was provided by pressure-demand devices.

  3. Experimental investigation on a turbine compressor for air supply system of a fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Masayasu; Tsuchiyama, Syozo

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quotes}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The aspect treated here concerns a study on the air supply system for the PEFC, with particular reference to system components.

  4. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  5. Formal Methods Applications in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. air transportation system is the most productive in the world, moving far more people and goods than any other. It is also the safest system in the world, thanks in part to its venerable air traffic control system. But as demand for air travel continues to grow, the air traffic control system s aging infrastructure and labor-intensive procedures are impinging on its ability to keep pace with demand. And that impinges on the growth of our economy. Air traffic control modernization has long held the promise of a more efficient air transportation system. Part of NASA s current mission is to develop advanced automation and operational concepts that will expand the capacity of our national airspace system while still maintaining its excellent record for safety. It is a challenging mission, as efforts to modernize have, for decades, been hamstrung by the inability to assure safety to the satisfaction of system operators, system regulators, and/or the traveling public. In this talk, we ll provide a brief history of air traffic control, focusing on the tension between efficiency and safety assurance, and the promise of formal methods going forward.

  6. Potential Impact of the National Plan for Future Electric Power Supply on Air Quality in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) announced the national plan for Korea's future electric power supply (2013 - 2027) in 2013. According to the plan, the national demand for electricity will be increased by 60% compared to that of 2010 and primary energy sources for electric generation will still lean on the fossil fuels such as petroleum, LNG, and coal, which would be a potential threat to air quality of Korea. This study focused on two subjects: (1) How the spatial distribution of the primary air pollutant's emissions (i.e., NOx, SOx, CO, PM) will be changed and (2) How the primary emission changes will influence on the national ambient air quality including ozone in 2027. We used GEOS-Chem model simulation with modification of Korean emissions inventory (Clean Air Policy Support System (CAPSS)) to simulate the current and future air quality in Korea. The national total emissions of CO, NOx, SOx, PM in year 2027 will be increased by 3%, 8%, 13%, 2%, respectively compared to 2010 and there are additional concern that the future location of the power plants will be closer to the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), where there are approximately 20 million population vulnerable to the potentially worsened air quality. While there are slight increase of concentration of CO, NOx, SOx, and PM in 2027, the O3 concentration is expected to be similar to the level of 2010. Those results may imply the characteristics of air pollution in East Asia such as potentially severe O3 titration and poorer O3/CO or O3/NOx ratio. Furthermore, we will discuss on the impact of transboundary pollution transport from China in the future, which is one of the large factors to control the air quality of Korea.

  7. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... for which approval is granted and at the minimum specified air-supply pressure. The maximum flow shall not exceed 425 liters (15 cubic feet) per minute at the maximum specified air-supply pressure with...

  8. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... for which approval is granted and at the minimum specified air-supply pressure. The maximum flow shall not exceed 425 liters (15 cubic feet) per minute at the maximum specified air-supply pressure with...

  9. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... for which approval is granted and at the minimum specified air-supply pressure. The maximum flow shall not exceed 425 liters (15 cubic feet) per minute at the maximum specified air-supply pressure with...

  10. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... for which approval is granted and at the minimum specified air-supply pressure. The maximum flow shall not exceed 425 liters (15 cubic feet) per minute at the maximum specified air-supply pressure with...

  11. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test... for which approval is granted and at the minimum specified air-supply pressure. The maximum flow shall not exceed 425 liters (15 cubic feet) per minute at the maximum specified air-supply pressure with...

  12. Alternative production methods to face global molybdenum-99 supply shortage.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Roussou, Eirini; Fytros, Stavros; Baka, Irini

    2011-01-01

    The sleeping giant of molybdenum-99 ((99)Mo) production is grinding to a halt and the world is wondering how this happened. Fewer than 10 reactors in the world are capable of producing radio nuclides for medicine; approximately 50% of the world's supply of raw material comes from National Research Universal (NRU) reactor in Canada. Many of these reactors, like the NRU, are old and aging. No one of these reactors, and probably not even all of them in combination, can replace the production of NRU. As the healthcare industry faces an aging population and the demand for diagnostic services using (99m)Tc continues to rise, the need for a consistent, reliable supply of (99)Mo has become increasingly important, so alternative methods to produce (99)Mo or even directly (99m)Tc had to be considered to avoid a supply shortage in the coming years. This need guides to the production of (99)Mo by replacing the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) target in a nuclear reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) and furthermore to the use of accelerators for manufacturing (99)Mo or for directly producing (99m)Tc.

  13. Repair of Corrosion in Air Supply Piping at the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1 by 1 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Michael

    2000-01-01

    During a test at the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1 x 1 Supersonic Wing Tunnel, it was discovered that particles entrained in the air flow were damaging the pressure sensitive paint on a test article. An investigation found the source of the entrained particles to be rust on the internal surfaces of the air supply piping. To remedy the situation, the air supply line components made from carbon steel were either refurbished or replaced with new stainless steel components. The refurbishment process included various combinations of chemical cleaning, bead blasting, painting and plating.

  14. Fuzzy Entropy Method for Quantifying Supply Chain Networks Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jihui; Xu, Junqin

    Supply chain is a special kind of complex network. Its complexity and uncertainty makes it very difficult to control and manage. Supply chains are faced with a rising complexity of products, structures, and processes. Because of the strong link between a supply chain’s complexity and its efficiency the supply chain complexity management becomes a major challenge of today’s business management. The aim of this paper is to quantify the complexity and organization level of an industrial network working towards the development of a ‘Supply Chain Network Analysis’ (SCNA). By measuring flows of goods and interaction costs between different sectors of activity within the supply chain borders, a network of flows is built and successively investigated by network analysis. The result of this study shows that our approach can provide an interesting conceptual perspective in which the modern supply network can be framed, and that network analysis can handle these issues in practice.

  15. Monitoring apparatus and method for battery power supply

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Harry L.; Goodson, Raymond E.

    1983-01-01

    A monitoring apparatus and method are disclosed for monitoring and/or indicating energy that a battery power source has then remaining and/or can deliver for utilization purposes as, for example, to an electric vehicle. A battery mathematical model forms the basis for monitoring with a capacity prediction determined from measurement of the discharge current rate and stored battery parameters. The predicted capacity is used to provide a state-of-charge indication. Self-calibration over the life of the battery power supply is enacted through use of a feedback voltage based upon the difference between predicted and measured voltages to correct the battery mathematical model. Through use of a microprocessor with central information storage of temperature, current and voltage, system behavior is monitored, and system flexibility is enhanced.

  16. External CO2 and water supplies for enhancing electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Fujiki, Itto; Sano, Daisuke; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    Alkalization on the cathode electrode limits the electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and thus external proton supply to the cathode electrode is essential to enhance the electrical power generation. In this study, the effects of external CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode on the electrical power generation were investigated, and then the relative contributions of CO2 and water supplies to the total proton consumption were experimentally evaluated. The CO2 supply decreased the cathode pH and consequently increased the power generation. Carbonate dissolution was the main proton source under ambient air conditions, which provides about 67% of total protons consumed for the cathode reaction. It is also critical to adequately control the water content on the cathode electrode of air-cathode MFCs because the carbonate dissolution was highly dependent on water content. On the basis of these experimental results, the power density was increased by 400% (143.0 ± 3.5 mW/m(2) to 575.0 ± 36.0 mW/m(2)) by supplying a humid gas containing 50% CO2 to the cathode chamber. This study demonstrates that the simultaneous CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode were effective to increase the electrical power generation of air-cathode MFCs for the first time.

  17. Experimental study of wood downdraft gasification for an improved producer gas quality through an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach.

    PubMed

    Jaojaruek, Kitipong; Jarungthammachote, Sompop; Gratuito, Maria Kathrina B; Wongsuwan, Hataitep; Homhual, Suwan

    2011-04-01

    This study conducted experiments on three different downdraft gasification approaches: single stage, conventional two-stage, and an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach. The innovative two-stage approach has two nozzle locations, one for air supply at combustion zone and the other located at the pyrolysis zone for supplying the premixed gas (air and producer gas). The producer gas is partially bypassed to mix with air and supplied to burn at the pyrolysis zone. The result shows that producer gas quality generated by the innovative two-stage approach improved as compared to conventional two-stage. The higher heating value (HHV) increased from 5.4 to 6.5 MJ/Nm(3). Tar content in producer gas reduced to less than 45 mg/Nm(3). With this approach, gas can be fed directly to an internal combustion engine. Furthermore, the gasification thermal efficiency also improved by approximately 14%. The approach gave double benefits on gas qualities and energy savings. PMID:21292477

  18. Experimental study of wood downdraft gasification for an improved producer gas quality through an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach.

    PubMed

    Jaojaruek, Kitipong; Jarungthammachote, Sompop; Gratuito, Maria Kathrina B; Wongsuwan, Hataitep; Homhual, Suwan

    2011-04-01

    This study conducted experiments on three different downdraft gasification approaches: single stage, conventional two-stage, and an innovative two-stage air and premixed air/gas supply approach. The innovative two-stage approach has two nozzle locations, one for air supply at combustion zone and the other located at the pyrolysis zone for supplying the premixed gas (air and producer gas). The producer gas is partially bypassed to mix with air and supplied to burn at the pyrolysis zone. The result shows that producer gas quality generated by the innovative two-stage approach improved as compared to conventional two-stage. The higher heating value (HHV) increased from 5.4 to 6.5 MJ/Nm(3). Tar content in producer gas reduced to less than 45 mg/Nm(3). With this approach, gas can be fed directly to an internal combustion engine. Furthermore, the gasification thermal efficiency also improved by approximately 14%. The approach gave double benefits on gas qualities and energy savings.

  19. Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump Chiller for Air-Conditioning and Hot Water Supply Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Mita, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tadashi; Hoshino, Norimasa; Kimura, Yoshihisa

    In Part 1 of this study, the performance characteristics of a 457kW gas engine-driven heat pump (GHP) chiller have been obtained from a simulation model analysis for both cooling and heating modes and it has been found that the part-load characteristics of the GHP chiller are fairly well. On the back of Part 1, a computer simulation program has been developed for the evaluation of GHP chiller systems to compare with the other types of heat source systems for air-conditioning and hot water supply applications. The simulation program can be used to estimate annual energy consumption, annual CO2 emission, etc. of the systems with the data of monthly and hourly thermal loads on various buildings, outdoor air conditions, and characteristics of various components comprising the systems. By applying this to some cases of medium-scale hotel, office, shop, and hospital buildings, it has been found that the GHP chiller systems have advantages particularly in the cases of hotels and hospitals where a lot of hot water demand exists. It has also been found that the combination of a GHP chiller and a direct-fired absorption water chiller boiler (hot and chilled water generator) appears promising.

  20. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall not exceed 38 mm. (1.5 inches) of water-column height. (b) The pressure...

  1. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  2. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  3. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  4. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  5. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  6. Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) Model: A New Method for Estimating the Global Dietary Supply of Nutrients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew R; Micha, Renata; Golden, Christopher D; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Myers, Samuel S

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient data exist for accurate estimation of global nutrient supplies. Commonly used global datasets contain key weaknesses: 1) data with global coverage, such as the FAO food balance sheets, lack specific information about many individual foods and no information on micronutrient supplies nor heterogeneity among subnational populations, while 2) household surveys provide a closer approximation of consumption, but are often not nationally representative, do not commonly capture many foods consumed outside of the home, and only provide adequate information for a few select populations. Here, we attempt to improve upon these datasets by constructing a new model--the Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) model--to estimate nutrient availabilities for 23 individual nutrients across 225 food categories for thirty-four age-sex groups in nearly all countries. Furthermore, the model provides historical trends in dietary nutritional supplies at the national level using data from 1961-2011. We determine supplies of edible food by expanding the food balance sheet data using FAO production and trade data to increase food supply estimates from 98 to 221 food groups, and then estimate the proportion of major cereals being processed to flours to increase to 225. Next, we estimate intake among twenty-six demographic groups (ages 20+, both sexes) in each country by using data taken from the Global Dietary Database, which uses nationally representative surveys to relate national averages of food consumption to individual age and sex-groups; for children and adolescents where GDD data does not yet exist, average calorie-adjusted amounts are assumed. Finally, we match food supplies with nutrient densities from regional food composition tables to estimate nutrient supplies, running Monte Carlo simulations to find the range of potential nutrient supplies provided by the diet. To validate our new method, we compare the GENuS estimates of nutrient supplies against independent

  7. Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) Model: A New Method for Estimating the Global Dietary Supply of Nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Christopher D.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient data exist for accurate estimation of global nutrient supplies. Commonly used global datasets contain key weaknesses: 1) data with global coverage, such as the FAO food balance sheets, lack specific information about many individual foods and no information on micronutrient supplies nor heterogeneity among subnational populations, while 2) household surveys provide a closer approximation of consumption, but are often not nationally representative, do not commonly capture many foods consumed outside of the home, and only provide adequate information for a few select populations. Here, we attempt to improve upon these datasets by constructing a new model—the Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) model—to estimate nutrient availabilities for 23 individual nutrients across 225 food categories for thirty-four age-sex groups in nearly all countries. Furthermore, the model provides historical trends in dietary nutritional supplies at the national level using data from 1961–2011. We determine supplies of edible food by expanding the food balance sheet data using FAO production and trade data to increase food supply estimates from 98 to 221 food groups, and then estimate the proportion of major cereals being processed to flours to increase to 225. Next, we estimate intake among twenty-six demographic groups (ages 20+, both sexes) in each country by using data taken from the Global Dietary Database, which uses nationally representative surveys to relate national averages of food consumption to individual age and sex-groups; for children and adolescents where GDD data does not yet exist, average calorie-adjusted amounts are assumed. Finally, we match food supplies with nutrient densities from regional food composition tables to estimate nutrient supplies, running Monte Carlo simulations to find the range of potential nutrient supplies provided by the diet. To validate our new method, we compare the GENuS estimates of nutrient supplies against independent

  8. Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) Model: A New Method for Estimating the Global Dietary Supply of Nutrients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew R; Micha, Renata; Golden, Christopher D; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Myers, Samuel S

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient data exist for accurate estimation of global nutrient supplies. Commonly used global datasets contain key weaknesses: 1) data with global coverage, such as the FAO food balance sheets, lack specific information about many individual foods and no information on micronutrient supplies nor heterogeneity among subnational populations, while 2) household surveys provide a closer approximation of consumption, but are often not nationally representative, do not commonly capture many foods consumed outside of the home, and only provide adequate information for a few select populations. Here, we attempt to improve upon these datasets by constructing a new model--the Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) model--to estimate nutrient availabilities for 23 individual nutrients across 225 food categories for thirty-four age-sex groups in nearly all countries. Furthermore, the model provides historical trends in dietary nutritional supplies at the national level using data from 1961-2011. We determine supplies of edible food by expanding the food balance sheet data using FAO production and trade data to increase food supply estimates from 98 to 221 food groups, and then estimate the proportion of major cereals being processed to flours to increase to 225. Next, we estimate intake among twenty-six demographic groups (ages 20+, both sexes) in each country by using data taken from the Global Dietary Database, which uses nationally representative surveys to relate national averages of food consumption to individual age and sex-groups; for children and adolescents where GDD data does not yet exist, average calorie-adjusted amounts are assumed. Finally, we match food supplies with nutrient densities from regional food composition tables to estimate nutrient supplies, running Monte Carlo simulations to find the range of potential nutrient supplies provided by the diet. To validate our new method, we compare the GENuS estimates of nutrient supplies against independent

  9. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Kirk J.; Barrie, Scott L.; Buttner, William J.

    1999-01-01

    A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

  10. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, K.J.; Barrie, S.L.; Buttner, W.J.

    1999-08-24

    A system is described for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein. 5 figs.

  11. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  12. Air Cleaning Devices for HVAC Supply Systems in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    Guidelines for maintaining indoor air quality in schools with HVAC air cleaning systems are provided in this document. Information is offered on the importance of air cleaning, sources of air contaminants and indoor pollutants, types of air cleaners and particulate filters used in central HVAC systems, vapor and gas removal, and performance…

  13. Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump Chiller for Air-Conditioning and Hot Water Supply Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Mita, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tadashi; Hoshino, Norimasa; Kimura, Yoshihisa

    A gas engine-driven heat pump (GHP) uses a natural gas-or LPG-powered engine to drive the compressor in a vapor-compression refrigeration cycle. The GHP has the benefits of being able to use the fuel energy effectively by recovering waste heat from the engine jacket coolant and exhaust gas and also to keep high efficiency even at part-load operation by varying the engine speed with relative ease. Hence, energy-efficient heat source systems for air-conditioning and hot water supply may be constructed with GHP chillers in place of conventional electrical-driven heat pump chillers. GHPs will necessarily contribute to the peak shaving of electrical demand in summer. In this study, the performance characteristics of a 457kW GHP chiller have been investigated by a simulation model analysis, for both cooling and heating modes. From the results of the analysis, it has been found that the part-load characteristics of the GHP chiller are fairly well. The evaluation of the heat source systems using GHP chillers will be described in Part 2.

  14. [The necessity for alternative methods of hygienic testing of air technical designs for operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Seipp, H M; Barth, U

    1994-06-01

    The performance assessment of technical systems for the supply of clean air is fraught with problems which are caused by the present assessment procedures and norms. Until now the distribution of germs in a clean room has been considered as stationary and has been tested as though it was independent of the measuring time. Accordingly the quality of clean air rooms has to date been determined by measurements of particle or germ concentrations (Federal Standard 209; European Standard 209-WG-1; VDI 2083/1). By contrast different methods demonstrate that the contaminations introduced into a clean air room as particles or as particle-bound bacteria are eliminated according to an exponential function in a time-dependent manner. Therefore the measurements of single concentrations without the consideration of the time-dependence of concentration changes must needs lead to extremely faulty results. Furthermore the influence of disturbing factors (test persons, properties of different air supply ceilings, measuring instruments). As a consequence of the poor reliability and lacking validity of presently valid assessment methods, there is a discrepancy between the seemingly high performance of the clean air supply systems under laboratory conditions (DIN 4799) on the one hand, and the frequently unsatisfactory functioning of the same systems under practical conditions. This discrepancy has caused a significant loss of confidence towards the whole clean air technique, especially among the users. Therefore critical test and evaluation methods should be immediately set up for comprehensive testing of technical clean air systems, methods which include the time-dependence of particle or germ elimination as well as test-dependent disturbing factors. PMID:7916866

  15. Identification of ambient air sampling and analysis methods for the 189 Title III air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Mukund, R.; Kelly, T.J.; Gordon, S.M.; Hays, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The state of development of ambient air measurement methods for the 189 Hazardous Air Pollution (HAPs) in Title 3 of the Clean Air Act Amendments was surveyed. Measurement methods for the HAPs were identified by reviews of established methods, and by literature searches for pertinent research techniques. Methods were segregated by their degree of development into Applicable, Likely, and Potential methods. This survey identified a total of 183 methods, applicable at varying degrees to ambient air measurements of one or more HAPs. As a basis for classifying the HAPs and evaluating the applicability of measurement methods, a survey of a variety of chemical and physical properties of the HAPs was also conducted. The results of both the methods and properties surveys were tabulated for each of the 189 HAP. The current state of development of ambient measurement methods for the 189 HAPs was then assessed from the results of the survey, and recommendations for method development initiatives were developed.

  16. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer; Marron, Lisa C.; Salton, Jonathan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  17. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  18. Effect of car speed on amount of air supplied by ventilation system to the space of car cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, Jan; Pokorný, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The amount of air supplied by ventilation system (HVAC system) of a car into a cabin is one of the main parameters for the correct simulation and prediction of a car cabin heat load. This amount is not based only on the current setting of the HVAC system, but also on the actual operating conditions and speed of the car. The authors therefore carried out experiments in the cabin of a passenger car in real traffic, while observing the amount of air on the speed of the car and setting of flap in mixing chamber. In a subsequent analysis the authors defined dependence of the airflow rate supplied by HVAC system on the speed of the car. Obtained empirical formulas were then used as a part of the code which calculates the data for the HVAC boundary conditions in the simulation of the car cabin environment.

  19. Assessing Aircraft Supply Air to Recommend Compounds for Timely Warning of Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard B.

    Taking aircraft out of service for even one day to correct fume-in-cabin events can cost the industry roughly $630 million per year in lost revenue. The quantitative correlation study investigated quantitative relationships between measured concentrations of contaminants in bleed air and probability of odor detectability. Data were collected from 94 aircraft engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) bleed air tests from an archival data set between 1997 and 2011, and no relationships were found. Pearson correlation was followed by regression analysis for individual contaminants. Significant relationships of concentrations of compounds in bleed air to probability of odor detectability were found (p<0.05), as well as between compound concentration and probability of sensory irritancy detectability. Study results may be useful to establish early warning levels. Predictive trend monitoring, a method to identify potential pending failure modes within a mechanical system, may influence scheduled down-time for maintenance as a planned event, rather than repair after a mechanical failure and thereby reduce operational costs associated with odor-in-cabin events. Twenty compounds (independent variables) were found statistically significant as related to probability of odor detectability (dependent variable 1). Seventeen compounds (independent variables) were found statistically significant as related to probability of sensory irritancy detectability (dependent variable 2). Additional research was recommended to further investigate relationships between concentrations of contaminants and probability of odor detectability or probability of sensory irritancy detectability for all turbine oil brands. Further research on implementation of predictive trend monitoring may be warranted to demonstrate how the monitoring process might be applied to in-flight application.

  20. Continuous air monitoring apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, G.D.; Cates, M.

    1992-01-01

    A continuous air monitoring apparatus utilizes a solid sorbent preconcentrator to concentrate airborne sorbent compounds to gas chromatographic analysis. Direct connection between the preconcentrator and gas chromatographic column allows direct desorption of the compounds into the column with minimal dead space. Temperature control on the column allows sharp chromatographic peaks to be attained without cryogenic focusing.

  1. HOW TO HEAT AND COOL A HOME WITH 400 CFM SUPPLY AIR AND KEEP THE DUCTS IN THE CONDITIONED SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1999-05-01

    A design strategy is presented that can enable a typical new home to be heated, cooled, and ventilated with less than 400 cfm of delivered air. The strategy has three major elements. First, peak cooling loads are minimized by using good available technologies for the envelope, with emphasis on minimizing heat gains through the windows. Second, the envelope is designed to have very low natural air leakage rates, such that all the ventilation air can be drawn in at one point and passed over the cooling coil before it is mixed with the house air. This permits a significant portion of the cooling load to be met at an air flow rate of {approximately}200 cubic feet per minute (cfm) per ton, compared with the typical 400 cfm per ton in standard air-conditioning systems. Third, by reducing the amount of supply air needed to meet the envelope loads, the required size of ductwork is reduced, making it easier to locate the ducts within the conditioned space. This reduces duct loads to zero, completing the three-part energy conserving strategy.

  2. Method and apparatus for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, S.

    1981-03-24

    A method and apparatus is described for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture supplied to the carburetor of an internal combustion engine. In a first embodiment, a valve opens and closes a port in an aluminum block between a passage coupled to the pcv and carburetor and a second passage open to the atmosphere. A spring in the second passage modulates the air flow as a function of vacuum pressure and thermally responsive means maintains the valve closed until the engine reaches its operating temperature. In a second embodiment the valve is opened as a function of the wind pressure produced during vehicle movement.

  3. Contributing recharge areas to water-supply wells at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in southwestern Ohio, has operated three well fields--Area B, Skeel Road, and the East Well Fields--to supply potable water for consumption and use for base activities. To protect these well fields from contamination and to comply with the Ohio Wellhead Protection Plan, the Base is developing a wellhead-protection program for the well fields. A three-dimensional, steady-state ground-water-flow model was developed in 1993 to simulate heads in (1) the buried-valley aquifer system that is tapped by the two active well fields, and in (2) an upland bedrock aquifer that may supply water to the wells. An advective particle-tracking algorithm that requires estimated porosities and simulated heads was used to estimate ground-water-flow pathlines and traveltimes to the active well fields. Contributing recharge areas (CRA's)--areas on the water table that contribute water to a well or well field--were generated for 1-, 5-, and 10-year traveltimes. Results from the simulation and subsequent particle tracking indicate that the CRA's for the Skeel Road Well Fields are oval and extend north- ward, toward the Mad River, as pumping at the well field increases. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Skeel Road Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 3.2 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the Area B Well Field extend to the north, up the Mad River Valley; as pumping increases at the well field, the CRA's extend up the Mad River Valley under Huffman Dam. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Area B Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.1, 0.5, and 0.9 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the East Well Field are affected by nearby streams under average pumping conditions. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of the East Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.2, 1.2, and 2.4 square miles, respectively. However, as pumping increases

  4. Sampling size in the verification of manufactured-supplied air kerma strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Luis Isaac; Martinez Monge, Rafael

    2005-11-15

    Quality control mandate that the air kerma strengths (S{sub K}) of permanent seeds be verified, this is usually done by statistics inferred from 10% of the seeds. The goal of this paper is to proposed a new sampling method in which the number of seeds to be measured will be set beforehand according to an a priori statistical level of uncertainty. The results are based on the assumption that the S{sub K} has a normal distribution. To demonstrate this, the S{sub K} of each of the seeds measured was corrected to ensure that the average S{sub K} of its sample remained the same. In this process 2030 results were collected and analyzed using a normal plot. In our opinion, the number of seeds sampled should be determined beforehand according to an a priori level of statistical uncertainty.

  5. A Risk Management Method for the Operation of a Supply-Chain without Storage:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Yuuji; Nakata, Norimasa; Kusaka, Satoshi

    A business risk management method has been developed for a supply-chain without a storage function under demand uncertainty. Power supply players in the deregulated power market face the need to develop the best policies for power supply from self-production and reserved purchases to balance demand, which is predictable with error. The proposed method maximizes profit from the operation of the supply-chain under probabilistic demand uncertainty on the basis of a probabilistic programming approach. Piece-wise linear functions are employed to formulate the impact of under-booked or over-booked purchases on the supply cost, and constraints on over-demand probability are introduced to limit over-demand frequency on the basis of the demand probability distribution. The developed method has been experimentally applied to the supply policy of a power-supply-chain, the operation of which is based on a 3-stage pricing purchase contract and on 28 time zones. The characteristics of the obtained optimal supply policy are successfully captured in the numerical results, which suggest the applicability of the proposed method.

  6. Enhanced performance of an air-cathode microbial fuel cell with oxygen supply from an externally connected algal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Kim, Jung Rae; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Min, Booki

    2015-11-01

    An algae bioreactor (ABR) was externally connected to air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to increase power generation by supplying a high amount of oxygen to cathode electrode. The MFC with oxygen fed from ABR produced maximum cell voltage and cathode potential at a fixed loading of 459 mV and 10 mV, respectively. During polarization analysis, the MFC displayed a maximum power density of 0.63 W/m(2) (at 2.06 A/m(2)) using 39.2% O2 from ABR, which was approximately 30% higher compared with use of atmospheric air (0.44 W/m(2), 20.8% O2,). The cyclic voltammogram analysis exhibited a higher reduction current of -137 mA with 46.5% O2 compared to atmospheric air (-115 mA). Oxygen supply by algae bioreactor to air-cathode MFC could also maintain better MFC performance in long term operation by minimizing cathode potential drop over time.

  7. High cell density cultivation of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 using glucose without the need for oxygen enriched air supply.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reeta; Duane, Gearoid; Kenny, Shane T; Cerrone, Federico; Guzik, Maciej W; Babu, Ramesh P; Casey, Eoin; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-04-01

    High Cell Density (HCD) cultivation of bacteria is essential for the majority of industrial processes to achieve high volumetric productivity (g L(-1) h(-1) ) of a bioproduct of interest. This study developed a fed batch bioprocess using glucose as sole carbon and energy source for the HCD of the well described biocatalyst Pseudomonas putida KT2440 without the supply of oxygen enriched air. Growth kinetics data from batch fermentations were used for building a bioprocess model and designing feeding strategies. An exponential followed by linearly increasing feeding strategy of glucose was found to be effective in maintaining biomass productivity while also delaying the onset of dissolved oxygen (supplied via compressed air) limitation. A final cell dry weight (CDW) of 102 g L(-1) was achieved in 33 h with a biomass productivity of 3.1 g L(-1) h(-1) which are the highest ever reported values for P. putida strains using glucose without the supply of pure oxygen or oxygen enriched air. The usefulness of the biomass as a biocatalyst was demonstrated through the production of the biodegradable polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). When nonanoic acid (NA) was supplied to the glucose grown cells of P. putida KT2440, it accumulated 32% of CDW as PHA in 11 h (2.85 g L(-1) h(-1) ) resulting in a total of 0.56 kg of PHA in 18 L with a yield of 0.56 g PHA g NA(-1) .

  8. Perfluorocarbon tracer method for air-infiltration measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, R.N.

    1982-09-23

    A method of measuring air infiltration rates suitable for use in rooms of homes and buildings comprises the steps of emitting perfluorocarbons in the room to be measured, sampling the air containing the emitted perfluorocarbons over a period of time, and analyzing the samples at a laboratory or other facility.

  9. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  10. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... March 6, 2009. The monitors are commercially available from the applicant, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Air... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent... of the designation of five new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY:...

  11. Air Pollution Instrumentation: A Trend toward Physical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1972-01-01

    Reviews reasons for the trend from wet chemical'' analytic techniques for measuring air pollutants toward physical methods based upon chemiluminescence, electrochemical transduction, flame ionization coupled with gas chromotography, and spectroscopy. (AL)

  12. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2000-01-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The renewable supply may comprise, for example, a photovoltaic power supply or a wind-based power supply.

  13. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  14. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the hose connection shall not exceed 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage). (c) Where the pressure at any point in the supply system exceeds 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage), the... connection from exceeding 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage) under any conditions....

  15. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the hose connection shall not exceed 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage). (c) Where the pressure at any point in the supply system exceeds 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage), the... connection from exceeding 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage) under any conditions....

  16. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the hose connection shall not exceed 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage). (c) Where the pressure at any point in the supply system exceeds 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage), the... connection from exceeding 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage) under any conditions....

  17. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the hose connection shall not exceed 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage). (c) Where the pressure at any point in the supply system exceeds 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage), the... connection from exceeding 863 kN/m.2 (125 pounds per square inch gage) under any conditions....

  18. IMPROVED TEST METHODS FOR ELECTRONIC AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to develop a fractional filtration efficiency test protocol for residential electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) that avoids the limitations of the ASHRAE 52.2 method. Specifically, the objectives were to a) determine the change in efficiency that ...

  19. A High Power Test Method for Pattern Magnet Power Supplies with Capacitor Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori; Morita, Yuichi; Sagawa, Ryu; Shimogawa, Tetsushi; Miura, Kazuki

    In the J-PARC Main Ring (MR), we plan to increase the beam intensity from 230 to 750 kW. To achieve this, the synchrotron repetition period must be shortened from 2.48 s to approximately 1 s using new power supplies for the main magnets. We are currently researching and developing new power supplies with large capacitor banks. Such banks are needed to reduce the power variation at the main grid in the J-PARC site for future operations with shorter repetition periods. However, it is very difficult to test the new power supplies at their rated power before installation. This is because the power handled by the power supplies used for the J-PARC MR main magnets is too high to be tested in factories or laboratories. To overcome this problem, we suggest a test method involving the use of two capacitor banks. In this method, two power supplies and a small inductive load are connected between two capacitor banks. By controlling the energy flow between the two capacitor banks in this setup, the received power and inductive load can be kept very small. This article describes the details of the control method and the results of the test experiment using a mini-model power supply.

  20. ELECTROSTATIC AIR CLEANING DEVICE AND METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, L.; Anderson, D.M.

    1961-07-18

    A method and apparatus for utilizing friction-charged particulate material from an aerosol are described. A bed of the plastic spheres is prepared, and the aerosol is passed upwardly through the bed at a rate just large enough to maintain the bed in a fluidized state wim over-all circulation of the balls. Wire members criss-crossing through the bed rub against the balls and maintain their surfaces with electrostatic charges. The particulate material in the aerosol adheres to the surfaces of the balls.

  1. Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

  2. The contrast model method for the thermodynamical calculation of air-air wet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiugan; Mei, Fang

    1989-02-01

    The 'contrast model' method thermodynamic calculation of air-air crossflow wet heat exchangers with initial air condensation is presented. Contrast-model equations are derived from the actual heat exchanger equations as well as imaginary ones; it is then possible to proceed to a proof that the enthalpy efficiency of the contrast model equations is similar to the temperature efficiency of the dry heat exchanger. Conditions are noted under which it becomes possible to unify thermodynamic calculations for wet and dry heat exchangers.

  3. Contribution of 222Rn in domestic water supplies to 222Rn in indoor air in Colorado homes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, E.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Nyberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of 222Rn from domestic water wells to indoor air was investigated in a study of 28 houses near Conifer, CO. Air concentrations determined by alpha-track detectors (ATDs) and continuous radon monitors were compared with the predictions of a single-cell model. In many of the houses, the water supply was shown to contribute significantly to levels of indoor 222Rn. The data from the ATD study were augmented with a continuous monitoring study of a house near Lyons, CO. The well water in that house has the highest known concentration of 222Rn in water yet reported (93 MBq m-3). The temporal pattern in the indoor 222Rn concentration corresponds to water-use records. In general, it is difficult to quantify the proportion of indoor radon attributable to water use. Several lines of evidence suggest that the single-cell model underestimates this proportion. Continuous- monitoring data, although useful, are impractical due to the cost of the equipment. We propose a protocol for 222Rn measurement based on three simultaneous integrating radon detectors that may help estimate the proportion of indoor 222Rn derived from the water supply.

