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Sample records for air temperature co2

  1. [Effect of air temperature and rainfall on wetland ecosystem CO2 exchange in China].

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiao-jing; Han, Guang-xuan

    2015-10-01

    Wetland can be a potential efficient sink to reduce global warming due to its higher primary productivity and lower carbon decomposition rate. While there has been a series progress on the influence mechanism of ecosystem CO2 exchange over China' s wetlands, a systematic metaanalysis of data still needs to be improved. We compiled data of ecosystem CO2 exchange of 21 typical wetland vegetation types in China from 29 papers and carried out an integrated analysis of air temperature and precipitation effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP), the response of NEE to PAR, and the response of Reco to temperature. The results showed that there were significant responses (P<0.05) of NEE (R2 = 50%, R2=57%), GPP (R2 = 60%, R2 = 50%) Reco (R2 = 44%, R2=50%) with increasing air temperature and enhanced precipitation on the annual scale. On the growing season scale, air temperature accounted for 50% of the spatial variation of NEE, 36% of GPP and 19% of Reco, respectively. Both NEE (R2 = 33%) and GPP (R2 =25%) were correlated positively with precipitation (P<0.05). However, the relationship between Reco and precipitation was not significant (P>0.05). Across different Chinese wetlands, both precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on apparent quantum yield (α) or ecosystem respiration in the daytime (Reco,day, P>0.05). The maximum photosynthesis rate (Amax) was remarkably correlated with precipitation (P <0.01), but not with air temperature. Besides, there was no significant correlation between basal respiration (Rref) and precipitation (P>0.05). Precipitation was negatively correlated with temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10, P<0.05). Furthermore, temperature accounted for 35% and 46% of the variations in temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10) and basal respiration (Rref P<0.05), respectively. PMID:26995905

  2. Spring photosynthetic recovery of boreal Norway spruce under conditions of elevated [CO(2)] and air temperature.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Göran; Hall, Marianne; Slaney, Michelle; Räntfors, Mats; Medhurst, Jane; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    Accumulated carbon uptake, apparent quantum yield (AQY) and light-saturated net CO2 assimilation (Asat) were used to assess the responses of photosynthesis to environmental conditions during spring for three consecutive years. Whole-tree chambers were used to expose 40-year-old field-grown Norway spruce trees in northern Sweden to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, [CO2], of 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1) (CE) and an air temperature (T) between 2.8 and 5.6 °C above ambient T (TE), during summer and winter. Net shoot CO2 exchange (Anet) was measured continuously on 1-year-old shoots and was used to calculate the accumulated carbon uptake and daily Asat and AQY. The accumulated carbon uptake, from 1 March to 30 June, was stimulated by 33, 44 and 61% when trees were exposed to CE, TE, and CE and TE combined, respectively. Air temperature strongly influenced the timing and extent of photosynthetic recovery expressed as AQY and Asat during the spring. Under elevated T (TE), the recovery of AQY and Asat commenced ∼10 days earlier and the activity of these parameters was significantly higher throughout the recovery period. In the absence of frost events, the photosynthetic recovery period was less than a week. However, frost events during spring slowed recovery so that full recovery could take up to 60 days to complete. Elevated [CO2] stimulated AQY and Asat on average by ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, throughout the recovery period, but had minimal or no effect on the onset and length of the photosynthetic recovery period during the spring. However, AQY, Asat and Anet all recovered at significantly higher T (average +2.2 °C) in TE than in TA, possibly caused by acclimation or by shorter days and lower light levels during the early part of the recovery in TE compared with TA. The results suggest that predicted future climate changes will cause prominent stimulation of photosynthetic CO2 uptake in boreal Norway spruce forest during spring, mainly caused by elevated T

  3. Spring photosynthetic recovery of boreal Norway spruce under conditions of elevated [CO(2)] and air temperature.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Göran; Hall, Marianne; Slaney, Michelle; Räntfors, Mats; Medhurst, Jane; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    Accumulated carbon uptake, apparent quantum yield (AQY) and light-saturated net CO2 assimilation (Asat) were used to assess the responses of photosynthesis to environmental conditions during spring for three consecutive years. Whole-tree chambers were used to expose 40-year-old field-grown Norway spruce trees in northern Sweden to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, [CO2], of 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1) (CE) and an air temperature (T) between 2.8 and 5.6 °C above ambient T (TE), during summer and winter. Net shoot CO2 exchange (Anet) was measured continuously on 1-year-old shoots and was used to calculate the accumulated carbon uptake and daily Asat and AQY. The accumulated carbon uptake, from 1 March to 30 June, was stimulated by 33, 44 and 61% when trees were exposed to CE, TE, and CE and TE combined, respectively. Air temperature strongly influenced the timing and extent of photosynthetic recovery expressed as AQY and Asat during the spring. Under elevated T (TE), the recovery of AQY and Asat commenced ∼10 days earlier and the activity of these parameters was significantly higher throughout the recovery period. In the absence of frost events, the photosynthetic recovery period was less than a week. However, frost events during spring slowed recovery so that full recovery could take up to 60 days to complete. Elevated [CO2] stimulated AQY and Asat on average by ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, throughout the recovery period, but had minimal or no effect on the onset and length of the photosynthetic recovery period during the spring. However, AQY, Asat and Anet all recovered at significantly higher T (average +2.2 °C) in TE than in TA, possibly caused by acclimation or by shorter days and lower light levels during the early part of the recovery in TE compared with TA. The results suggest that predicted future climate changes will cause prominent stimulation of photosynthetic CO2 uptake in boreal Norway spruce forest during spring, mainly caused by elevated T

  4. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  5. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  6. On the calculation of air-sea fluxes of CO2 in the presence of temperature and salinity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, D. K.; Land, P. E.; Shutler, J. D.; Goddijn-Murphy, L. M.; Donlon, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of vertical temperature and salinity gradients in the upper ocean and the occurrence of variations in temperature and salinity on time scales from hours to many years complicate the calculation of the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) across the sea surface. Temperature and salinity affect the interfacial concentration of aqueous CO2 primarily through their effect on solubility with lesser effects related to saturated vapor pressure and the relationship between fugacity and partial pressure. The effects of temperature and salinity profiles in the water column and changes in the aqueous concentration act primarily through the partitioning of the carbonate system. Climatological calculations of flux require attention to variability in the upper ocean and to the limited validity of assuming "constant chemistry" in transforming measurements to climatological values. Contrary to some recent analysis, it is shown that the effect on CO2 fluxes of a cool skin on the sea surface is large and ubiquitous. An opposing effect on calculated fluxes is related to the occurrence of warm layers near the surface; this effect can be locally large but will usually coincide with periods of low exchange. A salty skin and salinity anomalies in the upper ocean also affect CO2 flux calculations, though these haline effects are generally weaker than the thermal effects.

  7. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  8. High-Resolution Isotopic Monitoring of Cave Air CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töchterle, Paul; Dublyansky, Yuri; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Jost, Hj; Spötl, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    This study aims at characterising the ventilation patterns in Spannagel Cave, a high-alpine cave system in the Zillertal Alps, Austria. A Thermo Scientific Delta Ray Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer was installed in a chamber ca. 100 m behind the cave entrance to monitor pCO2 and δ13C and δ18O of CO2 at high temporal resolution (up to 1 s). The air temperature was independently monitored inside and outside the cave. This study aims at characterising the ventilation patterns in Spannagel Cave, a high-alpine cave system in the Zillertal Alps, Austria. A Thermo Scientific Delta Ray Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer was installed in a chamber ca. 100 m behind the cave entrance to monitor pCO2 and δ13C and δ18O of CO2 at high temporal resolution (up to 1s). The air temperature was independently monitored inside and outside the cave. The data show two distinct patterns in terms of CO2 concentration and its isotopic composition, which are closely coupled with the temperature difference between the cave interior and the outside atmosphere. This gradient controls the direction of air flow in the cave on a seasonal to synoptic timescale (chimney-type ventilation). The summer circulation is characterised by CO2 closely resembling atmospheric values (pCO2 = 399 ± 12 ppm, δ13C = -8.5 ± 0.7 permil, δ18O = 8.1 ± 2.5 permil). The winter circulation mode features generally higher CO2 concentrations and lower isotopic compositions (pCO2 = 409 ± 14 ppm, δ13C = -10.1 ± 0.7 permil, δ18O = 2.3 ± 1.5 permil). The high temporal resolution of stable isotope data allows tracking cave air ventilation changes, including transient and short-lived ones. Moreover, the data make it possible to address concomitant geochemical processes, such as the input of atmospheric CO2 and the degassing of CO2 from seepage water. These processes would not be possible to quantify without the new generation of laser-based isotope ratio instruments represented by the Delta Ray.

  9. Optimal Estimation Retrievals of CO2 from AIRS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irion, F. W.; Kulawik, S. S.; Kahn, B. H.; Worden, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Fishbein, E.

    2009-12-01

    Since September 2002, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS-Aqua platform has globally observed atmospheric profile information from nadir viewing of infrared emittance. Selecting cloud-free spectra over ocean, we apply an optimal estimation algorithm, similar to that used for the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), to simultaneously retrieve profiles of CO2, water vapor, ozone, temperature and ocean skin temperature. Preliminary results and validation over the Western Pacific are presented, showing good correlation with seasonal variation and long-term increase of CO2 as determined by in-situ aircraft measurements.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  11. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  12. Flame temperature theory-based model for evaluation of the flammable zones of hydrocarbon-air-CO2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shu, Gequn; Long, Biao; Tian, Hua; Wei, Haiqiao; Liang, Xingyu

    2015-08-30

    Theoretical models to evaluate the flammable zones of mixtures made up of hydrocarbon, carbon dioxide and air have been proposed in present study. A three-step reaction hypothesis for hydrocarbon combustion was introduced for predicting the upper flammability limit. The method to predict the parameters at fuel inertization point was put forward as well. Validation of these models has been conducted on existing experimental data reported in the literature, including the cases of methane, propane, propylene and isobutane, and an acceptable precision has been achieved. The average relative differences between the estimated results and experimental ones, except for the results at fuel inertization point, are less than 8.8% and 3.3% for upper and lower flammability limit, respectively. This work also indicated that these models possess practical application capacity and can provide safe prediction limits for nonflammable ranges of hydrocarbon diluted with carbon dioxide. PMID:25867586

  13. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  14. Indoor air quality in two urban elementary schools--measurements of airborne fungi, carpet allergens, CO2, temperature, and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Adgate, John L; Banerjee, Sudipto; Church, Timothy R; Jones, David; Fredrickson, Ann; Sexton, Ken

    2005-11-01

    This article presents measurements of biological contaminants in two elementary schools that serve inner city minority populations. One of the schools is an older building; the other is newer and was designed to minimize indoor air quality problems. Measurements were obtained for airborne fungi, carpet loadings of dust mite allergens, cockroach allergens, cat allergens, and carpet fungi. Carbon dioxide concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity were also measured. Each of these measurements was made in five classrooms in each school over three seasons--fall, winter, and spring. We compared the indoor environments at the two schools and examined the variability in measured parameters between and within schools and across seasons. A fixed-effects, nested analysis was performed to determine the effect of school, season, and room-within-school, as well as CO2, temperature and relative humidity. The levels of all measured parameters were comparable for the two schools. Carpet culturable fungal concentrations and cat allergen levels in the newer school started and remained higher than in the older school over the study period. Cockroach allergen levels in some areas were very high in the newer school and declined over the study period to levels lower than the older school. Dust mite allergen and culturable fungal concentrations in both schools were relatively low compared with benchmark values. The daily averages for temperature and relative humidity frequently did not meet ASHRAE guidelines in either school, which suggests that proper HVAC and general building operation and maintenance procedures are at least as important as proper design and construction for adequate indoor air quality. The results show that for fungi and cat allergens, the school environment can be an important exposure source for children.

  15. The Potential Impact of CO2 and Air Temperature Increases on Krummholz's Transformation into Arborescent Form in the Southern Siberian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Dvinskaya, M. L.; Im, S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Trees in the southern Siberian Mountains forest-tundra ecotone have considerably increased their radial and apical growth increments during the last few decades. This leads to the widespread vertical transformation of mat and prostrate krummholz forms of larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb) and Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour). An analysis of the radial growth increments showed that these transformations began in the mid-1980s. Larch showed a greater resistance to the harsh alpine environment and attained a vertical growth form in areas where Siberian pine is still krummholz. Upper larch treeline is about 10 m higher than Siberian pine treeline. Observed apical and radial growth increment increases were correlated with CO2 concentration (r = 0.83-0.87), summer temperatures (r = 0.55-0.64), and "cold period" (i.e. September-May) air temperatures (r = 0.36-0.37). Positive correlation between growth increments and winter precipitation was attributed to snow cover protection for trees during wintertime.

  16. On the proportionality between global temperature change and cumulative CO2 emissions during periods of net negative CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; MacDougall, Andrew H.; Damon Matthews, H.

    2016-05-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that global mean surface air warming is approximately proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions. This proportional relationship has received considerable attention, as it allows one to calculate the cumulative CO2 emissions (‘carbon budget’) compatible with temperature targets and is a useful measure for model inter-comparison. Here we use an Earth system model to explore whether this relationship persists during periods of net negative CO2 emissions. Negative CO2 emissions are required in the majority of emissions scenarios limiting global warming to 2 °C above pre-industrial, with emissions becoming net negative in the second half of this century in several scenarios. We find that for model simulations with a symmetric 1% per year increase and decrease in atmospheric CO2, the temperature change (ΔT) versus cumulative CO2 emissions (CE) relationship is nonlinear during periods of net negative emissions, owing to the lagged response of the deep ocean to previously increasing atmospheric CO2. When corrected for this lagged response, or if the CO2 decline is applied after the system has equilibrated with the previous CO2 increase, the ΔT versus CE relationship is close to linear during periods of net negative CO2 emissions. A proportionality constant—the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE)- can therefore be calculated for both positive and net negative CO2 emission periods. We find that in simulations with a symmetric 1% per year increase and decrease in atmospheric CO2 the TCRE is larger on the upward than on the downward CO2 trajectory, suggesting that positive CO2 emissions are more effective at warming than negative emissions are at subsequently cooling. We also find that the cooling effectiveness of negative CO2 emissions decreases if applied at higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  17. The effects of soil and air temperature on CO2 exchange and net biomass accumulation in Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Rasilo, Terhi; Villemot, Julie; Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    2012-06-01

    Soil temperature is proposed to affect the photosynthetic rate and carbon allocation in boreal trees through sink limitation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature on CO(2) exchange, biomass partitioning and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi of boreal tree species. We measured carbon allocation, above- and below-ground CO(2) exchange and the species composition of associated ECM fungi in the rhizosphere of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies K.) and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings grown in soil maintained at 7-12, 12-15 and 16-22 °C. We found increased root biomass and photosynthetic rate at higher soil temperatures, but simultaneously with photosynthesis rate, higher temperature generally increased soil respiration as well as shoot, and root and rhizosphere respiration. The net CO(2) exchange and seedling biomass did not increase significantly with increasing temperature due to a concomitant increase in carbon assimilation and respiration rates. The 2-month-long growth period in different soil temperatures did not alter the ECM fungi species composition and the below-ground carbon sink strength did not seem to be directly related to ECM biomass and species composition in any of the tree species. Ectomycorrhizal species composition and number of mycorrhiza did not explain the CO(2) exchange results at different temperatures.

  18. Low pCO2 Air-Polarized CO2 Concentrator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Franz H.

    1997-01-01

    Life Systems completed a Ground-based Space Station Experiment Development Study Program which verifies through testing the performance and applicability of the electrochemical Air-Polarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (APC) process technology for space missions requiring low (i.e., less than 3 mm Hg) CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the cabin atmosphere. Required test hardware was developed and testing was accomplished at an approximate one-person capacity CO2 removal level. Initially, two five-cell electrochemical modules using flight-like 0.5 sq ft cell hardware were tested individually, following by their testing at the integrated APC system level. Testing verified previously projected performance and established a database for sizing of APC systems. A four person capacity APC system was sized and compared with four candidate CO2 removal systems. At its weight of 252 lb, a volume of 7 cu ft and a power consumption of 566 W while operating at 2.2 mm Hg pCO2, the APC was surpassed only by an Electrochemical Depolarized CO2 Concentrator (EDC) (operating with H2), when compared on a total equivalent basis.

  19. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  20. Combined CO2-philicity and Ordered Mesoporosity for Highly Selective CO2 Capture at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Lim, Soo Yeon; Kim, Byung Gon; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-06-10

    Various dry sorbents have been lately introduced as promising media to capture carbon dioxide (CO2). However, it is still desirable to further improve their performance in diverse aspects, and high temperature selectivity of CO2 over other gases is clearly one of them. Here, we report a co-assembly approach to turn nonporous melamine resin to a highly ordered mesoporous polymeric network (space group: Im3̅m) containing high nitrogen content (∼18 at%). This mesoporous network shows anomalously increasing CO2/N2 selectivity with temperature rise, with the selectivity at 323 K reaching 117 (Henry method). This selectivity behavior is attributed to a combined effect of the high nitrogen content allowing for high binding affinity with CO2 and well-defined mesopores (2.5-2.9 nm) accelerating release of N2 with temperature rise. The given orthogonal approach suggests a new direction in designing dry sorbents with excellent selectivities at high temperatures. PMID:26000786

  1. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  2. Performance Prediction Method of CO2 Cycle for Air Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shigeru; Xue, Jun; Kuwahara, Ken

    From the perspective of global environmental protection and energy-saving, the research and development on high-efficiency heat pump and refrigeration systems using environment-friendly refrigerants have become one of the most important issues in the air-conditioning and refrigeration sector. In the present work, a steady-state model of the CO2 transcritical cycle for air cooling, which consists of a rotary compressor, a fin-tube gas cooler,a fin-tube evaporator and an expansion valve, has been developed. The detailed model of fin-tube heat exchanger has been constructed by means of the finite volume method, in which the local heat transfer and flow characteristics are evaluated. It should be noted that the effects of the dew condensation generated on the cooling surface are considered in the evaporator model. As a calculation example, the effects of the indoor air wet-bulb temperature on the cycle performance have been examined with this developed simulator.

  3. Heat-tolerant rice cultivars retain grain appearance quality under free-air CO2 enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat-tolerant rice cultivars have been developed as a countermeasure to poor grain appearance quality under high temperatures. Recent studies showed that elevated CO2 concentrations (E-[CO2]) also reduce grain quality. To determine whether heat-tolerant cultivars also tolerate E-[CO2], we conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment with 12 rice cultivars differing in heat tolerance. Results The percentage of undamaged grains of five standard cultivars (Akitakomachi, Kinuhikari, Koshihikari, Matsuribare, Nipponbare) averaged 61.7% in the ambient [CO2] (AMB) plot and 51.7% in the FACE plot, whereas that of heat-tolerant cultivars (Eminokizuna, Wa2398, Kanto 257, Toyama 80, Mineharuka, Kanto 259, Saikai 290) averaged 73.5% in AMB and 71.3% in FACE. This resulted in a significant [CO2] by cultivar interaction. The percentage of white-base or white-back grains increased from 8.4% in AMB to 17.1% in FACE in the sensitive cultivars, but from only 2.1% in AMB to only 4.4% in FACE in the heat-tolerant cultivars. Conclusion Heat-tolerant cultivars retained their grain appearance quality at E-[CO2] under present air temperatures. Further improvements in appearance quality under present conditions will be needed to achieve improvements under E-[CO2], because E-[CO2] will likely lower the threshold temperature for heat stress. PMID:24920972

  4. Characterizing the errors in AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2 retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, T.; Baker, D. F.; Kawa, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Mid- to upper-tropospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been retrieved since 2002 from thermal infrared channels of NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. Unlike retrievals using near-IR data from the Japanese Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) or NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO2), the sensitivity of AIRS measurements does not peak near the surface; however, the AIRS tropospheric CO2 data cover nearly the entire globe across a decadal time period - they should provide a good constraint on long-term surface CO2 fluxes at broad spatial scales, in the absence of significant biases. In this study, we attempt to characterize the systematic and random errors in AIRS CO2 retrievals by comparing to CO2 fields generated by the PCTM transport model using CarbonTracker-optimized fluxes. We examine both the standard and support products of AIRS Version 5 Release Level 2 CO2, together with other parameters (e.g., cloud top pressure/temperature) retrieved using coincident microwave measurements from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). We formulate a bias correction for AIRS CO2 against these parameters, remove the bias, and use the bias-corrected data to solve for weekly flux corrections across 2009-2011 at a 3.0 x 3.75 deg resolution (lat/lon).

  5. Long-term elevated air [CO2 ] strengthens photosynthetic functioning and mitigates the impact of supra-optimal temperatures in tropical Coffea arabica and C. canephora species.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Weverton P; Martins, Madlles Q; Fortunato, Ana S; Rodrigues, Ana P; Semedo, José N; Simões-Costa, Maria C; Pais, Isabel P; Leitão, António E; Colwell, Filipe; Goulao, Luis; Máguas, Cristina; Maia, Rodrigo; Partelli, Fábio L; Campostrini, Eliemar; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I; Lidon, Fernando C; DaMatta, Fábio M; Ramalho, José C

    2016-01-01

    The tropical coffee crop has been predicted to be threatened by future climate changes and global warming. However, the real biological effects of such changes remain unknown. Therefore, this work aims to link the physiological and biochemical responses of photosynthesis to elevated air [CO2 ] and temperature in cultivated genotypes of Coffea arabica L. (cv. Icatu and IPR108) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon CL153. Plants were grown for ca. 10 months at 25/20°C (day/night) and 380 or 700 μl CO2 l(-1) and then subjected to temperature increase (0.5°C day(-1) ) to 42/34°C. Leaf impacts related to stomatal traits, gas exchanges, C isotope composition, fluorescence parameters, thylakoid electron transport and enzyme activities were assessed at 25/20, 31/25, 37/30 and 42/34°C. The results showed that (1) both species were remarkably heat tolerant up to 37/30°C, but at 42/34°C a threshold for irreversible nonstomatal deleterious effects was reached. Impairments were greater in C. arabica (especially in Icatu) and under normal [CO2 ]. Photosystems and thylakoid electron transport were shown to be quite heat tolerant, contrasting to the enzymes related to energy metabolism, including RuBisCO, which were the most sensitive components. (2) Significant stomatal trait modifications were promoted almost exclusively by temperature and were species dependent. Elevated [CO2 ], (3) strongly mitigated the impact of temperature on both species, particularly at 42/34°C, modifying the response to supra-optimal temperatures, (4) promoted higher water-use efficiency under moderately higher temperature (31/25°C) and (5) did not provoke photosynthetic downregulation. Instead, enhancements in [CO2 ] strengthened photosynthetic photochemical efficiency, energy use and biochemical functioning at all temperatures. Our novel findings demonstrate a relevant heat resilience of coffee species and that elevated [CO2 ] remarkably mitigated the impact of heat on coffee physiology, therefore

  6. AIRS retrieved CO2 and its association with climatic parameters over India during 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Ravi; Revadekar, J V; Tiwari, Yogesh K

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) retrieved mid-tropospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) have been used to study the variability and its association with the climatic parameters over India during 2004 to 2011. The study also aims in understanding transport of CO2 from surface to mid-troposphere over India. The annual cycle of mid-tropospheric CO2 shows gradual increase in concentration from January till the month of May at the rate ~0.6 ppm/month. It decreases continuously in summer monsoon (JJAS) at the same rate during which strong westerlies persists over the region. A slight increase is seen during winter monsoon (DJF). Being a greenhouse gas, annual cycle of CO2 show good resemblance with annual cycle of surface air temperature with correlation coefficient (CC) of +0.8. Annual cycle of vertical velocity indicate inverse pattern compared to annual cycle of CO2. High values of mid-tropospheric CO2 correspond to upward wind, while low values of mid-tropospheric CO2 correspond to downward wind. In addition to vertical motion, zonal winds are also contributing towards the transport of CO2 from surface to mid-troposphere. Vegetation as it absorbs CO2 at surface level, show inverse annual cycle to that of annual cycle of CO2 (CC-0.64). Seasonal variation of rainfall-CO2 shows similarities with seasonal variation of NDVI-CO2. However, the use of long period data sets for CO2 at the surface and at the mid-troposphere will be an advantage to confirm these results.

  7. Sea-air of CO2 in the North Pacific using shipboard and satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Mark P.; Samuels, Geoffrey; Olson, Donald B.; Fine, Rana A.; Takahashi, Taro

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to produce high-resolution maps of pCO2 in surface water for the North Pacific using satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data and statistical relationships between measured pCO2 and temperature. In the subtropical North Pacific the pCO in seawater is controlled primarily by temperature. Accordingly, pCO2 values that are calculated from the satellite SST data have good agreement with the measured values (rms deviation of +/- microatm). In the northwestern subpolar region the pCO2 is controlled not only by temperature, but also by significant seasonal changes in the total CO2 concentration, which are caused by seasonal changes in primary production, mixing with subsurface waters and sea-air exchange. Consequently, the parameterization of oceanic p CO2 based on SST data alone is not totally successful in the northwestern region (rms deviation of +/- 40 microatm). The use of additional satellite products, such as wind and ocean color data, as planned for a future study, is considered necessary to account for the pCO2 variability caused by seasonal changes in the total CO2 concentration. The net CO2 flux for the area of the North Pacific included in this study (north of 10 deg N) has been calculated using the monthly pCO2 distributions computed, and monthly wind speeds from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The region is found to be a net source to the atmosphere of 1.9 x 10(exp 12) to 5.8 x 10(exp 12) moles of CO2 per year (or 0.02-0.07 Gt C/yr), most of the outflux occurring in the subtropics.

  8. Influence of O2 on the dielectric properties of CO2 at the elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Mingzhe; Sun, Hao; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Wang, Xiaohua; Wu, Mingliang

    2014-11-01

    SF6 gas is widely used in the high voltage circuit breakers but considering its high global warming potential other substitutes are being sought. Among them CO2 was investigated and even has been used in some practical products. However, at room temperature, the dielectric properties of CO2 are relatively lower than SF6 and air. The goal of this work is to investigate a CO2-based gas to improve the performance of the pure CO2. In this paper, the dielectric properties of hot CO2/O2 mixtures related to the dielectric recovery phase of the circuit breaker were investigated in the temperature range from 300 K to 4000 K and in the pressure range from 0.01 MPa to 1.0 MPa. The species compositions of hot CO2/O2 were obtained based on Gibbs free energy minimization under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium and local chemical equilibrium. The reduced critical electric field strength of CO2/O2 was determined by balancing electron generation and loss. These were calculated using the electron energy distribution function by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. The validity of the calculation method and the cross sections data was confirmed by comparing the measurements and calculations of the electron swarm data in previous work. The results indicate that in pure CO2 the critical electric field strength is higher only in higher temperature range. By adding the O2 into the CO2, the critical electric field strength at lower temperature is effectively enhanced. CO2/O2 mixtures have a much better dielectric strength than both the pure CO2 and air and thus have the potential to improve the CO2-based gas circuit breakers. Similar conclusions can also be found in others' work, which further confirm the validity of these results.

  9. Annual and seasonal fCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Chierici, M.; Counillon, F.; Omar, A.; Nondal, G.; Johannessen, T.; Olsen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Barents Sea is the strongest CO2 sink in the Arctic region, yet estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux in this area show a large span reflecting uncertainty as well as significant variability both seasonally and regionally. Here we use a previously unpublished data set of seawater CO2 fugacity (fCO2), and map these data over the western Barents Sea through multivariable linear regressions with SeaWiFS/MODIS remote sensing and TOPAZ model data fields. We find that two algorithms are necessary in order to cover the full seasonal cycle, mainly because not all proxy variables are available for the entire year, and because variability in fCO2 is driven by different mechanisms in summer and winter. A comprehensive skill assessment indicates that there is a good overall correspondence between observations and predictions. The algorithms are also validated using two independent data sets, with good results. The gridded fCO2 fields reveal tight links between water mass distribution and fCO2 in all months, and particularly in winter. The seasonal cycle show peaks in the total air-sea CO2 influx in May and September, caused by respectively biological drawdown of CO2 and low sea ice concentration leaving a large open water area. For 2007 the annual average air-sea CO2 flux is - 48 ± 5 gC m- 2, which is comparable to previous estimates.

  10. Surface Ocean pCO2 Seasonality and Sea-Air CO2 Flux Estimates for the North American East Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, Sergio; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G., Jr.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Salisbury, Joe; Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Underway and in situ observations of surface ocean pCO2, combined with satellite data, were used to develop pCO2 regional algorithms to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of surface ocean pCO2 and sea-air CO2 flux for five physically and biologically distinct regions of the eastern North American continental shelf: the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), the Gulf of Maine (GoM), Nantucket Shoals and Georges Bank (NS+GB), and the Scotian Shelf (SS). Temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon variability are the most influential factors driving the seasonality of pCO2. Estimates of the sea-air CO2 flux were derived from the available pCO2 data, as well as from the pCO2 reconstructed by the algorithm. Two different gas exchange parameterizations were used. The SS, GB+NS, MAB, and SAB regions are net sinks of atmospheric CO2 while the GoM is a weak source. The estimates vary depending on the use of surface ocean pCO2 from the data or algorithm, as well as with the use of the two different gas exchange parameterizations. Most of the regional estimates are in general agreement with previous studies when the range of uncertainty and interannual variability are taken into account. According to the algorithm, the average annual uptake of atmospheric CO2 by eastern North American continental shelf waters is found to be between 3.4 and 5.4 Tg C/yr (areal average of 0.7 to 1.0 mol CO2 /sq m/yr) over the period 2003-2010.

  11. Development of balloon-borne CO2 sonde: CO2 vertical profile (0-10km) observations and comparison with the air craft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, M.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration has drastically increased since the Industrial Revolution due to the mass consumption of fossil fuels and natural gas by human activities. CO2 is considered to be a major factor of global warming; therefore it is important to measure CO2 correctly. CO2 vertical profile measurement is the key to estimate CO2 sources and sinks in high precision. However, current CO2 monitoring sites are limited and there are few CO2 vertical profile measurements. We have been developing a balloon-borne instrument that can measure the vertical distribution of CO2 in any place in the world under any kind of weather conditions (CO2 sonde). The target specifications of altitude range is from surface to 10 km. Time resolution is 1min. The CO2 sensor, originally developed for upper air sounding by our team, is based on the non-dispersed infrared absorption spectroscopy technique (NDIR) at the wavelengths of 4.0 and 4.3 micrometer. The data of the optical infrared absorption are transmitted through a GPS sonde with temperature, humidity and GPS data every second. In this study, we will show simultaneous measurement campaigns of the balloon-borne instruments and in-situ aircraft measurements in January and February 2011 in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan. We will present the comparisons between the results of CO2 sonde (5 flights) and two types of aircraft measurements. One is observed by the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) and the other is chartered flight measurements operated by NIES/JAXA.

  12. Reconstruction of super-resolution fields of ocean pCO2 and air-sea fluxes of CO2 from satellite imagery in the Southeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, I.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Yahia, H.; Garbe, C.; Paulmier, A.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of Green House Gases GHGs fluxes at the air-sea interface at high resolution is crucial to accurately quantify the role of the ocean in the absorption and emission of GHGs. In this paper we present a novel method to reconstruct maps of surface ocean partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4 km) using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ocean Colour (OC) data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). Inference of super-resolution of pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes is performed using novel nonlinear signal processing methodologies that prove efficient in the context of oceanography. The theoretical background comes from the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism which unlocks the geometrical determination of cascading properties of physical intensive variables. As a consequence, a multiresolution analysis performed on the signal of the so-called singularity exponents allows the correct and near optimal cross-scale inference of GHGs fluxes, as the inference suits the geometric realization of the cascade. We apply such a methodology to the study offshore of the Benguela area. The inferred representation of oceanic partial pressure of CO2 improves and enhances the description provided by CarbonTracker, capturing the small scale variability. We examine different combinations of Ocean Colour and Sea Surface Temperature products in order to increase the number of valid points and the quality of the inferred pCO2 field. The methodology is validated using in-situ measurements by means of statistical errors. We obtain that mean absolute and relative errors in the inferred values of pCO2 with respect to in-situ measurements are smaller than for CarbonTracker.

  13. Net sea-air CO2 fluxes and modelled pCO2 in the southwestern subtropical Atlantic continental shelf during spring 2010 and summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Rosane Gonçalves; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Tavano, Virginia Maria

    2016-05-01

    Sea-air CO2 fluxes over continental shelves vary substantially in time on both seasonal and sub-seasonal scales, driven primarily by variations in surface pCO2 due to several oceanic mechanisms. Furthermore, coastal zones have not been appropriately considered in global estimates of sea-air CO2 fluxes, despite their importance to ecology and to productivity. In this work, we aimed to improve our understanding of the role played by shelf waters in controlling sea-air CO2 fluxes by investigating the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (21-35°S) region, where physical, chemical and biological measurements were made on board the Brazilian R. V. Cruzeiro do Sul during late spring 2010 and early summer 2011. Features such as discharge from the La Plata River, intrusions of tropical waters on the outer shelf due to meandering and flow instabilities of the Brazil Current, and coastal upwelling in the Santa Marta Grande Cape and São Tomé Cape were detected by both in situ measurements and ocean colour and thermal satellite imagery. Overall, shelf waters in the study area were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with an average of 1.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the late spring and 11.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the early summer cruises. The spatial variability in ocean pCO2 was associated with surface ocean properties (temperature, salinity and chlorophyll-a concentration) in both the slope and shelf waters. Empirical algorithms for predicting temperature-normalized surface ocean pCO2 as a function of surface ocean properties were shown to perform well in both shelf and slope waters, except (a) within cyclonic eddies produced by baroclinic instability of the Brazil Current as detected by satellite SST imagery and (b) in coastal upwelling regions. In these regions, surface ocean pCO2 values were higher as a result of upwelled CO2-enriched subsurface waters. Finally, a pCO2 algorithm based on both sea surface temperature and surface chlorophyll-a was developed that enabled the spatial

  14. Synthesis of germanium nanocrystals in high temperature supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianmao; Korgel, Brian A; Johnston, Keith P

    2005-07-01

    Germanium nanocrystals were synthesized in supercritical (sc) CO(2) by thermolysis of diphenylgermane (DPG) or tetraethylgermane (TEG) with octanol as a capping ligand at 500 °C and 27.6 MPa. The Ge nanocrystals were characterized with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of TEM, the mean diameters of the nanocrystals made from DPG and TEG were 10.1 and 5.6 nm, respectively. The synthesis in sc-CO(2) produced much less organic contamination compared with similar reactions in organic supercritical fluids. When the same reaction of DPG with octanol was performed in the gas phase without CO(2) present, bulk Ge crystals were formed instead of nanocrystals. Thus, the solvation of the hydrocarbon ligands by CO(2) was sufficient to provide steric stabilization. The presence of steric stabilization in CO(2) at a reduced temperature of 2.5, with a reduced solvent density of only 0.4, may be attributed to a reduction in the differences between ligand-ligand interactions and ligand-CO(2) interactions relative to thermal energy.

  15. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE, SOIL MOISTURE AND SEASONALITY BUT NOT CO2 AFFECT CANOPY ASSIMILATION AND SYSTEM RESPIRATION IN SEEDLING DOUGLAS-FIR ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and air temperature on C cycling in trees and associated soil system, focusing on canopy CO2 assimilation (Asys) and system CO2 loss through respiration (Rsys). We hypothesized that both elevated CO2 and elevated temperature...

  16. Atmospheric CO2: principal control knob governing Earth's temperature.

    PubMed

    Lacis, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gavin A; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A

    2010-10-15

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. This is because CO(2), like ozone, N(2)O, CH(4), and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO(2) and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state.

  17. Atmospheric CO2: Principal Control Knob Governing Earth's Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A.

    2010-01-01

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO2) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth s atmosphere. This is because CO2, like ozone, N2O, CH4, and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO2 and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state.

  18. Atmospheric CO2: principal control knob governing Earth's temperature.

    PubMed

    Lacis, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gavin A; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A

    2010-10-15

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. This is because CO(2), like ozone, N(2)O, CH(4), and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO(2) and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state. PMID:20947761

  19. Small CO2 Sensors Operate at Lower Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2009-01-01

    Solid-electrolyte-based amperometric sensors for measuring concentrations of CO2 in air are being developed for use in detection of fires, environmental monitoring, and other applications where liquid-based electrochemical cells are problematic. These sensors are small (sizes of the order of a millimeter), are robust, are amenable to batch fabrication at relatively low cost, and exhibit short response times (seconds) and wide detection ranges. A sensor of this type at a previous stage of development included a solid electrolyte of Na3Zr2Si2PO12 deposited mainly between interdigitated Pt electrodes on an alumina substrate, all overcoated with an auxiliary solid electrolyte of (Na2CO3:BaCO3 in a molar ratio of 1:1.7). It was necessary to heat this device to a temperature as high as 600 C to obtain the desired sensitivity and rapid response. Heating sensors increases the power consumption of the sensor system and complicates the use of the sensor in some applications. Thus, decreasing a sensor s power consumption while maintaining its performance is a technical goal of ongoing development.

  20. Air-Sea Exchange Of CO2: A Multi-Technology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengberg, A.; Almroth, E.; Anderson, L.; Hall, P.; Hjalmarsson, S.; Lefevre, D.; Omstedt, A.; Rutgersson, A.; Sahlee, E.; Smedman, A.; Wesslander, K.

    2006-12-01

    We report on experiences and results from a multidisciplinary project in which we try to elucidate the complex processes involved in air-sea exchange of CO2. This study was performed in the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish island Gotland) and combined the following technologies: - Meteorological measurements of wind, turbulence, temperature, humidity, humidity flux, CO2 and CO2 flux at several levels from a fixed observation tower - Hourly PCO2 measurements with a moored automatic instrument - Collection of dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity and turbidity data at different levels in the water column at 1-minute intervals - Daily light (PAR) and primary production measurements obtained with a moored automatic incubator - Daily primary production measurements using manual methods - Use of an acoustic current profiler to collect water column information on currents, turbulence, water level and waves - Repetitive water column profiles, from a ship, of dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, nutrients, alkalinity, pH, PAR, Chlorophyll A, salinity and temperature

  1. Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-20

    Oxide supports functionalized with amine moieties have been used for decades as catalysts and chromatographic media. Owing to the recognized impact of atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the study of the use of amine-oxide hybrid materials as CO2 sorbents has exploded in the past decade. While the majority of the work has concerned separation of CO2 from dilute mixtures such as flue gas from coal-fired power plants, it has been recognized by us and others that such supported amine materials are also perhaps uniquely suited to extract CO2 from ultradilute gas mixtures, such as ambient air. As unique, low temperature chemisorbents, they can operate under ambient conditions, spontaneously extracting CO2 from ambient air, while being regenerated under mild conditions using heat or the combination of heat and vacuum. This Account describes the evolution of our activities on the design of amine-functionalized silica materials for catalysis to the design, characterization, and utilization of these materials in CO2 separations. New materials developed in our laboratory, such as hyperbranched aminosilica materials, and previously known amine-oxide hybrid compositions, have been extensively studied for CO2 extraction from simulated ambient air (400 ppm of CO2). The role of amine type and structure (molecular, polymeric), support type and structure, the stability of the various compositions under simulated operating conditions, and the nature of the adsorbed CO2 have been investigated in detail. The requirements for an effective, practical air capture process have been outlined and the ability of amine-oxide hybrid materials to meet these needs has been discussed. Ultimately, the practicality of such a "direct air capture" process is predicated not only on the physicochemical properties of the sorbent, but also how the sorbent operates in a practical process that offers a scalable gas-solid contacting strategy. In this regard, the utility of low pressure drop monolith

  2. Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-20

    Oxide supports functionalized with amine moieties have been used for decades as catalysts and chromatographic media. Owing to the recognized impact of atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the study of the use of amine-oxide hybrid materials as CO2 sorbents has exploded in the past decade. While the majority of the work has concerned separation of CO2 from dilute mixtures such as flue gas from coal-fired power plants, it has been recognized by us and others that such supported amine materials are also perhaps uniquely suited to extract CO2 from ultradilute gas mixtures, such as ambient air. As unique, low temperature chemisorbents, they can operate under ambient conditions, spontaneously extracting CO2 from ambient air, while being regenerated under mild conditions using heat or the combination of heat and vacuum. This Account describes the evolution of our activities on the design of amine-functionalized silica materials for catalysis to the design, characterization, and utilization of these materials in CO2 separations. New materials developed in our laboratory, such as hyperbranched aminosilica materials, and previously known amine-oxide hybrid compositions, have been extensively studied for CO2 extraction from simulated ambient air (400 ppm of CO2). The role of amine type and structure (molecular, polymeric), support type and structure, the stability of the various compositions under simulated operating conditions, and the nature of the adsorbed CO2 have been investigated in detail. The requirements for an effective, practical air capture process have been outlined and the ability of amine-oxide hybrid materials to meet these needs has been discussed. Ultimately, the practicality of such a "direct air capture" process is predicated not only on the physicochemical properties of the sorbent, but also how the sorbent operates in a practical process that offers a scalable gas-solid contacting strategy. In this regard, the utility of low pressure drop monolith

  3. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, S V Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P V Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation.

  4. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on seed quality.

    PubMed

    Hampton, J G; Boelt, B; Rolston, M P; Chastain, T G

    2013-04-01

    Successful crop production depends initially on the availability of high-quality seed. By 2050 global climate change will have influenced crop yields, but will these changes affect seed quality? The present review examines the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and temperature during seed production on three seed quality components: seed mass, germination and seed vigour. In response to elevated CO2, seed mass has been reported to both increase and decrease in C3 plants, but not change in C4 plants. Increases are greater in legumes than non-legumes, and there is considerable variation among species. Seed mass increases may result in a decrease of seed nitrogen (N) concentration in non-legumes. Increasing temperature may decrease seed mass because of an accelerated growth rate and reduced seed filling duration, but lower seed mass does not necessarily reduce seed germination or vigour. Like seed mass, reported seed germination responses to elevated CO2 have been variable. The reported changes in seed C/N ratio can decrease seed protein content which may eventually lead to reduced viability. Conversely, increased ethylene production may stimulate germination in some species. High-temperature stress before developing seeds reach physiological maturity (PM) can reduce germination by inhibiting the ability of the plant to supply the assimilates necessary to synthesize the storage compounds required for germination. Nothing is known concerning the effects of elevated CO2 on seed vigour. However, seed vigour can be reduced by high-temperature stress both before and after PM. High temperatures induce or increase the physiological deterioration of seeds. Limited evidence suggests that only short periods of high-temperature stress at critical seed development stages are required to reduce seed vigour, but further research is required. The predicted environmental changes will lead to losses of seed quality, particularly for seed vigour and possibly germination. The seed

  5. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on seed quality.

    PubMed

    Hampton, J G; Boelt, B; Rolston, M P; Chastain, T G

    2013-04-01

    Successful crop production depends initially on the availability of high-quality seed. By 2050 global climate change will have influenced crop yields, but will these changes affect seed quality? The present review examines the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and temperature during seed production on three seed quality components: seed mass, germination and seed vigour. In response to elevated CO2, seed mass has been reported to both increase and decrease in C3 plants, but not change in C4 plants. Increases are greater in legumes than non-legumes, and there is considerable variation among species. Seed mass increases may result in a decrease of seed nitrogen (N) concentration in non-legumes. Increasing temperature may decrease seed mass because of an accelerated growth rate and reduced seed filling duration, but lower seed mass does not necessarily reduce seed germination or vigour. Like seed mass, reported seed germination responses to elevated CO2 have been variable. The reported changes in seed C/N ratio can decrease seed protein content which may eventually lead to reduced viability. Conversely, increased ethylene production may stimulate germination in some species. High-temperature stress before developing seeds reach physiological maturity (PM) can reduce germination by inhibiting the ability of the plant to supply the assimilates necessary to synthesize the storage compounds required for germination. Nothing is known concerning the effects of elevated CO2 on seed vigour. However, seed vigour can be reduced by high-temperature stress both before and after PM. High temperatures induce or increase the physiological deterioration of seeds. Limited evidence suggests that only short periods of high-temperature stress at critical seed development stages are required to reduce seed vigour, but further research is required. The predicted environmental changes will lead to losses of seed quality, particularly for seed vigour and possibly germination. The seed

  6. Low-Temperature CO-Oxidation Catalysts for Long-Life CO2 Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Editor); Hoflund, Gar B. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature CO-oxidation catalysts are necessary for closed-cycle pulsed CO2 lasers as well as for other applications, including air purification. The papers presented in this volume discuss several such catalysts, including information on catalyst preparation, techniques for enhancing catalyst performance, laboratory and laser test results, and mechanistic considerations.

  7. Large Temporal Variations in Air-Sea CO2 Flux off the Coast of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Sabine, C.; Cai, W.; Alin, S.

    2008-12-01

    Though the inner shelf is a small portion of global ocean area, its air-sea CO2 flux is disproportionately high. Due to its tight links with both terrestrial and oceanic systems, the inner shelf is likely to experience significant spatial and temporal variability. We measured the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) continuously from July 2006 to June 2008 on a moored platform in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary on Georgia's inner shelf. The long-term, high temporal resolution data has allowed us to begin to measure interannual variations in CO2 flux along the inner Georgia shelf. From July 2006-June 2007, the inner Georgia shelf was a CO2 sink (-3.26mmol/m2/day), while during following year, the shelf switched to being a source (2.26mmol/m2/day). Choice of wind data (satellite or buoy-derived) significantly alters these estimates of annual fluxes. QuikSCAT satellite wind data indicate a much larger sink (- 6.13mmol/m2/day) during 2006-2007, and a non-existent source (0.02mmol/m2/day) during 2007- 2008. An earlier, high-resolution spatial study from January 2005-May 2006 found that the inner shelf within the South Atlantic Bight may have been a source of 0.65 to 1.20mmol/m2/day, suggesting that the inner shelf may experience dramatic swings in CO2 flux. Though sea-surface temperature (SST) is the largest influence on surface water fCO2, average monthly SST varied little between both years; instead, possible explanations for the large variation in interannual CO2 flux include decreased biological production and increased river flow (and, hence carbon export) during 2007-2008. This is the first evidence of large-scale, annual switches in air-sea CO2 flux within an inner shelf, and it holds significant implications for global estimates of air-sea CO2 flux.

  8. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature.

    PubMed

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X San

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes. PMID:26900086

  9. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature.

    PubMed

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X San

    2016-02-22

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes.

  10. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X. San

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes. PMID:26900086

  11. Effects of CO2 and Temperature on Tritrophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lee A.; Richards, Lora A.; Short, Stephanie A.; Dodson, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in studies of how global change parameters affect interacting species or entire communities, yet the combined or interactive effects of increased atmospheric CO2 and associated increases in global mean temperatures on chemically mediated trophic interactions are mostly unknown. Thus, predictions of climate-induced changes on plant-insect interactions are still based primarily on studies of individual species, individual global change parameters, pairwise interactions, or parameters that summarize communities. A clear understanding of community response to global change will only emerge from studies that examine effects of multiple variables on biotic interactions. We examined the effects of increased CO2 and temperature on simple laboratory communities of interacting alfalfa, chemical defense, armyworm caterpillars, and parasitoid wasps. Higher temperatures and CO2 caused decreased plant quality, decreased caterpillar development times, developmental asynchrony between caterpillars and wasps, and complete wasp mortality. The effects measured here, along with other effects of global change on natural enemies suggest that biological control and other top-down effects of insect predators will decline over the coming decades. PMID:23638105

  12. Functionalized Polysilsesquioxane-Based Hybrid Silica Solid Amine Sorbents for the Regenerative Removal of CO2 from Air.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Kochukunju Adisser Saraladevi; Deepthi, Thomas; Sadhana, Retnakumari Amma; Benny, K George

    2015-08-19

    Functionalized polysilsesquioxane-based hybrid silica materials are presented as solid amine sorbents for direct CO2 capture from air. The sorbent was synthesized from amine and vinyl functionalized alkoxysilanes by a simple, energy efficient, and cost-effective co-condensation method. The material, containing bound amine functionalities, was found to have a selective CO2 capturing capacity of 1.68 mmol/g from atmospheric air with an adsorption half time of 50 min. This material also showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 2.28 mmol/g in pure CO2 and 1.92 mmol/g in 10% CO2. Desorption started at a temperature as low as 60 °C, and complete desorption occurred at 80 °C. The sorbent exhibited high recycling ability, and 100 cycles of adsorption/desorption were demonstrated in pure CO2 and 50 cycles in ambient air without any loss in efficiency.

  13. Crop responses to elevated CO2 and interactions with H2O, N, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    About twenty-seven years ago, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology was developed that enabled the air above open-field plots to be enriched with CO2 for entire growing seasons. Since then, FACE experiments have been conducted on cotton, wheat, ryegrass, clover, potato, grape, rice, barley, sugar beet, soybean, cassava, rape, mustard, coffee (C3 crops), and sorghum and maize (C4 crops). Elevated CO2 (550ppm from an ambient concentration of about 353ppm in 1990) decreased evapotranspiration about 10% on average and increased canopy temperatures about 0.7°C. Biomass and yield were increased by FACE in all C3 species, but not in C4 species except when water was limiting. Yields of C3 grain crops were increased on average about 19%. PMID:27043481

  14. Extraction of CO2 from air samples for isotopic analysis and limits to ultra high precision delta18O determination in CO2 gas.

    PubMed

    Werner, R A; Rothe, M; Brand, W A

    2001-01-01

    The determination of delta18O values in CO2 at a precision level of +/-0.02 per thousand (delta-notation) has always been a challenging, if not impossible, analytical task. Here, we demonstrate that beyond the usually assumed major cause of uncertainty - water contamination - there are other, hitherto underestimated sources of contamination and processes which can alter the oxygen isotope composition of CO2. Active surfaces in the preparation line with which CO2 comes into contact, as well as traces of air in the sample, can alter the apparent delta18O value both temporarily and permanently. We investigated the effects of different surface materials including electropolished stainless steel, Duran glass, gold and quartz, the latter both untreated and silanized. CO2 frozen with liquid nitrogen showed a transient alteration of the 18O/16O ratio on all surfaces tested. The time to recover from the alteration as well as the size of the alteration varied with surface type. Quartz that had been ultrasonically cleaned for several hours with high purity water (0.05 microS) exhibited the smallest effect on the measured oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 before and after freezing. However, quartz proved to be mechanically unstable with time when subjected to repeated large temperature changes during operation. After several days of operation the gas released from the freezing step contained progressively increasing trace amounts of O2 probably originating from inclusions within the quartz, which precludes the use of quartz for cryogenically trapping CO2. Stainless steel or gold proved to be suitable materials after proper pre-treatment. To ensure a high trapping efficiency of CO2 from a flow of gas, a cold trap design was chosen comprising a thin wall 1/4" outer tube and a 1/8" inner tube, made respectively from electropolished stainless steel and gold. Due to a considerable 18O specific isotope effect during the release of CO2 from the cold surface, the thawing time had to

  15. Dual-Pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Temperature and CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucht, Robert P.; Velur-Natarajan, Viswanathan; Carter, Campbell D.; Grinstead, Keith D., Jr.; Gord, James R.; Danehy, Paul M.; Fiechtner, G. J.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and CO2 concentration using dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, (CARS) are described. The measurements were performed in laboratory flames,in a room-temperature gas cell, and on an engine test stand at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. A modeless dye laser, a single-mode Nd:YAG laser, and an unintensified back-illuminated charge-coupled device digital camera were used for these measurements. The CARS measurements were performed on a single-laser-shot basis. The standard deviations of the temperatures and CO2 mole fractions determined from single-shot dual-pump CARS spectra in steady laminar propane/air flames were approximately 2 and 10% of the mean values of approximately 2000 K and 0.10, respectively. The precision and accuracy of single-shot temperature measurements obtained from the nitrogen part of the dual-pump CARS system were investigated in detail in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air/CO2 flames. The precision of the CARS temperature measurements was found to be comparable to the best results reported in the literature for conventional two-laser, single-pump CARS. The application of dual-pump CARS for single-shot measurements in a swirl-stabilized combustor fueled with JP-8 was also demonstrated.

  16. Impact of ENSO on variability of AIRS retrieved CO2 over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, K.; Tiwari, Yogesh K.; Revadekar, J. V.; Vellore, Ramesh; Guha, Tania

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the impact of ENSO on the CO2 variability over the Indian subcontinent for the period 2003-2011 based on the relationships between NINO indices derived from the sea surface temperature (SST) and AIRS-retrieved mid-tropospheric CO2 concentrations. The NINO4 region exhibits positive influence on the variability of CO2 almost during the entire year except for the post-monsoon/winter months (October through December; OND). Significant positive relationship (correlation coefficient r = +0.68) between NINO4 index and CO2 levels is observed for the month of June, while negative relationship (r = -0.73) for the month of October, and the negative relationship tends to continue till November with decreasing magnitudes (r = -0.41). The spatial distribution of mid-tropospheric CO2 concentrations during El Niño and La Niña periods also indicate large-scale impact over the Indian subcontinent with positive (negative) anomalies of about 1-2 ppm during El Niño (La Niña).

  17. CO2 lasers and temperature changes of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Oyster, D K; Parker, W B; Gher, M E

    1995-12-01

    Lasers may be useful in uncovering submerged implants or in removing contaminants from "ailing" implants. The purposes of this study were to record temperature changes at the bone-titanium implant interface when using a CO2 laser to: 1) uncover the implant at second stage surgery; and 2) "decontaminate" exposed implant threads. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize surface changes of lased implants, both uncontaminated or contaminated with blood or saliva. In part one, 28 titanium implants, measuring 3.75 mm by 7 to 20 mm, were placed into room temperature, fresh, resected pig mandibles and covered with a flap of gingiva. The overlying tissue was removed with a CO2 laser at different power levels. Bone-implant interface temperatures were measured with a thermocouple near the top of the implant, and 5 to 7 mm apical to the osseous crest. The effects of implant size, power level, tissue thickness, and operation time were evaluated. In part two, 5 mm by 4 mm bony dehiscences were created on 3 implants in one mandible and the exposed fixture threads lased at varying times and power levels. The results from part one showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 4.2 to 16.8 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple ranged from 2.0 to 11.5 degrees C. The results from part two showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 1.2 to 11.7 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple from 0.0 to 5.0 degrees C. If baseline ambient temperatures are 37 degrees C, then the temperature at the bone-implant interface might exceed 50 degrees C. SEM revealed no gross surface changes in lased uncontaminated implants, but laser treatment alone of contaminated implants failed to completely remove saliva or blood. Further study is needed regarding temperature increases and surface changes induced by lasers that may adversely affect osseointegration.