  4. A quantitative method for optimized placement of continuous air monitors.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Rodgers, John C; Moxley, John S

    2003-11-01

    Alarming continuous air monitors (CAMs) are a critical component for worker protection in facilities that handle large amounts of hazardous materials. In nuclear facilities, continuous air monitors alarm when levels of airborne radioactive materials exceed alarm thresholds, thus prompting workers to exit the room to reduce inhalation exposures. To maintain a high level of worker protection, continuous air monitors are required to detect radioactive aerosol clouds quickly and with good sensitivity. This requires that there are sufficient numbers of continuous air monitors in a room and that they are well positioned. Yet there are no published methodologies to quantitatively determine the optimal number and placement of continuous air monitors in a room. The goal of this study was to develop and test an approach to quantitatively determine optimal number and placement of continuous air monitors in a room. The method we have developed uses tracer aerosol releases (to simulate accidental releases) and the measurement of the temporal and spatial aspects of the dispersion of the tracer aerosol through the room. The aerosol dispersion data is then analyzed to optimize continuous air monitor utilization based on simulated worker exposure. This method was tested in a room within a Department of Energy operated plutonium facility at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, U.S. Results from this study show that the value of quantitative airflow and aerosol dispersion studies is significant and that worker protection can be significantly improved while balancing the costs associated with CAM programs.

  5. Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated

  6. Impact of forest biomass residues to the energy supply chain on regional air quality.

    PubMed

    Rafael, S; Tarelho, L; Monteiro, A; Sá, E; Miranda, A I; Borrego, C; Lopes, M

    2015-02-01

    The increase of the share of renewable energy in Portugal can be met from different sources, of which forest biomass residues (FBR) can play a main role. Taking into account the demand for information about the strategy of FBR to energy, and its implications on the Portuguese climate policy, the impact of energy conversion of FBR on air quality is evaluated. Three emission scenarios were defined and a numerical air quality model was selected to perform this evaluation. The results reveal that the biomass thermal plants contribute to an increment of the pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere, however restricted to the surrounding areas of the thermal plants, and most significant for NO₂ and O₃.

  7. Impact of forest biomass residues to the energy supply chain on regional air quality.

    PubMed

    Rafael, S; Tarelho, L; Monteiro, A; Sá, E; Miranda, A I; Borrego, C; Lopes, M

    2015-02-01

    The increase of the share of renewable energy in Portugal can be met from different sources, of which forest biomass residues (FBR) can play a main role. Taking into account the demand for information about the strategy of FBR to energy, and its implications on the Portuguese climate policy, the impact of energy conversion of FBR on air quality is evaluated. Three emission scenarios were defined and a numerical air quality model was selected to perform this evaluation. The results reveal that the biomass thermal plants contribute to an increment of the pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere, however restricted to the surrounding areas of the thermal plants, and most significant for NO₂ and O₃. PMID:25461067

  8. Thermodynamics of Air: Reinterpreting the Method of Clement and Desormes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornack, Frederick M.

    1996-10-01

    The well-known Clement-Desormes method for heat capacity ratio employs a large bottle of air, an oil manometer, and a rubber pressurizing bulb. The air sample at slightly elevated pressure undergoes a rapid adiabatic expansion followed by isochoric warming back to room temperature. The usual calculation of the ratio is sidestepped in favor of a new interpretation which recognizes that for air, the work done in the rapid expansion must equal the heat absorbed when the gas returns to room temperature. These quantitites and the accurately known differences between the PVT states permit a direct determination of the heat capacity Cv. Students are exposed to the concept of irreversible work, path independence of DeltaE, and experimentally use the equation DeltaE = Q + W. Since air is diatomic and closely obeys the ideal gas law, the heat capacities and various partial differential coefficients can be calculated and compared with experimental results.

  9. A combined compensation method for the output voltage of an insulated core transformer power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Yang, J.; Liu, K. F.; Qin, B.; Chen, D. Z.

    2014-06-01

    An insulated core transformer (ICT) power supply is an ideal high-voltage generator for irradiation accelerators with energy lower than 3 MeV. However, there is a significant problem that the structure of the segmented cores leads to an increase in the leakage flux and voltage differences between rectifier disks. A high level of consistency in the output of the disks helps to achieve a compact structure by improving the utilization of both the rectifier components and the insulation distances, and consequently increase the output voltage of the power supply. The output voltages of the disks which are far away from the primary coils need to be improved to reduce their inhomogeneity. In this study, by investigating and comparing the existing compensation methods, a new combined compensation method is proposed, which increases the turns on the secondary coils and employs parallel capacitors to improve the consistency of the disks, while covering the entire operating range of the power supply. This method turns out to be both feasible and effective during the development of an ICT power supply. The non-uniformity of the output voltages of the disks is less than 3.5% from no-load to full-load, and the power supply reaches an output specification of 350 kV/60 mA.

  10. Fuel supply system and method for coal-fired prime mover

    DOEpatents

    Smith, William C.; Paulson, Leland E.

    1995-01-01

    A coal-fired gas turbine engine is provided with an on-site coal preparation and engine feeding arrangement. With this arrangement, relatively large dry particles of coal from an on-site coal supply are micro-pulverized and the resulting dry, micron-sized, coal particulates are conveyed by steam or air into the combustion chamber of the engine. Thermal energy introduced into the coal particulates during the micro-pulverizing step is substantially recovered since the so-heated coal particulates are fed directly from the micro-pulverizer into the combustion chamber.

  11. Compendium of methods for the determination of air pollutants in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Winberry, W.T.; Forehand, L.; Murphy, N.T.; Ceroli, A.; Phinney, B.

    1990-04-01

    Determination of pollutants in indoor air is a complex task because of the wide variety of compounds of interest and the lack of standardized sampling and analysis procedures. To assist agencies and persons responsible for sampling and analysis of indoor pollutants, the methods compendium provides current, technically-reviewed sampling and analysis procedures in a standardized format for determination of selected pollutants of primary importance in indoor air. Each chapter contains one or more active or passive sampling procedures along with one or more appropriate analytical procedures. The ten chapters of the compendium cover determination of volatile organic compounds, nicotine, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, air exchange rate, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, benzo(a)pyrene and other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, acid gases and aerosols, particulate matter, and pesticides. As further advancements are made, the procedures may be modified or updated, or additional methods may be added as appropriate.

  12. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm. PMID:27079110

  13. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm.

  14. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  15. The Supply of Birth Control Methods, Education, and Fertility: Evidence from Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the supply of birth control methods on fertility behavior by examining Romania's 23-year period of pronatalist policies. Following the lifting of the restrictions in 1989 the immediate decrease in fertility was 30 percent. Women who spent most of their reproductive years under the restrictive regime…

  16. Monitoring of air pollution by plants methods and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Steubing, L.; Jager, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ecosystem pollution is often discovered too late for preventive measure to be implemented. Papers include the topics of methods and problems of bioindication of air pollution. The participants discussed passive and active biological monitoring, including mapping of natural vegetation (lichens and mosses, for example) and plant exposure. Morphological and microscopical studies, chemical, physiological and biochemical investigations are presented.

  17. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

    2010-02-03

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

  18. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  19. Methods of Visually Determining the Air Flow Around Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Melvin N; Johnson, Ernest

    1932-01-01

    This report describes methods used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to study visually the air flow around airplanes. The use of streamers, oil and exhaust gas streaks, lampblack and kerosene, powdered materials, and kerosene smoke is briefly described. The generation and distribution of smoke from candles and from titanium tetrachloride are described in greater detail because they appear most advantageous for general application. Examples are included showing results of the various methods.

  20. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  1. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2003-04-08

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  2. Betweenness-Based Method to Identify Critical Transmission Sectors for Supply Chain Environmental Pressure Mitigation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Qu, Shen; Xu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    To develop industry-specific policies for mitigating environmental pressures, previous studies primarily focus on identifying sectors that directly generate large amounts of environmental pressures (a.k.a. production-based method) or indirectly drive large amounts of environmental pressures through supply chains (e.g., consumption-based method). In addition to those sectors as important environmental pressure producers or drivers, there exist sectors that are also important to environmental pressure mitigation as transmission centers. Economy-wide environmental pressure mitigation might be achieved by improving production efficiency of these key transmission sectors, that is, using less upstream inputs to produce unitary output. We develop a betweenness-based method to measure the importance of transmission sectors, borrowing the betweenness concept from network analysis. We quantify the betweenness of sectors by examining supply chain paths extracted from structural path analysis that pass through a particular sector. We take China as an example and find that those critical transmission sectors identified by betweenness-based method are not always identifiable by existing methods. This indicates that betweenness-based method can provide additional insights that cannot be obtained with existing methods on the roles individual sectors play in generating economy-wide environmental pressures. Betweenness-based method proposed here can therefore complement existing methods for guiding sector-level environmental pressure mitigation strategies. PMID:26727352

  3. Passive Samplers for Investigations of Air Quality: Method Description, Implementation, and Comparison to Alternative Sampling Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Paper covers the basics of passive sampler design, compares passive samplers to conventional methods of air sampling, and discusses considerations when implementing a passive sampling program. The Paper also discusses field sampling and sample analysis considerations to ensu...

  4. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  5. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  6. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  7. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  8. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  9. Learning styles: The learning methods of air traffic control students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Dontae L.

    In the world of aviation, air traffic controllers are an integral part in the overall level of safety that is provided. With a number of controllers reaching retirement age, the Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) was created to provide a stronger candidate pool. However, AT-CTI Instructors have found that a number of AT-CTI students are unable to memorize types of aircraft effectively. This study focused on the basic learning styles (auditory, visual, and kinesthetic) of students and created a teaching method to try to increase memorization in AT-CTI students. The participants were asked to take a questionnaire to determine their learning style. Upon knowing their learning styles, participants attended two classroom sessions. The participants were given a presentation in the first class, and divided into a control and experimental group for the second class. The control group was given the same presentation from the first classroom session while the experimental group had a group discussion and utilized Middle Tennessee State University's Air Traffic Control simulator to learn the aircraft types. Participants took a quiz and filled out a survey, which tested the new teaching method. An appropriate statistical analysis was applied to determine if there was a significant difference between the control and experimental groups. The results showed that even though the participants felt that the method increased their learning, there was no significant difference between the two groups.

  10. Methods of reducing energy consumption of the oxidant supply system for MHD/steam power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted to identify possible improvements to the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants which would lead to higher thermal efficiency and reduction in the cost of electricity, COE. Results showed that the oxidant system energy consumption could be minimized when the process was designed to deliver a product O2 concentration of 70 mole percent. The study also led to the development of a new air separation process, referred to as 'liquid pumping and internal compression'. MHD system performance calculations show that the new process would permit an increase in plant thermal efficiency of 0.6 percent while allowing more favorable tradeoffs between magnetic energy and oxidant system capacity requirements.

  11. Methods of reducing energy consumption of the oxidant supply system for MHD/steam power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted to identify possible improvements to the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants which would lead to higher thermal efficiency and reduction in the cost of electricity, COE. Results showed that the oxidant system energy consumption could be minimized when the process was designed to deliver a product O2 concentration of 70 mole percent. The study also led to the development of a new air separation process, referred to as liquid pumping and internal compression. MHD system performance calculations show that the new process would permit an increase in plant thermal efficiency of 0.6 percent while allowing more favorable tradeoffs between magnetic energy and oxidant system capacity requirements.

  12. Apparatus and method for treating air from a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.O.

    1987-11-24

    This patent describes an apparatus for cooling and removing moisture from compressed air passing from a turbocharger and the like to an intake of an engine comprising: an air duct connecting the turbocharger to the intake of the engine; heat pipes extending across the air duct for receiving heat from the compressed air passing through the air duct; a portion of the heat pipes extending from the air duct into a zone of ambient air external to the air duct for transferring heat received from the compressed air to the ambient air thus cooling the compressed air; and a lower extension of the air duct forming a coalescer zone receiving the compressed air after cooling by the heat pipes extending across the air duct for removing moisture therefrom.

  13. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  14. Method to characterize collective impact of factors on indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Teuerle, Marek; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2015-02-01

    One of the most important problems in studies of building environment is a description of how it is influenced by various dynamically changing factors. In this paper we characterized the joint impact of a collection of factors on indoor air quality (IAQ). We assumed that the influence is reflected in the temporal variability of IAQ parameters and may be deduced from it. The proposed method utilizes mean square displacement (MSD) analysis which was originally developed for studying the dynamics in various systems. Based on the MSD time-dependence descriptor β, we distinguished three types of the collective impact of factors on IAQ: retarding, stabilizing and promoting. We presented how the aggregated factors influence the temperature, relative humidity and CO2 concentration, as these parameters are informative for the condition of indoor air. We discovered, that during a model day there are encountered one, two or even three types of influence. The presented method allows us to study the impacts from the perspective of the dynamics of indoor air.

  15. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as ] amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of a new equivalent method...

  16. Performance Prediction Method of CO2 Cycle for Air Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shigeru; Xue, Jun; Kuwahara, Ken

    From the perspective of global environmental protection and energy-saving, the research and development on high-efficiency heat pump and refrigeration systems using environment-friendly refrigerants have become one of the most important issues in the air-conditioning and refrigeration sector. In the present work, a steady-state model of the CO2 transcritical cycle for air cooling, which consists of a rotary compressor, a fin-tube gas cooler,a fin-tube evaporator and an expansion valve, has been developed. The detailed model of fin-tube heat exchanger has been constructed by means of the finite volume method, in which the local heat transfer and flow characteristics are evaluated. It should be noted that the effects of the dew condensation generated on the cooling surface are considered in the evaporator model. As a calculation example, the effects of the indoor air wet-bulb temperature on the cycle performance have been examined with this developed simulator.

  17. Impact of two-way air flow due to temperature difference on preventing the entry of outdoor particles using indoor positive pressure control method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Yang, Xudong

    2011-02-28

    Maintaining positive pressure indoors using mechanical ventilation system is a popular control method for preventing the entry of outdoor airborne particles. The idea is, as long as the supply air flow rate is larger than return air flow rate, the pressure inside the ventilated room should be positive since the superfluous air flow must exfiltrate from air leakages or other openings of the room to the outdoors. Based on experimental and theoretical analyses this paper aims to show the impact of two-way air flow due to indoor/outdoor temperature difference on preventing the entry of outdoor particles using positive pressure control method. The indoor positive pressure control method is effective only when the size of the opening area is restricted to a certain level, opening degree less than 30° in this study, due to the two-way air flow effect induced by differential temperature. The theoretical model was validated using the experimental data. The impacts of two-way air flow due to temperature difference and the supply air flow rate were also analyzed using the theoretical model as well as experimental data. For real houses, it seems that the idea about the positive pressure control method for preventing the entry of outdoor particles has a blind side.

  18. Establishing an educational programme for nurses to supply emergency hormonal contraception (combined method) to protocol.

    PubMed

    Brittain, D

    1999-10-01

    This paper gives an account of an innovative educational programme developed by the Department of Midwifery Studies at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) in 1995. The North West Regional Health Authority (NWRHA) approached the Department of Midwifery Studies to develop an educational programme for family planning nurses to supply the combined method of emergency hormonal contraception (EHC) under protocol when a doctor was not present. The purpose was to increase the availability and accessibility of EHC for young people in the North West region. The 3-day programme was designed to complement previous ENB 901/900 training, and also to provide the nurses with the specific skills and knowledge required to undertake this new role. One hundred and thirty-nine nurses from the North West area attended the programme between 1995-1998. Students were assessed both theoretically and clinically. Extending the role of family planning nurses to supply EHC gives purchasers and providers of sexual health care the potential to offer a wider range of accessible services. The recently published interim Crown Report1 on the supply and administration of medicines under group protocols states that protocols should specify clear arrangements for professional responsibility and accountability. Appropriate training is essential to ensure that the extended role of the nurse in family planning is fully understood.

  19. Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine

    DOEpatents

    Kubesh, John Thomas; Dodge, Lee Gene; Podnar, Daniel James

    1998-04-07

    The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

  20. The Development of a Strategic Prioritisation Method for Green Supply Chain Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Masoumik, S Maryam; Abdul-Rashid, Salwa Hanim; Olugu, Ezutah Udoncy

    2015-01-01

    To maintain a competitive position, companies are increasingly required to integrate their proactive environmental strategies into their business strategies. The shift from reactive and compliance-based to proactive and strategic environmental management has driven companies to consider the strategic factors while identifying the areas in which they should focus their green initiatives. In previous studies little attention was given to providing the managers with a basis from which they could strategically prioritise these green initiatives across their companies' supply chains. Considering this lacuna in the literature, we present a decision-making method for prioritising green supply chain initiatives aligned with the preferred green strategies alternatives for the manufacturing companies. To develop this method, the study considered a position between determinism and the voluntarism orientation of environmental management involving both external pressures and internal competitive drivers and key resources as decision factors. This decision-making method was developed using the analytic network process (ANP) technique. The elements of the decision model were derived from the literature. The causal relationships among the multiple decision variables were validated based on the results of structural equation modelling (SEM) using a dataset collected from a survey of the ISO 14001-certified manufacturers in Malaysia. A portion of the relative weights required for computation in ANP was also calculated using the SEM results. A case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. PMID:26618353

  1. The Development of a Strategic Prioritisation Method for Green Supply Chain Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Masoumik, S Maryam; Abdul-Rashid, Salwa Hanim; Olugu, Ezutah Udoncy

    2015-01-01

    To maintain a competitive position, companies are increasingly required to integrate their proactive environmental strategies into their business strategies. The shift from reactive and compliance-based to proactive and strategic environmental management has driven companies to consider the strategic factors while identifying the areas in which they should focus their green initiatives. In previous studies little attention was given to providing the managers with a basis from which they could strategically prioritise these green initiatives across their companies' supply chains. Considering this lacuna in the literature, we present a decision-making method for prioritising green supply chain initiatives aligned with the preferred green strategies alternatives for the manufacturing companies. To develop this method, the study considered a position between determinism and the voluntarism orientation of environmental management involving both external pressures and internal competitive drivers and key resources as decision factors. This decision-making method was developed using the analytic network process (ANP) technique. The elements of the decision model were derived from the literature. The causal relationships among the multiple decision variables were validated based on the results of structural equation modelling (SEM) using a dataset collected from a survey of the ISO 14001-certified manufacturers in Malaysia. A portion of the relative weights required for computation in ANP was also calculated using the SEM results. A case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method.

  2. The Development of a Strategic Prioritisation Method for Green Supply Chain Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Masoumik, S. Maryam; Abdul-Rashid, Salwa Hanim; Olugu, Ezutah Udoncy

    2015-01-01

    To maintain a competitive position, companies are increasingly required to integrate their proactive environmental strategies into their business strategies. The shift from reactive and compliance-based to proactive and strategic environmental management has driven companies to consider the strategic factors while identifying the areas in which they should focus their green initiatives. In previous studies little attention was given to providing the managers with a basis from which they could strategically prioritise these green initiatives across their companies’ supply chains. Considering this lacuna in the literature, we present a decision-making method for prioritising green supply chain initiatives aligned with the preferred green strategies alternatives for the manufacturing companies. To develop this method, the study considered a position between determinism and the voluntarism orientation of environmental management involving both external pressures and internal competitive drivers and key resources as decision factors. This decision-making method was developed using the analytic network process (ANP) technique. The elements of the decision model were derived from the literature. The causal relationships among the multiple decision variables were validated based on the results of structural equation modelling (SEM) using a dataset collected from a survey of the ISO 14001-certified manufacturers in Malaysia. A portion of the relative weights required for computation in ANP was also calculated using the SEM results. A case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. PMID:26618353

  3. Field evaluation of endotoxin air sampling assay methods.

    PubMed

    Thorne, P S; Reynolds, S J; Milton, D K; Bloebaum, P D; Zhang, X; Whitten, P; Burmeister, L F

    1997-11-01

    This study tested the importance of filter media, extraction and assay protocol, and bioaerosol source on the determination of endotoxin under field conditions in swine and poultry confinement buildings. Multiple simultaneous air samples were collected using glass fiber (GF) and polycarbonate (PC) filters, and these were assayed using two methods in two separate laboratories: an endpoint chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (QCL) performed in water and a kinetic chromogenic LAL assay (KQCL) performed in buffer with resistant-parallel line estimation analysis (KLARE). In addition, two aqueous filter extraction methods were compared in the QCL assay: 120 min extraction at 22 degrees C with vigorous shaking and 30 min extraction at 68 degrees C with gentle rocking. These extraction methods yielded endotoxin activities that were not significantly different and were very highly correlated. Reproducibility of endotoxin determinations from duplicate air sampling filters was very high (Cronbach alpha all > 0.94). When analyzed by the QCL method GF filters yielded significantly higher endotoxin activity than PC filters. QCL and KLARE methods gave similar estimates for endotoxin activity from PC filters; however, GF filters analyzed by the QCL method yielded significantly higher endotoxin activity estimates, suggesting enhancement of the QCL assay or inhibition of the KLARE asay with GF filters. Correlation between QCL-GF and QCL-PC was high (r = 0.98) while that between KLARE-GF and KLARE-PC was moderate (r = 0.68). Analysis of variance demonstrated that assay methodology, filter-type, barn-type, and interactions between assay and filter-type and between assay and barn-type were important factors influencing endotoxin exposure assessment.

  4. Methods used in estimating the ground water supply in the Wichita, Kansas well-field area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.C.; Lohman, S.W.

    1947-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used in studying the groundwater hydrology of an area in Harvey and Sedgwick Counties, Kansas, from which the city of Wichita derives its water supply. A summary of the data available for study is presented and several hydrologic factors are evaluated. The relationship between groundwater levels and precipitation is shown, and recharge is estimated. The effect of pumping on water levels is shown graphically, and the quantity of water withdrawn from storage is estimated from several water-table contour maps. The data are analyzed and the quantity of water available for pumping is estimated.

  5. A probabilistic method to diagnose faults of air handling units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Debashis

    Air handling unit (AHU) is one of the most extensively used equipment in large commercial buildings. This device is typically customized and lacks quality system integration which can result in hardwire failures and controller errors. Air handling unit Performance Assessment Rules (APAR) is a fault detection tool that uses a set of expert rules derived from mass and energy balances to detect faults in air handling units. APAR is computationally simple enough that it can be embedded in commercial building automation and control systems and relies only upon sensor data and control signals that are commonly available in these systems. Although APAR has many advantages over other methods, for example no training data required and easy to implement commercially, most of the time it is unable to provide the diagnosis of the faults. For instance, a fault on temperature sensor could be fixed bias, drifting bias, inappropriate location, complete failure. Also a fault in mixing box can be return and outdoor damper leak or stuck. In addition, when multiple rules are satisfied the list of faults increases. There is no proper way to have the correct diagnosis for rule based fault detection system. To overcome this limitation we proposed Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) as a diagnostic tool. BBN can be used to simulate diagnostic thinking of FDD experts through a probabilistic way. In this study we developed a new way to detect and diagnose faults in AHU through combining APAR rules and Bayesian Belief network. Bayesian Belief Network is used as a decision support tool for rule based expert system. BBN is highly capable to prioritize faults when multiple rules are satisfied simultaneously. Also it can get information from previous AHU operating conditions and maintenance records to provide proper diagnosis. The proposed model is validated with real time measured data of a campus building at University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA).The results show that BBN is correctly able to

  6. A new radiograpic method using electromagnetic component of air shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketa, A.; Okubo, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel radiographic method to measure the density length with electromagnetic component of air shower. Air shower produced by a primary cosmic ray consists of muon component and electromagnetic component. Electromagnetic component is consists of electron, positron and photon. The penetration power of electromagnetic component is weaker than that of muon, so soft component is suitable for small scale structure thinner than 2 kg/cm^2 equivalent to 20m thick water, like buildings and small hills. But it requires particle identification which means distinguishing muon and electromagnetic component. Particle identification can be done with strong magnets and dense detectors, but it is very hard to use that kind of detector for radiography because of their weight and cost. We established the cheap and effective method to distinguish soft component and hard component statistically. We also performed measurements in Arimura observation vault of Mt. Sakurajima, Japan. As a result of this observation, we found there is an anti-correlation between soft component flux and rainfall. If the water content of the soil became larger, the amount of absorption increases. So this result can be interpreted as detecting the increase of the water content by soft component flux. This method can be applied for the quantitive compensation of the measurement data like absolute gravitymeter data and tiltmeter data which is easy to receive turbulence by rain. It is also expected that the quantitive compensation leads to the improvement in accuracy of diastrophism measurement and the improvement in presumed accuracy of magma movement inside a volcano.

  7. A novel fast gas chromatography method for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in ambient air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C9-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a 14.5 min analysis time. Moreover, in-situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an 11.7 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to 19.7 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). These analysis times potentially allow for a twofold to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in-situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC (OBVOC) linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest

  8. Automated fluorometric method for hydrogen peroxide in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lazrus, A.L.; Kok, G.L.; Lind, J.A.; Gitlin, S.N.; Heikes, B.G.; Shetter, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    A fluorometric method for measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ vapor in air utilizes peroxidase enzyme to catalyze the reaction in which hydroperoxides cause dimerization of (p-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid. In a second channel, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is selectively decomposed by catalase so that the fluorescence signal is due only to organic hydroperoxides. The difference between the two signals is a measure of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ vapor. The H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ vapor is collected by means of a glass coil though which air and water flow concurrently. The coefficient of variation is 0.5% at 2.5 parts per billion by volume. The standard deviation of the base line is 10 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) under laboratory conditions. This standard deviation has varied between 3 and 33 pptv during ground-based field missions, and was 70 pptv on aircraft flights. Thirty seconds is required for the signal to change from 10 to 90% of its maximum value. 13 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Fast detection of air contaminants using immunobiological methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Katrin; Bolwien, Carsten; Sulz, Gerd; Koch, Wolfgang; Dunkhorst, Wilhelm; Lödding, Hubert; Schwarz, Katharina; Holländer, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Seidel, Björn; Hofbauer, Wolfgang; Rennebarth, Torsten; Renzl, Anna

    2009-05-01

    The fast and direct identification of possibly pathogenic microorganisms in air is gaining increasing interest due to their threat for public health, e.g. in clinical environments or in clean rooms of food or pharmaceutical industries. We present a new detection method allowing the direct recognition of relevant germs or bacteria via fluorescence-labeled antibodies within less than one hour. In detail, an air-sampling unit passes particles in the relevant size range to a substrate which contains antibodies with fluorescence labels for the detection of a specific microorganism. After the removal of the excess antibodies the optical detection unit comprising reflected-light and epifluorescence microscopy can identify the microorganisms by fast image processing on a single-particle level. First measurements with the system to identify various test particles as well as interfering influences have been performed, in particular with respect to autofluorescence of dust particles. Specific antibodies for the detection of Aspergillus fumigatus spores have been established. The biological test system consists of protein A-coated polymer particles which are detected by a fluorescence-labeled IgG. Furthermore the influence of interfering particles such as dust or debris is discussed.

  10. Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Stork, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

  11. A review of methods for predicting air pollution dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Grose, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Air pollution modeling, and problem areas in air pollution dispersion modeling were surveyed. Emission source inventory, meteorological data, and turbulent diffusion are discussed in terms of developing a dispersion model. Existing mathematical models of urban air pollution, and highway and airport models are discussed along with their limitations. Recommendations for improving modeling capabilities are included.

  12. Penumatic-power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Portable compressed air supply has two or more outputs at pressures from 20 to 100 psi. Applications include operating production equipment, spraying paint and lubricants, and pressurizing refrigeration systems. Supply filters air from standard high-pressure line, reduces it to working pressure, and adds lubricant when required. Regulator supplies low-pressure air to output channels. On channel lines, vernier-control valves select output pressures.

  13. Methods of rating unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics of public water supplies in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eimers, Jo Leslie; Weaver, J.C.; Terziotti, Silvia; Midgette, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    Overlay and index methods were derived for rating the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes. The rating of the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics represents a practical and effective means of assessing part of the inherent vulnerability of water supplies to potential contamination. Factors that influence the inherent vulnerability of the drinking water supply to potential contamination were selected and assigned ratings (on a scale of 1 to 10) to cover the possible range of values in North Carolina. These factors were assigned weights of 1, 2, or 3 to reflect their relative influence on the inherent vulnerability of the drinking water supply. The factor values were obtained from Geographic Information System data layers, and were transformed into grids having 60-meter by 60-meter cells, with each cell being assigned a value. Identification of factors, the development of ratings for each, and assignment of weights were based on (1) a literature search, which included examination of potential factors and their effects on the drinking water; and (2) consultation with experts in the science and engineering of hydrology, geology, forestry, agriculture, and water management. Factors selected for rating the inherent vulnerability of the unsaturated zone are vertical hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, land cover, and land use. Vertical hydraulic conductance is a measure of the capacity of unsaturated material to transmit water. Land-surface slope influences whether precipitation runs off land surfaces or infiltrates into the subsurface. Land cover, the physical overlay of the land surface, influences the amount of precipitation that becomes overland flow or infiltrates into the subsurface. Land use describes activities that occur on the land surface and influence the potential generation of nonpoint

  14. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  15. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    This invention relates to a rechargeable battery or fuel cell. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel air electrode comprising a new carbon electrode support material and a method of making same. 3 figs.

  16. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Philip N., Jr.

    1988-06-01

    This invention relates to a rechargeable battery or fuel cell. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel air electrode comprising a new carbon electrode support material and a method of making same.

  17. Calibration Methods for Air Coupled Antennas - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vânia; Solla, Mercedes; Fontul, Simona; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison of different methods for calibrating air coupled antennas: Coring, Surface Reflection Method (SRM) and Common Mid-Point (CMP) through the analysis of GPR data collected in a test site with different pavement solutions. Research activities have been carried out during a Short Term Scientific Mission (STSM) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in December 2015. The use of GPR in transport infrastructures represents one of the most significant advances for obtaining continuous data along the road, with the advantage of operation at traffic speed and being a non-destructive technique. Its main application has been the evaluation of layer thickness. For the determination of layer thickness, it is necessary to know the velocity of the signal, which depends on the dielectric constant of the material, and the two-way travel time of the reflected signal that is recorded by the GPR system. The calculation of the dielectric value of the materials can be done using different approaches such as: using fixed values based on experience, laboratory determination of dielectric values, applying the SRM, performing back calculation from ground truth references such as cores and test pits, or using the CMP method. The problem with using ground truth is that it is time consuming, labour intensive and intrusive to traffic, in addition, a drill core is not necessarily representative of the whole surveyed area. Regarding the surface reflection technique, one of the problems is that it only measures the dielectric value from the layer surface and not from the whole layer. Recent works already started to address some of these challenges proposing new approaches for GPR layer thickness measurements using multiple antennas to calculate the average dielectric value of the asphalt layer, taking advantage of significant hardware improvements in GPR

  18. Preliminary Study of Heat Supply during Carbon Nanodots Synthesis by Microwave-assisted Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakul, F.; Aimon, A. H.; Nuryadin, B. W.; Iskandar, F.

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanodots (CNDs) are known to be good phosphor materials with wide range emission band, low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. In this work, CNDs were synthesized from a precursor consisting of citric acid [C6H8O7] as carbon source and urea [(NH2)2CO] as nitrogen source through a microwave-assisted method. The heat energy supplied during the microwave process was controlled. Further, we studied the effect of citric acid mass on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of the CNDs by varying its percentage in the precursors. The optimum luminescence intensity was obtained from the sample that was produced from 1.2 wt% citric acid mass. It had a single emission band with bright yellow luminescence.

  19. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed 50 millimeters (2 inches) of water at an air flow of 115 liters (4 cubic feet) per minute. (b) The exhalation resistance to a flow of air at a rate of 85 liters (3 cubic feet) per minute shall not exceed 25... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C...

  20. Health, wealth, and air pollution: advancing theory and methods.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Marie S; Jerrett, Michael; Kawachi, Ichiro; Levy, Jonathan I; Cohen, Aaron J; Gouveia, Nelson; Wilkinson, Paul; Fletcher, Tony; Cifuentes, Luis; Schwartz, Joel

    2003-01-01

    The effects of both ambient air pollution and socioeconomic position (SEP) on health are well documented. A limited number of recent studies suggest that SEP may itself play a role in the epidemiology of disease and death associated with exposure to air pollution. Together with evidence that poor and working-class communities are often more exposed to air pollution, these studies have stimulated discussion among scientists, policy makers, and the public about the differential distribution of the health impacts from air pollution. Science and public policy would benefit from additional research that integrates the theory and practice from both air pollution and social epidemiologies to gain a better understanding of this issue. In this article we aim to promote such research by introducing readers to methodologic and conceptual approaches in the fields of air pollution and social epidemiology; by proposing theories and hypotheses about how air pollution and socioeconomic factors may interact to influence health, drawing on studies conducted worldwide; by discussing methodologic issues in the design and analysis of studies to determine whether health effects of exposure to ambient air pollution are modified by SEP; and by proposing specific steps that will advance knowledge in this field, fill information gaps, and apply research results to improve public health in collaboration with affected communities. PMID:14644658

  1. Results of borehole geophysical logging and hydraulic tests conducted in Area D supply wells, former US Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Grazul, Kevin E.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging, aquifer tests, and aquifer-isolation (packer) tests were conducted in four supply wells at the former U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in Warminster, PA to identify the depth and yield of water-bearing zones, occurrence of borehole flow, and effect of pumping on nearby wells. The study was conducted as part of an ongoing evaluation of ground-water contamination at the NAWC. Caliper, natural-gamma, single-point resistance, fluid resistivity, and fluid temperature logs and borehole television surveys were run in the supply wells, which range in depth from 242 to 560 ft (feet). Acoustic borehole televiewer and borehole deviation logs were run in two of the wells. The direction and rate of borehole-fluid movement under non-pumping conditions were measured with a high-resolution heatpulse flowmeter. The logs were used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine probable zones of vertical borehole-fluid movement, and determine the depth to set packers. An aquifer test was conducted in each well to determine open-hole specific capacity and the effect of pumping the open borehole on water levels in nearby wells. Specific capacities ranged from 0.21 to 1.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in each well to determine depth-discrete specific capacities and to determine the effect of pumping an individual fracture or fracture zone on water levels in nearby wells. Specific capacities of individual fractures and fracture zones ranged from 0 to 2.3 (gal/min)/ft. Most fractures identified as water-producing or water-receiving zones by borehole geophysical methods produced water when isolated and pumped. All hydrologically active fractures below 250 ft below land surface were identified as water-receiving zones and produced little water when isolated and pumped. In the two wells greater then 540 ft deep, downward borehole flow to the deep water-receiving fractures is caused by a large

  2. Aggregate supply and demand modeling using GIS methods for the front range urban corridor, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ahmet; Turner, Keith

    2004-07-01

    The combined use of allocation modeling and geographical information system (GIS) technologies for providing quantitative assessments of aggregate supply and demand is evaluated using representative data for the Front Range Urban Corridor (FRUC) in Colorado. The FRUC extends from the Colorado-Wyoming border to south of Colorado Springs, and includes Denver and the major urban growth regions of Colorado. In this area, aggregate demand is high and is increasing in response to population growth. Neighborhood opposition to the establishment of new pits and quarries and the depletion of many deposits are limiting aggregate supplies. Many sources are already covered by urban development or eliminated from production by zoning. Transport of aggregate by rail from distant resources may be required in the future. Two allocation-modeling procedures are tested in this study. Network analysis procedures provided within the ARC/INFO software, are unsatisfactory. Further aggregate allocation modeling used a model specifically designed for this task; a modified version of an existing Colorado School of Mines allocation model allows for more realistic market analyses. This study evaluated four scenarios. The entire region was evaluated with a scenario reflecting the current market and by a second scenario in which some existing suppliers were closed down and new potential suppliers were activated. The conditions within the Denver metropolitan area were studied before and after the introduction of three possible rail-to-truck aggregate distribution centers. GIS techniques are helpful in developing the required database to describe the Front Range Urban Corridor aggregate market conditions. GIS methods allow the digital representation of the regional road network, and the development of a distance matrix relating all suppliers and purchasers.

  3. Problems in estimating self-supplied industrial water use by indirect methods, the California example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Consumptive fresh-water use by industry in California is estimated at about 230 million gallons per day, or about one-half of one percent of agricultural withdrawals in the State , and only about 1 percent of agricultural consumptive use. Therefore, a significant State-wide realignment of the total water resources could not be made by industrial conservation measures. Nevertheless, considerable latitude for water conservation exists in industry -- fresh water consumed by self-supplied industry amounts to about 40 percent of its withdrawals in California, and only about 10 to 15 percent nationally (not including power-plant use). Furthermore, where firms withdraw and consume less water there is more for others nearby to use. The main question in attempting to estimate self-supplied industrial water use in California by indirect methods was whether accurate estimates of industrial water use could be made from data on surrogates such as production and employment. The answer is apparently not. A fundamental problem was that different data bases produced variable coefficients of water use for similar industries. Much of the potential for error appeared to lie in the water data bases rather than the production or employment data. The apparent reasons are that water-use data are based on responses to questionnaires, which are prone to errors in reporting, and because the data may be aggregated inappropriately for this kind of correlation. Industries within an apparently similar category commonly use different amounts of water, both because of differences in the product and because of differences in production processes even where the end-product is similar. (USGS)

  4. Collaborative Testing of Methods to Measure Air Pollutants, II. The Non-Dispersive Infrared Method for Carbon Monoxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Herbert C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Methods Standardization Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, has undertaken a program to standardize methods used in measuring air pollutants covered by the national primary and secondary air quality standards. This paper presents the results of a collective test of the method specified for…

  5. Semi-Lagrangian Methods in Air Pollution Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buus Hansen, A.; Kaas, E.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.

    2009-04-01

    Various semi-Lagrangian methods are tested for use in air pollution model- ing. The aim is to find a method fulfilling as many of the desirable properties by Rasch and Williamson (1990) and Machenhauer et al. (2008) as possi- ble. The focus is on accuracy, local mass conservation and computational efficiency. The methods tested are, first, classical semi-Lagrangian cubic interpola- tion, see e.g. Durran (1999), second, semi-Lagrangian cubic cascade inter- polation, by Nair et al. (2002), third, semi-Lagrangian cubic interpolation with the modified interpolation weights, by Kaas (2008), and last, semi- Lagrangian cubic interpolation with a locally mass conserving monotonic filter by Kaas and Nielsen (2008). Semi-Lagrangian (sL) interpolation is a classical method for atmospheric modeling, cascade interpolation is more efficient computationally, modified interpolation weights assure mass conservation and the locally mass con- serving monotonic filter imposes monotonicity. All schemes are tested with advection alone or with advection and chem- istry together under both typical rural and urban conditions using different temporal and spatial resolution. The methods are compared with a current state-of-the-art scheme presently used at the National Environmental Re- search Institute (NERI) in Denmark. The test cases are based either on the traditional slotted cylinder, see e.g. Zerroukat et al. (2002), or the rotating cone, see e.g. Molenkamp (1968) and Crowley (1968), where the schemes' ability to model both steep gradi- ents and slopes are challenged. The tests showed that the locally mass conserving monotonic filter im- proved the results significantly for some of the test cases, however, not for all. It was found that the semi-Lagrangian schemes, in almost every case, were not able to outperform the currently used ASD scheme used in DEHM, see e.g. Frohn et al. (2002). The present study is a part of the research of the Center for Energy, Envi- ronment and Health

  6. The Diffusion and Impact of Radio Frequency Identification in Supply Chains: A Multi-Method Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoran

    2012-01-01

    As a promising and emerging technology for supply chain management, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a new alternative to existing tracking technologies and also allows a range of internal control and supply chain coordination. RFID has generated a significant amount of interest and activities from both practitioners and researchers in…

  7. Supply Rate and Equilibrium Inventory of Air Force Enlisted Personnel: A Simultaneous Model of the Accession and Retention Markets Incorporating Force Level Constraints. Final Report for Period July 1969-June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVany, Arthur S.; And Others

    This research was designed to develop and test a model of the Air Force manpower market. The study indicates that previous manpower supply studies failed to account for simultaneous determination of enlistments and retentions and misinterpreted regressions as supply equations. They are, instead, reduced form equations resulting from joint…

  8. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykoski, R. T.

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass prescription bottles, and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author/RH)

  9. Reference and Equivalent Methods Used to Measure National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Criteria Air Pollutants - Volume I

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a number of Federal Reference Method (FRM) and Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) systems used to monitor the six criteria air pollutants (Lead [Pb], Carbon Monoxide [CO], Sulfur Dioxide [SO2], Nitrogen Dioxide [NO2], Ozone [O3], Particulate Matter [PM]) to determine if an...

  10. Methods Used to Assess the Susceptibility to Contamination of Transient, Non-Community Public Ground-Water Supplies in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arihood, Leslie D.; Cohen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Safe Water Drinking Act of 1974 as amended in 1996 gave each State the responsibility of developing a Source-Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) that is designed to protect public-water supplies from contamination. Each SWAP must include three elements: (1) a delineation of the source-water protection area, (2) an inventory of potential sources of contaminants within the area, and (3) a determination of the susceptibility of the public-water supply to contamination from the inventoried sources. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) was responsible for preparing a SWAP for all public-water supplies in Indiana, including about 2,400 small public ground-water supplies that are designated transient, non-community (TNC) supplies. In cooperation with IDEM, the U.S. Geological Survey compiled information on conditions near the TNC supplies and helped IDEM complete source-water assessments for each TNC supply. The delineation of a source-water protection area (called the assessment area) for each TNC ground-water supply was defined by IDEM as a circular area enclosed by a 300-foot radius centered at the TNC supply well. Contaminants of concern (COCs) were defined by IDEM as any of the 90 contaminants for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established primary drinking-water standards. Two of these, nitrate as nitrogen and total coliform bacteria, are Indiana State-regulated contaminants for TNC water supplies. IDEM representatives identified potential point and nonpoint sources of COCs within the assessment area, and computer database retrievals were used to identify potential point sources of COCs in the area outside the assessment area. Two types of methods-subjective and subjective hybrid-were used in the SWAP to determine susceptibility to contamination. Subjective methods involve decisions based upon professional judgment, prior experience, and (or) the application of a fundamental understanding of processes without the collection and

  11. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOEpatents

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  12. An empirical bayes method for comparing air pollution data to air quality standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suggs, Jack C.; Curran, Thomas C.

    Air pollution concentrations are often characterized by skewed distributions. For example, 24-h suspended particulate mass concentrations have historically been characterized by a 2-parameter lognormal distribution (Larsen, 1969, J. Air. Pollut. Control. Ass.19, 24-30). The error in making measurements of these concentrations also conforms to a distribution that is more symmetric and can usually be approximated by the normal distribution, often with the added feature that the error variation is a function of concentration level. Air pollution measurements are often used to determine status with respect to legal standards such as the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) (Fed. Reg. 36, 8186, 1971; 44, 8202, 1979). In general, these standards do not explicitly account for measurement error. Using Bayesian mathematics, a model is developed which deals with the probability of the "true" concentration exceeding the NAAQS given a measurement above the NAAQS. Several hypothetical examples are used to demonstrate that Bayesian techniques can combine both pollution history and instrument precision into a probablistic model for comparing air pollution data to NAAQS.

  13. Fractal analysis methods for solid alkane monolayer domains at SiO2/air interfaces.

    PubMed

    Knüfing, Lydia; Schollmeyer, Hauke; Riegler, Hans; Mecke, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    A systematic evaluation of various fractal analysis methods is essential for studying morphologies of finite and noisy experimental patterns such as domains of long chain alkanes at SiO(2)/air interfaces. The derivation of trustworthy fractal dimensions crucially relies on the definition of confidence intervals for the assumed scaling range. We demonstrate that the determination of the intervals can be improved largely by comparing the scaling behavior of different morphological measures (area, boundary, curvature). We show that the combination of area and boundary data from coarse-grained structures obtained with the box-counting method reveals clear confidence limits and thus credible morphological data. This also holds for the Minkowski density method. It also reveals the confidence range. Its main drawback, the larger swing-in period at the lower cutoff compared to the box-counting method, is compensated by more details on the scaling behavior of area, boundary, and curvature. The sandbox method is less recommendable. It essentially delivers the same data as box-counting, but it is more susceptible to finite size effects at the lower cutoff. It is found that the domain morphology depends on the surface coverage of alkanes. The individual domains at low surface coverage have a fractal dimension of approximately 1.7, whereas at coverages well above 50% the scaling dimension is 2 with a large margin of uncertainty at approximately 50% coverage. This change in morphology is attributed to a crossover from a growth regime dominated by diffusion-limited aggregation of individual domains to a regime where the growth is increasingly affected by annealing and the interaction of solid growth fronts which approach each other and thus compete for the alkane supply.

  14. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  15. Methods for determination of toxic organic compounds in air

    SciTech Connect

    Winberry, W.T. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides environmental regulatory agencies, industry, and other interested parties with specific, standardized sampling and analysis procedures for toxic organic compounds in air. Compounds include Volatile Organic Compounds, Organochlorine Pesticides and PCBs, Aldehydes and Ketones, Phosgene, N-Nitrosodimethylamine, Phenol and Methylphenols (Cresols), Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDDs), Formaldehyde, Non-Methane Organic Compounds (NMOCs) and Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  16. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  17. Method of making an air electrode material having controlled sinterability

    DOEpatents

    Vasilow, Theodore R.; Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1994-01-01

    A tubular, porous ceramic electrode structure (3) is made from the sintered admixture of doped lanthanum manganite and an additive containing cerium where a solid electrolyte (4), substantially surrounds the air electrode, and a porous outer fuel electrode (7) substantially surrounds the electrolyte, to form a fuel cell (1).

  18. PROTOTYPIC CONTINUITY METHODS FOR FASTER RECOVERY OF OIL PRODUCTS SUPPLY AFTER GREAT QUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuno, Takato

    In the Great East Japan Earthquake, some oil product farms and tanks had a lot of damages. Then we temporally run short of oil products such as gasoline, lamp oil. The oil product is indispensable to make cargo shipment, or rescue operations, and some trouble must come for everyday shopping and movement of business. The lifeline damages come out electric power, water service, gas and communication. In addition the oil product shortage overlaps then the importance to restore was recognized. After earthquake disaster, there is a possibility to interrupt supply services such as shipping from oil tanks and sale at stations. Even if their discontinuation comes, it needs some business continuity policies in order to recover supply service at early stage. This paper grasps oil product discontinuation of supply and restoration transition and tries to get disaster lessons. This paper proposes prototypic techniques to minimize the sum of penalties to supply no service for neighbor region with capacities of critical stations. It applies to Tohoku regions and their gas stations and comments the usefulness of techniques and implication of supply service continuity policy.

  19. A study on calculation method for mechanical impedance of air spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changgeng, SHUAI; Penghui, LI; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an approximate analytic method of obtaining the mechanical impedance of air spring. The sound pressure distribution in cylindrical air spring is calculated based on the linear air wave theory. The influences of different boundary conditions on the acoustic pressure field distribution in cylindrical air spring are analysed. A 1-order ordinary differential matrix equation for the state vector of revolutionary shells under internal pressure is derived based on the non-moment theory of elastic thin shell. Referring to the transfer matrix method, a kind of expanded homogeneous capacity high precision integration method is introduced to solve the non-homogeneous matrix differential equation. Combined the solved stress field of shell with the calculated sound pressure field in air spring under the displacement harmonic excitation, the approximate analytical expression of the input and transfer mechanical impedance for the air spring can be achieved. The numerical simulation with the Comsol Multiphysics software verifies the correctness of theoretical analysis result.

  20. Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.Q.; Santini, D.J.; Warinner, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Air pollutant emission values are used to determine the social costs of various technologies that cause air pollution and to estimate the benefits of emission control technologies. In this report, the authors present two methods of estimating air pollutant emission values--the damage value method and the control cost method--and review 15 recent studies in which these methods were employed to estimate emission values. The reviewed studies derived emission values for only a limited number of areas; emission value estimates are needed for other US regions. Using the emission values estimated in the reviewed studies, they establish regression relationships between emission values, air pollutant concentrations, and total population exposed, and apply the established relationships to 17 US metropolitan areas to estimate damage-based and control-cost-based emission values for reactive organic gases, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter measuring less than 10 microns, sulfur oxides, and carbon monoxide in these areas. Their estimates show significant variations in emission values across the 17 regions.

  1. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  2. Automated air-void system characterization of hardened concrete: Helping computers to count air-voids like people count air-voids---Methods for flatbed scanner calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Karl

    Since the discovery in the late 1930s that air entrainment can improve the durability of concrete, it has been important for people to know the quantity, spacial distribution, and size distribution of the air-voids in their concrete mixes in order to ensure a durable final product. The task of air-void system characterization has fallen on the microscopist, who, according to a standard test method laid forth by the American Society of Testing and Materials, must meticulously count or measure about a thousand air-voids per sample as exposed on a cut and polished cross-section of concrete. The equipment used to perform this task has traditionally included a stereomicroscope, a mechanical stage, and a tally counter. Over the past 30 years, with the availability of computers and digital imaging, automated methods have been introduced to perform the same task, but using the same basic equipment. The method described here replaces the microscope and mechanical stage with an ordinary flatbed desktop scanner, and replaces the microscopist and tally counter with a personal computer; two pieces of equipment much more readily available than a microscope with a mechanical stage, and certainly easier to find than a person willing to sit for extended periods of time counting air-voids. Most laboratories that perform air-void system characterization typically have cabinets full of prepared samples with corresponding results from manual operators. Proponents of automated methods often take advantage of this fact by analyzing the same samples and comparing the results. A similar iterative approach is described here where scanned images collected from a significant number of samples are analyzed, the results compared to those of the manual operator, and the settings optimized to best approximate the results of the manual operator. The results of this calibration procedure are compared to an alternative calibration procedure based on the more rigorous digital image accuracy

  3. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  4. Method and apparatus for air-coupled transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Junho (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An air-coupled transducer includes a ultrasonic transducer body having a radiation end with a backing fixture at the radiation end. There is a flexible backplate conformingly fit to the backing fixture and a thin membrane (preferably a metallized polymer) conformingly fit to the flexible backplate. In one embodiment, the backing fixture is spherically curved and the flexible backplate is spherically curved. The flexible backplate is preferably patterned with pits or depressions.

  5. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  6. Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission

    DOEpatents

    Kostiuk, Larry W.; Cheng, Robert K.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

  7. Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

    1993-09-21

    A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant. 1 figure.

  8. Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.

    1993-01-01

    A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant.

  9. Plant pneumatics: stem air flow is related to embolism - new perspectives on methods in plant hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano; Bittencourt, Paulo R L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Junior, Mauro B M; Barros, Fernanda V; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains a large amount of air, even in functional xylem. Air embolisms in the xylem affect water transport and can determine plant growth and survival. Embolisms are usually estimated with laborious hydraulic methods, which can be prone to several artefacts. Here, we describe a new method for estimating embolisms that is based on air flow measurements of entire branches. To calculate the amount of air flowing out of the branch, a vacuum was applied to the cut bases of branches under different water potentials. We first investigated the source of air by determining whether it came from inside or outside the branch. Second, we compared embolism curves according to air flow or hydraulic measurements in 15 vessel- and tracheid-bearing species to test the hypothesis that the air flow is related to embolism. Air flow came almost exclusively from air inside the branch during the 2.5-min measurements and was strongly related to embolism. We propose a new embolism measurement method that is simple, effective, rapid and inexpensive, and that allows several measurements on the same branch, thus opening up new possibilities for studying plant hydraulics.

  10. Plant pneumatics: stem air flow is related to embolism - new perspectives on methods in plant hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano; Bittencourt, Paulo R L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Junior, Mauro B M; Barros, Fernanda V; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains a large amount of air, even in functional xylem. Air embolisms in the xylem affect water transport and can determine plant growth and survival. Embolisms are usually estimated with laborious hydraulic methods, which can be prone to several artefacts. Here, we describe a new method for estimating embolisms that is based on air flow measurements of entire branches. To calculate the amount of air flowing out of the branch, a vacuum was applied to the cut bases of branches under different water potentials. We first investigated the source of air by determining whether it came from inside or outside the branch. Second, we compared embolism curves according to air flow or hydraulic measurements in 15 vessel- and tracheid-bearing species to test the hypothesis that the air flow is related to embolism. Air flow came almost exclusively from air inside the branch during the 2.5-min measurements and was strongly related to embolism. We propose a new embolism measurement method that is simple, effective, rapid and inexpensive, and that allows several measurements on the same branch, thus opening up new possibilities for studying plant hydraulics. PMID:26918522

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  12. Air-liquid interface cultures enhance the oxygen supply and trigger the structural and functional differentiation of intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC).

    PubMed

    Nossol, Constanze; Diesing, A-K; Walk, N; Faber-Zuschratter, H; Hartig, R; Post, A; Kluess, J; Rothkötter, H-J; Kahlert, S

    2011-07-01

    The specific function of the epithelium as critical barrier between the intestinal lumen and the organism's internal microenvironment is reflected by permanent maintenance of intercellular junctions and cellular polarity. The intestinal epithelial cells are responsible for absorption of nutritional components, facing mechanical stress and a changing oxygen supplementation via blood stream. Oxygen itself can regulate the barrier and the absorptive function of the epithelium. Therefore, we compared the dish cell culture, the transwell-like membrane culture and the oxygen enriched air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. We demonstrated strong influence of the different culture conditions on morphology and function of intestinal porcine epithelial cell lines in vitro. ALI culture resulted in a significant increase in cell number, epithelial cell layer thickness and expression as well as apical localisation of the microvilli-associated protein villin. Remarkable similarities regarding the morphological parameters were observed between ALI cultures and intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. Furthermore, the functional analysis of protein uptake and degradation by the epithelial cells demonstrated the necessity of sufficient oxygen supply as achieved in ALI cultures. Our study is the first report providing marked evidence that optimised oxygen supply using ALI cultures directly affects the morphological differentiation and functional properties of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

  13. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOEpatents

    Cromer, Robert Harold; Bechtel, William Theodore; Sutcu, Maz

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  14. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America-funded research by teams and national laboratories that resulted in the development of an ASHRAE standard and a standardized testing method for testing the air leakage of HVAC air handlers and furnace cabinets and has spurred equipment manufacturers to tighten the cabinets they use for residential HVAC systems.

  15. Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system

    DOEpatents

    Gorman, William G.; Carberg, William George; Jones, Charles Michael

    2002-01-01

    To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

  16. Hydrogeologic setting, water levels, and quality of water from supply wells at the US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, O.B.; Daniel, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Marine Corps Air Station is located in the Coastal Plain province of North Carolina. Four freshwater aquifers of sand and limestone underlie the area to a depth of about 500 feet. Saline water occurs below this depth. The aquifers are separated by three confining units that are thin and discontinuous in the southern part. Water supply is obtained from 195- to 330 feet wells in the Castle Hayne aquifer. Many wells are near landfills that have received hazardous wastes. Groundwater withdrawals have reduced hydraulic heads in the Castle Hayne some 20 feet around active production wells, creating potential for downward movement of contaminated water from the surface and for upward movement of saline water that occurs at depth. Chemical analyses of water from the Castle Hayne aquifer indicate median concentrations of iron and manganese are 0.78 and 0.08 milligrams per liter, respectively, and lead and (or) nickel exceed drinking water standards in three wells. Chloride increased from 10 to more than 40 milligrams per liter in the deepest operating well over a 45-year period. Benzene concentrations range from 0.5 to 1.9 milligrams per liter in the southern part of the Air Station but were below the 5 milligrams per liter maximum contaminant level for drinking water. Fatty acids were found in concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter in water from wells in an area centered around the intersection of Roosevelt Boulevard and Slocum Road. Resampling is needed to verify all constituents that indicate contamination.

  17. A simple method for the detection of PM2.5 air pollutions using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, PM2.5 air pollution is a social and transboundary environmental issue with the rapid economic growth in many countries. As PM2.5 is small and includes various ingredients, the detection of PM2.5 air pollutions by using satellite data is difficult compared with the detection of dust and sandstorms. In this paper, we examine various images (i.e., single-band images, band-difference images, RGB composite color images) to find a good method for detecting PM2.5 air pollutions by using MODIS data. A good method for the detection of PM2.5 air pollution is {R, G, B = band10, band9, T11}, where T11 is the brightness temperature of band31. In this composite color image, PM2.5 air pollutions are represented by light purple or pink color. This proposed method is simpler than the method by Nagatani et al. (2013), and is useful to grasp the distribution of PM2.5 air pollutions in the wide area (e.g., from China and India to Japan). By comparing AVI image with the image by proposed method, DSS and PM2.5 air pollutions can be classified.

  18. 75 FR 22126 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method for O 3 is an automated method that... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  19. Adaptation strategies for water supply management in a drought prone Mediterranean river basin: Application of outranking method.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Del Vasto-Terrientes, Luis; Valls, Aida; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The regional water allocation planning is one of those complex decision problems where holistic approach to water supply management considering different criteria would be valuable. However, multi-criteria decision making with diverse indicators measured on different scales and uncertainty levels is difficult to solve. Objective of this paper is to develop scenarios for the future imbalances in water supply and demand for a water stressed Mediterranean area of Northern Spain (Tarragona) and to test the applicability and suitability of an outranking method ELECTRE-III-H for evaluating sectoral water allocation policies. This study is focused on the use of alternative water supply scenarios to fulfil the demand of water from three major sectors: domestic, industrial and agricultural. A detail scenario planning for regional water demand and supply has been discussed. For each future scenario of climate change, the goal is to obtain a ranking of a set of possible actions with regards to different types of indicators (costs, water stress and environmental impact). The analytical method used is based on outranking models for decision aid with hierarchical structures of criteria and ranking alternatives using partial preorders based on pairwise preference relations. We compare several adaptation measures including alternative water sources (reclaimed water and desalination); inter basin water transfer and sectoral demand management coming from industry, agriculture and domestic sectors and tested the sustainability of management actions for different climate change scenarios. Results have shown use of alternative water resources as the most reliable alternative with medium reclaimed water reuse in industry and agriculture and low to medium use of desalination water in domestic and industrial sectors as the best alternative. The proposed method has several advantages such as the management of heterogeneous scales of measurement without requiring any artificial

  20. Adaptation strategies for water supply management in a drought prone Mediterranean river basin: Application of outranking method.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Del Vasto-Terrientes, Luis; Valls, Aida; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The regional water allocation planning is one of those complex decision problems where holistic approach to water supply management considering different criteria would be valuable. However, multi-criteria decision making with diverse indicators measured on different scales and uncertainty levels is difficult to solve. Objective of this paper is to develop scenarios for the future imbalances in water supply and demand for a water stressed Mediterranean area of Northern Spain (Tarragona) and to test the applicability and suitability of an outranking method ELECTRE-III-H for evaluating sectoral water allocation policies. This study is focused on the use of alternative water supply scenarios to fulfil the demand of water from three major sectors: domestic, industrial and agricultural. A detail scenario planning for regional water demand and supply has been discussed. For each future scenario of climate change, the goal is to obtain a ranking of a set of possible actions with regards to different types of indicators (costs, water stress and environmental impact). The analytical method used is based on outranking models for decision aid with hierarchical structures of criteria and ranking alternatives using partial preorders based on pairwise preference relations. We compare several adaptation measures including alternative water sources (reclaimed water and desalination); inter basin water transfer and sectoral demand management coming from industry, agriculture and domestic sectors and tested the sustainability of management actions for different climate change scenarios. Results have shown use of alternative water resources as the most reliable alternative with medium reclaimed water reuse in industry and agriculture and low to medium use of desalination water in domestic and industrial sectors as the best alternative. The proposed method has several advantages such as the management of heterogeneous scales of measurement without requiring any artificial

  1. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  2. A method for sampling halothane and enflurane present in trace amounts in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Burm, A G; Spierdijk, J

    1979-03-01

    A method for the sampling of small amounts of halothane and enflurane in ambient air is described. Sampling is performed by drawing air through a sampling tube packed with Porapak Q, which absorbs the anesthetic agent. The amount absorbed is determined by gas chromatography after thermal desorption. This method can be used for "spot" or personal sampling or for determining mean whole-room concentrations over relatively long periods (several hours).

  3. Assessment of Flatbed Scanner Method for Quality Assurance Testing of Air Content and Spacing Factor in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezami, Sona

    The flatbed scanner method for air void analysis of concrete is investigated through a comparison study with the standard ASTM C457 manual and Rapid Air 457 test methods. Air void parameters including air content and spacing factor are determined by image analysis of a large population of scanned samples through contrast enhancement and threshold determination procedures. It is shown that flatbed scanner method is giving comparable results to manual and Rapid Air 457 methods. Furthermore, a comparison of the air void chord length distributions obtained from the two methods of flatbed scanner and Rapid Air 457 has been implemented in this research. The effect of having different settings in the scanning process of scanner method is also investigated. Moreover, a threshold study has been performed that showed the flatbed scanner method can be employed in combination with manual and Rapid Air 457 methods as a time and cost saving strategy.

  4. Methods of Assessing the Risks Associated with Lack of Water Supplies, Water Safety Plan for National Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Sławomir

    2012-06-01

    Article shows the desire to obtain risk-control options, and bringing it to a tolerable level. Subjects were ways of managing and dealing with risk. Methods of dealing with aspects of the protection of industrial buildings and high-risk critical infrastructure vulnerability analysis methodology to the loss of integrity. Also a set method to deal with aspects of the protection of industrial buildings and high-risk critical infrastructure that is the analysis of susceptibility to loss of integrity. The article also presents the basic principles of water safety plan based on national and foreign research publications. In the next part of article WSP methodology was concluded, outlining the actions which use significantly reduces the risk of threats that could lead to supply of contaminated tap water or total interruption of its supply. In further considerations the most important steps in creating WSP were presented. In the final section the principle of modular computer system operation that is used for network management for urban water supply in Rzeszow was presented.

  5. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air using a desiccant

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method can be considered as four phases: (1) adsorbing water from air into a desiccant, (2) isolating the water-laden desiccant from the air source, (3) desorbing water as vapor from the desiccant into a chamber, and (4) isolating the desiccant from the chamber, and compressing the vapor in the chamber to form liquid condensate. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. Careful design of the dead volumes and pressure balances can minimize the energy required. The dried air can be exchanged for fresh moist air and the process repeated. An apparatus comprises a first chamber in fluid communication with a desiccant, and having ports to intake moist air and exhaust dried air. The apparatus also comprises a second chamber in fluid communication with the desiccant. The second chamber allows variable internal pressure, and has a port for removal of liquid condensate. Each chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with the desiccant. The first chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with a course of moist air. Various arrangements of valves, pistons, and chambers are described.

  6. Filter for on-line air monitor unaffected by radon progeny and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Terrance D.; Edwards, Howard D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The apparatus includes a sampling box having an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air. The sampling box includes a filter made of a plate of sintered stainless steel. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough. A method of testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The method includes providing a testing apparatus that has a sampling box with an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air, and has a sintered stainless steel filter disposed within said sampling box; drawing air from a source into the sampling box using a vacuum pump; passing the air through the filter; monitoring the contaminants trapped by the filter; and providing an alarm when a selected level of contaminants is reached. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough.

  7. Practical method of diffusion-welding steel plate in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Method is ideal for critical service requirements where parent metal properties are equaled in notch toughness, stress rupture and other characteristics. Welding technique variations may be used on a variety of materials, such as carbon steels, alloy steels, stainless steels, ceramics, and reactive and refractory materials.

  8. A method to optimize sampling locations for measuring indoor air distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Shen, Xiong; Li, Jianmin; Li, Bingye; Duan, Ran; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Liu, Junjie; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Indoor air distributions, such as the distributions of air temperature, air velocity, and contaminant concentrations, are very important to occupants' health and comfort in enclosed spaces. When point data is collected for interpolation to form field distributions, the sampling locations (the locations of the point sensors) have a significant effect on time invested, labor costs and measuring accuracy on field interpolation. This investigation compared two different sampling methods: the grid method and the gradient-based method, for determining sampling locations. The two methods were applied to obtain point air parameter data in an office room and in a section of an economy-class aircraft cabin. The point data obtained was then interpolated to form field distributions by the ordinary Kriging method. Our error analysis shows that the gradient-based sampling method has 32.6% smaller error of interpolation than the grid sampling method. We acquired the function between the interpolation errors and the sampling size (the number of sampling points). According to the function, the sampling size has an optimal value and the maximum sampling size can be determined by the sensor and system errors. This study recommends the gradient-based sampling method for measuring indoor air distributions.

  9. 76 FR 62402 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35597). The new O 3 equivalent method is an... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods; Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  10. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  11. A study on various methods of supplying propellant to an orbit insertion rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretz, J. E.; Huniu, S.; Thompson, M.; Pagani, M.; Paulsen, B.; Lewis, J.; Paul, D.

    1980-01-01

    Various types of pumps and pump drives were evaluated to determine the lightest weight system for supplying propellants to a planetary orbit insertion rocket engine. From these analyses four candidate propellant feed systems were identified. Systems Nos. 1 and 2 were both battery powered (lithium-thionyl-chloride or silver-zinc) motor driven pumps. System 3 was a monopropellant gas generator powered turbopump. System 4 was a bipropellant gas generator powered turbopump. Parameters considered were pump break horsepower, weight, reliability, transient response and system stability. Figures of merit were established and the ranking of the candidate systems was determined. Conceptual designs were prepared for typical motor driven pumps and turbopump configurations for a 1000 lbf thrust rocket engine.

  12. Environmental Asbestos Assessment Manual: Superfund Method for the Determination of Asbestos in Ambient Air, Part 1: Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a sampling and analysis method for the determination of asbestos in air. Samples are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although a small subset of samples are to be prepared using a direct procedure, the majority of samples analyzed using this method wil...

  13. A method for near real time continuous air monitoring of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Lattin, F.G.; Paul, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    A sorbent-based gas chromatographic method provides continuous quantitative measurement of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride in ambient air. These compounds are subject to workplace exposure limits as well as regulation under terms of the Chemical Arms Treaty and Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. The method was developed for on-site use in a mobile laboratory during remediation operations. Incorporated into the method are automated multi-level calibrations at time weighted average (TW) concentrations, or lower. Gaseous standards are prepared in fused silica lined air sampling canisters, then transferred to the analytical system through dynamic spiking. Precision and accuracy studies performed to validate the method are described. Also described are system deactivation and passivation techniques critical to optimum method performance.

  14. Accuracy comparison of spatial interpolation methods for estimation of air temperatures in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Shim, K.; Jung, M.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    Because of complex terrain, micro- as well as meso-climate variability is extreme by locations in Korea. In particular, air temperature of agricultural fields are influenced by topographic features of the surroundings making accurate interpolation of regional meteorological data from point-measured data. This study was conducted to compare accuracy of a spatial interpolation method to estimate air temperature in Korean Peninsula with the rugged terrains in South Korea. Four spatial interpolation methods including Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Spline, Kriging and Cokriging were tested to estimate monthly air temperature of unobserved stations. Monthly measured data sets (minimum and maximum air temperature) from 456 automatic weather station (AWS) locations in South Korea were used to generate the gridded air temperature surface. Result of cross validation showed that using Exponential theoretical model produced a lower root mean square error (RMSE) than using Gaussian theoretical model in case of Kriging and Cokriging and Spline produced the lowest RMSE of spatial interpolation methods in both maximum and minimum air temperature estimation. In conclusion, Spline showed the best accuracy among the methods, but further experiments which reflect topography effects such as temperature lapse rate are necessary to improve the prediction.