  18. Detection of room air contamination of angiographic CO2 with use of a gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Culp, William C; Culp, William C

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a practical method to detect room air contamination in CO2 used for angiography. Samples of CO2 with known room air contamination levels were used in a "bag system" of CO2 delivery and sampled by a gas analyzer commonly used in anesthesia. Nitrogen levels were reliably detected indicating contamination with as little as 2% air. Oxygen levels were reliably detected, indicating contamination with as little as 5% air. Measured CO2 values were unreliable with higher-than-true values at all levels except 100%. All clinically important amounts of N2 and O2 contamination were readily detected by this practical method.

  19. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, S. V. Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N.; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P. V. Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q.

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation. PMID:27446143

  20. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, S V Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P V Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation. PMID:27446143

  1. CO2 Capture from the Air: Technology Assessment and Implications for Climate Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, D. W.

    2002-05-01

    It is physically possible to capture CO2 directly from the air and immobilize it in geological structures. Today, there are no large-scale technologies that achieve air capture at reasonable cost. Yet, strong arguments suggest that it will comparatively easy to develop practical air capture technologies on the timescales relevant to climate policy [1]. This paper first analyzes the cost of air capture and then assesses the implications for climate policy. We first analyze the lower bound on the cost needed for air capture, describing the thermodynamic and physical limits to the use of energy and land. We then compare the costs of air capture to the cost of capture from combustion exhaust streams. While the intrinsic minimum energy requirement is larger for air capture, we argue that air capture has important structural advantages, such as the reduction of transport costs and the larger potential for economies of scale. These advantages suggest that, in the long-run air capture be competitive with other methods of achieving deep emissions reductions. We provide a preliminary engineering-economic analysis of an air capture system based on CaO to CaCO3 chemical looping [1]. We analyze the possibility of doing the calcination in a modified pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) burning coal in a CO2 rich atmosphere with oxygen supplied by an air separation unit. The CaCO3-to-coal ratio would be ~2:1 and the system would be nearly thermally neutral. PFBC systems have been demonstrated at capacities of over 100 MW. Such systems already include CaCO3 injection for sulfur control, and operate at suitable temperatures and pressures for calcination. We assess the potential to recover heat from the dissolution of CaO in order to reduce the overall energy requirements. We analyze the possibility of adapting existing large water/air heat exchangers for use as contacting systems to capture CO2 from the air using the calcium hydroxide solution. The implications of air capture

  2. Diffuse CO 2 soil degassing and CO 2 and H 2S concentrations in air and related hazards at Vulcano Island (Aeolian arc, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Barberi, F.; Ranaldi, M.; Ricci, T.; Tarchini, L.; Barrancos, J.; Fischer, C.; Perez, N.; Weber, K.; Di Piazza, A.; Gattuso, A.

    2011-10-01

    La Fossa crater on Vulcano Island is quiescent since 1890. Periodically it undergoes "crises" characterized by marked increase of temperature (T), gas output and concentration of magmatic components in the crater fumaroles (T may exceed 600 °C). During these crises, which so far did not lead to any eruptive reactivation, the diffuse CO 2 soil degassing also increases and in December 2005 an anomalous CO 2 flux of 1350 tons/day was estimated by 1588 measurements over a surface of 1.66 km 2 extending from La Fossa crater to the inhabited zone of Vulcano Porto. The crater area and two other anomalously degassing sites (Levante Beach and Palizzi) have been periodically investigated from December 2004 to August 2010 for diffuse CO 2 soil flux. They show a marked variation with time of the degassing rate, with synchronous maxima in December 2005. Carbon dioxide soil flux and environmental parameters have been also continuously monitored for over one year by an automatic station at Vulcano Porto. In order to assess the hazard of the endogenous gas emissions, CO 2 and H 2S air concentrations have been measured by Tunable Diode Laser profiles near the fumaroles of the crater rim and of the Levante Beach area, where also the viscous gas flux has been estimated. In addition, CO 2 air concentration has been measured both indoor and outdoor in an inhabited sector of Vulcano Porto. Results show that in some sites usually frequented by tourists there is a dangerous H 2S air concentration and CO 2 exceeds the hazardous thresholds in some Vulcano houses. These zones should be immediately monitored for gas hazard should a new crisis arise.

  3. Simulation of climate change impacts on grain sorghum production grown under free air CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tongcheng; Ko, Jonghan; Wall, Gerard W.; Pinter, Paul J.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Ottman, Michael J.; Kim, Han-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Potential impacts of climate change on grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) productivity were investigated using the CERES-sorghum model in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer v4.5. The model was first calibrated for a sorghum cultivar grown in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment at the University of Arizona, Maricopa, Arizona, USA in 1998. The model was then validated with an independent dataset collected in 1999. The simulated grain yield, growth, and soil water of sorghum for the both years were in statistical agreement with the corresponding measurements, respectively. Neither simulated nor measured yields responded to elevated CO2, but both were sensitive to water supply. The validated model was then applied to simulate possible effects of climate change on sorghum grain yield and water use efficiency in western North America for the years 2080-2100. The projected CO2 fertilizer effect on grain yield was dominated by the adverse effect of projected temperature increases. Therefore, temperature appears to be a dominant driver of the global climate change influencing future sorghum productivity. These results suggest that an increase in water demand for sorghum production should be anticipated in a future high-CO2 world.

  4. Temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange in a low-emission estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Sørensen, Lise Lotte

    2016-07-01

    There is the need for further study of whether global estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange in estuarine systems capture the relevant temporal variability and, as such, the temporal variability of bulk parameterized and directly measured CO2 fluxes was investigated in the Danish estuary, Roskilde Fjord. The air-sea CO2 fluxes showed large temporal variability across seasons and between days and that more than 30% of the net CO2 emission in 2013 was a result of two large fall and winter storms. The diurnal variability of ΔpCO2 was up to 400 during summer changing the estuary from a source to a sink of CO2 within the day. Across seasons the system was suggested to change from a sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring to near neutral during summer and later to a source of atmospheric CO2 during fall. Results indicated that Roskilde Fjord was an annual low-emission estuary, with an estimated bulk parameterized release of 3.9 ± 8.7 mol CO2 m-2 y-1 during 2012-2013. It was suggested that the production-respiration balance leading to the low annual emission in Roskilde Fjord, was caused by the shallow depth, long residence time and high water quality in the estuary. In the data analysis the eddy covariance CO2 flux samples were filtered according to the H2Osbnd CO2 cross-sensitivity assessment suggested by Landwehr et al. (2014). This filtering reduced episodes of contradicting directions between measured and bulk parameterized air-sea CO2 exchanges and changed the net air-sea CO2 exchange from an uptake to a release. The CO2 gas transfer velocity was calculated from directly measured CO2 fluxes and ΔpCO2 and agreed to previous observations and parameterizations.

  5. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  6. Influence of vertical temperature contrasts and diel cycles on near-surface seawater pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Robin; deYoung, Brad

    2016-04-01

    While the oceanic mixed layer is sometimes assumed to be of vertically-uniform temperature, it is well-known that considerable temperature gradients (>0.1C/m) can develop within its upper few meters, particularly in the tropics during daytime. Given that the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2sw) is strongly temperature-dependent, ceteris paribus (all else being equal), we would expect to observe sizeable corresponding vertical pCO2sw gradients under such situations. If prevalent and persistent, such gradients could affect the accuracy of large-scale air-sea CO2 flux estimates since, while intended to be representative of the sea surface skin, the pCO2sw measurements used to compute these are typically from underway systems sampling at 2-4m depth. Vertical variability in pCO2sw could thus be an important but as yet, poorly quantified uncertainty in air-sea CO2 flux estimates. As a first step towards assessing this uncertainty, we derive a global gridded monthly climatology for the peak daily vertical temperature contrast between the upper (0-2m) and lower (2-10m) sea surface and compute the corresponding vertical pCO2sw differences these would cause, ceteris paribus. The latter are an estimate of the temperature-driven pCO2 contrast we would expect to find in a given month between the upper sea surface and the sampling depth of an underway system at the time of the peak temperature contrast in the daily cycle. In addition, we construct a monthly climatology for the amplitude of diel variation in upper sea temperature and compute the corresponding diel pCO2sw amplitudes these would generate, ceteris paribus. While these analyses reveal the locations and months for which vertical temperature contrasts and diel cycles are likely to exert a strong influence on pCO2sw, temperature is only one factor influencing this carbonate chemistry parameter. In situ measurements are required to reveal the actual dynamics of pCO2sw under the influence of all competing factors

  7. Regenerable device for scrubbing breathable air of CO2 and moisture without special heat exchanger equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tepper, E. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The device concerns the circulation of cabin air through canisters which absorb and adsorb carbon dioxide, together with excess moisture, and return the scrubbed air to the cabin for recirculation. A coating on an inert substrate in granular form absorbs and adsorbs the impurities at standard temperatures and pressures, but desorbs such impurities at low pressures (vacuum) and standard temperatures. This fact is exploited by making the device in a stack of cells consisting of layers or cells which are isolated from one another flow-wise and are connected to separate manifolds and valving systems into two separate subsets. A first subset may be connected for the flow breathable air therethrough until the polyethyleneimine of its cells is saturated with CO2 and H2O. During the same period the second subset of cells is manifolded to a vacuum source.

  8. Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air

    PubMed Central

    House, Kurt Zenz; Baclig, Antonio C.; Ranjan, Manya; van Nierop, Ernst A.; Wilcox, Jennifer; Herzog, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (“air capture”) in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO2 concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per tonne of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. We investigate the thermodynamic efficiencies of commercial separation systems as well as trace gas removal systems to better understand and constrain the energy requirements and costs of these air capture systems. Our empirical analyses of operating commercial processes suggest that the energetic and financial costs of capturing CO2 from the air are likely to have been underestimated. Specifically, our analysis of existing gas separation systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mole of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 negative. We estimate that total system costs of an air capture system will be on the order of $1,000 per tonne of CO2, based on experience with as-built large-scale trace gas removal systems. PMID:22143760

  9. High temperature phase transformation studies in magnetite nanoparticles doped with Co2+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Gopinath, S.; Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M. P.; Philip, John

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the effect of Co2+ ion doping in magnetite (Fe3O4) on its crystal structure, magnetic properties, and phase stability during air and vacuum annealing. The nanoparticles are prepared by co-precipitation method and the particles are characterized by XRD, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), themogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and vibrating sample magnetometer. The SAXS analysis on the doped samples show the most probable size, shape, and the polydispersity of particles, synthesized with different fractions (0-0.6) of Co2+ ion doping remains almost the same. On increasing cobalt content ferrimagnetic to the antiferromagnetic hematite (α-Fe2O3) phase transformation temperature is found to increase dramatically. For 0.1 fraction of Co2+ metal ion doping, an enhancement of 100 °C in the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature is observed in the air annealed samples, whereas magnetic nature remains stable up to 1000 °C in vacuum annealed samples. On increasing the cobalt fractions beyond 0.2, air annealed samples show no change in the phase transition temperature. The observed enhancement in the phase transition temperature is attributed to the increased activation energy for phase transformation in presence of Co2+. Further, the DSC results corroborate the finding of an increase in the maghemite to hematite phase transition temperature with increase in cobalt fraction (x). The decrease in enthalpy from 89.86 to 17.62 J g-1 with an increase in cobalt content indicates that the degree of conversion of maghemite to hematite decreases with the cobalt content, which is in good agreement with the Rietveld analysis. The decrease in the Ms value in air annealed sample is attributed to the re-distribution of cations in the tetrahedral and octahedral sites, as the Fe3+A-Fe3+B super-exchange interaction is different from the Co2+A-Fe3+B interaction. These results suggest that a very small percentage of Co2+ metal ion doping can

  10. Reduction of CO 2 concentration in a zinc/air battery by absorption in a rotating packed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsu-Hsiang; Tan, Chung-Sung

    The reduction of CO 2 concentration in a gas stream containing 500 ppm of CO 2 by a technique combining chemical absorption with Higee (high gravity) was investigated in this study. Using a 2.0 L aqueous amine-based solution to treat the feed gas with a flow rate which varied from 12.9 to 20.6 L min -1, piperazine (PZ) was found to be more effective than 2-(2-aminoethylamino) ethanol (AEEA) and monoethanolamine (MEA) for reducing the CO 2 concentration to a level below 20 ppm. The effects of temperature, rotating speed, amine solution flow rate, and gas flow rate on the removal efficiency of CO 2 were systematically examined. The results indicated that the proposed compact device could effectively reduce CO 2 to a level below 20 ppm, as required by a zinc/air battery, for a long period of time using PZ and its mixture with AEEA and MEA as the absorbents.

  11. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on rice canopy microlimate].

    PubMed

    Luo, Weihong; Mayumi, Yoshimoto; Dai, Jianfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Han, Yong; Liu, Gan

    2002-10-01

    In this study, the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system (setup at at Anzhen, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province in 2001) was used to investigate the effects of FACE on rice canopy microclimate. The rice canopy microclimate observations were carried out from August 26 to October 13, 2001, when the rice crops were at the heading to maturing development stage. The results showed that FACE reduced the rice leaf stomatal conductance. The rice leaf stomatal conductance difference between FACE and ambient was larger among upper layer leaves than among lower layer leaves and at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. FACE increased daytime rice canopy temperature but had little effect on nighttime rice canopy temperature. The daytime rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient was larger at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. From heading to flowering, the daily maximum rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient reached 1.2 degrees C under fine weather condition. The average daytime rice canopy temperature from flowering to maturing stage was about 0.43 degree C. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was also affected by FACE. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was higher in FACE plot than in ambient plot. The value of daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient increased with the increase of solar radiation and varied with height. The maximum daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient varied between 0.47-1.2 degrees C and 0.37-0.8 degree C at middle of canopy and canopy height, respectively. Air humidity and nighttime air temperature inside rice canopy were not significantly affected by FACE. These results indicate that FACE reducing rice leaf stomatal conductance was the major cause of the increase of canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot. The higher canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot resulted in the earlier

  12. Vibro-acoustic characterization of flexible hose in CO2 car air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bergami, A.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    Following the EU directive 2006/40/EC proscribing from 2011 that refrigerant fluids must have a global warming potential not higher than 150, it will not be allowed anymore to employ the current R134a on car air conditioning systems. Maflow s.p.a (automotive hose maker) is developing products for each possible new refrigerant. This paper is focused on hoses for CO2 refrigerants operating in the worst conditions because of the high pressures and temperatures at which they are working (with R134a the high pressure is 18 bar and low pressure is 3 bar; with CO2 the high pressure is 100 bar and low pressure is 35 bar). Therefore the noise emission control of the CO2 air conditioning systems is very important. The aim of this study is to develop a standard measurement method for the vibro - acoustic characterization of High Pressure (HP - Shark F4) and Low Pressure (LP - ULEV) hoses to reduce noise emission and raise car passenger comfort; in particular deep research on high pressure hose. The method is based on the measurement of the vibration level of the hoses in a standard test bench by means of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and its acoustic emission by a sound intensity probe.

  13. Controlling the temperature of bones using pulsed CO2 lasers: observations and mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Luc; Noël, Jean-Marc; Scott, Calum

    2015-01-01

    Temperature of porcine bone specimens are investigated by aiming a pulsed CO2 laser beam at the bone-air surface. This method of controlling temperature is believed to be flexible in medical applications as it avoids the uses of thermal devices, which are often cumbersome and generate rather larger temperature variations with time. The control of temperature using this method is modeled by the heat-conduction equation. In this investigation, it is assumed that the energy delivered by the CO2 laser is confined within a very thin surface layer of roughly 9 μm. It is shown that temperature can be maintained at a steady temperature using a CO2 laser and we demonstrate that the method can be adapted to be used in tandem with another laser beam. This method to control the temperature is believed to be useful in de-contamination of bone during the implantation treatment, in bone augmentation when using natural or synthetic materials and in low-level laser therapy. PMID:26713192

  14. Controlling the temperature of bones using pulsed CO2 lasers: observations and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Luc; Noël, Jean-Marc; Scott, Calum

    2015-12-01

    Temperature of porcine bone specimens are investigated by aiming a pulsed CO2 laser beam at the bone-air surface. This method of controlling temperature is believed to be flexible in medical applications as it avoids the uses of thermal devices, which are often cumbersome and generate rather larger temperature variations with time. The control of temperature using this method is modeled by the heat-conduction equation. In this investigation, it is assumed that the energy delivered by the CO2 laser is confined within a very thin surface layer of roughly 9 μm. It is shown that temperature can be maintained at a steady temperature using a CO2 laser and we demonstrate that the method can be adapted to be used in tandem with another laser beam. This method to control the temperature is believed to be useful in de-contamination of bone during the implantation treatment, in bone augmentation when using natural or synthetic materials and in low-level laser therapy. PMID:26713192

  15. Rice grain yield and quality responses to free-air CO2 enrichment combined with soil and water warming.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Tokida, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2016-03-01

    Rising air temperatures are projected to reduce rice yield and quality, whereas increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2 ]) can increase grain yield. For irrigated rice, ponded water is an important temperature environment, but few open-field evaluations are available on the combined effects of temperature and [CO2 ], which limits our ability to predict future rice production. We conducted free-air CO2 enrichment and soil and water warming experiments, for three growing seasons to determine the yield and quality response to elevated [CO2 ] (+200 μmol mol(-1) , E-[CO2 ]) and soil and water temperatures (+2 °C, E-T). E-[CO2 ] significantly increased biomass and grain yield by approximately 14% averaged over 3 years, mainly because of increased panicle and spikelet density. E-T significantly increased biomass but had no significant effect on the grain yield. E-T decreased days from transplanting to heading by approximately 1%, but days to the maximum tiller number (MTN) stage were reduced by approximately 8%, which limited the panicle density and therefore sink capacity. On the other hand, E-[CO2 ] increased days to the MTN stage by approximately 4%, leading to a greater number of tillers. Grain appearance quality was decreased by both treatments, but E-[CO2 ] showed a much larger effect than did E-T. The significant decrease in undamaged grains (UDG) by E-[CO2 ] was mainly the result of an increased percentage of white-base grains (WBSG), which were negatively correlated with grain protein content. A significant decrease in grain protein content by E-[CO2 ] accounted in part for the increased WBSG. The dependence of WBSG on grain protein content, however, was different among years; the slope and intercept of the relationship were positively correlated with a heat dose above 26 °C. Year-to-year variation in the response of grain appearance quality demonstrated that E-[CO2 ] and rising air temperatures synergistically reduce grain appearance quality of

  16. Variations in atmospheric CO2 growth rates coupled with tropical temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weile; Ciais, Philippe; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Canadell, Josep G.; Piao, Shilong; Sitch, Stephen; White, Michael A.; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Milesi, Cristina; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the occurrence and intensity of El Niño–Southern Oscillation as important drivers of the interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 growth rate, but the underlying biogeophysical mechanisms governing such connections remain unclear. Here we show a strong and persistent coupling (r2 ≈ 0.50) between interannual variations of the CO2 growth rate and tropical land–surface air temperature during 1959 to 2011, with a 1 °C tropical temperature anomaly leading to a 3.5 ± 0.6 Petagrams of carbon per year (PgC/y) CO2 growth-rate anomaly on average. Analysis of simulation results from Dynamic Global Vegetation Models suggests that this temperature–CO2 coupling is contributed mainly by the additive responses of heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and net primary production (NPP) to temperature variations in tropical ecosystems. However, we find a weaker and less consistent (r2 ≈ 0.25) interannual coupling between CO2 growth rate and tropical land precipitation than diagnosed from the Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, likely resulting from the subtractive responses of tropical Rh and NPP to precipitation anomalies that partly offset each other in the net ecosystem exchange (i.e., net ecosystem exchange ≈ Rh − NPP). Variations in other climate variables (e.g., large-scale cloudiness) and natural disturbances (e.g., volcanic eruptions) may induce transient reductions in the temperature–CO2 coupling, but the relationship is robust during the past 50 y and shows full recovery within a few years after any such major variability event. Therefore, it provides an important diagnostic tool for improved understanding of the contemporary and future global carbon cycle. PMID:23884654

  17. Experimental and modeling study on effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition characteristics of methane/air mixture

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen; Ma, Hongan; Liang, Yuntao; Hu, Erjiang

    2014-01-01

    The ignition delay times of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 were experimentally measured in a chemical shock tube. The experiments were performed over the temperature range of 1300–2100 K, pressure range of 0.1–1.0 MPa, equivalence ratio range of 0.5–2.0 and for the dilution coefficients of 0%, 20% and 50%. The results suggest that a linear relationship exists between the reciprocal of temperature and the logarithm of the ignition delay times. Meanwhile, with ignition temperature and pressure increasing, the measured ignition delay times of methane/air mixture are decreasing. Furthermore, an increase in the dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2 results in increasing ignition delays and the inhibition effect of CO2 on methane/air mixture ignition is stronger than that of N2. Simulated ignition delays of methane/air mixture using three kinetic models were compared to the experimental data. Results show that GRI_3.0 mechanism gives the best prediction on ignition delays of methane/air mixture and it was selected to identify the effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition delays and the key elementary reactions in the ignition chemistry of methane/air mixture. Comparisons of the calculated ignition delays with the experimental data of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 show excellent agreement, and sensitivity coefficients of chain branching reactions which promote mixture ignition decrease with increasing dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2. PMID:25750753

  18. Experimental and modeling study on effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition characteristics of methane/air mixture.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Ma, Hongan; Liang, Yuntao; Hu, Erjiang

    2015-03-01

    The ignition delay times of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 were experimentally measured in a chemical shock tube. The experiments were performed over the temperature range of 1300-2100 K, pressure range of 0.1-1.0 MPa, equivalence ratio range of 0.5-2.0 and for the dilution coefficients of 0%, 20% and 50%. The results suggest that a linear relationship exists between the reciprocal of temperature and the logarithm of the ignition delay times. Meanwhile, with ignition temperature and pressure increasing, the measured ignition delay times of methane/air mixture are decreasing. Furthermore, an increase in the dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2 results in increasing ignition delays and the inhibition effect of CO2 on methane/air mixture ignition is stronger than that of N2. Simulated ignition delays of methane/air mixture using three kinetic models were compared to the experimental data. Results show that GRI_3.0 mechanism gives the best prediction on ignition delays of methane/air mixture and it was selected to identify the effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition delays and the key elementary reactions in the ignition chemistry of methane/air mixture. Comparisons of the calculated ignition delays with the experimental data of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 show excellent agreement, and sensitivity coefficients of chain branching reactions which promote mixture ignition decrease with increasing dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2. PMID:25750753

  19. Experimental and modeling study on effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition characteristics of methane/air mixture.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Ma, Hongan; Liang, Yuntao; Hu, Erjiang

    2015-03-01

    The ignition delay times of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 were experimentally measured in a chemical shock tube. The experiments were performed over the temperature range of 1300-2100 K, pressure range of 0.1-1.0 MPa, equivalence ratio range of 0.5-2.0 and for the dilution coefficients of 0%, 20% and 50%. The results suggest that a linear relationship exists between the reciprocal of temperature and the logarithm of the ignition delay times. Meanwhile, with ignition temperature and pressure increasing, the measured ignition delay times of methane/air mixture are decreasing. Furthermore, an increase in the dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2 results in increasing ignition delays and the inhibition effect of CO2 on methane/air mixture ignition is stronger than that of N2. Simulated ignition delays of methane/air mixture using three kinetic models were compared to the experimental data. Results show that GRI_3.0 mechanism gives the best prediction on ignition delays of methane/air mixture and it was selected to identify the effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition delays and the key elementary reactions in the ignition chemistry of methane/air mixture. Comparisons of the calculated ignition delays with the experimental data of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 show excellent agreement, and sensitivity coefficients of chain branching reactions which promote mixture ignition decrease with increasing dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2.

  20. Effect of diurnal and seasonal temperature variation on Cussac cave ventilation using co2 assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyraube, Nicolas; Lastennet, Roland; Villanueva, Jessica Denila; Houillon, Nicolas; Malaurent, Philippe; Denis, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Cussac cave was investigated to assess the cave air temperature variations and to understand its ventilation regime. This cave is located in an active karst system in the south west part of France. It has a single entrance and is considered as a cold air trap. In this study, air mass exchanges were probed. Measurements of temperature and Pco2 with a 30-min frequency were made in several locations close to the cave entrance. Speed of the air flow was also measured at the door of cave entrance. Results show that cave air Pco2 varies from 0.18 to 3.33 %. This cave appears to be a CO2 source with a net mass of 2319 tons blown in 2009. Carbon-stable isotope of CO2 (13Cco2) ranges from -20.6 ‰ in cold season to -23.8 ‰ in warm season. Cave air is interpreted as a result of a mix between external air and an isotopically depleted air, coming from the rock environment. The isotopic value of the light member varies through time, from -23.9 to -22.5 ‰. Furthermore, this study ascertains that the cave never stops in communicating with the external air. The ventilation regime is identified. (1) In cold season, the cave inhales at night and blows a little at the warmest hours. However, in warm season, (2) cave blows at night, but (3) during the day, a convection loop takes place in the entrance area and prevents the external air from entering the cave, confirming the cold air trap.

  1. Global and Regional Seasonal Variability of Mid-Tropospheric CO2 as Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.; Nguyen, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002 into a near polar sun-synchronous orbit. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 ?m to 15.4 ?m and a 13.5 km footprint at nadir. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4. AIRS CO2 climatologies have been shown to be useful for identifying anomalies associated with geophysical events such as El Nino-Southern Oscillation or Madden-Julian oscillation. In this study, monthly representations of mid-tropospheric CO2 are constructed from 10 years of AIRS Version 5 monthly Level 3 data. We compare the AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2 representations to ground-based measurements from the Scripps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Modeling and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA CMDL) ground networks to better understand the phase lag of the CO2 seasonal cycle between the surface and middle troposphere. Results show only a small phase lag in the tropics that grows to approximately two months in the northern latitudes.

  2. High-speed Air Temperature Measurements in a Closed-path Cell and Quality of CO2 and H2O Fluxes from a Short-tube Gas Analyzer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Fratini, G.

    2015-12-01

    Gas analyzers traditionally used for eddy covariance method measure gas density. When fluxes are calculated, corrections are applied to account for the changes in gas density due to changing temperature and pressure (Ideal Gas Law) and changing water vapor density (Dalton's Law). The new generation of gas analyzers with fast air temperature and pressure measurements in the sampling cell enables on-the-fly calculation of fast dry mole fraction. This significantly simplifies the flux processing because the WPL density terms are no longer required, and leads to the reduction in uncertainties associated with latent and sensible heat flux inputs into the density terms. Traditional closed-path instruments with long intake tubes often can effectively dampen the fast temperature fluctuations in the tube before reaching the measurement cell, thus reducing or eliminating the need for temperature correction for density-based fluxes. But in instruments with a short-tube design, most - but not all - of the temperature fluctuations are attenuated, so calculating unbiased fluxes using fast dry mole fraction requires high-speed precise temperature measurements of the air stream inside the cell. Fast pressure and water vapor content of the sampled air should also be measured in the cell and carefully aligned in time with gas density and sample temperature measurements.In this study we examine the impact of fast-response air temperature measurements in the cell on the calculations of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes at different time scales from three different ecosystems. The fast cell air temperature data is filtered mathematically to obtain slower response cell temperature time series, which is used in the calculation of fluxes. This exercise is intended to simulate the use of thicker slower response thermocouples instead of fast response fine wire thermocouples for estimating cell temperature. The directly measured block temperature is also utilized to illustrate the

  3. Tree and forest water use under elevated CO2 and temperature in Scandinavian boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg Hasper, Thomas; Wallin, Göran; Lamba, Shubhangi; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Medhurst, Jane L.; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Uddling, Johan

    2014-05-01

    According to experimental studies and models, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to affect stomatal conductance and, consequently, tree and forest transpiration. This effect has in turn the capacity to influence the terrestrial energy and water balance, including affecting of the magnitude of river runoff. Furthermore, forest productivity is currently water-limited in southern Scandinavia and in a near future, under the projected climatic change, this limitation may become a reality in the central and northern parts of Scandinavia. In this study we examine the water-use responses in 12 40-year old native boreal Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees exposed to a factorial combination of two levels of [CO2] (ambient and doubled) and temperature (ambient and +2.8 °C in summer / +5.6 °C in winter), as well as of entire boreal forests to temporal variation in [CO2], temperature and precipitation over the past 50 years in central and northern Sweden. The controlled factorial CO2 and temperature whole-tree chamber experiment at Flakaliden study site demonstrated that Norway spruce trees lacked elevated [CO2]-induced water savings at guard cell, shoot, and tree levels in the years of measurements. Experimentally, elevated temperature did not result in increased shoot or tree water use as stomatal closure fully cancelled the effect of higher vapour pressure deficit in warmed air environment. Consistent with these results, large scale river runoff data and evapotranspiration estimates from large forested watersheds in central Sweden supported lack of elevated CO2-mediated water savings, and rather suggested that the increasing evapotranspiration trend found in this study was primarily linked to increasing precipitation, rising temperature and more efficient forest management. The results from the whole-tree chamber experiment and boreal forested watersheds have important implications for more accurate

  4. Response of microalgae to elevated CO2 and temperature: impact of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaoguang; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Niu, Qigui; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the combined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on microalgae, three typical and worldwide freshwater species, the green alga Scenedesmus acuminatus, the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana, and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, as well as mixes of these three species were continuously cultured in controlled environment chambers with CO2 at 390 and 1000 ppm and temperatures of 20, 25, and 30 °C. CO2 and temperature significantly affected the production of microalgae. The cell productivity increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. Although the green alga dominated in the mixed culture within all CO2 and temperature conditions, rising temperature and CO2 intensified the competition of the cyanobacterium with other microalgae. CO2 affected the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics of the green alga and the cyanobacterium. Elevated CO2 induced the generation of humic substances in the EPS fractions of the green alga, the cyanobacterium, and the mixed culture. The extracellular carbohydrates of the diatom and the extracellular proteins of the cyanobacterium increased with elevated CO2 and temperature, while the extracellular carbohydrates and proteins of the green alga and the mixes increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. There were synergistic effects of CO2 and temperature on the productivity and the EPS of microalgae. Climate change related CO2 and temperature increases will promote autochthonous organic carbon production in aquatic ecosystems and facilitate the proliferation of cyanobacteria, which potentially changes the carbon cycling and undermines the functioning of ecosystems. PMID:27421856

  5. Response of microalgae to elevated CO2 and temperature: impact of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaoguang; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Niu, Qigui; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the combined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on microalgae, three typical and worldwide freshwater species, the green alga Scenedesmus acuminatus, the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana, and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, as well as mixes of these three species were continuously cultured in controlled environment chambers with CO2 at 390 and 1000 ppm and temperatures of 20, 25, and 30 °C. CO2 and temperature significantly affected the production of microalgae. The cell productivity increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. Although the green alga dominated in the mixed culture within all CO2 and temperature conditions, rising temperature and CO2 intensified the competition of the cyanobacterium with other microalgae. CO2 affected the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics of the green alga and the cyanobacterium. Elevated CO2 induced the generation of humic substances in the EPS fractions of the green alga, the cyanobacterium, and the mixed culture. The extracellular carbohydrates of the diatom and the extracellular proteins of the cyanobacterium increased with elevated CO2 and temperature, while the extracellular carbohydrates and proteins of the green alga and the mixes increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. There were synergistic effects of CO2 and temperature on the productivity and the EPS of microalgae. Climate change related CO2 and temperature increases will promote autochthonous organic carbon production in aquatic ecosystems and facilitate the proliferation of cyanobacteria, which potentially changes the carbon cycling and undermines the functioning of ecosystems.

  6. Reducing the cost of Ca-based direct air capture of CO2.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Direct air capture, the chemical removal of CO2 directly from the atmosphere, may play a role in mitigating future climate risk or form the basis of a sustainable transportation infrastructure. The current discussion is centered on the estimated cost of the technology and its link to "overshoot" trajectories, where atmospheric CO2 levels are actively reduced later in the century. The American Physical Society (APS) published a report, later updated, estimating the cost of a one million tonne CO2 per year air capture facility constructed today that highlights several fundamental concepts of chemical air capture. These fundamentals are viewed through the lens of a chemical process that cycles between removing CO2 from the air and releasing the absorbed CO2 in concentrated form. This work builds on the APS report to investigate the effect of modifications to the air capture system based on suggestions in the report and subsequent publications. The work shows that reduced carbon electricity and plastic packing materials (for the contactor) may have significant effects on the overall price, reducing the APS estimate from $610 to $309/tCO2 avoided. Such a reduction does not challenge postcombustion capture from point sources, estimated at $80/tCO2, but does make air capture a feasible alternative for the transportation sector and a potential negative emissions technology. Furthermore, air capture represents atmospheric reductions rather than simply avoided emissions. PMID:25207956

  7. Reducing the cost of Ca-based direct air capture of CO2.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Direct air capture, the chemical removal of CO2 directly from the atmosphere, may play a role in mitigating future climate risk or form the basis of a sustainable transportation infrastructure. The current discussion is centered on the estimated cost of the technology and its link to "overshoot" trajectories, where atmospheric CO2 levels are actively reduced later in the century. The American Physical Society (APS) published a report, later updated, estimating the cost of a one million tonne CO2 per year air capture facility constructed today that highlights several fundamental concepts of chemical air capture. These fundamentals are viewed through the lens of a chemical process that cycles between removing CO2 from the air and releasing the absorbed CO2 in concentrated form. This work builds on the APS report to investigate the effect of modifications to the air capture system based on suggestions in the report and subsequent publications. The work shows that reduced carbon electricity and plastic packing materials (for the contactor) may have significant effects on the overall price, reducing the APS estimate from $610 to $309/tCO2 avoided. Such a reduction does not challenge postcombustion capture from point sources, estimated at $80/tCO2, but does make air capture a feasible alternative for the transportation sector and a potential negative emissions technology. Furthermore, air capture represents atmospheric reductions rather than simply avoided emissions.

  8. Climatological mean and decadal change in surface ocean pCO 2, and net sea-air CO 2 flux over the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Sweeney, Colm; Feely, Richard A.; Chipman, David W.; Hales, Burke; Friederich, Gernot; Chavez, Francisco; Sabine, Christopher; Watson, Andrew; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Schuster, Ute; Metzl, Nicolas; Yoshikawa-Inoue, Hisayuki; Ishii, Masao; Midorikawa, Takashi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Körtzinger, Arne; Steinhoff, Tobias; Hoppema, Mario; Olafsson, Jon; Arnarson, Thorarinn S.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Bellerby, Richard; Wong, C. S.; Delille, Bruno; Bates, N. R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2009-04-01

    A climatological mean distribution for the surface water pCO 2 over the global oceans in non-El Niño conditions has been constructed with spatial resolution of 4° (latitude) ×5° (longitude) for a reference year 2000 based upon about 3 million measurements of surface water pCO 2 obtained from 1970 to 2007. The database used for this study is about 3 times larger than the 0.94 million used for our earlier paper [Takahashi et al., 2002. Global sea-air CO 2 flux based on climatological surface ocean pCO 2, and seasonal biological and temperature effects. Deep-Sea Res. II, 49, 1601-1622]. A time-trend analysis using deseasonalized surface water pCO 2 data in portions of the North Atlantic, North and South Pacific and Southern Oceans (which cover about 27% of the global ocean areas) indicates that the surface water pCO 2 over these oceanic areas has increased on average at a mean rate of 1.5 μatm y -1 with basin-specific rates varying between 1.2±0.5 and 2.1±0.4 μatm y -1. A global ocean database for a single reference year 2000 is assembled using this mean rate for correcting observations made in different years to the reference year. The observations made during El Niño periods in the equatorial Pacific and those made in coastal zones are excluded from the database. Seasonal changes in the surface water pCO 2 and the sea-air pCO 2 difference over four climatic zones in the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans are presented. Over the Southern Ocean seasonal ice zone, the seasonality is complex. Although it cannot be thoroughly documented due to the limited extent of observations, seasonal changes in pCO 2 are approximated by using the data for under-ice waters during austral winter and those for the marginal ice and ice-free zones. The net air-sea CO 2 flux is estimated using the sea-air pCO 2 difference and the air-sea gas transfer rate that is parameterized as a function of (wind speed) 2 with a scaling factor of 0.26. This is estimated by inverting

  9. Energy and material balance of CO2 capture from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Current Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies focus on large, stationary sources that produce approximately 50% of global CO2 emissions. We propose an industrial technology that captures CO2 directly from ambient air to target the remaining emissions. First, a wet scrubbing technique absorbs CO2 into a sodium hydroxide solution. The resultant carbonate is transferred from sodium ions to calcium ions via causticization. The captured CO2 is released from the calcium carbonate through thermal calcination in a modified kiln. The energy consumption is calculated as 350 kJ/mol of CO2 captured. It is dominated by the thermal energy demand of the kiln and the mechanical power required for air movement. The low concentration of CO2 in air requires a throughput of 3 million cubic meters of air per ton of CO2 removed, which could result in significant water losses. Electricity consumption in the process results in CO2 emissions and the use of coal power would significantly reduce to net amount captured. The thermodynamic efficiency of this process is low but comparable to other "end of pipe" capture technologies. As another carbon mitigation technology, air capture could allow for the continued use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels in the transportation sector.

  10. Investigating the major carbon input to cave-air CO2 and speleothem calcite by using the respiratory quotient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergel, S.; Breecker, D.; Carlson, P.; Larson, T.; Banner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Speleothems (cave mineral deposits) are used to reconstruct changes in rainfall, moisture sources, atmospheric temperatures, and vegetation. Soil respiration is generally considered to be one of the major sources of cave-air CO2, and by extension a major source of carbon in speleothem calcite. However, the δ13C values from speleothem calcite are difficult to interpret. The purpose of this study is to investigate the major source of carbon in cave-air CO2 using a novel tracer, and thereby increase the accuracy of δ13C from speleothem calcite as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Potential sources of CO2 in cave-air include (1) soil respiration (primarily from roots and microbes), (2) animal respiration, (3) in-cave decomposition of organic matter, (4) deep magmatic or metamorphic sources, and (5) atmospheric air. Of these potential sources, soil respiration and atmospheric air are currently considered to be most significant in most caves. We use the respiratory quotient (RQ, which is the number of moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed, defined here in relation to atmospheric air) to compare cave air and overlying soil gas at two localities in central Texas: Natural Bridge Caverns and Inner Space Cavern. Soil gas samples (RQ = 1.32) follow a trend expected for respiration followed by diffusion whereas cave air samples (RQ = 0.97) follow a trend expected for respiration without subsequent diffusion. We suggest that root and rhizomicrobial respiration below the soil in the epikarst fracture network, where gas transport is dominated by advection rather than diffusion, contributes significantly to cave-air CO2. This is important because 12CO2 preferentially diffuses out of soils, elevating the d13C values of residual soil CO2, whereas no carbon isotope fractionation occurs during advection. Our interpretation of RQ values suggests that the d13C value of cave-air CO2 is not influenced by diffusive loss of CO2. In order to further investigate soil and cave carbon

  11. Temperature and CO2 effect on phrenic activity and tracheal occlusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Trippenbach, T; Milic-Emili, J

    1977-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the interaction of CO2 and body temperature on phrenic activity (moving average) and tracheal occlusion pressure. Studies were performed on spontaneously ventilated cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium at different body temperatures (32-41 degrees C) while breathing room air, 2 and 4% CO2 in 50% O2. At any given chemical drive, increased body temperature caused a similar increase in rate of phrenic activity and tracheal occlusion pressure, while their peak values remained virtually unchanged. At any given body temperature, increased chemical drive caused an increase in both rate of rise and peak values of phrenic activity and tracheal occlusion pressure. These results confirm previous findings that body temperature affects the rate of rise of the central inspiratory activity (CIA), but not the inspiratory "off-switch" threshold, while CO2 increases both the rate of rise of CIA and off-switch threshold. In addition the results indicate that tracheal occlusion pressure provides a similar index of CIA as "integrated" phrenic activity.

  12. Modeling CO2 air dispersion from gas driven lake eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco

    2016-04-01

    The most tragic event of gas driven lake eruption occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) on 21 August 1986, when a dense cloud of CO2 suffocated more than 1700 people and an uncounted number of animals in just one night. The event stimulated a series of researches aimed to understand gas origins, gas release mechanisms and strategies for gas hazard mitigation. Very few studies have been carried out for describing the transport of dense CO2 clouds in the atmosphere. Although from a theoretical point of view, gas dispersion can be fully studied by solving the complete equations system for mass, momentum and energy transport, in actual practice, different simplified models able to describe only specific phases or aspects have to be used. In order to simulate dispersion of a heavy gas and to assess the consequent hazard we used a model based on a shallow layer approach (TWODEE2). This technique which uses depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behavior of dense gas over complex topography represents a good compromise between the complexity of computational fluid dynamic models and the simpler integral models. Recently the model has been applied for simulating CO2 dispersion from natural gas emissions in Central Italy. The results have shown how the dispersion pattern is strongly affected by the intensity of gas release, the topography and the ambient wind speed. Here for the first time we applied TWODEE2 code to simulate the dispersion of the large CO2 clouds released by limnic eruptions. An application concerns the case of the 1986 event at lake Nyos. Some difficulties for the simulations were related to the lack of quantitative information: gas flux estimations are not well constrained, meteorological conditions are only qualitatively known, the digital model of the terrain is of poor quality. Different scenarios were taken into account in order to reproduce the qualitative observations available for such episode. The observations regard mainly the effects of gas on

  13. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH, BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF DOUGLAS-FIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the interactive effects of CO2 concentration and mean annual temperature on physiology, biochemistry and growth of Douglas fir seedlings. Seedlings were grown at ambient CO2 or ambient + 200 ppm CO2 and at ambient temperature or ambient + 4 ?C. Needle gas exchange m...

  14. Energy requirements for CO2 capture from ambient air (DAC) competitive with capture from flue-gas (PCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinrenken, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Capture of CO2, whether from a flue gas source (PCC) or from distributed sources via ambient air (DAC), is a key enabling technology to provide carbon for sustainable synthetic energy carriers such as solar fuels. Based on thermodynamic minimum considerations, DAC is often expected to require about 3 times more energy (per ton CO2 captured) than PCC because CO2 in ambient air is more dilute. Here, we calculate the energy required for a humidity swing-based DAC installation that uses an anionic exchange resin as sorbent. The calculation uses recently measured equilibrium CO2 loadings of the sorbent as function of partial CO2 pressure, temperature, and humidity. We calculate the installation's electricity consumption to be about 45 kJ per mole of pure CO2 at 1 bar (scenario-dependent). Furthermore, we estimate the amount of heat provided by ambient air and thus provide context of the overall energy and entropy balance and thermodynamic minimum views. The electricity consumption is competitive with typical parasitic loads of PCC-equipped coal-fired power plants (40-50 kJ per mole at same pressure) and significantly lower than predicted for other DAC installations such as Na(OH) sorbent-based systems. Our analyses elucidate why DAC is not always more energy-intensive that PCC, thus alleviating often cited concerns of significant cost impediments. Financial support by ABB for research presented herein is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. 3D modelling of the early martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.; Millour, E.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Kerber, L.; Leconte, J.; Marcq, E.; Haberle, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young Sun and a CO2 atmosphere with surface pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet. Previous studies had suggested that they could have warmed the planet thanks to their scattering greenhouse effect. However, even assuming parameters that maximize this effect, it does not exceed +15 K. Combined with the revised CO2 spectroscopy and the impact of surface CO2 ice on the planetary albedo, we find that a CO2 atmosphere could not have raised the annual mean temperature above 0 °C anywhere on the planet. The collapse of the atmosphere into permanent CO2 ice caps is predicted for pressures higher than 3 bar, or conversely at pressure lower than 1 bar if the obliquity is low enough. Summertime diurnal mean surface temperatures above 0 °C (a condition which could have allowed rivers and lakes to form) are predicted for obliquity larger than 40° at high latitudes but not in locations where most valley networks or layered sedimentary units are observed. In the absence of other warming mechanisms, our climate model results are thus consistent

  16. Stem respiration of Populus species in the third year of free-air CO2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Birgit; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2003-04-01

    Carbon cycling in ecosystems, and especially in forests, is intensively studied to predict the effects of global climate change, and the role which forests may play in 'changing climate change'. One of the questions is whether the carbon balance of forests will be affected by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Regarding this question, effects of elevated [CO2] on woody-tissue respiration have frequently been neglected. Stem respiration of three Populus species (P. alba L. (Clone 2AS-11), P. nigra L. (Clone Jean Pourtet), and P. x euramericana (Clone I-214)) was measured in a managed, high-density forest plantation exposed to free-air CO2 enrichment (POPFACE). During the period of measurements, in May of the third year, stem respiration rates were not affected by the FACE treatment. Moreover, FACE did not influence the relationships between respiration rate and both stem temperature and relative growth rate. The results were supported by the reported absence of a FACE-effect on growth and stem wood density.

  17. Diurnal hysteresis between soil CO2 and soil temperature is controlled by soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Emanuel, Ryan E.; Muth, Daniel J.; McGlynn, Brian L.; Epstein, Howard E.; Welsch, Daniel L.; Pacific, Vincent J.; Wraith, Jon M.

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in measuring and modeling soil CO2 efflux, as this flux represents a large component of ecosystem respiration and is a key determinant of ecosystem carbon balance. Process-based models of soil CO2 production and efflux, commonly based on soil temperature, are limited by nonlinearities such as the observed diurnal hysteresis between soil CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and temperature. Here we quantify the degree to which hysteresis between soil [CO2] and soil temperature is controlled by soil water content in a montane conifer forest, and how this nonlinearity impacts estimates of soil CO2 efflux. A representative model that does not consider hysteresis overestimated soil CO2 efflux for the entire growing season by 19%. At high levels of soil water content, hysteresis imposes organized, daily variability in the relationship between soil [CO2] and soil temperature, and at low levels of soil water content, hysteresis is minimized.

  18. Temperature changes across CO2-lased dentin during multiple exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariasen, Kenneth L.; Barron, Joseph R.; Boran, Thomas L.

    1990-06-01

    2000 m section utilizing two exposures. Analysis of Variance (p < .0001) and Duncan's Multiple Range Test (p =.05) indicated significant differences existed among the mean temperature elevations observed. While significant differences in temperature elevation can be observed both by numbers of exposures and by dentin thickness, it would appear that, under the conditions of this study, the temperature changes across CO2 lased dentin are all relatively low. It should be reiterated that the lasing parameters used in this study are far in excess of those necessary for preventive applications and are, in fact, in the range of exposures which will fuse enamel and dental porcelain, or remove dental caries. The modest temperature elevations observed, combined with the relatively severe exposure parameters utilized on thin sections of dentin, demonstrate the effective protective barrier which dentin provides for the dental pulp relative to heat damage from C02 lasing.

  19. Temperature effects on microbial respiration assessed with CO2-exchange and continuous culture techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C.; Min, K.; Song, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work attempts to incorporate requirements of soil microorganisms for carbon and other resources, and how these requirements may respond to temperature, into theoretical concepts of soil organic matter decomposition and climate change. Because of the difficulties of measuring resource fluxes in natural soils, empirical data to guide these concepts remain scarce. Here, we present an experimental system that combines continuous culture techniques with CO2 measurements to study carbon fluxes through microbes in a reductionist, controlled environment amenable to experimental manipulation. In this pilot study, we quantified mass specific respiration rates (MSR) and δ13C of respired CO2 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Gram-negative bacterium common to soils, grown at 15°C and 25°C with otherwise identical environmental conditions. The microbes were grown in a 1.9 L bioreactor, in 0.9 L of nutrient medium with C:N:P atomic ratios of 100:10:3, and with 10 mM cellobiose as the carbon source. A peristaltic pump continuously supplied the bioreactor with sterile medium, and removed medium from the bioreactor, at a rate of 63 mL h-1. Both vessels were contained within a temperature incubator, and stir bars provided continuously well mixed volumes. CO2-free air was continuously bubbled through the reactor medium so to provide the microbes with O2; a cavity ring down spectrometer withdrew reactor headspace air and measured concentration and δ13C of the CO2. Air supply was regulated with a pressure/mass flow controller to approx. 27 mL min-1. In both temperature regimes, the pH of the bioreactor as well as concentration and δ13C of the CO2 in the head space air were constant over the course of 1 d, such that any imbalances in the CO2-H2CO3 equilibrium were considered negligible in the assessment of microbial respiration rates and the δ13C of respired CO2. After this time period, reactor medium was passed through a 0.22 μm filter and the filtrate dried for 24 h to obtain

  20. An air-liquid contactor for large-scale capture of CO2 from air.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Geoffrey; Keith, David W

    2012-09-13

    We present a conceptually simple method for optimizing the design of a gas-liquid contactor for capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air, or 'air capture'. We apply the method to a slab geometry contactor that uses components, design and fabrication methods derived from cooling towers. We use mass transfer data appropriate for capture using a strong NaOH solution, combined with engineering and cost data derived from engineering studies performed by Carbon Engineering Ltd, and find that the total costs for air contacting alone-no regeneration-can be of the order of $60 per tonne CO(2). We analyse the reasons why our cost estimate diverges from that of other recent reports and conclude that the divergence arises from fundamental design choices rather than from differences in costing methodology. Finally, we review the technology risks and conclude that they can be readily addressed by prototype testing.

  1. Rechargeable Room-Temperature Na-CO2 Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Sun, Jianchao; Li, Zifan; Zhao, Qing; Chen, Chengcheng; Chen, Jun

    2016-05-23

    Developing rechargeable Na-CO2 batteries is significant for energy conversion and utilization of CO2 . However, the reported batteries in pure CO2 atmosphere are non-rechargeable with limited discharge capacity of 200 mAh g(-1) . Herein, we realized the rechargeability of a Na-CO2 battery, with the proposed and demonstrated reversible reaction of 3 CO2 +4 Na↔2 Na2 CO3 +C. The battery consists of a Na anode, an ether-based electrolyte, and a designed cathode with electrolyte-treated multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and shows reversible capacity of 60000 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) (≈1000 Wh kg(-1) ) and runs for 200 cycles with controlled capacity of 2000 mAh g(-1) at charge voltage <3.7 V. The porous structure, high electro-conductivity, and good wettability of electrolyte to cathode lead to reduced electrochemical polarization of the battery and further result in high performance. Our work provides an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 .

  2. Rechargeable Room-Temperature Na-CO2 Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Sun, Jianchao; Li, Zifan; Zhao, Qing; Chen, Chengcheng; Chen, Jun

    2016-05-23

    Developing rechargeable Na-CO2 batteries is significant for energy conversion and utilization of CO2 . However, the reported batteries in pure CO2 atmosphere are non-rechargeable with limited discharge capacity of 200 mAh g(-1) . Herein, we realized the rechargeability of a Na-CO2 battery, with the proposed and demonstrated reversible reaction of 3 CO2 +4 Na↔2 Na2 CO3 +C. The battery consists of a Na anode, an ether-based electrolyte, and a designed cathode with electrolyte-treated multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and shows reversible capacity of 60000 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) (≈1000 Wh kg(-1) ) and runs for 200 cycles with controlled capacity of 2000 mAh g(-1) at charge voltage <3.7 V. The porous structure, high electro-conductivity, and good wettability of electrolyte to cathode lead to reduced electrochemical polarization of the battery and further result in high performance. Our work provides an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 . PMID:27089434

  3. [Responses of agricultural crops of free-air CO2 enrichment].

    PubMed

    Kimball, B A; Zhu, Jianguo; Cheng, Lei; Kobayashi, K; Bindi, M

    2002-10-01

    Over the past decade, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments have been conducted on several agricultural crops: wheat(Triticum aestivum L.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and rice(Oryza sativa L.) which are C3 grasses; sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Möench), a C4 grass; white clover (Trifolium repens), a C3 legume; potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a C3 forb with tuber storage; and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and grape (Vitis vinifera L.) which are C3 woody perennials. Using reports from these experiments, the relative responses of these crops was discussed with regard to photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, canopy temperature, water use, water potential, leaf area index, shoot and root biomass accumulation, agricultural yield, radiation use efficiency, specific leaf area, tissue nitrogen concentration, nitrogen yield, carbohydrate concentration, phenology, soil microbiology, soil respiration, trace gas emissions, and soil carbon sequestration. Generally, the magnitude of these responses varied with the functional type of plant and with the soil nitrogen and water status. As expected, the elevated CO2 increased photosynthesis and biomass production and yield substantially in C3 species, but little in C4, and it decreased stomatal conductance and transpiration in both C3 and C4 species and greatly improved water-use efficiency in all the crops. Growth stimulations were as large or larger under water-stress compared to well-watered conditions. Growth stimulations of non-legumes were reduced at low soil nitrogen, whereas elevated CO2 strongly stimulated the growth of the clover legume both at ample and under low N conditions. Roots were generally stimulated more than shoots. Woody perennials had larger growth responses to elevated CO2, while at the same time, their reductions in stomatal conductance were smaller. Tissue nitrogen concentrations went down while carbohydrate and some other carbon-based compounds went up due to elevated CO2, with leaves and

  4. Interactive effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on coral physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.; Cai, W.; Warner, M.; Melman, T.; Schoepf, V.; Baumann, J.; Matsui, Y.; Pettay, D. T.; Hoadley, K.; Xu, H.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.; Hu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Increases in ocean acidification and temperature threaten coral reefs globally. However, the interactive effect of both lower pH and higher temperature on coral physiology and growth are poorly understood. Here, we present preliminary findings from a replicated controlled experiment where four species of corals (Acorpora millepora, Pocillopora damicornis, Montipora monasteriata, Turbinaria reniformis) were reared under the following six treatments for three weeks: 1) 400ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 2) 400ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 3) 650ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 4) 650ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 5) 800ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 6) 800ppm CO2 and elevated temperature. Initial findings of photophysiological health (Fv/Fm), calcification rates (as measured by both buoyant weight and the total alkalinity methods), and energy reserves will be presented.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of a membrane-based system for removing CO2 from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Wytcherley, Randi W.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Ray, Rod J.

    1990-01-01

    Processes to remove and/or recover CO2 from air are essential to the long-term success of the U.S. space program. The results of a preliminary investigation of the use of a novel membrane-based system for removal of CO2 from air are presented. Features of this technology that make it attractive include the following: (1) it is lightweight; (2) it requires no consumables or expendables; (3) it is relatively simple; and (4) it does not rely directly on other subsystems. Preliminary designs of systems for removing CO2 from spacecraft cabin atmospheres and from the extravehicular mobility unit are presented.

  6. Soil and water warming accelerates phenology and down-regulation of leaf photosynthesis of rice plants grown under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-02-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol(-1)) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]-ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])-NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]-NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]-ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2].

  7. Soil and water warming accelerates phenology and down-regulation of leaf photosynthesis of rice plants grown under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-02-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol(-1)) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]-ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])-NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]-NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]-ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2]. PMID:24406632

  8. Nitrogen assimilation and transpiration: key processes conditioning responsiveness of wheat to elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Iván; Aroca, Ricardo; Garnica, María; Zamarreño, Ángel M; García-Mina, José M; Serret, Maria D; Parry, Martin; Irigoyen, Juan J; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-11-01

    Although climate scenarios have predicted an increase in [CO(2)] and temperature conditions, to date few experiments have focused on the interaction of [CO(2)] and temperature effects in wheat development. Recent evidence suggests that photosynthetic acclimation is linked to the photorespiration and N assimilation inhibition of plants exposed to elevated CO(2). The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of interacting [CO(2)] and temperature on leaf photorespiration, C/N metabolism and N transport in wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions. For this purpose, wheat plants were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (400 vs 700 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (ambient vs ambient + 4°C) in CO(2) gradient greenhouses during the entire life cycle. Although at the agronomic level, elevated temperature had no effect on plant biomass, physiological analyses revealed that combined elevated [CO(2)] and temperature negatively affected photosynthetic performance. The limited energy levels resulting from the reduced respiratory and photorespiration rates of such plants were apparently inadequate to sustain nitrate reductase activity. Inhibited N assimilation was associated with a strong reduction in amino acid content, conditioned leaf soluble protein content and constrained leaf N status. Therefore, the plant response to elevated [CO(2)] and elevated temperature resulted in photosynthetic acclimation. The reduction in transpiration rates induced limitations in nutrient transport in leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature, led to mineral depletion and therefore contributed to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity.

  9. Nitrogen assimilation and transpiration: key processes conditioning responsiveness of wheat to elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Iván; Aroca, Ricardo; Garnica, María; Zamarreño, Ángel M; García-Mina, José M; Serret, Maria D; Parry, Martin; Irigoyen, Juan J; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-11-01

    Although climate scenarios have predicted an increase in [CO(2)] and temperature conditions, to date few experiments have focused on the interaction of [CO(2)] and temperature effects in wheat development. Recent evidence suggests that photosynthetic acclimation is linked to the photorespiration and N assimilation inhibition of plants exposed to elevated CO(2). The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of interacting [CO(2)] and temperature on leaf photorespiration, C/N metabolism and N transport in wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions. For this purpose, wheat plants were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (400 vs 700 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (ambient vs ambient + 4°C) in CO(2) gradient greenhouses during the entire life cycle. Although at the agronomic level, elevated temperature had no effect on plant biomass, physiological analyses revealed that combined elevated [CO(2)] and temperature negatively affected photosynthetic performance. The limited energy levels resulting from the reduced respiratory and photorespiration rates of such plants were apparently inadequate to sustain nitrate reductase activity. Inhibited N assimilation was associated with a strong reduction in amino acid content, conditioned leaf soluble protein content and constrained leaf N status. Therefore, the plant response to elevated [CO(2)] and elevated temperature resulted in photosynthetic acclimation. The reduction in transpiration rates induced limitations in nutrient transport in leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature, led to mineral depletion and therefore contributed to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity. PMID:25958969

  10. Effect of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Temperature on Leaf Optical Properties and Chlorophyll Content in Acer saccharum (Marsh.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Bahadur, Raj; Norby, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 pressure and numerous causes of plant stress often result in decreased leaf chlorophyll contents and thus would be expected to alter leaf optical properties. Hypotheses that elevated carbon dioxide pressure and air temperature would alter leaf optical properties were tested for sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in the middle of its fourth growing season under treatment. The saplings had been growing since 1994 in open-top chambers at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under the following treatments: 1) Ambient CO2 pressure and air temperature (control); 2) CO2 pressure approximately 30 Pa above ambient; 3) Air temperatures 3 C above ambient; 4) Elevated CO2 and air temperature. Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance in the visible spectrum (400-720 nm) did not change significantly (rho = 0.05) in response to any treatment compared with control values. Although reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance at 700 nm correlated strongly with leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll content was not altered significantly by the treatments. The lack of treatment effects on pigmentation explained the non-significant change in optical properties in the visible spectrum. Optical properties in the near-infrared (721-850 nm) were similarly unresponsive to treatment with the exception of an increased absorptance in leaves that developed under elevated air temperature alone. This response could not be explained by the data, but might have resulted from effects of air temperature on leaf internal structure. Results indicated no significant potential for detecting leaf optical responses to elevated CO2 or temperature by the remote sensing of reflected radiation in the 400-850 nm spectrum.

  11. Validation of AIRS Retrievals of CO2 via Comparison to In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Edward T.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Chen, Luke L.; Jiang, Xun; Pagano, Thomas S.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2008-01-01

    Topics include AIRS on Aqua, 2002-present with discussion about continued operation to 2011 and beyond and background, including spectrum, weighting functions, and initialization; comparison with aircraft and FTIR measurements in Masueda (CONTRAIL) JAL flask measurements, Park Falls, WI FTIR, Bremen, GDF, and Spitsbergen, Norway; AIRS retrievals over addition FTIR sites in Darwin, AU and Lauder, NZ; and mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide weather and contribution from major surface sources. Slide titles include typical AIRS infrared spectrum, AIRS sensitivity for retrieving CO2 profiles, independence of CO2 solution with respect to the initial guess, available in situ measurements for validation and comparison, comparison of collocated V1.5x AIRS CO2 (N_coll greater than or equal to 9) with INTEX-NA and SPURT;

  12. Responses of wheat and rice to factorial combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and temperature in FACE experiments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuang; Yin, Xinyou; He, Shuaiqi; Jiang, Wenyu; Si, Chuanfei; Struik, Paul C; Luo, Weihong; Li, Gang; Xie, Yingtian; Xiong, Yan; Pan, Genxing

    2016-02-01

    Elevated CO2 and temperature strongly affect crop production, but understanding of the crop response to combined CO2 and temperature increases under field conditions is still limited while data are scarce. We grew wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two levels of CO2 (ambient and enriched up to 500 μmol mol(-1) ) and two levels of canopy temperature (ambient and increased by 1.5-2.0 °C) in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) systems and carried out a detailed growth and yield component analysis during two growing seasons for both crops. An increase in CO2 resulted in higher grain yield, whereas an increase in temperature reduced grain yield, in both crops. An increase in CO2 was unable to compensate for the negative impact of an increase in temperature on biomass and yield of wheat and rice. Yields of wheat and rice were decreased by 10-12% and 17-35%, respectively, under the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature. The number of filled grains per unit area was the most important yield component accounting for the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature in wheat and rice. Our data showed complex treatment effects on the interplay between preheading duration, nitrogen uptake, tillering, leaf area index, and radiation-use efficiency, and thus on yield components and yield. Nitrogen uptake before heading was crucial in minimizing yield loss due to climate change in both crops. For rice, however, a breeding strategy to increase grain number per m(2) and % filled grains (or to reduce spikelet sterility) at high temperature is also required to prevent yield reduction under conditions of global change.

  13. Free-air CO2 enrichment (face): model analysis of gaseous dispersion arrays for studying rising atmospheric CO2 effects on vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has risen from about 280 to 380 micromol/mol since the beginning of the industrial revolution due mainly to burning of fossil fuels. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) arrays have been devised with large areas and undisturbed aerial conditions that allow secondary soil o...

  14. Direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Hamish A.; MacKellar, Mellissa C.; Gray, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over coral reefs has relied on microscale measurements of pCO2 gradients across the air-sea interfacial boundary; shipboard measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over adjacent ocean inferred to represent over reef processes or ecosystem productivity modeling. Here we present by way of case study the first direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef made using the eddy covariance method. Research was conducted during the summer monsoon over a lagoonal platform reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Results show the reef flat to be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of similar magnitude as coastal lakes, while adjacent shallow and deep lagoons were net sinks as was the surrounding ocean. This heterogeneity in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere confirms need for spatially representative direct measurements of CO2 over coral reefs to accurately quantify their role in atmospheric carbon budgets.

  15. Variability in AIRS CO2 during active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Ravi Kumar, K; Tiwari, Yogesh K; Valsala, Vinu

    2016-01-15

    Due to human activities, the atmospheric concentration of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has been rising extensively since the Industrial Revolution. Indian summer monsoon (ISM) has a dominant westerly component from ocean to land with a strong tendency to ascend and hence may have role in CO2 distribution in lower and middle troposphere over Indian sub-continent. A substantial component of ISM variability arises from the fluctuations on the intra-seasonal scale between active and break phases which correspond to strong and weak monsoon circulation. In view of the above, an attempt is made in this study to examine the AIRS/AQUA satellite retrieved CO2 distribution in response to atmospheric circulation with focus on active and break phase. Correlation analysis indicates the increase in AIRS CO2 linked with strong monsoon circulation. Study also reveals that anomalous circulation pattern during active and break phase show resemblance with high and low values of AIRS CO2. Homogeneous monsoon regions of India show substantial increase in CO2 levels during active phase. Hilly regions of India show strong contrast in CO2 and vertical velocity during active and break phases.

  16. The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Brennan, Sarah; Matter, Jürg M.; Park, A.-H. Alissa; Wright, Allen; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to develop into an important tool to address climate change. Given society’s present reliance on fossil fuels, widespread adoption of CCS appears indispensable for meeting stringent climate targets. We argue that for conventional CCS to become a successful climate mitigation technology—which by necessity has to operate on a large scale—it may need to be complemented with air capture, removing CO2 directly from the atmosphere. Air capture of CO2 could act as insurance against CO2 leaking from storage and furthermore may provide an option for dealing with emissions from mobile dispersed sources such as automobiles and airplanes. PMID:22843674

  17. Conversion of CO2 from Air into Methanol Using a Polyamine and a Homogeneous Ruthenium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya

    2016-01-27

    A highly efficient homogeneous catalyst system for the production of CH3OH from CO2 using pentaethylenehexamine and Ru-Macho-BH (1) at 125-165 °C in an ethereal solvent has been developed (initial turnover frequency = 70 h(-1) at 145 °C). Ease of separation of CH3OH is demonstrated by simple distillation from the reaction mixture. The robustness of the catalytic system was shown by recycling the catalyst over five runs without significant loss of activity (turnover number > 2000). Various sources of CO2 can be used for this reaction including air, despite its low CO2 concentration (400 ppm). For the first time, we have demonstrated that CO2 captured from air can be directly converted to CH3OH in 79% yield using a homogeneous catalytic system. PMID:26713663

  18. Conversion of CO2 from Air into Methanol Using a Polyamine and a Homogeneous Ruthenium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya

    2016-01-27

    A highly efficient homogeneous catalyst system for the production of CH3OH from CO2 using pentaethylenehexamine and Ru-Macho-BH (1) at 125-165 °C in an ethereal solvent has been developed (initial turnover frequency = 70 h(-1) at 145 °C). Ease of separation of CH3OH is demonstrated by simple distillation from the reaction mixture. The robustness of the catalytic system was shown by recycling the catalyst over five runs without significant loss of activity (turnover number > 2000). Various sources of CO2 can be used for this reaction including air, despite its low CO2 concentration (400 ppm). For the first time, we have demonstrated that CO2 captured from air can be directly converted to CH3OH in 79% yield using a homogeneous catalytic system.

  19. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen

    PubMed Central

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol–1 or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol–1. The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. PMID:25399006

  20. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size.

  1. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  2. Development of a Prototype Algal Reactor for Removing CO2 from Cabin Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Vrajen; Monje, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide in spacecraft cabin air may be accomplished using algal photobioreactors (PBRs). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of a commercial microcontroller, the Arduino Mega 2560, for measuring key photioreactor variables: dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, light, and carbon dioxide. The Arduino platform is an opensource physical computing platform composed of a compact microcontroller board and a C++/C computer language (Arduino 1.0.5). The functionality of the Arduino platform can be expanded by the use of numerous add-ons or 'shields'. The Arduino Mega 2560 was equipped with the following shields: datalogger, BNC shield for reading pH sensor, a Mega Moto shield for controlling CO2 addition, as well as multiple sensors. The dissolved oxygen (DO) probe was calibrated using a nitrogen bubbling technique and the pH probe was calibrated via an Omega pH simulator. The PBR was constructed using a 2 L beaker, a 66 L box for addition of CO2, a micro porous membrane, a diaphragm pump, four 25 watt light bulbs, a MasterFiex speed controller, and a fan. The algae (wild type Synechocystis PCC6803) was grown in an aerated flask until the algae was dense enough to used in the main reactor. After the algae was grown, it was transferred to the 2 L beaker where CO2 consumption and O2 production was measured using the microcontroller sensor suite. The data was recorded via the datalogger and transferred to a computer for analysis.

  3. Elevated CO2 interacts with herbivory to alter chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf temperature in Betula papyrifera and Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Hillstrom, Michael L; Lindroth, Richard L; DeLucia, Evan H

    2012-08-01

    Herbivory can influence ecosystem productivity, but recent evidence suggests that damage by herbivores modulates potential productivity specific to damage type. Because productivity is linked to photosynthesis at the leaf level, which in turn is influenced by atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, we investigated how different herbivore damage types alter component processes of photosynthesis under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO(2). We examined spatial patterns in chlorophyll fluorescence and the temperature of leaves damaged by leaf-chewing, gall-forming, and leaf-folding insects in aspen trees as well as by leaf-chewing insects in birch trees under ambient and elevated CO(2) at the aspen free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) site in Wisconsin. Both defoliation and gall damage suppressed the operating efficiency of photosystem II (ΦPSII) in remaining leaf tissue, and the distance that damage propagated into visibly undamaged tissue was marginally attenuated under elevated CO(2). Elevated CO(2) increased leaf temperatures, which reduced the cooling effect of gall formation and freshly chewed leaf tissue. These results provide mechanistic insight into how different damage types influence the remaining, visibly undamaged leaf tissue, and suggest that elevated CO(2) may reduce the effects of herbivory on the primary photochemistry controlling photosynthesis.

  4. Photosynthesis, productivity, and yield of maize are not affected by open-air elevation of CO2 concentration in the absence of drought.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Uribelarrea, Martin; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Naidu, Shawna L; Rogers, Alistair; Ort, Donald R; Long, Stephen P

    2006-02-01

    While increasing temperatures and altered soil moisture arising from climate change in the next 50 years are projected to decrease yield of food crops, elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) is predicted to enhance yield and offset these detrimental factors. However, C4 photosynthesis is usually saturated at current [CO2] and theoretically should not be stimulated under elevated [CO2]. Nevertheless, some controlled environment studies have reported direct stimulation of C4 photosynthesis and productivity, as well as physiological acclimation, under elevated [CO2]. To test if these effects occur in the open air and within the Corn Belt, maize (Zea mays) was grown in ambient [CO2] (376 micromol mol(-1)) and elevated [CO2] (550 micromol mol(-1)) using Free-Air Concentration Enrichment technology. The 2004 season had ideal growing conditions in which the crop did not experience water stress. In the absence of water stress, growth at elevated [CO2] did not stimulate photosynthesis, biomass, or yield. Nor was there any CO2 effect on the activity of key photosynthetic enzymes, or metabolic markers of carbon and nitrogen status. Stomatal conductance was lower (-34%) and soil moisture was higher (up to 31%), consistent with reduced crop water use. The results provide unique field evidence that photosynthesis and production of maize may be unaffected by rising [CO2] in the absence of drought. This suggests that rising [CO2] may not provide the full dividend to North American maize production anticipated in projections of future global food supply. PMID:16407441

  5. Healing and sliding stability of simulated anhydrite fault gouge: Effects of water, temperature and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluymakers, Anne M. H.; Niemeijer, André R.

    2015-08-01

    Anhydrite-bearing faults are currently of interest to 1) CO2-storage sites capped by anhydrite caprocks (such as those found in the North Sea) and 2) seismically active faults in evaporite formations (such as the Italian Apennines). In order to assess the likelihood of fault reactivation, the mode of fault slip and/or fault leakage, it is important to understand the evolution of frictional strength during periods of no slip and upon reloading (healing and relaxation behavior) and of the velocity dependence of friction of anhydrite fault gouge. Therefore, we performed slide-hold-slide experiments combined with a velocity-stepping sequence using simulated anhydrite fault gouge (> 95 wt.% CaSO4). Vacuum-dry and water-wet experiments were performed at temperatures ranging from 20 to 150 °C, and at an effective normal stress of 25 MPa. We also performed tests using dry CO2, water-wetted CO2 and CO2-saturated water as pore fluid, but only at 120 °C. If pore fluid was present, a fluid pressure of 15 MPa was present. Vacuum-dry samples exhibit similar frictional healing to samples containing lab-air, but healing is significantly enhanced in wet samples. Dry samples exhibit velocity-weakening behavior at T ≥ 120 °C, and wet samples exhibit velocity-strengthening behavior over the full temperature range. The presence of CO2 does not influence the healing behavior or the velocity-dependence of friction. Samples containing water-wetted CO2 exhibit behavior similar to wet samples. We infer that the healing in dry samples is controlled by plastic asperity creep (Dieterich-type), possibly through dislocation creep and/or twinning. In wet samples healing is inferred to be controlled by increases in contact area and cohesion by pressure solution. Using a pressure solution rate model to extrapolate healing by contact area growth indicates that the maximum re-strengthening through such a mechanism will only take days to tens of days.

  6. Kinetics of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: the role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-03-11

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from a flute poured with a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, all along the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at three sets of temperature, namely, 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. It was demonstrated that the lower the champagne temperature, the lower CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute. Therefore, the lower the champagne temperature, the lower its progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time, which constitutes the first analytical proof that low champagne temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps retains its effervescence. A correlation was also proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute poured with champagne and its continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. Finally, the contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by the use of results developed over recent years. The temperature dependence of the champagne viscosity was found to play a major role in the kinetics of CO(2) outgassing from a flute. On the basis of this bubbling model, the theoretical influence of champagne temperature on CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from a flute was discussed and found to be in quite good accordance with our experimental results.

  7. Interactive effects of CO2 enrichment and temperature on the growth of dioecious Hydrilla verticillata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, De-Xing; Coughenour, M. B.; Eberts, Debra; Thullen, Joan S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments of plant growth responses to different CO2 concentrations and temperatures were conducted in growth chambers to explore the interactive effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment and temperature on the growth and dry matter allocation of dioecious Hydrilla [Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle]. Hydrilla plants were exposed to two atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 ppm) and three temperatures (15, 25 and 32°C) under a 12-hr photoperiod for about 2 months. The plant growth analysis showed that elevated CO2 appeared to enhance the growth of Hydrilla, and that the percentage of the enhancement is strongly temperature-dependent. Maximum biomass production was achieved at 700 ppm CO2 and 32°C. At 15°C, the total dry matter production was increased about 27% by doubling CO2, due to a 26% enhancement of leaf biomass, a 34% enhancement of stem biomass and 16% enhancement of root biomass. At 25°C, the dry matter production was increased about 46% by doubling CO2, due to a 29% enhancement of leaf biomass, a 27% enhancement of stem biomass and 40% enhancement of root biomass. At 32°C, however, the percentage of the enhancement of total dry matter production by doubling CO2 was only about 7%. The dry matter allocation among different plant parts was influenced by temperature but not by elevated CO2 concentration.

  8. Synchronous change of atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature during the last deglacial warming.

    PubMed

    Parrenin, F; Masson-Delmotte, V; Köhler, P; Raynaud, D; Paillard, D; Schwander, J; Barbante, C; Landais, A; Wegner, A; Jouzel, J

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the role of atmospheric CO2 during past climate changes requires clear knowledge of how it varies in time relative to temperature. Antarctic ice cores preserve highly resolved records of atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature for the past 800,000 years. Here we propose a revised relative age scale for the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature for the last deglacial warming, using data from five Antarctic ice cores. We infer the phasing between CO2 concentration and Antarctic temperature at four times when their trends change abruptly. We find no significant asynchrony between them, indicating that Antarctic temperature did not begin to rise hundreds of years before the concentration of atmospheric CO2, as has been suggested by earlier studies.

  9. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  10. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). However, the regular collection of air samples from the stratosphere, for example using aircraft and balloons, is prohibitively expensive. Here we describe radiocarbon measurements in stratospheric CO2 collected by the AirCore sampling method. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which comprises a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and it has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ≈ 30 km) measurements of CH4 and CO2. In Europe, AirCore measurements have been being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä (northern Finland) since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of samples from two such AirCore flights made there in July 2014, for determining the radiocarbon concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore profiles were collected on consecutive days. The stratospheric part of the AirCore was divided into six sections, each containing ≈ 35 µg CO2 ( ≈ 9.6 µgC), and stored in a stratospheric air subsampler constructed from 1/4 in. coiled stainless steel tubing ( ≈ 3 m). A small-volume extraction system was constructed that enabled > 99.5 % CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples. Additionally, a new small-volume high-efficiency graphitization system was constructed for graphitization of these extracted CO2 samples, which were measured at the Groningen AMS facility. Since the stratospheric samples were very similar in mass, reference samples were also prepared in the same mass range for

  11. Soil air CO2 concentration as an integrative parameter of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Corinna; Gaertig, Thorsten; Fründ, Heinz-Christian

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of soil structure is an important but difficult issue and normally takes place in the laboratory. Typical parameters are soil bulk density, porosity, water or air conductivity or gas diffusivity. All methods are time-consuming. The integrative parameter soil air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) can be used to assess soil structure in situ and in a short time. Several studies highlighted that independent of soil respiration, [CO2] in the soil air increases with decreasing soil aeration. Therefore, [CO2] is a useful indicator of soil aeration. Embedded in the German research project RÜWOLA, which focus on soil protection at forest sites, we investigated soil compaction and recovery of soil structure after harvesting. Therefore, we measured soil air CO2 concentrations continuously and in single measurements and compared the results with the measurements of bulk density, porosity and gas diffusivity. Two test areas were investigated: At test area 1 with high natural regeneration potential (clay content approx. 25 % and soil-pH between 5 and 7), solid-state CO2-sensors using NDIR technology were installed in the wheel track of different aged skidding tracks in 5 and 10 cm soil depths. At area 2 (acidic silty loam, soil-pH between 3.5 and 4), CO2-sensors and water-tension sensors (WatermarkR) were installed in 6 cm soil depth. The results show a low variance of [CO2] in the undisturbed soil with a long term mean from May to June 2014 between 0.2 and 0.5 % [CO2] in both areas. In the wheel tracks [CO2] was consistently higher. The long term mean [CO2] in the 8-year-old-wheel track in test area 1 is 5 times higher than in the reference soil and shows a high variation (mean=2.0 %). The 18-year-old wheel track shows a long-term mean of 1.2 % [CO2]. Furthermore, there were strong fluctuations of [CO2] in the wheel tracks corresponding to precipitation and humidity. Similar results were yielded with single measurements during the vegetation period using a portable

  12. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R. M.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet it remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 PgC yr-1 is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 PgC yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the southern Indian Ocean (18-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), overestimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but overestimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by ocean biogeochemical models (OBGMs) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predicted an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than that found by atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric

  13. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the Southern Indian Ocean (18° S-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1) are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), over estimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by a lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but over estimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by Ocean BioGeochemical Models (OBGM) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predict an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric inversions

  14. Large-Scale Atmospheric Variability in AIRS CO2 and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Jiang, X.; Chahine, M.; Yung, Y.; Olsen, E.; Chen, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a modeling analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) from AIRS with results from two atmospheric chemistry and transport models (CTMs), in the context of the large-scale atmospheric transport. AIRS data, from selected periods in 2003 are retrieved applying the Vanishing Partial Derivative (VPD) method (Chahine et al. [GRL, 2005] and the presentation by Chahine et al., this meeting). Corresponding model results are simulated by 2-D and 3-D atmospheric CTMs. The AIRS retrieved and model simulated CO2 mixing ratios, averaged over 300-500 hPa, are compared with the Matsueda et al. observations in the tropics between 9 and 13 km (see the presentation by Jiang et al., this meeting). The latitudinal distributions of O3, both retrieved and simulated, are compared with ozonesonde data. Both comparisons show reasonable agreement. We then examine the spatiotemporal variabilities of CO2 and O3 and their correlation, both in the AIRS data and model results. Our objective is to better understand the AIRS observed atmospheric variability in CO2 that is associated with underlying large-scale atmospheric transport, particularly the stratosphere-troposphere- exchange (STE) at northern high latitudes in spring and the Asian monsoon summer circulation over South Asia.

  15. Determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, obtained through AirCore sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), with carbon dioxide as the most prominent example, has been and still is increasing, predominantly due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion. CO2 is also the most important component of the global carbon cycle. Among other tracers, radiocarbon (Carbon-14) is a unique and an important atmospheric tracer used in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. Radiocarbon is a naturally occurring isotope (radioactive, t 1/2 = 5730 ± 40 years) of carbon produced through the interaction of thermalized neutrons and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Generally, for performing atmospheric radiocarbon measurements in the higher atmosphere, large samples (few liters of air) were collected using aircrafts and balloons. However, collecting stratospheric samples on a regular basis for radiocarbon analysis is extremely expensive. Here we describe the determination of radiocarbon concentrations in stratospheric CO2, collected using AirCore sampling. AirCore is an innovative sampling technique for obtaining vertical atmospheric profiles and, in Europe, is done on a regular basis at Sodankylä, Finland for CO2, CH4 and CO. The stratospheric parts of two such AirCore profiles were used in this study as a proof-of-principle. CO2 from the stratospheric air samples were extracted and converted to elemental carbon, which were then measured at the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) facility of the Centre for Isotope Research (CIO) at the University of Groningen. The stratospheric part of the AirCore profile was divided into six sections, each contained approximately 10 μg C. A detailed description of the extraction, graphitization, AMS analysis and the derivation of the stratospheric radiocarbon profile will be the main focus. Through our results, we will show that AirCore is a viable sampling method for performing high-precision radiocarbon measurements of stratospheric CO2 with reasonably good spatial resolution on a regular basis

  16. High-Temperature CO2 Sorption on Hydrotalcite Having a High Mg/Al Molar Ratio.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suji; Jeon, Sang Goo; Lee, Ki Bong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrotalcites having a Mg/Al molar ratio between 3 and 30 have been synthesized as promising high-temperature CO2 sorbents. The existence of NaNO3 in the hydrotalcite structure, which originates from excess magnesium nitrate in the precursor, markedly increases CO2 sorption uptake by hydrotalcite up to the record high value of 9.27 mol kg(-1) at 240 °C and 1 atm CO2.

  17. DOES SOIL CO2 EFFLUX ACCLIMATIZETO ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND CO2 DURING LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF DOUGLAS-FIR SEEDLINGS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 efflux (SCE) during the third an fourth years of study. We hypothesized that elevated temperature would stimulate SCE, and elevated CO2 would also stimulate SCE with the stimulation being greater at hig...

  18. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air.

    PubMed

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Yoo, Chun-Jae; Tan, Shuai; Rashidi, Fereshteh; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-07-21

    The development of practical and effective gas-solid contactors is an important area in the development of CO2 capture technologies. Target CO2 capture applications, such as postcombustion carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from power plant flue gases or CO2 extraction directly from ambient air (DAC), require high flow rates of gas to be processed at low cost. Extruded monolithic honeycomb structures, such as those employed in the catalytic converters of automobiles, have excellent potential as structured contactors for CO2 adsorption applications because of the low pressure drop imposed on fluid moving through the straight channels of such structures. Here, we report the impregnation of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), an effective aminopolymer reported commonly for CO2 separation, into extruded monolithic alumina to form structured CO2 sorbents. These structured sorbents are first prepared on a small scale, characterized thoroughly, and compared with powder sorbents with a similar composition. Despite consistent differences observed in the filling of mesopores with PEI between the monolithic and powder sorbents, their performance in CO2 adsorption is similar across a range of PEI contents. A larger monolithic cylinder (1 inch diameter, 4 inch length) is evaluated under conditions closer to those that might be used in large-scale applications and shows a similar performance to the smaller monoliths and powders tested initially. This larger structure is evaluated over five cycles of CO2 adsorption and steam desorption and demonstrates a volumetric capacity of 350 molCO2  m-3monolith and an equilibration time of 350 min under a 0.4 m s(-1) linear flow velocity through the monolith channels using 400 ppm CO2 in N2 as the adsorption gas at 30 °C. This volumetric capacity surpasses that of a similar technology considered previously, which suggested that CO2 could be removed from air at an operating cost as low as $100 per ton.

  19. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air.

    PubMed

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Yoo, Chun-Jae; Tan, Shuai; Rashidi, Fereshteh; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-07-21

    The development of practical and effective gas-solid contactors is an important area in the development of CO2 capture technologies. Target CO2 capture applications, such as postcombustion carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from power plant flue gases or CO2 extraction directly from ambient air (DAC), require high flow rates of gas to be processed at low cost. Extruded monolithic honeycomb structures, such as those employed in the catalytic converters of automobiles, have excellent potential as structured contactors for CO2 adsorption applications because of the low pressure drop imposed on fluid moving through the straight channels of such structures. Here, we report the impregnation of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), an effective aminopolymer reported commonly for CO2 separation, into extruded monolithic alumina to form structured CO2 sorbents. These structured sorbents are first prepared on a small scale, characterized thoroughly, and compared with powder sorbents with a similar composition. Despite consistent differences observed in the filling of mesopores with PEI between the monolithic and powder sorbents, their performance in CO2 adsorption is similar across a range of PEI contents. A larger monolithic cylinder (1 inch diameter, 4 inch length) is evaluated under conditions closer to those that might be used in large-scale applications and shows a similar performance to the smaller monoliths and powders tested initially. This larger structure is evaluated over five cycles of CO2 adsorption and steam desorption and demonstrates a volumetric capacity of 350 molCO2  m-3monolith and an equilibration time of 350 min under a 0.4 m s(-1) linear flow velocity through the monolith channels using 400 ppm CO2 in N2 as the adsorption gas at 30 °C. This volumetric capacity surpasses that of a similar technology considered previously, which suggested that CO2 could be removed from air at an operating cost as low as $100 per ton. PMID:27304708

  20. The doubled CO2 climate - Impact of the sea surface temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1987-01-01

    The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM of Hansen et al. (1983) was run, with 4 deg x 5 deg resolution, with doubled CO2 and two sets of sea surface temperature gradient distributions. One set was derived from the equilibrium doubled CO2 run of the 8 deg x 10 deg GISS GCM, with minimal high latitude amplification. The other set resembled closely the GFDL model results, with greater amplification. Both experiments had the same global mean surface air temperature change. The two experiments were often found to produce substantially different climate characteristics. With reduced high latitude amplification (set one), and thus, more equatorial warming, there was a greater increase in specific humidity and the greenhouse capacity of the atmosphere, resulting in a warmer atmosphere in general. Features such as the low-latitude precipitation, Hadley cell intensity, jet stream magnitude, and atmospheric energy transports all increased in comparison with the control run. In contrast, these features all decreased in the experiment with greater high latitude amplification (set two).

  1. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  2. [Effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on desert algal crust photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Su, Yan-gui; Li, Xin-rong; Chen, Ying-wu; Cui, Yan; Lu, Yan

    2010-09-01

    Taking the 26- and 51-year-old artificial vegetation areas and the natural vegetation area in Shapotou region of southeast Tengger Desert as study sites, this paper measured the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) of algal crusts, and analyzed its relationships with crust water content (> 100%, 40%-60%, and <20%), atmospheric CO2 concentration (360 and 700 mg x L(-1)), and air temperature (13 degrees C, 24 degrees C, and 28 degrees C). The Pn of the crusts in the 26- and 51-year-old artificial vegetation areas and natural vegetation area was 3.4, 4.4, and 3.2 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), respectively, and the Pn in 51-year-old artificial vegetation area was significantly higher than that in the other two areas. Crust water content had significant effects on the Pn, which was significantly higher at medium water content (40%-60%) than at low (<20%) and high (>100%) water content. When the CO2 concentration doubled (700 mg x L(-1)), the Pn increased by 1.8-3.3 times at medium and high crust water content but had less change at low crust water content, compared with that under ambient CO2 concentration (360 mg x L(-1)). At medium and high crust water content, the Pn at 24 degrees C and 28 degrees C was 27%-66% higher than that at 13 degrees C (P < 0.05), but at low crust water content, no significant difference was observed at the three temperatures. PMID:21265140

  3. Cost Effective Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions in the Air Freight Sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinge, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents cost effective measures to reduce CO2 emissions in the air freight sector. One door-to-door transport chain is studied in detail from a Scandinavian city to a city in southern Europe. The transport chain was selected by a group of representatives from the air freight sector in order to encompass general characteristics within the sector. Three different ways of shipping air cargo are studied, i.e., by air freighter, as belly freight (in passenger aircrafts) and trucking. CO2 emissions are calculated for each part of the transport chain and its relative importance towards the total amount CO2 emitted during the whole transport chain is shown. It is confirmed that the most CO2 emitting part of the transport chain is the actual flight and that it is in the take-off and climbing phases that most fuel are burned. It is also known that the technical development of aircraft implies a reduction in fuel consumption for each new generation of aircraft. Thus, the aircraft manufacturers have an important role in this development. Having confirmed these observations, this paper focuses on other factors that significantly affects the fuel consumption. Analyzed factors are, e.g., optimization of speed and altitude, traffic management, congestion on and around the airfields, tankering, "latest acceptance time" for goods and improving the load factor. The different factors relative contribution to the total emission levels for the transport chain has been estimated.

  4. AIRS CO2 Retrievals Using the Method of Vanishing Partial Derivatives (VPD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Yung, Yuk; Li, Qinbin; Olsen, Ed; Chen, Luke; Krakauer, Nir

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the work being done with observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using the concept of Vanishing Partial Derivatives. The infrared region is where several minor gases such as CO2, O3, CO, CH4 and SO2 are radiatively active.

  5. Coral Energy Reserves and Calcification in a High-CO2 World at Two Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Warner, Mark E.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Melman, Todd F.; Hoadley, Kenneth D.; Pettay, D. Tye; Hu, Xinping; Li, Qian; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yongchen; Matsui, Yohei; Baumann, Justin H.

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm), and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0°C) within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (−53%) in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected. PMID:24146747

  6. Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Cai, Wei-Jun; Melman, Todd F; Hoadley, Kenneth D; Pettay, D Tye; Hu, Xinping; Li, Qian; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yongchen; Matsui, Yohei; Baumann, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm), and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0 °C) within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (-53%) in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected.

  7. Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Cai, Wei-Jun; Melman, Todd F; Hoadley, Kenneth D; Pettay, D Tye; Hu, Xinping; Li, Qian; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yongchen; Matsui, Yohei; Baumann, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm), and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0 °C) within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (-53%) in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected. PMID:24146747

  8. Resistivity Variation due to CO2 Migration in Different Temperature and Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Y.; Onishi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Matsuoka, T.; Xue, Z.

    2007-12-01

    CO2 geological sequestration is one of the effective approaches solving the global warming problem. Captured CO2 is injected to the deep aquifers or depleted oil and gas fields. Injected CO2 migrates thorough the reservoir rock, however, the details behavior of injected CO2 under the ground at super critical phase is not yet fully understood. Migration of injected CO2 will change by the condition of the injected reservoir such as the temperature and pressure. Also density and permeability of the rock may be changed due to temperature or pressure variations. These changes control the migration behavior of injected CO2. In this study, experiments of resistivity measurements were conducted to detect the migration difference of CO2 in different temperature and pressure conditions by using sandstone core samples. Core sample was taken from Berea sandstone and processed to 5cm diameter and 12cm length. For the resistivity measurement, impression electrode was set on the both end and the measurement electrode of ring condition was set on the side of the rock sample. We stetted the core sample in the pressure vessel and recreated the condition of underground reservoir which is high pressure and high temperature. We injected supercritical CO2 in different pressure and temperature for each experiment. Pressure was changed in range of 8 to 11MPa and temperature was changed in range of 35° to 45°. This means that all the experiments were conducted in supercritical phase. From the measured resistivity variation, we verified the migration of CO2 and compared the migration behavior of CO2 in different conditions.

  9. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on Gynostemma pentaphyllum physiology and bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia-Dong; Mantri, Nitin; Sun, Bin; Jiang, Li; Chen, Ping; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Zhengdong; Zhang, Jialei; Shen, Jiahao; Lu, Hongfei; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an important topic of research has been how climate change is seriously threatening the sustainability of agricultural production. However, there is surprisingly little experimental data regarding how elevated temperature and CO2 will affect the growth of medicinal plants and production of bioactive compounds. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on the photosynthetic process, biomass, total sugars, antioxidant compounds, antioxidant capacity, and bioactive compounds of Gynostemma pentaphyllum. Two different CO2 concentrations [360 and 720μmolmol(-1)] were imposed on plants grown at two different temperature regimes of 23/18 and 28/23°C (day/night) for 60days. Results show that elevated CO2 and temperature significantly increase the biomass, particularly in proportion to inflorescence total dry weight. The chlorophyll content in leaves increased under the elevated temperature and CO2. Further, electron transport rate (ETR), photochemical quenching (qP), actual photochemical quantum yield (Yield), instantaneous photosynthetic rate (Photo), transpiration rate (Trmmol) and stomatal conductance (Cond) also increased to different degrees under elevated CO2 and temperature. Moreover, elevated CO2 increased the level of total sugars and gypenoside A, but decreased the total antioxidant capacity and main antioxidant compounds in different organs of G. pentaphyllum. Accumulation of total phenolics and flavonoids also decreased in leaves, stems, and inflorescences under elevated CO2 and temperature. Overall, our data indicate that the predicted increase in atmospheric temperature and CO2 could improve the biomass of G. pentaphyllum, but they would reduce its health-promoting properties. PMID:27054772

  10. Comparison of CO2 Dynamics and Air-Sea Exchange in Contrasting Tropical Reef Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Shamberger, K. E.; Musielewicz, S. B.; Maenner-Jones, S.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiyear high temporal resolution CO2 records in three differing coral reef settings were obtained using buoys deployed in coastal waters of Oahu since June 2008. The buoys are located on the barrier reef of Kaneohe Bay and offshore of Honolulu, on the south shore of Oahu. Annualized CO2 air-sea fluxes at the three buoys ranged from +0.05 mol C/m2/yr offshore Honolulu on a fringing reef well mixed with the open ocean to -1.12 mol C/m2/yr on a barrier reef flat in Kaneohe Bay (positive values represent CO2 sinks from the atmosphere and negative values represent sources). These fluxes compare well to those estimated from previous studies in Kaneohe Bay as well as in other tropical reef environments. pCO2 measurements, made every 3 hours, at each location show strong temporal cycles on multiple time scales ranging from diel to seasonal at each buoy and an anticorrelation with pO2. These records, when combined with those of a prior buoy deployment in southern Kaneohe Bay and several synoptic studies, allow us to examine how the principal biological cycles of productivity/respiration and calcification/carbonate dissolution are influenced by changing water column properties, physical processes (e.g. residence time) and atmospheric conditions and how these processes ultimately impact the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere on hourly to interannual cycles. The data clearly demonstrate the need for high frequency pCO2 data to characterize completely and accurately short-term local changes in the CO2-carbonic acid system parameters and how these changes overprint the longer scale process of ocean acidification as a result of invasion of CO2 into the ocean due to emissions of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere. Since many coral reef ecosystems are still sources of CO2 to the atmosphere because of positive net ecosystem calcification, and in some instances net heterotrophy, such data are even more critical in terms of assessing future changes in the direction

  11. Modeling forest C and N allocation responses to free-air CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; De Kauwe, Martin; Walker, Anthony; Werner, Christian; Iversen, Colleen; McCarthy, Heather; Medlyn, Belinda; Norby, Richard; Oren, Ram; Zak, Donald; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation allocation patterns and soil-vegetation partitioning of C and N are predicted to change in response to rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2. These allocation responses to rising CO2 have been examined at the ecosystem level through through free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, and their global implications for the timing of progressive N limitation (PNL) and C sequestration have been predicted for ~100 years using a variety of ecosystem models. However, recent FACE model-data syntheses studies [1,2,3] have indicated that ecosystem models do not capture the 5-10 year site-level ecosystem allocation responses to elevated CO2. This may be due in part to the missing representation of the rhizosphere interactions between plants and soil biota in models. Ecosystem allocation of C and N is altered by interactions between soil and vegetation through the priming effect: as plant N availability diminishes, plants respond physiologically by altering their tissue allocation strategies so as to increase rates of root growth and rhizodeposition. In response, either soil organic material begins to accumulate, which hastens the onset of PNL, or soil microbes start to decompose C more rapidly, resulting in increased N availability for plant uptake, which delays PNL. In this study, a straightforward approach for representing rhizosphere interactions in ecosystem models was developed through which C and N allocation to roots and rhizodeposition responds dynamically to elevated CO2 conditions, modifying soil decomposition rates without pre-specification of the direction in which soil C and N accumulation should shift in response to elevated CO2. This approach was implemented in a variety of ecosystem models ranging from stand (G'DAY), to land surface (CLM 4.5, O-CN), to dynamic global vegetation (LPJ-GUESS) models. Comparisons against data from three forest FACE sites (Duke, Oak Ridge & Rhinelander) indicated that representing rhizosphere interactions allowed

  12. Factors regulating soil surface CO2 and NOx flux in response to high temperature, pulse water events, and nutrient fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Grantz, D. A.; Chatterjee, A.; Eberwein, J. R.; Allsman, L. A.; Jenerette, D.

    2012-12-01

    Trace gas emissions from the soil surface are often underestimated due to poor understanding of the factors regulating fluxes under extreme conditions when moisture can be highly variable. In particular, dynamics of soil surface trace gas emissions from hot agricultural regions can be difficult to predict due to the sporadic use of flood irrigation and nitrogen fertilization. Soil surface CO2 and NOx fluxes are especially difficult to predict due to nonlinear responses to pulse water and fertilization events. Additionally, models such as Lloyd and Taylor (1994) and Yienger and Levy II (1995) are not well parameterized for soil surface CO2 and NOx flux, respectively, under excessively high temperatures. We measured soil surface CO2 and NOx flux in an agricultural field transitioning from fallow to biofuel crop production (Sorghum bicolor). Soil surface CO2 flux was measured using CO2 probes coupled with the flux-gradient method. NOx measurements were made using chambers coupled with a NOx monitor. Our field site is located at the University of California Desert Research and Extension Center in the Imperial Valley of CA. Air temperatures regularly exceed 42°C in the summer. Flood irrigation is used at the site as well as nitrogen fertilizers. Soil respiration ranged from 0-15 μmoles CO2 m-2 s-1, with strong hysteresis observed both with and without plants. Soil CO2 fluxes measured in the fallow field before the biofuel crop was planted were temperature independent and mainly regulated by soil moisture. When plants were introduced, temperature became an important predictor for soil respiration as well as canopy height. NOx fluxes were highest at intermediate soil moisture and varied significantly across an irrigation cycle. NOx emissions were temperature dependent, ranging from 3-113 ng N cm-2 hr-1. Neither CO2 nor NOx emissions showed inhibition at soil temperatures up to 55°C. Models may underestimate fluxes of CO2 and NOx from hot agricultural regions due to

  13. Quantifying the air quality-CO2 tradeoff potential for airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Akshay; Dedoussi, Irene C.; Yim, Steve H. L.; Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Aircraft movements on the airport surface are responsible for CO2 emissions that contribute to climate change and other emissions that affect air quality and human health. While the potential for optimizing aircraft surface movements to minimize CO2 emissions has been assessed, the implications of CO2 emissions minimization for air quality have not been quantified. In this paper, we identify conditions in which there is a tradeoff between CO2 emissions and population exposure to O3 and secondary PM2.5 - i.e. where decreasing fuel burn (which is directly proportional to CO2 emissions) results in increased exposure. Fuel burn and emissions are estimated as a function of thrust setting for five common gas turbine engines at 34 US airports. Regional air quality impacts, which are dominated by ozone and secondary PM2.5, are computed as a function of airport location and time using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model. Tradeoffs between CO2 emissions and population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 occur between 2-18% and 5-60% of the year, respectively, depending on airport location, engine type, and thrust setting. The total duration of tradeoff conditions is 5-12 times longer at maximum thrust operations (typical for takeoff) relative to 4% thrust operations (typical for taxiing). Per kilogram of additional fuel burn at constant thrust setting during tradeoff conditions, reductions in population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 are 6-13% and 32-1060% of the annual average (positive) population exposure per kilogram fuel burn, where the ranges encompass the medians over the 34 airports. For fuel burn increases due to thrust increases (i.e. for constant operating time), reductions in both PM2.5 and O3 exposure are 1.5-6.4 times larger in magnitude than those due to increasing fuel burn at constant thrust (i.e. increasing operating time). Airports with relatively high population exposure reduction potentials - which occur due to a combination of high duration and

  14. Has the Impact of Rising CO2 on Plants been Exaggerated by Meta-Analysis of Free Air CO2 Enrichment Studies?

    PubMed

    Haworth, Matthew; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Killi, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis is extensively used to synthesize the results of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) studies to produce an average effect size, which is then used to model likely plant response to rising [CO2]. The efficacy of meta-analysis is reliant upon the use of data that characterizes the range of responses to a given factor. Previous meta-analyses of the effect of FACE on plants have not incorporated the potential impact of reporting bias in skewing data. By replicating the methodology of these meta-analytic studies, we demonstrate that meta-analysis of FACE has likely exaggerated the effect size of elevated [CO2] on plants by 20 to 40%; having significant implications for predictions of food security and vegetation response to climate change. Incorporation of the impact of reporting bias did not affect the significance or the direction of the [CO2] effect. PMID:27536310

  15. Has the Impact of Rising CO2 on Plants been Exaggerated by Meta-Analysis of Free Air CO2 Enrichment Studies?

    PubMed

    Haworth, Matthew; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Killi, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis is extensively used to synthesize the results of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) studies to produce an average effect size, which is then used to model likely plant response to rising [CO2]. The efficacy of meta-analysis is reliant upon the use of data that characterizes the range of responses to a given factor. Previous meta-analyses of the effect of FACE on plants have not incorporated the potential impact of reporting bias in skewing data. By replicating the methodology of these meta-analytic studies, we demonstrate that meta-analysis of FACE has likely exaggerated the effect size of elevated [CO2] on plants by 20 to 40%; having significant implications for predictions of food security and vegetation response to climate change. Incorporation of the impact of reporting bias did not affect the significance or the direction of the [CO2] effect.

  16. Interdependencies between temperature and moisture sensitivities of CO2 emissions in European land ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsch, C.; Zimmermann, M.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2015-03-01

    Soil respiration is one of the largest terrestrial fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Hence, small changes in soil respiration rates could have large effects on atmospheric CO2. In order to assess CO2 emissions from diverse European soils under different land-use and climate (soil moisture and temperature) we conducted a laboratory incubation experiment. Emission measurements of carbon dioxide under controlled conditions were conducted using soil monoliths of nine sites from the ÉCLAIRE flux network. Sites are located all over Europe; from the UK in the west to the Ukraine in the east; Italy in the south to Finland in the north and can be separated according to four land-uses (forests, grasslands, arable lands and one peatland). Intact soil cores were incubated in the laboratory at the temperatures 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C in a two factorial design of five soil moisture levels (5, 20, 40, 60, 80 (100)% water filled pore space, WFPS), before analysed for CO2 fluxes with an automated laboratory incubation measurement system. Land-use generally had a substantial influence on carbon dioxide fluxes, with the order of CO2 emission rates of the different land-uses being grassland > peatland > forest/arable land (P < 0.001). CO2 efflux responded strongly to varying temperature and moisture content with optimum moisture contents for CO2 emissions between 40-70% WFPS and a positive relationship between CO2 emissions and temperature. The relationship between temperature and CO2 emissions could be well described by a Gaussian model. Q10 values ranged between 0.86-10.85 and were negatively related to temperature for most of the moisture contents and sites investigated. At higher temperatures the effect of water and temperature on Q10 was very low. In addition under cold temperatures Q10 varied with moisture contents indicating a stronger prospective effect of rain events in cold areas on temperature sensitivity. We found at both coniferous forest sites a strong

  17. Dual Phase Membrane for High Temperature CO2 Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y.S. Lin; Matthew Anderson

    2006-09-29

    Dual-phase membranes consisting of stainless steel supports infiltrated with molten carbonate have been shown to be selective to CO{sub 2} at high temperatures (400-650 C). However, over time at high temperatures, the formation of iron oxides on the surface of the stainless steel supports render the membranes ineffective. This report details synthesis and characteristics of dual-phase carbonate membrane with an oxidation resistant perovskite type ceramic (lanthanum-strontium-cobaltite-iron; LSCF) support. Porous LSCF supports were prepared from its powder synthesized by the citrate method. Both steady state permeation and mercury porosimetry confirmed that the LSCF membrane sintered at 900 C has pores large enough to absorb molten carbonate, yet small enough to retain the molten carbonate under high pressure conditions. Results of XRD analysis have shown that LSCF and the molten carbonate mixture do not react with each other at temperatures below 700 C. Four-point method conductivity tests indicate that the support material has sufficiently high electronic conductivity for this application. Li-Na-K carbonate was coated to the porous LSCF support by a liquid infiltration method. Helium permeance of the support before and after infiltration of molten carbonate are on the order of 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -10} moles/m{sup 2} {center_dot} Pa {center_dot} s respectively, indicating that the molten carbonate is able to sufficiently infiltrate the membrane. Preliminary high temperature permeation experiments indicate that the membrane does separate CO{sub 2} in the presence of O{sub 2}, with a maximum flux of 0.623 ml/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min obtained at 850 C.

  18. Response of cave air CO2 and drip water to brush clearing in central Texas: Implications for recharge and soil CO2 dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Corinne; Banner, Jay L.

    2010-12-01

    Brush removal is commonly conducted to increase water availability in arid areas, such as central Texas, where water resources are stressed. The effectiveness of brush clearing to enhance recharge, however, remains uncertain as numerous studies have yielded contradictory results. This study assesses the effects of brush clearing on recharge to a cave at Natural Bridge Caverns, central Texas by evaluating changes in drip rate, drip water compositions, cave air CO2 concentrations, and calcite growth in a cave underlying an area cleared of brush. Drip sites were monitored for 3 years preclearing and 2 years postclearing at five drip sites beneath and seven drip sites not beneath the surface cleared of brush. Physical and chemical drip water parameters exhibit preclearing and postclearing variability. Postclearing drip rate characteristics reflect an initial interval of anomalously heavy rainfall, then a longer dry period. Drip water 87Sr/86Sr values do not exhibit preclearing to postclearing variation at sites beneath the cleared area and indicate no change in postclearing water residence time. Significant decreases in postclearing cave air CO2 are observed at seven of nine drip sites in the cave beneath the clearing. Decreases in cave air CO2 influence calcite growth, which impacts postclearing drip water Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca. Decreases in cave air CO2 immediately following brush clearing suggest that a significant portion of soil CO2 respiration is from tree root respiration rather than from soil microbial activity. Seasonal calcite growth patterns, linked to cave air CO2, also exhibit variability postclearing and suggest that cave mineral deposits may record historical changes in vegetative cover.

  19. Automated CO2 extraction from air for clumped isotope analysis in the atmo- and biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Magdalena; Ziegler, Martin; Pons, Thijs; Lourens, Lucas; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The conventional stable isotope ratios 13C/12C and 18O/16O in atmospheric CO2 are a powerful tool for unraveling the global carbon cycle. In recent years, it has been suggested that the abundance of the very rare isotopologue 13C18O16O on m/z 47 might be a promising tracer to complement conventional stable isotope analysis of atmospheric CO2 [Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al. 2007; Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Yeung et al., 2009]. Here we present an automated analytical system that is designed for clumped isotope analysis of atmo- and biospheric CO2. The carbon dioxide gas is quantitatively extracted from about 1.5L of air (ATP). The automated stainless steel extraction and purification line consists of three main components: (i) a drying unit (a magnesium perchlorate unit and a cryogenic water trap), (ii) two CO2 traps cooled with liquid nitrogen [Werner et al., 2001] and (iii) a GC column packed with Porapak Q that can be cooled with liquid nitrogen to -30°C during purification and heated up to 230°C in-between two extraction runs. After CO2 extraction and purification, the CO2 is automatically transferred to the mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometric analysis of the 13C18O16O abundance is carried out in dual inlet mode on a MAT 253 mass spectrometer. Each analysis generally consists of 80 change-over-cycles. Three additional Faraday cups were added to the mass spectrometer for simultaneous analysis of the mass-to-charge ratios 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49. The reproducibility for δ13C, δ18O and Δ47 for repeated CO2 extractions from air is in the range of 0.11o (SD), 0.18o (SD) and 0.02 (SD)o respectively. This automated CO2 extraction and purification system will be used to analyse the clumped isotopic signature in atmospheric CO2 (tall tower, Cabauw, Netherlands) and to study the clumped isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis (leaf chamber experiments) and soil respiration. References Affek, H. P., Xu, X. & Eiler, J. M., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 5033

  20. Impact of pressure and temperature on CO2-brine-mica contact angles and CO2-brine interfacial tension: Implications for carbon geo-sequestration.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Al-Yaseri, Ahmed Z; Barifcani, Ahmed; Lebedev, Maxim; Iglauer, Stefan

    2016-01-15

    Precise characterization of wettability of CO2-brine-rock system and CO2-brine interfacial tension at reservoir conditions is essential as they influence capillary sealing efficiency of caprocks, which in turn, impacts the structural and residual trapping during CO2 geo-sequestration. In this context, we have experimentally measured advancing and receding contact angles for brine-CO2-mica system (surface roughness ∼12nm) at different pressures (0.1MPa, 5MPa, 7MPa, 10MPa, 15MPa, 20MPa), temperatures (308K, 323K, and 343K), and salinities (0wt%, 5wt%, 10wt%, 20wt% and 30wt% NaCl). For the same experimental matrix, CO2-brine interfacial tensions have also been measured using the pendant drop technique. The results indicate that both advancing and receding contact angles increase with pressure and salinity, but decrease with temperature. On the contrary, CO2-brine interfacial tension decrease with pressure and increase with temperature. At 20MPa and 308K, the advancing angle is measured to be ∼110°, indicating CO2-wetting. The results have been compared with various published literature data and probable factors responsible for deviations have been highlighted. Finally we demonstrate the implications of measured data by evaluating CO2 storage heights under various operating conditions. We conclude that for a given storage depth, reservoirs with lower pressures and high temperatures can store larger volumes and thus exhibit better sealing efficiency.