  15. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOEpatents

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  16. Method and apparatus for monitoring oxygen partial pressure in air masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark E. (Inventor); Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring an oxygen partial pressure in an air mask and providing a tactile warning to the user. The oxygen partial pressure in the air mask is detected using an electrochemical sensor, the output signal from which is provided to a comparator. The comparator compares the output signal with a preset reference value or range of values representing acceptable oxygen partial pressures. If the output signal is different than the reference value or outside the range of values, the air mask is vibrated by a vibrating motor to alert the user to a potentially hypoxic condition.

  17. Satellite measurements of large-scale air pollution - Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Fraser, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for deriving large-scale pollution parameters from NIR and visible satellite remote-sensing images obtained over land or water is described and demonstrated on AVHRR images. The method is based on comparison of the upward radiances on clear and hazy days and permits simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness with error Delta tau(a) = 0.08-0.15, particle size with error + or - 100-200 nm, and single-scattering albedo with error + or - 0.03 (for albedos near 1), all assuming accurate and stable satellite calibration and stable surface reflectance between the clear and hazy days. In the analysis of AVHRR images of smoke from a forest fire, good agreement was obtained between satellite and ground-based (sun-photometer) measurements of aerosol optical thickness, but the satellite particle sizes were systematically greater than those measured from the ground. The AVHRR single-scattering albedo agreed well with a Landsat albedo for the same smoke.

  18. Materials and methods for the separation of oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    MacKay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2003-07-15

    Metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes having the formula: O.sub.5+z where: x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides, Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof and B" is Co or Mg, with the exception that when B" is Mg, A' and A" are not Mg. The metal oxides are useful for preparation of dense membranes which may be formed from dense thin films of the mixed metal oxide on a porous metal oxide element. The invention also provides methods and catalytic reactors for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula.

  19. Predictive methods for estimating pesticide flux to air

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.

    1996-10-01

    Published evaporative flux values for pesticides volatilizing from soil, plants, and water were correlated with compound vapor pressures (VP), modified by compound properties appropriate to the treated matrix (e.g., soil adsorption coefficient [K{sub oc}], water solubility [S{sub w}]). These correlations were formulated as Ln-Ln plots with correlation (r{sup 2}) coefficients in the range 0.93-0.99: (1) Soil surface - Ln flux vs Ln (VP/[K{sub oc} x S{sub w}]); (2) soil incorporation - Ln flux vs Ln [(VP x AR)/(K{sub oc} x S{sub w} x d)] (AR = application rate, d = incorporation depth); (3) plants - Ln flux vs Ln VP; and (4) water - Ln (flux/water conc) vs Ln (VP/Sw). Using estimated flux values from the plant correlation as source terms in the EPA`s SCREEN-2 dispersion model gave downwind concentrations that agreed to within 65-114% with measured concentrations. Further validation using other treated matrices is in progress. These predictive methods for estimating flux, when coupled with downwind dispersion modeling, provide tools for limiting downwind exposures.

  20. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  1. COMPARISON OF FAST GC/TOFMS WITH METHOD TO-14 FOR ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT AIR SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies using portable gas chromatographs (PGC) to analyze volatile organic compounds in ambient air usually include, as reference standard method, the analysis of concurrent, collocated canister samples by EPA Method TO-14. Each laboratory analysis takes about an hour a...

  2. Third Graders' Understanding of Air Concepts Facilitated by the iPod Inquiry Teaching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-san

    2016-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to determine the learning performance of the air concept unit for third graders in a primary school facilitated by the iPod inquiry teaching method. This study adopts a quasi-experimental method. Participants were third graders in a primary school in New Taipei city. The experimental group consisted of 53…

  3. 75 FR 9894 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    .... This designation is made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  4. Air demand estimation in bottom outlets with the particle finite element method - Susqueda Dam case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Fernando; San-Mauro, Javier; Celigueta, Miguel Ángel; Oñate, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    Dam bottom outlets play a vital role in dam operation and safety, as they allow controlling the water surface elevation below the spillway level. For partial openings, water flows under the gate lip at high velocity and drags the air downstream of the gate, which may cause damages due to cavitation and vibration. The convenience of installing air vents in dam bottom outlets is well known by practitioners. The design of this element depends basically on the maximum air flow through the air vent, which in turn is a function of the specific geometry and the boundary conditions. The intrinsic features of this phenomenon makes it hard to analyse either on site or in full scaled experimental facilities. As a consequence, empirical formulas are frequently employed, which offer a conservative estimate of the maximum air flow. In this work, the particle finite element method was used to model the air-water interaction in Susqueda Dam bottom outlet, with different gate openings. Specific enhancements of the formulation were developed to consider air-water interaction. The results were analysed as compared to the conventional design criteria and to information gathered on site during the gate operation tests. This analysis suggests that numerical modelling with the PFEM can be helpful for the design of this kind of hydraulic works.

  5. A proposed method for quantifying low-air-loss mattress performance by moisture transport.

    PubMed

    Figliola, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Because they are believed to control the microclimate of the skin by removing or reducing perspiration accumulation and providing localized cooling, low-air-loss mattress systems are used for the treatment and prevention of pressure ulcers. However, no clear, universally agreed upon definition exists for their design, and reproducible standards on which to base their performance or assess their anticipated clinical effect are lacking. A clinically relevant, reproducible, mechanistic, controlled laboratory test methodology was developed to assess and compare the moisture transport properties of a variety of low-air-loss products by measuring and balancing the complete moisture transport into and out of low-air-loss mattress systems. Using a controlled and defined operating environment, the low-air-loss system is moisture- and weight-loaded using a patient skin moisture analog. Moisture and air transport properties into and out of the environment are measured. Total moisture balance, comparing total moisture change of the analog against the time-based moisture transport data, validates the results. Using mattresses from various manufacturers, time-based data using the study method showed important differences in low-air-loss characteristics related to mattress system design, performance, and function. The observed time-averaged moisture transport performance values indicate that several systems meet an acceptable minimum level of performance, but performance levels between different low-air-loss mattress systems vary markedly. PMID:12532032

  6. STUDY ON AIR INGRESS MITIGATION METHODS IN THE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR (VHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh

    2011-03-01

    -ingress mitigation methods are proposed in this study. Among them, the following two mitigation ideas are extensively investigated using computational fluid dynamic codes (CFD): (1) helium injection in the lower plenum, and (2) reactor enclosure opened at the bottom. The main idea of the helium injection method is to replace air in the core and the lower plenum upper part by buoyancy force. This method reduces graphite oxidation damage in the severe locations of the reactor inside. To validate this method, CFD simulations are addressed here. A simple 2-D CFD model is developed based on the GT-MHR 600MWt design. The simulation results showed that the helium replace the air flow into the core and significantly reduce the air concentration in the core and bottom reflector potentially protecting oxidation damage. According to the simulation results, even small helium flow was sufficient to remove air in the core, mitigating the air-ingress successfully. The idea of the reactor enclosure with an opening at the bottom changes overall air-ingress mechanism from natural convection to molecular diffusion. This method can be applied to the current system by some design modification of the reactor cavity. To validate this concept, this study also uses CFD simulations based on the simplified 2-D geometry. The simulation results showed that the enclosure open at the bottom can successfully mitigate air-ingress into the reactor even after on-set natural circulation occurs.

  7. Method and apparatus for operating a self-starting air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Heinrich, Charles E.

    1983-12-06

    A self-starting, fuel fired, air heating system including a fuel burner fired vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser and heating the air. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with a method and apparatus which on start-up prevents the vapor generator's vapor output from being conducted to the turbine until a predetermined pressure differential has been achieved. However, after the vapor flow is once permitted, it cannot again be prevented until after the fuel burner has been shut off and restarted.

  8. [A method for resolving spectra shift in the urban air quality monitoring system (DOAS)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-Sheng; Wei, Qing-Nong; Feng, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Kai; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2009-06-01

    In the urban air quality monitoring system, there is spectra shift which is caused by environment factors on the optical part (temperature and optic fiber position), or by the self-change of Xe-lamp. Relative spectra shift will occur if the shift of lamp-spectrum and air-spectrum is inconsistent which has direct influences on the accuracy of the measurement results. So the match of wavelength between lamp-spectrum and air-spectrum should be considered when we retrieve pollutants concentration measurement of trace gas in the atmosphere through DOAS method. Based on the study of the unique structures for Xe-lamp emitting spectrum, a method for the calibration of two signal spectra using Xe-lamp emitting peak and least square fitting is given. The results show that, the impact of spectrum shift can be reduced by this method for retrieving results. PMID:19810506

  9. Water supply management using an extended group fuzzy decision-making method: a case study in north-eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minatour, Yasser; Bonakdari, Hossein; Zarghami, Mahdi; Bakhshi, Maryam Ali

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a group fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making method to be applied in rating problems associated with water resources management. Thus, here Chen's group fuzzy TOPSIS method extended by a difference technique to handle uncertainties of applying a group decision making. Then, the extended group fuzzy TOPSIS method combined with a consistency check. In the presented method, initially linguistic judgments are being surveyed via a consistency checking process, and afterward these judgments are being used in the extended Chen's fuzzy TOPSIS method. Here, each expert's opinion is turned to accurate mathematical numbers and, then, to apply uncertainties, the opinions of group are turned to fuzzy numbers using three mathematical operators. The proposed method is applied to select the optimal strategy for the rural water supply of Nohoor village in north-eastern Iran, as a case study and illustrated example. Sensitivity analyses test over results and comparing results with project reality showed that proposed method offered good results for water resources projects.

  10. Global Monitoring of Water Supply and Sanitation: History, Methods and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bartram, Jamie; Brocklehurst, Clarissa; Fisher, Michael B.; Luyendijk, Rolf; Hossain, Rifat; Wardlaw, Tessa; Gordon, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    International monitoring of drinking water and sanitation shapes awareness of countries’ needs and informs policy, implementation and research efforts to extend and improve services. The Millennium Development Goals established global targets for drinking water and sanitation access; progress towards these targets, facilitated by international monitoring, has contributed to reducing the global disease burden and increasing quality of life. The experiences of the MDG period generated important lessons about the strengths and limitations of current approaches to defining and monitoring access to drinking water and sanitation. The methods by which the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) of WHO and UNICEF tracks access and progress are based on analysis of data from household surveys and linear regression modelling of these results over time. These methods provide nationally-representative and internationally-comparable insights into the drinking water and sanitation facilities used by populations worldwide, but also have substantial limitations: current methods do not address water quality, equity of access, or extra-household services. Improved statistical methods are needed to better model temporal trends. This article describes and critically reviews JMP methods in detail for the first time. It also explores the impact of, and future directions for, international monitoring of drinking water and sanitation. PMID:25116635

  11. A rapid method for the computation of equilibrium chemical composition of air to 15000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Erickson, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid computational method has been developed to determine the chemical composition of equilibrium air to 15000 K. Eleven chemically reacting species, i.e., O2, N2, O, NO, N, NO+, e-, N+, O+, Ar, and Ar+ are included. The method involves combining algebraically seven nonlinear equilibrium equations and four linear elemental mass balance and charge neutrality equations. Computational speeds for determining the equilibrium chemical composition are significantly faster than the often used free energy minimization procedure. Data are also included from which the thermodynamic properties of air can be computed. A listing of the computer program together with a set of sample results are included.

  12. A Method for Monitoring Organic Chlorides, Hydrochloric Acid and Chlorine in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. E.; Menichelli, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    While not commonly presented in nonurban atmospheres, organic chlorides, hydrochloric acid and chlorine are significant in industrial air pollution and industrial hygiene. Based on a microcoulometer, a much more sensitive method than has heretofore been available has been developed for monitoring these air impurities. The method has a response time (90%) of about twenty seconds, requires no calibration, is accurate to +/- 2.5%, and specific except for bromide and iodide interferences. The instrument is portable and has been operated unattended for 18 hours without difficulty.

  13. Methods for advanced hepatocyte cell culture in microwells utilizing air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Au, Sam H; Faris, Ronald A; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-02-21

    Flat, two-dimensional (2D) cell culture substrates are simple to use but offer little control over cell morphologies and behavior. In this article, we present a number of novel and unique methods for advanced cell culture in microwells utilizing air bubbles as a way to seed cells in order to provide substantial control over cellular microenvironments and organization to achieve specific cell-based applications. These cell culture methods enable controlled formation of stable air bubbles in the microwells that spontaneously formed when polar solvents such as cell culture media are loaded. The presence of air bubbles (air bubble masking) enables highly controllable cell patterning and organization of seeded cells as well as cell co-culture in microwells. In addition, these cell culture methods are simple to use and implement, yet versatile, and have the potential to provide a wide range of microenvironments to improve in vivo-like behavior for a number of cell types and applications. The air bubble masking technique can also be used to produce a micron thick layer of collagen film suspended on top of the microwells. These collagen film enclosed microwells could provide an easy way for high throughput drug screening and cytotoxicity assays as different drug compounds could be pre-loaded and dried in selected microwells and then released during cell culture.

  14. A two-stage inexact joint-probabilistic programming method for air quality management under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lv, Y; Huang, G H; Li, Y P; Yang, Z F; Sun, W

    2011-03-01

    A two-stage inexact joint-probabilistic programming (TIJP) method is developed for planning a regional air quality management system with multiple pollutants and multiple sources. The TIJP method incorporates the techniques of two-stage stochastic programming, joint-probabilistic constraint programming and interval mathematical programming, where uncertainties expressed as probability distributions and interval values can be addressed. Moreover, it can not only examine the risk of violating joint-probability constraints, but also account for economic penalties as corrective measures against any infeasibility. The developed TIJP method is applied to a case study of a regional air pollution control problem, where the air quality index (AQI) is introduced for evaluation of the integrated air quality management system associated with multiple pollutants. The joint-probability exists in the environmental constraints for AQI, such that individual probabilistic constraints for each pollutant can be efficiently incorporated within the TIJP model. The results indicate that useful solutions for air quality management practices have been generated; they can help decision makers to identify desired pollution abatement strategies with minimized system cost and maximized environmental efficiency. PMID:21067860

  15. Using the Case Study Method to Enhance the Learning Skills of Supply Chain Management Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, M.; Derera, E.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions need to align themselves more closely with the needs of businesses and equip students with the skills and experience necessary to make them more successful and value-adding employees. This paper explores undergraduate student perceptions of the effectiveness of the case study teaching and learning method in the…

  16. 10 CFR Appendix Z to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of External Power Supplies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... power supply that is designed to convert line voltage AC input into more than one simultaneous lower-voltage output. j. Nameplate input frequency means the AC input frequency of the power supply as specified on the manufacturer's label on the power supply housing. k. Nameplate input voltage means the...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix Z to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of External Power Supplies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., of the total real output power produced by a power supply to the real input power required to produce...-voltage output. j. Nameplate input frequency means the AC input frequency of the power supply as specified... supply that is designed to convert line voltage AC input into lower voltage AC output and is able...

  18. A method to estimate spatiotemporal air quality in an urban traffic corridor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nongthombam Premananda; Gokhale, Sharad

    2015-12-15

    Air quality exposure assessment using personal exposure sampling or direct measurement of spatiotemporal air pollutant concentrations has difficulty and limitations. Most statistical methods used for estimating spatiotemporal air quality do not account for the source characteristics (e.g. emissions). In this study, a prediction method, based on the lognormal probability distribution of hourly-average-spatial concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained by a CALINE4 model, has been developed and validated in an urban traffic corridor. The data on CO concentrations were collected at three locations and traffic and meteorology within the urban traffic corridor.(1) The method has been developed with the data of one location and validated at other two locations. The method estimated the CO concentrations reasonably well (correlation coefficient, r≥0.96). Later, the method has been applied to estimate the probability of occurrence [P(C≥Cstd] of the spatial CO concentrations in the corridor. The results have been promising and, therefore, may be useful to quantifying spatiotemporal air quality within an urban area. PMID:26318683

  19. A method to estimate spatiotemporal air quality in an urban traffic corridor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nongthombam Premananda; Gokhale, Sharad

    2015-12-15

    Air quality exposure assessment using personal exposure sampling or direct measurement of spatiotemporal air pollutant concentrations has difficulty and limitations. Most statistical methods used for estimating spatiotemporal air quality do not account for the source characteristics (e.g. emissions). In this study, a prediction method, based on the lognormal probability distribution of hourly-average-spatial concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained by a CALINE4 model, has been developed and validated in an urban traffic corridor. The data on CO concentrations were collected at three locations and traffic and meteorology within the urban traffic corridor.(1) The method has been developed with the data of one location and validated at other two locations. The method estimated the CO concentrations reasonably well (correlation coefficient, r≥0.96). Later, the method has been applied to estimate the probability of occurrence [P(C≥Cstd] of the spatial CO concentrations in the corridor. The results have been promising and, therefore, may be useful to quantifying spatiotemporal air quality within an urban area.

  20. Sterilization of Bacillus atrophaeus using OH radicals supplied by vacuum ultraviolet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Sterilization by cold plasma has widely been performed. It is well known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) has a potential of sterilization. However, it is not clear which ROS is effective on sterilization because a lot of types of ROS are produced in plasma. In this study, sterilization effect of OH radicals by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) method was investigated. This method utilizes photodissociation reaction to produce ROS so it can produce ROS selectively. Wet and dry helium with and without 1% O2 gas was used to demonstrate sterilization effect of OH radicals. Gases were flowed in a quartz tube (inner diameter 2 mm, outer diameter 4 mm) at a flow rate of 1.5 L/min. The produced ROS flowed out of the quartz tube nozzle. A Xe2 excimer lamp emitting 172 +/- 7 nm VUV light was placed parallel to the quartz tube with a distance of 8 mm. The distance between the lower end of the lamp and the nozzle of quartz tube was changed from 3 to 15 cm. As a target of sterilization, Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) was used. The density of OH radicals was measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). As a result, sterilization using VUV method was verified. This result showed that OH radicals sterilized the bacteria.

  1. Alternative Methods for Assessing Contaminant Transport from the Vadose Zone to Indoor Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, K. J.; Lee, A.; Reddy, P.; Plate, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vapor intrusion, which is the transport of contaminant vapors from groundwater and the vadose zone to indoor air, has emerged as a significant human health risk near hazardous waste sites. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) can volatilize from groundwater and from residual sources in the vadose zone and enter homes and commercial buildings through cracks in the slab, plumbing conduits, or other preferential pathways. Assessment of the vapor intrusion pathway typically requires collection of groundwater, soil gas, and indoor air samples, a process which can be expensive and time-consuming. We evaluated three alternative vapor intrusion assessment methods, including 1) use of radon as a surrogate for vapor intrusion, 2) use of pressure differential measurements between indoor/outdoor and indoor/subslab to assess the potential for vapor intrusion, and 3) use of passive, longer-duration sorbent methods to measure indoor air VOC concentrations. The primary test site, located approximately 30 miles south of San Francisco, was selected due to the presence of TCE (10 - 300 ug/L) in shallow groundwater (5 to 10 feet bgs). At this test site, we found that radon was not a suitable surrogate to asses vapor intrusion and that pressure differential measurements are challenging to implement and equipment-intensive. More significantly, we found that the passive, longer-duration sorbent methods are easy to deploy and compared well quantitatively with standard indoor air sampling methods. The sorbent technique is less than half the cost of typical indoor air methods, and also provides a longer duration sample, typically 3 to 14 days rather than 8 to 24 hours for standard methods. The passive sorbent methods can be a reliable, cost-effective, and easy way to sample for TCE, PCE and other VOCs as part of a vapor intrusion investigation.

  2. Advanced air transport concepts. [review of design methods for very large aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The concepts of laminar flow control, very large all-wing aircraft, an aerial relay transportation system and alternative fuels, which would enable large improvements in fuel conservation in air transportation in the 1990's are discussed. Laminar boundary layer control through suction would greatly reduce skin friction and has been reported to reduce fuel consumption by up to 29%. Distributed load aircraft, in which all fuel and payload are carried in the wing and the fuselage is absent, permit the use of lighter construction materials and the elimination of fuselage and tail drag. Spanloader aircraft with laminar flow control could be used in an aerial relay transportation system which would employ a network of continuously flying liners supplied with fuel, cargo and crews by smaller feeder aircraft. Liquid hydrogen and methane fuels derived from coal are shown to be more weight efficient and less costly than coal-derived synthetic jet fuels.

  3. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Test Procedures § 431.96 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. (a) Scope. This section contains test... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  5. EVALUATION OF A TEST METHOD FOR MEASURING INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM DRY-PROCESS PHOTOCOPIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large chamber test method for measuring indoor air emissions from office equipment was developed, evaluated, and revised based on the initial testing of four dry-process photocopiers. Because all chambers may not necessarily produce similar results (e.g., due to differences in ...

  6. A Method to Exchange Air Nitrogen Emission Reductions for Watershed Nitrogen Load Reductions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation of the method developed for the Chesapeake Bay Program to estimate changes in nitrogen loading to Chesapeake due to changes in Bay State state-level nitrogen oxide emissions to support air-water trading by the Bay States. Type for SticsUnder AMAD Application QAPP, QA...

  7. Performance of the Proposed New Federal Reference Methods for Measuring Ozone Concentrations in Ambient Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current Federal Reference Method (FRM) for measuring concentrations of ozone in ambient air, described in EPA regulations at 40 CFR Part 50, Appendix D, is based on the dry, gas-phase, chemiluminescence reaction between ethylene (C2H4) and any ozone (O

  8. Evaluation and Comparison of Chemiluminescence and UV Photometric Methods for Measuring Ozone Concentrations in Ambient Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current Federal Reference Method (FRM) for measuring concentrations of ozone in ambient air is based on the dry, gas-phase, chemiluminescence reaction between ethylene (C2H4) and any ozone (O3) that may be p...

  9. RECOMMENDED METHODS FOR AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF NO, NO2, NOY, AND INDIVIDUAL NOZ SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most appropriate monitoring methods for reactive nitrogen oxides are identified subject to the requirements for diagnostic testing of air quality simulation models. Measurements must be made over 1 h or less and with an uncertainty of

  10. A bottom-up assessment method of limitations to and vulnerability of energy supply in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissner, Tabea; Olonscheck, Mady; Walther, Carsten; Kropp, Jürgen P.; Reusser, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Sufficient energy access is essential for development and adequate livelihood conditions, as the majority of societal activities depend on reliable and sufficient energy. Especially in developing and threshold countries, energy access remains limited and intermittent. Moreover, compared to developed countries, often the expenditures for energy constitute a huge part of the available money. The vulnerability of energy systems to the impacts of climate change differs depending on the utilized source of energy. A special characteristic of developing and threshold countries is the fact that the spatial heterogeneity of the energy supply structure, especially between urban and rural regions, is generally larger than in developed countries, while the adaptive capacity of people is often much lower. A sound consideration of these complex conditions is a necessary basis for determining in how far climate change impacts can further diminish energy access in regions, where energy access is already limited. The topic of energy vulnerability has often been addressed for developed countries, but assessments for less developed countries remain scarce. On the one hand, data needed for energy vulnerability assessments, as they exist for the developed world, is usually not available. On the other hand, existing assessment methods for the developed world are often not transferable because they focus on specific supply infrastructure or energy carriers. Transferability is also hindered by the large differences in energy access and energy use patterns. We propose a novel approach to assess domestic energy supply vulnerability, by reversing the usual chain of assessment. On the basis of a basket of household energy needs for different purposes, we first assess which sources are used in order to fulfil specific energy needs. By focussing on the regionally specific energy carriers, we are able to significantly reduce data needs and assess directly, how energy vulnerability may play out

  11. Development of an air displacement method for whole body volume measurement of infants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Aksoy, Y; Scopes, J W; du Mont, G; Taylor, B A

    1985-01-01

    An infant enclosed in a rigid-walled chamber displaces a volume of air equal to its own volume. The volume of air displaced can be estimated by the change in pressure produced by a standard reduction in the chamber's volume according to Boyle's law. An instrument embodying this principle has been developed in which the differential pressure between two identical chambers is measured during equal sinusoidally imposed volume changes in the two. Problems arising from variable departure of conditions of pressure cycling, from isothermal towards adiabatic, have been dealt with by empirically derived corrections. Data are presented on the use of the method for low birth-weight infants. PMID:3982015

  12. The nature of air pollution and the methods available for measuring it

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, J. McK.

    1965-01-01

    At present the principal sources of energy in Europe are coal and oil and fuels derived from them, and in European towns air pollution consists mainly of their combustion products. These combustion products naturally divide into two categories, gaseous and particulate, which are very different chemically and which behave very differently when they are near collecting surfaces; they therefore require very different techniques both for collecting and for estimating samples. Some methods of measurement, suitable for everyday routine use in Europe, are described; these offer a compromise between completeness and economy, and can help to give a general outline of the air pollution situation without undue complexity or prohibitive cost. PMID:14315712

  13. Integrated Energy Method for Propulsion Dynamics Analysis of Air-Pressurized Waterjet Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsing-Juin; Chiu, Chih-Hong; Hsia, Wen-Kung

    The launching of a waterjet rocket has been a very popular idea in recent years. Its basic propulsion principle makes use of the high-pressurized air inside the rocket’s main body to swiftly expel the water out of the nozzle and thus generate thrust. The waterjet rocket is characterized with nature, interest, combustionlessness, environmental friendliness, simplicity, and minimal cost. Moreover, it is a very good science model for propulsion analysis, design, experiment, and education because of an abundance of easily adjustable key parameters. This model also features separately stored energy and mass of the propellant, in contrast to a conventional rocket. However, related literature shows that no in-depth theoretical analysis of the waterjet rocket has been attempted for various reasons. In this research, the propulsion dynamics of a waterjet rocket is analyzed by simultaneously solving the momentum and the newly derived generalized power equations to predict its flight histogram, computationally, and convolutionally. This integrated energy approach synthesizes the internal and external dynamics analyses together and ingeniously takes full advantage of the clear power supply of pressurized air in a waterjet rocket. The analysis results are generally agreeable with the experimental flight data. While the new power equation herein gives a complete spectrum of physical parameters to be manipulated, there will be wider room in quest of better rocket propulsion performance, especially through the heuristic research of this versatile but affordable waterjet rocket.

  14. A novel method to determine air leakage in heat pump clothes dryers

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Pradeep; Mohabir, Amar; Miller, William

    2016-01-06

    A heat pump clothes dryer offers the potential to save a significant amount of energy as compared with conventional vented electric dryers. Although heat pump clothes dryers (HPCD) offer higher energy efficiency; it has been observed that they are prone to air leakages, which inhibits the HPCD's gain in efficiency. This study serves to develop a novel method of quantifying leakage, and to determine specific leakage locations in the dryer drum and air circulation system. The basis of this method is the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E779 10, which is used to determine air leakage areamore » in a household ventilation system through fan pressurization. This ASTM method is adapted to the dryer system, and the leakage area is determined by an analysis of the leakage volumetric flow - pressure relationship. Easily accessible leakage points were quantified: the front and back crease (in the dryer drum), the leakage in the dryer duct, the air filter, and the remaining leakage in the drum. The procedure allows investigators to determine major components contributing to leakage in HPCDs, thus improving component design features that result in more efficient HPCD systems.« less

  15. A NOVEL METHOD TO DETERMINE AIR LEAKAGE IN HEAT PUMP CLOTHES DRYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep; Miller, William A

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer offers the potential to save a significant amount of energy as compared with conventional vented electric dryers. Although heat pump clothes dryers (HPCD) offer higher energy efficiency; it has been observed that they are prone to air leakages, which inhibits the HPCD's gain in efficiency. This study serves to develop a novel method of quantifying leakage, and to determine specific leakage locations in the dryer drum and air circulation system. The basis of this method is the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E779 10, which is used to determine air leakage area in a household ventilation system through fan pressurization. This ASTM method is adapted to the dryer system, and the leakage area is determined by an analysis of the leakage volumetric flow - pressure relationship. Easily accessible leakage points were quantified: the front and back crease (in the dryer drum), the leakage in the dryer duct, the air filter, and the remaining leakage in the drum. The procedure allows investigators to determine major components contributing to leakage in HPCDs, thus improving component design features that result in more efficient HPCD systems.

  16. Tracing Ambient Air Geochemistry using a Modified X-Ray Fluorescence Filter Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.; Wrice, T.

    2002-12-01

    Modifications of x-ray fluorescence counting procedures enable tracing of aerosol dispersals related to weather fronts and local weather phenomena. Improved X-ray fluorescence methods for bulk aerosols deposited under positive air pressure conditions onto Millipore filters at 80 liters/hour enable the tracing of geological samples in periods down to one hour. Vacuum-plating aliquots of USGS standards onto 0.2 micron polycarbonate and quartz Millipore filters create standards with a shelf life of several months. The analytical system permits detection of light oxides, such as silica to 10 ppm, and heavy elements, such as iron to 0.5 ppm. These collections allow discriminations to be drawn between dominantly geological, silica-enriched air mass and dominantly iron-enriched air of possible industrial origin. These ambient air collections at 120 feet elevation at City College are used to create possible distinctions in air masses related to points of origin. Splits of aerosol examined by neutron activation and coupled plasma emission spectroscopy agree with x-ray fluorescence methods to within analytical error. Aerosol flux conditions are monitored for speciation using direct examination by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analytical capability plus aerosol physical properties by sun photometry. The latter provides bulk optical transmission at six major wavelengths and estimates for bulk aerosol size properties. Preliminary data show positive photometry links with iron-aerosols with a correlation coefficient with southwesterly wind-driven conditions of seventy percent over a four hour monitoring period. Aerosol flux comparisons with heavy metal populations, Ba, Rb, Zr, La show uniform distributions with iron- and silica-enriched populations indicating a pervasive background condition in the ambient air mass over New York City.

  17. Reliability of environmental fate modeling results for POPs based on various methods of determining the air/water partition coefficient (log KAW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odziomek, K.; Gajewicz, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Puzyn, T.

    2013-07-01

    Air-water partition coefficient (KAW) is one of the key parameters determining environmental behavior of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). Experimentally measured values of KAW are still unavailable for majority of POPs, thus alternative methods of supplying data, including Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) modeling, are often in use. In this paper, applicability of two QSPR methods of predicting KAW were compared with each other in the context of further application of the predicted data in environmental transport and fate studies. According to the first (indirect) method, KAW is calculated from previously predicted values of octanol-water (KOW) and octanol-air (KOA) partition coefficients. In the second (direct) approach, KAW is calculated, based on the estimated value of Henry's law constant (KH) and then adjusted to ensure its consistency with the other two partition coefficients (KOW and KOA). Although the indirect method carries theoretically twice as much error as the direct method, when the predicted values of KAW are then utilized as an input to the environmental fate model The OECD POV and LRTP Screening Tool, ver. 2.2, the indirect method elicits much higher and therefore much more restrictive values of overall persistence (POV) and transfer efficiency (TE) than its equivalent (direct method). High uncertainties related to the application of the direct method result mainly from the necessary adjustment procedure.

  18. Methods for studying private sector supply of public health products in developing countries: a conceptual framework and review.

    PubMed

    Conteh, Lesong; Hanson, Kara

    2003-10-01

    The private sector is an important supplier of public health products (PHPs) in developing countries. Although there are concerns about the quality and affordability of these products, private providers also offer possibilities for expanding access to key commodities. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding the public health implications of private sales of PHPs. It reviews methods for studying these sales, together with their advantages and shortcomings. Ten methods are identified which can be used for studying the behaviour of providers and consumers. The effects of seasonal variation are discussed, together with the challenges of creating a sampling frame and studying illicit behaviour. We conclude that relatively little is known about the sales of PHPs, that more is known about contraceptives and drugs than about the newer products, and that the demand side of the market has been studied in greater depth than the behaviour of suppliers. The existing toolbox is biased towards formal providers, and thus, probably towards understanding the provision of PHPs to those who are better off. Methods for studying the supply of PHPs in outlets used by poor people is a priority area for further methodological development.

  19. Human-System Safety Methods for Development of Advanced Air Traffic Management Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1999-05-24

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the development of advanced air traffic management (ATM) systems as part of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program. As part of this program INEEL conducted a survey of human-system safety methods that have been applied to complex technical systems, to identify lessons learned from these applications and provide recommendations for the development of advanced ATM systems. The domains that were surveyed included offshore oil and gas, commercial nuclear power, commercial aviation, and military. The survey showed that widely different approaches are used in these industries, and that the methods used range from very high-level, qualitative approaches to very detailed quantitative methods such as human reliability analysis (HRA) and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). In addition, the industries varied widely in how effectively they incorporate human-system safety assessment in the design, development, and testing of complex technical systems. In spite of the lack of uniformity in the approaches and methods used, it was found that methods are available that can be combined and adapted to support the development of advanced air traffic management systems.

  20. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  1. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented.

  2. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  3. Measuring air-water interfacial area for soils using the mass balance surfactant-tracer method.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Juliana B; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L

    2015-09-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention.

  4. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor and outdoor air with chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Zhong; Shen, Xueyou; Liu, Yong-Jian

    2003-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor and outdoor air of four typical homes in Hangzhou, China were determined with a highly automated chromatographic method. The results indicated that the concentrations of the 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the indoor air were between 1.907 microg/m3 and 14.29 microg/m3, which were much higher than those in the corresponding outdoor air. Because of the popular use of mothball in wardrobes, naphthalene had the highest concentration in all the 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which was up to 13.17 microg/m3 and contributed 68% to the total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the room. In kitchen, because of the representative cooking method, there had much of three- and four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The indoor smoking not only led to high concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the indoor air, but also contributed almost all the benzo(a)pyrene. Naphthalene, acenaphthene and pyrene were considered being generated by the indoor sources in all the four homes.