  1. A MIXED MODEL ANALYSIS OF SOIL CO2 EFFLUX AND NIGHT-TIME RESPIRATION RESPONSES TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 on soil CO2 efflux and system respiration responses. The study was conducted in sun-lit controlled-environment chambers using two-year-old Douglas-fir seedlings grown in reconstructed litter-so...

  2. Characterization of an urban-rural CO 2 /temperature gradient and associated changes in initial plant productivity during secondary succession

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L. H.; Bunce, J. A.; Goins, E. W.

    2004-05-01

    To examine the impact of climate change on vegetative productivity, we exposed fallow agricultural soil to an in situ temperature and CO2 gradient between urban, suburban and rural areas in 2002. Along the gradient, average daytime CO2 concentration increased by 21% and maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime) daily temperatures increased by 1.6 and 3.3°C, respectively in an urban relative to a rural location. Consistent location differences in soil temperature were also ascertained. No other consistent differences in meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed, humidity, PAR, tropospheric ozone) as a function of urbanization were documented. The urban-induced environmental changes that were observed were consistent with most short-term (~50 year) global change scenarios regarding CO2 concentration and air temperature. Productivity, determined as final above-ground biomass, and maximum plant height were positively affected by daytime and soil temperatures as well as enhanced [CO2], increasing 60 and 115% for the suburban and urban sites, respectively, relative to the rural site. While long-term data are needed, these initial results suggest that urban environments may act as a reasonable surrogate for investigating future climatic change in vegetative communities.

  3. Efficient MgO-based mesoporous CO2 trapper and its performance at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Kun Kun; Zhou, Yu; Chun, Yuan; Zhu, Jian Hua

    2012-02-15

    A novel MgO-based porous adsorbent has been synthesized in a facile co-precipitation method for the first time, in order to provide a candidate for trapping CO(2) in flue gas at high temperature. The resulting composite exhibits a mesoporous structure with a wide pore size distribution, due to the even dispersion and distribution of microcrystalline MgO in the framework of alumina to form a concrete-like structure. These sorbents can capture CO(2) at high temperature (150-400°C), possessing high reactivity and stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption processes, providing competitive candidates to control CO(2) emission. PMID:22226721

  4. Assessing model sensitivity and uncertainty across multiple Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowdery, E.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    As atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide levels continue to increase, it is critical that terrestrial ecosystem models can accurately predict ecological responses to the changing environment. Current predictions of net primary productivity (NPP) in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations are highly variable and contain a considerable amount of uncertainty. It is necessary that we understand which factors are driving this uncertainty. The Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments have equipped us with a rich data source that can be used to calibrate and validate these model predictions. To identify and evaluate the assumptions causing inter-model differences we performed model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis across ambient and elevated CO2 treatments using the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model and the Ecosystem Demography Model (ED2), two process-based models ranging from low to high complexity respectively. These modeled process responses were compared to experimental data from the Kennedy Space Center Open Top Chamber Experiment, the Nevada Desert Free Air CO2 Enrichment Facility, the Rhinelander FACE experiment, the Wyoming Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment Experiment, the Duke Forest Face experiment and the Oak Ridge Experiment on CO2 Enrichment. By leveraging data access proxy and data tilling services provided by the BrownDog data curation project alongside analysis modules available in the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), we produced automated, repeatable benchmarking workflows that are generalized to incorporate different sites and ecological models. Combining the observed patterns of uncertainty between the two models with results of the recent FACE-model data synthesis project (FACE-MDS) can help identify which processes need further study and additional data constraints. These findings can be used to inform future experimental design and in turn can provide informative starting point for data assimilation.

  5. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Impact of Rain on Regional and Global Sea-Air Fluxes of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, J. D.; Land, P. E.; Woolf, D. K.; Quartly, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    The global oceans are considered a major sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Rain is known to alter the physical and chemical conditions at the sea surface, and thus influence the transfer of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. It can influence gas exchange through enhanced gas transfer velocity, the direct export of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean, by altering the sea skin temperature, and through surface layer dilution. However, to date, very few studies quantifying these effects on global net sea-air fluxes exist. Here, we include terms for the enhanced gas transfer velocity and the direct export of carbon in calculations of the global net sea-air fluxes, using a 7-year time series of monthly global climate quality satellite remote sensing observations, model and in-situ data. The use of a non-linear relationship between the effects of rain and wind significantly reduces the estimated impact of rain-induced surface turbulence on the rate of sea-air gas transfer, when compared to a linear relationship. Nevertheless, globally, the rain enhanced gas transfer and rain induced direct export increase the estimated annual oceanic integrated net sink of CO2 by up to 6%. Regionally, the variations can be larger, with rain increasing the estimated annual net sink in the Pacific Ocean by up to 15% and altering monthly net flux by > ± 50%. Based on these analyses, the impacts of rain should be included in the uncertainty analysis of studies that estimate net sea-air fluxes of CO2 as the rain can have a considerable impact, dependent upon the region and timescale. PMID:27673683

  6. Influence of precipitation on the CO2 air-sea flux, an eddy covariance field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarsky, Alexander; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2016-04-01

    During the SPACES-OASIS cruise (July-August 2015) from Durban, SA to Male, MV direct fluxes of CO2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The cruise covered areas of sources and sinks for atmospheric CO2, where the bulk concentration gradient measurements resembled the Takahashi (2009) climatology. Most of the time, bulk CO2 fluxes (F=k* [cwater-cair]), calculated with the parametrization (k) by Nightingale et al. 2000, were in general agreement with direct EC measurements. However, during heavy rain events, the directly measured CO2 fluxes were 4 times higher than predicted. It has been previously described that rain influences the k parametrization of air-sea gas exchange, but this alone cannot explain the measured discrepancy. There is evidence that freshwater input and a change in the carbonate chemistry causes the water side concentration of ?c=cwater-cair to decrease. Unfortunately this cannot be detected by most bulk measurement systems. Using the flux measurements of an additional gas like DMS, this rain influence can be evaluated as DMS does not react to changes in the carbonate system and has a different solubility. A pending question is if the enhanced flux of CO2 in the ocean is sequestered into the ocean mixed layer and below. This question will be tackled using the GOTM model to understand the implications for the global carbon cycle.

  7. DUAL PHASE MEMBRANE FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CO2 SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y.S. Lin; Seungjoon Chung; Matthew Anderson

    2005-12-01

    This project is intended to expand upon the previous year's research en route to the development of a sustainable dual phase membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. It was found that the pores within the supports had to be less than 9 {micro}m in order to maintain the stability of the dual phase membrane. Pores larger than 9 {micro}m would be unable to hold the molten carbonate phase in place, rendering the membrane ineffective. Calculations show that 80% of the pore volume of the 0.5 media grade metal support was filled with the molten carbonate. Information obtained from EDS and SEM confirmed that the molten carbonate completely infiltrated the pores on both the contact and non-contact size of the metal support. Permeation tests for CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} at 450-750 C show very low permeance of those two gases through the dual phase membrane, which was expected due to the lack of ionization of those two gases. Permeance of the CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} mixture was much higher, indicating that the gases do form an ionic species, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, enhancing transport through the membrane. However, at temperatures in excess of 650 C, the permeance of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} decreased quite rapidly, while predictions showed that permeance should have continued to increase. XRD data obtained form the surface of the membrane indicated the formation of lithium iron oxides on the support. This layer has a very low conductivity, which drastically reduces the flow of electrons to the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture, limiting the formation of the ionic species. These results indicate that the use of stainless steel supports in a high temperature oxidative environment can lead to decreased performance of the membranes. This revelation has created the need for an oxidation resistant support, which can be gained by the use of a ceramic-type membrane. Future research efforts will be directed towards preparation of a new ceramic-carbonate dual phase membrane. The membrane will based on an

  8. Mid-stratospheric measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Karion, A.; Newberger, T.; Sweeney, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    AirCore, a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for CO2 and CH4 measurements. Previous studies show that vertical profiles from the ground level up to ~ 20 km (~ 40 mbar) can be achieved during a balloon flight. The ceiling of the profile is restricted mainly by the diffusion of air in the AirCore and the resolution of the analyzer used for the analysis. Here air with an extremely high CO mixing ratio (~ 10 ppm) has been employed as the initial fill air in the AirCore. This high CO fill gas is used as a label to track the mixing between sampled air and fill air at the top of the profile thus providing the ability to retrieve full profiles for CO2 and CH4 up to the balloon's ceiling height of ~ 30 km (~ 11 mbar). Stratospheric measurements of CO lack agreement among previous studies, (i.e. cryogenic sampling, in-situ measurements, and remote sensing) due to difficulties that are inherent to the various techniques and possibly due to latitudinal and seasonal variations that could not be represented by the available sparse observations. Efforts to collect an accurate profile of stratospheric CO using the AirCore, are complicated by the reaction of CO and O3 in the coil, which is particular important for stratospheric air with high O3. To remove the influence of O3 on the CO measurements from AirCore, we have investigated three O3 scrubbers: 1) Manganese dioxide (MnO2); 2) Sodium Sulfite (Na2SO3); 3) Sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3). Laboratory tests reveal that Sodium thiosulfate is the best choice as it has sufficient capacity to absorb O3 and does not impact measurements of CO2 and CH4. We will show experimental results from both aircraft and balloon flights. Regular ongoing stratospheric profiles of CO2, CH4, and CO are necessary to improve and validate total column measurements by remote sensing techniques, such as FTS and satellite. Such measurements

  9. Co-location of air capture, subseafloor CO2 sequestration, and energy production on the Kerguelen plateau.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David S; Lackner, Klaus S; Han, Patrick; Slagle, Angela L; Wang, Tao

    2013-07-01

    Reducing atmospheric CO2 using a combination of air capture and offshore geological storage can address technical and policy concerns with climate mitigation. Because CO2 mixes rapidly in the atmosphere, air capture could operate anywhere and in principle reduce CO2 to preindustrial levels. We investigate the Kerguelen plateau in the Indian Ocean, which offers steady wind resources, vast subseafloor storage capacities, and minimal risk of economic damages or human inconvenience and harm. The efficiency of humidity swing driven air capture under humid and windy conditions is tested in the laboratory. Powered by wind, we estimate ∼75 Mt CO2/yr could be collected using air capture and sequestered below seafloor or partially used for synfuel. Our analysis suggests that Kerguelen offers a remote and environmentally secure location for CO2 sequestration using renewable energy. Regional reservoirs could hold over 1500 Gt CO2, sequestering a large fraction of 21st century emissions.

  10. Seasonal and interannual variability of sea-air CO2 fluxes in the tropical Atlantic affected by the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Diverrès, Denis; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    CO2 fugacities obtained from a merchant ship sailing from France to French Guyana were used to explore the seasonal and interannual variability of the sea-air CO2 exchange in the western tropical North Atlantic (TNA; 5-14°N, 41-52°W). Two distinct oceanic water masses were identified in the area associated to the main surface currents, i.e., the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Current (NEC). The NBC was characterized by permanent CO2 oversaturation throughout the studied period, contrasting with the seasonal pattern identified in the NEC. The NBC retroflection was the main contributor to the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC), thus spreading into the central TNA, the Amazon River plume, and the CO2-rich waters probably originated from the equatorial upwelling. Strong CO2 undersaturation was associated to the Amazon River plume. Total inorganic carbon drawdown due to biological activity was estimated to be 154 µmol kg-1 within the river plume. As a consequence, the studied area acted as a net sink of atmospheric CO2 (from -72.2 ± 10.2 mmol m-2 month-1 in February to 14.3 ± 4.5 mmol m-2 month-1 in May). This contrasted with the net CO2 efflux estimated by the main global sea-air CO2 flux climatologies. Interannual sea surface temperature changes in the TNA caused by large-scale climatic events could determine the direction and intensity of the sea-air CO2 fluxes in the NEC. Positive temperature anomalies observed in the TNA led to an almost permanent CO2 outgassing in the NEC in 2010.

  11. A meta-analysis of plant physiological and growth responses to temperature and elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Wang, Xianzhong; Philpott, Stacy M

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and global mean temperature are expected to be significantly higher by the end of the 21st century. Elevated CO(2) (eCO(2)) and higher temperature each affect plant physiology and growth, but their interactive effects have not been reviewed statistically with respect to higher chronic mean temperatures and abrupt heat stress. In this meta-analysis, we examined the effect of CO(2) on the physiology and growth of plants subjected to different temperature treatments. The CO(2) treatments were categorized into ambient (<400 ppm) or elevated (>560 ppm) levels, while temperature treatments were categorized into ambient temperature (AT), elevated temperature (ET; AT + 1.4-6°C), or heat stress (HS; AT + >8°C). Plant species were grouped according to photosynthetic pathways (C(3), C(4)), functional types (legumes, non-legumes), growth forms (herbaceous, woody), and economic purposes (crop, non-crop). eCO(2) enhanced net photosynthesis at AT, ET, and HS in C(3) species (especially at the HS level), but in C(4) species, it had no effect at AT, a positive effect at ET, and a negative effect at HS. The positive effect of eCO(2) on net photosynthesis was greater for legumes than for non-legumes at HS, for non-crops than crops at ET, and for woody than herbaceous species at ET and HS. Total (W (T)) and above- (W (AG)) and below-ground (W (BG)) biomass were increased by eCO(2) for most species groups at all temperatures, except for C(4) species and W (BG) of legumes at HS. Hence, eCO(2) × heat effects on growth were often not explained by effects on net photosynthesis. Overall, the results show that eCO(2) effects on plant physiology and growth vary under different temperature regimes, among functional groups and photosynthetic pathways, and among response variables. These findings have important implications for biomass accumulation and ecosystem functioning in the future when the CO(2) level is higher and climate extremes, such as heat waves

  12. Effect of elevated CO2 and high temperature on seed-set and grain quality of rice

    PubMed Central

    Madan, P.; Jagadish, S. V. K.; Craufurd, P. Q.; Fitzgerald, M.; Lafarge, T.; Wheeler, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid vigour may help overcome the negative effects of climate change in rice. A popular rice hybrid (IR75217H), a heat-tolerant check (N22), and a mega-variety (IR64) were tested for tolerance of seed-set and grain quality to high-temperature stress at anthesis at ambient and elevated [CO2]. Under an ambient air temperature of 29 °C (tissue temperature 28.3 °C), elevated [CO2] increased vegetative and reproductive growth, including seed yield in all three genotypes. Seed-set was reduced by high temperature in all three genotypes, with the hybrid and IR64 equally affected and twice as sensitive as the tolerant cultivar N22. No interaction occurred between temperature and [CO2] for seed-set. The hybrid had significantly more anthesed spikelets at all temperatures than IR64 and at 29 °C this resulted in a large yield advantage. At 35 °C (tissue temperature 32.9 °C) the hybrid had a higher seed yield than IR64 due to the higher spikelet number, but at 38 °C (tissue temperature 34–35 °C) there was no yield advantage. Grain gel consistency in the hybrid and IR64 was reduced by high temperatures only at elevated [CO2], while the percentage of broken grains increased from 10% at 29 °C to 35% at 38 °C in the hybrid. It is concluded that seed-set of hybrids is susceptible to short episodes of high temperature during anthesis, but that at intermediate tissue temperatures of 32.9 °C higher spikelet number (yield potential) of the hybrid can compensate to some extent. If the heat tolerance from N22 or other tolerant donors could be transferred into hybrids, yield could be maintained under the higher temperatures predicted with climate change. PMID:22438302

  13. Formation of Magnesite at Low Temperature in Mineral:Supercritical CO2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, O.; Hu, J.; Arey, B.; Liu, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Felmy, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming is storage and sequestration of the anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations. Consequently, evaluating mineral-fluid interaction in aqueous systems saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has been the focus for subsurface CO2 storage research. An important factor in assessing mineral-fluid interactions is the potential for the formation of stable divalent metal carbonates, principally Ca and Mg, which can immobilize the disposed CO2 as mineral precipitates. The formation of some of these phases, especially the Mg anhydrous phase magnesite (MgCO3), has been hindered by slow precipitation kinetics owing to the strong affinity of Mg2+ ion for the waters of hydration. Understanding conditions that lead to formation of magnesite at temperatures significant to subsurface disposal of CO2 can be substantial in the development of efficient carbon sequestration techniques. Here we present recently obtained experimental data on the formation of magnesite at low temperature (as low as 350C) and microscopy data that can elucidate factors that might contribute to magnesite formation. The experimental studies were conducted over a range of temperature, pressure, pH, and initial Mg(HCO3)2 concentration to map out the specific solution phase conditions which result in nucleation of magnesite in aqueous solution saturated with scCO2.

  14. Controls of CO2 sources and sinks in the earth scale surface ocean - Temperature and nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Liu, Zhongze

    1988-01-01

    Several regions in the ocean in which disequilibrium persists on an annual avarage between CO2 in the surface water and the overlying atmosphere were examined using various models in which CO2 does cycle in a steady state at which sources (ocean outgassing) and sinks (ingassing) are in balance. The relative values of the surface temperature and surface nutrients, the two major contributors to the CO2 source and/or sink properties, are determined. Results from models with two ocean surfaces indicate that the sink in the north Atlantic and the sources in the equatorial Atlantic and Pacific are all dominated by the global temperature patterns. Results from ocean models with three surface zones show that, in the equatorial Pacific, the temperature control is responsible for over 50 percent (and, possibly, for almost 70 percent) of the CO2 outgassing, with the balance coming from the earth scale surface nutrient structure.

  15. Influence of CO2 and Temperature on Metabolism and Development of Helicoverpa armigera (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Akbar, S Md; Pavani, T; Nagaraja, T; Sharma, H C

    2016-02-01

    Climate change will have a major bearing on survival and development of insects as a result of increase in CO2 and temperature. Therefore, we studied the direct effects of CO2 and temperature on larval development and metabolism in cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner). The larvae were reared under a range of CO2 (350, 550, and 750 ppm) and temperature (15, 25, 35, and 45°C) regimes on artificial diet. Elevated CO2 negatively affected the larval survival, larval weight, larval period, pupation, and adult emergence, but showed a positive effect on pupal weight, pupal period, and fecundity. Increase in temperature exhibited a negative effect on larval survival, larval period, pupal weights, and pupal period, but a positive effect on larval growth. Pupation and adult emergence were optimum at 25°C. Elevated CO2 and temperature increased food consumption and metabolism of larvae by enhancing the activity of midgut proteases, carbohydrases (amylase and cellulase), and mitochondrial enzymes and therefore may cause more damage to crop production. Elevated CO2 and global warming will affect insect growth and development, which will change the interactions between the insect pests and their crop hosts. Therefore, there is need to gain an understanding of these interactions to develop strategies for mitigating the effects of climate change. PMID:26363173

  16. Microclimatic Performance of a Free-Air Warming and CO2 Enrichment Experiment in Windy Wyoming, USA

    PubMed Central

    LeCain, Daniel; Smith, David; Morgan, Jack; Kimball, Bruce A.; Pendall, Elise; Miglietta, Franco

    2015-01-01

    In order to plan for global changing climate experiments are being conducted in many countries, but few have monitored the effects of the climate change treatments (warming, elevated CO2) on the experimental plot microclimate. During three years of an eight year study with year-round feedback-controlled infra-red heater warming (1.5/3.0°C day/night) and growing season free-air CO2 enrichment (600 ppm) in the mixed-grass prairie of Wyoming, USA, we monitored soil, leaf, canopy-air, above-canopy-air temperatures and relative humidity of control and treated experimental plots and evaluated ecologically important temperature differentials. Leaves were warmed somewhat less than the target settings (1.1 & 1.5°C day/night) but soil was warmed more creating an average that matched the target settings extremely well both during the day and night plus the summer and winter. The site typically has about 50% bare or litter covered soil, therefore soil heat transfer is more critical than in dense canopy ecosystems. The Wyoming site commonly has strong winds (5 ms-1 average) and significant daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations (as much as 30°C daily) but the warming system was nearly always able to maintain the set temperatures regardless of abiotic variation. The within canopy-air was only slightly warmed and above canopy-air was not warmed by the system, therefore convective warming was minor. Elevated CO2 had no direct effect nor interaction with the warming treatment on microclimate. Relative humidity within the plant canopy was only slightly reduced by warming. Soil water content was reduced by warming but increased by elevated CO2. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring the microclimate in manipulative field global change experiments so that critical physiological and ecological conclusions can be determined. Highly variable energy demand fluctuations showed that passive IR heater warming systems will not maintain desired warming for much of the

  17. Retrieval of Mid-tropospheric CO2 Directly from AIRS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Edward T.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Chen, Luke L.; Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    We apply the method of Vanishing Partial Derivatives (VPD) to AIRS spectra to retrieve daily the global distribution of CO2 at a nadir geospatial resolution of 90 km x 90 km without requiring a first-guess input beyond the global average. Our retrievals utilize the 15 (micro)m band radiances, a complex spectral region. This method may be of value in other applications, in which spectral signatures of multiple species are not well isolated spectrally from one another.

  18. Sea ice pCO2 dynamics and air-ice CO2 fluxes during the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment - Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Tison, J.-L.; Ackley, S. F.; Galley, R. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Miller, L. A.; Delille, B.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal evolution of pCO2 profiles in sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica, in October 2007 shows physical and thermodynamic processes controls the CO2 system in the ice. During the survey, cyclical warming and cooling strongly influenced the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of the ice cover. Two sampling sites with contrasting characteristics of ice and snow thickness were sampled: one had little snow accumulation (from 8 to 25 cm) and larger temperature and salinity variations than the second site, where the snow cover was up to 38 cm thick and therefore better insulated the underlying sea ice. We show that each cooling/warming event was associated with an increase/decrease in the brine salinity, total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2), and in situ brine and bulk ice CO2 partial pressures (pCO2). Thicker snow covers reduced the amplitude of these changes: snow cover influences the sea ice carbonate system by modulating the temperature and therefore the salinity of the sea ice cover. Results indicate that pCO2 was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere both in the in situ bulk ice (from 10 to 193 μatm) and brine (from 65 to 293 μatm), causing the sea ice to act as a sink for atmospheric CO2 (up to 2.9 mmol m-2 d-1), despite supersaturation of the underlying seawater (up to 462 μatm).

  19. Impact of elevated CO2, water table, and temperature changes on CO2 and CH4 fluxes from arctic tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Donatella; Haynes, Katherine; Deutschman, Douglas; Bryant, Emma; McEwing, Katherine; Davidson, Scott; Oechel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Large uncertainties still exist on the response of tundra C emissions to future climate due, in part, to the lack of understanding of the interactive effects of potentially controlling variables on C emissions from Arctic ecosystems. In this study we subjected 48 soil cores (without active vegetation) from dominant arctic wetland vegetation types, to a laboratory manipulation of elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated temperature, and altered water table, representing current and future conditions in the Arctic for two growing seasons. To our knowledge this experiment comprised the most extensively replicated manipulation of intact soil cores in the Arctic. The hydrological status of the soil was the most dominant control on both soil CO2 and CH4 emissions. Despite higher soil CO2 emission occurring in the drier plots, substantial CO2 respiration occurred under flooded conditions, suggesting significant anaerobic respirations in these arctic tundra ecosystems. Importantly, a critical control on soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes was the original vascular plant cover. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration was correlated with cumulative CH4 emissions but not with cumulative CO2 suggesting C quality influenced CH4 production but not soil CO2 emissions. An interactive effect between increased temperature and elevated CO2 on soil CO2 emissions suggested a potential shift of the soils microbial community towards more efficient soil organic matter degraders with warming and elevated CO2. Methane emissions did not decrease over the course of the experiment, even with no input from vegetation. This result indicated that CH4 emissions are not carbon limited in these C rich soils. Overall CH4 emissions represented about 49% of the sum of total C (C-CO2 + C-CH4) emission in the wet treatments, and 15% in the dry treatments, representing a dominant component of the overall C balance from arctic soils.

  20. The combined effects of temperature and CO2 lead to altered gene expression in Acropora aspera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, D.; Bobeszko, T.; Ainsworth, T.; Leggat, W.

    2013-12-01

    This study explored the interactive effects of near-term CO2 increases (40-90 ppm above current ambient) during a simulated bleaching event (34 °C for 5 d) of Acropora aspera by linking physiology to expression patterns of genes involved in carbon metabolism. Symbiodinium photosynthetic efficiency ( F v / F m ) was significantly depressed by the bleaching event, while elevated pressure of CO2 (pCO2) slightly mitigated the effects of increased temperature on F v / F m during the final 4 d of the recovery period, however, did not affect the loss of symbionts. Elevated pCO2 alone had no effect on F v / F m or symbiont density. Expression of targeted Symbiodinium genes involved in carbon metabolism and heat stress response was not significantly altered by either increased temperature and/or CO2. Of the selected host genes, two carbonic anhydrase isoforms (coCA2 and coCA3) exhibited the largest changes, most notably in crossed bleaching and elevated pCO2 treatments. CA2 was significantly down-regulated on day 14 in all treatments, with the greatest decrease in the crossed treatment (relative expression compared to control = 0.16; p < 0.05); CA3 showed a similar trend, with expression levels 0.20-fold of controls on day 14 ( p < 0.05) in the elevated temperature/pCO2 treatment. The synergistic effects of ocean acidification and bleaching were evident during this study and demonstrate that increased pCO2 in surface waters will impact corals much sooner than many studies utilising end-of-century pCO2 concentrations would indicate.

  1. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  2. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data from the Duke Forest FACE Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOEÆs Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. The Duke University FACE website actually presents information on several FACE experiments. The Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) facility is located in the Blackwood Division of the Duke Forest. It consists of four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) plots that provide elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and four plots that provide ambient CO2 control. The system has been in operation since June, 1994 in the prototype plot, and since August, 1996 in the three additional plots. The prototype plot and its reference were halved with a barrier inserted in the soil in 1998 to conduct, together with five additional plot pairs, CO2 X soil nutrient enrichment experiments. The rest of the plots were partitioned in early 2005 and incorporated into the CO2 X nutrient experiment. To increase statistical power, four additional ambient plots were established in January, 2005, halved, and one half of each fertilized. [copied from http://face.env.duke.edu/description.cfm] The Duke FACE home page makes information available from both completed and ongoing projects, provides a searchable database of publications and presentations, and data, images, and links to related websites.

  3. Dynamics of CO(2) laser pulse filamentation in air influenced by spectrally selective molecular absorption.

    PubMed

    Geints, Yuri E; Zemlyanov, Alexander A

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical aspects of self-focusing and filamentation of high-power pulsed CO(2) laser radiation with carrier wavelength 10.6 μm in air are considered. The spectrally selective molecular absorption of realistic atmospheric air is included in the theoretical model. In the conditions of strong pulse self-phase modulation and pulse spectral broadening, the supercontinual radiation spectrum is substantially influenced by the selective atmospheric absorption that destabilizes the filamentation process and results in considerable shortening of the filamentation length. PMID:25321358

  4. Tuneable Diode Laser for measuring CO2 and CO air concentration on New Zealand volcanoes: An emerging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazot, A.; Christenson, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A new technique, called Open-Path laser, has been used for monitoring of CO2 degassing in volcanic areas in New Zealand. The purpose of these surveys is to have a better knowledge in the spatial and temporal dynamics of CO2 degassing in the atmosphere. CO2 is less reactive than other volcanic gases. CO is present in lesser amounts in volcanic gases but the CO/CO2 ratio is a good indicator of the redox conditions at depth because a change in the ratio can be related to a new input of magma in the volcanic system. This presentation introduces the new laser based technique for future volcanic gas surveillance at Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand. Frequent mild to moderate explosive eruptions have occurred in historical time from the crater lake of Ruapehu with the last hydrothermal eruption occurring in September 2007. The pH of the lake is around 1.1 with lake temperatures ranging from 10 to 60 oC. CO2 emission measurements have been made since 2003 from an airborne platform at a constant distance from the summit and the data were processed using the plume contouring method. The total CO2 emission rate varies from not detectable to 2200 t/day. We here show new results from a measurement campaign conduced 23 May, 2012 over the Ruapehu Crater lake and show how paths are reduced to CO2 values. The values are then compared to long term measurements obtained on the airborne platform. This technique has been also used on another New Zealand volcano, Tongariro which showed volcano seismic unrest beginning in mid-July 2012. The last eruption at the Tongariro volcano was from Te Maari craters in 1897 with reported ash fall as far as Napier 115 km away from the volcano. In response to this activity, we conducted a range of geochemical sampling including, spring sampling and soil gas measurements. In addition, we tested the Tuneable Diode Laser to measure CO2 air concentration. The new method may prove useful for geochemical gas surveillance in combination with the geodetic and

  5. Multiplex CARS for simultaneous measurement of temperature and CO2 and H2 concentrations in a combustion environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Yueh, F. Y.

    1991-05-01

    Simultaneous temperature and CO2 concentration measurements with multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra of CO2 were performed. CARS spectra of pure CO2 and various mixtures of CO2 and N2 in a furnace were recorded at various temperatures to test the computer code that simulates CO2 CARS spectra using recent spectroscopic constants. The temperatures obtained from the CO2 CARS spectra were in good agreement with thermocouple temperature measurements. However, the CO2 concentrations cannot be accurately extracted from these spectra. H2 pure rotational lines S(4) and S(5) were found in the CO2 CARS spectra of a hydrocarbon flame. CARS spectra of preanalyzed mixtures of N2, CO2, and H2 in a furnace were recorded to investigate the feasibility of inferring the H2 concentration from these spectra.

  6. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  7. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  8. Investigation into the Presence of Urban CO2 Domes in California and Their Enhancement on Other Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A.; Grossberg, N.; Yang, M. M.; Peischl, J.; Lefer, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Urban carbon dioxide (CO2) domes, defined as the buildup of CO2 over major cities, or an urban to rural CO2 gradient are thought to be the product of local emissions. CO2 domes have been characterized in major cities in the United States and Europe via ground and satellite measurements. Their presence is evidence that CO2 emissions, while a widely accepted global problem, also affects local air quality. In 2010, Jacobson modeled urban CO2 domes in the Los Angeles Basin, Northern California, and the Central Valley of California as well as modeling the effects of their presence on the enhancement of other air pollutants. In order to identify CO2 in this study, airborne in-situ data from the 2008 NASA ARCTAS mission, the 2010 NOAA CALNEX mission and the 2012 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) was analyzed for the presence of urban CO2 domes. The background mean of CO2 for each mission was determined and enhancements of CO2 greater than 5 ppm from the background mean and below the boundary layer were studied. CO2 enhancements were seen in the areas predicted by Jacobson. These enhancements were greater than expected in the Central Valley and Northern California.

  9. 13CO2/12CO2 ratio analysis in exhaled air by lead-salt tunable diode lasers for noninvasive diagnostics in gastroenterology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Miliaev, Valerii A.; Selivanov, Yurii G.; Chizhevskii, Eugene G.; Os'kina, Svetlana; Ivashkin, Vladimir T.; Nikitina, Elena I.

    1999-07-01

    An analyzer of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air based on lead-salt tunable diode lasers is presented. High accuracy of the carbon isotope ratio detection in exhaled carbon dioxide was achieved with help of very simple optical schematics. It was based on the use of MBE laser diodes operating in pulse mode and on recording the resonance CO2 absorption at 4.2 micrometers . Special fast acquisition electronics and software were applied for spectral data collection and processing. Developed laser system was tested in a clinical train aimed to assessment eradication efficiency in therapy of gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Data on the 13C-urea breath test used for P.pylori detection and obtained with tunable diode lasers in the course of the trail was compared with the results of Mass-Spectroscopy analysis and histology observations. The analyzer can be used also for 13CO2/12CO2 ratio detection in exhalation to perform gastroenterology breath test based on using other compounds labeled with stable isotopes.

  10. A Fine-Tuned Fluorinated MOF Addresses the Needs for Trace CO2 Removal and Air Capture Using Physisorption.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Prashant M; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cadiau, Amandine; Adil, Karim; Shekhah, Osama; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Barbour, Leonard J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-07-27

    The development of functional solid-state materials for carbon capture at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, namely, from confined spaces (<0.5%) and in particular from air (400 ppm), is of prime importance with respect to energy and environment sustainability. Herein, we report the deliberate construction of a hydrolytically stable fluorinated metal-organic framework (MOF), NbOFFIVE-1-Ni, with the appropriate pore system (size, shape, and functionality), ideal for the effective and energy-efficient removal of trace carbon dioxide. Markedly, the CO2-selective NbOFFIVE-1-Ni exhibits the highest CO2 gravimetric and volumetric uptake (ca. 1.3 mmol/g and 51.4 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3)) for a physical adsorbent at 400 ppm of CO2 and 298 K. Practically, NbOFFIVE-1-Ni offers the complete CO2 desorption at 328 K under vacuum with an associated moderate energy input of 54 kJ/mol, typical for the full CO2 desorption in conventional physical adsorbents but considerably lower than chemical sorbents. Noticeably, the contracted square-like channels, affording the close proximity of the fluorine centers, permitted the enhancement of the CO2-framework interactions and subsequently the attainment of an unprecedented CO2 selectivity at very low CO2 concentrations. The precise localization of the adsorbed CO2 at the vicinity of the periodically aligned fluorine centers, promoting the selective adsorption of CO2, is evidenced by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on NbOFFIVE-1-Ni hosting CO2 molecules. Cyclic CO2/N2 mixed-gas column breakthrough experiments under dry and humid conditions corroborate the excellent CO2 selectivity under practical carbon capture conditions. Pertinently, the notable hydrolytic stability positions NbOFFIVE-1-Ni as the new benchmark adsorbent for direct air capture and CO2 removal from confined spaces. PMID:27388208

  11. A Fine-Tuned Fluorinated MOF Addresses the Needs for Trace CO2 Removal and Air Capture Using Physisorption.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Prashant M; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cadiau, Amandine; Adil, Karim; Shekhah, Osama; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Barbour, Leonard J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-07-27

    The development of functional solid-state materials for carbon capture at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, namely, from confined spaces (<0.5%) and in particular from air (400 ppm), is of prime importance with respect to energy and environment sustainability. Herein, we report the deliberate construction of a hydrolytically stable fluorinated metal-organic framework (MOF), NbOFFIVE-1-Ni, with the appropriate pore system (size, shape, and functionality), ideal for the effective and energy-efficient removal of trace carbon dioxide. Markedly, the CO2-selective NbOFFIVE-1-Ni exhibits the highest CO2 gravimetric and volumetric uptake (ca. 1.3 mmol/g and 51.4 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3)) for a physical adsorbent at 400 ppm of CO2 and 298 K. Practically, NbOFFIVE-1-Ni offers the complete CO2 desorption at 328 K under vacuum with an associated moderate energy input of 54 kJ/mol, typical for the full CO2 desorption in conventional physical adsorbents but considerably lower than chemical sorbents. Noticeably, the contracted square-like channels, affording the close proximity of the fluorine centers, permitted the enhancement of the CO2-framework interactions and subsequently the attainment of an unprecedented CO2 selectivity at very low CO2 concentrations. The precise localization of the adsorbed CO2 at the vicinity of the periodically aligned fluorine centers, promoting the selective adsorption of CO2, is evidenced by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on NbOFFIVE-1-Ni hosting CO2 molecules. Cyclic CO2/N2 mixed-gas column breakthrough experiments under dry and humid conditions corroborate the excellent CO2 selectivity under practical carbon capture conditions. Pertinently, the notable hydrolytic stability positions NbOFFIVE-1-Ni as the new benchmark adsorbent for direct air capture and CO2 removal from confined spaces.

  12. One-Dimensional Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Storage Systems - Change in Cap Rock Porosity Triggered by Pressure and Temperature Dependent CO2-Water-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemme, C.; van Berk, W.

    2015-12-01

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems supercritical CO2 is injected into a reservoir and dissolves in the reservoir brine. Subsequently, CO2(aq) diffuses into the cap rock to regions of lower total pressure and temperature and triggers CO2-water-rock interactions that are coupled with mass transport and result in precipitation and/or dissolution of minerals along the CO2 migration path. Such hydrogeochemical interactions change porosities and are responsible for the improvement or deterioration of the long term integrity of the system. This study presents a semi-generic hydrogeochemical model based on chemical equilibrium thermodynamics, data from several CO2 storage systems, and plausible assumptions regarding non-available data. One-dimensional reactive transport modeling is performed by using the U.S.G.S. PHREEQC code (3.1.4-8929; phreeqc.dat database) to identify and quantify the loss or gain of total porosity affected by hydrogeochemical reactions driven by diffusive mass transport exposed to pressure and temperature gradients. A fine spatial and temporal discretization, the use of non-reactive tracers, and a broad variety of modeling scenarios enable the calculation of the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 and the consideration of the pressure dependent mass action law constants along the CO2 migration path. Modeling results show that the relevant timescale for simulations of long-term storage of CO2 is in the range of 106 years, and that pressure/temperature conditions, heterogeneities (veins and fractures) and the mineralogical composition of the cap rock have the strongest influence on the increase in cap rock porosity (maximum increase from initial 5 % to 7.5 %). Critical parameter combinations - total pressure effects are crucial - could put long-term integrity at risks. Nevertheless, a wide range of conditions and parameter combinations for safe CO2 storage is identified by other modeling scenarios.

  13. CO2 concentrations and delta13C (CO2) values in monthly sets of air samples from downtown Parma and the Parma and Taro river valleys, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.

    PubMed

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enricomaria

    2006-09-01

    Monthly sets of discrete air samples were collected from September 2004 to June 2005 in the town of Parma, along North-South and East-West runs (8 plus 8 samples), using four-litre Pyrex flasks. The CO2 concentrations and delta13C values were determined on these samples with the aim of evaluating quantitatively the contribution of domestic heating to the winter atmospheric CO2 pollution in downtown Parma by comparing autumn and spring atmospheric values with winter values. After separation of CO2 from the other air gases in the laboratory, the CO2 concentrations were calculated from the intensity of the 12C16O2+ ion beam in the mass spectrometer, after calibration with artificial air samples whose CO2 concentration was very carefully determined by the Monte Cimone Observatory (Sestola, Modena, Italy). The reproducibility of these measurements was of approximately +/-0.4 % and, consequently, the most probable error is not higher than+/-2-3 ppmv and does not affect the magnitude of the gradients between different samples. The standard deviation of delta13C measurements ranges from+/-0.02 to +/-0.04 per thousand (1sigma). The results suggest that the contribution of domestic heating to atmospheric CO2 pollution is almost negligible in the case of ground level atmosphere, where the main CO2 pollution is essentially related to the heavy car traffic. This is probably because of the fact that the gases from the domestic heating systems are discharged tens of metres above ground level at a relatively high temperature so that they rise quickly to the upper atmospheric layers and are then displaced by air masses dynamics. Monthly sets of discrete air samples were also collected from October 2004 to June 2005 along North-South runs from the town of Parma to the Apennine ridge following the Parma and the Taro river valleys (8 samples and 7 samples per set, respectively) and measured using the same technique. The aim of this study was the comparison between the town samples

  14. Elevated CO2 and temperature increase soil C losses from a soy-maize ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warming temperatures and increasing CO2 are likely to have large effects on the amount of carbon stored in soil, but predictions of these effects are poorly constrained. We elevated temperature (canopy: +2.8 °C; soil growing season: +1.8 °C; soil fallow: +2.3 °C) for three years within the 9th-11th ...

  15. CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation of steel slags under ambient temperature: parameters influence, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghacham, Alia Ben; Pasquier, Louis-César; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the influence of different parameters on the efficiency of steel slag carbonation in slurry phase under ambient temperature. In the first part, a response surface methodology was used to identify the effect and the interactions of the gas pressure, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, gas/liquid ratio (G/L), and reaction time on the CO2 removed/sample and to optimize the parameters. In the second part, the parameters' effect on the dissolution of CO2 and its conversion into carbonates were studied more in detail. The results show that the pressure and the G/L ratio have a positive effect on both the dissolution and the conversion of CO2. These results have been correlated with the higher CO2 mass introduced in the reactor. On the other hand, an important effect of the L/S ratio on the overall CO2 removal and more specifically on the carbonate precipitation has been identified. The best results were obtained L/S ratios of 4:1 and 10:1 with respectively 0.046 and 0.052 gCO2 carbonated/g sample. These yields were achieved after 10 min reaction, at ambient temperature, and 10.68 bar of total gas pressure following direct gas treatment.

  16. CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation of steel slags under ambient temperature: parameters influence, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghacham, Alia Ben; Pasquier, Louis-César; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the influence of different parameters on the efficiency of steel slag carbonation in slurry phase under ambient temperature. In the first part, a response surface methodology was used to identify the effect and the interactions of the gas pressure, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, gas/liquid ratio (G/L), and reaction time on the CO2 removed/sample and to optimize the parameters. In the second part, the parameters' effect on the dissolution of CO2 and its conversion into carbonates were studied more in detail. The results show that the pressure and the G/L ratio have a positive effect on both the dissolution and the conversion of CO2. These results have been correlated with the higher CO2 mass introduced in the reactor. On the other hand, an important effect of the L/S ratio on the overall CO2 removal and more specifically on the carbonate precipitation has been identified. The best results were obtained L/S ratios of 4:1 and 10:1 with respectively 0.046 and 0.052 gCO2 carbonated/g sample. These yields were achieved after 10 min reaction, at ambient temperature, and 10.68 bar of total gas pressure following direct gas treatment. PMID:27236443

  17. A direct detection 1.6μm DIAL with three wavelengths for high accuracy measurements of vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is an attractive method for obtaining vertical CO2 profiles and we have developed an 1.6μm DIAL system to perform simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration, atmospheric temperature profile and wind profile. The absorption cross sections of gas and air density depends on atmospheric temperature and pressure. Then precise temperature and pressure profiles are necessary for accurate CO2 mixing ratio measurement by DIAL. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature. The receiving optics include the near-infrared photomultiplier tube and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift.

  18. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) on yield formation of wheat].

    PubMed

    Ynag, Lian-xin; Li, Shi-feng; Wang, Yu-long; Huang, Jian-ye; Yang, Hong-jian; Dong, Gui-chun; Zhu, Jian-guo; Liu, Gang

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of predicted higher CO2 levels on the growth duration, plant height, yield, and yield components of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment with weak gluten variety Ningmai 9 was conducted at Anzhen of Wuxi in Jiangsu Province in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 growth seasons. The target [CO2] in FACE plots was 200 microl x L(-1) above that in ambient air. Three levels of N were supplied, i.e., 90 kg x hm(-2) (2001-2002) and 125 kg x hm(-2)(2002-2003) (low level, LN), 180 kg x hm(-2) 2002-2003) (medium level, MN), and 250 kg x hm(-2)(high level, HN). The durations from sowing to heading and from heading to maturity and the whole growth period of wheat in FACE plots shortened 1.3 , 1.3 and 2.6 days, respectively, compared with the control. FACE increased the plant height (+4.0% significantly, due to the increases of panicle length and of the first and second internode lengths. FACE also greatly increased the grain yield by an average of 24.6%. Across the two years, there was a positive [CO2] x N interaction for grain yield, with a yield increase of 15.2%, 21.4% and 35.4% at LN, MN and HN, respectively. The ears per square meter in FACE plots was increased by an average of 17.8% mainly due to the increase of maximum tiller number per unit ground area rather than that of the percentage of productive tiller (panicle bearing). In addition, FACE increased the grain number per ear (+2.9% and the individual grain mass (+4.8%).

  19. Contribution of tropical cyclones to the air-sea CO2 flux: A global view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LéVy, M.; Lengaigne, M.; Bopp, L.; Vincent, E. M.; Madec, G.; Ethé, C.; Kumar, D.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.

    2012-06-01

    Previous case studies have illustrated the strong local influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on CO2 air-sea flux ? suggesting that they can significantly contribute to the global ? In this study, we use a state-of-the art global ocean biochemical model driven by TCs wind forcing derived from a historical TCs database, allowing to sample the ? response under 1663 TCs. Our results evidence a very weak contribution of TCs to global ? one or two order of magnitude smaller than previous estimates extrapolated from case studies. This result arises from several competing effects involved in the ? response to TCs, not accounted for in previous studies. While previous estimates have hypothesized the ocean to be systematically oversaturated in CO2 under TCs, our results reveal that a similar proportion of TCs occur over oversaturated regions (i.e. the North Atlantic, Northeast Pacific and the Arabian Sea) and undersaturated regions (i.e. Westernmost North Pacific, South Indian and Pacific Ocean). Consequently, by increasing the gas exchange coefficient, TCs can generate either instantaneous CO2 flux directed from the ocean to the atmosphere (efflux) or the opposite (influx), depending on the CO2 conditions at the time of the TC passage. A large portion of TCs also occurs over regions where the ocean and the atmosphere are in near equilibrium, resulting in very weak instantaneous fluxes. Previous estimates also did not account for any asynchronous effect of TCs on ? during several weeks after the storm, oceanic pCO2 is reduced in response to vertical mixing, which systematically causes an influx anomaly. This implies that, contrary to previous estimates, TCs weakly affect the CO2 efflux when they blow over supersaturated areas because the instantaneous storm wind effect and post-storm mixing effect oppose with each other. In contrast, TCs increase the CO2 influx in undersaturated conditions because the two effects add up. These compensating effects result in a very weak

  20. Influence of Ambient Temperature on the CO2 Emitted With Exhaust Gases of Gasoline Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainikov, D.; Chikishev, E.; Anisimov, I.; Gavaev, A.

    2016-08-01

    This article focuses on the regulation of CO2 emitted in the exhaust gases of gasoline vehicles. Based on comparing the world practices of restrictive measures on greenhouse gas emissions with Russian legislation, we conclude that there is a need to adjust the limits of CO2 emission taking into account the negative impact of ambient temperature on CO2 emission. The climatic conditions of many countries stipulate the use of vehicles in temperatures below zero. At the same time, the existing regulations fully take into account the temperature features of the various countries, which casts doubt on the existence of uniform emission standards for all countries. Here, we conduct an experiment on one of the most popular cars in Russia: the Mitsubishi Lancer 9. We establish that lower temperatures are correlated with larger concentrations of CO2 in the exhaust gases. We draw a conclusion about the need to account for the actual operating conditions when establishing limit values on CO2 emissions of vehicles.

  1. [Responses of CO2 fluxes to light intensity and temperature in rice paddy field].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-li; Wu, Jin-shui; Tong, Cheng-li; Wang, Ke-lin; Wang, Qin-xue

    2008-04-01

    CO2 fluxes in rice paddy ecosystem in subtropical hilly region were measured continuously using eddy covariance technique. The objectives were to investigate the responses of CO2 fluxes to light intensity and temperature in the paddy ecosystem. Results showed a rectangular hyperbolic light-response function could be used to describe the relationship of CO2 flux and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The absolute values of CO2 fluxes increased with the increment of PPFD. When PPFD was higher than 1000 micromol/(m2 x s), the maximum was observed. CO2 fluxes responded differently to light between early and late rice. Values of quantum yield of late rice (0.0465-0.0999 micromol/micromol) were general higher than that of early rice (0.0176-0.0541 micromol/micromol). Moreover, the quantum yield and the maximum rate of photosynthesis assimilation in the blooming stage were higher than that in tillering and ripening stages. In nighttime, respiration from soil and plants (ecosystem respiration, Reco) changed exponentially with the increase of soil temperature at the depth of 5 cm (T5), 10 cm (T10), and 20 cm (T20), respectively. Whereas, T5 was more feasible than others to be considered as the temperature parameter for Reco calculation. During early rice growing season, Reco was more sensitive to temperature change than that during late rice growing season. PMID:18637359

  2. Subambient temperature CO(2) and light gas permeation through segmented block copolymers with tailored soft phase.

    PubMed

    Reijerkerk, Sander R; Ijzer, Anne Corine; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Arun, Araichimani; Gaymans, Reinoud J; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-02-01

    The permeation properties of a series of block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide)-ran-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-ran-PPO) soft segments and monodisperse tetra-amide (T6T6T) hard segments have been studied. The polyether soft segment used in the current study differs from the commonly used pure poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) soft segment by the fact that it contains 25 wt % randomly distributed poly(propylene oxide) (PPO). The presence of the methyl group of PPO suppresses crystallization of the soft segment and strongly improves the permeability of these materials, especially at subambient temperatures. In addition, the unique monodisperse character of the hard segment ensures a very well phase-separated morphology, resulting in a very pure soft phase. The soft segment length of these block copolymers was varied between 1000 and 10000 g/mol (62-89 wt %). High soft segment concentrations and flexibility were obtained resulting in high CO(2) permeabilities (up to 570 Barrer at 50 degrees C). Due to the random distribution of PPO in the predominantly PEO based soft segment crystallization of PEO was not observed at temperatures as low as -10 degrees C. CO(2) permeabilities exceeding 200 Barrer could be obtained at this low temperature. The CO(2)/light gas selectivity in these materials is governed by the solubility selectivity and consequently only slightly lowered because of the introduction of PPO in the soft segment. Comparison with literature revealed that this block copolymer system has exceptionally high CO(2) permeabilities combined with reasonable CO(2)/light gas selectivities. It is very interesting in CO(2) separation processes where subambient conditions are present (e.g., separation of CO(2) from natural gas), as at these low temperatures, one can take maximum advantage of the increased separation ability of the polymer materials while maintaining excellent transport characteristics.

  3. Fuel consumption and CO2/pollutant emissions of mobile air conditioning at fleet level - new data and model comparison.

    PubMed

    Weilenmann, Martin F; Alvarez, Robert; Keller, Mario

    2010-07-01

    Mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems are the second-largest energy consumers in cars after driving itself. While different measurement series are available to illustrate their behavior in hot ambient conditions, little data are available for lower temperatures. There are also no data available on diesel vehicles, despite these being quite common in Europe (up to 70% of the fleet in some countries). In the present study, six representative modern diesel passenger cars were tested. In combination with data from previous measurements on gasoline cars, a new model was developed - EEMAC = Empa Emission model for Mobile Air Conditioning systems - to predict emissions from air conditioning. The measurements obtained show that A/C activity still occurs at temperatures below the desired interior temperature. The EEMAC model was applied to the average meteorological year of a central European region and compared with the US EPA MOBILE6 model. As temperatures in central Europe are often below 20 degrees C (the point below which the two models differ), the overall results differ clearly. The estimated average annual CO(2) output according to EEMAC is six times higher than that of MOBILE6. EEMAC also indicates that around two-thirds of the fuel used for air conditioning could be saved by switching the MAC system off below 18 degrees C.

  4. Room-temperature ionic liquids and composite materials: platform technologies for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jason E; Camper, Dean E; Gin, Douglas L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-01-19

    Clean energy production has become one of the most prominent global issues of the early 21st century, prompting social, economic, and scientific debates regarding energy usage, energy sources, and sustainable energy strategies. The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, specifically carbon dioxide (CO(2)), figures prominently in the discussions on the future of global energy policy. Billions of tons of annual CO(2) emissions are the direct result of fossil fuel combustion to generate electricity. Producing clean energy from abundant sources such as coal will require a massive infrastructure and highly efficient capture technologies to curb CO(2) emissions. Current technologies for CO(2) removal from other gases, such as those used in natural gas sweetening, are also capable of capturing CO(2) from power plant emissions. Aqueous amine processes are found in the vast majority of natural gas sweetening operations in the United States. However, conventional aqueous amine processes are highly energy intensive; their implementation for postcombustion CO(2) capture from power plant emissions would drastically cut plant output and efficiency. Membranes, another technology used in natural gas sweetening, have been proposed as an alternative mechanism for CO(2) capture from flue gas. Although membranes offer a potentially less energy-intensive approach, their development and industrial implementation lags far behind that of amine processes. Thus, to minimize the impact of postcombustion CO(2) capture on the economics of energy production, advances are needed in both of these areas. In this Account, we review our recent research devoted to absorptive processes and membranes. Specifically, we have explored the use of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in absorptive and membrane technologies for CO(2) capture. RTILs present a highly versatile and tunable platform for the development of new processes and materials aimed at the capture of CO(2) from power plant flue gas and

  5. Room-temperature ionic liquids and composite materials: platform technologies for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jason E; Camper, Dean E; Gin, Douglas L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-01-19

    Clean energy production has become one of the most prominent global issues of the early 21st century, prompting social, economic, and scientific debates regarding energy usage, energy sources, and sustainable energy strategies. The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, specifically carbon dioxide (CO(2)), figures prominently in the discussions on the future of global energy policy. Billions of tons of annual CO(2) emissions are the direct result of fossil fuel combustion to generate electricity. Producing clean energy from abundant sources such as coal will require a massive infrastructure and highly efficient capture technologies to curb CO(2) emissions. Current technologies for CO(2) removal from other gases, such as those used in natural gas sweetening, are also capable of capturing CO(2) from power plant emissions. Aqueous amine processes are found in the vast majority of natural gas sweetening operations in the United States. However, conventional aqueous amine processes are highly energy intensive; their implementation for postcombustion CO(2) capture from power plant emissions would drastically cut plant output and efficiency. Membranes, another technology used in natural gas sweetening, have been proposed as an alternative mechanism for CO(2) capture from flue gas. Although membranes offer a potentially less energy-intensive approach, their development and industrial implementation lags far behind that of amine processes. Thus, to minimize the impact of postcombustion CO(2) capture on the economics of energy production, advances are needed in both of these areas. In this Account, we review our recent research devoted to absorptive processes and membranes. Specifically, we have explored the use of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in absorptive and membrane technologies for CO(2) capture. RTILs present a highly versatile and tunable platform for the development of new processes and materials aimed at the capture of CO(2) from power plant flue gas and

  6. Response of leaf litter decomposition to rises in atmospheric CO2 and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammrich, A.; Flury, S.; Gessner, M. O.

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have considerably increased in the last century and are expected to rise further. Elevated CO2 concentrations not only increase global temperature but also have potential to change plant litter quality, for example by increasing lignin content, changing C:N ratios and altering tannin contents. These chemical changes may interact with increased temperature to alter litter decomposition. To test whether changes in litter quality and warming affect decomposition, we conducted a field experiment with leaf litter collected from six species of mature deciduous trees exposed to either ambient or elevated CO2 levels. We used a set of 16 enclosures installed in four blocks in a freshwater marsh in a prealpine lake to test for the effects of CO2-mediated litter quality and temperature and the interaction of both factors. We measured leaf mass loss of the twelve litter types in control and heated enclosures (4 °C above ambient) and also in the open marsh. In contrast to expectations, species decomposing at low (oak and beech) and medium (hornbeam and maple) rates showed faster mass loss when leaves were grown under elevated CO2 conditions, whereas fast-decomposing species (cherry and basswood) showed no clear response. The accelerated decomposition of CO2-enriched litter could be due to higher amounts of nonstructural carbohydrates, which may have been either leached or readily degraded. Warming had a surprisingly small influence on mass loss of the tested litter species, and interactive effects were weak. These results suggest that direct and indirect effects of elevated CO2 levels on litter decomposition may not be readily predictable from first principles.

  7. Enhanced Volcanic Degassing Decoupled Atmospheric CO2 and Temperature During the Last Interglacial-Glacial Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupke, L.; Knorr, G.; Hasenclever, J.; Köhler, P.; Morgan, J. P.; Garofalo, K.; Barker, S.; Lohmann, G.; Hall, I. R.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from the joint interpretation of proxy data as well as geodynamical and biogeochemical modeling results point to complex interactions between sea level drawdown, volcanic degassing, and atmospheric CO2 that hampered the climate system's decent into the last ice age. Ice core data shows that atmospheric CO2 dropped abruptly into glacial Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 at ~71 ka, while Antarctic temperatures display a more gradual decline between ~85 ka to ~71 ka across the MIS 5/4 transition. Based on 2D and 3D geodynamical simulations, we show that a ~60-100 m sea level drop associated with the MIS 5/4 transition led to a significant increase in magma and possibly CO2 flux at mid-ocean ridges (MOR) and oceanic hotspot volcanoes. The MOR signal is assessed with 2D thermomechanical models that account for mantle melting and resolve the flux of incompatible carbon dioxide. These models have been run at different spreading rates and integrated with the global distribution of opening rates to compute global variations in magma and CO2 flux across the MIS 5/4 transition. 3D plume models have been used to quantify the impact of a dropping sea level on oceanic hotspot melting and CO2 release. Here a wide range of simulations with differing plume fluxes, lithospheric thicknesses as well as speeds, and plume excess temperatures have been integrated with data from ~40 hotspots in order to compute a global signal. Biogeochemical carbon cycle modeling shows that the predicted increase in volcanic emissions is likely to have raised atmospheric CO2 by up to 15 ppmv, sufficient to explain the bulk of the decoupling between temperature and atmospheric CO2 during the global change to pronounced glacial conditions across the MIS 5/4 transition.

  8. Effects of elevated CO2 on grain yield and quality of wheat: results from a 3-year free-air CO2 enrichment experiment.

    PubMed

    Högy, P; Wieser, H; Köhler, P; Schwadorf, K; Breuer, J; Franzaring, J; Muntifering, R; Fangmeier, A

    2009-11-01

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. TRISO) was grown for three consecutive seasons in a free-air carbon dioxide (CO(2)) enrichment (FACE) field experiment in order to examine the effects on crop yield and grain quality. CO(2) enrichment promoted aboveground biomass (+11.8%) and grain yield (+10.4%). However, adverse effects were predominantly observed on wholegrain quality characteristics. Although the thousand-grain weight remained unchanged, size distribution was significantly shifted towards smaller grains, which may directly relate to lower market value. Total grain protein concentration decreased significantly by 7.4% under elevated CO(2), and protein and amino acid composition were altered. Corresponding to the decline in grain protein concentration, CO(2) enrichment resulted in an overall decrease in amino acid concentrations, with greater reductions in non-essential than essential amino acids. Minerals such as potassium, molybdenum and lead increased, while manganese, iron, cadmium and silicon decreased, suggesting that adjustments of agricultural practices may be required to retain current grain quality standards. The concentration of fructose and fructan, as well as amounts per area of total and individual non-structural carbohydrates, except for starch, significantly increased in the grain. The same holds true for the amount of lipids. With regard to mixing and rheological properties of the flour, a significant increase in gluten resistance under elevated CO(2) was observed. CO(2) enrichment obviously affected grain quality characteristics that are important for consumer nutrition and health, and for industrial processing and marketing, which have to date received little attention.

  9. Impacts of potential CO2-reduction policies on air quality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Trail, Marcus A; Tsimpidi, Alexandra P; Liu, Peng; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Hu, Yongtao; Rudokas, Jason R; Miller, Paul J; Nenes, Athanasios; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-04-21

    Impacts of emissions changes from four potential U.S. CO2 emission reduction policies on 2050 air quality are analyzed using the community multiscale air quality model (CMAQ). Future meteorology was downscaled from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE General Circulation Model (GCM) to the regional scale using the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model. We use emissions growth factors from the EPAUS9r MARKAL model to project emissions inventories for two climate tax scenarios, a combined transportation and energy scenario, a biomass energy scenario and a reference case. Implementation of a relatively aggressive carbon tax leads to improved PM2.5 air quality compared to the reference case as incentives increase for facilities to install flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. However, less capital is available to install NOX reduction technologies, resulting in an O3 increase. A policy aimed at reducing CO2 from the transportation sector and electricity production sectors leads to reduced emissions of mobile source NOX, thus reducing O3. Over most of the U.S., this scenario leads to reduced PM2.5 concentrations. However, increased primary PM2.5 emissions associated with fuel switching in the residential and industrial sectors leads to increased organic matter (OM) and PM2.5 in some cities. PMID:25811418

  10. Impacts of potential CO2-reduction policies on air quality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Trail, Marcus A; Tsimpidi, Alexandra P; Liu, Peng; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Hu, Yongtao; Rudokas, Jason R; Miller, Paul J; Nenes, Athanasios; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-04-21

    Impacts of emissions changes from four potential U.S. CO2 emission reduction policies on 2050 air quality are analyzed using the community multiscale air quality model (CMAQ). Future meteorology was downscaled from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE General Circulation Model (GCM) to the regional scale using the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model. We use emissions growth factors from the EPAUS9r MARKAL model to project emissions inventories for two climate tax scenarios, a combined transportation and energy scenario, a biomass energy scenario and a reference case. Implementation of a relatively aggressive carbon tax leads to improved PM2.5 air quality compared to the reference case as incentives increase for facilities to install flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. However, less capital is available to install NOX reduction technologies, resulting in an O3 increase. A policy aimed at reducing CO2 from the transportation sector and electricity production sectors leads to reduced emissions of mobile source NOX, thus reducing O3. Over most of the U.S., this scenario leads to reduced PM2.5 concentrations. However, increased primary PM2.5 emissions associated with fuel switching in the residential and industrial sectors leads to increased organic matter (OM) and PM2.5 in some cities.

  11. Development of a Low-Power CO2 Removal and Compression System for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization in Future Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Moate, Joe R.

    2005-01-01

    The current CO2 removal technology of NASA is very energy intensive and contains many non-optimized subsystems. This paper discusses the design and prototype development of a two-stage CO2 removal and compression system that will utilize much less power than NASA s current CO2 removal technology. This integrated system contains a Nafion membrane followed by a residual water adsorber that performs the function of the desiccant beds in the four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) system of the International Space Station (ISS). The membrane and the water adsorber are followed by a two-stage CO2 removal and compression subsystem that satisfies the operations of the CO2 adsorbent beds of the 4BMS aid the interface compressor for the Sabatier reactor connection. The two-stage compressor will utilize the principles of temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compression technology for CO2 removal and compression. The similarities in operation and cycle times of the CO2 removal (first stage) and compression (second stage) operations will allow thermal coupling of the processes to maximize the efficiency of the system. In addition to the low-power advantage, this processor will maintain a lower CO2 concentration in the cabin than that can be achieved by the existing CO2 removal systems. The compact, consolidated, configuration of membrane gas dryer and CO2 separator and compressor will allow continuous recycling of humid air in the cabin and supply of compressed CO2 to the reduction unit for oxygen recovery. The device has potential application to the International Space Station and future, long duration, transit, and planetary missions.

  12. Mechanisms of low temperature capture and regeneration of CO2 using diamino protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Simons, Tristan J; Verheyen, Thomas; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Vijayaraghavan, R; Young, Scott; Pearson, Andrew K; Pas, Steven J; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2016-01-14

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) chemical absorption and regeneration was investigated in two diamino carboxylate protic ionic liquids (PILs), dimethylethylenediamine formate (DMEDAH formate) and dimethylpropylenediamine acetate (DMPDAH acetate), using novel calorimetric techniques. The PILs under study have previously been shown to possess a CO2 absorption capacity similar to the industrial standard, 30% aqueous MEA, while requiring much lower temperatures to release the captured CO2. We show that this is in part due to the fact that the PILs exhibit enthalpies of CO2 desorption as low as 40 kJ mol(-1), significantly lower than the 85 kJ mol(-1) required for 30% aqueous MEA. Computational and spectroscopic analyses were used to probe the mechanism of CO2 capture, which was found to proceed via the formation of carbamate moieties on the primary amine of both DMEDAH and DMPDAH. Evidence was also found that weakly acidic counter-ions such as formate and acetate provide, unexpectedly, an additional proton acceptor site in the traditional carbamate mechanism, revealing opportunities to increase CO2 uptake capacity in the future through careful design of the anion and cation used in the PIL capture agent.

  13. Which are the most important parameters for modelling carbon assimilation in boreal Norway spruce under elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions?

    PubMed

    Hall, Marianne; Medlyn, Belinda E; Abramowitz, Gab; Franklin, Oskar; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Wallin, Göran

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological variables, including phenology, foliage nitrogen (N) content, atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]), irradiation (Q), air temperature (T) and vapour pressure deficit (D). Each of these responses is likely to be modified by long-term changes in climatic conditions such as rising air temperature and [CO2]. When modelling photosynthesis under climatic changes, which parameters are then most important to calibrate for future conditions? To assess this, we used measurements of shoot carbon assimilation rates and microclimate conditions collected at Flakaliden, northern Sweden. Twelve 40-year-old Norway spruce trees were enclosed in whole-tree chambers and exposed to elevated [CO2] and elevated air temperature, separately and in combination. The treatments imposed were elevated temperature, +2.8 °C in July/August and +5.6 °C in December above ambient, and [CO2] (ambient CO2 ∼370 μ mol mol(-1), elevated CO2 ∼700 μ mol mol(-1)). The relative importance of parameterization of Q, T and D responses for effects on the photosynthetic rate, expressed on a projected needle area, and the annual shoot carbon uptake was quantified using an empirical shoot photosynthesis model, which was developed and fitted to the measurements. The functional form of the response curves was established using an artificial neural network. The [CO2] treatment increased annual shoot carbon (C) uptake by 50%. Most important was effects on the light response curve, with a 67% increase in light-saturated photosynthetic rate, and a 52% increase in the initial slope of the light response curve. An interactive effect of light saturated photosynthetic rate was found with foliage N status, but no interactive effect for high temperature and high CO2. The air temperature treatment increased the annual shoot C uptake by 44%. The most important parameter was the seasonality, with an elongation of the growing season by almost 4

  14. Direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag for CO2 sequestration at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Rushendra Revathy, T D; Palanivelu, K; Ramachandran, A

    2016-04-01

    Rapid increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has forced the international community towards adopting actions to restrain from the impacts of climate change. Moreover, in India, the dependence on fossil fuels is projected to increase in the future, implying the necessity of capturing CO2 in a safe manner. Alkaline solid wastes can be utilized for CO2 sequestration by which its disposal issues in the country could also be met. The present work focuses to study direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag (SS) at room temperature and low-pressure conditions (<10 bar). Direct mineral carbonation of SS was carried out in a batch reactor with pure CO2 gas. The process parameters that may influence the carbonation of SS, namely, CO2 gas pressure, liquid to solid ratio (L/S) and reaction time were also studied. The results showed that maximum sequestration of SS was attained in the aqueous route with a capacity of 82 g of CO2/kg (6 bar, L/S ratio of 10 and 3 h). In the gas-solid route, maximum sequestration capacity of about 11.1 g of CO2/kg of SS (3 bar and 3 h) was achieved indicating that aqueous route is the better one under the conditions studied. These findings demonstrate that SS is a promising resource and this approach could be further developed and used for CO2 sequestration in the country. The carbonation process was evidenced using FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TG analysis.

  15. Pyropia yezoensis can utilize CO2 in the air during moderate dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; He, Linwen; Yang, Fang; Lin, Apeng; Zhang, Baoyu; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2014-03-01

    Pyropia yezoensis, an intertidal seaweed, experiences regular dehydration and rehydration with the tides. In this study, the responses of P. yezoensis to dehydration and rehydration under high and low CO2 concentrations ((600-700)×10-6 and (40-80)×10-6, named Group I and Group II respectively) were investigated. The thalli of Group I had a significantly higher effective photosystem II quantum yield than the thalli of Group II at 71% absolute water content (AWC). There was little difference between thalli morphology, total Rubisco activity and total protein content at 100% and 71% AWC, which might be the basis for the normal performance of photosynthesis during moderate dehydration. A higher effective photosystem I quantum yield was observed in the thalli subjected to a low CO2 concentration during moderate dehydration, which might be caused by the enhancement of cyclic electron flow. These results suggested that P. yezoensis can directly utilize CO2 in ambient air during moderate dehydration.

  16. Responses of soybeans and wheat to elevated CO2 in free-air and open top chamber systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing demand for agricultural products, more confidence is needed concerning impacts of rising atmospheric CO2 on crop yields. Despite debate about the merits of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and open top chamber (OTC) systems, there has been only one reported experiment directly compari...

  17. The electrical conductivity of CO2-bearing pore waters at elevated pressure and temperature: a laboratory study and its implications in CO2 storage monitoring and leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The electrical rock conductivity is a sensitive indicator for carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and migration processes. For a reliable balancing of the free CO2 in pore space with petrophysical models such as Archie's law or for the detection of migrating CO2, detailed knowledge of the pore water conductivity during interaction with CO2 is essential but not available yet. Contrary to common assumptions, pore water conductivity cannot be assumed constant since CO2 is a reactive gas that dissolves into the pore water in large amounts and provides additional charge carriers due to the dissociation of carbonic acid. We consequently carried out systematic laboratory experiments to quantify and analyse the changes in saline pore water conductivity caused by CO2 at thermodynamic equilibrium. Electrical conductivity is measured on pore water samples for pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 80 °C. The parameter range covers the gaseous, liquid and supercritical state of the CO2 involved. Pore water salinities from 0.006 up to 57.27 g L-1 sodium chloride were investigated as well as selective other ion species. At the same time, the CO2 concentration in the salt solution was determined by a wet-chemical procedure. A two-regime behaviour appears: for small salinities, we observe an increase of up to more than factor 3 in the electrical pore water conductivity, which strongly depends on the solution salinity (low-salinity regime). This is an expected behaviour, since the additional ions originating from the dissociation of carbonic acid positively contribute to the solution conductivity. However, when increasing salinities are considered this effect is completely diminished. For highly saline solutions, the increased mutual impeding causes the mobility of all ions to decrease, which may result in a significant reduction of conductivity by up to 15 per cent despite the added CO2 (high-salinity regime). We present the data set covering the pressure, temperature, salinity

  18. Dolomite-magnesian calcite relations at elevated temperatures and CO2 pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graf, D.L.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    The equilibrium thermal decomposition curve of dolomite has been determined up to a CO2 pressure of 20,000 lb/in.2, at which pressure dolomite decomposes at 857??C. Equilibrium was approached from both directions, by the breakdown and by the solid-state synthesis of dolomite. At elevated temperatures and pressures, calcites in equilibrium with periclase as well as those in equilibrium with dolomite contain Mg in solid solution. In the former, the Mg content increases with increasing CO2 pressure, and decreases with increasing temperature. In the latter, it is a function of temperature only. The exsolution curve of dolomite and magnesian calcite has been determined between 500?? and 800??C; at 500?? dolomite is in equilibrium with a magnesian calcite containing ~6 mol per cent MgCO2; at 800??, ~22 mol per cent. There appears to be a small but real deviation from the ideal 1 : 1 Ca : Mg ratio of dolomite, in the direction of excess Ca, for material in equilibrium with magnesian calcite at high temperature. The experimental findings indicate that very little Mg is stable in the calcites of sedimentary environments, but that an appreciable amount is stable under higher-temperature metamorphic conditions, if sufficient CO2 pressure is maintained. ?? 1955.

  19. Leaf shape responds to temperature but not CO2 in Acer rubrum.

    PubMed

    Royer, Dana L

    2012-01-01

    The degree of leaf dissection and the presence of leaf teeth, along with tooth size and abundance, inversely correlate with mean annual temperature (MAT) across many plant communities. These relationships form the core of several methods for reconstructing MAT from fossils, yet the direct selection of temperature on tooth morphology has not been demonstrated experimentally. It is also not known if atmospheric CO(2) concentration affects leaf shape, limiting confidence in ancient climate reconstructions because CO(2) has varied widely on geologic timescales. Here I report the results of growing Acer rubrum (red maple) in growth cabinets at contrasting temperature and CO(2) conditions. The CO(2) treatment imparted no significant differences in leaf size and shape, while plants grown at cooler temperatures tended to have more teeth and more highly dissected leaves. These results provide direct evidence for the selection of temperature on leaf shape in one species, and support a key link in many leaf-climate methods. More broadly, these results increase confidence for using leaf shape in fossils to reconstruct paleoclimate.

  20. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Dou, Binlin; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yingguang; Feng, Cong

    2010-11-15

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO(2) capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO(2) gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO(2) level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO(2) capture at 550°C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900°C by pure N(2) flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO(2) were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  1. CO2 sensing at room temperature using carbon nanotubes coated core fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivananju, B. N.; Yamdagni, S.; Fazuldeen, R.; Sarin Kumar, A. K.; Hegde, G. M.; Varma, M. M.; Asokan, S.

    2013-06-01

    The sensing of carbon dioxide (CO2) at room temperature, which has potential applications in environmental monitoring, healthcare, mining, biotechnology, food industry, etc., is a challenge for the scientific community due to the relative inertness of CO2. Here, we propose a novel gas sensor based on clad-etched Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) with polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated on the surface of the core for detecting the concentrations of CO2 gas at room temperature, in ppm levels over a wide range (1000 ppm-4000 ppm). The limit of detection observed in polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated core-FBG has been found to be about 75 ppm. In this approach, when CO2 gas molecules interact with the polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated FBG, the effective refractive index of the fiber core changes, resulting in a shift in Bragg wavelength. The experimental data show a linear response of Bragg wavelength shift for increase in concentration of CO2 gas. Besides being reproducible and repeatable, the technique is fast, compact, and highly sensitive.

  2. Forsterite dissolution in saline water at elevated temperature and high CO2 pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Giammar, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The rates and mechanisms of magnesium silicate dissolution can control the aqueous chemistry in ways that influence carbonate mineral precipitation during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A series of batch experiments was performed with forsterite (Mg(1.81)Fe(0.19)SiO(4)) powder to determine the effects of pressure (10-100 bar CO(2)), temperature (25-100 °C), and salinity (0-50,000 mg/L NaCl) on its dissolution rate at conditions relevant to GCS. Dissolution rates and products were determined by analysis of the aqueous phase, equilibrium and reaction path modeling, and solid phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After an initially rapid dissolution period, the dissolution rate declined significantly, an effect that is attributed to the formation of a silica-rich layer at the forsterite surface. The initial dissolution rate increased with increasing temperature and increasing CO(2) pressure; the effect of CO(2) was through its influence on the pH. The dissolution rate was enhanced by NaCl, which may have been due to its inhibition of the formation of a silica-rich surface layer. The experimental results provide information about magnesium silicate dissolution at conditions that will be encountered during GCS that can be used to predict the fate of CO(2) and the evolution of subsurface geochemistry following CO(2) injection.

  3. Highly CO2/N2-switchable zwitterionic surfactant for pickering emulsions at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingwei; Lu, Weiqiang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Li, Bo-Geng; Zhu, Shiping

    2014-09-01

    Cross-linked polymer particles were prepared via surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and sodium methacrylate (SMA) using N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA) as a cross-linker. Generated particles are zwitterionic, possessing unique isoelectric points in the pH range of 7.5-8.0, which is readily tunable through CO2/N2 bubbling. The particles were found to be highly responsive to CO2/N2 switching, dissolving in water with CO2 bubbling and precipitating with N2 bubbling at room temperature. Pickering emulsions of n-dodecane were prepared using these particles as the sole emulsifier. These emulsions can be rapidly demulsified with CO2 bubbling, resulting in complete oil/water phase separations. Nitrogen bubbling efficiently re-emulsifies the oil with the aid of homogenization. The rapid emulsification/demulsification using CO2/N2 bubbling at room temperature provides these cross-linked zwitterionic particles with distinct advantages as functional Pickering surfactants.

  4. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World

  5. EFFECTS OF CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON FINE ROOT PRODUCTION AND MORTALITY IN DOUGLAS FIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the effects of global climate change on the production and mortality of fine roots. We conducted a 4-year study to determine the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on Douglas fir fine ( 2 mm in diameter) roots. The study was conducted in sun-lit cont...

  6. ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ALTER NITROGEN ALLOCATION IN DOUGLAS-FIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on principal carbon constituents (PCC) and C and N allocation between needle, woody (stem and branches) and root tissue of Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco seedlings were determined. The seedlings were grown in sun-lit controlled-envi...

  7. A statistical analysis of three ensembles of crop model responses to temperature and CO2 concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensembles of process-based crop models are now commonly used to simulate crop growth and development for climate scenarios of temperature and/or precipitation changes corresponding to different projections of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This approach generates large datasets with thousands of de...

  8. Vulnerability of lodging risk to elevated CO2 and increased soil temperature differs between rice cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], and subsequent increases in surface temperatures, are likely to impact the growth and yield of cereal crops. One means for yield reduction is for climate parameters to increase the occurrence of lodging. Using an in situ f...

  9. MONOTERPENE LEVELS IN NEEDLES OF DOUGLAS-FIR EXPOSED TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Levels of monoterpenes in current year needles of douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings were measured at the conclusion of four years of exposure to ambient or elevated CO2 (+ 179 mmol.mol-1), and ambient or elevated temperature (+ 3.5 C). Eleven monoterpen...

  10. Refractive index of air: 3. The roles of CO2, H2O, and refractivity virials.

    PubMed

    Ciddor, Philip E

    2002-04-20

    The author's recent studies of the refractive index of air are extended, and several assumptions made therein are further examined. It is shown that the alternative dispersion equations for CO2, which are due to Edlen [Metrologia 2, 71 (1966)] and Old et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 89 (1971)] result in differences of less than 2 x 10(-9) in the phase refractive index and less than 3 x 10(-9) in the group refractive index for current and predicted concentrations of CO2. However, because the dispersion equation given by Old et al. is consistent with experimental data in the near infrared, it is preferable to the equation used by Edlen, which is valid only in the ultraviolet and the visible. The classical measurement by Barrell and Sears [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 238, 1 (1939)] on the refractivity of moist air is shown to have some procedural errors in addition to the one discussed by Birch and Downs [Metrologia 30, 155 (1993)]. It is shown that for normal atmospheric conditions the higher refractivity virial coefficients related to the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are adequately incorporated into the empirically determined first refractivity virial. As a guide to users the practical limits to the calculation of the refractive index of the atmosphere that result from the uncertainties in the measurement of the various atmospheric parameters are summarized.

  11. Changes in Belowground Carbon Cycling After 10 Years at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.; Cook, C. W.; Pippen, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrations are increasing rapidly in the earth's atmosphere and have risen by a third since the start of the industrial revolution. Beginning in 1996, the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment has exposed a loblolly pine forest to an additional 200 parts per million CO2 (high CO2 treatment) compared to trees at ambient CO2. Root biomass has increased significantly at high CO2, as have soil respiration and the concentration of CO2 in the soil at different depths. Peak changes for root biomas, soil respiration, and many other variables occur in mid summer, with responses diminishing or disappearing in winter. This presentation will review the changes over the first decade of the experiment, emphasizing results from the most recent three years.

  12. Soil air and soil flux measurements of 222Radon and CO2: A soil flux parametrization at Lutjewad (NL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, R. E. M.; Kettner, E.; Palstra, S. W. L.; Hoekman, S.; van der Graaf, E. R.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric 222Radon concentration measurements are used as a valuable transport tracer verifying the transport part of Carbon Cycle and Greenhouse Gas models. The production rate of the radioactive noble gas 222Radon (T1•2 = 3.8 days) by radioactive decay of 226Radium in the soil is constant, the absolute quantity depending on the local soil Radium concentration. The flux of 222Radon to the atmosphere (the soil exhalation, or effective atmospheric production rate), however, is not constant. It strongly depends on soil texture, soil humidity, precipitation and other parameters, but is nearly constant if these parameters stay unchanged. Recently, an effort has been done to predict this flux rate with widely available γ-dosimetry measurements (Szegvary et al., Predicting terrestrial 222Rn-flux using gamma dose rate as a proxy, ACP 7, 2789-2795, 2007), but real 222Radon-flux measurements are sparse. 222Radon undergoes the same transport processes on the way from soil to atmosphere as any other soil-derived (greenhouse) gas. This makes 222Radon an ideal tracer to separate variations in e.g. soil CO2-production from changes in the soil-atmosphere CO2-transport, both being reflected in the total soil-atmosphere CO2-flux. At the atmospheric measurement site Lutjewad in the north of the Netherlands (53N24'18", 6E21'13", www.rug.nl/ees/onderzoek/cio/projecten/atmosphericgases) we started in 2006 with the measurements of the soil 222Radon and CO2 concentration through soil probes as well as the Radon and CO2 soil fluxes by means of an automatic soil chamber. While there are up to eight soil air measurements per day, the soil chamber is automatically closed twice per day. The station is situated directly on the Waddensea dike at an elevation of 1 m a.s.l. on seaclay soil. The groundwater table shows variations between 0.5 m and 2 m below terrain. From our measurements we find that in the dryer summer season, from April to July, the mean 222Radon-flux can be up to 40

  13. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  14. CO2 Capture and Regeneration at Low Temperatures: Novel Non-Aqueous CO2 Solvents and Capture Process with Substantially Reduced Energy Penalties

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: RTI is developing a solvent and process that could significantly reduce the temperature associated with regenerating solvent and CO2 captured from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. Traditional CO2 removal processes using water-based solvents require significant amount of steam from power plants in order to regenerate the solvent so it can be reused after each reaction. RTI’s solvents can be better at absorbing CO2 than many water-based solvents, and are regenerated at lower temperatures using less steam. Thus, industrial heat that is normally too cool to re-use can be deployed for regeneration, rather than using high-value steam. This saves the power plant money, which results in increased cost savings for consumers.

  15. The vibrationally averaged, temperature-dependent structure of polyatomic molecules. I - CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Archer, B. T.

    1983-07-01

    A new high-temperature nozzle has been added to our counting electron diffraction apparatus, enabling precise studies of the vibrationally averaged structure of molecules at temperatures between 300 and 1000 K. Our results for CO2 are compared with the harmonic theory and the recent variational wave function calculation of Kohl and Hilderbrandt. The new nozzle system is described, and differences between the data and the theories are discussed.

  16. Exploring the Phase Diagram SiO2-CO2 at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, A.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is an important volatile system relevant for planetary sciences and fundamental chemistry. Molecular CO2 has doubly bonded O=C=O units but high pressure-high temperature (HP-HT) studies have recently shown its transformation into a three-dimensional network of corner-linked [CO4] units analogous to the silica mineral polymorphs, through intermediate non-molecular phases. Here, we report P-V-T data on CO2-IV ice from time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments, which allow determining the compressibility and thermal expansivity of this intermediate molecular-to-non-molecular phase.1 Aditionally, we have explored the SiO2-CO2 phase diagram and the potential formation of silicon carbonate compounds. New data obtained by laser-heating diamond-anvil experiments in CO2-filled microporous silica polymorphs will be shown. In particular, these HP-HT experiments explore the existence of potential CO2/SiO2 compounds with tetrahedrally-coordinated C/Si atoms by oxygens, which are predicted to be stable (or metastable) by state-of-the-art ab initio simulations.2,3 These theoretical predictions were supported by a recent study that reports the formation of a cristobalite-type Si0.4C0.6O2 solid solution at high-pressures and temperatures, which can be retained as a metastable solid down to ambient conditions.4 Entirely new families of structures could exist based on [CO4]4- units in various degrees of polymerisation, giving rise to a range of chain, sheet and framework solids like those found in silicate chemistry. References[1] S. Palaich et al., Am. Mineral. Submitted (2015) [2] A. Morales-Garcia et al., Theor. Chem. Acc. 132, 1308 (2013) [3] R. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. X, 4, 011030 (2014) [4] M. Santoro et al. Nature Commun. 5, 3761 (2014)

  17. Healing and sliding stability of simulated anhydrite fault gouge: effects of water, temperature and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Niemeijer, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Anhydrite-bearing faults are currently of interest to 1) CO2-storage sites capped by anhydrite caprocks (such as found in the North Sea) and 2) seismically active faults in evaporite formations (such as the Italian Apennines). In order to assess the likelihood of fault reactivation, the mode of fault slip and/or fault leakage, it is important to understand the evolution of frictional strength during periods of no slip and upon reloading (healing and relaxation behavior) and of the velocity dependence of friction of anhydrite fault gouge. Therefore, we performed slide-hold-slide experiments combined with a velocity-stepping sequence using simulated anhydrite fault gouge (>95wt% CaSO4). Vacuum-dry and wet experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-150°C, an effective normal stress of 25 MPa, and if pore fluid was present, a fluid pressure of 15 MPa. We also performed tests using dry CO2, water-wetted CO2 and CO2-saturated water as pore fluid, but only at 120°C. Our results show healing even for vacuum-dry samples, but healing is significantly enhanced in wet samples. Dry samples exhibit velocity-weakening behavior at T≥120°C, and wet samples exhibit velocity-strengthening behavior over the full temperature range. The presence of CO2 does not influence the healing behavior or the velocity-dependence of friction. Samples containing water-wetted CO2 exhibit behavior similar to wet samples. We infer that the healing in dry samples is controlled by plastic asperity creep (Dieterich-type), probably through dislocation creep. In wet samples healing is inferred to be controlled by pressure solution. Extrapolation of the experimental results to natural reservoir conditions for wet anhydrite fault gouges using a pressure solution rate law shows that complete healing will occur within (tens of) days.

  18. Low transition temperature mixtures as innovative and sustainable CO2 capture solvents.

    PubMed

    Zubeir, Lawien F; Lacroix, Mark H M; Kroon, Maaike C

    2014-12-11

    The potential of three newly discovered low transition temperature mixtures (LTTMs) is explored as sustainable substituents for the traditional carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbents. LTTMs are mixtures of two solid compounds, a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), which form liquids upon mixing with melting points far below those of the individual compounds. In this work the HBD is lactic acid and the HBAs are tetramethylammonium chloride, tetraethylammonium chloride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride. These compounds were found to form LTTMs for the first time at molar ratios of HBD:HBA = 2:1. First, the LTTMs were characterized by determining the thermal operating window (e.g., decomposition temperature and glass transition temperature) and the physical properties (e.g., density and viscosity). Thereafter, the phase behavior of CO2 with the LTTMs has been measured using a gravimetric magnetic suspension balance operating in the static mode at 308 and 318 K and pressures up to 2 MPa. The CO2 solubility increased with increasing chain length, increasing pressure, and decreasing temperature. The Peng-Robinson equation of state was applied to correlate the phase equilibria. From the solubility data, thermodynamic parameters were determined (e.g., Henry's law coefficient and enthalpy of absorption). The heat of absorption was found to be similar to that in conventional physical solvents (-11.21 to -14.87 kJ·mol(-1)). Furthermore, the kinetics in terms of the diffusion coefficient of CO2 in all LTTMs were determined (10(-11)-10(-10) m(2)·s(-1)). Even though the CO2 solubilities in the studied LTTMs were found to be slightly lower than those in thoroughly studied conventional physical solvents, LTTMs are a promising new class of absorbents due to their low cost, their environmentally friendly character, and their easy tunability, allowing further optimization for carbon capture.

  19. Temperature increases during surface decontamination of titanium implants using CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Mouhyi, J; Sennerby, L; Nammour, S; Guillaume, P; Van Reck, J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of the present in vitro investigation was to measure temperature changes at the implant surface when using pulsed CO2 laser in a simulated implant surface decontamination protocol. Six threaded titanium implants were placed in a fresh resected pig mandible. A 4 x 4 mm defect was created buccally to each implant in order to expose the implant head and approximately 5 threads. Temperature changes were monitored by two thermocouples placed near the dehiscence and at the apical part of the implant. Several setting combinations of the CO2 laser with regard to output power, pulse width, pulse repetition rate and irradiation time were tested on dry and wet (distilled water) surfaces. Only minor temperature increases were measured when lasing wet titanium surfaces, while the temperature at dry surfaces exceeded the proposed thresholds for bone damage at clinically relevant settings. It is concluded that the CO2 laser when used on a wet implant surface in a pulsed mode at 8 W/10 ms/20 hz during 5 s induces a temperature increase of less than 3 degrees C. This would minimize the risk of temperature induced tissue damage as a result of lasing implant surfaces.

  20. Modelling forest growth and carbon storage in response to increasing CO2 and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Miko U. F.

    1999-11-01

    The response of plant growth to increasing climate change remains one of the unresolved issues in understanding the future of the terrestrial biosphere. It was investigated here by using the comprehensive forest growth model CenW 1.0.5 which integrates routines for the fluxes of carbon and water, interception of radiation and the cycling of nutrients. It was run with water and/or nutrient limitations on a background of naturally observed climate at Canberra, Australia. It was parameterised for Pinus radiata, the commercially most important plantation species in Australia. The simulations showed that under water-limited conditions, forest growth was highly sensitive to doubling CO2,with growth increases of over 50% on average and even greater increases in dry years. In contrast, when water supply was adequate, but nutrients were limiting, growth increases were smaller, with an initial increase of about 15% during the first year after CO2 was doubled. This growth increase diminished further over subsequent years so that after 20years, there was virtually no remaining effect. This diminishing response was due to developing nutrient limitations caused by extra carbon input which immobilised nutrients in the soil. When both water and nutrients were adequate, growth was increased by about 15 20% with no decrease over time. Increasing ambient temperature had a positive effect on growth under nutrient limited conditions by stimulating nitrogen mineralisation rates, but had very little effect when nutrients were non-limiting. Responses were qualitatively similar when conditions were changed gradually. In response to increasing CO2 by 2µmol mol-1year-1 over 50years, growth was increased by only 1% under nutrient-limited condition but by 16% under water-limited conditions. When temperature and CO2

  1. Gas temperature in transient CO2 plasma measured by Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehmer, F.; Welzel, S.; Klarenaar, B. L. M.; van der Meiden, H. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Engeln, R.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational Raman scattering on the vibrational ground state of CO2 was performed to determine the gas temperature in narrow-gap dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs). The Raman spectrometer was equipped with a straightforward spectral filtering to mask ca. 30 cm-1 (0.85 nm) centered around the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Linearisation of the observed transitions (J = 18-42) was applied to retrieve gas temperatures in discharge gaps of 1 mm. The DBD was operated in pure CO2 at atmospheric pressure and non-negligible gas heating of about 160 K was observed at 33 W injected power. Based on a simplified energy balance the gas temperature measurements were extrapolated to a broad range of injected plasma power values (0-60 W).

  2. Mars south polar spring and summer temperatures - A residual CO2 frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) energy measurements over the Mars south polar cap throughout the Martian spring and summer revealed complex spatial, spectral, and temporal variations. High albedos did not directly correspond with low temperatures, and as the cap shrank to its residual position, it maintained large differences in brightness temperature between the four IRTM surface-sensing bands at 7, 9, 11, and 20 microns. The late summer infrared spectral pattern can be matched by a surface consisting of CO2 frost with 20 micron emissivity of 0.8 and about 6% dark, warm soil under a dusty atmosphere of moderate infrared opacity and spectral properties similar to those measured for the Martian global dust storms. Low temperature, the absence of appreciable water vapor in the south polar atmosphere, and the absence of surface warming expected if H2O were to become exposed, all imply that the residual south polar cap was covered by solid CO2.

  3. Escherichia coli inactivation by pressurized CO2 treatment methods at room temperature: Critical issues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongji; Huang, Doudou; Zhou, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to increase the inactivation efficiency of CO2 against Escherichia coli under mild conditions to facilitate the application of pressurized CO2 technology in water disinfection. Based on an aerating-cycling apparatus, three different treatment methods (continuous aeration, continuous reflux, and simultaneous aeration and reflux) were compared for the same temperature, pressure (0.3-0.7MPa), initial concentration, and exposure time (25min). The simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment (combined method) was shown to be the best method under optimum conditions, which were determined to be 0.7MPa, room temperature, and an exposure time of 10min. This treatment achieved 5.1-log reduction after 25min of treatment at the pressure of 0.3MPa and 5.73-log reduction after 10min at 0.7MPa. Log reductions of 4.4 and 5.0 occurred at the end of continuous aeration and continuous reflux treatments at 0.7MPa, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggested that cells were ruptured after the simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment and the continuous reflux treatment. The increase of the solubilization rate of CO2 due to intense hydraulic conditions led to a rapid inactivation effect. It was found that the reduction of intracellular pH caused by CO2 led to a more lethal bactericidal effect. PMID:27155435

  4. The effects of CO2 and nutrient fertilisation on the growth and temperature response of the mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    PubMed

    Reef, Ruth; Slot, Martijn; Motro, Uzi; Motro, Michal; Motro, Yoav; Adame, Maria F; Garcia, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Lovelock, Catherine E; Winter, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand plant responses to both the widespread phenomenon of increased nutrient inputs to coastal zones and the concurrent rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, CO2-nutrient interactions need to be considered. In addition to its potential stimulating effect on photosynthesis and growth, elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of photosynthesis. The scarcity of experiments testing how elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of tropical trees hinders our ability to model future primary productivity. In a glasshouse study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 (800 ppm) and nutrient availability on seedlings of the widespread mangrove Avicennia germinans. We assessed photosynthetic performance, the temperature response of photosynthesis, seedling growth and biomass allocation. We found large synergistic gains in both growth (42 %) and photosynthesis (115 %) when seedlings grown under elevated CO2 were supplied with elevated nutrient concentrations relative to their ambient growing conditions. Growth was significantly enhanced under elevated CO2 only under high-nutrient conditions, mainly in above-ground tissues. Under low-nutrient conditions and elevated CO2, root volume was more than double that of seedlings grown under ambient CO2 levels. Elevated CO2 significantly increased the temperature optimum for photosynthesis by ca. 4 °C. Rising CO2 concentrations are likely to have a significant positive effect on the growth rate of A. germinans over the next century, especially in areas where nutrient availability is high.

  5. The effects of CO2 and nutrient fertilisation on the growth and temperature response of the mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    PubMed

    Reef, Ruth; Slot, Martijn; Motro, Uzi; Motro, Michal; Motro, Yoav; Adame, Maria F; Garcia, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Lovelock, Catherine E; Winter, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand plant responses to both the widespread phenomenon of increased nutrient inputs to coastal zones and the concurrent rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, CO2-nutrient interactions need to be considered. In addition to its potential stimulating effect on photosynthesis and growth, elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of photosynthesis. The scarcity of experiments testing how elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of tropical trees hinders our ability to model future primary productivity. In a glasshouse study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 (800 ppm) and nutrient availability on seedlings of the widespread mangrove Avicennia germinans. We assessed photosynthetic performance, the temperature response of photosynthesis, seedling growth and biomass allocation. We found large synergistic gains in both growth (42 %) and photosynthesis (115 %) when seedlings grown under elevated CO2 were supplied with elevated nutrient concentrations relative to their ambient growing conditions. Growth was significantly enhanced under elevated CO2 only under high-nutrient conditions, mainly in above-ground tissues. Under low-nutrient conditions and elevated CO2, root volume was more than double that of seedlings grown under ambient CO2 levels. Elevated CO2 significantly increased the temperature optimum for photosynthesis by ca. 4 °C. Rising CO2 concentrations are likely to have a significant positive effect on the growth rate of A. germinans over the next century, especially in areas where nutrient availability is high. PMID:27259536

  6. Inference of super-resolution ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes from non-linear and multiscale processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Sudre, Joel; Garçon, Veronique; Yahia, Hussein; Dewitte, Boris; Garbe, Christoph; Illig, Séréna; Montes, Ivonne; Dadou, Isabelle; Paulmier, Aurélien; Butz, André

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the role of submesoscale activity is emerging as being more and more important to understand global ocean properties, for instance, for accurately estimating the sources and sinks of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) at the air-sea interface. The scarcity of oceanographic cruises and the lack of available satellite products for GHG concentrations at high resolution prevent from obtaining a global assessment of their spatial variability at small scales. In this work we develop a novel method to reconstruct maps of CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4km) using SST and ocean colour data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). The responsible process for propagating the information between scales is related to cascading properties and multiscale organization, typical of fully developed turbulence. The methodology, based on the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism, makes use, from the knowledge of singularity exponents, of the optimal wavelet for the determination of the energy injection mechanism between scales. We perform a validation analysis of the results of our algorithm using pCO2 ocean data from in-situ measurements in the upwelling region off Namibia.

  7. Effect of temperature-dependent organic carbon decay on atmospheric pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Hashioka, Taketo; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Extendingy an almost universal observation that the rate of microbial activity increases with temperature, we propose that marine microbial activity was suppressed during previous glacial periods and allowed proportionally more organic carbon to be exported out of the surface ocean. A stronger organic carbon pump and therefore lower rain ratios of CaCO3 to organic carbon may have contributed to the low atmospheric CO2 content during the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous study of temperature-dependent export production (Laws et al., 2000) and our map of data-based, global distribution of the rain ratios lend support to today's rain ratios being controlled at least partly by temperature. A close examination with a high-resolution regional ocean ecosystem model indicates that the correlation between rain ratio and temperature is caused indeed by preferential remineralization of organic matter, but a part of the correlation is also driven by temperature-dependent community composition. An extrapolation of these results to the globe using a global carbon cycle box model with a module for sediments indicates that the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 by the proposed mechanism is approximately 30 ppm. While this estimate is subject to uncertainty, the fact that it represents nearly one third of the glacial-interglacial variation in atmosphere pCO2 suggests the potential importance of the new mechanism. Given the historical difficulty in explaining the full CO2 amplitude with a single cause, we suggest that a set of multiple mechanisms were responsible and that the temperature-dependent POC degradation rate is one of them. We discuss two possible difficulties with our proposal that have to do with the potentially important role that ballasts play in organic carbon export and the possibility that enhanced biological pump is self limiting.

  8. Spatial and seasonal variability of CO2 flux at the air-water interface of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Le, Yang; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoke; Duan, Xiaonan; Tong, Lei; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Hepeng

    2013-11-01

    Diffusive carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the water surface of the Three Gorges Reservoir, currently the largest hydroelectric reservoir in the world, were measured using floating static chambers over the course of a yearlong survey. The results showed that the average annual CO2 flux was (163.3 +/- 117.4) mg CO2/(m2.hr) at the reservoir surface, which was larger than the CO2 flux in most boreal and temperate reservoirs but lower than that in tropical reservoirs. Significant spatial variations in CO2 flux were observed at four measured sites, with the largest flux measured at Wushan (221.9 mg CO2/(m2.hr)) and the smallest flux measured at Zigui (88.6 mg CO2/(m(2).hr)); these differences were probably related to the average water velocities at different sites. Seasonal variations in CO2 flux were also observed at four sites, starting to increase in January, continuously rising until peaking in the summer (June-August) and gradually decreasing thereafter. Seasonal variations in CO2 flux could reflect seasonal dynamics in pH, water velocity, and temperature. Since the spatial and temporal variations in CO2 flux were significant and dependent on multiple physical, chemical, and hydrological factors, it is suggested that long-term measurements should be made on a large spatial scale to assess the climatic influence of hydropower in China, as well as the rest of the world.

  9. Effects of winter temperature and summer drought on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Skiba, Ute; Nemitz, Eiko; Billett, Michael; Sutton, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the most important global sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); their ability to sequester C is a natural feedback mechanism controlled by climatic variables such as precipitation, temperature, length of growing season and period of snow cover. In the UK it has been predicted that peatlands could become a net source of carbon in response to climate change with climate models predicting a rise in global temperature of ca. 3oC between 1961-1990 and 2100. Land-atmosphere exchange of CO2in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variations, which have significant short- and long-term effects on carbon sink strength. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance (EC) at Auchencorth Moss (55° 47'32 N, 3° 14'35 W, 267 m a.s.l.), a temperate peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from 5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The EC system consists of a LiCOR 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer. Over the 10 year period, the site was a consistent yet variable sink of CO2 ranging from -34.1 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -69.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing seasons and mean winter air temperature explained 93% of the variability in summertime sink strength, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant development and productivity were stunted by colder winters causing a net reduction in the annual carbon sink strength of this peatland where autotrophic processes are thought to be

  10. Elevated CO2 Reduced Floret Death in Wheat Under Warmer Average Temperatures and Terminal Drought

    PubMed Central

    Dias de Oliveira, Eduardo; Palta, Jairo A.; Bramley, Helen; Stefanova, Katia; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 often increases grain yield in wheat by enhancing grain number per ear, which can result from an increase in the potential number of florets or a reduction in the death of developed florets. The hypotheses that elevated CO2 reduces floret death rather than increases floret development, and that grain size in a genotype with more grains per unit area is limited by the rate of grain filling, were tested in a pair of sister lines contrasting in tillering capacity (restricted- vs. free-tillering). The hypotheses were tested under elevated CO2, combined with +3°C above ambient temperature and terminal drought, using specialized field tunnel houses. Elevated CO2 increased net leaf photosynthetic rates and likely the availability of carbon assimilates, which significantly reduced the rates of floret death and increased the potential number of grains at anthesis in both sister lines by an average of 42%. The restricted-tillering line had faster grain-filling rates than the free-tillering line because the free-tillering line had more grains to fill. Furthermore, grain-filling rates were faster under elevated CO2 and +3°C above ambient. Terminal drought reduced grain yield in both lines by 19%. Elevated CO2 alone increased the potential number of grains, but a trade-off in yield components limited grain yield in the free-tillering line. This emphasizes the need for breeding cultivars with a greater potential number of florets, since this was not affected by the predicted future climate variables. PMID:26635837

  11. Emissions of CO2 and criteria air pollutants from mobile sources: Insights from integrating real-time traffic data into local air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gately, C.; Hutyra, L.; Sue Wing, I.; Peterson, S.; Janetos, A.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, on-road mobile sources were responsible for over 26% of U.S. fossil fuel carbon dioxide (ffCO2) emissions, and over 34% of both CO and NOx emissions. However, accurate representations of these emissions at the scale of urban areas remains a difficult challenge. Quantifying emissions at the scale of local streets and highways is critical to provide policymakers with the information needed to develop appropriate mitigation strategies and to guide research into the underlying process that drive mobile emissions. Quantification of vehicle ffCO2 emissions at high spatial and temporal resolutions requires a detailed synthesis of data on traffic activity, roadway attributes, fleet characteristics and vehicle speeds. To accurately characterize criteria air pollutant emissions, information on local meteorology is also critical, as the temperature and relative humidity can affect emissions rates of these pollutants by as much as 400%. As the health impacts of air pollutants are more severe for residents living in close proximity (<500m) to road sources, it is critical that inventories of these emissions rely on highly resolved source data to locate potential hot-spots of exposure. In this study we utilize real-time GPS estimates of vehicle speeds to estimate ffCO2 and criteria air pollutant emissions at multiple spatial and temporal scales across a large metropolitan area. We observe large variations in emissions associated with diurnal activity patterns, congestion, sporting and civic events, and weather anomalies. We discuss the advantages and challenges of using highly-resolved source data to quantify emissions at a roadway scale, and the potential of this methodology for forecasting the air quality impacts of changes in infrastructure, urban planning policies, and regional climate.

  12. Emissions of CO2 and criteria air pollutants from mobile sources: Insights from integrating real-time traffic data into local air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gately, Conor; Hutyra, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, on-road mobile sources were responsible for over 26% of U.S. fossil fuel carbon dioxide (ffCO2) emissions, and over 34% of both CO and NOx emissions. However, accurate representations of these emissions at the scale of urban areas remains a difficult challenge. Quantifying emissions at the scale of local streets and highways is critical to provide policymakers with the information needed to develop appropriate mitigation strategies and to guide research into the underlying process that drive mobile emissions. Quantification of vehicle ffCO2 emissions at high spatial and temporal resolutions requires a detailed synthesis of data on traffic activity, roadway attributes, fleet characteristics and vehicle speeds. To accurately characterize criteria air pollutant emissions, information on local meteorology is also critical, as the temperature and relative humidity can affect emissions rates of these pollutants by as much as 400%. As the health impacts of air pollutants are more severe for residents living in close proximity (<500m) to road sources, it is critical that inventories of these emissions rely on highly resolved source data to locate potential hot-spots of exposure. In this study we utilize real-time GPS estimates of vehicle speeds to estimate ffCO2 and criteria air pollutant emissions at multiple spatial and temporal scales across a large metropolitan area. We observe large variations in emissions associated with diurnal activity patterns, congestion, sporting and civic events, and weather anomalies. We discuss the advantages and challenges of using highly-resolved source data to quantify emissions at a roadway scale, and the potential of this methodology for forecasting the air quality impacts of changes in infrastructure, urban planning policies, and regional climate.

  13. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) on yield formation in rice (Oryza sativa)].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianye; Yang, Hongjian; Dong, Guichun; Wang, Yulong; Zhu, Jianguo; Yang, Lianxian; Shan, Yuhua

    2002-10-01

    Effect of Free-Air CO2 enrichment (FACE, 200 mumol.mol-1 higher than CK) on rice yield and its components under field condition were studied with a Japonica variety 99-15. Results showed that FACE treatment had no obvious effect on plant height and number of leaves on main stem, but could quicken growth process of rice, shorten the whole growth duration. Increment of nitrogen application rate could weaken the effect of FACE on whole growth duration. The number of tillers and panicles, and fulfilled-grain percentage increased significantly under FACE treatment, whereas spikelets per panicle decreased. FACE treatment could significantly increase grain yield of rice, especially when higher rate of nitrogen fertilizer was applied. Increasing spikelets per panicle and spikelets per unit area under FACE treatment would result in marked increment of rice yield. Increasing nitrogen application rate was an important approach to increase spikelets per panicle and spikelets per unit area under FACE treatment.

  14. High temperature thermoelectric properties of Bi2-xNaxSr2Co2Oy ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. L.; Li, S. Y.; Gao, F.; Zhu, Z.; Hu, X.; Song, H. Z.

    2015-09-01

    The Na doping effects on the high temperature thermoelectric properties of Bi2-xNaxSr2Co2Oy (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.30) ceramics were investigated from 343 K to 973 K. When x ≤ 0.15, the electrical resistivity of Bi2-xNaxSr2Co2Oy decreases with increasing Na doping amount due to the hole-doping effect, which exhibits metallic electrical conductivity behavior. While, at the temperature range of 480-830 K, the samples with x > 0.20 exhibit semiconductor electrical conductivity behavior instead. The Seebeck coefficients are improved by Na doping at lower temperature, but they decrease slightly at higher temperature except for x = 0.2. Roughly, the thermal conductivity is depressed by the doping defects. As an overall result, the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of Bi1.8Na0.2Sr2Co2Oy reaches the maximum value of 0.3 K at 973 K, which is nearly twice the value of the undoped sample LBFSx.

  15. Transcriptome and biomineralization responses of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zhang, Shuwen; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming have been shown to significantly affect the physiological performances of marine calcifiers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, the transcriptome and biomineralization responses of Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 (pH 7.8 and pH 7.5) and temperature (25 °C and 31 °C) are investigated. Increases in CO2 and temperature induced significant changes in gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, net calcification rates and relative calcium content, whereas no changes are observed in the shell ultrastructure. “Ion and acid-base regulation” related genes and “amino acid metabolism” pathway respond to the elevated CO2 (pH 7.8), suggesting that P. fucata implements a compensatory acid-base mechanism to mitigate the effects of low pH. Additionally, “anti-oxidation”-related genes and “Toll-like receptor signaling”, “arachidonic acid metabolism”, “lysosome” and “other glycan degradation” pathways exhibited responses to elevated temperature (25 °C and 31 °C), suggesting that P. fucata utilizes anti-oxidative and lysosome strategies to alleviate the effects of temperature stress. These responses are energy-consuming processes, which can lead to a decrease in biomineralization capacity. This study therefore is important for understanding the mechanisms by which pearl oysters respond to changing environments and predicting the effects of global climate change on pearl aquaculture. PMID:26732540

  16. Transcriptome and biomineralization responses of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zhang, Shuwen; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming have been shown to significantly affect the physiological performances of marine calcifiers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, the transcriptome and biomineralization responses of Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 (pH 7.8 and pH 7.5) and temperature (25 °C and 31 °C) are investigated. Increases in CO2 and temperature induced significant changes in gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, net calcification rates and relative calcium content, whereas no changes are observed in the shell ultrastructure. “Ion and acid-base regulation” related genes and “amino acid metabolism” pathway respond to the elevated CO2 (pH 7.8), suggesting that P. fucata implements a compensatory acid-base mechanism to mitigate the effects of low pH. Additionally, “anti-oxidation”-related genes and “Toll-like receptor signaling”, “arachidonic acid metabolism”, “lysosome” and “other glycan degradation” pathways exhibited responses to elevated temperature (25 °C and 31 °C), suggesting that P. fucata utilizes anti-oxidative and lysosome strategies to alleviate the effects of temperature stress. These responses are energy-consuming processes, which can lead to a decrease in biomineralization capacity. This study therefore is important for understanding the mechanisms by which pearl oysters respond to changing environments and predicting the effects of global climate change on pearl aquaculture.

  17. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  18. [Mathematic models of cucumber net photosynthesis rate responding to CO2 concentration, temperature, and illumination intensity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Mei; Wang, Yun-Cheng; Yu, Xian-Chang; Li, Yan-Su

    2007-04-01

    With two cucumber varieties (greenhouse variety Jinyou No. 1 and open-field variety Jinyan No. 4) as test materials, this paper measured their net photosynthesis rate (P(n)) under given environmental conditions including CO2 concentration, temperature and illumination intensity in phytotron, and the responses of P(n) (y) to these factors were modeled by mathematic methods, which could be described as y = exp (- 242. 1217/x1) [61.0202 - 0.11 (x2 - 30.926)2] exp (-272. 8874/x3) + 0.9355 for Jinyou No. 1, and y = exp (- 179.8803/x1) [50.0771-0.0609 (x2 -34.3455)2] exp (-267.9653/x3) + 0.7377 for Jinyan No. 4, where x1, x2 and x3 represented the values of CO2 concentration, temperature, and illumination intensity, respectively. The response of P(n) to temperature accorded with conic function, while its responses to CO2 concentration and illumination intensity accorded with exponential function.