  5. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as

  6. Emergency supply of prescription-only medicines to patients by community pharmacists: a mixed methods evaluation incorporating patient, pharmacist and GP perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morecroft, Charles W; Mackridge, Adam J; Stokes, Elizabeth C; Gray, Nicola J; Wilson, Sarah E; Ashcroft, Darren M; Mensah, Noah; Pickup, Graham B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and inform emergency supply of prescription-only medicines by community pharmacists (CPs), including how the service could form an integral component of established healthcare provision to maximise adherence. Design Mixed methods. 4 phases: prospective audit of emergency supply requests for prescribed medicines (October–November 2012 and April 2013); interviews with CPs (February–April 2013); follow-up interviews with patients (April–May 2013); interactive feedback sessions with general practice teams (October–November 2013). Setting 22 community pharmacies and 6 general practices in Northwest England. Participants 27 CPs with experience of dealing with requests for emergency supplies; 25 patients who received an emergency supply of a prescribed medicine; 58 staff at 6 general practices. Results Clinical audit in 22 pharmacies over two 4-week periods reported that 526 medicines were requested by 450 patients. Requests peaked over a bank holiday and around weekends. A significant number of supplies were made during practice opening hours. Most requests were for older patients and for medicines used in long-term conditions. Difficulty in renewing repeat medication (forgetting to order, or prescription delays) was the major reason for requests. The majority of medicines were ‘loaned’ in advance of a National Health Service (NHS) prescription. Interviews with CPs and patients indicated that continuous supply had a positive impact on medicines adherence, removing the need to access urgent care. General practice staff were surprised and concerned by the extent of emergency supply episodes. Conclusions CPs regularly provide emergency supplies to patients who run out of their repeat medication, including during practice opening hours. This may aid adherence. There is currently no feedback loop, however, to general practice. Patient care and interprofessional communication may be better served by the introduction of a formally structured

  7. Selected supplies prognosis problems of aviation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żurek, J.; Czapla, R.

    2016-06-01

    Aviation technology, i.e. aircraft, control and airfield infrastructure wear out, become defective and need servicing. It seems indispensible to maintain facilities and spare parts at a level necessary to keep the technology in commission. The paper discusses the factors influencing spare parts supply requirements to secure air operations. Aviation technology has been classified with regard to various criteria, which influence the choice of supply management strategies, along with availability and aircraft exploitation cost. The method of optimization of the stock for a complex system characterized by series reliability structure according to the wear-out and cost criteria assuming Poisson's process of demand has been presented.

  8. Characterization of spark-generated N-waves in air using an optical schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Karzova, Maria M; Yuldashev, Petr V; Khokhlova, Vera A; Ollivier, Sébastien; Salze, Edouard; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Accurate measurement of high-amplitude, broadband shock pulses in air is an important part of laboratory-scale experiments in atmospheric acoustics. Although various methods have been developed, specific drawbacks still exist and need to be addressed. Here, a schlieren optical method was used to reconstruct the pressure signatures of nonlinear spherically diverging short acoustic pulses generated using an electric spark source (2.5 kPa, 33 μs at 10 cm from the source) in homogeneous air. A high-speed camera was used to capture light rays deflected by refractive index inhomogeneities, caused by the acoustic wave. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed from the light intensity patterns in the recorded images using an Abel-type inversion method. Absolute pressure levels were determined by analyzing at different propagation distances the duration of the compression phase of pulses, which changed due to nonlinear propagation effects. Numerical modeling base on the generalized Burgers equation was used to evaluate the smearing of the waveform caused by finite exposure time of the high-speed camera and corresponding limitations in resolution of the schlieren technique. The proposed method allows the study of the evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air starting from the very short distances from the spark, 30 mm, up to 600 mm. PMID:26093414

  9. Characterization of spark-generated N-waves in air using an optical schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Karzova, Maria M; Yuldashev, Petr V; Khokhlova, Vera A; Ollivier, Sébastien; Salze, Edouard; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Accurate measurement of high-amplitude, broadband shock pulses in air is an important part of laboratory-scale experiments in atmospheric acoustics. Although various methods have been developed, specific drawbacks still exist and need to be addressed. Here, a schlieren optical method was used to reconstruct the pressure signatures of nonlinear spherically diverging short acoustic pulses generated using an electric spark source (2.5 kPa, 33 μs at 10 cm from the source) in homogeneous air. A high-speed camera was used to capture light rays deflected by refractive index inhomogeneities, caused by the acoustic wave. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed from the light intensity patterns in the recorded images using an Abel-type inversion method. Absolute pressure levels were determined by analyzing at different propagation distances the duration of the compression phase of pulses, which changed due to nonlinear propagation effects. Numerical modeling base on the generalized Burgers equation was used to evaluate the smearing of the waveform caused by finite exposure time of the high-speed camera and corresponding limitations in resolution of the schlieren technique. The proposed method allows the study of the evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air starting from the very short distances from the spark, 30 mm, up to 600 mm.

  10. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  11. [Contemporary solutions for better air quality at electric welders workplace].

    PubMed

    Markova, O L; Ivanova, E V

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with hygienic evaluation of electric welder's workplace, concerning chemical factor, with technical solutions on organization of supply-and-exhaust ventilation and methods to improve air quality in various welding tasks. PMID:25895242

  12. Novel method for detecting the hadronic component of extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Volchenko, V. I.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Shchegolev, O. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2015-05-15

    A novel method for studying the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS) is proposed. The method is based on recording thermal neutrons accompanying EAS with en-detectors that are sensitive to two EAS components: an electromagnetic (e) component and a hadron component in the form of neutrons (n). In contrast to hadron calorimeters used in some arrays, the proposed method makes it possible to record the hadronic component over the whole area of the array. The efficiency of a prototype array that consists of 32 en-detectors was tested for a long time, and some parameters of the neutron EAS component were determined.

  13. Air-coupled method to investigate the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb mode in stubbed and air-drilled phononic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongbo; Zhao, Jinfeng; Bonello, Bernard; Li, Libing; Wei, Jianxin; Pan, Yongdong; Zhong, Zheng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we applied a robust and fully air-coupled method to investigate the propagation of the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb (A0) mode in both a stubbed and an air-drilled phononic-crystal (PC) plate. By measuring simply the radiative acoustic waves of A0 mode close to the plate surface, we observed the band gaps for the stubbed PC plate caused by either the local resonance or the Bragg scattering, in frequency ranges in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We measured then the complete band gap of A0 mode for the air-drilled PC plate, in good agreement with the band structures. Finally, we compared the measurements made using the air-coupled method with those obtained by the laser ultrasonic technique.

  14. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The new equivalent methods are automated... beta radiation attenuation. The newly designated equivalent methods are identified as follows: EQPM-0912-204, ``Teledyne Model 602 Beta\\PLUS\\ Particle Measurement System'' and ``SWAM 5a Dual...

  15. Environmental equity research: review with focus on outdoor air pollution research methods and analytic tools.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qun; Chen, Dongmei; Buzzelli, Michael; Aronson, Kristan J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review environmental equity research on outdoor air pollution and, specifically, methods and tools used in research, published in English, with the aim of recommending the best methods and analytic tools. English language publications from 2000 to 2012 were identified in Google Scholar, Ovid MEDLINE, and PubMed. Research methodologies and results were reviewed and potential deficiencies and knowledge gaps identified. The publications show that exposure to outdoor air pollution differs by social factors, but findings are inconsistent in Canada. In terms of study designs, most were small and ecological and therefore prone to the ecological fallacy. Newer tools such as geographic information systems, modeling, and biomarkers offer improved precision in exposure measurement. Higher-quality research using large, individual-based samples and more precise analytic tools are needed to provide better evidence for policy-making to reduce environmental inequities.

  16. Pattern recognition methods and air pollution source identification. [based on wind direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Directional air samplers, used for resolving suspended particulate matter on the basis of time and wind direction were used to assess the feasibility of characterizing and identifying emission source types in urban multisource environments. Filters were evaluated for 16 elements and X-ray fluorescence methods yielded elemental concentrations for direction, day, and the interaction of direction and day. Large numbers of samples are necessary to compensate for large day-to-day variations caused by wind perturbations and/or source changes.

  17. Evaluation of sampling and analytical methods for the determination of chlorodifluoromethane in air.

    PubMed

    Seymour, M J; Lucas, M F

    1993-05-01

    In January 1989, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published revised permissible exposure limits (PELs) for 212 compounds and established PELs for 164 additional compounds. In cases where regulated compounds did not have specific sampling and analytical methods, methods were suggested by OSHA. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM) Method 1020, which was developed for 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, was suggested by OSHA for the determination of chlorodifluoromethane in workplace air. Because this method was developed for a liquid and chlorodifluoromethane is a gas, the ability of NMAM Method 1020 to adequately sample and quantitate chlorodifluoromethane was questioned and tested by researchers at NIOSH. The evaluation of NMAM Method 1020 for chlorodifluoromethane showed that the capacity of the 100/50-mg charcoal sorbent bed was limited, the standard preparation procedure was incorrect for a gas analyte, and the analyte had low solubility in carbon disulfide. NMAM Method 1018 for dichlorodifluoromethane uses two coconut-shell charcoal tubes in series, a 400/200-mg tube followed by a 100/50-mg tube, which are desorbed with methylene chloride. This method was evaluated for chlorodifluoromethane. Test atmospheres, with chlorodifluoromethane concentrations from 0.5-2 times the PEL were generated. Modifications of NMAM Method 1018 included changes in the standard preparation procedure, and the gas chromatograph was equipped with a capillary column. These revisions to NMAM 1018 resulted in a 96.5% recovery and a total precision for the method of 7.1% for chlorodifluoromethane. No significant bias in the method was found. Results indicate that the revised NMAM Method 1018 is suitable for the determination of chlorodifluoromethane in workplace air.

  18. LinAir: A multi-element discrete vortex Weissinger aerodynamic prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    LinAir is a vortex lattice aerodynamic prediction method similar to Weissinger's extended lifting-line theory, except that the circulation around a wing is represented by discrete horseshoe vortices, not a continuous distribution of vorticity. The program calculates subsonic longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary aircraft geometries. It was originally written by Dr. Ilan Kroo of Stanford University, and subsequently modified by the author to simplify modeling of complex configurations. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy was added by the author to extend the range of applicability of LinAir to low aspect ratio (i.e., fighter-type) configurations. A brief discussion of the theory of LinAir is presented, and details on how to run the program are given along with some comparisons with experimental data to validate the code. Example input and output files are given in the appendices to aid in understanding the program and its use. This version of LinAir runs in the VAX/VMS, Cray UNICOS, and Silicon Graphics Iris workstation environments at the time of this writing.

  19. Noninvasive effects measurements for air pollution human studies: methods, analysis, and implications.

    PubMed

    Mirowsky, Jaime; Gordon, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure studies, compared with cell and animal models, are heavily relied upon to study the associations between health effects in humans and air pollutant inhalation. Human studies vary in exposure methodology, with some work conducted in controlled settings, whereas other studies are conducted in ambient environments. Human studies can also vary in the health metrics explored, as there exists a myriad of health effect end points commonly measured. In this review, we compiled mini reviews of the most commonly used noninvasive health effect end points that are suitable for panel studies of air pollution, broken into cardiovascular end points, respiratory end points, and biomarkers of effect from biological specimens. Pertinent information regarding each health end point and the suggested methods for mobile collection in the field are assessed. In addition, the clinical implications for each health end point are summarized, along with the factors identified that can modify each measurement. Finally, the important research findings regarding each health end point and air pollutant exposures were reviewed. It appeared that most of the adverse health effects end points explored were found to positively correlate with pollutant levels, although differences in study design, pollutants measured, and study population were found to influence the magnitude of these effects. Thus, this review is intended to act as a guide for researchers interested in conducting human exposure studies of air pollutants while in the field, although there can be a wider application for using these end points in many epidemiological study designs. PMID:25605444

  20. Bio-polymer slurry trench method for installation of in-situ air sparging system

    SciTech Connect

    Linneman, D.M.

    1996-08-01

    An investigation was conducted at a site in Greenville Country, South Carolina which detected contaminants in the groundwater. It was then decided that remedial action was required. The contaminants and their location in the groundwater led to the selection of an in-situ air sparging system to be installed at approximately thirty-four feet deep. Due to design depth requirements and other site conditions, the bio-polymer slurry trench (B-P drain) Method was utilized in the air sparging system installation. The two trenches were installed using a biodegradable slurry in lieu of the bentonite slurry commonly utilized in the more traditional slurry trench technique. The slurry temporarily supported the trench walls while the air sparging components were submerged and set at the proper elevations Once backfilled with stone, the slurry in both trenches was broken by introducing a breaker solution which reduced the slurry to sugar water. The trenching, air sparging piping installation, and backfilling operations were completed in about six weeks.

  1. Noninvasive effects measurements for air pollution human studies: methods, analysis, and implications.

    PubMed

    Mirowsky, Jaime; Gordon, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure studies, compared with cell and animal models, are heavily relied upon to study the associations between health effects in humans and air pollutant inhalation. Human studies vary in exposure methodology, with some work conducted in controlled settings, whereas other studies are conducted in ambient environments. Human studies can also vary in the health metrics explored, as there exists a myriad of health effect end points commonly measured. In this review, we compiled mini reviews of the most commonly used noninvasive health effect end points that are suitable for panel studies of air pollution, broken into cardiovascular end points, respiratory end points, and biomarkers of effect from biological specimens. Pertinent information regarding each health end point and the suggested methods for mobile collection in the field are assessed. In addition, the clinical implications for each health end point are summarized, along with the factors identified that can modify each measurement. Finally, the important research findings regarding each health end point and air pollutant exposures were reviewed. It appeared that most of the adverse health effects end points explored were found to positively correlate with pollutant levels, although differences in study design, pollutants measured, and study population were found to influence the magnitude of these effects. Thus, this review is intended to act as a guide for researchers interested in conducting human exposure studies of air pollutants while in the field, although there can be a wider application for using these end points in many epidemiological study designs.

  2. Methods for assessing the extent of exposure and effects of air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In many places in Europe, the ambient air pollution exceeds the levels considered to be safe for health. The objective of the paper is to review and summarise the methods of assessment of its impact on health, and to indicate the contributions of various research disciplines, particularly environmental epidemiology. METHODS: The framework for assessment of impact is based on a four stage model: assessment of release of pollutant; assessment of exposure; assessment of the consequence; and risk estimation. RESULTS: Epidemiology is crucial in providing the data for the assessment of consequence. The criteria that determine the use of epidemiological studies for this task include lack of bias, correct control of confounding, and measured estimates of exposure. At present, those criteria are easier to satisfy for studies of short term effects on health than for the delayed consequences of exposure, or exposure accumulated over a prolonged period. Combinations of results from various populations through meta-analysis of existing studies or conducting multicentre studies is often necessary to increase the reliability of the consequence assessment stage. CONCLUSION: To assess the impact on health systematically helps to focus on actions to limit air pollutants with the greatest impacts on human health and on the most affected populations. This method allows identification of the most pertinent questions which have to be answered by studies on relations between pollution and health and on exposure of populations to air pollutants. Epidemiology has considerable potential to contribute to this research. PMID:9155775

  3. B2B collaboration method through trust values for e-supply chain integrator: a case study of Malaysian construction industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab. Aziz, Norshakirah; Ahmad, Rohiza; Dhanapal Durai, Dominic

    2011-12-01

    Limited trust, cooperation and communication have been identified as some of the issues that hinder collaboration among business partners. These one also true in the acceptance of e-supply chain integrator among organizations that involve in the same industry. On top of that, the huge number of components in supply chain industry also makes it impossible to include entire supply chain components in the integrator. Hence, this study intends to propose a method for identifying "trusted" collaborators for inclusion into an e-supply chain integrator. For the purpose of constructing and validating the method, the Malaysian construction industry is chosen as the case study due to its size and importance to the economy. This paper puts forward the background of the research, some relevant literatures which lead to trust values elements formulation, data collection from Malaysian Construction Supply Chain and a glimpse of the proposed method for trusted partner selection. Future work is also presented to highlight the next step of this research.

  4. Sorbent-based sampling methods for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in air Part 1: Sorbent-based air monitoring options.

    PubMed

    Woolfenden, Elizabeth

    2010-04-16

    Sorbent tubes/traps are widely used in combination with gas chromatographic (GC) analytical methods to monitor the vapour-phase fraction of organic compounds in air. Target compounds range in volatility from acetylene and freons to phthalates and PCBs and include apolar, polar and reactive species. Airborne vapour concentrations will vary depending on the nature of the location, nearby pollution sources, weather conditions, etc. Levels can range from low percent concentrations in stack and vent emissions to low part per trillion (ppt) levels in ultra-clean outdoor locations. Hundreds, even thousands of different compounds may be present in any given atmosphere. GC is commonly used in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection especially for environmental monitoring or for screening uncharacterised workplace atmospheres. Given the complexity and variability of organic vapours in air, no one sampling approach suits every monitoring scenario. A variety of different sampling strategies and sorbent media have been developed to address specific applications. Key sorbent-based examples include: active (pumped) sampling onto tubes packed with one or more sorbents held at ambient temperature; diffusive (passive) sampling onto sorbent tubes/cartridges; on-line sampling of air/gas streams into cooled sorbent traps; and transfer of air samples from containers (canisters, Tedlar) bags, etc.) into cooled sorbent focusing traps. Whichever sampling approach is selected, subsequent analysis almost always involves either solvent extraction or thermal desorption (TD) prior to GC(/MS) analysis. The overall performance of the air monitoring method will depend heavily on appropriate selection of key sampling and analytical parameters. This comprehensive review of air monitoring using sorbent tubes/traps is divided into 2 parts. (1) Sorbent-based air sampling option. (2) Sorbent selection and other aspects of optimizing sorbent-based air monitoring methods. The paper presents

  5. Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

    2009-02-18

    This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is

  6. Microbiological investigation of an industrial ultra pure supply water plant using cultivation-based and cultivation-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Bohus, Veronika; Tóth, Erika M; Székely, Anna J; Makk, Judit; Baranyi, Krisztián; Patek, Gábor; Schunk, János; Márialigeti, Károly

    2010-12-01

    Ultra pure waters (UPW), characterized by extremely low salt and nutrient concentrations, can suffer from microbial contamination which causes biofouling and biocorrosion, possibly leading to reduced lifetime and increased operational costs. Samples were taken from an ultra pure supply water producing plant of a power plant. Scanning electron microscopic examination was carried out on the biofilms formed in the system. Biofilm, ion exchange resin, and water samples were characterized by culture-based methods and molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [T-RFLP] analysis and molecular cloning). Identification of bacteria was based on 16S rDNA sequence comparison. A complex microbial community structure was revealed. Nearly 46% of the clones were related to as yet uncultured bacteria. The community profiles of the water samples were the most diverse and most of bacteria were recruited from bacterial communities of tube surface and ion exchange resin biofilms. Microbiota of different layers of the mixed bed ion exchange resin showed the highest similarity. Most of the identified taxa (dominated by β-Proteobacteria) could take part in microbially influenced corrosion.

  7. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Hot Block Dilute Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide Filter Extraction'' In this method, total suspended... and nitric acid and two aliquots of hydrogen peroxide, for a total of two and a half hours extraction... Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) with Hot Block Dilute Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide...

  8. Improved biostability assessment of drinking water with a suite of test methods at a water supply treating eutrophic lake water.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Dick; Martijn, Bram; Schaap, Peter G; Hoogenboezem, Wim; Veenendaal, Harm R; van der Wielen, Paul W J J

    2015-12-15

    Assessment of drinking-water biostability is generally based on measuring bacterial growth in short-term batch tests. However, microbial growth in the distribution system is affected by multiple interactions between water, biofilms and sediments. Therefore a diversity of test methods was applied to characterize the biostability of drinking water distributed without disinfectant residual at a surface-water supply. This drinking water complied with the standards for the heterotrophic plate count and coliforms, but aeromonads periodically exceeded the regulatory limit (1000 CFU 100 mL(-1)). Compounds promoting growth of the biopolymer-utilizing Flavobacterium johnsoniae strain A3 accounted for c. 21% of the easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration (17 ± 2 μg C L(-1)) determined by growth of pure cultures in the water after granular activated-carbon filtration (GACF). Growth of the indigenous bacteria measured as adenosine tri-phosphate in water samples incubated at 25 °C confirmed the low AOC in the GACF but revealed the presence of compounds promoting growth after more than one week of incubation. Furthermore, the concentration of particulate organic carbon in the GACF (83 ± 42 μg C L(-1), including 65% carbohydrates) exceeded the AOC concentration. The increased biomass accumulation rate in the continuous biofouling monitor (CBM) at the distribution system reservoir demonstrated the presence of easily biodegradable by-products related to ClO2 dosage to the GACF and in the CBM at 42 km from the treatment plant an iron-associated biomass accumulation was observed. The various methods applied thus distinguished between easily assimilable compounds, biopolymers, slowly biodegradable compounds and biomass-accumulation potential, providing an improved assessment of the biostability of the water. Regrowth of aeromonads may be related to biomass-turnover processes in the distribution system, but establishment of quantitative relationships is needed for

  9. LITERATURE SEARCH FOR METHODS FOR HAZARD ANALYSES OF AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ - GURIDI,G.; SAMANTA,P.

    2002-07-01

    Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and several air carriers under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 developed a system-engineering model of the functions of air-carrier operations. Their analyses form the foundation or basic architecture upon which other task areas are based: hazard analyses, performance measures, and risk indicator design. To carry out these other tasks, models may need to be developed using the basic architecture of the Air Carrier Operations System Model (ACOSM). Since ACOSM encompasses various areas of air-carrier operations and can be used to address different task areas with differing but interrelated objectives, the modeling needs are broad. A literature search was conducted to identify and analyze the existing models that may be applicable for pursuing the task areas in ACOSM. The intent of the literature search was not necessarily to identify a specific model that can be directly used, but rather to identify relevant ones that have similarities with the processes and activities defined within ACOSM. Such models may provide useful inputs and insights in structuring ACOSM models. ACOSM simulates processes and activities in air-carrier operation, but, in a general framework, it has similarities with other industries where attention also has been paid to hazard analyses, emphasizing risk management, and in designing risk indicators. To assure that efforts in other industries are adequately considered, the literature search includes publications from other industries, e.g., chemical, nuclear, and process industries. This report discusses the literature search, the relevant methods identified and provides a preliminary assessment of their use in developing the models needed for the ACOSM task areas. A detailed assessment of the models has not been made. Defining those applicable for ACOSM will need further analyses of both the models and tools identified. The report is organized in four chapters

  10. Calculation of nonequilibrium hydrogen-air reactions with implicit flux vector splitting method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Ho; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods, fully- and loosely-coupled, are developed to incorporate nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry into the fluid dynamic implicit flux vector splitting code (F3D). The new code (F3D/Chem) is validated against other existing codes for two cases: nozzle expansion, and shock-induced combustion around a blunt body. The shock-induced combustion case is compared also with an experimental data. The reaction rate constants are varied in an effort to reproduce the experimental data. The fully- and loosely-coupled methods are found to yield comparable results, but the computation time is shorter using the loosely-coupled method. The present method is found to reproduce results obtained using different existing codes. The experimental data was not reproduced with any selected rate coefficients set.

  11. Organophosphates in aircraft cabin and cockpit air--method development and measurements of contaminants.

    PubMed

    Solbu, Kasper; Daae, Hanne Line; Olsen, Raymond; Thorud, Syvert; Ellingsen, Dag Gunnar; Lindgren, Torsten; Bakke, Berit; Lundanes, Elsa; Molander, Paal

    2011-05-01

    Methods for measurements and the potential for occupational exposure to organophosphates (OPs) originating from turbine and hydraulic oils among flying personnel in the aviation industry are described. Different sampling methods were applied, including active within-day methods for OPs and VOCs, newly developed passive long-term sample methods (deposition of OPs to wipe surface areas and to activated charcoal cloths), and measurements of OPs in high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) recirculation filters (n = 6). In total, 95 and 72 within-day OP and VOC samples, respectively, have been collected during 47 flights in six different models of turbine jet engine, propeller and helicopter aircrafts (n = 40). In general, the OP air levels from the within-day samples were low. The most relevant OP in this regard originating from turbine and engine oils, tricresyl phosphate (TCP), was detected in only 4% of the samples (min-max air, was an order of magnitude higher as compared to after engine replacement (p = 0.02).

  12. Organophosphates in aircraft cabin and cockpit air--method development and measurements of contaminants.

    PubMed

    Solbu, Kasper; Daae, Hanne Line; Olsen, Raymond; Thorud, Syvert; Ellingsen, Dag Gunnar; Lindgren, Torsten; Bakke, Berit; Lundanes, Elsa; Molander, Paal

    2011-05-01

    Methods for measurements and the potential for occupational exposure to organophosphates (OPs) originating from turbine and hydraulic oils among flying personnel in the aviation industry are described. Different sampling methods were applied, including active within-day methods for OPs and VOCs, newly developed passive long-term sample methods (deposition of OPs to wipe surface areas and to activated charcoal cloths), and measurements of OPs in high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) recirculation filters (n = 6). In total, 95 and 72 within-day OP and VOC samples, respectively, have been collected during 47 flights in six different models of turbine jet engine, propeller and helicopter aircrafts (n = 40). In general, the OP air levels from the within-day samples were low. The most relevant OP in this regard originating from turbine and engine oils, tricresyl phosphate (TCP), was detected in only 4% of the samples (min-max air, was an order of magnitude higher as compared to after engine replacement (p = 0.02). PMID:21399836

  13. Methods for measuring performance of vehicle cab air cleaning systems against aerosols and vapours.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Subra, I; Régnier, R

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle cabs equipped with an effective air cleaning and pressurization system, fitted to agricultural and off-road machineries, isolate drivers from the polluted environment, in which they are likely to work. These cabs provide protection against particulate and gaseous pollutants generated by these types of work activities. Two laboratory methods have been applied to determining the performance characteristics of two cabs of different design, namely, optical counting-based measurement of a potassium chloride (KCl) aerosol and fluorescein aerosol-based tracing. Results of cab confinement efficiency measurements agreed closely for these two methods implemented in the study. Measurements showed that high confinement efficiencies can be achieved with cabs, which are properly designed in ventilation/cleaning/airtightness terms. We also noted the importance of filter mounting airtightness, in which the smallest defect is reflected by significant degradation in cab performance. Determination of clean airflow rate by monitoring the decrease in test aerosol concentration in the test chamber gave excellent results. This method could represent an attractive alternative to methods involving gas tracing or air velocity measurement at blowing inlets.

  14. Methods for measuring performance of vehicle cab air cleaning systems against aerosols and vapours.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Subra, I; Régnier, R

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle cabs equipped with an effective air cleaning and pressurization system, fitted to agricultural and off-road machineries, isolate drivers from the polluted environment, in which they are likely to work. These cabs provide protection against particulate and gaseous pollutants generated by these types of work activities. Two laboratory methods have been applied to determining the performance characteristics of two cabs of different design, namely, optical counting-based measurement of a potassium chloride (KCl) aerosol and fluorescein aerosol-based tracing. Results of cab confinement efficiency measurements agreed closely for these two methods implemented in the study. Measurements showed that high confinement efficiencies can be achieved with cabs, which are properly designed in ventilation/cleaning/airtightness terms. We also noted the importance of filter mounting airtightness, in which the smallest defect is reflected by significant degradation in cab performance. Determination of clean airflow rate by monitoring the decrease in test aerosol concentration in the test chamber gave excellent results. This method could represent an attractive alternative to methods involving gas tracing or air velocity measurement at blowing inlets. PMID:19406910

  15. Problems in creation of modern air inlet filters of power gas turbine plants in Russia and methods of their solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Sherapov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The main problems in creation and operation of modern air inlet paths of gas turbine plants installed as part of combined-cycle plants in Russia are presented. It is noted that design features of air inlet filters shall be formed at the stage of the technical assignment not only considering the requirements of gas turbine plant manufacturer but also climatic conditions, local atmospheric air dustiness, and a number of other factors. The recommendations on completing of filtration system for air inlet filter of power gas turbine plants depending on the facility location are given, specific defects in design and experience in operation of imported air inlet paths are analyzed, and influence of cycle air preparation quality for gas turbine plant on value of operating expenses and cost of repair works is noted. Air treatment equipment of various manufacturers, influence of aerodynamic characteristics on operation of air inlet filters, features of filtration system operation, anti-icing system, weather canopies, and other elements of air inlet paths are considered. It is shown that nonuniformity of air flow velocity fields in clean air chamber has a negative effect on capacity and aerodynamic resistance of air inlet filter. Besides, the necessity in installation of a sufficient number of differential pressure transmitters allowing controlling state of each treatment stage not being limited to one measurement of total differential pressure in the filtration system is noted in the article. According to the results of the analysis trends and methods for modernization of available equipment for air inlet path, the importance of creation and implementation of new technologies for manufacturing of filtering elements on sites of Russia within the limits of import substitution are given, and measures on reliability improvement and energy efficiency for air inlet filter are considered.

  16. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel carbonaceous electrode support material is disclosed characterized by a corrosion rate of 0.03 wt. %/hour or less when measured a5 550 millivolts vs. a Hg/HgO electrode in a 30 wt. % KOH electrolyte a5 30.degree. C. The electrode support material comprises a preselected carbon black material which has been heat-treated by heating the material to a temperature of from about 2500.degree. to about 3000.degree. C. over a period of from about 1 to about 5 hours in an inert atmosphere and then maintaining the preselected carbon black material at this temperature for a period of at least about 1 hour, and preferably about 2 hours, in the inert atmosphere. A carbonaceous electrode suitable for use as an air electrode in a metal-air cell may be made from the electrode support material by shaping and forming it into a catalyst support and then impregnating it with a catalytically active material capable of catalyzing the reaction with oxygen at the air electrode of metal-air cell.

  17. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  18. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  19. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  1. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  2. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certified ratings that is required to be maintained under 10 CFR 429.71. (f) Manufacturer involvement in... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Test Procedures § 431.96 Uniform test method for the measurement...

  3. Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers

    DOEpatents

    Tuttle, Kenneth L.

    1980-01-01

    A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

  4. Apparatus and Method for Measuring Air Temperature Ahead of an Aircraft for Controlling a Variable Inlet/Engine Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method employ remote sensing to measure the air temperature a sufficient distance ahead of the aircraft to allow time for a variable inlet/engine assembly to be reconfigured in response to the measured temperature, to avoid inlet unstart and/or engine compressor stall. In one embodiment, the apparatus of the invention has a remote sensor for measuring at least one air temperature ahead of the vehicle and an inlet control system for varying the inlet. The remote sensor determines a change in temperature value using at least one temperature measurement and prior temperature measurements corresponding to the location of the aircraft. The control system uses the change in air temperature value to vary the inlet configuration to maintain the position of the shock wave during the arrival of the measured air in the inlet. In one embodiment, the method of the invention includes measuring at least one air temperature ahead of the vehicle, determining an air temperature at the vehicle from prior air temperature measurements, determining a change in temperature value using the air temperature at the vehicle and the at least one air temperature measurement ahead of the vehicle, and using the change in temperature value to-reposition the airflow inlet, to cause the shock wave to maintain substantially the same position within the inlet as the airflow temperature changes within the inlet.

  5. Estimating monthly averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat and momentum are computed from 25 years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly averaged wind speeds, temperatures and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimates of monthly averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly averaged nonneutral values.

  6. Comparison of prediction methods for octanol-air partition coefficients of diverse organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Xuehua; Wang, Ya'nan; Yu, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    The octanol-air partition coefficient (KOA) is needed for assessing multimedia transport and bioaccumulability of organic chemicals in the environment. As experimental determination of KOA for various chemicals is costly and laborious, development of KOA estimation methods is necessary. We investigated three methods for KOA prediction, conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on molecular structural descriptors, group contribution models based on atom-centered fragments, and a novel model that predicts KOA via solvation free energy from air to octanol phase (ΔGO(0)), with a collection of 939 experimental KOA values for 379 compounds at different temperatures (263.15-323.15 K) as validation or training sets. The developed models were evaluated with the OECD guidelines on QSAR models validation and applicability domain (AD) description. Results showed that although the ΔGO(0) model is theoretically sound and has a broad AD, the prediction accuracy of the model is the poorest. The QSAR models perform better than the group contribution models, and have similar predictability and accuracy with the conventional method that estimates KOA from the octanol-water partition coefficient and Henry's law constant. One QSAR model, which can predict KOA at different temperatures, was recommended for application as to assess the long-range transport potential of chemicals. PMID:26802270

  7. A method for optimizing waste collection using mathematical programming: a Buenos Aires case study.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Flavio; Durán, Guillermo; Larumbe, Frederico; Marenco, Javier

    2012-03-01

    A method is proposed that uses operations research techniques to optimize the routes of waste collection vehicles servicing dumpster or skip-type containers. The waste collection problem is reduced to the classic travelling salesman problem, which is then solved using the Concorde solver program. A case study applying the method to the collection system in the southern zone of Buenos Aires is also presented. In addition to the typical minimum distance criterion, the optimization problem incorporates the objective of reducing vehicle wear and tear as measured by the physics concept of mechanical work. The solution approach, employing graph theory and mathematical programming tools, is fully described and the data correction process is also discussed. The application of the proposed method minimized the distance travelled by each collection vehicle in the areas studied, with actual reductions ranging from 10 to 40% of the existing routes. The shortened distances led in turn to substantial decreases in work done and therefore in vehicle wear and tear. Extrapolation of the results to the entire southern zone of Buenos Aires indicates potential savings for the civic authorities of more than US $200,000 per year in addition to the qualitative impacts of less traffic disruption, less vehicle driver fatigue and less pollution.