  19. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity. PMID:26249015

  20. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity.

  1. Rapid, broadband spectroscopic temperature measurement of hbox {CO}_2 using VIPA spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Andrew; Ycas, Gabriel; Cruz, Flavio C.; Maser, Daniel L.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic temperature measurements of a sealed carbon dioxide sample cell were realized with an optical frequency comb combined with a two-dimensional dispersive spectrometer. A supercontinuum laser source based on an erbium fiber mode-locked laser was employed to generate coherent light around 2000 nm (5000hbox { cm}^{-1}). The laser was passed through a 12-cm-long cell containing hbox {CO}_2, and the transmitted light was analyzed in a virtually imaged phased array-based spectrometer. Broadband spectra spanning more than 100hbox { cm}^{-1 } with a spectral resolution of roughly 0.075hbox { cm}^{-1} (2.2 GHz) were acquired with an integration period of 2 ms. The temperature of the hbox {CO}_2 sample was deduced from fitting a modeled spectrum to the line intensities of the experimentally acquired spectrum. Temperature dynamics on the timescale of milliseconds were observed with a temperature resolution of 2.6 K. The spectroscopically deduced temperatures agreed with temperatures of the sample cell measured with a thermistor. Potential applications of this technique include quantitative measurement of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature dynamics in gas-phase chemical reactions (e.g., combustion) and plasma diagnostics.

  2. Radiocarbon-depleted CO2 evidence for fuel biodegradation at the Naval Air Station North Island (USA) fuel farm site.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Thomas J; Pound, Michael J; Lohr, Daniel; Coffin, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved CO(2) radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope ratios were measured in groundwater from a fuel contaminated site at the North Island Naval Air Station in San Diego, CA (USA). A background groundwater sampling well and 16 wells in the underground fuel contamination zone were evaluated. For each sample, a two end-member isotopic mixing model was used to determine the fraction of CO(2) derived from fossil fuel. The CO(2) fraction from fossil sources ranged from 8 to 93% at the fuel contaminated site, while stable carbon isotope values ranged from -14 to +5‰VPDB. Wells associated with highest historical and contemporary fuel contamination showed the highest fraction of CO(2) derived from petroleum (fossil) sources. Stable carbon isotope ratios indicated sub-regions on-site with recycled CO(2) (δ(13)CO(2) as high as +5‰VPDB) - most likely resulting from methanogenesis. Ancillary measurements (pH and cations) were used to determine that no fossil CaCO(3), for instance limestone, biased the analytical conclusions. Radiocarbon analysis is verified as a viable and definitive technique for confirming fossil hydrocarbon conversion to CO(2) (complete oxidation) at hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater sites. The technique should also be very useful for assessing the efficacy of engineered remediation efforts and by using CO(2) production rates, contaminant mass conversion over time and per unit volume.

  3. Milk pH as a function of CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure in a heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-12-01

    Raw skim milk, with or without added CO2, was heated, held, and cooled in a small pilot-scale tubular heat exchanger (372 ml/min). The experiment was replicated twice, and, for each replication, milk was first carbonated at 0 to 1 degree C to contain 0 (control), 600, 1200, 1800, and 2400 ppm added CO2 using a continuous carbonation unit. After storage at 0 to 1 degree C, portions of milk at each CO2 concentration were heated to 40, 56, 72, and 80 degrees C, held at the desired temperature for 30 s (except 80 degrees C, holding 20 s) and cooled to 0 to 1 degree C. At each temperature, five pressures were applied: 69, 138, 207, 276, and 345 kPa. Pressure was controlled with a needle valve at the heat exchanger exit. Both the pressure gauge and pH probe were inline at the end of the holding section. Milk pH during heating depended on CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure. During heating of milk without added CO2, pH decreased linearly as a function of increasing temperature but was independent of pressure. In general, the pH of milk with added CO2 decreased with increasing CO2 concentration and pressure. For milk with added CO2, at a fixed CO2 concentration, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater at a higher temperature. At a fixed temperature, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater for milk with a higher CO2 concentration. Thermal death of bacteria during pasteurization of milk without added CO2 is probably due not only to temperature but also to the decrease in pH that occurs during the process. Increasing milk CO2 concentration and pressure decreases the milk pH even further during heating and may further enhance the microbial killing power of pasteurization.

  4. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Clode, P. L.

    2016-03-01

    Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility may leave animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ˜ 540 Ma. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals; however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of 1-month-old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C) and pCO2 (˜ 900 µatm) conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be the investigation of the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  5. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Clode, P. L.

    2015-08-01

    Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility leaves animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore, important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ∼540 myr. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals, however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of one-month old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C) and pCO2 (∼900 μatm) conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be to investigate the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  6. Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats.

    PubMed

    Treat, C C; Wollheim, W M; Varner, R K; Grandy, A S; Talbot, J; Frolking, S

    2014-08-01

    Controls on the fate of ~277 Pg of soil organic carbon (C) stored in permafrost peatland soils remain poorly understood despite the potential for a significant positive feedback to climate change. Our objective was to quantify the temperature, moisture, organic matter, and microbial controls on soil organic carbon (SOC) losses following permafrost thaw in peat soils across Alaska. We compared the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) emissions from peat samples collected at active layer and permafrost depths when incubated aerobically and anaerobically at -5, -0.5, +4, and +20 °C. Temperature had a strong, positive effect on C emissions; global warming potential (GWP) was >3× larger at 20 °C than at 4 °C. Anaerobic conditions significantly reduced CO2 emissions and GWP by 47% at 20 °C but did not have a significant effect at -0.5 °C. Net anaerobic CH4 production over 30 days was 7.1 ± 2.8 μg CH4 -C gC(-1) at 20 °C. Cumulative CO2 emissions were related to organic matter chemistry and best predicted by the relative abundance of polysaccharides and proteins (R(2) = 0.81) in SOC. Carbon emissions (CO2 -C + CH4 -C) from the active layer depth peat ranged from 77% larger to not significantly different than permafrost depths and varied depending on the peat type and peat decomposition stage rather than thermal state. Potential SOC losses with warming depend not only on the magnitude of temperature increase and hydrology but also organic matter quality, permafrost history, and vegetation dynamics, which will ultimately determine net radiative forcing due to permafrost thaw.

  7. ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ALTER THE ECOSYSTEM C EXCHANGE IN A YOUNG DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (EC) [ambient CO2 (AC) + 190 ppm] and elevated temperature (ET) [ambient temperature (AT) + 3.6 °C] on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of seedling Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mesocosms. As the study utilized seedlings in reconstruc...

  8. Temperature Dependence of the Vibrational Relaxation of OH(υ = 1 and 2) by CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanescu, C.; Marakov, A.; Timmers, H.; Kalogerakis, K.; Copeland, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical is a key species in the energy budget of the terrestrial atmospheres. The main source of OH, the reaction between H-atoms and ozone, produces OH radicals with up to nine quanta of vibrational energy. The energy of OH(υ ≥ 1) is either transferred to an ambient species via collisional relaxation or is emitted as an infrared or visible photon. The relative intensities of the OH emission bands depend strongly on the planet’s atmospheric composition and temperature. Recently, the Venus Express mission detected IR emissions corresponding to the (1-0) and (2-0) bands of ground state of OH at an altitude of around 95 km.1 In the atmosphere of Venus, the dynamics of the OH vibrational populations are controlled mainly by collisions with CO2 molecules. Therefore, the key input parameters to the OH kinetic models are the vibrational quenching rate constants by CO2 and the fractions of single- and multi-quantum relaxation steps at temperatures relevant to the altitudes where these emissions occur. Currently, there are no available data for the vibrational relaxation of OH(υ = 1, 2) by CO2 below 300 K. Given the importance of these rate constants for the understanding the OH radical emissions on Venus, we applied a two-laser approach to extract the rate constants for the vibrational relaxation of OH(υ = 1, 2) by CO2. The pathways for relaxation of OH((υ = 2) were also examined. Ozone is photolysed at 248 nm and a small fraction of resulting O(1D) reacts with H2O and form OH(υ ≤ 2). The remaining O(1D) atoms are quenched to O(3P) by collisions with N2 and CO2. The OH(υ = 1, 2) populations are monitored by using LIF. The transients corresponding to the decay of OH(υ) and kinetic simulations are used to extract the rate constants and the relaxation pathways. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 210 - 295 K. The results indicate that the rate constant increases as the temperature decreases. This temperature dependence needs to be

  9. Toward a lithium-"air" battery: the effect of CO2 on the chemistry of a lithium-oxygen cell.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Lim, Hee-Dae; Park, Kyu-Young; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Gwon, Hyeokjo; Hong, Jihyun; Goddard, William A; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-07-01

    Lithium-oxygen chemistry offers the highest energy density for a rechargeable system as a "lithium-air battery". Most studies of lithium-air batteries have focused on demonstrating battery operations in pure oxygen conditions; such a battery should technically be described as a "lithium-dioxygen battery". Consequently, the next step for the lithium-"air" battery is to understand how the reaction chemistry is affected by the constituents of ambient air. Among the components of air, CO2 is of particular interest because of its high solubility in organic solvents and it can react actively with O2(-•), which is the key intermediate species in Li-O2 battery reactions. In this work, we investigated the reaction mechanisms in the Li-O2/CO2 cell under various electrolyte conditions using quantum mechanical simulations combined with experimental verification. Our most important finding is that the subtle balance among various reaction pathways influencing the potential energy surfaces can be modified by the electrolyte solvation effect. Thus, a low dielectric electrolyte tends to primarily form Li2O2, while a high dielectric electrolyte is effective in electrochemically activating CO2, yielding only Li2CO3. Most surprisingly, we further discovered that a high dielectric medium such as DMSO can result in the reversible reaction of Li2CO3 over multiple cycles. We believe that the current mechanistic understanding of the chemistry of CO2 in a Li-air cell and the interplay of CO2 with electrolyte solvation will provide an important guideline for developing Li-air batteries. Furthermore, the possibility for a rechargeable Li-O2/CO2 battery based on Li2CO3 may have merits in enhancing cyclability by minimizing side reactions.

  10. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    PubMed

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  11. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Greg H.; Carroll, Susan A.; Bourcier, William L.; Singleton, Michael J.; Smith, Megan M.; Aines, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 105-fold increase in OH− concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH− initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  12. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    PubMed

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification.

  13. Bubble nucleation in H2O-CO2 bearing basaltic melts: results of high temperature decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, N.; Pichavant, M.; Burgisser, A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous experiments have shown that mechanisms of basalt degassing are strongly contrasted when gas bubbles are present or when they are absent. Thus, experimental information on the kinetics of bubble nucleation in basaltic melts is needed, and high temperature decompression experiments have been investigated. All experiments used PST-9 basaltic pumice from Stromboli as starting material. The sample was fused in air at 1400°C for 3h and then cylinders (l up to 10mm, d 2.5 and 5mm) were cored. Synthesis experiments were performed to produce the volatile-bearing melts to be used in the decompression experiments. Glass cores, distilled H2O and Ag2C2O4 were loaded in AuPd capsules. Three different H2O/CO2 were introduced, corresponding to XH2Oin=1 (#1: only H2O dissolved in glass), 0.55 (#2: high dissolved H2O/CO2), 0 (#3: low dissolved H2O/CO2). The synthesis experiments were ran at 1200°C during about 40h in an internally heated vessel pressurized with Ar-H2. The synthesized crystal- and bubble-free glasses were cut in 2 parts: one for the decompression experiments and the other for the analysis. Decompression experiments were conducted at a fast rate of 39kPa/s, exceptionally of 77.8kPa/s, at 1200°C from an initial pressure (Pin) of 200MPa and to final pressures (Pf) of 200, 150, 100 and 50MPa. Experiments to 25MPa are in progress. Each run included 3 capsules, corresponding to the 3 XH2Oin conditions of glass synthesis, allowing results for the 3 H2O/CO2 to be directly compared. Charges were rapid-quenched immediately after attainment of Pf. Textures were analyzed by X-ray microtomography, and volatile concentrations and spatial distributions in pre- and post-decompression glasses were determined by FTIR. Pre-decompression glasses have homogeneous volatile contents and distributions. They divide into 3 compositional groups consistent with their XH2Oin conditions of synthesis: group #1 (average H2O content=4.82wt%, average CO2 content=0ppm), group #2 (2.15wt

  14. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Thorburn, Peter J.; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Angulo, Carlos; Basso, Bruno; Bertuzzi, Patrick; Biernath, Christian; Brisson, Nadine; Challinor, Andrew J.; Doltra, Jordi; Gayler, Sebastian; Goldberg, Richie; Heng, Lee; Steduto, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  15. Gravimetric analysis of CO2 adsorption on activated carbon at various pressures and temperatures using piezoelectric microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yusung; Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Sangkyu; Moon, Wonkyu; Jeon, Sangmin

    2011-09-15

    We investigated the adsorption and desorption of CO(2) on activated carbon using piezoelectric microcantilevers. After coating the free end of a cantilever with activated carbon, variations in the resonance frequency of the cantilever were measured as a function of CO(2) pressure, which is related to mass changes due to the adsorption or desorption of CO(2). The pressure-dependent viscous damping effects were compensated in the calculation of the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the activated carbon by comparing the frequency differences between the coated and uncoated cantilevers. The mass sensitivity of the piezoelectric cantilever was found to be better than 1 pg. The fractional coverage of CO(2) agreed with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm, indicating that a submonolayer of adsorbed CO(2) occurred on the surface of the activated carbon under the experimental conditions. The heat of adsorption was determined using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation and the fractional coverage of CO(2) at various temperatures and pressures.

  16. First continuous measurements of δ18O-CO2 in air with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Hammer, S.; Sabasch, M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Levin, I.

    2015-02-01

    The continuous in situ measurement of δ18O in atmospheric CO2 opens a new door to differentiating between CO2 source and sink components with high temporal resolution. Continuous 13C-CO2 measurement systems have already been commercially available for some time, but until now, only few instruments have been able to provide a continuous measurement of the oxygen isotope ratio in CO2. Besides precise 13C/12C observations, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer is also able to measure the 18O / 16O ratio in CO2, but the precision and accuracy of the measurements have not yet been evaluated. Here we present a first analysis of δ18O-CO2 (and δ13C-CO2) measurements with the FTIR analyser in Heidelberg. We used Allan deviation to determine the repeatability of δ18O-CO2 measurements and found that it decreases from 0.25‰ for 10 min averages to about 0.1‰ after 2 h and remains at that value up to 24 h. We evaluated the measurement precision over a 10-month period (intermediate measurement precision) using daily working gas measurements and found that our spectrometer measured δ18O-CO2 to better than 0.3‰ at a temporal resolution of less than 10 min. The compatibility of our FTIR-spectrometric measurements to isotope-ratio mass-spectrometric (IRMS) measurements was determined by comparing FTIR measurements of cylinder gases and ambient air with IRMS measurements of flask samples, filled with gases of the same cylinders or collected from the same ambient air intake. Two-sample t tests revealed that, at the 0.01 significance level, the FTIR and the IRMS measurements do not differ significantly from each other and are thus compatible. We describe two weekly episodes of ambient air measurements, one in winter and one in summer, and discuss what potential insights and new challenges combined highly resolved CO2, δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 records may provide in terms of better understanding regional scale continental carbon exchange processes.

  17. Effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on abiotic and biologically-driven basalt weathering and C sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Sabrina; Dontsova, Katerina; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Chollet, Simon; Llavata, Mathieu; Massol, Florent; Cros, Alexis; Barré, Pierre; Gelabert, Alexandre; Daval, Damien; Corvisier, Jérôme; Troch, Peter; Barron-Gafford, Greg; Van Haren, Joost; Ferrière, Régis

    2016-04-01

    Weathering of primary silicates is one of the mechanisms involved in carbon removal from the atmosphere, affecting the carbon cycle at geologic timescales with basalt significantly contributing to the global weathering CO2 flux. Mineral weathering can be enhanced by microbiota and plants. Increase in both temperature and amount of CO2 in the atmosphere can directly increase weathering and can also affect weathering through impact on biological systems. This would result in possible negative feedback on climate change. The goal of this research was to quantify direct and indirect effects of temperature and elevated CO2 on basalt weathering and carbon sequestration. In order to achieve this goal we performed controlled-environment mesocosm experiments at Ecotron Ile-de-France (France). Granular basalt collected in Flagstaff (AZ, USA) was exposed to rainfall at equilibrium with two different CO2 concentrations in the air, ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (800 ppm); and kept at two climate regimes, with ambient and elevated (+ 4° C) temperature. Four biological treatments were superimposed on this design: a plant-free control; N-fixing grass (Alfalfa, Medicago sativa), N-fixing tree (Velvet mesquite, Prosopis velutina); and grass that does not form symbiotic relationships with N fixers (Green Sprangletop, Leptochloa dubia). All used basalt had native microbial community. Mesocosms were equipped with solution and gas samplers. To monitor biogenic and lithogenic weathering product concentrations, soil solution samples were collected under vacuum after each rainfall event and analyzed to determine pH, electrical conductivity, major and trace elements concentrations, anions concentrations, and aqueous phase organic matter chemistry. Soil gases were monitored for CO2 using porous Teflon gas samplers connected to the Vaisala probes. Plant biomass was collected at the end of the experiment to determine dry weight, as well as removal of N and lithogenic elements by the plants

  18. Effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on abiotic and biologically-driven basalt weathering and C sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, K.; Juarez, S.; Le Galliard, J. F.; Chollet, S.; Cros, A.; Llavata, M.; Massol, F.; Barré, P.; Gelabert, A.; Daval, D.; Corvisier, J.; Troch, P. A. A.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Ferrière, R.

    2015-12-01

    Weathering of primary silicates is one of the mechanisms involved in carbon removal from the atmosphere, affecting the carbon cycle at geologic timescales with basalt significantly contributing to the global weathering CO2 flux. Mineral weathering can be enhanced by microbiota and plants. Increase in both temperature and amount of CO2 in the atmosphere can directly increase weathering and can also affect weathering through impact on biological systems. This would result in possible negative feedback on climate change. The goal of this research was to quantify direct and indirect effects of temperature and elevated CO2 on basalt weathering and carbon sequestration. In order to achieve this goal we performed controlled-environment mesocosm experiments at Ecotron Ile-de-France. Granular basalt collected in Flagstaff, AZ was exposed to rainfall at equilibrium with two different CO2 concentrations in the air, ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (800 ppm); and kept at two climate regimes, with ambient and elevated (+ 4° C) temperature. Four biological treatments were superimposed on this design: a plant-free control; N-fixing grass (alfalfa, Medicago sativa), N-fixing tree (Velvet mesquite, Prosopis velutina); and grass that does not form symbiotic relationships with N fixers (Green Sprangletop, Leptochloa dubia). All used basalt had native microbial community. Mesocosms were equipped with solution and gas samplers. To monitor biogenic and lithogenic weathering product concentrations, soil solution samples were collected under vacuum after each rainfall event and analyzed to determine pH, electrical conductivity, major and trace elements concentrations, anions concentrations, and aqueous phase organic matter chemistry. Soil gases were monitored for CO2 using porous Teflon gas samplers connected to the Vaisala probes. Plant biomass was collected at the end of the experiment to determine dry weight, as well as removal of N and lithogenic elements by the plants. Solid samples

  19. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  20. Near IR Spectral Mapping of Mars: Temperatures, Aerosols and CO2 Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenar, D. A.; Bjoraker, G.; Smith, M.; Pearl, J.; Blaney, D.; Hansen, G.; Klassen, D.

    2003-05-01

    We summarize recent progress derived from the analysis of near infrared long-slit, drift scan spectra of Mars acquired during the 2001 opposition, using the SpeX grating spectrometer at the NASA IRTF. Under stable observing conditions the drift-scan technique produces high spectral resolution, spectral image cubes (x-y-wavelength) with full hemispherical image content. This approach has previously been used in a study of the diurnal properties of aphelion season clouds (Glenar et al., Icarus, v161, 2003). Temperatures: At SpeX resolving power (R= 1200-1800), the spectral shape of the 2 micron gaseous CO2 absorption band is a sensitive function of temperature. This band thus serves as a low altitude atmospheric thermometer, since the reflectance (R) contribution function dR/dTj (j=layer) within this band mimics the pressure-height profile P(j). Least-squares fits to SpeX measurements using a set of reference opacity spectra allow measurements of temperature versus position in regions of low dust opacity. Dust Optical Depth: Near-IR dust optical depth can be measured by the extent to which it suppresses the 2 micron CO2 band shape. We have been evolving an IDL-based dust optical depth mapping algorithm which incorporates multi-stream scattering model computations (DISORT), and newly available dust radiative transfer parameters at these wavelengths. However, we presently observe large (20-30 discrepancies between CO2 surface pressures predicted by forcing this model to agree with measurements, and those predicted from Viking lander data with position corrections from the MOLA data set. This latter approach is routinely used as a boundary value for temperature retrievals by the TES team. CO2 Ice Parameters: Near-IR bidirectional reflectance spectra of the south polar CO2 ice cap has been modeled as a function of grain size and contamination by dust and water ice. These parameters are of direct importance to the cap thermal balance since they affect albedo and

  1. External CO2 and water supplies for enhancing electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Fujiki, Itto; Sano, Daisuke; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    Alkalization on the cathode electrode limits the electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and thus external proton supply to the cathode electrode is essential to enhance the electrical power generation. In this study, the effects of external CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode on the electrical power generation were investigated, and then the relative contributions of CO2 and water supplies to the total proton consumption were experimentally evaluated. The CO2 supply decreased the cathode pH and consequently increased the power generation. Carbonate dissolution was the main proton source under ambient air conditions, which provides about 67% of total protons consumed for the cathode reaction. It is also critical to adequately control the water content on the cathode electrode of air-cathode MFCs because the carbonate dissolution was highly dependent on water content. On the basis of these experimental results, the power density was increased by 400% (143.0 ± 3.5 mW/m(2) to 575.0 ± 36.0 mW/m(2)) by supplying a humid gas containing 50% CO2 to the cathode chamber. This study demonstrates that the simultaneous CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode were effective to increase the electrical power generation of air-cathode MFCs for the first time.

  2. Leaf conductance decreased under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) for three perennials in the Nevada desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Robert S.; Defalco, Lesley A.; Wilcox, Carolyn S.; Jordan, Dean N.; Coleman, James S.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2001-01-01

    A common response of plants to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (CO2) is decreased leaf conductance. Consequently, leaf temperature is predicted to increase under elevated CO2.Diurnal patterns of leaf conductance and temperature were measured for three desert perennials, the C3 shrub Larrea tridentata, C3 tussock grass Achnatherum hymenoides and C4tussock grass Pleuraphis rigida, at the Nevada Desert FACE facility. Measurements were made on ambient and c. 550 µmol mol−1 CO2 plots through both a wet and dry year.Reductions in conductance were 35%, 20% and 13% for Pleuraphis, Achnatherum and Larrea, respectively. Decreased conductance occurred throughout the day only for Pleuraphis. Both C3species had smaller CO2 effects during dry periods than wet. Leaf temperature did not differ significantly between elevated and ambient CO2 for any species. Comparisons of blower-control and nonring plots indicated that the FACE apparatus did not confound our results.All three species exhibited decreased leaf conductance under elevated CO2, although reductions were not uniform during the day or among years. Nonetheless, leaf energy balance was only minimally changed for these microphyllous desert perennials.

  3. Both experimental study and numerical modelling of the effect of temperature gradient on CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvisier, J.; Lagneau, V.; Jobard, E.; Sterpenich, J.; Pironon, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 injection and underground storage obviously requires dealing with temperature differences between the injection well and the reservoir. Temperature enhances both species transport and reactions kinetics, while CO2 solubility also greatly decreases with temperature. This point could be of great importance especially in wellbore surroundings, although it has not been the subject of devoted studies up to now. To assess this issue, an experimental set up, COTAGES, has been designed (Fig.1). It consists in a 0.72m-long cylindrical autoclave (the diameter is 2.1cm) that can be filled with 12 fiberglass/teflon packets containing 12.5 grams of mineral grains and a pre-equilibrated saline aqueous solution. When loaded, one end of the autoclave is heaten up and maintained at 100°C. After having reached a steady-state, the other end is around 30°C. Finally, CO2 is injected in the cold zone (100 bars) and, from this moment, the experiment lasts 1 month while both pressure and temperatures (3 zones) are being monitored. The first results show the same general trend for both a reservoir rock such as oolitic limestone (Lavoux, France) and clay minerals such as COx argillite (Lundin, France). In these two experiments, a global mass loss is observed for all the packets except for those comprised between 75 and 95°C. There, a mass gain is noted and is remarkably important in the case of clay (greater than 11.5%). The greater losses are recorded around 65-70°C and are also of greater importance for COx clay (up to 10.0%). During the whole experiments, quite important variations of the total pressure are observed. Even if they are partly related to CO2 dissolution into water and to temperature variations (due to regulation), they shall also depend on involved chemical reactions. Indeed, after injection, pressure drastically decreases (up to 50 bar less). Since CO2 solubility is higher in the cold zone (more than 4 times), the aqueous solution gets more acidic there. It leads

  4. The Influence of Temperature on the Sorption and Permeability of CO2 in poly(fluoroalkoxyphosphazene) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mayur Ostwal; JOshua M. Lau; Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart; J. Douglas Way

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports the transport and sorption properties of poly(fluoroalkoxyphosphazene) (PFAP) membranes for carbon dioxide and nitrogen in both pure and mixed gas experiments. The CO2 permeability decreased from 336 to 142 Barrers with an increase in the CO2/N2 ideal separation factor from 12 to 21 as the membrane temperature was decreased from 303 K to 258 K at feed pressure of 2.9 bars. At lower feed pressure (1.5 bars) the CO2 permeability decreased from 327 to 140 Barrers, while the CO2/N2 ideal separation factor increased from 13 to 22 over the same temperature range. CO2 sorption isotherms were measured using the pressure decay equilibrium method. Solubility of CO2 was determined using the sorption isotherms and the diffusion coefficients were calculated from CO2 permeabilities and solubilities. Sorption isotherms were linear at each temperature for the pressure range studied and the enthalpy of sorption was -5.8 kcal/mol. The solubility coefficient values for CO2 increased from 0.95 to 5.43 cm3 CO2(STP)/cm3 polymer.atm whereas the diffusion coefficient decreased from 2.71 X 10-6 to 0.19 X 10-6 cm2/sec as the temperature decreased from 303 K to 258 K.

  5. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  6. Influence of temperature and CO2 on the strontium and magnesium composition of coccolithophore calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. N.; Lebrato, M.; Riebesell, U.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Blanco-Ameijeiras, S.; Sett, S.; Eisenhauer, A.; Stoll, H. M.

    2013-10-01

    Marine calcareous sediments provide a fundamental basis for paleoceanographic studies aiming to reconstruct past oceanic conditions and understand key biogeochemical element cycles. Calcifying unicellular phytoplankton (coccolithophores) are a major contributor to both carbon and calcium cycling by photosynthesis and the production of calcite (coccoliths) in the euphotic zone and the subsequent long-term deposition and burial into marine sediments. Here we present data from controlled laboratory experiments on four coccolithophore species and elucidate the relation between the divalent cation (Sr, Mg and Ca) partitioning in coccoliths and cellular physiology (growth, calcification and photosynthesis). Coccolithophores were cultured under different seawater temperature and carbonate chemistry conditions. The partition coefficient of strontium (DSr) was positively correlated with both carbon dioxide (pCO2) and temperature but displayed no coherent relation to particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates. Furthermore, DSr correlated positively with cellular growth rates when driven by temperature but no correlation was present when changes in growth rates were pCO2-induced. The results demonstrate the complex interaction between environmental forcing and physiological control on the strontium partitioning in coccolithophore calcite. The partition coefficient of magnesium (DMg) displayed species-specific differences and elevated values under nutrient limitation. No conclusive correlation between coccolith DMg and temperature was observed but pCO2 induced a rising trend in coccolith DMg. Interestingly, the best correlation was found between coccolith DMg and chlorophyll a production suggesting that chlorophyll a and calcite associated Mg originate from the same intracellular pool. These results give an extended insight into the driving factors that lead to variations in the coccolith Mg / Ca ratio and can be used for Sr / Ca and Mg / Ca paleoproxy

  7. Sustained enhancement of photosynthesis in mature deciduous forest trees after 8 years of free air CO(2) enrichment.

    PubMed

    Bader, Martin Karl-Friedrich; Siegwolf, Rolf; Körner, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Carbon uptake by forests constitutes half of the planet's terrestrial net primary production; therefore, photosynthetic responses of trees to rising atmospheric CO(2) are critical to understanding the future global carbon cycle. At the Swiss Canopy Crane, we investigated gas exchange characteristics and leaf traits in five deciduous tree species during their eighth growing season under free air carbon dioxide enrichment in a 35-m tall, ca. 100-year-old mixed forest. Net photosynthesis of upper-canopy foliage was 48% (July) and 42% (September) higher in CO(2)-enriched trees and showed no sign of down-regulation. Elevated CO(2) had no effect on carboxylation efficiency (V (cmax)) or maximal electron transport (J (max)) driving ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration. CO(2) enrichment improved nitrogen use efficiency, but did not affect leaf nitrogen (N) concentration, leaf thickness or specific leaf area except for one species. Non-structural carbohydrates accumulated more strongly in leaves grown under elevated CO(2) (largely driven by Quercus). Because leaf area index did not change, the CO(2)-driven stimulation of photosynthesis in these trees may persist in the upper canopy under future atmospheric CO(2) concentrations without reductions in photosynthetic capacity. However, given the lack of growth stimulation, the fate of the additionally assimilated carbon remains uncertain.

  8. An Approach to Minimizing Artifacts Caused by Cross-Sensitivity in the Determination of Air-Sea CO2 Flux Using the Eddy-Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ziqiang; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Zengxiang; Wang, Renlei; Xue, Yuhuan; Yao, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    The air-sea CO2 flux was measured from a research vessel in the North Yellow Sea in October 2007 using an open-path eddy-covariance technique. In 11 out of 64 samples, the normalized spectra of scalars (C}2, water vapour, and temperature) showed similarities. However, in the remaining samples, the normalized CO2 spectra were observed to be greater than those of water vapour and temperature at low frequencies. In this paper, the noise due to cross-sensitivity was identified through a combination of intercomparisons among the normalized spectra of three scalars and additional analyses. Upon examination, the cross-sensitivity noise appeared to be mainly present at frequencies {<}0.8 Hz. Our analysis also suggested that the high-frequency fluctuations of CO2 concentration (frequency {>}0.8 Hz) was probably less affected by the cross-sensitivity. To circumvent the cross-sensitivity issue, the cospectrum in the high-frequency range 0.8-1.5 Hz, instead of the whole range, was used to estimate the CO2 flux by taking the contribution of the high frequency to the CO2 flux to be the same as the contribution to the water vapour flux. The estimated air-sea CO2 flux in the North Yellow Sea was -0.039 ± 0.048 mg m^{-2} s^{-1}, a value comparable to the estimates using the inertial dissipation method and Edson's method (Edson et al., J Geophys Res 116:C00F10, 2011).

  9. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  10. An energy balance perspective on regional CO2-induced temperature changes in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Jouni

    2016-08-01

    An energy balance decomposition of temperature changes is conducted for idealized transient CO2-only simulations in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. The multimodel global mean warming is dominated by enhanced clear-sky greenhouse effect due to increased CO2 and water vapour, but other components of the energy balance substantially modify the geographical and seasonal patterns of the change. Changes in the net surface energy flux are important over the oceans, being especially crucial for the muted warming over the northern North Atlantic and for the seasonal cycle of warming over the Arctic Ocean. Changes in atmospheric energy flux convergence tend to smooth the gradients of temperature change and reduce its land-sea contrast, but they also amplify the seasonal cycle of warming in northern North America and Eurasia. The three most important terms for intermodel differences in warming are the changes in the clear-sky greenhouse effect, clouds, and the net surface energy flux, making the largest contribution to the standard deviation of annual mean temperature change in 34, 29 and 20 % of the world, respectively. Changes in atmospheric energy flux convergence mostly damp intermodel variations of temperature change especially over the oceans. However, the opposite is true for example in Greenland and Antarctica, where the warming appears to be substantially controlled by heat transport from the surrounding sea areas.

  11. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the northwestern European shelf based on voluntary observing ship and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-09-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 data set based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in northwestern European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), wind speed (WND), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 data set (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT and LDEO databases and obtained good agreement between modeled and observed data. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.6 ± 0.3, -0.9 ± 0.3 and -0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the northern Celtic Sea, southern Celtic sea and nWEC, respectively, whereas permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.2 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the sWEC and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over these provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -1.11 ± 0.32 Tg C yr-1 for this part of the northwestern European continental shelf. Our study showed that combining VOS data with satellite observations can be a powerful tool to

  12. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North-West European Shelf based on Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 dataset based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the Western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in north-west European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), the gas transfer velocity coefficient (K), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with relative uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 dataset (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish Seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT database and obtained relatively robust results with an average precision of 4 ± 22 μatm in the seasonally stratified nWEC and the southern and northern CS (sCS and nCS), but less promising results in the permanently well-mixed sWEC, IS and Cap Lizard (CL) waters. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.4, -0.9 and -0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the nCS, sCS and nWEC, respectively, whereas, permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the sWEC, CL and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over six provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -0.95 Tg C year-1 for this

  13. Relative sensitivity of five Hawaiian coral species to high temperature under high-pCO2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Keisha D.; Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku'ulei S.

    2016-06-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are presently undergoing decline due to anthropogenic climate change. The chief detrimental factors are increased temperature and increased pCO2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of these two stressors operating independently and in unison on the biological response of common Hawaiian reef corals. Manipulative experiments were performed using five species ( Porites compressa, Pocillopora damicornis, Fungia scutaria, Montipora capitata, and Leptastrea purpurea) in a continuous-flow mesocosm system under natural sunlight conditions. Corals were grown together as a community under treatments of high temperature (2 °C above normal maximum summer temperature), high pCO2 (twice present-day conditions), and with both factors acting in unison. Control corals were grown under present-day pCO2 and at normal summer temperatures. Leptastrea purpurea proved to be an extremely hardy coral. No change in calcification or mortality occurred under treatments of high temperature, high pCO2, or combined high temperature-high pCO2. The remaining four species showed reduced calcification in the high-temperature treatment. Two species ( L. purpurea and M. capitata) showed no response to increased pCO2. Also, high pCO2 ameliorated the negative effect of high temperature on the calcification rates of P. damicornis. Mortality was driven primarily by high temperature, with a negative synergistic effect in P. compressa only in the high-pCO2-high-temperature treatment. Results support the observation that biological response to temperature and pCO2 elevation is highly species-specific, so generalizations based on response of a single species might not apply to a diverse and complex coral reef community.

  14. Changes in life history parameters of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Homoptera: Aphididae) under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haicui; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Wenqiang; Wang, Zhenying; Ni, Xinzhi; Cai, Wanzhi; He, Kanglai

    2014-08-01

    Biological characteristics of corn leaf aphid, Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), on barley, Hordeum vulgare L., were examined for two generations under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations. The developmental duration for each life stage was significantly reduced under the elevated temperature (+4 degrees C). The elevated CO2 (700-750 microl/liter) reduced only the development time of fourth-instar nymph. The overall duration of nymphal stage was reduced in the second generation. Thus, the temperature was the dominant factor to development duration of corn leaf aphid. The fecundity of corn leaf aphid was significantly increased under the elevated temperature and CO2, as well as in the later generation. Elevated temperature and CO2 increased the number of alate production, which may enhance the aphid migration or dispersal and the spread of plant viruses. Corn leaf aphid had the highest intrinsic rate of increase under the elevated temperature and CO2 combination in the second generation. These results indicate that the combined effects of both elevated temperature and CO2 on aphid biology may exacerbate aphid damage on barley under the climate change in accompany with elevated temperature and CO2 level. PMID:25195429

  15. Interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 growth rate: roles of precipitation and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zeng, Ning; Wang, Meirong

    2016-04-01

    The interannual variability (IAV) in atmospheric CO2 growth rate (CGR) is closely connected with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. However, sensitivities of CGR to temperature and precipitation remain largely uncertain. This paper analyzed the relationship between Mauna Loa CGR and tropical land climatic elements. We find that Mauna Loa CGR lags precipitation by 4 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.63, leads temperature by 1 month (0.77), and correlates with soil moisture (-0.65) with zero lag. Additionally, precipitation and temperature are highly correlated (-0.66), with precipitation leading by 4-5 months. Regression analysis shows that sensitivities of Mauna Loa CGR to temperature and precipitation are 2.92 ± 0.20 PgC yr-1 K-1 and -0.46 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 100 mm-1, respectively. Unlike some recent suggestions, these empirical relationships favor neither temperature nor precipitation as the dominant factor of CGR IAV. We further analyzed seven terrestrial carbon cycle models, from the TRENDY project, to study the processes underlying CGR IAV. All models capture well the IAV of tropical land-atmosphere carbon flux (CFTA). Sensitivities of the ensemble mean CFTA to temperature and precipitation are 3.18 ± 0.11 PgC yr-1 K-1 and -0.67 ± 0.04 PgC yr-1 100 mm-1, close to Mauna Loa CGR. Importantly, the models consistently show the variability in net primary productivity (NPP) dominates CGR, rather than heterotrophic respiration. Because previous studies have proved that NPP is largely driven by precipitation in tropics, it suggests a key role of precipitation in CGR IAV despite the higher CGR correlation with temperature. Understanding the relative contribution of CO2 sensitivity to precipitation and temperature has important implications for future carbon-climate feedback using such ''emergent constraint''.

  16. Five-years of microenvironment data along an urban-rural transect; temperature and CO2 concentrations in urban area at levels expected globally with climate change.

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kate; Ziska, Lewis H; Bunce, James A; Quebedeaux, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    The heat island effect and the high use of fossil fuels in large city centers is well documented, but by how much fossil fuel consumption is elevating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and whether elevations in both atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are consistent from year to year are less well known. Our aim was to record atmospheric CO2 concentrations, air temperature and other environmental variables in an urban area and compare it to suburban and rural sites to see if urban sites are experiencing climates expected globally in the future with climate change. A transect was established from Baltimore city center (Urban site), to the outer suburbs of Baltimore (suburban site) and out to an organic farm (rural site). At each site a weather station was set-up to monitor environmental variables annually for five years. Atmospheric CO2 was significantly increased on average by 66 ppm from the rural to the urban site over the five years of the study. Air temperature was significantly higher at the urban site (14.8 oC) compared to the suburban (13.6 oC) and rural (12.7 oC) sites. Relative humidity was not different between sites but vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was significantly higher at the urban site compared to the suburban and rural sites. During wet years relative humidity was significantly increased and VPD significantly reduced. Increased nitrogen deposition at the rural site (2.1 % compared to 1.8 and 1.2 % at the suburban and urban sites) was small enough not to affect soil nitrogen content. Dense urban areas with large populations and high vehicular traffic have significantly different microclimates compared to outlying suburban and rural areas. The increases in atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are similar to changes predicted in the short term with global climate change, therefore providing an environment suitable for studying future effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. NASA GES DISC support of CO2 Data from OCO-2, ACOS, and AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer C; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Hearty, Thomas J; Albayrak, Rustem Arif; Deshong, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Centers (GES DISC) is the data center assigned to archive and distribute current AIRS, ACOS data and data from the upcoming OCO-2 mission. The GES DISC archives and supports data containing information on CO2 as well as other atmospheric composition, atmospheric dynamics, modeling and precipitation. Along with the data stewardship, an important mission of GES DISC is to facilitate access to and enhance the usability of data as well as to broaden the user base. GES DISC strives to promote the awareness of science content and novelty of the data by working with Science Team members and releasing news articles as appropriate. Analysis of events that are of interest to the general public, and that help in understanding the goals of NASA Earth Observing missions, have been among most popular practices.Users have unrestricted access to a user-friendly search interface, Mirador, that allows temporal, spatial, keyword and event searches, as well as an ontology-driven drill down. Variable subsetting, format conversion, quality screening, and quick browse, are among the services available in Mirador. The majority of the GES DISC data are also accessible through OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) and WMS (Web Map Service). These services add more options for specialized subsetting, format conversion, image viewing and contributing to data interoperability.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange of alongshore waters in summer near Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Hiroki; Oechel, Walter C.

    2014-03-01

    Alongshore water off Barrow, Alaska is a useful area for studying the carbon cycle of the Arctic coastal sea, because the different coastal characteristics extant in the area likely represent much larger regions of the coastal water of the western Arctic Ocean. Especially noteworthy is the inflow shelf water transferred northward by the Arctic Coastal Current into the Chukchi Sea from the North Pacific and turbid water in the Elson Lagoon where a significant amount of coastal erosion has been reported along the extensive coastal line and where a part of the water from the lagoon drains into the Beaufort Sea adjacent to the Chukchi Sea. To investigate spatial and temporal variations of air-sea CO2 flux (CO2 flux) of the alongshore water, partial pressure of CO2 of surface seawater (pCO2sw) was measured in summer, 2007 and 2008, and CO2 flux was directly measured by eddy covariance at a fixed point for the Beaufort Sea in summer 2008. Measured pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was the lowest in the beginning of the measurement season and increased later in the season both in 2007 and 2008. The average CO2 flux estimated based on pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was -0.10 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) using the sign convention of positive fluxes into the atmosphere from the ocean. pCO2sw in the Beaufort Sea and the Elson Lagoon was relatively higher in early summer and decreased in the middle of the summer. The overall average CO2 flux was -0.07 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) for the Beaufort Sea side and -0.03 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.07 s.d.) for the Elson Lagoon respectively, indicating a sink of CO2 despite high carbon inflows from the terrestrial margin into the Elson Lagoon. A strong sink of CO2 was often observed from the Beaufort Sea by eddy covariance in the middle of the summer. This sink activity in the middle summer in the Beaufort Sea and Elson Lagoon was likely due to biological carbon uptake as inferred by low apparent oxygen utilization and high chlorophyll

  19. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  20. Radiative Forcing and Temperature Response to Changes in Urban Albedos and Associated CO2 Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2009-01-01

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the response of the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation to urban albedo changes. Globally, the total outgoing radiation increased by 0.5 W/square m and temperature decreased by -0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in albedo. For the U.S. the total outgoing total radiation increased by 2.3 W/square meter, and temperature decreased by approximately 0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in albedo. These values are for the boreal summer (Tune-July-August). Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO2 offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be approximately 57 Gt CO2 . A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on climate and the expected CO2 offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  1. The effect of CO2 on the speciation of bromine in low-temperature geological solutions: an XANES study.

    PubMed

    Evans, K A; Mavrogenes, J; Newville, M

    2007-03-01

    CO(2)-rich solutions are common in geological environments. An XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) study of Br in CO(2)-bearing synthetic fluid inclusions has revealed that Br exhibits a strong pre-edge feature at temperatures from 298 to 423 K. Br in CO(2)-free solutions does not show such a feature. The feature becomes smaller and disappears as temperature increases, but reappears when temperature is reduced. The size of the feature increases with increasing X(CO(2)) in the fluid inclusion, where X(CO(2)) is the mole fraction of CO(2) in the solution [n(CO(2))/(n(CO(2)) + n(H(2)(O)) + n(RbBr)); n indicates the number of moles]. The pre-edge feature is similar to that shown by covalently bonded Br, but observed and calculated concentrations of plausible Br-bearing covalent compounds (Br(2), CH(3)Br and HBr) are vanishingly small. An alternative possibility is that CO(2) affects the hydration of Br sufficiently that the charge density changes to favour the 1s-p level transitions that are thought to cause the pre-edge peak. The distance between the first two post-edge maxima in the XANES also decreases with increasing X(CO(2)). This is attributed to a CO(2)-related decrease in the polarity of the solvent. The proposed causes of the observed features are not integrated into existing geochemical models; thus CO(2)-bearing solutions could be predicted poorly by such models, with significant consequences for models of geological processes such as ore-formation and metamorphism. PMID:17317924

  2. Performance of a CO2 Impedimetric Sensor Prototype for Air Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Mandayo, Gemma García; Herrán, Jaime; Castro-Hurtado, Irene; Castaño, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide detection is a relevant issue in many fields, and this work focuses on the use of a BaTiO3-CuO sputtered thin film layer in a gas sensor prototype for air quality measurements. For this, a double side sensor was fabricated, with a Pt heater on one side and the sensing layer over the electrodes on the other side. The uniformity of the temperature on the sensing layer was tested and further tests to check its sensing performance were carried out. Humidity influence in the detection was found to be almost negligible within the usual range in air quality measurements and repeatability tests show satisfactory results for air quality control purposes. PMID:22163889

  3. Performance of a CO2 impedimetric sensor prototype for air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mandayo, Gemma García; Herrán, Jaime; Castro-Hurtado, Irene; Castaño, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide detection is a relevant issue in many fields, and this work focuses on the use of a BaTiO(3)-CuO sputtered thin film layer in a gas sensor prototype for air quality measurements. For this, a double side sensor was fabricated, with a Pt heater on one side and the sensing layer over the electrodes on the other side. The uniformity of the temperature on the sensing layer was tested and further tests to check its sensing performance were carried out. Humidity influence in the detection was found to be almost negligible within the usual range in air quality measurements and repeatability tests show satisfactory results for air quality control purposes. PMID:22163889

  4. Influence of temperature and CO2 on the strontium and magnesium composition of coccolithophore calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. N.; Lebrato, M.; Riebesell, U.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Blanco-Ameijeiras, S.; Sett, S.; Eisenhauer, A.; Stoll, H. M.

    2014-02-01

    Marine calcareous sediments provide a fundamental basis for palaeoceanographic studies aiming to reconstruct past oceanic conditions and understand key biogeochemical element cycles. Calcifying unicellular phytoplankton (coccolithophores) are a major contributor to both carbon and calcium cycling by photosynthesis and the production of calcite (coccoliths) in the euphotic zone, and the subsequent long-term deposition and burial into marine sediments. Here we present data from controlled laboratory experiments on four coccolithophore species and elucidate the relation between the divalent cation (Sr, Mg and Ca) partitioning in coccoliths and cellular physiology (growth, calcification and photosynthesis). Coccolithophores were cultured under different seawater temperature and carbonate chemistry conditions. The partition coefficient of strontium (DSr) was positively correlated with both carbon dioxide (pCO2) and temperature but displayed no coherent relation to particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates. Furthermore, DSr correlated positively with cellular growth rates when driven by temperature but no correlation was present when changes in growth rates were pCO2-induced. Our results demonstrate the complex interaction between environmental forcing and physiological control on the strontium partitioning in coccolithophore calcite and challenge interpretations of the coccolith Sr / Ca ratio from high-pCO2 environments (e.g. Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum). The partition coefficient of magnesium (DMg) displayed species-specific differences and elevated values under nutrient limitation. No conclusive correlation between coccolith DMg and temperature was observed but pCO2 induced a rising trend in coccolith DMg. Interestingly, the best correlation was found between coccolith DMg and chlorophyll a production, suggesting that chlorophyll a and calcite associated Mg originate from the same intracellular pool. These and previous findings indicate that Mg

  5. Ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity on carbon molecular sieves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Wahby, Anass; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2011-06-28

    Although metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have been postulated as superior to any other sorbent for CO(2) adsorption at room temperature, here we prove that the appropriate selection of the raw material and the synthesis conditions allows the preparation of carbon molecular sieves (CMSs) with adsorption capacity, on a volumetric basis, highly exceeding those reported in the literature for MOFs. Furthermore, the excellent sorption properties of CMSs over the whole pressure range (up to 50 bar) are fully reversible after different adsorption/desorption cycles.

  6. Tritium isotope separation by CO2-laser irradiation at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Satooka, S.; Makide, Y.

    1984-02-01

    Tritium isotope separation by CO2-laser induced multiphoton dissociation of CTF3 is investigated. For the optimization of the performance of this working substance, trifluoromethane, the conditions to yield high-selectivity at high-operating pressure and low-critical fluence for complete dissociation are studied using our deconvolution procedure. The irradiation conditions are varied over the following ranges; wavenumber: 1052 1087 cm-1, gas temperature: 25°C to -78°C, CHF3 pressure: 5 205 Torr. The selectivities exceeding 104 are observed for 85 205 Torr CHF3 at -78°C by the irradiation at 1057 cm-1.

  7. High temperature corrosion of welded ferritic stainless steel in flowing CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2013-05-01

    The high temperature corrosion of welded structure of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) in flowing Ar-75%CO2 gas at 700°C has been investigated. The welded structure of FSS joint using ER 308L filler metal by GTAW. The soundness of welded joint has been clarified by X-Ray CT Scan. Prior the high temperature exposure, the welded FSS compulsory passed the standard of ASME. The welded structure of FSS was heated in flowing CO2 gas for 50 h at 1 atm. The morphology and microstructure of oxide formation on welded FSS alloy was characterized by using SEM. The result shows that the different oxide morphologies were observed on parent and fusion metal. The formation of different oxide and element properties at the interface were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction. The differences of the physical condition and morphology microstructure of welded and parent metal were observed to respond to different exposure times. This phenomenon perhaps explained due to the differences of the minor alloying elements on both parent and filler metals. The high temperature corrosion behaviour was discussed in details in this paper regarding on the physical properties, morphology and the microstructure.

  8. Maximum temperature accounts for annual soil CO2 efflux in temperate forests of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Xu, Meili; Kang, Fengfeng; Jianxin Sun, Osbert

    2015-01-01

    It will help understand the representation legality of soil temperature to explore the correlations of soil respiration with variant properties of soil temperature. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth was hourly logged through twelve months. Basing on the measured soil temperature, soil respiration at different temporal scales were calculated using empirical functions for temperate forests. On monthly scale, soil respiration significantly correlated with maximum, minimum, mean and accumulated effective soil temperatures. Annual soil respiration varied from 409 g C m(-2) in coniferous forest to 570 g C m(-2) in mixed forest and to 692 g C m(-2) in broadleaved forest, and was markedly explained by mean soil temperatures of the warmest day, July and summer, separately. These three soil temperatures reflected the maximum values on diurnal, monthly and annual scales. In accordance with their higher temperatures, summer soil respiration accounted for 51% of annual soil respiration across forest types, and broadleaved forest also had higher soil organic carbon content (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon content (SMBC), but a lower contribution of SMBC to SOC. This added proof to the findings that maximum soil temperature may accelerate the transformation of SOC to CO2-C via stimulating activities of soil microorganisms. PMID:26179467

  9. Effect of Temperature, CO2 Concentration, and Light Intensity on Oxygen Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Wheat Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, P. A.; Tregunna, E. B.

    1968-01-01

    The effect of 21% O2 and 3% O2 on the CO2 exchange of detached wheat leaves was measured in a closed system with an infrared carbon dioxide analyzer. Temperature was varied between 2° and 43°, CO2 concentration between 0.000% and 0.050% and light intensity between 40 ft-c and 1000 ft-c. In most conditions, the apparent rate of photosynthesis was inhibited in 21% O2 compared to 3% O2. The degree of inhibition increased with increasing temperature and decreasing CO2 concentration. Light intensity did not alter the effect of O2 except at light intensities or CO2 concentrations near the compensation point. At high CO2 concentrations and low temperature, O2 inhibition of apparent photosynthesis was absent. At 3% O2, wheat resembled tropical grasses in possessing a high rate of photosynthesis, a temperature optimum for photosynthesis above 30°, and a CO2 compensation point of less than 0.0005% CO2. The effect of O2 on apparent photosynthesis could be ascribed to a combination of stimulation of CO2 production during photosynthesis, and inhibition of photosynthesis itself. PMID:16656860

  10. Effect of Temperature, CO(2) Concentration, and Light Intensity on Oxygen Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Wheat Leaves.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, P A; Tregunna, E B

    1968-06-01

    The effect of 21% O(2) and 3% O(2) on the CO(2) exchange of detached wheat leaves was measured in a closed system with an infrared carbon dioxide analyzer. Temperature was varied between 2 degrees and 43 degrees , CO(2) concentration between 0.000% and 0.050% and light intensity between 40 ft-c and 1000 ft-c. In most conditions, the apparent rate of photosynthesis was inhibited in 21% O(2) compared to 3% O(2). The degree of inhibition increased with increasing temperature and decreasing CO(2) concentration. Light intensity did not alter the effect of O(2) except at light intensities or CO(2) concentrations near the compensation point. At high CO(2) concentrations and low temperature, O(2) inhibition of apparent photosynthesis was absent. At 3% O(2), wheat resembled tropical grasses in possessing a high rate of photosynthesis, a temperature optimum for photosynthesis above 30 degrees , and a CO(2) compensation point of less than 0.0005% CO(2). The effect of O(2) on apparent photosynthesis could be ascribed to a combination of stimulation of CO(2) production during photosynthesis, and inhibition of photosynthesis itself.

  11. Use of visual CO2 feedback as a retrofit solution for improving classroom air quality.

    PubMed

    Wargocki, P; Da Silva, N A F

    2015-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) sensors that provide a visual indication were installed in classrooms during normal school operation. During 2-week periods, teachers and students were instructed to open the windows in response to the visual CO2 feedback in 1 week and open them, as they would normally do, without visual feedback, in the other week. In the heating season, two pairs of classrooms were monitored, one pair naturally and the other pair mechanically ventilated. In the cooling season, two pairs of naturally ventilated classrooms were monitored, one pair with split cooling in operation and the other pair with no cooling. Classrooms were matched by grade. Providing visual CO2 feedback reduced CO2 levels, as more windows were opened in this condition. This increased energy use for heating and reduced the cooling requirement in summertime. Split cooling reduced the frequency of window opening only when no visual CO2 feedback was present.

  12. Effects of CO 2 in air on Li deintercalation from LiNi 1- x- yCo xAl yO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazutoshi; Kuzuo, Ryuichi; Takeya, Kaname; Yamanaka, Atsushi

    The reaction of CO 2 and practical high-performance cathode materials LiNi 1- x- yCo xAl yO 2 was examined with XRD at RT and high temperature, TGA, IR, and chemical analysis. Even at room temperature, Li deintercalation took place and formed Li 2CO 3 on the mother surface. The conversion to Li 2CO 3 in air at 55% RH at 25°C was in proportion to the square root of exposure time. It was 8% after being left for 500 h. Using high-temperature XRD at 25-800°C, the Li 2CO 3 phase formation was confirmed from about 500°C, and the conversion exceeded 70% under atmospheric CO 2 at 675°C. The activation energy of the reaction of deintercalated Li and CO 2 was estimated by Ozawa's method. The activation energy obtained using Ozawa's method was 130 kJ/mol for CO 2 diffusing through the Li 2CO 3 layer which formed on the surface during the reaction.

  13. A study of the interacting effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on the skeletal growth of two Caribbean coral species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, C.; Baker, A.; Jones, P.

    2011-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate how corals may be impacted by the combination of rising temperature and declining pH. In a fully crossed experimental design two important Caribbean reef-building coral species Acropora cervicornis and Montastraea faveolata were exposed to combinations of a normal (26°C) and elevated (32°C) temperature and normal (380 ppm) and elevated (800 ppm) CO2 level. Nine colonies of each species were placed in eight tanks. Two tanks were assigned to each of the four temperature and CO2 combinations. The CO2 level was controlled by bubbling with either outside air or outside air enriched with CO2 gas to achieve the desired CO2 concentration in the tank. Corals were pre-conditioned for 39 days under 26°C and 380 ppm. The temperature and CO2 in the experimental tanks was then ramped up at a rate of 0.3°C and 30 ppm per day over a two week period. The skeletal growth of the corals was measured weekly over 62 days using an optical or laser micrometer. At the end of the high temperature and CO2 part the experiment the ability of the corals to recover from these stressful conditions was examined for 56 days. The CO2 in the high CO2 tanks was reduced to 380 ppm and the temperature in the 32°C 380 tanks was reduced to 26°C. This experiment is our second attempt to measure short term changes in skeletal growth as a function of temperature and CO2. In the first year none of the corals grew. We eventually discovered that supplemental feeding was necessary. The results of the second year's experiment are interesting but exhibit a great deal of variability. Forty-four percent of A. cervicornis colonies exhibited a decline in growth of 45% and seventy-seven percent of the M. faveolata colonies experienced a decline of 44% under 800 ppm and recovered quickly when the CO2 was lowered to 380 ppm during the recovery phase. However, the other colonies either failed to grow at all, showed no response to CO2 or seemed to grow more quickly under elevated

  14. Comparison of Anthropogenic CO2, NOx, and CO Emissions: Exploiting a Synergy Between Air Quality and Carbon Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Gurney, K. R.; Gregg, J. S.; Murtishaw, S.; Knox, S.; Andres, R. J.; Sieb, B.

    2005-05-01

    Studies of biospheric CO2 exchange at the regional to continental scale would be facilitated by spatiotemporally resolved estimates of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and other human activities. However, current estimates of fossil CO2 emissions do not provide sufficient temporal or spatial resolution for regional-scale investigations. The US-EPA National Emission Inventory (NEI) for criteria pollutants (e.g., NOx and CO) was developed for control of regional air quality and currently provides high resolution emissions estimates that are based, in part on, estimates of fuel consumption. Here we investigate the applicability of estimating CO2 emissions from either 1) NEI estimates of NOx or CO emissions, or 2) underlying information on fuel use contained within NEI. First, we calculate monthly sums of NOx and CO emissions separately for mobile, distributed area, and point sources for the 48 continental United States. We compare the aggregate NOx and CO emissions with monthly sums of each states CO2 emissions computed from sales of petroleum, natural gas, and coal as reported by the US Energy Information Agency (EIA). We then compute linear regressions to estimate CO:CO2 and NOx:CO2 emissions ratios and quantify the fraction of variance in CO2 captured by NOx and CO. Although the categories in the two data sets do not overlap perfectly, we find that in the cases where a close correspondence between fuel type and use is expected (e.g., petroleum and mobile sources), variations in NOx and CO explain approximately 80% of the variation in CO2 emissions. Second, we employ the Consolidated Community Emissions Processing Tool (CONCEPT) framework to extract estimates of fuel use or other proxy variables and estimate CO2 directly from the information contained in the NEI, and compare with the EIA estimates of CO2 emissions, and with NEI estimates of NOx and CO emissions as above. Finally, we discuss these results with consideration of previous atmospheric

  15. Comparison of Anthropogenic CO2, NOx, and CO Emissions: Exploiting a Synergy Between Air Quality and Carbon Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Gurney, K. R.; Gregg, J. S.; Murtishaw, S.; Knox, S.; Andres, R. J.; Sieb, B.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of biospheric CO2 exchange at the regional to continental scale would be facilitated by spatiotemporally resolved estimates of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and other human activities. However, current estimates of fossil CO2 emissions do not provide sufficient temporal or spatial resolution for regional-scale investigations. The US-EPA National Emission Inventory (NEI) for criteria pollutants (e.g., NOx and CO) was developed for control of regional air quality and currently provides high resolution emissions estimates that are based, in part on, estimates of fuel consumption. Here we investigate the applicability of estimating CO2 emissions from either 1) NEI estimates of NOx or CO emissions, or 2) underlying information on fuel use contained within NEI. First, we calculate monthly sums of NOx and CO emissions separately for mobile, distributed area, and point sources for the 48 continental United States. We compare the aggregate NOx and CO emissions with monthly sums of each states CO2 emissions computed from sales of petroleum, natural gas, and coal as reported by the US Energy Information Agency (EIA). We then compute linear regressions to estimate CO:CO2 and NOx:CO2 emissions ratios and quantify the fraction of variance in CO2 captured by NOx and CO. Although the categories in the two data sets do not overlap perfectly, we find that in the cases where a close correspondence between fuel type and use is expected (e.g., petroleum and mobile sources), variations in NOx and CO explain approximately 80% of the variation in CO2 emissions. Second, we employ the Consolidated Community Emissions Processing Tool (CONCEPT) framework to extract estimates of fuel use or other proxy variables and estimate CO2 directly from the information contained in the NEI, and compare with the EIA estimates of CO2 emissions, and with NEI estimates of NOx and CO emissions as above. Finally, we discuss these results with consideration of previous atmospheric

  16. Litterfall 15N abundance indicates declining soil nitrogen availability in a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment.

    PubMed

    Garten, Charles T; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Forest productivity increases in response to carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment of the atmosphere. However, in nitrogen-limited ecosystems, increased productivity may cause a decline in soil nitrogen (N) availability and induce a negative feedback on further enhancement of forest production. In a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment, the response of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) productivity to elevated CO2 concentrations [CO2] has declined over time, but documenting an associated change in soil N availability has been difficult. Here we assess the time history of soil N availability through analysis of natural 15N abundance in archived samples of freshly fallen leaf litterfall. Litterfall delta15N declined from 1998 to 2005, and the rate of decline was significantly faster in elevated [CO2]. Declining leaf litterfall delta15N is indicative of a tighter ecosystem N cycle and more limited soil N availability. By integrating N availability over time and throughout the soil profile, temporal dynamics in leaf litterfall delta15N provide a powerful tool for documenting changes in N availability and the critical feedbacks between C and N cycles that will control forest response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  17. Response of sugarcane to carbon dioxide enrichment and elevated air temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four sugarcane cultivars (CP 72-2086, CP 73-1547, CP 88-1508, and CP 80-1827) were grown in elongated temperature-gradient greenhouses (TGG) at ambient or elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) of 360 or 720 µmol CO2 mol-1 air (ppm, mole fraction basis), respectively. Elevated CO2 was maintained by injection...

  18. Effects of air current speed, light intensity and co2 concentration on photosynthesis and transpiration of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Tsuruyama, J.; Shibuya, T.; Kiyota, M.

    To obtain basic data for adequate air circulation to promote gas exchange and growth of plants in closed plant culture modules in bioregenerative life support systems in space, the effects of air current speeds less than 0.8 m s-1 on transpiration (Tr) and net photosynthetic rates (Pn) of sweetpotato and barley leaves were determined using a leaf chamber method under different photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFDs) and CO_2 concentrations. The air current speed inside the leaf chamber was controlled by controlling the input voltages for an air circulation fan. The leaf surface boundary layer resistance was determined by the evaporation rate of wet paper and the water vapor pressure difference between the paper and surrounding air in the leaf chamber. The Tr and Pn of leaves rapidly increased as the air current speed increased from 0.01 to 0.1 m s-1 and gradually increased from 0.1 to 0.8 m s-1. These changes are correspondent to the change of the leaf surface boundary layer resistance. The depression of Tr by low air current speeds was greater than that of Pn. Tr and Pn decreased by 0.5 and 0.7 times, respectively, as the air current speed decreased from 0.8 to 0.01 m s-1. The depressions of Tr and Pn by low air current speeds were most notable at PPFDs of 500 and 250 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The air current speeds affected Tr and Pn at a CO_2 concentration of 700 μmol mol-1 as well as at 400 μmol mol-1. The results confirmed the importance of controlling air movement for enhancing Tr and Pn under the relatively high PPFD and elevated CO_2 levels likely in plant culture systems in space.

  19. Quantifying the air-sea CO2 flux at a time-series in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Nathalie; Veleda, Doris; Araujo, Moacyr; Caniaux, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Hourly fCO2 is recorded at a time-series at the PIRATA buoy located at 6oS 10oW in the eastern tropical Atlantic since June 2006. This site is located south and west of the seasonal Atlantic cold tongue and is affected by its propagation from June to September. Using an alkalinity-salinity relationship determined for the eastern tropical Atlantic and the observed fCO2, pH and the inorganic carbon concentration are calculated. The time-series of fCO2 exhibits strong intraseasonal, seasonal and interannual variability. On seasonal timescales, the variations of fCO2 and pH are mostly controlled by sea surface salinity. At interannual timescales, some important differences appear in 2011-2012: lower fCO2 and fluxes are observed from September to December 2011 and are explained by higher advection of salty waters at the mooring. In early 2012, the anomaly is still present and is associated with lower sea surface temperatures. No significant long-term trend is detected over the period 2006-2013 on CO2 and any other physical parameter. However, as atmospheric fCO2 is increasing over time, the outgassing of CO2 is reduced over the period 2006-2013 as the flux is mainly controlled by the difference of fCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. A longer time-series is required to determine if any significant trend exists in this region.

  20. Elevated Temperature and CO2 Stimulate Late-Season Photosynthesis But Impair Cold Hardening in Pine[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperature and CO2 levels may sustain late-season net photosynthesis of evergreen conifers but could also impair the development of cold hardiness. Our study investigated how elevated temperature, and the combination of elevated temperature with elevated CO2, affected photosynthetic rates, leaf carbohydrates, freezing tolerance, and proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold hardening in Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). We designed an experiment where control seedlings were acclimated to long photoperiod (day/night 14/10 h), warm temperature (22°C/15°C), and either ambient (400 μL L−1) or elevated (800 μmol mol−1) CO2, and then shifted seedlings to growth conditions with short photoperiod (8/16 h) and low temperature/ambient CO2 (LTAC), elevated temperature/ambient CO2 (ETAC), or elevated temperature/elevated CO2 (ETEC). Exposure to LTAC induced down-regulation of photosynthesis, development of sustained nonphotochemical quenching, accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, expression of a 16-kD dehydrin absent under long photoperiod, and increased freezing tolerance. In ETAC seedlings, photosynthesis was not down-regulated, while accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, dehydrin expression, and freezing tolerance were impaired. ETEC seedlings revealed increased photosynthesis and improved water use efficiency but impaired dehydrin expression and freezing tolerance similar to ETAC seedlings. Sixteen-kilodalton dehydrin expression strongly correlated with increases in freezing tolerance, suggesting its involvement in the development of cold hardiness in P. strobus. Our findings suggest that exposure to elevated temperature and CO2 during autumn can delay down-regulation of photosynthesis and stimulate late-season net photosynthesis in P. strobus seedlings. However, this comes at the cost of impaired freezing tolerance. Elevated temperature and CO2 also impaired freezing tolerance. However, unless the frequency and timing of extreme low-temperature

  1. Degradation of flubendiamide as affected by elevated CO2, temperature, and carbon mineralization rate in soil.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar; Kumar, Aman

    2016-10-01

    An experiment was conducted under three levels of atmospheric CO2 [ambient (398 ± 10 μmol mol(-1)), elevated (570 ± 10 μmol mol(-1)) and open condition], three levels of temperature (4, 25, and 40 °C) to study the degradation pattern of flubendiamide in soil and also carbon mineralization in soil. Results of this study revealed that flubendiamide was found to persist longer under outdoor condition (T1/2, 177.0 and 181.1 days) than ambient (T1/2, 168.4 and 172.3 days) and elevated condition (T1/2, 159.3 and 155.3 days) at 1 and 10 μg g(-1) fortification level, respectively. Results also revealed that flubendiamide dissipated faster at 40 °C (T1/2, 189.4 days) than 25 °C (T1/2, 225.3 days). Slower dissipation was recorded at 4 °C (T1/2, 326.3 days). Thus, increased CO2 levels and temperature following global warming might adversely affect flubendiamide degradation in soil. Laboratory study on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and carbon mineralization (Cmin) in soil revealed that in des-iodo flubendiamide-treated soils, MBC significantly increased up to 45 days and then decreased. Flubendiamide-treated soil showed a non-significantly decreasing trend of soil MBC with time up to the 15th day of incubation and after 15 days significantly decreased up to 90 days of incubation. In des-iodo flubendiamide-treated soil, the evolution of CO2 decreased up to 45 days, which was increased after 45 days up to 90 days. In flubendiamide-treated soil, CO2 evolution decreased up to 30 days and after 45 days, it increased up to 90 days. PMID:27430656

  2. Air-water CO2 outgassing in the Lower Lakes (Alexandrina and Albert, Australia) following a millennium drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T; Ward, Nicholas J; Sullivan, Leigh A; Dong, Fangyong

    2016-01-15

    Lakes are an important source and sink of atmospheric CO2, and thus are a vital component of the global carbon cycle. However, with scarce data on potentially important subtropical and tropical areas for whole continents such as Australia, the magnitude of large-scale lake CO2 emissions is unclear. This study presents spatiotemporal changes of dissolved inorganic carbon and water - to - air interface CO2 flux in the two of Australia's largest connected, yet geomorphically different freshwater lakes (Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert, South Australia), during drought (2007 to September-2010) and post-drought (October 2010 to 2013). Lake levels in the extreme drought were on average approximately 1m lower than long-term average (0.71 m AHD). Drought was associated with an increase in the concentrations of dissolved inorganic species, organic carbon, nitrogen, Chl-a and major ions, as well as water acidification as a consequence of acid sulfate soil (ASS) exposure, and hence, had profound effects on lake pCO2 concentrations. Lakes Alexandrina and Albert were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the drought period, with efflux ranging from 0.3 to 7.0 mmol/m(2)/d. The lake air-water CO2 flux was negative in the post-drought, ranging between -16.4 and 0.9 mmol/m(2)/d. The average annual CO2 emission was estimated at 615.5×10(6) mol CO2/y during the drought period. These calculated emission rates are in the lower range for lakes, despite the potential for drought conditions that shift the lakes from sink to net source for atmospheric CO2. These observations have significant implications in the context of predicted increasing frequency and intensity of drought as a result of climate change. Further information on the spatial and temporal variability in CO2 flux from Australian lakes is urgently warranted to revise the global carbon budget for lakes. PMID:26520269

  3. Air-water CO2 outgassing in the Lower Lakes (Alexandrina and Albert, Australia) following a millennium drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T; Ward, Nicholas J; Sullivan, Leigh A; Dong, Fangyong

    2016-01-15

    Lakes are an important source and sink of atmospheric CO2, and thus are a vital component of the global carbon cycle. However, with scarce data on potentially important subtropical and tropical areas for whole continents such as Australia, the magnitude of large-scale lake CO2 emissions is unclear. This study presents spatiotemporal changes of dissolved inorganic carbon and water - to - air interface CO2 flux in the two of Australia's largest connected, yet geomorphically different freshwater lakes (Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert, South Australia), during drought (2007 to September-2010) and post-drought (October 2010 to 2013). Lake levels in the extreme drought were on average approximately 1m lower than long-term average (0.71 m AHD). Drought was associated with an increase in the concentrations of dissolved inorganic species, organic carbon, nitrogen, Chl-a and major ions, as well as water acidification as a consequence of acid sulfate soil (ASS) exposure, and hence, had profound effects on lake pCO2 concentrations. Lakes Alexandrina and Albert were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the drought period, with efflux ranging from 0.3 to 7.0 mmol/m(2)/d. The lake air-water CO2 flux was negative in the post-drought, ranging between -16.4 and 0.9 mmol/m(2)/d. The average annual CO2 emission was estimated at 615.5×10(6) mol CO2/y during the drought period. These calculated emission rates are in the lower range for lakes, despite the potential for drought conditions that shift the lakes from sink to net source for atmospheric CO2. These observations have significant implications in the context of predicted increasing frequency and intensity of drought as a result of climate change. Further information on the spatial and temporal variability in CO2 flux from Australian lakes is urgently warranted to revise the global carbon budget for lakes.

  4. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  5. Time Series of CO2 Mixing Ratios, Delta-13C, and Delta-18O in Air in Pasadena, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S.; Stolper, E.

    2008-12-01

    Flask air samples have been collected mid-afternoon every 1-2 days since October 1998 on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, CA, located ~14 km northeast of Los Angeles. The samples were analyzed by manometry for CO2 mixing ratio and by dual inlet mass spectrometry for δ13C and δ18O. Preliminary time series analyses of all three parameters reveal periodicities at 1 and 0.5 year and 7 days. For comparison, time series of CO2 mixing ratios, δ13C, and δ18O for the Mauna Loa observatory only show periodicities of approximately 1 and 0.5 years (although the record for Mauna Loa cannot show a periodicity at 1 week given the sampling frequency). Seasonal plant growth patterns can explain the 0.5 and 1 year signals. The 7-day cycle in Pasadena could well be due to emissions from burning of fossil fuels, especially gasoline during the workweek. More detailed investigation of seasonal patterns in the Pasadena time series reveals that the seasonal variation amplitudes for δ13C and δ18O are twice as large for Pasadena air as for clean Hawaiian air, and the δ13C pattern is inverted in Pasadena relative to that at Mauna Loa. There is no well-defined seasonal variation in CO2 mixing ratio in Pasadena, in contrast to the well-known Mauna Loa pattern. The seasonal variations in Pasadena reflect the superposition of local contributions of CO2 in Pasadena on global temporal variations, as reflected at clean air sites such as Mauna Loa. The local contributions are significant: e.g., the total CO2 concentration in Pasadena is ~30 ppm higher than at Mauna Loa. The Pasadena pattern reflects burning of fossil fuels that introduces light CO2 into the atmosphere preferentially during the hot summer months when there is more demand for electricity for air conditioning. Thus, CO2 mixing ratios do not decrease during the summer in the urban Los Angeles basin, but rather, the local anthropogenic contribution overwhelms the seasonal pattern observed in clean air.

  6. Estimating cutting front temperature difference in disk and CO2 laser beam fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, L. D.; Tricarico, L.

    2012-07-01

    A three-dimensional, semi-stationary, simplified thermal numerical model was developed. The average cutting front temperature difference in disk and CO2 laser beam fusion cutting of 90MnCrV8 was estimated by computing the conductive power loss. Basing on heat affected zone extension experimentally measured and using an inverse methodology approach, the unknown thermal load on the cutting front during laser cutting was calculated. The accuracy of the numerical power loss estimation was evaluated comparing the results from simulation with the ones from analytical models. A good agreement was found for all the test cases considered in this study. The conduction losses estimation was used for justifying the lower quality of disk laser cuts due to the lower average cut front temperature. This results in the increase of viscosity of molten material and in the subsequent more difficult ejection of the melted material from the cut kerf.

  7. Indian Monsoon controlling the effect of anthropogenic emission on the seasonal variation of air-CO2 over Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, T.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    India is one of prime emitting country of green house gases identified by the International Energy Agency and the major contribution comes from energy sectors specifically from coal based power plants. Biomass burning is another source of CO2 for the tropical country and more frequencies of burning are observed during the dry seasons. Indian region experiences seasonal reversal of the wind pattern associated with monsoon circulations. The monsoon rainfall promotes green cover and uptake of CO2 from atmosphere. The study of atmospheric CO2 composition can provide important information on the temporal variability of anthropogenic emission as well as the biosphere response. In this context, urban locations being hot spots of anthropogenic emission are more suitable for air-CO2 monitoring. We are monitoring mixing ratio and carbon isotopic ratio (δ13C) of atmospheric CO2 for last three years from Bangalore (BLR), an urban station in Southern India. Region experiences four distinct seasons i.e. dry hot summer (March-May), southwest monsoon (SWM) (June-September), post monsoon (October-November) and winter (December-February). Air samples were collected from the campus of IISc, Bangalore (12° 58‧ N, 77° 38‧ E, masl= 920 m) using an experimental set up calibrated with respect to internationally accepted JRAS Reference material. The external precision for the measurement of mixing ratio and δ13C are ±2μmol.mol-1 and ±0.02‰ respectively based on repeat analysis of JRAS mixture. The seasonal variation of both CO2 mixing ratio and δ13C of air CO2 is observed from BLR station where the amplitude of signal is found to be lower in 2011 which was a La Nina year (compared to 2009, 2010). The δ13C of CO2 is maximum (-8‰) in October and it slowly decreases during dry summer months and reaches its minima (-9‰) in April, May. Subsequently, it increases slowly with the advancement of the SWM months prior to reaching maxima again during the month of October. During

  8. Synergistic effects of temperature extremes, hypoxia, and increases in CO2 on marine animals: From Earth history to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PöRtner, Hans O.; Langenbuch, Martina; Michaelidis, Basile

    2005-09-01

    Currently rising CO2 levels in atmosphere and marine surface waters as well as projected scenarios of CO2 disposal in the ocean emphasize that CO2 sensitivities need to be investigated in aquatic organisms, especially in animals which may well be the most sensitive. Moreover, to understand causes and effects, we need to identify the physiological processes that are sensitive to CO2 beyond the current emphasis on calcification. Few animals may be acutely sensitive to moderate CO2 increases, but subtle changes due to long-term exposure may already have started to be felt in a wide range of species. CO2 effects identified in invertebrate fauna from habitats characterized by oscillating CO2 levels include depressed metabolic rates and reduced ion exchange and protein synthesis rates. These result in shifts in metabolic equilibria and slowed growth. Long-term moderate hypercapnia has been observed to produce enhanced mortality with as yet unidentified cause and effect relationships. During future climate change, simultaneous shifts in temperature, CO2, and hypoxia levels will enhance sensitivity to environmental extremes relative to a change in just one of these variables. Some interactions between these variables result from joint effects on the same physiological mechanisms. Such interactions need to be considered in terms of future increases in atmospheric CO2 and its uptake by the ocean as well as in terms of currently proposed mitigation scenarios. These include purposeful injection of CO2 in the deep ocean or Fe fertilization of the surface ocean, which reduces subsurface O2 levels. The resulting ecosystem shifts could develop progressively, rather than beyond specific thresholds, such that effects parallel CO2 oscillations. It is unsure to what extent and how quickly species may adapt to permanently elevated CO2 levels by microevolutionary compensatory processes.

  9. Evidence for divergence of response in Indica, Japonica, and wild rice to high CO2 x temperature interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating variability of rice response to concurrent increases in CO2 and temperature forecasted for future climates is a prerequisite step towards characterizing the genetic architecture underlying this response. Expanding on previous single cultivar studies, we evaluated eleven biogeographically ...

  10. [Effects of drought stress, high temperature and elevated CO2 concentration on the growth of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Si, Fu-Yan; Qiao, Yun-Zhou; Jiang, Jing-Wei; Dong, Bao-Di; Shi, Chang-Hai; Liu, Meng-Yu

    2014-09-01

    The impacts of climate change on the grain yield, photosynthesis, and water conditions of winter wheat were assessed based on an experiment, in which wheat plants were subjected to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations, ambient and elevated temperatures, and low and high water conditions independently and in combination. The CO2 enrichment alone had no effect on the photosynthesis of winter wheat, whereas higher temperature and drought significantly decreased the photosynthetic rate. Water conditions in flag leaves were not significantly changed at the elevated CO2 concentration or elevated temperature. However, drought stress decreased the relative water content in flag leaves, and the combination of elevated temperature and drought reduced the water potential in flag leaves. The combination of elevated CO2 concentration, elevated temperature, and drought significantly reduced the photosynthetic rate and water conditions, and led to a 41.4% decrease in grain yield. The elevated CO2 concentration alone increased the grain yield by 21.2%, whereas the elevated temperature decreased the grain yield by 12.3%. The grain yield was not affected by the combination of elevated CO2 concentration and temperature, but the grain yield was significantly decreased by the drought stress if combined with any of the climate scenarios applied in this study. These findings suggested that maintaining high soil water content might be a vital means of reducing the potential harm caused by the climate change.

  11. Decadal trends in air-sea CO2 exchange in the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2016-05-01

    Highly productive Antarctic shelf systems, like the Ross Sea, play important roles in regional carbon budgets, but the drivers of local variations are poorly quantified. We assess the variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle using a regional physical-biogeochemical model. Regionally, total partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increases are largely controlled by the biological pump and broadly similar to those in the offshore Southern Ocean. However, this masks substantial local variability within the Ross Sea, where interannual fluctuations in total pCO2 are driven by the biological pump and alkalinity, whereas those for anthropogenic pCO2 are related to physical processes. Overall, the high degree of spatial variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle causes extremes in aragonite saturation that can be as large as long-term trends. Therefore, Antarctic shelf polynya systems like the Ross Sea will be strongly affected by local processes in addition to larger-scale phenomena.

  12. Flexible and High Performance Supercapacitors Based on NiCo2O4for Wide Temperature Range Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ram K.; Candler, John; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Ramasamy, Karthik; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Binder free nanostructured NiCo2O4 were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the phase purity of NiCo2O4. The surface morphology and microstructure of the NiCo2O4 analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed flower-like morphology composed of needle-like structures. The potential application of binder free NiCo2O4 as an electrode for supercapacitor devices was investigated using electrochemical methods. The cyclic voltammograms of NiCo2O4 electrode using alkaline aqueous electrolytes showed the presence of redox peaks suggesting pseudocapacitance behavior. Quasi-solid state supercapacitor device fabricated by sandwiching two NiCo2O4 electrodes and separating them by ion transporting layer. The performance of the device was tested using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The device showed excellent flexibility and cyclic stability. The temperature dependent charge storage capacity was measured for their variable temperature applications. Specific capacitance of the device was enhanced by ~150% on raising the temperature from 20 to 60 °C. Hence, the results suggest that NiCo2O4 grown under these conditions could be a suitable material for high performance supercapacitor devices that can be operated at variable temperatures. PMID:26482921

  13. A hierarchical three-dimensional NiCo2O4 nanowire array/carbon cloth as an air electrode for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Ming; Gao, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yin; Sun, Qian; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2013-10-14

    A 3D NiCo2O4 nanowire array/carbon cloth (NCONW/CC) was employed as the cathode for Li-air batteries with a non-aqueous electrolyte. After its discharge, novel porous ball-like Li2O2 was found to be deposited on the tip of NiCo2O4 nanowires. The special structure of Li2O2 and active sites of catalysts are also discussed.

  14. Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature in growth chambers or in the field

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Anna M.; Sack, Lawren; Bernacchi, Carl J.; Ort, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf hydraulic properties are strongly linked with transpiration and photosynthesis in many species. However, it is not known if gas exchange and hydraulics will have co-ordinated responses to climate change. The objective of this study was to investigate the responses of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) in Glycine max (soybean) to growth at elevated [CO2] and increased temperature compared with the responses of leaf gas exchange and leaf water status. Methods Two controlled-environment growth chamber experiments were conducted with soybean to measure Kleaf, stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (A) during growth at elevated [CO2] and temperature relative to ambient levels. These results were validated with field experiments on soybean grown under free-air elevated [CO2] (FACE) and canopy warming. Key results In chamber studies, Kleaf did not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2], even though stomatal conductance decreased and photosynthesis increased. Growth at elevated temperature also did not affect Kleaf, although gs and A showed significant but inconsistent decreases. The lack of response of Kleaf to growth at increased [CO2] and temperature in chamber-grown plants was confirmed with field-grown soybean at a FACE facility. Conclusions Leaf hydraulic and leaf gas exchange responses to these two climate change factors were not strongly linked in soybean, although gs responded to [CO2] and increased temperature as previously reported. This differential behaviour could lead to an imbalance between hydraulic supply and transpiration demand under extreme environmental conditions likely to become more common as global climate continues to change. PMID:23864003

  15. Development of a Next-Generation Membrane-Integrated Adsorption Processor for CO2 Removal and Compression for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila; LeVan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    The current CO2 removal technology of NASA is very energy intensive and contains many non-optimized subsystems. This paper discusses the concept of a next-generation, membrane integrated, adsorption processor for CO2 removal nd compression in closed-loop air revitalization systems. This processor will use many times less power than NASA's current CO2 removal technology and will be capable of maintaining a lower CO2 concentration in the cabin than that can be achieved by the existing CO2 removal systems. The compact, consolidated, configuration of gas dryer, CO2 separator, and CO2 compressor will allow continuous recycling of humid air in the cabin and supply of compressed CO2 to the reduction unit for oxygen recovery. The device has potential application to the International Space Station and future, long duration, transit, and planetary missions.

  16. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions. PMID:27600710

  17. Air-sea CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance in a coastal station in Baja California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, L.; Ocampo-Torres, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of wave-associated parameters controlling turbulent CO2 fluxes through the air-sea water interface is evaluated in a coastal region. The study area, located within the Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México, was found to be a weak sink of CO2 with a mean flux of -1.32 µmol m-2s-1. The low correlation found between flux and wind speed (r = 0.09), suggests that the influence of other forcing mechanisms, besides wind, is important for gas transfer modulation through the sea surface, at least for the conditions found in this study. In addition, the results suggest that for short periods where an intensification of the wave conditions occurs, a CO2 flux response increases the transport of gas to the ocean.

  18. Amphiphilic graft copolymers with ethyl cellulose backbone: Synthesis, self-assembly and tunable temperature-CO2 response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weizhong; Zou, Hui; Shen, Jin

    2016-01-20

    Amphiphilic ethyl cellulose-graft-poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (EC-g-PDMAEMA) and ethyl cellulose-graft-poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate-co-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (EC-g-P(MEO2MA-co-DMAEMA)) graft copolymers were easily synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The micelles self-assembled from the copolymer presented switchable temperature-CO2 dually responsive properties. The value of lower critical solution temperature (LCST) for the copolymer micelle solutions could be adjusted by CO2/Ar. Moreover, due to the alteration of the ratio of DMAEMA to MEO2MA, the LCST values of the micelle solutions decreased with the increase of MEO2MA in copolymer. The temperature-CO2 dually responsive properties of the copolymer were reversible and could be accomplished through altering the temperature and bubbling CO2/Ar. The hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of the copolymer micelles was also influenced by the ratio of DMAEMA to MEO2MA and the stimuli of temperature and CO2/Ar. As a drug release system, the copolymer micelles could achieve the control release of doxorubicin (DOX) by changing the temperature and alternatively bubbling CO2/Ar.

  19. Sterilization of ginseng using a high pressure CO2 at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Fariba; Annabi, Nasim; Titus, Mamata; Valtchev, Peter; Tumilar, Aldric

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using high pressure CO2 for sterilization of Ginseng powder, as an alternative method to conventional techniques such as gamma-irradiation and ethylene oxide. The Ginseng sample used in this study was originally contaminated with fungi and 5 x 10(7) bacteria/g that was not suitable for oral use. This is the first time that high pressure CO2 has been used for the sterilization of herbal medicine to decrease the total aerobic microbial count (TAMC) and fungi. The effect of the process duration, operating pressure, temperature, and amount of additives on the sterilization efficiency of high pressure CO2 were investigated. The process duration was varied over 15 h; the pressure between 100 and 200 bar and the temperature between 25 and 75 degrees C. A 2.67-log reduction of bacteria in the Ginseng sample was achieved after long treatment time of 15 h at 60 degrees C and 100 bar, when using neat carbon dioxide. However, the addition of a small quantity of water/ethanol/H2O2 mixture, as low as 0.02 mL of each additive/g Ginseng powder, was sufficient for complete inactivation of fungi within 6 h at 60 degrees C and 100 bar. At these conditions the bacterial count was decreased from 5 x 10(7) to 2.0 x 10(3) TAMC/g complying with the TGA standard for orally ingested products. A 4.3 log reduction in bacteria was achieved at 150 bar and 30 degrees C, decreasing the TAMC in Ginseng sample to 2,000, below the allowable limit. However, fungi still remained in the sample. The complete inactivation of both bacteria and fungi was achieved within 2 h at 30 degrees C and 170 bar using 0.1 mL of each additive/g Ginseng. Microbial inactivation at this low temperature opens an avenue for the sterilization of many thermally labile pharmaceutical and food products that may involve sensitive compounds to gamma-radiation and chemically reactive antiseptic agents.

  20. The effect of CO2 at low temperature and pressure on solutions supersaturated with silica in the presence of limestone and dolomite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.; Patten, L.E.

    1962-01-01

    The effect of 1 atm of CO2 over initially neutral solutions supersaturated with silica, at room temperature, as contrasted with 1 atm of air was determined over a period of 5 months, together with changes brought about by the introduction of calcite and dolomite to these solutions in the form of either chips or finely ground powder. In the absence of CO2 all solutions quickly reached equilibrium and no silica precipitated. In the presence of CO2 approximately two-thirds of the silica precipitated as silica gel within the first 2 months; the amount of silica precipitated was not affected by the presence of limestone or dolomite. Silica gel precipitated as a fine powder in the presence of finely ground calcite and dolomite, but as a cloudy gelatinous mass in the presence of coarse chips of dolomite and calcite, and in the absence of either calcite or dolomite. Preferential leaching of calcium from dolomite took place, both in the presence of air and in the presence of CO2, but was more pronounced in the presence of air. There was no evidence of physical replacement of either limestone or dolomite by precipitated silica. ?? 1962.

  1. Inspection of non-CO2 greenhouse gases from emission sources and in ambient air by Fourier-transform-infrared-spectrometry: Measurements with FTIS-MAPS.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, K; Haus, R; Heland, J

    1994-05-01

    Infrared spectrometry is a versatile basis to analyse greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. A multicomponent air pollution software (MAPS) was developed for retrieval of gas concentrations from radiation emission as well as absorption measurements. Concentrations of CO, CH4, N2O, and H2O as well as CO2, NO, NO2, NH3, SO2, HCl, HCHO, and the temperature of warm gases are determined on-line. The analyses of greenhouse gases in gaseous emission sources and in ambient air are performed by a mobile remote sensing system using the double-pendulum interferometer K300 of the Munich company Kayser-Threde. Passive radiation measurements are performed to retrieve CO, N2O, and H2O as well as CO2, NO, SO2, and HCl concentrations in smoke stack effluents of thermal power plants and municipal incinerators and CO and H2O as well as CO2 and NO in exhausts of aircraft engines. Open-path radiation measurements are used to determine greenhouse gas concentrations at different ambient air conditions and greenhouse gas emission rates of diffusive sources as garbage deposits, open coal mining, stock farming together with additional compounds (e.g. NH3), and from road traffic together with HCHO. Some results of measurements are shown. A future task is the verification of emission cadastres by these inspection measurements.

  2. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films: dependence on Pt thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiufeng; Dai, Zhiwen; Huang, Lin; Lu, Guangduo; Liu, Min; Piao, Hongguang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yu, Seong-cho; Pan, Liqing

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature and the Pt layer thickness dependence of the magnetoresistances (MRs) in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films. Based on the field dependent measurements, it can be seen that the spin-current-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) plays the dominant role in the MRs in the Co2FeSi/Pt bilayers in the whole temperature range. Meanwhile, a quite small part of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) existed in the MRs. It proved to be originated from magnetic proximity effect (MPE) by measuring the Pt thickness and temperature dependence of the AMR. Moreover, the Co2FeSi layer thickness has much weaker effect on the SMR and AMR compared to the Pt layer thickness. These results indicate that the Co2FeSi/Pt interface is beneficial to be used in the spin-current-induced physical phenomena.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and CO2 concentration employing diode laser absorption near 2.0 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingdong; Gao, Guangzhen; Wang, Minrui; Wang, Guishi; Liu, Ying; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and CO2 concentration in combustion gases using an extended-wavelength diode laser sensor at 2.0 μm are reported. A CO2 transition pair located near 5,006.140 and 5,010.725 cm-1 is selected based on existing line-selection criteria. The gas temperature and CO2 concentration are inferred from the peak heights of the 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f signals. Some important factors (modulation depth, total pressure, and species concentration) influencing the performance of the sensor are discussed. Validation experiments performed in a heated static cell indicated that the sensor has accuracies of 1.21 and 2.98 % for temperature and CO2 concentration measurement. The demonstration in combustion gases produced by a burner illustrates the potential of the 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f sensor for combustion diagnosis.

  4. Fast and reversible direct CO2 capture from air onto all-polymer nanofibrillated cellulose-polyethylenimine foams.

    PubMed

    Sehaqui, Houssine; Gálvez, María Elena; Becatinni, Viola; cheng Ng, Yi; Steinfeld, Aldo; Zimmermann, Tanja; Tingaut, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Fully polymeric and biobased CO2 sorbents composed of oxidized nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and a high molar mass polyethylenimine (PEI) have been prepared via a freeze-drying process. This resulted in NFC/PEI foams displaying a sheet structure with porosity above 97% and specific surface area in the range 2.7-8.3 m(2)·g(-1). Systematic studies on the impact of both PEI content and relative humidity on the CO2 capture capacity of the amine functionalized sorbents have been conducted under atmospheric conditions (moist air with ∼400 ppm of CO2). At 80% RH and an optimum PEI content of 44 wt %, a CO2 capacity of 2.22 mmol·g(-1), a stability over five cycles, and an exceptionally low adsorption half time of 10.6 min were achieved. In the 20-80% RH range studied, the increase in relative humidity increased CO2 capacity of NFC/PEI foams at the expense of a high H2O uptake in the range 3.8-28 mmol·g(-1).

  5. Temperature response of photosynthesis and internal conductance to CO2: results from two independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Warren, C R; Dreyer, E

    2006-01-01

    The internal conductance to CO(2) transfer from intercellular spaces to chloroplasts poses a major limitation to photosynthesis, but few studies have investigated its temperature response. The aim of this study was to determine the temperature response of photosynthesis and internal conductance between 10 degrees C and 35 degrees C in seedlings of a deciduous forest tree species, Quercus canariensis. Internal conductance was estimated via simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence ("variable J method"). Two of the required parameters, the intercellular photocompensation point (C(i)*) and rate of mitochondrial respiration in the light (R(d)), were estimated by the Laisk method. These were used to calculate the chloroplastic photocompensation point (Gamma*) in a simultaneous equation with g(i). An independent estimate of internal conductance was obtained by a novel curve-fitting method based on the curvature of the initial Rubisco-limited portion of an A/C(i) curve. The temperature responses of the rate of Rubisco carboxylation (V(cmax)) and the RuBP limited rate of electron transport (J(max)) were determined from chloroplastic CO(2) concentrations. The rate of net photosynthesis peaked at 24 degrees C. C(i)* was similar to reports for other species with a C(i)* of 39 micromol mol(-1) at 25 degrees C and an activation energy of 34 kJ mol(-1). Gamma* was very similar to the published temperature response for Spinacia oleracea from 20 degrees C to 35 degrees C, but was slightly greater at 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C. J(max) peaked at 30 degrees C, whereas V(cmax) did not reach a maximum between 10 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Activation energies were 49 kJ mol(-1) for V(cmax) and 100 kJ mol(-1) for J(max). Both methods showed that internal conductance doubled from 10 degrees C to 20 degrees C, and then was nearly temperature-independent from 20 degrees C to 35 degrees C. Hence, the temperature response of internal conductance could not be

  6. High-Pressure Measurements of Temperature and CO2 Concentration Using Tunable Diode Lasers at 2 μm.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tingdong; Gao, Guangzhen; Wang, Minrui; Wang, Guishi; Liu, Ying; Gao, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    A sensor for simultaneous measurements of temperature and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration at elevated pressure is developed using tunable diode lasers at 2 µm. Based on some selection rules, a CO2 line pair at 5006.140 and 5010.725 cm(-1) is selected for the TDL sensor. In order to ensure the accuracy and rapidity of the sensor, a quasi-fixed-wavelength WMS is employed. Normalization of the 2f signal with the 1f signal magnitude is used to remove the need for calibration and correct for transmission variation due to beam steering, mechanical misalignments, soot, and windows fouling. Temperatures are obtained from comparison of the background-subtracted 1f-normalized WMS-2f signals ratio and a 1f-normalized WMS-2f peak values ratio model. CO2 concentration is inferred from the 1f-normalized WMS-2f peak values of the CO2 transition at 5006.140 cm(-1). Measurements of temperature and CO2 concentration are carried out in static cell experiments (P = 1-10 atm, T = 500-1200 K) to validate the accuracy and ability of the sensor. The results show that accuracy of the sensor for temperature and CO2 concentration are 1.66% temperature and 3.1%, respectively. All the measurements show the potential utility of the sensor for combustion diagnose at elevated pressure. PMID:26798080

  7. Culture characteristics of the atmospheric and room temperature plasma-mutated Spirulina platensis mutants in CO2 aeration culture system for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyee; Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Li, He-Ping; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-10-01

    For biomass production of Spirulina platensis as feedstock of fermentation, the culture characteristics of three typical mutants of 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 generated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) mutagenesis were systematically studied by using CO2 aeration culture system and compared with the wild strain. The specific growth rate of wild strain in the pure air aeration culture system exhibited a 76.2% increase compared with static culture, while the specific growth rates of the 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system were increased by 114.4%, 95.9% and 88.2% compared with their static cultures. Compared with static culture, the carbohydrate contents of wild strain, 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system dropped plainly by 51.0%, 79.3%, 85.5% and 26.1%. Increase of CO2 concentration enhanced carbohydrate content and productivity. Based on the carbohydrate productivity, the optimal inlet of CO2 concentration in aeration culture was determined to be 12% (v/v). Under this condition, 3-B2 exhibited the highest carbohydrate content (30.7%), CO2 fixation rate (0.120gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) and higher growth rate (0.093 g L(-1)·d(-1)), while 3-A10 showed the highest growth rate (0.118 g L(-1)·d(-1)) and higher CO2 fixation rate (0.117gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) but low carbohydrate content (24.5%), and 4-B3 showed the highest chlorophyll (Chl) content (3.82 mg·g(-1)). The most outstanding mutant by static culture in terms of growth rate and carbohydrate productivity (3-B2), was also demonstrated by CO2 aeration culture system. This study revealed that the ARTP mutagenesis could generate the S. platensis mutants suitable for CO2 aeration culture aiming at biomass production. PMID:25795571

  8. Culture characteristics of the atmospheric and room temperature plasma-mutated Spirulina platensis mutants in CO2 aeration culture system for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyee; Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Li, He-Ping; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-10-01

    For biomass production of Spirulina platensis as feedstock of fermentation, the culture characteristics of three typical mutants of 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 generated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) mutagenesis were systematically studied by using CO2 aeration culture system and compared with the wild strain. The specific growth rate of wild strain in the pure air aeration culture system exhibited a 76.2% increase compared with static culture, while the specific growth rates of the 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system were increased by 114.4%, 95.9% and 88.2% compared with their static cultures. Compared with static culture, the carbohydrate contents of wild strain, 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system dropped plainly by 51.0%, 79.3%, 85.5% and 26.1%. Increase of CO2 concentration enhanced carbohydrate content and productivity. Based on the carbohydrate productivity, the optimal inlet of CO2 concentration in aeration culture was determined to be 12% (v/v). Under this condition, 3-B2 exhibited the highest carbohydrate content (30.7%), CO2 fixation rate (0.120gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) and higher growth rate (0.093 g L(-1)·d(-1)), while 3-A10 showed the highest growth rate (0.118 g L(-1)·d(-1)) and higher CO2 fixation rate (0.117gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) but low carbohydrate content (24.5%), and 4-B3 showed the highest chlorophyll (Chl) content (3.82 mg·g(-1)). The most outstanding mutant by static culture in terms of growth rate and carbohydrate productivity (3-B2), was also demonstrated by CO2 aeration culture system. This study revealed that the ARTP mutagenesis could generate the S. platensis mutants suitable for CO2 aeration culture aiming at biomass production.

  9. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on two phylogeographically distinct clones of common reed (Phragmites australis)

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Achenbach, Luciana; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aboveground growth, physiological and biochemical parameters of two clones of the cosmopolitan wetland grass Phragmites australis, grown at four treatment combinations of temperature and CO2, were investigated to elucidate whether their climate response differed due to inherent differences in their ecological adaptation. The two phylogeographically distinct P. australis clones (DK clone, European genetic background; ALG clone, Mediterranean genetic background) were grown for 151 days in phytotrons at 19/12 °C (day/night temperature) and 390 ppm CO2, and at elevated temperature (+5 °C) and CO2 (700 ppm) with treatment factors alone or in combination. The ALG clone had 2–4 times higher aboveground biomass, higher light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Pmax), maximum electron transport rates (ETRmax) and Rubisco activity, and higher photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency than the DK clone. The DK clone, however, produced more shoots, leaves and side-shoots, and had 9–51 % higher specific leaf area and 15–39 % higher leaf nitrogen concentration than the ALG clone. Although elevated atmospheric CO2 alone barely affected the aboveground growth of the two P. australis clones, simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2 stimulated growth and aboveground biomass. Overall, elevated CO2 stimulated photosynthesis, but the clones responded differently to a concomitant increase in CO2 and temperature, depending on the phylogeographic background of the plant. The DK clone showed overall stronger responses, and can be considered the more plastic of the two clones with respect to CO2 and temperature. Thus, the DK clone may be better adapted to climate change than the ALG clone, at least in the short term.

  10. Spatial and temporal variability of CO2 fluxes at the sediment-air interface in a tidal flat of a temperate lagoon (Arcachon Bay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Ouisse, Vincent; Boucher, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the spatial and temporal variability of benthic metabolism in a temperate mesotidal lagoon. This was achieved by measuring fluxes of CO2 in static chambers during emersion, both under light and dark conditions. Three sample sites were selected according to their tidal level (upper or mid), their sediment type (sand or mud) and the presence/absence of the seagrass Zostera noltei. The three sites were investigated at three seasons (end of winter, spring and beginning of autumn). At each site and each season, three benthic chambers were used simultaneously in successive incubations over the emersion period. The sediment chlorophyll-a content varied seasonally in the upper sands (reaching 283 mg.m- 2 in spring) but not in the mid muds (averaging 142 mg m- 2 in bare muds and 186 mg m- 2 in muds covered by seagrass). The maximum sediment CO2-uptake under light was 9.89 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid-bare muds, in early autumn. The maximum sediment CO2-release under darkness was 6.97 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid muds covered by seagrass, in spring. Both CO2-fluxes measured in the light and in the dark increased over periods of emersion. This increase, not related to light nor temperature variations, could be explained by changes in the amount and chemistry of pore water during the air exposure of sediments. The benthic trophic state index, based on the maximum light CO2-flux versus maximum dark CO2-flux ratio, assigned to each site at each season indicated that the sediments were net autotrophic in spring in upper sands and in mid muds covered by seagrass and highly autotrophic in other cases. The most autotrophic sediments were the mid-level bare muds whatever the season. The relevance of this index is discussed compared to carbon annual budget.

  11. Finite temperature path integral Monte Carlo simulations of structural and dynamical properties of Ar(N)-CO2 clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lecheng; Xie, Daiqian

    2012-08-21

    We report finite temperature quantum mechanical simulations of structural and dynamical properties of Ar(N)-CO(2) clusters using a path integral Monte Carlo algorithm. The simulations are based on a newly developed analytical Ar-CO(2) interaction potential obtained by fitting ab initio results to an anisotropic two-dimensional Morse/Long-range function. The calculated distributions of argon atoms around the CO(2) molecule in Ar(N)-CO(2) clusters with different sizes are consistent to the previous studies of the configurations of the clusters. A first-order perturbation theory is used to quantitatively predict the CO(2) vibrational frequency shift in different clusters. The first-solvation shell is completed at N = 17. Interestingly, our simulations for larger Ar(N)-CO(2) clusters showed several different structures of the argon shell around the doped CO(2) molecule. The observed two distinct peaks (2338.8 and 2344.5 cm(-1)) in the υ(3) band of CO(2) may be due to the different arrangements of argon atoms around the dopant molecule.

  12. Genotypes of Brassica rapa respond differently to plant-induced variation in air CO2 concentration in growth chambers with standard and enhanced venting.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christine E; Haselhorst, Monia S H; McKnite, Autumn M; Ewers, Brent E; Williams, David G; Weinig, Cynthia

    2009-10-01

    Growth chambers allow measurement of phenotypic differences among genotypes under controlled environment conditions. However, unintended variation in growth chamber air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) may affect the expression of diverse phenotypic traits, and genotypes may differ in their response to variation in [CO2]. We monitored [CO2] and quantified phenotypic responses of 22 Brassica rapa genotypes in growth chambers with either standard or enhanced venting. [CO2] in chambers with standard venting dropped to 280 micromol mol(-1) during the period of maximum canopy development, approximately 80 micromol mol(-1) lower than in chambers with enhanced venting. The stable carbon isotope ratio of CO2 in chamber air (delta13C(air)) was negatively correlated with [CO2], suggesting that photosynthesis caused observed [CO2] decreases. Significant genotype x chamber-venting interactions were detected for 12 of 20 traits, likely due to differences in the extent to which [CO2] changed in relation to genotypes' phenology or differential sensitivity of genotypes to low [CO2]. One trait, 13C discrimination (delta13C), was particularly influenced by unaccounted-for fluctuations in delta13C(air) and [CO2]. Observed responses to [CO2] suggest that genetic variance components estimated in poorly vented growth chambers may be influenced by the expression of genes involved in CO2 stress responses; genotypic values estimated in these chambers may likewise be misleading such that some mapped quantitative trait loci may regulate responses to CO2 stress rather than a response to the environmental factor of interest. These results underscore the importance of monitoring, and where possible, controlling [CO2].

  13. Source and meteorological influences on air quality (CO, CH4 & CO2) at a Southern Hemisphere urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, R. R.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Kubistin, D.; Caldow, C.; Fisher, J. A.; Deutscher, N. M.; Kettlewell, G.; Riggenbach, M.; Macatangay, R.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.

    2016-02-01

    Wollongong, Australia is an urban site at the intersection of anthropogenic, biomass burning, biogenic and marine sources of atmospheric trace gases. The location offers a valuable opportunity to study drivers of atmospheric composition in the Southern Hemisphere. Here, a record of surface carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) was measured with an in situ Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser between April 2011 and August 2014. Clean air was found to arrive at Wollongong in approximately 10% of air masses. Biomass burning influence was evident in the average annual cycle of clean air CO during austral spring. A significant negative short-term trend was found in clean air CO (-1.5 nmol mol-1 a-1), driven by a reduction in northern Australian biomass burning. Significant short-term positive trends in clean air CH4 (5.4 nmol mol-1 a-1) and CO2 (1.9 μmol mol-1 a-1) were consistent with the long-term global average trends. Polluted Wollongong air was investigated using wind-direction/wind-speed clustering, which revealed major influence from local urban and industrial sources from the south. High values of CH4, with anthropogenic ΔCH4/ΔCO2 enhancement ratio signatures, originated from the northwest, in the direction of local coal mining. A pollution climatology was developed for the region using back trajectory analysis and ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Ozone production environments in austral spring and summer were associated with anticyclonic meteorology on the east coast of Australia, while ozone depletion environments in autumn and winter were associated with continental transport, or fast moving trajectories from southern latitudes. This implies the need to consider meteorological conditions when developing policies for controlling air quality.

  14. Photodissociation in the atmosphere of Mars - Impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Allen, M.; Nair, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements, reported by Lewis and Carver (1983), on calculations of photodissociation rate coefficients in the Martian atmosphere. We find that the adoption of 50 A intervals for the purpose of computational efficiency results in errors in the calculated values for photodissociation of CO2, H2O, and O2 which are generally not above 10 percent, but as large as 20 percent in some instances. These are acceptably small errors, especially considering the uncertainties introduced by the large temperature dependence of the CO2 cross section. The inclusion of temperature-dependent CO2 cross sections is shown to lead to a decrease in the diurnally averaged rate of CO2 photodissociation as large as 33 percent at some altitudes, and increases of as much as 950 percent and 80 percent in the photodissociation rate coefficients of H2O and O2, respectively. The actual magnitude of the changes depends on the assumptions used to model the CO2 absorption spectrum at temperatures lower than the available measurements, and at wavelengths longward of 1970 A.

  15. "Supergreen" Renewables: Integration of Mineral Weathering Into Renewable Energy Production for Air CO2 Removal and Storage as Ocean Alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. H.; Carroll, S.; Ren, Z. J.

    2015-12-01

    Excess planetary CO2 and accompanying ocean acidification are naturally mitigated on geologic time scales via mineral weathering. Here, CO2 acidifies the hydrosphere, which then slowly reacts with silicate and carbonate minerals to produce dissolved bicarbonates that are ultimately delivered to the ocean. This alkalinity not only provides long-term sequestration of the excess atmospheric carbon, but it also chemically counters the effects of ocean acidification by stabilizing or raising pH and carbonate saturation state, thus helping rebalance ocean chemistry and preserving marine ecosystems. Recent research has demonstrated ways of greatly accelerating this process by its integration into energy systems. Specifically, it has been shown (1) that some 80% of the CO2 in a waste gas stream can be spontaneously converted to stable, seawater mineral bicarbonate in the presence of a common carbonate mineral - limestone. This can allow removal of CO2 from biomass combustion and bio-energy production while generating beneficial ocean alkalinity, providing a potentially cheaper and more environmentally friendly negative-CO2-emissions alternative to BECCS. It has also been demonstrated that strong acids anodically produced in a standard saline water electrolysis cell in the formation of H2 can be reacted with carbonate or silicate minerals to generate strong base solutions. These solutions are highly absorptive of air CO2, converting it to mineral bicarbonate in solution. When such electrochemical cells are powered by non-fossil energy (e.g. electricity from wind, solar, tidal, biomass, geothermal, etc. energy sources), the system generates H2 that is strongly CO2-emissions-negative, while producing beneficial marine alkalinity (2-4). The preceding systems therefore point the way toward renewable energy production that, when tightly coupled to geochemical mitigation of CO2 and formation of natural ocean "antacids", forms a high capacity, negative-CO2-emissions, "supergreen

  16. High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, JS; Mok, MM; Cowan, MG; McDanel, WM; Carlisle, TK; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-12-24

    We have developed and fabricated thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with an active layer consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid/polymerized (room-temperature ionic liquid) [i.e., (RTIL)/poly(RTIL)] composite material. The resulting membrane has a CO2 permeance of 6100 +/- 400 GPU (where 1 GPU = 10(-6) cm(3)/(cm(2) s cmHg)) and an ideal CO2/N-2 selectivity of 22 +/- 2. This represents a new membrane with state-of-the-art CO2 permeance and good CO2/N-2 selectivity. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a TFC gas separation membrane composed of an RTIL-containing active layer.