  8. Comparison of prediction methods for octanol-air partition coefficients of diverse organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Xuehua; Wang, Ya'nan; Yu, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    The octanol-air partition coefficient (KOA) is needed for assessing multimedia transport and bioaccumulability of organic chemicals in the environment. As experimental determination of KOA for various chemicals is costly and laborious, development of KOA estimation methods is necessary. We investigated three methods for KOA prediction, conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on molecular structural descriptors, group contribution models based on atom-centered fragments, and a novel model that predicts KOA via solvation free energy from air to octanol phase (ΔGO(0)), with a collection of 939 experimental KOA values for 379 compounds at different temperatures (263.15-323.15 K) as validation or training sets. The developed models were evaluated with the OECD guidelines on QSAR models validation and applicability domain (AD) description. Results showed that although the ΔGO(0) model is theoretically sound and has a broad AD, the prediction accuracy of the model is the poorest. The QSAR models perform better than the group contribution models, and have similar predictability and accuracy with the conventional method that estimates KOA from the octanol-water partition coefficient and Henry's law constant. One QSAR model, which can predict KOA at different temperatures, was recommended for application as to assess the long-range transport potential of chemicals.

  9. A method for optimizing waste collection using mathematical programming: a Buenos Aires case study.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Flavio; Durán, Guillermo; Larumbe, Frederico; Marenco, Javier

    2012-03-01

    A method is proposed that uses operations research techniques to optimize the routes of waste collection vehicles servicing dumpster or skip-type containers. The waste collection problem is reduced to the classic travelling salesman problem, which is then solved using the Concorde solver program. A case study applying the method to the collection system in the southern zone of Buenos Aires is also presented. In addition to the typical minimum distance criterion, the optimization problem incorporates the objective of reducing vehicle wear and tear as measured by the physics concept of mechanical work. The solution approach, employing graph theory and mathematical programming tools, is fully described and the data correction process is also discussed. The application of the proposed method minimized the distance travelled by each collection vehicle in the areas studied, with actual reductions ranging from 10 to 40% of the existing routes. The shortened distances led in turn to substantial decreases in work done and therefore in vehicle wear and tear. Extrapolation of the results to the entire southern zone of Buenos Aires indicates potential savings for the civic authorities of more than US $200,000 per year in addition to the qualitative impacts of less traffic disruption, less vehicle driver fatigue and less pollution. PMID:21460074

  10. A Fast Air-dry Dropping Chromosome Preparation Method Suitable for FISH in Plants.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Ma, Lu; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of chromosome spreads is a prerequisite for the successful performance of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Preparation of high quality plant chromosome spreads is challenging due to the rigid cell wall. One of the approved methods for the preparation of plant chromosomes is a so-called drop preparation, also known as drop-spreading or air-drying technique. Here, we present a protocol for the fast preparation of mitotic chromosome spreads suitable for the FISH detection of single and high copy DNA probes. This method is an improved variant of the air-dry drop method performed under a relative humidity of 50%-55%. This protocol comprises a reduced number of washing steps making its application easy, efficient and reproducible. Obvious benefits of this approach are well-spread, undamaged and numerous metaphase chromosomes serving as a perfect prerequisite for successful FISH analysis. Using this protocol we obtained high-quality chromosome spreads and reproducible FISH results for Hordeum vulgare, H. bulbosum, H. marinum, H. murinum, H. pubiflorum and Secale cereale. PMID:26709593

  11. a Multiscale, Lacunarity and Neural Network Method for γ/h Discrimination in Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaro, A.; D'Anna, F.; D'Alí Staiti, G.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for the identification of extensive air showers initiated by different primaries. The method uses the multiscale concept and is based on the analysis of multifractal behaviour and lacunarity of secondary particle distributions together with a properly designed and trained artificial neural network. The separation technique is particularly suited for being applied when the topology of the particle distribution in the shower front is as largely detailed as possible. In the present work the method is discussed and applied in the experimental framework of ARGO-YBJ, to obtain hadron to gamma primary separation. We show that the presented approach gives very good results, leading, in the 1 - 10 Tev energy range, to a clear improvement of the discrimination power with respect to the existing figures for extended shower detectors.

  12. Methods proposed to achieve air quality standards for mobile sources and technology surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1975-01-01

    The methods proposed to meet the 1975 Standards of the Clean Air Act for mobile sources are alternative antiknocks, exhaust emission control devices, and alternative engine designs. Technology surveillance analysis applied to this situation is an attempt to anticipate potential public and environmental health problems from these methods, before they happen. Components of this analysis are exhaust emission characterization, environmental transport and transformation, levels of public and environmental exposure, and the influence of economics on the selection of alternative methods. The purpose of this presentation is to show trends as a result of the interaction of these different components. In no manner can these trends be interpreted explicitly as to what will really happen. Such an analysis is necessary so that public and environmental health officials have the opportunity to act on potential problems before they become manifest. PMID:50944

  13. Interpretation of borehole geophysical logs, aquifer-isolation tests, and water quality, supply wells 1 and 2, Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Goode, Daniel J.; Frasch, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water pumped from supply wells 1 and 2 on the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) provides water for use at the base, including potable water for drinking. The supply wells have been contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), particularly trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and the water is treated to remove the VOC?s. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer. The ground-water-flow system for the supply wells was characterized by use of borehole geophysical logs and heatpulse-flowmeter measurements. The heatpulse-flowmeter measurements showed upward and downward borehole flow under nonpumping conditions in both wells. The hydraulic and chemical properties of discrete water-bearing fractures in the supply wells were characterized by isolating each water-bearing fracture with straddle packers. Eight fractures in supply well 1 and five fractures in supply well 2 were selected for testing on the basis of the borehole geophysical logs and borehole television surveys. Water samples were collected from each isolated fracture and analyzed for VOC?s and inorganic constituents. Fractures at 50?59, 79?80, 196, 124?152, 182, 241, 256, and 350?354 ft btoc (feet below top of casing) were isolated in supply well 1. Specific capacities ranged from 0.26 to 5.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. The highest specific capacity was for the fracture isolated at 179.8?188 ft btoc. Specific capacity and depth of fracture were not related in either supply well. The highest concentrations of PCE were in water samples collected from fractures isolated at 236.8?245 and 249.8?258 ft btoc, which are hydraulically connected. The concentration of PCE generally increased with depth to a maximum of 39 mg/L (micrograms per liter) at a depth of 249.8? 258 ft btoc and then decreased to 21 mg/L at a

  14. Passive methods for improving air quality in the built environment: A review of porous and solid barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John; Baldauf, Richard; Fuller, Christina H.; Kumar, Prashant; Gill, Laurence W.; McNabola, Aonghus

    2015-11-01

    Protecting the health of growing urban populations from air pollution remains a challenge for planners and requires detailed understanding of air flow and pollutant transport in the built environment. In recent years, the work undertaken on passive methods of reducing air pollution has been examined to address the question: "how can the built environment work to alter natural dispersion patterns to improve air quality for nearby populations?" This review brings together a collective of methods that have demonstrated an ability to influence air flow patterns to reduce personal exposure in the built environment. A number of passive methods exists but, in the context of this paper, are split into two distinct categories: porous and solid barriers. These methods include trees and vegetation (porous) as well as noise barriers, low boundary walls and parked cars (solid); all of which have gained different levels of research momentum over the past decade. Experimental and modelling studies have provided an understanding of the potential for these barriers to improve air quality under varying urban geometrical and meteorological conditions. However, differences in results between these studies and real-world measurements demonstrate the challenges and complexities of simulating pollutant transport in urban areas. These methods provide additional benefits to improving air quality through altering dispersion patterns; avenue trees and vegetation are aesthetically pleasing and provides cooling and shade from direct sunlight. Additionally, real-world case studies are considered an important direction for further verification of these methods in the built environment. Developing design guidelines is an important next stage in promoting passive methods for reducing air pollution and ensuring their integration into future urban planning strategies. In addition, developing channels of communication with urban planners will enhance the development and uptake of design guidelines to

  15. Analyzing nonrenewable resource supply

    SciTech Connect

    Bohi, D.R.; Toman, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Starting with their vision of a useful model of supply behavior as dynamic and market oriented, the authors examine the literature to see what it offers, to fill in some of the missing elements, and to direct attention to the research that is required. Following an introduction, separate chapters deal with the basic theory of supply behavior; joint products, externalities, and technical change; uncertainty, expectations, and supply behavior; aggregate supply and market behavior; and empirical methods and problems. The authors argue that practical understanding of nonrenewable resource supply is hampered by gaps among theory, methodology, and data, and offer a standard designed to achieve consistency among theory, data, and estimation methods. Their recommendations for additional research focus on general specification issues, uncertainty and expectations, market-level analysis, and strategic behavioral issues. 151 references, 9 figures.

  16. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 969±1°C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.10±0.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 942±1°C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.99±0.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the

  17. TEMPORAL SIGNATURES OF AIR QUALITY OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL OUTPUTS: DO TIME SERIES DECOMPOSITION METHODS CAPTURE RELEVANT TIME SCALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time series decomposition methods were applied to meteorological and air quality data and their numerical model estimates. Decomposition techniques express a time series as the sum of a small number of independent modes which hypothetically represent identifiable forcings, thereb...

  18. Regionalized LCA-based optimization of building energy supply: method and case study for a Swiss municipality.

    PubMed

    Saner, Dominik; Vadenbo, Carl; Steubing, Bernhard; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a regionalized LCA-based multiobjective optimization model of building energy demand and supply for the case of a Swiss municipality for the minimization of greenhouse gas emissions and particulate matter formation. The results show that the environmental improvement potential is very large: in the optimal case, greenhouse gas emissions from energy supply could be reduced by more than 75% and particulate emissions by over 50% in the municipality. This scenario supposes a drastic shift of heat supply systems from a fossil fuel dominated portfolio to a portfolio consisting of mainly heat pump and woodchip incineration systems. In addition to a change in heat supply technologies, roofs, windows and walls would need to be refurbished in more than 65% of the municipality's buildings. The full potential of the environmental impact reductions will hardly be achieved in reality, particularly in the short term, for example, because of financial constraints and social acceptance, which were not taken into account in this study. Nevertheless, the results of the optimization model can help policy makers to identify the most effective measures for improvement at the decision making level, for example, at the building level for refurbishment and selection of heating systems or at the municipal level for designing district heating networks. Therefore, this work represents a starting point for designing effective incentives to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. While the results of the optimization model are specific to the municipality studied, the model could readily be adapted to other regions.

  19. Controller for controlling operation of at least one electrical load operating on an AC supply, and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cantin, Luc; Deschenes, Mario; D'Amours, Mario

    1995-08-15

    A controller is provided for controlling operation of at least one electrical load operating on an AC supply having a typical frequency, the AC supply being provided via power transformers by an electrical power distribution grid. The controller is associated with the load and comprises an input interface for coupling the controller to the grid, a frequency detector for detecting the frequency of the AC supply and producing a signal indicative of the frequency, memory modules for storing preprogrammed commands, a frequency monitor for reading the signal indicative of the frequency and producing frequency data derived thereof, a selector for selecting at least one of the preprogrammed commands with respect to the frequency data, a control unit for producing at least one command signal representative of the selected preprogrammed commands, and an output interface including a device responsive to the command signal for controlling the load. Therefore, the load can be controlled by means of the controller depending on the frequency of the AC supply.

  20. Regionalized LCA-based optimization of building energy supply: method and case study for a Swiss municipality.

    PubMed

    Saner, Dominik; Vadenbo, Carl; Steubing, Bernhard; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a regionalized LCA-based multiobjective optimization model of building energy demand and supply for the case of a Swiss municipality for the minimization of greenhouse gas emissions and particulate matter formation. The results show that the environmental improvement potential is very large: in the optimal case, greenhouse gas emissions from energy supply could be reduced by more than 75% and particulate emissions by over 50% in the municipality. This scenario supposes a drastic shift of heat supply systems from a fossil fuel dominated portfolio to a portfolio consisting of mainly heat pump and woodchip incineration systems. In addition to a change in heat supply technologies, roofs, windows and walls would need to be refurbished in more than 65% of the municipality's buildings. The full potential of the environmental impact reductions will hardly be achieved in reality, particularly in the short term, for example, because of financial constraints and social acceptance, which were not taken into account in this study. Nevertheless, the results of the optimization model can help policy makers to identify the most effective measures for improvement at the decision making level, for example, at the building level for refurbishment and selection of heating systems or at the municipal level for designing district heating networks. Therefore, this work represents a starting point for designing effective incentives to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. While the results of the optimization model are specific to the municipality studied, the model could readily be adapted to other regions. PMID:24865977

  1. Evaluation of a modified sampling method for molecular analysis of air microflora.

    PubMed

    Lech, T; Ziembinska-Buczynska, A

    2015-04-10

    A serious issue concerning the durability of economically important materials for humans related to cultural heritage is the process of biodeterioration. As a result of this phenomenon, priceless works of art, documents, and old prints have undergone a process of decomposition caused by microorganisms. Therefore, it is important to constantly monitor the presence and diversity of microorganisms in exposition rooms and storage areas of historical objects. In addition, the use of molecular biology tools for conservation studies will enable detailed research as well as reduce the time needed to perform the analyses compared with using conventional methods related to microbiology and conservation. The aim of this study was to adapt the sampling indoor air method for direct DNA extraction from microorganisms, including evaluating the extracted DNA quality and concentration. The obtained DNA was used to study the diversity of mold fungi in indoor air using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in specific archives and museum environments. The research was conducted in 2 storage rooms of the National Archives in Krakow and in 1 exposition room of the Archaeological Museum in Krakow (Poland).

  2. Development of an Analytical Method for Predicting Flow in a Supersonic Air Ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracik, Jan; Dvorak, Vaclav

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with development of an analytical method for predicting flow in an ejector with twelve supersonic nozzles, which are located at the periphery of the mixing chamber of the ejector. Supersonic primary air stream makes the investigation more complex. The secondary air (atmospheric) is sucked in direction of the ejector axis. The shape of the mixing chamber is convergent - divergent and a throat is formed behind the primary nozzles. Each of the primary nozzles can be treated independently so there can be various number of nozzles under operation in the ejector. According to previous investigations, constant pressure mixing is assumed to occur inside a part of the mixing chamber. The method under investigation is considered for isentropic flow in the first approximation and after that the stagnation pressure corrections at the inlets are considered. Furthermore, the decrease in stagnation pressure in the mixing chamber is considered to take losses in the mixing chamber and diffuser into account. The numerical data of the stagnation pressure has been obtained from Ansys Fluent software. In addition, a comparison with previous experimental results is introduced.

  3. NASA Langley's Formal Methods Research in Support of the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.

    2008-01-01

    This talk will provide a brief introduction to the formal methods developed at NASA Langley and the National Institute for Aerospace (NIA) for air traffic management applications. NASA Langley's formal methods research supports the Interagency Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) effort to define and develop the 2025 Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS). The JPDO was created by the passage of the Vision 100 Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act in Dec 2003. The NGATS vision calls for a major transformation of the nation s air transportation system that will enable growth to 3 times the traffic of the current system. The transformation will require an unprecedented level of safety-critical automation used in complex procedural operations based on 4-dimensional (4D) trajectories that enable dynamic reconfiguration of airspace scalable to geographic and temporal demand. The goal of our formal methods research is to provide verification methods that can be used to insure the safety of the NGATS system. Our work has focused on the safety assessment of concepts of operation and fundamental algorithms for conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) and self- spacing in the terminal area. Formal analysis of a concept of operations is a novel area of application of formal methods. Here one must establish that a system concept involving aircraft, pilots, and ground resources is safe. The formal analysis of algorithms is a more traditional endeavor. However, the formal analysis of ATM algorithms involves reasoning about the interaction of algorithmic logic and aircraft trajectories defined over an airspace. These trajectories are described using 2D and 3D vectors and are often constrained by trigonometric relations. Thus, in many cases it has been necessary to unload the full power of an advanced theorem prover. The verification challenge is to establish that the safety-critical algorithms produce valid solutions that are guaranteed to maintain separation

  4. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. ); Schmalz, H. Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL )

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  5. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H. |

    1992-11-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  6. Modeling of Soft Tissues Interacting with Fluid (Blood or Air) Using the Immersed Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lucy T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents some biomedical applications that involve fluid-structure interactions which are simulated using the Immersed Finite Element Method (IFEM). Here, we first review the original and enhanced IFEM methods that are suitable to model incompressible or compressible fluid that can have densities that are significantly lower than the solid, such as air. Then, three biomedical applications are studied using the IFEM. Each of the applications may require a specific set of IFEM formulation for its respective numerical stability and accuracy due to the disparities between the fluid and the solid. We show that these biomedical applications require a fully-coupled and stable numerical technique in order to produce meaningful results. PMID:26855688

  7. Comparison of effectiveness of convection-, transpiration-, and film-cooling methods with air as coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, N B

    1954-01-01

    Various parts of aircraft propulsion engines that are in contact with hot gases often require cooling. Transpiration and film cooling, new methods that supposedly utilize cooling air more effectively than conventional convection cooling, have already been proposed. This report presents material necessary for a comparison of the cooling requirements of these three methods. Correlations that are regarded by the authors as the most reliable today are employed in evaluating each of the cooling processes. Calculations for the special case in which the gas velocity is constant along the cooled wall (flat plate) are presented. The calculations reveal that a comparison of the three cooling processes can be made on quite a general basis. The superiority of transpiration cooling is clearly shown for both laminar and turbulent flow. This superiority is reduced when the effects of radiation are included; for gas-turbine blades, however, there is evidence indicating that radiation may be neglected.

  8. On-line air-tightness and insertion loss simultaneous detection method of high air-tightness fiber optic penetration connector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchuan; Yang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    The high air-tightness multicore fiber optic penetration connector is a core component for the optical fiber sensing and communication technologies applied in the space environment simulator under the vacuum thermal environment. High air-tightness and insertion loss are the two key indexes of the fiber optic penetration connector. The air-tightness and insertion loss on-line synchronous detection method was proposed. First, established hardware-in-the-loop testing platform by using the vacuum pumping system, the vacuum vessel, the helium mass spectrometer leak detector and optical time-domain reflectmeter, then, described the air tightness and insertion loss on-line detection principle, finally, designed a detection test scheme and air-tightness and insertion loss were tested. Experimental results indicate that the leakage rate is lower than 1.0×10-7Pa•L/S, the minimum of which is1.0×10-10Pa•L/S and the insertion loss at wave length window 1550 nm is +/-0.07db, which is less than +/-0.1db. It can lay the data basis for the design of opto-mechanical combination and later period fine processing.

  9. Analytical methods in bioassay-directed investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate material.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Christopher H; Hewitt, L Mark

    2007-01-01

    The combination of short-term bioassays and analytical chemical techniques has been successfully used in the identification of a variety of mutagenic compounds in complex mixtures. Much of the early work in the field of bioassay-directed fractionation resulted from the development of a short-term bacterial assay employing Salmonella typhimurium; this assay is commonly known as the Ames assay. Ideally, analytical methods for assessment of mutagenicity of any environmental matrix should exhibit characteristics including high capacity, good selectivity, good analytical resolution, non-destructiveness, and reproducibility. A variety of extraction solvents have been employed in investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate; sequential combination of dichloromethane followed by methanol is most popular. Soxhlet extraction has been the most common extraction method, followed by sonication. Attempts at initial fractionation using different extraction solvents have met with limited success and highlight the need for fractionation schemes applicable to moderately polar and polar mutagenic compounds. Fractionation methods reported in the literature are reviewed according to three general schemas: (i) acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by fractionation using open-column chromatography and/or HPLC; (ii) fractionation based on normal-phase (NP) HPLC using a cyanopropyl or chemically similar stationary phase; and (iii) fractionation by open-column chromatography followed by NP-HPLC. The HPLC methods may be preparative, semi-preparative, or analytical scale. Variations based on acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by a chromatographic separation have also been employed. Other lesser-used approaches involve fractionation based on ion-exchange and thin-layer chromatographies. Although some of the methodologies used in contemporary studies of mutagenicity of air particulate do not represent significant advances in technology over the past 30 years, their simplicity, low

  10. Air-spore in Cartagena, Spain: viable and non-viable sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Rendueles, Belen; Moreno, Jose; Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio; Vergara, Nuria; Martinez-Garcia, Maria Jose; Moreno-Grau, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In the presented study the airborne fungal spores of the semiarid city of Cartagena, Spain, are identified and quantified by means of viable or non-viable sampling methods. Airborne fungal samples were collected simultaneously using a filtration method and a pollen and particle sampler based on the Hirst methodology. This information is very useful for elucidating geographical patterns of hay fever and asthma. The qualitative results showed that when the non-viable methodology was employed, Cladosporium, Ustilago, and Alternaria were the most abundant spores identified in the atmosphere of Cartagena, while the viable methodology showed that the most abundant taxa were: Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria. The quantitative results of airborne fungal spores identified by the Hirst-type air sampler (non-viable method), showed that Deuteromycetes represented 74% of total annual spore counts, Cladosporium being the major component of the fungal spectrum (62.2%), followed by Alternaria (5.3%), and Stemphylium (1.3%). The Basidiomycetes group represented 18.9% of total annual spore counts, Ustilago (7.1%) being the most representative taxon of this group and the second most abundant spore type. Ascomycetes accounted for 6.9%, Nectria (2.3%) being the principal taxon. Oomycetes (0.2%) and Zygomycestes and Myxomycestes (0.06%) were scarce. The prevailing species define our bioaerosol as typical of dry air. The viable methodology was better at identifying small hyaline spores and allowed for the discrimination of the genus of some spore types. However, non-viable methods revealed the richness of fungal types present in the bioaerosol. Thus, the use of both methodologies provides a more comprehensive characterization of the spore profile.

  11. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  12. Simulated Convectively Influenced vs. Lightning Influenced Air: Methods for Calculation and Associated Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, N.; Freeman, S.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Some atmospheric chemical processes are influenced by the presence of convection and/or lightning. Therefore, it is often important to determine whether a sampled air parcel previously has encountered these influences. This paper describes procedures for making these determinations and provides uncertainties associated with the procedures. Prior locations of the sampled air are obtained by calculating backward trajectories based on 1 h WRF output with 3 domains (horizontal grid spacing of 36, 12, and 4 km). Back trajectories are released along every DC-8 flight track from the recent NASA SEAC4RS campaign (~22,000 trajectories total). If lightning influence is sought, locations of the flashes usually are obtained from ground-based networks such as the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results show that the user-defined spatial and temporal separation between a trajectory and the flash location greatly influences whether the trajectory is considered lightning influenced. For example, a spatial threshold of 0.5 (0.25) deg lat/lon leads to 69% (60%) of the trajectories being lightning influenced. If model-derived convective influence is sought, a vertical displacement threshold corresponding to w≥1 m s-1 is used to identify convectively influenced parcels. Remarkably, the model-derived method using the 4 km WRF output leads to only 5% (compared to ~60% from lightning) of the trajectories being convectively influenced. Additionally, the horizontal grid spacing (36 km vs. 4 km) exerts a major influence on the paths of the trajectories. The overriding conclusion is that very different results are obtained depending on whether simulated convectively influenced or lightning influenced air is being sought. Also, once this choice is made, the resolution of the model and the time/space thresholds that are chosen will have a major impact on the number of trajectories that are determined to be influenced. This paper will provide guidance on these choices.

  13. Methods to determine the biological composition of particulate matter collected from outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womiloju, Taiwo O.; Miller, J. David; Mayer, Paul M.; Brook, Jeffrey R.

    Associations between increased morbidity and exposure to ambient air particulates have been the subject of intense study. Few data exist on the presence of cells or cell materials of fungi, bacteria and pollen in fine particle samples (< 2.5 μm). Because it is not possible to recognize such fragments by conventional means, one approach is to determine the presence of signature biochemicals. This paper reports the development of a method for the analysis of intact glycerophospholipids present in extracts of fungi and pollen common in outdoor air by normal-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Using cluster analysis of the phospholipids found, both mycelia and spores of fungi and pollen common in outdoor air could be separated. Little variation was detected between single spore isolates of individual strains of such fungi isolated across North America. White Birch and ragweed pollen contained similar phospholipid patterns but different from the fungi. From literature data, both were different than Gram negative bacteria. Semi-hivolume fine particle samples were collected on glass fibre filters in three locations in and near Toronto, extracted and analyzed. The concentrations of phospholipids measured suggested that fungal cells and pollen were responsible for 12-22% of the organic carbon fraction or 4-11% of the total mass depending upon location. The qualitative and quantitative estimates obtained compared favourably to data from concurrent rotorod samples. This suggests that, with improved sensitivity, the analysis of a larger number of samples would provide useful data for epidemiological studies and on the nature of organic carbon in fine particulate samples.

  14. Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Maxwell Laboratories capacitor charging power supply is the first commercial spinoff from the NASA CCDS program - a consortia of industries and government establishments to accelerate development of ground and space based commercial applications of NASA technology. The power supply transforms and conditions large voltages to charge capacitors used in x-ray sources, medical accelerators, etc. It is lighter, more reliable, more compact and efficient. Originally developed for space lasers, its commercial potential was soon recognized.

  15. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 4: Maintenance document (version 1.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baruah, P. K.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Chiang, D. T.; Massena, W. A.; Nelson, F. D.; Furdon, D. J.; Tsurusaki, K.

    1981-01-01

    The Maintenance Document is a guide to the PAN AIR software system, a system which computes the subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about a body of nearly arbitrary shape, using a higher order panel method. The document describes the over-all system and each program module of the system. Sufficient detail is given for program maintenance, updating and modification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with programming and CDC (Control Data Corporation) computer systems. The PAN AIR system was written in FORTRAN 4 language except for a few COMPASS language subroutines which exist in the PAN AIR library. Structured programming techniques were used to provide code documentation and maintainability. The operating systems accommodated are NOS 1.2, NOS/BE and SCOPE 2.1.3 on the CDC 6600, 7600 and Cyber 175 computing systems. The system is comprised of a data management system, a program library, an execution control module and nine separate FORTRAN technical modules. Each module calculates part of the posed PAN AIR problem. The data base manager is used to communicate between modules and within modules. The technical modules must be run in a prescribed fashion for each PAN AIR problem. In order to ease the problem of supplying the many JCL cards required to execute the modules, a separate module called MEC (Module Execution Control) was created to automatically supply most of the JCL cards. In addition to the MEC generated JCL, there is an additional set of user supplied JCL cards to initiate the JCL sequence stored on the system.

  16. Air-coupled acoustic method for testing and evaluation of microscale structures.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Justin; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2007-05-01

    A noncontact testing and characterization approach for microscale structures based on air-coupled acoustic excitation and optical sensing is proposed and demonstrated. Using an air-coupled transducer to externally excite and a laser Doppler vibrometer/interferometer to capture transient displacement wave forms, the experimental approach results in a technique to determine mechanical properties of microscale structural elements. The effectiveness of this method has been demonstrated on commercially available microcantilever beams and microscale rotational oscillators fabricated for this study. The resonance frequencies and mechanical properties (Young's modulus and stiffness) extracted from the transient displacement wave forms have been compared, with good agreement, to computational and simplified analytical models for each case. It is also shown that the technique could serve to diagnose stiction problems of microscale structures. Some potential advantages of the approach described include the simplicity of the test setup, functionality at room conditions, noncontact and nondestructive operations, and repeatability and rapid turn-around time for the evaluation of modal parameters and mechanical properties of microscale structures.

  17. Using Machine learning method to estimate Air Temperature from MODIS over Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, F.; Preusker, R.; Sodoudi, S.; Taheri, H.; Allahbakhshi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is defined as the temperature of the interface between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere and thus it is a critical variable to understand land-atmosphere interactions and a key parameter in meteorological and hydrological studies, which is involved in energy fluxes. Air temperature (Tair) is one of the most important input variables in different spatially distributed hydrological, ecological models. The estimation of near surface air temperature is useful for a wide range of applications. Some applications from traffic or energy management, require Tair data in high spatial and temporal resolution at two meters height above the ground (T2m), sometimes in near-real-time. Thus, a parameterization based on boundary layer physical principles was developed that determines the air temperature from remote sensing data (MODIS). Tair is commonly obtained from synoptic measurements in weather stations. However, the derivation of near surface air temperature from the LST derived from satellite is far from straight forward. T2m is not driven directly by the sun, but indirectly by LST, thus T2m can be parameterized from the LST and other variables such as Albedo, NDVI, Water vapor and etc. Most of the previous studies have focused on estimating T2m based on simple and advanced statistical approaches, Temperature-Vegetation index and energy-balance approaches but the main objective of this research is to explore the relationships between T2m and LST in Berlin by using Artificial intelligence method with the aim of studying key variables to allow us establishing suitable techniques to obtain Tair from satellite Products and ground data. Secondly, an attempt was explored to identify an individual mix of attributes that reveals a particular pattern to better understanding variation of T2m during day and nighttime over the different area of Berlin. For this reason, a three layer Feedforward neural networks is considered with LMA algorithm

  18. Supplemental air injection method and devices for carburetors of internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Coberley, L.E.

    1986-03-11

    A supplemental air injection means for carburetors of internal combustion engines is described consisting of: a coupling provided with an air inlet port for receiving air under pressure and at least one air outlet port for exhausting the air under pressure; a nozzle means comprising a hose connected at one end to the outlet port and a nozzle at the other end of the hose for selectively directing the air under pressure issuing therefrom; and clamp means for selectively positioning the nozzle for directing air under pressure issuing therefrom into the venturi of a carburetor of the associated engine; the clamp means comprising an apertured strip of metal for mounting in an associated air filter of the associated engine for supporting and selectively positioning the nozzle means.

  19. 40 CFR 86.166-12 - Method for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to air conditioning leakage. 86.166-12 Section 86.166-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage. This section describes procedures used to determine a refrigerant leakage rate in grams per year from vehicle-based air conditioning units....

  20. 40 CFR 86.166-12 - Method for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to air conditioning leakage. 86.166-12 Section 86.166-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage. This section describes procedures used to determine a refrigerant leakage rate in grams per year from vehicle-based air conditioning units....

  1. Air fuel ratio control apparatus and method for an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Ikeura, K.; Morita, T.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1984-05-29

    Normally, an air-fuel ratio is controlled in accordance with the engine speed and the intake air quantity of an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger. When the output pressure of the turbocharger increases excessively, an intake relief valve opens to decrease the intake air quantity. In this case, the fuel injection quantity is controlled solely in accordance with the engine speed.

  2. A simple analytical method to estimate all exit parameters of a cross-flow air dehumidifier using liquid desiccant.

    PubMed

    Bassuoni, M M

    2014-03-01

    The dehumidifier is a key component in liquid desiccant air-conditioning systems. Analytical solutions have more advantages than numerical solutions in studying the dehumidifier performance parameters. This paper presents the performance results of exit parameters from an analytical model of an adiabatic cross-flow liquid desiccant air dehumidifier. Calcium chloride is used as desiccant material in this investigation. A program performing the analytical solution is developed using the engineering equation solver software. Good accuracy has been found between analytical solution and reliable experimental results with a maximum deviation of +6.63% and -5.65% in the moisture removal rate. The method developed here can be used in the quick prediction of the dehumidifier performance. The exit parameters from the dehumidifier are evaluated under the effects of variables such as air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and air to desiccant flow rates. The results show that hot humid air and desiccant concentration have the greatest impact on the performance of the dehumidifier. The moisture removal rate is decreased with increasing both air inlet temperature and desiccant temperature while increases with increasing air to solution mass ratio, inlet desiccant concentration, and inlet air humidity ratio.

  3. A simple analytical method to estimate all exit parameters of a cross-flow air dehumidifier using liquid desiccant

    PubMed Central

    Bassuoni, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The dehumidifier is a key component in liquid desiccant air-conditioning systems. Analytical solutions have more advantages than numerical solutions in studying the dehumidifier performance parameters. This paper presents the performance results of exit parameters from an analytical model of an adiabatic cross-flow liquid desiccant air dehumidifier. Calcium chloride is used as desiccant material in this investigation. A program performing the analytical solution is developed using the engineering equation solver software. Good accuracy has been found between analytical solution and reliable experimental results with a maximum deviation of +6.63% and −5.65% in the moisture removal rate. The method developed here can be used in the quick prediction of the dehumidifier performance. The exit parameters from the dehumidifier are evaluated under the effects of variables such as air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and air to desiccant flow rates. The results show that hot humid air and desiccant concentration have the greatest impact on the performance of the dehumidifier. The moisture removal rate is decreased with increasing both air inlet temperature and desiccant temperature while increases with increasing air to solution mass ratio, inlet desiccant concentration, and inlet air humidity ratio. PMID:25685485

  4. A simple method for screening emission sources of carbonyl compounds in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shohei; Kume, Kazunari; Horiike, Toshiyuki; Honma, Nobuyuki; Fusaya, Masahiro; Ohura, Takeshi; Amagai, Takashi

    2010-06-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building and furnishing materials are frequently observed in high concentrations in indoor air. Nondestructive analytical methods that determine the main parameters influencing concentration of the chemical substances are necessary to screen for sources of VOC emissions. Toward this goal, we have developed a new flux sampler, referred to herein as an emission cell for simultaneous multi-sampling (ECSMS), that is used for screening indoor emission sources of VOCs and for determining the emission rates of these sources. Because the ECSMS is based on passive sampling, it can be easily used on-site at a low cost. Among VOCs, low-molecular-weight carbonyl compounds including formaldehyde are frequently detected at high concentrations in indoor environments. In this study, we determined the reliability of the ECSMS for the collection of formaldehyde and other carbonyl compounds emitted from wood-based composites of medium density fiberboards and particleboards. We then used emission rates determined by the ECSMS to predict airborne concentrations of formaldehyde emitted from a bookshelf in a large chamber, and these data were compared to formaldehyde concentrations that were acquired simultaneously by means of an active sampling method. The values obtained from the two methods were quite similar, suggesting that ECSMS measurement is an effective method for screening primary sources influencing indoor concentrations of formaldehyde. PMID:20149530

  5. An update to the ambient ratio method for 1-h NO2 air quality standards dispersion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podrez, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOX) gases are typically emitted by fuel combustion sources in the form of nitric oxide (NO), which then reacts with ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere to convert a portion of the NO to nitrogen dioxide (NO2). EPA has promulgated a 1-h average National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for NO2, and major sources of NOX emissions must estimate their NO2 air quality impacts as part of EPA's air quality permitting programs. The AERMOD dispersion model has been developed by EPA for these air quality impact analyses, and AERMOD contains three different NO to NO2 conversion methods for estimating the ambient concentrations of NO2. This paper describes a refinement to one of the methods, the Ambient Ratio Method version 2 (ARM2). ARM2 is an empirical approach that uses a variable conversion factor, based on an analysis of ambient air measurements of NO and NO2, to estimate the portion of the AERMOD predicted air concentration of total NOX species that is in the form of NO2. The performance of ARM2 has been evaluated and found to compare well to actual ambient measurements and to other more complex EPA conversion methods. EPA has included ARM2 as a "beta-testing" option in AERMOD version 14134, and provided guidance on the use of ARM2 for regulatory modeling analyses in a September 2014 memorandum. This paper also discusses this recent EPA guidance.