  17. Combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 concentration on Cd and Zn accumulation dynamics in Triticum aestivum L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoheng; Li, Yu; Lu, Hong; Wang, Shigong

    2016-09-01

    A simulated climate warming experiment was conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 concentration on the bioaccumulation, translocation and subcellular distributions of Cd and Zn in wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Xihan 1.) at Dingxi, Gansu Province, China. The objective was to find evidence that global climate change is affecting the bioaccumulation of Cd and Zn in T. aestivum L. cv. Xihan 1. The results showed that compared to control A, elevated temperature and CO2 increased Cd bioaccumulation in the shoots by 1.4-2.5 times, and increased that in the roots by 1.2-1.5 times, but decreased Zn levels in wheat shoots by 1.4-2.0 times, while decreased that in the roots by 1.6-1.9 times. Moreover, temperature and CO2 concentration increase also led to increased Cd concentration, and decreased Zn concentration in subcellular compartments of wheat seedlings. The largest Cd concentration increase (174.4%) was observed in the cell wall and debris fractions of shoots after they were subjected to the highest CO2 and temperature treatment (TC3). The largest Zn concentration decrease (53.1%) was observed in the soluble (F3) fractions of shoots after they were subjected to the medium CO2 and temperature treatment (TC2). The temperature and CO2 increase had no significant effect on the proportional distribution of Cd and Zn in the subcellular fractions. The root-to-shoot translocation of Cd increased with the increasing temperature and CO2 concentration. However, the Zn distributions only fluctuated within a small range.

  18. Combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 concentration on Cd and Zn accumulation dynamics in Triticum aestivum L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoheng; Li, Yu; Lu, Hong; Wang, Shigong

    2016-09-01

    A simulated climate warming experiment was conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 concentration on the bioaccumulation, translocation and subcellular distributions of Cd and Zn in wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Xihan 1.) at Dingxi, Gansu Province, China. The objective was to find evidence that global climate change is affecting the bioaccumulation of Cd and Zn in T. aestivum L. cv. Xihan 1. The results showed that compared to control A, elevated temperature and CO2 increased Cd bioaccumulation in the shoots by 1.4-2.5 times, and increased that in the roots by 1.2-1.5 times, but decreased Zn levels in wheat shoots by 1.4-2.0 times, while decreased that in the roots by 1.6-1.9 times. Moreover, temperature and CO2 concentration increase also led to increased Cd concentration, and decreased Zn concentration in subcellular compartments of wheat seedlings. The largest Cd concentration increase (174.4%) was observed in the cell wall and debris fractions of shoots after they were subjected to the highest CO2 and temperature treatment (TC3). The largest Zn concentration decrease (53.1%) was observed in the soluble (F3) fractions of shoots after they were subjected to the medium CO2 and temperature treatment (TC2). The temperature and CO2 increase had no significant effect on the proportional distribution of Cd and Zn in the subcellular fractions. The root-to-shoot translocation of Cd increased with the increasing temperature and CO2 concentration. However, the Zn distributions only fluctuated within a small range. PMID:27593278

  19. Synergism between elevated pCO2 and temperature on the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torstensson, A.; Hedblom, M.; Andersson, J.; Andersson, M. X.; Wulff, A.

    2013-04-01

    Polar oceans are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and warming. Diatoms play a significant role in sea ice biogeochemistry and provide an important food source to grazers in ice-covered oceans, especially during early spring. However, the ecophysiology of ice living organisms has received little attention in terms of ocean acidification. In this study, the synergism between temperature and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) was investigated in relationship to the optimal growth temperature of the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. Diatoms were kept in cultures at controlled levels of pCO2 (∼390 and ∼960 μatm}) and temperature (-1.8 and 2.5 °C) for 14 days. Synergism between temperature and pCO2 was detected in growth rate and acyl lipid fatty acid content. Carbon enrichment only promoted (3%) growth rate closer to the optimal growth, but not at the control temperature (-1.8 °C). Optimal growth rate was observed around 5 °C in a separate experiment. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) comprised up to 98% of the total acyl lipid fatty acid pool at -1.8 °C. However, the total content of fatty acids was reduced by 39% at elevated pCO2, but only at the control temperature. PUFAs were reduced by 30% at high pCO2. Effects of carbon enrichment may be different depending on ocean warming scenario or season, e.g. reduced food quality for higher trophic levels during spring. Synergy between temperature and pCO2 may be particularly important in polar areas since a narrow thermal window generally limits cold-water organisms.

  20. 78 FR 13497 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Deferral for CO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permitting requirements to biogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2... talley.david@epa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On September 7, 2012 (77 FR 55171), EPA... (77 FR 68721). II. Summary of SIP Revision EPA incorporated the biomass deferral into the Code...

  1. 77 FR 65627 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Deferral for CO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permitting requirements to biogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2... this document, whenever ``we,'' ``us,'' or ``our'' is used, we mean EPA. On April 18, 2012, (77 FR... provisions on May 13, 2011 (76 FR 27898). In addition to the incorporation of the Biomass Deferral, the...

  2. CO2 Fixation, Lipid Production, and Power Generation by a Novel Air-Lift-Type Microbial Carbon Capture Cell System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Liu, Baojun; Zhou, Jiti; Jin, Ruofei; Qiao, Sen; Liu, Guangfei

    2015-09-01

    An air-lift-type microbial carbon capture cell (ALMCC) was constructed for the first time by using an air-lift-type photobioreactor as the cathode chamber. The performance of ALMCC in fixing high concentration of CO2, producing energy (power and biodiesel), and removing COD together with nutrients was investigated and compared with the traditional microbial carbon capture cell (MCC) and air-lift-type photobioreactor (ALP). The ALMCC system produced a maximum power density of 972.5 mW·m(-3) and removed 86.69% of COD, 70.52% of ammonium nitrogen, and 69.24% of phosphorus, which indicate that ALMCC performed better than MCC in terms of power generation and wastewater treatment efficiency. Besides, ALMCC demonstrated 9.98- and 1.88-fold increases over ALP and MCC in the CO2 fixation rate, respectively. Similarly, the ALMCC significantly presented a higher lipid productivity compared to those control reactors. More importantly, the preliminary analysis of energy balance suggested that the net energy of the ALMCC system was significantly superior to other systems and could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption. In this work, the established ALMCC system simultaneously achieved the high level of CO2 fixation, energy recycle, and municipal wastewater treatment effectively and efficiently.

  3. Effect of water and temperature on absorption of CO2 by amine-functionalized anion-tethered ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Brett F; de la Fuente, Juan C; Gurkan, Burcu E; Lopez, Zulema K; Price, Erica A; Huang, Yong; Brennecke, Joan F

    2011-07-28

    Amine-functionalized anion-tethered ionic liquids (ILs) trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium asparaginate [P(66614)][Asn], glutaminate [P(66614)][Gln], lysinate [P(66614)][Lys], methioninate [P(66614)][Met], prolinate [P(66614)][Pro], taurinate [P(66614)][Tau], and threoninate [P(66614)][Thr] were synthesized and investigated as potential absorbents for CO(2) capture from postcombustion flue gas. Their physical properties, including density, viscosity, glass transition temperature, and thermal decomposition temperature were determined. Furthermore, the CO(2) absorption isotherms of [P(66614)][Lys], [P(66614)][Tau], [P(66614)][Pro], and [P(66614)][Met] were measured using a volumetric method, and the results were modeled with two different Langmuir-type absorption models. The most important result of this study is that the viscosity of [P(66614)][Pro] only increased by a factor of 2 when fully complexed with 1 bar of CO(2) at room temperature. This is in stark contrast to the other chemically reacted ILs investigated here and all other amino acid-based ILs reported in the literature, which dramatically increase in viscosity, typically by 2 orders of magnitude, when complexed with CO(2). The unique behavior of [P(66614)][Pro] is likely due to its ring structure, which limits the number and availability of hydrogen atoms that can participate in a hydrogen bonding network. We found that water can be used to further reduce the viscosity of the CO(2)-complexed IL, while only slightly decreasing the CO(2) capacity. Finally, from temperature-dependent isotherms, we estimate a heat of absorption of -63 kJ/mol of CO(2) for the 1:1 reaction of CO(2) with [P(66614)][Pro], when we use the two-reaction model.

  4. “Large Animal Model of Pumpless Arteriovenous Extracorporeal CO2 Removal Using Room Air Via Subclavian Vessels”

    PubMed Central

    Witer, Lucas; Howard, Ryan; Trahanas, John; Bryner, Benjamin S.; Alghanem, Fares; Hoffman, Hayley R.; Cornell, Marie S.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    End-stage lung disease (ESLD) causes progressive hypercapnia, dyspnea, and impacts quality of life. Many extracorporeal support (ECS) configurations for CO2 removal resolve symptoms but limit ambulation. An ovine model of pumpless ECS using subclavian vessels was developed to allow for ambulatory support. Vascular grafts were anastomosed to the left subclavian vessels in four healthy sheep. A low-resistance membrane oxygenator was attached in an arteriovenous (AV) configuration. Device function was evaluated in each animal while awake and spontaneously breathing, and while mechanically ventilated with hypercapnia induced. Sweep gas (FiO2=0.21) to the device was increased from 0-15 L/min and arterial and post-device blood gases, as well as post-device air, were sampled. Hemodynamics remained stable with average AV shunt flows of 1.34±0.14 L/min.. In awake animals, CO2 removal was 3.4±1.0 mL/kg/min at maximum sweep gas flow. Respiratory rate decreased from 60±25 at baseline to 30±11 breaths per minute. In animals with induced hypercapnia, PaCO2 increased to 73.9±15.1. At maximum sweep gas flow, CO2 removal was 3.4±0.4 mL/kg/min and PaCO2 decreased to 49.1±6.7 mmHg. Subclavian AV access is effective in lowering PaCO2 and respiratory rate, and is potentially an effective ambulatory destination therapy for ESLD patients. PMID:26461241

  5. Carbon budgets for three autotrophic Australian estuaries: Implications for global estimates of the coastal air-water CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-03-01

    Estuaries are `hot spots' in the global carbon cycle, yet data on carbon dynamics, in particular air-sea CO2 fluxes, from autotrophic systems are rare. Estuarine carbon budgets were constructed for three geomorphically distinct warm temperate Australian estuaries over an annual cycle. All three estuaries were net autotrophic, with annual net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) ranging from 8 ± 13.4 molC m-2 yr-1 to 10 ± 14 molC m-2 yr-1. There was a net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the estuaries of between 0.4 ± 0.6 molC m-2 yr-1 and 2 ± 0.9 molC m-2 yr-1. Loading of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the estuaries varied markedly within and between the estuaries, and was directly related to freshwater inflow. While NEM was similar in all three estuaries, the ratio of benthic versus pelagic contributions to NEM differed, with NEM dominated by pelagic production in the river dominated system, benthic production dominating in the intermediate estuary, and equal contributions of benthic and pelagic production in the marine dominated lagoon. All three estuaries exported more organic carbon than was imported, fueled by additional organic carbon supplied by NEM. The estuaries essentially acted as bioreactors, transforming DIC to organic carbon. Burial of organic carbon ranged from 1.2 ± 0.3 molC m-2 yr-1 to 4.4 ± 1.2 molC m-2 yr-1 and represented up to half of NEM. The annual net uptake of atmospheric CO2 in these systems, along with previous estimates of the global estuarine CO2flux being based predominantly on heterotrophic, large river dominated estuarine systems, indicates that the global estimate of the estuarine air-water CO2flux may be over-estimated due to the lack of studies from autotrophic marine dominated estuaries.

  6. Sudden cold temperature regulates the time-lag between plant CO2 uptake and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, M.; Cieraad, E.; Zakharova, A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    Since substrates for respiration are supplied mainly by recent photo-assimilates, there is a strong but time-lagged link between short-term above- and belowground carbon (C) cycling. However, regulation of this coupling by environmental variables is poorly understood. Whereas recent studies focussed on the effect of drought and shading on the link between above and belowground short-term C cycling, the effect of temperature remains unclear. We used a 13CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment to investigate the effect of a sudden temperature change from 25 °C to 10 °C on the short-term coupling between assimilatory C uptake and respiratory loss. The study was done in the laboratory using two month old perennial rye-grass plants (temperature (10 °C) reduced the short-term coupling between shoot and roots by delaying belowground transfer of recent assimilates and its subsequent respiratory use, as indicated by the δ13C signal of root respiration (δ13CRR). That is, the time-lag from the actual shoot labelling to the first appearance of the label in 13CRR was about 1.5 times longer under cold temperature (time-lags of 1 h and 1.5 h in the warm and cold treatments, respectively). Moreover, analysis of bulk shoot and root material revealed that plants at cold temperature invest relatively more carbon into respiration compared to growth or storage. These results increase our understanding of environmental controls on the link between short-term above- and belowground C cycling.

  7. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  8. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  9. Monitoring Gaseous CO2 and Ethanol above Champagne Glasses: Flute versus Coupe, and the Role of Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  10. High-temperature measurements of VUV-absorption cross sections of CO2 and their application to exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Fray, N.; Bénilan, Y.; Gazeau, M.-C.; Hébrard, E.; Larcher, G.; Schwell, M.; Dobrijevic, M.; Selsis, F.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Ultraviolet (UV) absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Aims: Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We also investigate the influence of these new data on the photochemistry of some exoplanets. Methods: We performed these measurements with synchrotron radiation as a tunable VUV light source for the 115-200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195-230 nm range, we used a deuterium lamp and a 1.5 m Jobin-Yvon spectrometer and we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We implemented the measured cross section into a 1D photochemical model. Results: For λ > 170 nm, the wavelength dependence of ln(σCO2(λ,T) × 1/(Qv(T))) can be parametrized with a linear law. Thus, we can interpolate σCO2(λ,T) at any temperature between 300 and 800 K. Within the studied range of temperature, the CO2 cross section can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. This, in particular, makes the absorption of CO2 significant up to wavelengths as high as 230 nm, while it is negligible above 200 nm at 300 K. Conclusions: The absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm. The model predicts that accounting for this temperature dependency of CO2 cross section can affect the computed abundances of NH3, CO2, and CO by one order of magnitude in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter and hot

  11. Heliotropic leaf movements in common beans controlled by air temperature.

    PubMed

    Fu, Q A; Ehleringer, J R

    1989-11-01

    Heliotropic leaf movements were examined in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris cv Blue Lake Bush) under outdoor and laboratory conditions. Heliotropic leaf movements in well-watered plants were partly controlled by temperature, and appeared to be independent of atmospheric humidity and CO(2) concentration. When environmental conditions were held constant in the laboratory, increased air temperature caused bean leaves to orient more obliquely to a light source. Ambient CO(2), intercellular CO(2), and net photosynthesis were not correlated with the temperature-induced changes in heliotropic movements, nor did they significantly affect these movements directly. The effect of air temperature on leaf movements need not be mediated through a change in leaf water potential, transpiration, or leaf conductance. Air temperature modified laminar orientation in light through its effect on tissue temperature in the pulvinal region, not that of the lamina or petiole. However, under darkness the temperature effects on leaf movements were not expressed. Active heliotropic movements in response to air temperature allowed lamina temperature to remain close to the thermal optimum of photosynthesis. This temperature effect underlies a commonly observed pattern of leaf movements under well-watered conditions: a tendency for leaves to face the sun more obliquely on hot days than cool days. PMID:16667127

  12. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 with high temperature.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yongtao; Zhao, Feng; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation of the Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 combined with high temperature (HPCD+HT) and to analyze the clumping effect of the spores on their HPCD+HT resistance. The spores of B. subtilis were subjected to heat at 0.1 MPa and HPCD at 6.5-25 MPa, and 82 °C, 86 °C, and 91 °C for 0-120 min. The spores were effectively inactivated by HPCD+HT, but a protective effect on the spores was also found, which was closely correlated to the pressure, temperature and time. The spores treated by HPCD+HT at 6.5 and 10 MPa exhibited a two-stage inactivation curve of shoulder and log-linear regions whereas the spores at 15-25 MPa exhibited a three-stage inactivation curve of shoulder, log-linear and tailing regions, and these curves were well fitted to the Geeraerd model. Approximately 90% of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA) was released after HPCD+HT and the 90% DPA release time depend on the pressure and temperature. Moreover, the spore clumping in suspensions was examined by dynamic light scattering. The particle size of the spore suspensions increased with the increase of pressure, temperature and time, indicating the spore clumping. 0.1% Tween 80 as a surfactant inhibited the spore clumping and increased the inactivation ratio of the spores by HPCD+HT. These results indicated that the spore clumping enhanced the spores' resistance to HPCD+HT and induced a protective effect.

  13. Mean Ages of Stratospheric Air Derived From in Situ Observations of CO2, CH4, and N2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, A. E.; Boering, K. A.; Daube, B. C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Loewenstein, M.; Jost, H.; Podolske, J. R.; Webster, C. R.; Herman, R. L.; Scott, D. C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Accurate mean ages for stratospheric air have been derived from a spatially and temporally comprehensive set of in situ observations of CO2, CH4, and N2O obtained from 1992 to 1998 from the NASA ER-2 aircraft and balloon flights. Errors associated with the tropospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and interannual variations in the CO2 growth rate are less than 0.5 year throughout the stratosphere and less than 0.3 year for air older than 2 years (N2O less than 275 ppbv), indicating that the age spectra are broad enough to attenuate these influences over the time period covered by these observations. The distribution of mean age with latitude and altitude provides detailed, quantitative information about the general circulation of the stratosphere. At 20 km, sharp meridional gradients in the mean age are observed across the subtropics. Between 20 and 30 km, the average difference in mean age between the tropics and midlatitudes is approximately 2 years, with slightly smaller differences at higher and lower altitudes. The mean age in the midlatitude middle stratosphere (approx. 25-32 km) is relatively constant with respect to altitude at 5 plus or minus 0.5 years. Comparison with earlier balloon observations of CO2 dating back to the 1970s indicates that the mean age of air in this region has remained within 11 year of its current value over the last 25 years. A climatology of mean age is derived from the observed compact relationship between mean age and N2O. These characteristics of the distribution of mean age in the stratosphere will serve as critically needed diagnostics for models of stratospheric transport.

  14. Paleobotanical Evidence for Coupling of Temperature and pCO2 during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. Y.; Greenwood, D. R.; Basinger, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) was the warmest period of the Cenozoic, indicated by multiple proxy mean annual temperature estimates for sea and land surface. However, estimates of pCO2 from geochemical, modeling, and paleontological proxies show a wide range of values, from near modern day levels to an order of magnitude greater. Resolving the pCO2 record for this time period, and correlating it with trends in temperature, is a key task in understanding the interaction of climate and pCO2 in globally warm periods. Here we present a fine scale study of trends in temperature and pCO2 based on paleobotanical data from an early Eocene site from the Okanagan Highlands of British Columbia, Canada. Plant macrofossils were collected using an unbiased census approach from three informal units, allowing for quantitative comparison of trends within the site. Temperature estimates derived from multiple paleobotanical techniques (physiognomic and floristic approaches) suggest microthermal (MAT <13°C) but equable (CMMT >0°C) conditions for this upland site, and show a trend in declining MAT over time reflected in the three units. At the same time, stomatal frequency of Ginkgo suggests that pCO2 was high (>2x modern values), but also declining over time. These results suggest that temperature and pCO2 were coupled during this globally warm period, and that fine scale trends on the order of 103 - 104 years can be tracked within fossil sites to provide a window on climate/pCO2 interactions.

  15. Simultaneous and time-resolved temperature and relative CO2-N2 and O2-CO2-N2 concentration measurements with pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering for pressures as great as 5 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Martin; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2005-09-10

    Pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering (CARS) measurements have been performed in binary CO2-N2 and ternary CO2-O2-N2 mixtures in a temperature range between 300 and 773 K and pressures from 0.1 to 5 MPa to prove its potential for simultaneous single-shot thermometry and multispecies concentration measurements. In pressurized systems the CO2 component has a strong spectral influence on the pure rotational CARS spectra. Because of this dominance, pure rotational CARS proves to be a sensitive tool to measure in high-pressure combustion systems and the relative CO2-N2 concentration in the lower temperature range simultaneously with the temperature and the relative O2-N2 concentration. The evaluation of the spectra utilized a least-sum-squared differences fit of the spectral shape, weighted either constantly or inversely with respect to the normalized signal intensity. The results of the simultaneous temperature and relative CO2-N2 and O2-CO2-N2 concentration measurements provided a good accuracy and precision both in temperature and in concentrations. Because of the strong increase in the relative spectral contribution of CO2 with rising pressure, the precision of the CO2 concentration determination is in general significantly improved toward higher pressures, thus also clearly enhancing the CO2 detectability. The influence of temperature, O2 and CO2 concentration, pressure, and the evaluation techniques employed on both the accuracy and the precision is explained as well as their cross dependencies. The influence and limitations of the approximations used to model the CO2 molecule are discussed.

  16. CO2 air-sea fluxes across the Portuguese estuaries Tagus and Sado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, G.; Nogueira, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally, estuaries and proximal shelves under the direct influence of river runoff and large inputs of organic matter are mostly heterotrophic and, therefore, act as a carbon source. In this context the CO2 dynamics in Tagus and Sado estuaries (SW Portugal) was studied under two different climate and hydrological situations. These moderately productive mesotidal coastal-plain lagoon-type estuaries, localised in the center of Portugal and distant 30-40 km apart, present quite different freshwater inflows, surface areas and water residence times. A study performed in 2001 revealed that the magnitude of CO2 fluxes in the two estuarine systems varied seasonally. CO2 emissions during the huge rainfall winter were similar in both estuaries, reaching a mean value of ~50 mmol m-2 d-1, while in spring emissions from Sado were ~6 times higher then Tagus ones, attaining a mean value of 62 mmol m-2 d-1. Nevertheless, in both sampling periods, Sado estuary showed, within the upper estuary (salinity

  17. Study on the effect of temperature and pressure on nickel-electroplating characteristics in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Kim, Jae-Youn; Kim, Chul Kyung; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2005-01-01

    In this work, it was investigated the effect of solubility in supercritical CO2 on the nickel-electroplating characteristics. The plating characteristics could be controlled by electric resistance and dispersion in emulsion as well. CO2 concentration had better be controlled at lower concentration than 50 CO2 wt% to decrease electric resistance since supercritical CO2 is non-polar material. Non-ionic surfactant with EO/PO block copolymer was more efficient than any other surfactant and the dispersion at 0.2 surfactant wt% was better than at any surfactant concentration and over-added surfactant concentration over 0.2 wt% brought to the decrease of dispersion properties. Electric resistance was constant at 20Omega in ranging from pH 2.2 to pH 3.5 and increased slowly to 50Omega at pH 4 and rapidly to 400Omega at pH 5. Characteristics of nickel film has a close relation with solubility in supercritical CO2 and solubility is dependent on pressure and temperature. Solubility at 16 MPa was higher than that any other at pressure and at constant pressure of 16 MPa, solubility in supercritical CO2 increased with an increasing temperature from 31 to 45 degrees C and decreased over 45 degrees C.

  18. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  19. Interactions of CO2, temperature and management practices: simulations with a modified version of CERES-Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubiello, F. N.; Rosenzweig, C.; Volk, T.

    1995-01-01

    A new growth subroutine was developed for CERES-Wheat, a computer model of wheat (Triticum aestivum) growth and development. The new subroutine simulates canopy photosynthetic response to CO2 concentrations and light levels, and includes the effects of temperature on canopy light-use efficiency. Its performance was compared to the original CERES-Wheat V-2 10 in 30 different cases. Biomass and yield predictions of the two models were well correlated (correlation coefficient r > 0.95). As an application, summer growth of spring wheat was simulated at one site. Modeled crop responses to higher mean temperatures, different amounts of minimum and maximum warming, and doubled CO2 concentrations were compared to observations. The importance of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization in modulating the wheat crop climatic responses were also analyzed. Specifically, in agreement with observations, rainfed crops were found to be more sensitive to CO2 increases than irrigated ones. On the other hand, low nitrogen applications depressed the ability of the wheat crop to respond positively to CO2 increases. In general, the positive effects of high CO2 on grain yield were found to be almost completely counterbalanced by the negative effects of high temperatures. Depending on how temperature minima and maxima were increased, yield changes averaged across management practices ranged from -4% to 8%.

  20. High temperatures and high pressures Brillouin scattering studies of liquid H(2)O+CO(2) mixtures.

    PubMed

    Qin, Junfeng; Li, Min; Li, Jun; Chen, Rongyan; Duan, Zhenhao; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Fangfei; Cui, Qiliang

    2010-10-21

    The Brillouin scattering spectroscopy studies have been conducted in a diamond anvil cell for a liquid mixtures composed of 95 mol % H(2)O and 5 mol % CO(2) under high temperatures and pressures. The sound velocity, refractive index, density, and adiabatic bulk modulus of the H(2)O+CO(2) mixtures were determined under pressures up to the freezing point at 293, 453, and 575 K. It is found from the experiment that sound velocities of the liquid mixture are substantially lower than those of pure water at 575 K, but not at lower temperatures. We presented an empirical relation of the density in terms of pressure and temperature. Our results show that liquid H(2)O+CO(2) mixtures are more compressible than water obtained from an existing equation of state of at 453 and 575 K. PMID:20969409

  1. Diversity in neotropical wet forests during the Cenozoic is linked more to atmospheric CO2 than temperature.

    PubMed

    Royer, Dana L; Chernoff, Barry

    2013-08-01

    Models generally predict a response in species richness to climate, but strong climate-diversity associations are seldom observed in long-term (more than 10(6) years) fossil records. Moreover, fossil studies rarely distinguish between the effects of atmospheric CO2 and temperature, which limits their ability to identify the causal controls on biodiversity. Plants are excellent organisms for testing climate-diversity hypotheses owing to their strong sensitivity to CO2, temperature and moisture. We find that pollen morphospecies richness in an angiosperm-dominated record from the Palaeogene and early Neogene (65-20 Ma) of Colombia and Venezuela correlates positively to CO2 much more strongly than to temperature (both tropical sea surface temperatures and estimates of global mean surface temperature). The weaker sensitivity to temperature may be due to reduced variance in long-term climate relative to in higher latitudes, or to the occurrence of lethal or sub-lethal temperatures during the warmest times of the Eocene. Physiological models predict that productivity should be the most sensitive to CO2 within the angiosperms, a prediction supported by our analyses if productivity is linked to species richness; however, evaluations of non-angiosperm assemblages are needed to more completely test this idea.

  2. Diversity in neotropical wet forests during the Cenozoic is linked more to atmospheric CO2 than temperature

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Dana L.; Chernoff, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Models generally predict a response in species richness to climate, but strong climate-diversity associations are seldom observed in long-term (more than 106 years) fossil records. Moreover, fossil studies rarely distinguish between the effects of atmospheric CO2 and temperature, which limits their ability to identify the causal controls on biodiversity. Plants are excellent organisms for testing climate-diversity hypotheses owing to their strong sensitivity to CO2, temperature and moisture. We find that pollen morphospecies richness in an angiosperm-dominated record from the Palaeogene and early Neogene (65–20 Ma) of Colombia and Venezuela correlates positively to CO2 much more strongly than to temperature (both tropical sea surface temperatures and estimates of global mean surface temperature). The weaker sensitivity to temperature may be due to reduced variance in long-term climate relative to in higher latitudes, or to the occurrence of lethal or sub-lethal temperatures during the warmest times of the Eocene. Physiological models predict that productivity should be the most sensitive to CO2 within the angiosperms, a prediction supported by our analyses if productivity is linked to species richness; however, evaluations of non-angiosperm assemblages are needed to more completely test this idea. PMID:23760866

  3. Diversity in neotropical wet forests during the Cenozoic is linked more to atmospheric CO2 than temperature.

    PubMed

    Royer, Dana L; Chernoff, Barry

    2013-08-01

    Models generally predict a response in species richness to climate, but strong climate-diversity associations are seldom observed in long-term (more than 10(6) years) fossil records. Moreover, fossil studies rarely distinguish between the effects of atmospheric CO2 and temperature, which limits their ability to identify the causal controls on biodiversity. Plants are excellent organisms for testing climate-diversity hypotheses owing to their strong sensitivity to CO2, temperature and moisture. We find that pollen morphospecies richness in an angiosperm-dominated record from the Palaeogene and early Neogene (65-20 Ma) of Colombia and Venezuela correlates positively to CO2 much more strongly than to temperature (both tropical sea surface temperatures and estimates of global mean surface temperature). The weaker sensitivity to temperature may be due to reduced variance in long-term climate relative to in higher latitudes, or to the occurrence of lethal or sub-lethal temperatures during the warmest times of the Eocene. Physiological models predict that productivity should be the most sensitive to CO2 within the angiosperms, a prediction supported by our analyses if productivity is linked to species richness; however, evaluations of non-angiosperm assemblages are needed to more completely test this idea. PMID:23760866

  4. Experimental multi-phase H2O-CO2 brine interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    The burning of fossil fuel and other anthropogenic activities have caused a continuous and dramatic 30% increase of atmospheric CO2 over the past 150 yr. CO2 sequestration is increasingly being viewed as a tool for managing these anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. CO2-saturated brine-rock experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration in mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were generally consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions were occurring on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  5. Physiological and genetic control mechanisms for plant adaptation to high temperature and elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, Eduardo

    2001-02-01

    Acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2 were characterized. Stomata from the model plant used, Vicia faba, are very sensitive to ambient CO2 when grown in growth chambers as compared to stomata from green house grown leaves. The different CO2 sensitivities of growth chamber and green house grown guard cells was confirmed by reciprocal transfer experiments. Stomata acclimated to their new environment and acquired the CO2 sensitivity typical of that environment. A mechanism for CO2 sensing was also characterized. Results show that CO2 concentration alters the concentration of zeaxanthin in the guard cell chloroplast, thus modifying the light response of the guard cells. This mechanism accounts for the well characterized interactions of light and CO2 in the stomatal responses. The xanthophyll cycle in the stomata of the facultative CAM plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, was characterized. In the C3 mode, zeaxanthin is formed in the light and stomata open. Upon induction of the CAM mode, zeaxanthin synthesis is blocked and stomata no longer respond to light. These results implicate the regulation of the xanthophyll cycle of guard cells in the CAM adaptation.

  6. Dural reconstruction by fascia using a temperature-controlled CO2 laser soldering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forer, Boaz; Vasilyev, Tamar; Brosh, Tamar; Kariv, Naam; Gil, Ziv; Fliss, Dan M.; Katzir, Abraham

    2005-04-01

    Conventional methods for dura repair are normally based on sutures or stitches. These methods have several disadvantages: (1) The dura is often brittle, and the standard procedures are difficult and time consuming. (2) The seal is leaky. (3) The introduction of a foreign body (e.g. sutures) may cause an inflammatory response. In order to overcome these difficulties we used a temperature controlled fiber optic based CO2 laser soldering system. In a set of in vitro experiments we generated a hole of diameter 10 mm in the dura of a pig corpse, covered the hole with a segment of fascia, and soldered the fascia to the edges of the hole, using 47% bovine albumin as a solder. The soldering was carried out spot by spot, and each spot was heated to 65° C for 3-6 seconds. The soldered dura was removed and the burst pressure of the soldered patch was measured. The average value for microscopic muscular side soldering was 194 mm Hg. This is much higher than the maximal physiological pressure of the CSF fluid in the brain, which is 15 mm Hg. In a set of in vivo experiments, fascia patches were soldered on holes in five farm pigs. The long term results of these experiments were very promising. In conclusion, we have developed an advanced technique for dural reconstruction, which will find important clinical applications.

  7. Drought responses of two gymnosperm species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies under elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Duan, Honglang; O'Grady, Anthony P; Duursma, Remko A; Choat, Brendan; Huang, Guomin; Smith, Renee A; Jiang, Yanan; Tissue, David T

    2015-07-01

    Future climate regimes characterized by rising [CO2], rising temperatures and associated droughts may differentially affect tree growth and physiology. However, the interactive effects of these three factors are complex because elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature may generate differential physiological responses during drought. To date, the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature on drought-induced tree mortality remain poorly understood in gymnosperm species that differ in stomatal regulation strategies. Water relations and carbon dynamics were examined in two species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies: Pinus radiata D. Don (relatively isohydric gymnosperm; regulating stomata to maintain leaf water potential above critical thresholds) and Callitris rhomboidea R. Br (relatively anisohydric gymnosperm; allowing leaf water potential to decline as the soil dries), to assess response to drought as a function of [CO2] and temperature. Both species were grown in two [CO2] (C(a) (ambient, 400 μl l(-1)) and C(e) (elevated, 640 μl l(-1))) and two temperature (T(a) (ambient) and T(e) (ambient +4 °C)) treatments in a sun-lit glasshouse under well-watered conditions. Drought plants were then exposed to a progressive drought until mortality. Prior to mortality, extensive xylem cavitation occurred in both species, but significant depletion of non-structural carbohydrates was not observed in either species. Te resulted in faster mortality in P. radiata, but it did not modify the time-to-mortality in C. rhomboidea. C(e) did not delay the time-to-mortality in either species under drought or T(e) treatments. In summary, elevated temperature (+4 °C) had greater influence than elevated [CO2] (+240 μl l(-1)) on drought responses of the two studied gymnosperm species, while stomatal regulation strategies did not generally affect the relative contributions of hydraulic failure and carbohydrate depletion to mortality under severe drought. PMID

  8. Drought responses of two gymnosperm species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies under elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Duan, Honglang; O'Grady, Anthony P; Duursma, Remko A; Choat, Brendan; Huang, Guomin; Smith, Renee A; Jiang, Yanan; Tissue, David T

    2015-07-01

    Future climate regimes characterized by rising [CO2], rising temperatures and associated droughts may differentially affect tree growth and physiology. However, the interactive effects of these three factors are complex because elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature may generate differential physiological responses during drought. To date, the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature on drought-induced tree mortality remain poorly understood in gymnosperm species that differ in stomatal regulation strategies. Water relations and carbon dynamics were examined in two species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies: Pinus radiata D. Don (relatively isohydric gymnosperm; regulating stomata to maintain leaf water potential above critical thresholds) and Callitris rhomboidea R. Br (relatively anisohydric gymnosperm; allowing leaf water potential to decline as the soil dries), to assess response to drought as a function of [CO2] and temperature. Both species were grown in two [CO2] (C(a) (ambient, 400 μl l(-1)) and C(e) (elevated, 640 μl l(-1))) and two temperature (T(a) (ambient) and T(e) (ambient +4 °C)) treatments in a sun-lit glasshouse under well-watered conditions. Drought plants were then exposed to a progressive drought until mortality. Prior to mortality, extensive xylem cavitation occurred in both species, but significant depletion of non-structural carbohydrates was not observed in either species. Te resulted in faster mortality in P. radiata, but it did not modify the time-to-mortality in C. rhomboidea. C(e) did not delay the time-to-mortality in either species under drought or T(e) treatments. In summary, elevated temperature (+4 °C) had greater influence than elevated [CO2] (+240 μl l(-1)) on drought responses of the two studied gymnosperm species, while stomatal regulation strategies did not generally affect the relative contributions of hydraulic failure and carbohydrate depletion to mortality under severe drought.

  9. Are microbial N transformation rates in a permanent grassland soil after 17 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 sensitive to soil temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Clough, Tim; Braker, Gesche; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations (17 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. These changes are responsible for a doubling of annual N2O emissions under elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) caused by increased emissions during the plant growing season. The goal of this lab study was to understand how soil temperature influences the long-term effects of eCO2 and plant carbon input on microbial N transformations in the Giessen FACE. Therefore, a pulse labelling study with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out with incubated soil samples from elevated and ambient CO2 FACE rings in climate chambers at two different temperatures (10°C and 19°C), while water filled pore space of the samples was adjusted to the same level. The various N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, soil organic matter), N2O emissions and simultaneous gross N transformation rates were quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, 15NO2- and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization, temperature and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland soil. While the soil respiration after labelling was significantly increased at 19°C compared to 10°C, N2O emissions showed no significant differences. There were also no significant differences of N2O emissions between soil samples from control and elevated CO2 rings within each temperature level. As the soil temperature (within the range of 10-19°C) had no significant effects on N transformations responsible for the observed doubling of N2O emissions under eCO2, it seems most likely that other factors like direct carbon input by plants and/or soil moisture differences between ambient and elevated rings in the field are responsible for the observed increase in N2O emissions under eCO2.

  10. Are microbial N transformation rates in a permanent grassland soil after 17 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 sensitive to soil temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Clough, Tim; Braker, Gesche; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations (17 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. These changes are responsible for a doubling of annual N2O emissions under elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) caused by increased emissions during the plant growing season. The goal of this lab study was to understand how soil temperature influences the long-term effects of eCO2 and plant carbon input on microbial N transformations in the Giessen FACE. Therefore, a pulse labelling study with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3‑ was carried out with incubated soil samples from elevated and ambient CO2 FACE rings in climate chambers at two different temperatures (10°C and 19°C), while water filled pore space of the samples was adjusted to the same level. The various N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3‑, NO2‑, soil organic matter), N2O emissions and simultaneous gross N transformation rates were quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of 15NH4+, 15NO3‑, 15NO2‑ and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization, temperature and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland soil. While the soil respiration after labelling was significantly increased at 19°C compared to 10°C, N2O emissions showed no significant differences. There were also no significant differences of N2O emissions between soil samples from control and elevated CO2 rings within each temperature level. As the soil temperature (within the range of 10-19°C) had no significant effects on N transformations responsible for the observed doubling of N2O emissions under eCO2, it seems most likely that other factors like direct carbon input by plants and/or soil moisture differences between ambient and elevated rings in the field are responsible for the observed increase in N2O emissions under eCO2.

  11. Temperature versus plant effects on diel dynamics of soil CO2 production and efflux: a controlled environment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinthaler, David; Roy, Jacques; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clement; Resco de Dios, Victor; Bahn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is the biggest source of CO2 emitted from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Therefore the understanding of its drivers is of major importance for models of carbon cycling. Next to temperature as a major abiotic factor, photosynthesis has been suggested as an important driver influencing diel patterns in Rs. Under natural conditions it is difficult to disentangle abiotic and biotic effects on soil CO2 production, as fluctuating light intensity affects both photosynthetic activity and soil temperature. To analyse individual and combined effects of soil temperature and light on the dynamics of soil CO2 production and efflux, we performed a controlled environment study at the ECOTRON facility in Montpellier. The study manipulated temperature and photosynthetically active radiation independently and was carried out in large macrocosms, hosting canopies of either a woody (cotton) or a herbaceous (bean) crop. In each macrocosm membrane tubes had been installed across the soil profile for continuous measurement of soil CO2 concentrations. In addition, an automated soil respiration system was installed in each macrocosm, whose data were also used for validating a model of soil CO2 production and transport based on the concentration profiles. Both for cotton and for bean canopies, under conditions of naturally fluctuating temperature and light conditions, soil CO2 production and efflux followed a clear diel pattern. Under constantly dark conditions (excluding immediate effects of photosynthesis) and constant temperature, no significant diel changes in Rs could be observed. Furthermore, soil CO2 production and efflux did not increase significantly upon exposure of previously darkened macrocosms to light. Under constant temperature and fluctuating light conditions, we observed a dampened diel pattern of Rs, which did not match diurnal solar cycles. A detailed residual analysis accounting for temporal trends in soil moisture suggested a significant

  12. Growth temperature dependent structural and magnetic properties of epitaxial Co2FeAl Heusler alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shuang; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui

    2013-06-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a series of Co2FeAl Heusler alloy films grown on GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied. The epitaxial Co2FeAl films with an ordered L21 structure have been successfully obtained at growth temperature of 433 K, with an in-plane cubic magnetic anisotropy superimposed with an unusual uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With increasing growth temperature, the ordered L21 structure degrades. Meanwhile, the uniaxial anisotropy decreases and eventually disappears above 673 K. The interfacial bonding between As and Co or Fe atom is suggested to be responsible for the additional uniaxial anisotropy.

  13. Inactivation of bacteria and spores by pulse electric field and high pressure CO2 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Spilimbergo, Sara; Dehghani, Fariba; Bertucco, Alberto; Foster, Neil R

    2003-04-01

    The common methods for inactivation of bacteria involve heating or exposure to toxic chemicals. These methods are not suitable for heat-sensitive materials, food, and pharmaceutical products. Recently, a complete inactivation of many microorganisms was achieved with high-pressure carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and in the absence of organic solvent and irradiation. The inactivation of spores with CO(2) required long residence time and high temperatures, such as 60 degrees C. In this study the synergistic effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) in combination with high-pressure CO(2) for inactivation was investigated. The bacteria Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus were suspended in glycerol solution and treated in the first step with PEF (up to 25 KV/cm) and then with high-pressure CO(2) not higher than 40 degrees C and 200 bar. The inactivation efficiency was determined by counting the colony formation units of control and sample. Samples of the cells subjected to PEF treatment alone and in combination with CO(2) treatment were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of the processes on the cell wall. Experimental results indicate that the viability decreased with increasing electrical field strength and number of pulses. A further batch treatment with supercritical CO(2) lead to complete inactivation of bacterial species and decreased the count of the spores by at least three orders of magnitude, the inactivation being enhanced by an increase of contact time between CO(2) and the sample. A synergistic effect between the pulsed electric field and the high-pressure CO(2) was evident in all the species treated. The new low temperature process is an alternative for pasteurization of thermally labile compounds such as protein and plasma and minimizes denaturation of important nutrient compounds in the liquid media.

  14. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO2 and Heat Removal/Rejection in a Martian PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Bower, Chad; Straub-Lopez, Kathrine; Anderson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber; Paul, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    Two of the fundamental problems facing the development of a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use on Mars, are (i) heat rejection (because traditional technologies use sublimation of water, which wastes a scarce resource and contaminates the premises), and (ii) rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) in an environment with a CO2 partial pressure (ppCO2) of 0.4-0.9 kPa. Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed to address both these challenges. The technology utilizes an adsorbent that when cooled with liquid CO2 to near sublimation temperatures (195K) removes metabolically-produced CO2 in the ventilation loop. Once fully loaded, the adsorbent is then warmed externally by the ventilation loop (300K), rejecting the captured CO2 to Mars ambient. Two beds are used to provide a continuous cycle of CO2 removal/rejection as well as facilitate heat exchange out of the ventilation loop. Any cryogenic fluid can be used in the application; however, since CO2 is readily available on Mars and can be easily produced and stored on the Martian surface, the solution is rather elegant and less complicated when employing liquid CO2. As some metabolic heat will need to be rejected anyway, finding a practical use for metabolic heat is also an overall benefit to the PLSS. To investigate the feasibility of the technology, a series of experiments were conducted which lead to the selection and partial characterization of an appropriate adsorbent. The Molsiv Adsorbents 13X 8x12 (also known as NaX zeolite) successfully removed CO2 from a simulated ventilation loop at the prescribed temperature swing anticipated during PLSS operating conditions on Mars using a cryogenic fluid. Thermal conductivity of the adsorbent was also measured to eventually aid in a demonstrator design of the technology. These results provide no show stoppers to the development of MTSA technology and allow its development to focus on other design

  15. Co-location of air capture, sub-ocean CO2 storage and energy production on the Kerguelen plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, D.; Han, P.; Lackner, K.; Wang, T.

    2011-12-01

    How can carbon capture and storage activities be sustained from an energy perspective while keeping the entire activity out of sight and away from material risk and social refrain near populated areas? In light of reducing the atmospheric CO2 level to mitigate its effect on climate change, the combination of new air-capture technologies and large offshore storage reservoirs, supplemented by carbon neutral renewable energy, could address both of these engineering and public policy concerns. Because CO2 mixes rapidly in the atmosphere, air capture scrubbers could be located anywhere in the world. Although the power requirements for this technology may reduce net efficiencies, the local availability of carbon-neutral renewable energy for this purpose would eliminate some net energy loss. Certain locations where wind speeds are high and steady, such as those observed at high latitude and across the open ocean, appeal as carbon-neutral energy sources in close proximity to immense and secure reservoirs for geological sequestration of captured CO2. In particular, sub-ocean basalt flows are vast and carry minimal risks of leakage and damages compared to on-land sites. Such implementation of a localized renewable energy source coupled with carbon capture and storage infrastructure could result in a global impact of lowered CO2 levels. We consider an extreme location on the Kerguelen plateau in the southern Indian Ocean, where high wind speeds and basalt storage reservoirs are both plentiful. Though endowed with these advantages, this mid-ocean location incurs clear material and economic challenges due to its remoteness and technological challenges for CO2 capture due to constant high humidity. We study the wind energy-air capture power balance and consider related factors in the feasibility of this location for carbon capture and storage. Other remote oceanic sites where steady winds blow and near large geological reservoirs may be viable as well, although all would require

  16. CO2 Extraction from Ambient Air Using Alkali-Metal Hydroxide Solutions Derived from Concrete Waste and Steel Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolaroff, J. K.; Lowry, G. V.; Keith, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    To mitigate global climate change, deep reductions in CO2 emissions are required in the coming decades. Carbon sequestration will play a crucial role in this reduction. Early adoption of carbon sequestration in low-cost niche markets will help develop the technology and experience required for large-scale deployment. One such niche may be the use of alkali metals from industrial waste streams to form carbonate minerals, a safe and stable means of sequestering carbon. In this research, the potential of using two industrial waste streams---concrete and steel slag---for sequestering carbon is assessed. The scheme is outlined as follows: Ca and Mg are leached with water from a finely ground bed of steel slag or concrete. The resulting solution is sprayed through air, capturing CO2 and forming solid carbonates, and collected. The feasibility of this scheme is explored with a combination of experiments, theoretical calculations, cost accounting, and literature review. The dissolution kinetics of steel slag and concrete as a function of particle size and pH is examined. In stirred batch reactors, the majority of Ca which dissolved did so within the first hour, yielding between 50 and 250 (mg; Ca)/(g; slag) and between 10 and 30 (mg; Ca)/(g; concrete). The kinetics of dissolution are thus taken to be sufficiently fast to support the type of scheme described above. As proof-of-concept, further experiments were performed where water was dripped slowly through a stagnant column of slag or concrete and collected at the bottom. Leachate Ca concentrations in the range of 15 mM were achieved --- sufficient to support the scheme. Using basic physical principles and numerical methods, the quantity of CO2 captured by falling droplets is estimated. Proportion of water loss and required pumping energy is similarly estimated. The results indicate that sprays are capable of capturing CO2 from the air and that the water and energy requirements are tractable. An example system for

  17. Experimental multi-phase CO2-brine-rock interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.J.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    Long-term CO2 saturated brine-rock experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations when CO2-saturated brines were reacted with limestone rocks. The CO2-saturated brine-limestone reactions were characterized by compositional and mineralogical-changes in the aquifer fluid and formation rocks that were dependent on initial brine composition as were the changes in formation porosity, especially dissolved sulfate. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone rocks relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions occured on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  18. Experimental investigation of CO2-brine-rock interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.J.; Koksalan, T.; Palandri, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Deep-saline aquifers are potential repositories for excess CO2, currently being emitted to the atmosphere from anthropogenic activities, but the reactivity of supercritical CO2 with host aquifer fluids and formation minerals needs to be understood. Experiments reacting supercritical CO2 with natural and synthetic brines in the presence and absence of limestone and plagioclase-rich arkosic sandstone showed that the reaction of CO2-saturated brine with limestone results in compositional, mineralogical, and porosity changes in the aquifer fluid and rock that are dependent on initial brine composition, especially dissolved calcium and sulfate. Experiments reacting CO2-saturated, low-sulfate brine with limestone dissolved 10% of the original calcite and increased rock porosity by 2.6%. Experiments reacting high-sulfate brine with limestone, both in the presence and absence of supercritical CO2, were characterized by the precipitation of anhydrite, dolomitization of the limestone, and a final decrease in porosity of 4.5%. However, based on favorable initial porosity changes of about 15% due to the dissolution of calcite, the combination of CO2 co-injection with other mitigation strategies might help alleviate some of the well-bore scale and formation-plugging problems near the injection zone of a brine disposal well in Paradox Valley, Colorado, as well as provide a repository for CO2. Experiments showed that the solubility of CO2 is enhanced in brine in the presence of limestone by 9% at 25 ??C and 6% at 120 ??C and 200 bar relative to the brine itself. The solubility of CO2 is enhanced also in brine in the presence of arkosic sandstone by 5% at 120 ??C and 300 bar. The storage of CO 2 in limestone aquifers is limited to only ionic and hydraulic trapping. However, brine reacted with supercritical CO2 and arkose yielded fixation and sequestration of CO2 in carbonate mineral phases. Brine desiccation was observed in all experiments containing a discrete CO2 phase

  19. Low Temperature Thermodynamic Equilibrium of CO2 Dimer Anion Species in Cryogenic Argon and Krypton Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Michael E.; Moore, David T.

    2016-06-01

    The separated CO2 dimer anion, (CO2)(CO2-), is observed by FTIR spectroscopy in matrix isolation experiments at 1652 cm-1 upon deposition of high energy argon ions into an argon matrix doped with 0.5% CO2. It has previously been reported by Andrews that upon annealing the matrix to 25K, the separated species converts to an oxalate-like C2O4- species which appears at 1856 cm-1.a We have observed that subsequently holding the matrix at 10K caused the C2O4- species to fully convert back to (CO2)(CO2-). Upon further investigation, we determined that the two species reversibly interconvert between 19K and 23K, suggesting the species are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The associated van't Hoff plot has a linear trend and indicates an endothermic reaction driven by a large increase in entropy. An analogous experiment in a krypton matrix was performed, and the equilibrium was found to occur between 26K and 31K. Interestingly, analysis revealed the reaction in krypton is more endothermic, but has nearly the same entropy value as was observed in the argon experiment. aZhou, M.; Andrews, L.; J. Chem. Phys. 110, 2414 (1999).

  20. A system for high-quality CO2 isotope analyses of air samples collected by the CARIBIC Airbus A340-600.

    PubMed

    Assonov, S; Taylor, P; Brenninkmeijer, C A M

    2009-05-01

    In 2007, JRC-IRMM began a series of atmospheric CO2 isotope measurements, with the focus on understanding instrumental effects, corrections as well as metrological aspects. The calibration approach at JRC-IRMM is based on use of a plain CO2 sample (working reference CO2) as a calibration carrier and CO2-air mixtures (in high-pressure cylinders) to determine the method-related correction under actual analytical conditions (another calibration carrier, in the same form as the samples). Although this approach differs from that in other laboratories, it does give a direct link to the primary reference NBS-19-CO2. It also helps to investigate the magnitude and nature for each of the instrumental corrections and allows for the quantification of the uncertainty introduced. Critical tests were focused on the instrumental corrections. It was confirmed that the use of non-symmetrical capillary crimping (an approach used here to deal with small samples) systematically modifies delta13C(CO2) and delta18O(CO2), with a clear dependence on the amount of extracted CO2. However, the calibration of CO2-air mixtures required the use of the symmetrical dual-inlet mode. As a proof of our approach, we found that delta13C(CO2) on extracts from mixtures agreed (within 0.010 per thousand) with values obtained from the 'mother' CO2 used for the mixtures. It was further found that very low levels of hydrocarbons in the pumping systems and the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) instrument itself were critical. The m/z 46 values (consequently the calculated delta18O(CO2) values) are affected by several other effects with traces of air co-trapped with frozen CO2 being the most critical. A careful cryo-distillation of the extracted CO2 is recommended. After extensive testing, optimisation, and routine automated use, the system was found to give precise data on air samples that can be traced with confidence to the primary standards. The typical total combined uncertainty in delta13C(CO2) and

  1. CO2 temperature-controlled laser soldering of pig trachea incisions in vitro using flexible albumin bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharvit, Dan; Vasilyev, Tamar; Vasserman, Irena; Simhon, David; Kariv, Naam; DeRowe, Ari; Katzir, Abraham

    2005-04-01

    Resection of a segment of the trachea is a procedure applied for the removal of cervical tumors invading the trachea, or for the treatment of severe tracheal stenosis. The current method of anastomosis is based on multiple sutures. The main drawbacks of this method are: 1) A long procedure time, 2) An air leakage, and 3) An inflammatory response to the sutures. In this study we evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of the use of temperature controlled CO2 laser soldering of incisions in pig tracheas in vitro. A transverse incision was made in a separated pig trachea. A flexible albumin band was prepared and was laser soldered with albumin solder to the outer surface of the trachea, covering the incision. The soldered trachea ends were sealed and the burst pressure was measured. In a series of in vitro experiments, the mean burst pressure was found to be 230 mm Hg. These preliminary results demonstrated that laser soldering using a flexible albumin band may be a useful method for sealing an incision in the trachea.

  2. Synergism between elevated pCO2 and temperature on the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torstensson, A.; Hedblom, M.; Andersson, J.; Andersson, M. X.; Wulff, A.

    2013-10-01

    Polar oceans are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and warming. Diatoms play a significant role in sea ice biogeochemistry and provide an important food source to grazers in ice-covered oceans, especially during early spring. However, the ecophysiology of ice-living organisms has received little attention in terms of ocean acidification. In this study, the synergism between temperature and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) was investigated in relationship to the optimal growth temperature of the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. Diatoms were kept in cultures at controlled levels of pCO2 (∼390 and ∼960 μatm) and temperature (-1.8 and 2.5 °C) for 14 days. Synergism between temperature and pCO2 was detected in growth rate and acyl lipid fatty acid (FA) content. Optimal growth rate was observed around 5 °C in a separate experiment. Carbon enrichment only promoted (6%) growth rate closer to the optimal growth, but not at the control temperature (-1.8 °C). At -1.8 °C and at ∼960 μatm pCO2, the total FA content was reduced relative to the ∼390 μatm treatment, although no difference between pCO2 treatments was observed at 2.5 °C. A large proportion (97%) of the total FAs comprised on average of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) at -1.8 °C. Cellular PUFA content was reduced at ∼960 relative to ∼390 μatm pCO2. Effects of carbon enrichment may be different depending on ocean warming scenario or season, e.g. reduced cellular FA content in response to elevated CO2 at low temperatures only, reflected as reduced food quality for higher trophic levels. Synergy between warming and acidification may be particularly important in polar areas since a narrow thermal window generally limits cold-water organisms.

  3. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO 2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    DOE PAGES

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.

    2014-11-26

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 Cmore » showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and neg