  6. Development of a sensitive thermal desorption method for the determination of trihalomethanes in humid ambient and alveolar air.

    PubMed

    Caro, J; Gallego, M

    2008-08-15

    A sensitive and reliable method has been developed for the determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) in air samples through adsorption in sorbent tubes and thermal desorption (TD) of the compounds, followed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Three commercial sorbent materials were compared in terms of adsorption efficiency and breakthrough volume, finding Chromosorb 102 to be the most appropriate adsorbent for air sampling. The method allows us to reach detection limits of 0.03 ng (0.01 microg m(-3) for 3 l of air), linear ranges from 0.1 to 2000 ng and specific uncertainties of ca. 5.0+/-0.2 ng for all THMs. Several salts were tested to reduce water retention (from the humid air of an indoor swimming pool) at the sampling stage, Na(2)SO(4) being the one that provides optimum efficiency. The method was validated by a new recovery study in which several tubes with and without adsorbent were spiked with THMs and analyzed by TD-GC/MS, recoveries ranging from 92% to 97% for all the compounds. Finally, the performance of the method was evaluated through the analysis of ambient air samples from an indoor swimming pool and alveolar air samples from swimmers to assess their THM uptake. THMs were found to be stable in the sorbent tubes for at least 1 month when stored at 4 degrees C.

  7. Effective medium method for sound propagation in a soft medium containing air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Zou, Xinye; Cheng, Jianchun

    2008-09-01

    An effective medium method (EMM) is developed to investigate the nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves for soft media containing air bubbles, which accounts for the effects of weak compressibility, viscosity, surrounding pressure, surface tension, and encapsulating shells. Based on the dynamics model of an individual bubble that has included these effects, the EMM is presented by employing a simple perturbation approach to "homogenize" the bubbly soft media. The equations describing the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are derived that applies to three-dimensional cases, and then solved in a one-dimensional case to obtain the effective acoustical parameters of a longitudinal wave. The EMM is compared with the previous theories in three representative cases regarded as simple models of significant practical applications. The results show that the EMM agrees well with the previous theories and can incorporate the additional effects, which may notably affect the accuracy of the results. The limitations of the EMM are also identified and stated.

  8. Pesticides in Air and Rainwater in the Midcontinental United States, 1995 - Methods and Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Coupe, Richard H.; Goolsby, Donald A.; Wiebe, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    Weekly composite high-volume air and wet-only deposition samples were collected from April through September 1995 at paired urban and agricultural areas in Mississippi, Iowa, and Minnesota, and at a background site in Michigan?s Upper Peninsula. This report describes the methods used to collect, analyze, and quality assure the samples, and presents the results of all chemical analyses and quality control procedures. Each sample was analyzed for 49 compounds, including several pesticides not examined in previous atmospheric studies. Eighty-five percent of the herbicides, 70 percent of the insecticides, and 100 percent of the transformation products that were targeted for analysis were detected in one or more samples at each paired site.

  9. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  10. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsev, A. N.; Kumkova, I. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Popov, V. E.; Shtengel', S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  11. System and method for conditioning intake air to an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Sellnau, Mark C.

    2015-08-04

    A system for conditioning the intake air to an internal combustion engine includes a means to boost the pressure of the intake air to the engine and a liquid cooled charge air cooler disposed between the output of the boost means and the charge air intake of the engine. Valves in the coolant system can be actuated so as to define a first configuration in which engine cooling is performed by coolant circulating in a first coolant loop at one temperature, and charge air cooling is performed by coolant flowing in a second coolant loop at a lower temperature. The valves can be actuated so as to define a second configuration in which coolant that has flowed through the engine can be routed through the charge air cooler. The temperature of intake air to the engine can be controlled over a wide range of engine operation.

  12. Formal Methods in Air Traffic Management: The Case of Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    As the technological and operational capabilities of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) continue to grow, so too does the need to introduce these systems into civil airspace. Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System is a NASA research project that addresses the integration of civil UAS into non-segregated airspace operations. One of the major challenges of this integration is the lack of an onboard pilot to comply with the legal requirement that pilots see and avoid other aircraft. The need to provide an equivalent to this requirement for UAS has motivated the development of a detect and avoid (DAA) capability to provide the appropriate situational awareness and maneuver guidance in avoiding and remaining well clear of traffic aircraft. Formal methods has played a fundamental role in the development of this capability. This talk reports on the formal methods work conducted under NASA's Safe Autonomous System Operations project in support of the development of DAA for UAS. This work includes specification of low-level and high-level functional requirements, formal verification of algorithms, and rigorous validation of software implementations. The talk also discusses technical challenges in formal methods research in the context of the development and safety analysis of advanced air traffic management concepts.

  13. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  14. Improving Energy Security for Air Force Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, David

    Like civilian infrastructure, Air Force installations are dependent on electrical energy for daily operations. Energy shortages translate to decreased productivity, higher costs, and increased health risks. But for the United States military, energy shortages have the potential to become national security risks. Over ninety-five percent of the electrical energy used by the Air Force is supplied by the domestic grid, which is susceptible to shortages and disruptions. Many Air Force operations require a continuous source of energy, and while the Air Force has historically established redundant supplies of electrical energy, these back-ups are designed for short-term outages and may not provide sufficient supply for a longer, sustained power outage. Furthermore, it is the goal of the Department of Defense to produce or procure 25 percent of its facility energy from renewable sources by fiscal year 2025. In a government budget environment where decision makers are required to provide more capability with less money, it is becoming increasingly important for informed decisions regarding which energy supply options bear the most benefit for an installation. The analysis begins by exploring the field of energy supply options available to an Air Force installation. The supply options are assessed according to their ability to provide continuous and reliable energy, their applicability to unique requirements of Air Force installations, and their costs. Various methods of calculating energy usage by an installation are also addressed. The next step of this research develops a methodology and tool which assesses how an installation responds to various power outage scenarios. Lastly, various energy supply options are applied to the tool, and the results are reported in terms of cost and loss of installation capability. This approach will allow installation commanders and energy managers the ability to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of various energy investment options.

  15. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 4: Maintenance document (version 3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdon, David J.; Baruah, Pranab K.; Bussoletti, John E.; Epton, Michael A.; Massena, William A.; Nelson, Franklin D.; Tsurusaki, Kiyoharu

    1990-01-01

    The Maintenance Document Version 3.0 is a guide to the PAN AIR software system, a system which computes the subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about a body of nearly arbitrary shape, using a higher order panel method. The document describes the overall system and each program module of the system. Sufficient detail is given for program maintenance, updating, and modification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with programming and CRAY computer systems. The PAN AIR system was written in FORTRAN 4 language except for a few CAL language subroutines which exist in the PAN AIR library. Structured programming techniques were used to provide code documentation and maintainability. The operating systems accommodated are COS 1.11, COS 1.12, COS 1.13, and COS 1.14 on the CRAY 1S, 1M, and X-MP computing systems. The system is comprised of a data base management system, a program library, an execution control module, and nine separate FORTRAN technical modules. Each module calculates part of the posed PAN AIR problem. The data base manager is used to communicate between modules and within modules. The technical modules must be run in a prescribed fashion for each PAN AIR problem. In order to ease the problem of supplying the many JCL cards required to execute the modules, a set of CRAY procedures (PAPROCS) was created to automatically supply most of the JCL cards. Most of this document has not changed for Version 3.0. It now, however, strictly applies only to PAN AIR version 3.0. The major changes are: (1) additional sections covering the new FDP module (which calculates streamlines and offbody points); (2) a complete rewrite of the section on the MAG module; and (3) strict applicability to CRAY computing systems.

  16. Environmental Asbestos Assessment Manual Superfund Method for the Determination of Asbestos in Ambient Air Part 2: Technical Background Document

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sampling and analysis method for the determination of asbestos in air is presented in Part 1 of this report, under separate cover. This method is designed specifically to provide results suitable for supporting risk assessments at Superfund sites, although it is applicable t...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room...

  18. Power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  19. Estimating irrigation water demand using an improved method and optimizing reservoir operation for water supply and hydropower generation: a case study of the Xinfengjiang reservoir in southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for water due to growth of population and socioeconomic development in the past several decades has posed a worldwide threat to water supply security and to the environmental health of rivers. This study aims to derive reservoir operating rules through establishing a multi-objective optimization model for the Xinfengjiang (XFJ) reservoir in the East River Basin in southern China to minimize water supply deficit and maximize hydropower generation. Additionally, to enhance the estimation of irrigation water demand from the downstream agricultural area of the XFJ reservoir, a conventional method for calculating crop water demand is improved using hydrological model simulation results. Although the optimal reservoir operating rules are derived for the XFJ reservoir with three priority scenarios (water supply only, hydropower generation only, and equal priority), the river environmental health is set as the basic demand no matter which scenario is adopted. The results show that the new rules derived under the three scenarios can improve the reservoir operation for both water supply and hydropower generation when comparing to the historical performance. Moreover, these alternative reservoir operating policies provide the flexibility for the reservoir authority to choose the most appropriate one. Although changing the current operating rules may influence its hydropower-oriented functions, the new rules can be significant to cope with the increasingly prominent water shortage and degradation in the aquatic environment. Overall, our results and methods (improved estimation of irrigation water demand and formulation of the reservoir optimization model) can be useful for local watershed managers and valuable for other researchers worldwide.

  20. Impact of percentile computation method on PM 24-h air quality standard.

    PubMed

    Salako, Gbenga Oladoyin; Hopke, Philip K

    2012-09-30

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) introduced a percentile form of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM). Studies had shown that a specified percentile in the frequency distribution of measured values of PM increased the probability of detecting non-attainment areas (power) and decreased the likelihood of misclassification of attainment areas as being non-attainment (type 2 error). However, this new NAAQS used a percentile form that was different from a standard percentile in a distribution. Instead of taking the percentile of the distribution of the required 3 years of measurements, the PM(2.5) values for the selected percentile for each year were determined and the average of these 3 values was used as the NAAQS indicator value. However, no studies have been made of this average of the 3 years method and compared to a standard percentile in the multiyear data. The relationships between the values obtained using these two approaches have been explored. PM data measured at selected US EPA Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) website from January 2004 to December 2008 at 20 sites in 20 different states in United States were utilized. PM samples were collected for 24-h periods from midnight to midnight every third day for PM(2.5) and every sixth day for PM(10). At some sites, continuous measurements of PM(2.5) were made and averaged to provide 24-hr values. Using these data, the NAAQS percentile values were compared with the actual 98th percentile values of the three years of data. Regression and t-test analyses were used to compare these two methods and found high correlation coefficients and no significant difference in most cases. Overall, the two methods showed substantial agreement such that either of the two approaches could serve as the statistical form of the 24-h standard. In exploring the PM(10) standard, an arbitrarily chosen standard value of 85 μg/m(3) was used to explore the

  1. A Method for Forecasting the Commercial Air Traffic Schedule in the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Dou; Lee, David; Gaier, Eric; Johnson, Jesse; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an integrated set of models that forecasts air carriers' future operations when delays due to limited terminal-area capacity are considered. This report models the industry as a whole, avoiding unnecessary details of competition among the carriers. To develop the schedule outputs, we first present a model to forecast the unconstrained flight schedules in the future, based on the assumption of rational behavior of the carriers. Then we develop a method to modify the unconstrained schedules, accounting for effects of congestion due to limited NAS capacities. Our underlying assumption is that carriers will modify their operations to keep mean delays within certain limits. We estimate values for those limits from changes in planned block times reflected in the OAG. Our method for modifying schedules takes many means of reducing the delays into considerations, albeit some of them indirectly. The direct actions include depeaking, operating in off-hours, and reducing hub airports'operations. Indirect actions include using secondary airports, using larger aircraft, and selecting new hub airports, which, we assume, have already been modeled in the FAA's TAF. Users of our suite of models can substitute an alternative forecast for the TAF.

  2. Air-stable Fe@Au nanoparticles synthesized by the microemulsion's methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, José; Redondo, Yolanda Piñeiro; Iglesias-Silva, Esther; Vilas-Vilela, J. M.; León, L. M.; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particles covered by gold are very important in many biological applications. However, there are not simple methods to produce small (< 5-10 nm) nanoparticles. One of the main reasons for that is the general use of iron oxides as magnetic cores, which have a large crystalline mismatch with gold. The use of Fe would be more appropriate, but its high tendency to oxidation has largely precluded it from being used as a core. Here, we will show that using a simple "one-pot" successive reaction method in microemulsions, can avoid such problems and is able to produce very stable core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles. With this procedure, nanoparticles of ˜6 nm with a Fe core of 3 nm can easily be obtained. These Fe@Au nanoparticles, with a saturation magnetization of 1.13 emu/g, are very stable even in air after magnetic separation from the solution, which shows the good covering of the Fe core by the Au shell. In this contribution we will report the key parameters, which have to be taken into account, to prepare such stable Fe@Au dispersions and analyze their optical and magnetic properties, as well as their possible applications as biosensors, targeted magnetic separation, etc.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating large mass flow of high temperature air at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, A. P.; Stewart, R. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High temperature, high mass air flow and a high Reynolds number test air flow in the Mach number 8-10 regime of adequate test flow duration is attained by pressurizing a ceramic-lined storage tank with air to a pressure of about 100 to 200 atmospheres. The air is heated to temperatures of 7,000 to 8,000 R prior to introduction into the tank by passing the air over an electric arc heater means. The air cools to 5,500 to 6,000 R while in the tank. A decomposable gas such as nitrous oxide or a combustible gas such as propane is injected into the tank after pressurization and the heated pressurized air in the tank is rapidly released through a Mach number 8-10 nozzle. The injected gas medium upon contact with the heated pressurized air effects an exothermic reaction which maintains the pressure and temperature of the pressurized air during the rapid release.

  4. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part I: Data comparability and method characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable quantification of air-biosphere exchange flux of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury. However, there has not been a standard analytical protocol for flux quantification, and little attention has been devoted to characterize the temporal variability and comparability of fluxes measured by different methods. In this study, we deployed a collocated set of micrometeorological (MM) and dynamic flux chamber (DFC) measurement systems to quantify Hg0 flux over bare soil and low standing crop in an agricultural field. The techniques include relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), modified Bowen ratio (MBR), aerodynamic gradient (AGM) as well as dynamic flux chambers of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs. The five systems and their measured fluxes were cross-examined with respect to magnitude, temporal trend and correlation with environmental variables. Fluxes measured by the MM and DFC methods showed distinct temporal trends. The former exhibited a highly dynamic temporal variability while the latter had much more gradual temporal features. The diurnal characteristics reflected the difference in the fundamental processes driving the measurements. The correlations between NDFC and TDFC fluxes and between MBR and AGM fluxes were significant (R>0.8, p<0.05), but the correlation between DFC and MM fluxes were from weak to moderate (R=0.1-0.5). Statistical analysis indicated that the median of turbulent fluxes estimated by the three independent MM techniques were not significantly different. Cumulative flux measured by TDFC is considerably lower (42% of AGM and 31% of MBR fluxes) while those measured by NDFC, AGM and MBR were similar (<10% difference). This suggests that incorporating an atmospheric turbulence property such as friction velocity for correcting the DFC-measured flux effectively bridged the gap between the Hg0 fluxes measured by enclosure and MM techniques. Cumulated flux measured by REA

  5. Development of a combined air sampling and quantitative real-time PCR method for detection of Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Sirigul, Chomrach; Wongwit, Waranya; Phanprasit, Wantanee; Paveenkittiporn, Wantana; Blacksell, Stuart D; Ramasoota, Pongrama

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and optimize the combined methods of air sampling and real time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for quantifying aerosol Legionella spp. Primers and TaqMan hydrolysis probe based on 5S rRNA gene specific for Legionella spp were used to amplify a specific DNA product of 84 bp. The impinger air sampler plus T-100 sampling pump was used to collect aerosol Legionella and as low as 10 fg of Legionella DNA per reaction could detected. Preliminary studies demonstrated that the developed method could detect aerosol Legionella spp 1.5-185 organisms /500 l of air within 5 hours, in contrast to culture method, that required a minimum of 7-10 days. PMID:17120970

  6. Impacts of rising air temperatures and emissions mitigation on electricity demand and supply in the United States: a multi-model comparison

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Yet fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. The present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. The increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  7. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    DOE PAGES

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; et al

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effectsmore » of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.« less

  8. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  9. Erratum to: Impacts of rising air temperatures and emissions mitigation on electricity demand and supply in the United States: a multi-model comparison

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-07-07

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Yet fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. The present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. The increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  10. A Method for Making Cross-Comparable Estimates of the Benefits of Decision Support Technologies for Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David; Long, Dou; Etheridge, Mel; Plugge, Joana; Johnson, Jesse; Kostiuk, Peter

    1998-01-01

    We present a general method for making cross comparable estimates of the benefits of NASA-developed decision support technologies for air traffic management, and we apply a specific implementation of the method to estimate benefits of three decision support tools (DSTs) under development in NASA's advanced Air Transportation Technologies Program: Active Final Approach Spacing Tool (A-FAST), Expedite Departure Path (EDP), and Conflict Probe and Trial Planning Tool (CPTP). The report also reviews data about the present operation of the national airspace system (NAS) to identify opportunities for DST's to reduce delays and inefficiencies.

  11. Community Air Sensor Network (CAIRSENSE) Project: Lower Cost, Continuous Ambient Monitoring Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in air pollution sensor technology have enabled the development of small and low cost systems to measure outdoor air pollution. The deployment of numerous sensors across a small geographic area would have potential benefits to supplement existing monitoring networks and ...

  12. 40 CFR 86.166-12 - Method for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... determine a refrigerant leakage rate in grams per year from vehicle-based air conditioning units. The... using the following equation: Grams/YRTOT = Grams/YRRP + Grams/YRSP + Grams/YRFH + Grams/YRMC + Grams/YRC Where: Grams/YRTOT = Total air conditioning system emission rate in grams per year and rounded...

  13. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  14. Pollution resistance assessment of existing landscape plants on Beijing streets based on air pollution tolerance index method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Qian; Liu, Yan-Ju; Chen, Xing; Yang, Zheng; Zhu, Ming-Hao; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Various plant species of green belt in urban traffic area help to reduce air pollution and beautify the city environment. Those plant species growing healthily under long-term atmospheric pollution environment are considered to be resilient. This study aims to identify plant species that are more tolerant to air pollution from traffic and to give recommendations for future green belt development in urban areas. Leaf samples of 47 plant species were collected from two heavy traffic roadside sites and one suburban site in Beijing during summer 2014. Four parameters in leaves were separately measured including relative water content (RWC), total chlorophyll content (TCH), leaf-extract pH (pH), and ascorbic acid (AA). The air pollution tolerance index (APTI) method was adopted to assess plants' resistance ability based on the above four parameters. The tolerant levels of plant species were classified using two methods, one by comparing the APTI value of individual plant to the average of all species and another by using fixed APTI values as standards. Tolerant species were then selected based on combination results from both methods. The results showed that different tolerance orders of species has been found at the three sampling sites due to varied air pollution and other environmental conditions. In general, plant species Magnolia denudata, Diospyros kaki, Ailanthus altissima, Fraxinus chinensis and Rosa chinensis were identified as tolerant species to air pollution environment and recommend to be planted at various location of the city, especially at heavy traffic roadside. PMID:27326901

  15. Pollution resistance assessment of existing landscape plants on Beijing streets based on air pollution tolerance index method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Qian; Liu, Yan-Ju; Chen, Xing; Yang, Zheng; Zhu, Ming-Hao; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Various plant species of green belt in urban traffic area help to reduce air pollution and beautify the city environment. Those plant species growing healthily under long-term atmospheric pollution environment are considered to be resilient. This study aims to identify plant species that are more tolerant to air pollution from traffic and to give recommendations for future green belt development in urban areas. Leaf samples of 47 plant species were collected from two heavy traffic roadside sites and one suburban site in Beijing during summer 2014. Four parameters in leaves were separately measured including relative water content (RWC), total chlorophyll content (TCH), leaf-extract pH (pH), and ascorbic acid (AA). The air pollution tolerance index (APTI) method was adopted to assess plants' resistance ability based on the above four parameters. The tolerant levels of plant species were classified using two methods, one by comparing the APTI value of individual plant to the average of all species and another by using fixed APTI values as standards. Tolerant species were then selected based on combination results from both methods. The results showed that different tolerance orders of species has been found at the three sampling sites due to varied air pollution and other environmental conditions. In general, plant species Magnolia denudata, Diospyros kaki, Ailanthus altissima, Fraxinus chinensis and Rosa chinensis were identified as tolerant species to air pollution environment and recommend to be planted at various location of the city, especially at heavy traffic roadside.

  16. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Edward J.; Leeman, James E.; MacDougall, Hugh R.; Marron, John J.; Smith, Calvin C.

    1976-01-01

    An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

  17. The head dome: A simplified method for human exposures to inhaled air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, S.M. III; Frank, R.; Swift, D.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute controlled exposures of human subjects to air pollutants are customarily carried out with whole-body chambers, masks, or mouthpieces. The use of these methods may be limited by cost or technical considerations. To permit a study involving a highly unstable pollutant, artificial acid fog, administered to subjects during natural breathing, a head-only exposure chamber, called a head dome, was developed. It consists of a transparent cylinder with a neck seal which fits over the subject's head and rests lightly on his shoulders. The head dome does not constrain the upper airways or impede exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Ventilation can be monitored accurately and unobtrusively with a pneumotachograph at the exhaust port of the dome. A thermocouple may be used to monitor the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. For short-term exposures to unstable or reactive pollutants lasting up to several hours, the head dome is an effective alternative to a whole-body chamber and probably superior to a face mask or mouthpiece.

  18. Methods for Predicting More Confident Lifetimes of Seals in Air Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.

    1999-03-05

    We have been working for many years to develop improved methods for predicting the lifetimes of polymers exposed to air environments and have recently turned our attention to seal materials. This paper describes an extensive study on a butyl material using elevated temperature compression stress-relaxation (CSR) techniques in combination with conventional oven aging exposures. The results initially indicated important synergistic effects when mechanical strain is combined with oven aging, as well as complex, non-Arrhenius behavior of the CSR results. By combining modeling and experiments, we show that diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) anomalies dominate traditional CSR experiments. A new CSR approach allows us to eliminate DLO effects and recover Arrhenius behavior. Furthermore, the resulting CSR activation energy (E{sub a}) from 125 C to 70 C is identical to the activation energies for the tensile elongation and for the oxygen consumption rate of unstrained material over similar temperature ranges. This strongly suggests that the same underlying oxidation reactions determine both the unstrained and strained degradation rates. We therefore utilize our ultrasensitive oxygen consumption rate approach down to 23 C to show that the CSR E{sub a} likely remains unchanged when extrapolated below 70 C, allowing very confident room temperature lifetime predictions for the butyl seal.

  19. A method of observing cherenkov light from extensive air shower at Yakutsk EAS array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Lev; Anatoly, Ivanov

    2016-07-01

    Proposed a new method for measuring the cherenkov light from the extensive air shower (EAS) of cosmic rays (CR), which allows to determine not only the primary particle energy and angle of arrival, but also the parameters of the shower in the atmosphere - the maximum depth and "age". For measurements Cherenkov light produced by EAS is proposed to use a ground network of wide-angle telescopes which are separated from each other by a distance 100-300 m depending on the total number of telescopes operating in the coincidence signals, acting autonomously, or includes a detector of the charged components, radio waves, etc. as part of EAS. In a results such array could developed, energy measurement and CR angle of arrival data on the depth of the maximum and the associated mass of the primary particle generating by EAS. This is particularly important in the study of galactic cosmic ray in E> 10^14 eV, where currently there are no direct measurements of the maximum depth of the EAS.

  20. Into Thin Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Shows how schools are working to avoid the types of equipment, supplies, and maintenance practices that harm indoor air quality. Simple steps to maintaining a cleaner indoor air environment are highlighted as are steps to reducing the problem air quality and the occurrence of asthma. (GR)

  1. Preparation of drinking water used in water supply systems of the towns Zrenjanin and Temerin by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo; Mikulic, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development and application of the pilot plant with the capacity of 1000 L/day for the purification of groundwater used for human consumption characterized with high concentration of arsenic and increased values of organic pollutants, ammonia, nitrites, color and turbidity. For that purpose, groundwater from the production wells supplying the towns Zrenjanin and Temerin (Vojvodina, Serbia) was used. Due to its complex composition, the purification system required the combination of the electroreduction/electrocoagulation, using iron and aluminum electrode plates with/without ozonation, followed by the electromagnetic treatment and the finally by the simultaneous ozonation/UV treatment. The electroreduction was used for the removal of nitrates, nitrites, and Cr(VI), while the removal of arsenic, heavy metals, suspended solids, color and turbidity required the application of the electrocoagulation with simultaneous ozonation. Organic contaminants and ammonia were removed completely in the last treatment step by applying the simultaneous ozonation/UV treatment. All measured parameters in the purified water were significantly lower compared to the regulated values. Under the optimum treatment conditions, the removal efficiencies for color, turbidity, suspended solids, total arsenic, total chromium, Ni(II), total copper, sulfates, fluorides, chemical oxygen demand, ammonia, nitrates, and nitrites were 100%. The removal efficiencies of the total manganese and iron were 85.19% and 97.44%, respectively, whilst the final concentrations were 4 and 7 μg/L, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings. PMID:27569522

  3. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings.

  4. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth in Mexico City: study design and methods.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Marie S; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Castillo-Castrejon, Marisol; Mordhukovich, Irina B; Brown, Daniel G; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2013-03-15

    Preterm birth is one of the leading causes of perinatal mortality and is associated with long-term adverse health consequences for surviving infants. Preterm birth rates are rising worldwide, and no effective means for prevention currently exists. Air pollution exposure may be a significant cause of prematurity, but many published studies lack the individual, clinical data needed to elucidate possible biological mechanisms mediating these epidemiological associations. This paper presents the design of a prospective study now underway to evaluate those mechanisms in a cohort of pregnant women residing in Mexico City. We address how air quality may act together with other factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Data collection includes: biomarkers relevant to inflammation in cervico-vaginal exudate and peripheral blood, along with full clinical information, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and air pollution data to evaluate spatial and temporal variability in air pollution exposure. Samples are collected on a monthly basis and participants are followed for the duration of pregnancy. The data will be used to evaluate whether ambient air pollution is associated with preterm birth, controlling for other risk factors. We will evaluate which time windows during pregnancy are most influential in the air pollution and preterm birth association. In addition, the epidemiological study will be complemented with a parallel toxicology invitro study, in which monocytic cells will be exposed to air particle samples to evaluate the expression of biomarkers of inflammation. PMID:23177781

  5. Methods, fluxes and sources of gas phase alkyl nitrates in the coastal air.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Buczyńska, Anna J; Godoi, Ana F L; Favoreto, Rodrigo; Bencs, László; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Grieken, René; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2014-10-01

    The daily and seasonal atmospheric concentrations, deposition fluxes and emission sources of a few C3-C9 gaseous alkyl nitrates (ANs) at the Belgian coast (De Haan) on the Southern North Sea were determined. An adapted sampler design for low- and high-volume air-sampling, optimized sample extraction and clean-up, as well as identification and quantification of ANs in air samples by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry, are reported. The total concentrations of ANs ranged from 0.03 to 85 pptv and consisted primarily of the nitro-butane and nitro-pentane isomers. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated by the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine the influence of main air masses on AN levels in the air. The shorter chain ANs have been the most abundant in the Atlantic/Channel/UK air masses, while longer chain ANs prevailed in continental air. The overall mean N fluxes of the ANs were slightly higher for summer than those for winter-spring, although their contributions to the total nitrogen flux were low. High correlations between AN and HNO₂ levels were observed during winter/spring. During summer, the shorter chain ANs correlated well with precipitation. Source apportionment by means of principal component analysis indicated that most of the gas phase ANs could be attributed to traffic/combustion, secondary photochemical formation and biomass burning, although marine sources may also have been present and a contributing factor. PMID:24952420

  6. Methods, fluxes and sources of gas phase alkyl nitrates in the coastal air.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Buczyńska, Anna J; Godoi, Ana F L; Favoreto, Rodrigo; Bencs, László; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Grieken, René; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2014-10-01

    The daily and seasonal atmospheric concentrations, deposition fluxes and emission sources of a few C3-C9 gaseous alkyl nitrates (ANs) at the Belgian coast (De Haan) on the Southern North Sea were determined. An adapted sampler design for low- and high-volume air-sampling, optimized sample extraction and clean-up, as well as identification and quantification of ANs in air samples by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry, are reported. The total concentrations of ANs ranged from 0.03 to 85 pptv and consisted primarily of the nitro-butane and nitro-pentane isomers. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated by the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine the influence of main air masses on AN levels in the air. The shorter chain ANs have been the most abundant in the Atlantic/Channel/UK air masses, while longer chain ANs prevailed in continental air. The overall mean N fluxes of the ANs were slightly higher for summer than those for winter-spring, although their contributions to the total nitrogen flux were low. High correlations between AN and HNO₂ levels were observed during winter/spring. During summer, the shorter chain ANs correlated well with precipitation. Source apportionment by means of principal component analysis indicated that most of the gas phase ANs could be attributed to traffic/combustion, secondary photochemical formation and biomass burning, although marine sources may also have been present and a contributing factor.

  7. Imputation method for lifetime exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental epidemiology, when focused on the life course of exposure to a specific pollutant, requires historical exposure estimates that are difficult to obtain for the full time period due to gaps in the historical record, especially in earlier years. We show that these gaps can be filled by applying multiple imputation methods to a formal risk equation that incorporates lifetime exposure. We also address challenges that arise, including choice of imputation method, potential bias in regression coefficients, and uncertainty in age-at-exposure sensitivities. Methods During time periods when parameters needed in the risk equation are missing for an individual, the parameters are filled by an imputation model using group level information or interpolation. A random component is added to match the variance found in the estimates for study subjects not needing imputation. The process is repeated to obtain multiple data sets, whose regressions against health data can be combined statistically to develop confidence limits using Rubin’s rules to account for the uncertainty introduced by the imputations. To test for possible recall bias between cases and controls, which can occur when historical residence location is obtained by interview, and which can lead to misclassification of imputed exposure by disease status, we introduce an “incompleteness index,” equal to the percentage of dose imputed (PDI) for a subject. “Effective doses” can be computed using different functional dependencies of relative risk on age of exposure, allowing intercomparison of different risk models. To illustrate our approach, we quantify lifetime exposure (dose) from traffic air pollution in an established case–control study on Long Island, New York, where considerable in-migration occurred over a period of many decades. Results The major result is the described approach to imputation. The illustrative example revealed potential recall bias, suggesting that regressions

  8. Windsor, Ontario exposure assessment study: design and methods validation of personal, indoor, and outdoor air pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Amanda J; Xu, Xiaohong; Kulka, Ryan; You, Hongyu; Wallace, Lance; Mallach, Gary; Van Ryswyk, Keith; MacNeill, Morgan; Kearney, Jill; Rasmussen, Pat E; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Wang, Daniel; Poon, Raymond; Williams, Ron; Stocco, Corinne; Anastassopoulos, Angelos; Miller, J David; Dales, Robert; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2011-03-01

    The Windsor, Ontario Exposure Assessment Study evaluated the contribution of ambient air pollutants to personal and indoor exposures of adults and asthmatic children living in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. In addition, the role of personal, indoor, and outdoor air pollution exposures upon asthmatic children's respiratory health was assessed. Several active and passive sampling methods were applied, or adapted, for personal, indoor, and outdoor residential monitoring of nitrogen dioxide, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter (PM; PM-2.5 pm [PM2.5] and < or =10 microm [PM10] in aerodynamic diameter), elemental carbon, ultrafine particles, ozone, air exchange rates, allergens in settled dust, and particulate-associated metals. Participants completed five consecutive days of monitoring during the winter and summer of 2005 and 2006. During 2006, in addition to undertaking the air pollution measurements, asthmatic children completed respiratory health measurements (including peak flow meter tests and exhaled breath condensate) and tracked respiratory symptoms in a diary. Extensive quality assurance and quality control steps were implemented, including the collocation of instruments at the National Air Pollution Surveillance site operated by Environment Canada and at the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality site in Allen Park, Detroit, MI. During field sampling, duplicate and blank samples were also completed and these data are reported. In total, 50 adults and 51 asthmatic children were recruited to participate, resulting in 922 participant days of data. When comparing the methods used in the study with standard reference methods, field blanks were low and bias was acceptable, with most methods being within 20% of reference methods. Duplicates were typically within less than 10% of each other, indicating that study results can be used with confidence. This paper covers study design, recruitment, methodology, time activity diary, surveys, and quality

  9. An Improved Calibration Method for Hydrazine Monitors for the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K

    2003-07-07

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 of the ''Air Force Hydrazine Detector Characterization and Calibration Project''. A method for calibrating model MDA 7100 hydrazine detectors in the United States Air Force (AF) inventory has been developed. The calibration system consists of a Kintek 491 reference gas generation system, a humidifier/mixer system which combines the dry reference hydrazine gas with humidified diluent or carrier gas to generate the required humidified reference for calibrations, and a gas sampling interface. The Kintek reference gas generation system itself is periodically calibrated using an ORNL-constructed coulometric titration system to verify the hydrazine concentration of the sample atmosphere in the interface module. The Kintek reference gas is then used to calibrate the hydrazine monitors. Thus, coulometric titration is only used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek reference gas generation system, and is not required for hydrazine monitor calibrations. One advantage of using coulometric titration for verifying the concentration of the reference gas is that it is a primary standard (if used for simple solutions), thereby guaranteeing, in principle, that measurements will be traceable to SI units (i.e., to the mole). The effect of humidity of the reference gas was characterized by using the results of concentrations determined by coulometric titration to develop a humidity correction graph for the Kintek 491 reference gas generation system. Using this calibration method, calibration uncertainty has been reduced by 50% compared to the current method used to calibrate hydrazine monitors in the Air Force inventory and calibration time has also been reduced by more than 20%. Significant findings from studies documented in this report are the following: (1) The Kintek 491 reference gas generation system (generator, humidifier and interface module) can be used to calibrate hydrazine detectors. (2) The Kintek system output

  10. Total Quality Management: Statistics and Graphics III - Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods. AIR 1993 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Robert A.

    Interest in Total Quality Management (TQM) at institutions of higher education has been stressed in recent years as an important area of activity for institutional researchers. Two previous AIR Forum papers have presented some of the statistical and graphical methods used for TQM. This paper, the third in the series, first discusses some of the…

  11. Evaluation of Methods for Analysis of Lead in Air Particulates: An Intra-Laboratory and Inter-Laboratory Comparison

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2008, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) set a new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead (Pb) in total suspended particulate matter (Pb-TSP) which called for significant decreases in the allowable limits. The Federal Reference Method (FR...

  12. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  13. ESP 2.0: Improved method for projecting U.S. GHG and air pollution emissions through 2055

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Emission Scenario Projection (ESP) method is used to develop multi-decadal projections of U.S. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and criteria pollutant emissions. The resulting future-year emissions can then translated into an emissions inventory and applied in climate and air quality mod...

  14. PROPOSED ASTM METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ASBESTOS IN AIR BY TEM AND INFORMATION ON INTERFERING FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft of the ASTM Test Method for air entitled: "Airborne Asbestos Concentration in Ambient and Indoor Atmospheres as Determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy Direct Transfer (TEM)" (ASTM Z7077Z) is an adaptation of the International Standard, ISO 10312. It is currently...

  15. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm...

  16. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm...

  17. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm...

  18. Method for Fusing Observational Data and Chemical Transport Model Simulations To Estimate Spatiotemporally Resolved Ambient Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Mariel D; Zhai, Xinxin; Holmes, Heather A; Chang, Howard H; Strickland, Matthew J; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Tolbert, Paige E; Russell, Armistead G; Mulholland, James A

    2016-04-01

    Investigations of ambient air pollution health effects rely on complete and accurate spatiotemporal air pollutant estimates. Three methods are developed for fusing ambient monitor measurements and 12 km resolution chemical transport model (CMAQ) simulations to estimate daily air pollutant concentrations across Georgia. Temporal variance is determined by observations in one method, with the annual mean CMAQ field providing spatial structure. A second method involves scaling daily CMAQ simulated fields using mean observations to reduce bias. Finally, a weighted average of these results based on prediction of temporal variance provides optimized daily estimates for each 12 × 12 km grid. These methods were applied to daily metrics of 12 pollutants (CO, NO2, NOx, O3, SO2, PM10, PM2.5, and five PM2.5 components) over the state of Georgia for a seven-year period (2002-2008). Cross-validation demonstrates a wide range in optimized model performance across pollutants, with SO2 predicted most poorly due to limitations in coal combustion plume monitoring and modeling. For the other pollutants studied, 54-88% of the spatiotemporal variance (Pearson R(2) from cross-validation) was captured, with ozone and PM2.5 predicted best. The optimized fusion approach developed provides daily spatial field estimates of air pollutant concentrations and uncertainties that are consistent with observations, emissions, and meteorology. PMID:26923334

  19. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room...

  20. A stably enhanced transparent conductive graphene film obtained using an air-annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Sun, Tai; Yu, Leyong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongna; Fang, Liang; Wei, Dacheng; Shi, Haofei; Du, Chunlei

    2016-08-01

    A simple and effective air-annealing technique was developed to stably improve both the electrical conductivity and light transmission of pristine graphene. After the graphene film was annealed in air at 250 °C for 80 min, the mobility and carrier concentration were both significantly enhanced, and the sheet resistance was greatly reduced with a decrease rate of ∼33%. Meanwhile, the transparency was also improved by more than 3%. The mechanism is carefully discussed. The reason might be that air-annealing conditions provide a suitable atmosphere to etch and remove amorphous carbons. More importantly, the enhanced transparent conductive properties of the air-annealed graphene films were extraordinarily stable, and remained almost unchanged for 100 days.

  1. A stably enhanced transparent conductive graphene film obtained using an air-annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Sun, Tai; Yu, Leyong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongna; Fang, Liang; Wei, Dacheng; Shi, Haofei; Du, Chunlei

    2016-08-01

    A simple and effective air-annealing technique was developed to stably improve both the electrical conductivity and light transmission of pristine graphene. After the graphene film was annealed in air at 250 °C for 80 min, the mobility and carrier concentration were both significantly enhanced, and the sheet resistance was greatly reduced with a decrease rate of ˜33%. Meanwhile, the transparency was also improved by more than 3%. The mechanism is carefully discussed. The reason might be that air-annealing conditions provide a suitable atmosphere to etch and remove amorphous carbons. More importantly, the enhanced transparent conductive properties of the air-annealed graphene films were extraordinarily stable, and remained almost unchanged for 100 days.

  2. High-throughput liquid-absorption air-sampling apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2000-01-01

    A portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler [PHTLAAS] has an asymmetric air inlet through which air is drawn upward by a small and light-weight centrifugal fan driven by a direct current motor that can be powered by a battery. The air inlet is so configured as to impart both rotational and downward components of motion to the sampled air near said inlet. The PHTLAAS comprises a glass tube of relatively small size through which air passes at a high rate in a swirling, highly turbulent motion, which facilitates rapid transfer of vapors and particulates to a liquid film covering the inner walls of the tube. The pressure drop through the glass tube is <10 cm of water, usually <5 cm of water. The sampler's collection efficiency is usually >20% for vapors or airborne particulates in the 2-3.mu. range and >50% for particles larger than 4.mu.. In conjunction with various analyzers, the PHTLAAS can serve to monitor a variety of hazardous or illicit airborne substances, such as lead-containing particulates, tritiated water vapor, biological aerosols, or traces of concealed drugs or explosives.

  3. Growth of β-Ga2O3 single crystals using vertical Bridgman method in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, K.; Ohba, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Yanagisawa, J.; Miyagawa, C.; Nakamura, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A new approach to β-Ga2O3 single crystal growth was studied, using the vertical Bridgman (VB) method in ambient air, while measuring the β-Ga2O3 melting temperature and investigating the effects of crucible composition and shape. β-Ga2O3 single crystals 25 mm in diameter were grown in platinum-rhodium alloy crucibles in ambient air, with no adhesion of the crystals to the crucible wall. Single crystal growth without a crystal seed was realized by (100) faceted growth with a growth direction perpendicular to the (100) faceted plane.

  4. PAN AIR - A higher order panel method for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. L.; Erickson, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    PAN AIR is a computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about arbitrary configurations. It uses linear source and quadratic doublet strength distributions. These higher-order distributions have been implemented in a manner that greatly reduces the numerical stability problems that have plagued earlier attempts to make surface paneling methods work successfully for supersonic flow. PAN AIR's problem-solving capability, numerical approach, modeling features, and program architecture are described. Numerical results are presented for a variety of geometries at supersonic Mach numbers.

  5. Effectiveness of Air Drying and Magnification Methods for Detecting Initial Caries on Occlusal Surfaces Using Three Different Diagnostic Aids.

    PubMed

    Goel, Deepti; Sandhu, Meera; Jhingan, Pulkit; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective-The aim of this study was to assess the effect of magnification and air-drying on detection of carious lesion. Study Design-44 human extracted premolars were selected with sound occlusal surfaces without frank cavitation. The Diagnostic techniques used were Unaided visual examination, Magnifying Loupes (4.2×) and Stereomicroscope (10×, before and after air-drying) and then the teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and both the surfaces were examined under Stereomicroscope (50×) to assess the presence or absence of carious lesion in the pit and fissures. The scores were compared to obtain Cohen's kappa coefficient (Reproducibility) and subjected to the Friedman Test and Paired t test. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value used to assess accuracy. Results-On Statistical analysis, visual examination before and after air drying had highest specificity but lowest sensitivity compared to different diagnostic techniques. Magnifying loupes after air-drying had highest sensitivity and lowest specificity compared to other diagnostic techniques. Conclusion-Air drying combined with magnifying aids are cost-effective, reliable method for detection of early carious lesion. If used in pediatric clinical practice, any undesirable pain and discomfort to the patient due to invasive procedures and helps in employing preventive measures. PMID:27472570

  6. Evaluation of a sampling and analysis method for determination of polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Harless, R.L.; Lewis, R.G.; McDaniel, D.D.; Gibson, J.F.; Dupuy, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    General Metals Works PS-1 PUF air samplers and an analytical method based on high resolution gas chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS) were evaluated for determination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), polybrominated dibenz-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/PBDFs) and bromo/chloro dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (BCDDs/BCDFs) in ambient air. Dilute solutions of these compounds and (13)C-1,2,3,4-TCDD were used to spike the filters of PS-1 air samplers which were then operated 24 hrs to sample 350-400 cubic meter ambient air. After sampling, each quartz-fiber filter and polyurethane foam (PUF) were spiked with (13)C-12-labeled PCDD, PCDF, PBDD, and PBDF internal standards before separate Soxhlet extractions with benzene. The extracts were subjected to an acid/base clean-up procedure followed by clean-up on microcolumns of silica gel, alumina, and carbon and then analyzed by HRGC-HRMS. Results derived from the study indicated the PS-1 ambient air samplers and the analytical procedures were very efficient and that pg/cubic meter and sub-pg/cubic meter levels of total PCDDs/PCDFs, PBDDs/PBDFs, BCDDs/BCDFs, and 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners could be accurately measured.

  7. Assessing isocyanate exposures in polyurethane industry sectors using biological and air monitoring methods.

    PubMed

    Creely, K S; Hughson, G W; Cocker, J; Jones, K

    2006-08-01

    company (0.066 mg m(-3)) and also during spray application of polyurethane foam insulation (0.023 mg m(-3)). The most commonly detected isocyanate in the urine was hexamethylene diisocyanate, which was detected in 21 instances. The geometric mean total isocyanate metabolite concentration for the dataset was 0.29 micromol mol(-1) creatinine (range 0.05-12.64 micromol mol(-1) creatinine). A total of 23 samples collected were above the agreed biological monitoring guidance value of 1.0 micromol mol(-1) creatinine. Activities that resulted in the highest biological monitoring results of the dataset included mixing and casting of polyurethane products (12.64 micromol mol(-1) creatinine), semi-automatic moulding (4.80 micromol mol(-1) creatinine) and resin application (3.91 micromol mol(-1) creatinine). The biological monitoring results show that despite low airborne isocyanate concentrations, it was possible to demonstrate biological uptake. This tends to suggest high sensitivity of the biological monitoring method and/or that in some instances the RPE being used by operators was not effective or that absorption may have occurred via dermal or other routes of exposure. This study demonstrates that biological monitoring is a useful tool when assessing worker exposure to isocyanates, providing a more complete picture on the efficacy of control measures in place than is possible by air monitoring alone. The results also demonstrated that where control measures were judged to be adequate, most biological samples were close to or < 1 micromol mol(-1) creatinine, the agreed biological monitoring benchmark.

  8. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples.

  9. A method for the determination of potentially profitable service patterns for commuter air carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Kuhlthau, A. R.; Deptula, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A methodology for estimating market conception was developed as a part of the short-haul air transportation program. It is based upon an analysis of actual documents which provide a record of known travel history. Applying this methodology a forecast was made of the demand for an air feeder service between Charlottesville, Virginia and Dulles International Airport. Local business travel vouchers and local travel agent records were selected to provide the documentation. The market was determined to be profitable for an 8-passenger Cessna 402B aircraft flying a 2-hour daily service pattern designed to mesh to the best extent possible with the connecting schedules at Dulles. The Charlottesville - Dulles air feeder service market conception forecast and its methodology are documented.

  10. Simple method for high-performance stretchable composite conductors with entrapped air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyejin; Kim, Dae-Gon; Jang, Nam-Su; Kong, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We integrate air bubbles into conductive elastic composite-based stretchable conductors to make them mechanically less stiff and electrically more robust against physical deformations. A surfactant facilitates both the formation and maintenance of air bubbles inside the elastic composites, leading to a simple fabrication of bubble-entrapped stretchable conductors. Based on the unique bubble-entrapped architecture, the elastic properties are greatly enhanced and the resistance change in response to tensile strains can clearly be controlled. The bubble-entrapped conductor achieves ~80 % elongation at ~3.4 times lower stress and ~44.8 % smaller change in the electrical resistance at 80 % tensile strain, compared to bare conductor without air bubbles.

  11. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  12. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  13. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  14. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  15. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Effect of air flow and effect of fabric dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1976-01-01

    One sample each of commercial polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams were evaluated using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. Air flow rates of 0, 0.16, 16, and 48 ml/sec were used to determine the effect of air flow on relative toxicity. Time to first sign of incapacitation and time to death were substantially reduced with both polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams by the introduction of 16 to 48 ml/sec air flow. The relative toxicity rankings of these materials were not altered by changes in air flow. Under these test conditions, the polyurethane foam consistently appeared more toxic than the polychloroprene foam. Samples of six different colors from the same fabric were evaluated separately, using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method, to determine the effect of fabric dye, if any. The material was an upholstery fabric, consisting of 46 percent cotton, 33 percent wool, and 21 percent nylon. There appeared to be no significant effect of fabric dye on relative toxicity, for this material under these test conditions.

  16. A multi-residue method for characterization of endocrine disruptors in gaseous and particulate phases of ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliot, Fabrice; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Bourges, Catherine; Desportes, Annie; Teil, Marie-Jeanne; Blanchard, Martine; Chevreuil, Marc

    2014-08-01

    A number of semi-volatile compounds occur in indoor air most of them being considered as potent endocrine disruptors and thus, exerting a possible impact upon health. To assess their concentration levels in indoor air, we developed and validated a method for sampling and multi-residue analysis of 58 compounds including phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), parabens, bisphenol A (BPA) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in gaseous and particulate phases of air. We validated each step of procedures from extraction until analysis. Matrice spiking were performed at extraction, fractionation and purification stages. The more volatile compounds were analyzed with a gas chromatography system coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC/MS) or with a tandem mass spectrometer (GC/MS/MS). The less volatile compounds were analyzed with a liquid chromatography system coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS). Labeled internal standard method was used ensuring high quantification accuracy. The instrumental detection limits were under 1 pg for all compounds and therefore, a limit of quantification averaging 1 pg m-3 for the gaseous and the particulate phases and a volume of 150 m3, except for phthalates, phenol compounds and BDE-209. Satisfactory recoveries were found except for phenol compounds. That method was successfully applied to several indoor air samples (office, apartment and day nursery) and most of the targeted compounds were quantified, mainly occurring in the gaseous phase. The most abundant were phthalates (up to 918 ng m-3 in total air), followed by PCBs > parabens > BPA > PAHs > PBDEs.

  17. Method for verifying the air kerma strength of I-125 plaques for the treatment of ocular melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, L W; Wilkinson, D Allan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a method for easily verifying that the activity or air kerma strength of pre-assembled eye plaques, used in the treatment of ocular melanomas, agrees with the activity or air kerma strength called for in the treatment plan. A Capintec CRC-7 Dose Calibrator with its standard vial/syringe sample holder was used to measure the activity of pre-assembled COMS and Eye Physics EP917 eye plaques using IsoAid Advantage I-125 seeds. Plaque activity measurements were made by placing the plaque face up in the center of a 5 cm tall Styrofoam insert in the source holder. Activity measurements were made with the source holder rotated to four angles (0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°). The average of these four values was converted to air kerma strength and divided by the assay air kerma strength, from the NIST traceable source calibration, and decayed to the plaque measurement date, to determine a plaque calibration factor. The average of the calibration factors for each plaque type was used to establish a calibration factor for each plaque type. Several partially loaded plaque configurations were included in this study and different methods were used to determine the effects of partial loading. This verification method is easy to implement with commonly available equipment and is effective in identifying possible errors. During this two-year study, the air kerma strength of 115 eye plaques was checked and 11 possible errors were identified. PMID:25207419

  18. On the validity of the arithmetic-geometric mean method to locate the optimal solution in a supply chain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kun-Jen

    2012-08-01

    Cardenas-Barron [Cardenas-Barron, L.E. (2010) 'A Simple Method to Compute Economic order Quantities: Some Observations', Applied Mathematical Modelling, 34, 1684-1688] indicates that there are several functions in which the arithmetic-geometric mean method (AGM) does not give the minimum. This article presents another situation to reveal that the AGM inequality to locate the optimal solution may be invalid for Teng, Chen, and Goyal [Teng, J.T., Chen, J., and Goyal S.K. (2009), 'A Comprehensive Note on: An Inventory Model under Two Levels of Trade Credit and Limited Storage Space Derived without Derivatives', Applied Mathematical Modelling, 33, 4388-4396], Teng and Goyal [Teng, J.T., and Goyal S.K. (2009), 'Comment on 'Optimal Inventory Replenishment Policy for the EPQ Model under Trade Credit Derived without Derivatives', International Journal of Systems Science, 40, 1095-1098] and Hsieh, Chang, Weng, and Dye [Hsieh, T.P., Chang, H.J., Weng, M.W., and Dye, C.Y. (2008), 'A Simple Approach to an Integrated Single-vendor Single-buyer Inventory System with Shortage', Production Planning and Control, 19, 601-604]. So, the main purpose of this article is to adopt the calculus approach not only to overcome shortcomings of the arithmetic-geometric mean method of Teng et al. (2009), Teng and Goyal (2009) and Hsieh et al. (2008), but also to develop the complete solution procedures for them.

  19. Effect of precursor supply on structural and morphological characteristics of fe nanomaterials synthesized via chemical vapor condensation method.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jong-Keun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2012-01-01

    Various physical, chemical and mechanical methods, such as inert gas condensation, chemical vapor condensation, sol-gel, pulsed wire evaporation, evaporation technique, and mechanical alloying, have been used to synthesize nanoparticles. Among them, chemical vapor condensation (CVC) has the benefit of its applicability to almost all materials because a wide range of precursors are available for large-scale production with a non-agglomerated state. In this work, Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation method using iron pentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) as the precursor. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure, size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were studied. In particular, we investigated close correlation of size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with atomic quantity of inflow precursor into the electric furnace as the quantitative analysis. The atomic quantity was calculated by Boyle's ideal gas law. The Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with various diameter and morphology have successfully been synthesized by the chemical vapor condensation method. PMID:22524015

  20. A Novel Method to Retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness from High-Resolution Optical Satellite Images for Air Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; Wilson, R. T.; Milton, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data has many important applications including atmospheric correction of satellite imagery and monitoring of particulate matter air pollution. Current data products are generally available at a kilometre-scale resolution, but many applications require far higher resolutions. For example, particulate matter concentrations vary on a metre-scale, and thus data products at a similar scale are required to provide accurate assessments of particle densities and allow effective monitoring of air quality and analysis of local air quality effects on health. A novel method has been developed which retrieves per-pixel AOT values from high-resolution (~30m) satellite data. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers - including both bright and dark surfaces - and requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT). The HOT was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to provide AOT data instead. Significant extensions include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values through radiative transfer modelling. This novel method will enable many new applications of AOT data that were impossible with previously available low-resolution data, and has the potential to contribute significantly to our understanding of the air quality on health, the accuracy of satellite image atmospheric correction and the role of aerosols in the climate system.

  1. The health and visibility cost of air pollution: a comparison of estimation methods.

    PubMed

    Delucchi, Mark A; Murphy, James J; McCubbin, Donald R

    2002-02-01

    Air pollution from motor vehicles, electricity-generating plants, industry, and other sources can harm human health, injure crops and forests, damage building materials, and impair visibility. Economists sometimes analyze the social cost of these impacts, in order to illuminate tradeoffs, compare alternatives, and promote efficient use of scarce resource. In this paper, we compare estimates of the health and visibility costs of air pollution derived from a meta-hedonic price analysis, with an estimate of health costs derived from a damage-function analysis and an estimate of the visibility cost derived from contingent valuation. We find that the meta-hedonic price analysis produces an estimate of the health cost that lies at the low end of the range of damage-function estimates. This is consistent with hypotheses that on the one hand, hedonic price analysis does not capture all of the health costs of air pollution (because individuals may not be fully informed about all of the health effects), and that on the other hand, the value of mortality used in the high-end damage function estimates is too high. The analysis of the visibility cost of air pollution derived from a meta-hedonic price analysis produces an estimate that is essentially identical to an independent estimate based on contingent valuation. This close agreement lends some credence to the estimates. We then apply the meta hedonic-price model to estimate the visibility cost per kilogram of motor vehicle emissions.

  2. A STRINGENT COMPARISON OF SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR VOCS IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A carefully designed study was conducted during the summer of 1998 to simultaneously collect samples of ambient air by canisters and compare the analysis results to direct sorbent preconcentration results taken at the time of sample collection. A total of 32 1-h sample sets we...

  3. Changes in lung function after working with the shotcrete lining method under compressed air conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, R; Redl, M; Mauermayer, R; Praml, G J

    1989-01-01

    Shotcrete techniques under compressed air are increasingly applied in the construction of tunnels. Up to now little is known about the influence of shotcrete dusts on the function of the lung. The lung function of 30 miners working with shotcrete under compressed air (before and after one shift) was measured. They carried personal air samplers to assess the total dust exposure. Long term effects were studied on a second group of 29 individuals exposed to shotcrete dusts and compressed air for two years. A significant increase of airway resistance and a significant decrease of some flow-volume parameters were found after one workshift. These changes partially correlate close to the dust exposure. After two years exposure a significant decrease of mean expiratory flow (MEF)50 and MEF25 was found. These results point to damage in the small airways and emphasise the major role of the lung function test--including the flow-volume manoeuvre for the medical examination of the workers. Additionally, they should carry filter masks. Images PMID:2923823

  4. Computer-Assisted Performance Evaluation for Navy Anti-Air Warfare Training: Concepts, Methods, and Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesler, David J.

    An improved general methodological approach for the development of computer-assisted evaluation of trainee performance in the computer-based simulation environment is formulated in this report. The report focuses on the Tactical Advanced Combat Direction and Electronic Warfare system (TACDEW) at the Fleet Anti-Air Warfare Training Center at San…

  5. SOIL-AIR PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENT WITH A TRANSIENT PRESSURE BUILDUP METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical solution for transient pressure change in a single venting well was derived from mass conservation of air, Darcy's law of flow in porous media, and the ideal gas law equation of state. Slopes of plots of Pw2 against ln (t+Δt)/Δt similar to Homer's plot were used to ...

  6. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  7. AIRS CO2 Retrievals Using the Method of Vanishing Partial Derivatives (VPD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Yung, Yuk; Li, Qinbin; Olsen, Ed; Chen, Luke; Krakauer, Nir

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the work being done with observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using the concept of Vanishing Partial Derivatives. The infrared region is where several minor gases such as CO2, O3, CO, CH4 and SO2 are radiatively active.

  8. Comparison of Air Impaction and Electrostatic Dust Collector Sampling Methods to Assess Airborne Fungal Contamination in Public Buildings.

    PubMed

    Normand, Anne-Cécile; Ranque, Stéphane; Cassagne, Carole; Gaudart, Jean; Sallah, Kankoé; Charpin, Denis-André; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    Many ailments can be linked to exposure to indoor airborne fungus. However, obtaining a precise measurement of airborne fungal levels is complicated partly due to indoor air fluctuations and non-standardized techniques. Electrostatic dust collector (EDC) sampling devices have been used to measure a wide range of airborne analytes, including endotoxins, allergens, β-glucans, and microbial DNA in various indoor environments. In contrast, viable mold contamination has only been assessed in highly contaminated environments such as farms and archive buildings. This study aimed to assess the use of EDCs, compared with repeated air-impactor measurements, to assess airborne viable fungal flora in moderately contaminated indoor environments. Indoor airborne fungal flora was cultured from EDCs and daily air-impaction samples collected in an office building and a daycare center. The quantitative fungal measurements obtained using a single EDC significantly correlated with the cumulative measurement of nine daily air impactions. Both methods enabled the assessment of fungal exposure, although a few differences were observed between the detected fungal species and the relative quantity of each species. EDCs were also used over a 32-month period to monitor indoor airborne fungal flora in a hospital office building, which enabled us to assess the impact of outdoor events (e.g. ground excavations) on the fungal flora levels on the indoor environment. In conclusion, EDC-based measurements provided a relatively accurate profile of the viable airborne flora present during a sampling period. In particular, EDCs provided a more representative assessment of fungal levels compared with single air-impactor sampling. The EDC technique is also simpler than performing repetitive air-impaction measures over the course of several consecutive days. EDC is a versatile tool for collecting airborne samples and was efficient for measuring mold levels in indoor environments.

  9. Evaluation of a sampling and analysis method for determination of polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Harless, R.L.; Lewis, R.G.; McDaniel, D.D.; Gibson, J.F.; Dupuy, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    General Metals Works PS-1 PUF air samplers and an analytical method based on high resolution gas chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS) were evaluated for determination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/PBDFs) and bromo/chloro dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (BCDDs/BCDFs) in ambient air. Dilute solutions of these compounds and (13)C12-1,2,3,4-TCDD were used to spike the filters of PS-1 air samplers which were then operated 24 hrs to sample 350-400 cu m ambient air. After sampling, each quartz-fiber filter and polyurethane foam (PUF) were spiked with (13)C12-labeled PCDD, PCDF, PBDD, and PBDF internal standards before separate Soxhlet extractions with benzene. The extracts were subjected to an acid/base clean-up procedure followed by clean-up on microcolumns of silica gel, alumina, and carbon and then analyzed by HRGC-HRMS. Results derived from the study indicated the PS-1 ambient air samplers and the analytical procedures were very efficient and that pg/cu m and sub-pg/cu m levels of total PCDDs/PCDFs, PBDDs/PBDFs, BCDDs/BCDFs, and 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners could be accurately measured. Background levels of these compounds in the ambient air were also determined. Total PCDDs, PCDFs, TBDFs, and PeBDFs were detected in a low concentration range of 0.3 to 3.0 pg/cu m.

  10. The Anaesthesia Gas Supply System

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Subhrajyoti; Bose, Payel

    2013-01-01

    The anaesthesia gas supply system is designed to provide a safe, cost-effective and convenient system for the delivery of medical gases at the point of-use. The doctrine of the anaesthesia gas supply system is based on four essential principles: Identity, continuity, adequacy and quality. Knowledge about gas supply system is an integral component of safe anaesthetic practice. Mishaps involving the malfunction or misuse of medical gas supply to operating theatres have cost many lives. The medical gases used in anaesthesia and intensive care are oxygen, nitrous oxide, medical air, entonox, carbon dioxide and heliox. Oxygen is one of the most widely used gases for life-support and respiratory therapy besides anaesthetic procedures. In this article, an effort is made to describe the production, storage and delivery of anaesthetic gases. The design of anaesthesia equipment must take into account the local conditions such as climate, demand and power supply. The operational policy of the gas supply system should have a backup plan to cater to the emergency need of the hospital, in the event of the loss of the primary source of supply. PMID:24249882

  11. Evaluation of methods for simultaneous collection and determination of nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Kuhlman, M.R.; Wilson, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether one sampling system and one analytical method can be used to measure both polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nicotine. The PAH collection efficiencies for both XAD-2 and XAD-4 adsorbents are very similar, but the nicotine collection efficiency was greater for XAD-4. The spiked perdeuterated PAH were retained well in both adsorbents after exposure to more than 300 cu m of air. A two-step Soxhlet extraction, dichloromethane followed by ethylacetate, was used to remove nicotine and PAH from XAD-4. The extract was analyzed by positive chemical ionization or electron impact gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine nicotine and PAH. It is shown that one sampling system (quartz fiber filter and XAD-4 in series) and one analytical method (Soxhlet extraction and GC/MS) can be used to measure both nicotine and PAH in indoor air.

  12. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  13. The Gillings Sampler--an electrostatic air sampler as an alternative method for aerosol in vitro exposure studies.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Jose; Lichtveld, Kim; Ebersviller, Seth; Carson, Johnny L; Walters, Glenn W; Jaspers, Ilona; Jeffries, Harvey E; Sexton, Kenneth G; Vizuete, William

    2014-09-01

    There is growing interest in studying the toxicity and health risk of exposure to multi-pollutant mixtures found in ambient air, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving towards setting standards for these types of mixtures. Additionally, the Health Effects Institute's strategic plan aims to develop and apply next-generation multi-pollutant approaches to understanding the health effects of air pollutants. There's increasing concern that conventional in vitro exposure methods are not adequate to meet EPA's strategic plan to demonstrate a direct link between air pollution and health effects. To meet the demand for new in vitro technology that better represents direct air-to-cell inhalation exposures, a new system that exposes cells at the air-liquid interface was developed. This new system, named the Gillings Sampler, is a modified two-stage electrostatic precipitator that provides a viable environment for cultured cells. Polystyrene latex spheres were used to determine deposition efficiencies (38-45%), while microscopy and imaging techniques were used to confirm uniform particle deposition. Negative control A549 cell exposures indicated the sampler can be operated for up to 4h without inducing any significant toxic effects on cells, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). A novel positive aerosol control exposure method, consisting of a p-tolualdehyde (TOLALD) impregnated mineral oil aerosol (MOA), was developed to test this system. Exposures to the toxic MOA at a 1 ng/cm(2) dose of TOLALD yielded a reproducible 1.4 and 2-fold increase in LDH and IL-8 mRNA levels over controls. This new system is intended to be used as an alternative research tool for aerosol in vitro exposure studies. While further testing and optimization is still required to produce a "commercially ready" system, it serves as a stepping-stone in the development of cost-effective in vitro technology that can be made accessible to researchers in the

  14. Climate change effects on extreme flows of water supply area in Istanbul: utility of regional climate models and downscaling method.

    PubMed

    Kara, Fatih; Yucel, Ismail

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the climate change impact on the changes of mean and extreme flows under current and future climate conditions in the Omerli Basin of Istanbul, Turkey. The 15 regional climate model output from the EU-ENSEMBLES project and a downscaling method based on local implications from geophysical variables were used for the comparative analyses. Automated calibration algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdel-ning (HBV) model for the study catchment using observed daily temperature and precipitation. The calibrated HBV model was implemented to simulate daily flows using precipitation and temperature data from climate models with and without downscaling method for reference (1960-1990) and scenario (2071-2100) periods. Flood indices were derived from daily flows, and their changes throughout the four seasons and year were evaluated by comparing their values derived from simulations corresponding to the current and future climate. All climate models strongly underestimate precipitation while downscaling improves their underestimation feature particularly for extreme events. Depending on precipitation input from climate models with and without downscaling the HBV also significantly underestimates daily mean and extreme flows through all seasons. However, this underestimation feature is importantly improved for all seasons especially for spring and winter through the use of downscaled inputs. Changes in extreme flows from reference to future increased for the winter and spring and decreased for the fall and summer seasons. These changes were more significant with downscaling inputs. With respect to current time, higher flow magnitudes for given return periods will be experienced in the future and hence, in the planning of the Omerli reservoir, the effective storage and water use should be sustained.

  15. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  16. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  17. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  18. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  19. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  20. The Kyoto protocol and payments for tropical forest: An interdisciplinary method for estimating carbon-offset supply and increasing the feasibility of a carbon market under the CDM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfaff, Alexander S.P.; Kerr, Suzi; Hughes, R. Flint; Liu, Shuguang; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G. Arturo; Schimel, David; Tosi, Joseph; Watson, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    Protecting tropical forests under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) could reduce the cost of emissions limitations set in Kyoto. However, while society must soon decide whether or not to use tropical forest-based offsets, evidence regarding tropical carbon sinks is sparse. This paper presents a general method for constructing an integrated model (based on detailed historical, remote sensing and field data) that can produce land-use and carbon baselines, predict carbon sequestration supply to a carbon-offsets market and also help to evaluate optimal market rules. Creating such integrated models requires close collaboration between social and natural scientists. Our project combines varied disciplinary expertise (in economics, ecology and geography) with local knowledge in order to create high-quality, empirically grounded, integrated models for Costa Rica.