Science.gov

Sample records for air temperature fluctuations

  1. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  2. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  3. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  4. Air temperature drives 140 years of fluctuations at a major Greenlandic tidewater glacier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, James M.; Mair, Douglas WF; Nick, Faezeh M.; Rea, Brice R.; Nienow, Peter W.

    2014-05-01

    The primary controls on the fluctuations of tidewater glaciers are currently poorly understood. Both oceanic and atmospheric forcing mechanisms have been invoked to explain observed changes. Numerical modelling simulations have previously utilised only relatively short observational records for calibration and validation. Hence the longer term climatic controls on tidewater glacier stability are not well known. Herein we apply a 1-D numerical flow-band model with a crevasse water depth calving criterion (Nick et al., 2010) to Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS), SW Greenland. We force the model using air and sea surface temperature records for the period 1871-2012. Model sensitivity to climate forcing was determined by varying climatic tuning coefficients using a Monte Carlo approach. The output from 1500 model runs was compared against observations of terminus position and glacier geometry from the last 140 years. The results of best-fit model runs were then used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of KNS to changes in atmospheric or oceanic forcing. Our results show that all best-fit model runs have tuning coefficients associated with strong atmospheric forcing, but do not all require strong oceanic forcing. This suggests that changes in air temperature are the primary driver of the terminus fluctuations of KNS from 1866-2012, and may be the principal climatic control on glacier stability for similar tidewater glaciers in Greenland.

  5. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  6. On the importance of high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations for spectroscopic corrections of open-path carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Helbig, Manuel; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies report systematic differences in CO2 flux estimates obtained with the two main types of gas analyzers: compared to eddy-covariance systems based on closed-path (CP) gas analyzers, systems with open-path (OP) gas analyzers systematically overestimate CO2 uptake during daytime periods with high positive sensible heat fluxes, while patterns for differences in nighttime CO2 exchange are less obvious. These biases have been shown to correlate with the sign and the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and to introduce large uncertainties when calculating annual CO2 budgets. In general, CP and OP gas analyzers commonly used to measure the CO2 density in the atmosphere operate on the principle of infrared light absorption approximated by Beer-Lambert's law. Non-dispersive interference-based optical filter elements are used to select spectral bands with strong attenuation of light transmission, characteristic to the gas of interest. The intensity of the light passing through the optical sensing path depends primarily on the amount of absorber gas in the measurement volume. Besides the density of the gas, barometric pressure and air temperature are additional factors affecting the strength and the half-width of the absorption lines. These so-called spectroscopic effects are accounted for by measuring barometric pressure and air temperature in the sensing path and scaling the light-intensity measurements before applying the calibration equation. This approach works well for CP gas analyzers with an intake tube that acts as a low-pass filter on fast air-temperature fluctuations. Low-frequency response temperature sensors in the measurement cell are therefore sufficient to account for spectroscopic temperature effects. In contrast, OP gas analyzers are exposed to high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations associated with the atmospheric surface-layer turbulent heat exchange. If not corrected adequately, these fast air-temperature variations can cause

  7. Mesoscale Temperature Fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    Isentrope surfaces in the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere reveal that air parcels undergo mesoscale temperature fluctuations that depend on latitude and season. The largest temperature fluctuations occur at high latitude winter, whereas the smallest fluctuations occur at high latitude summer. This is the same pattern found for the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere. However, the amplitude of the seasonal dependence in the Southern Hemisphere is only 37% of the Northern Hemisphere's seasonal amplitude.

  8. Interannual fluctuations of sea-air CO2 fluxes and carbon transport between 1950 and 2000: Biological and temperature effects deduced from OBCMSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winguth, A.; Dobbel, M.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Wentzel, P.

    2003-04-01

    Factors controlling the interannual variability of air-sea CO2 in response to the changes in temperature, circulation, and phytoplankton or zooplankton are not well known and controversially discussed. A recent analysis of pCO2 data by Takahasi et al. (2002) show the importance of high-latitude northern and southern oceans as a sink for atmospheric CO2. These areas are source areas for deep an intermediate water masses and hence represents a direct connection between the atmosphere and the deep oceans. We are using two coupled ocean general circulation - marine ecosystem models with different resolution, the NPZD-type HAMOCC4 coupled to the LSG and the C-HOPE, to explore how biology, temperature, and circulation changes can explain some of the agreements and discrepancies between the data and the model in these regions. These exploratory sensitivity experiments are designed to be a first step towards a currently developed inverse ecosystem model to quantify large-scale interannual-to-decadal fluctuations of the marine carbon cycle and to provide more accurate predictions of the climate system.

  9. Resonance of plankton communities with temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Benincà, Elisa; Dakos, Vasilis; Van Nes, Egbert H; Huisman, Jef; Scheffer, Marten

    2011-10-01

    The interplay between intrinsic population dynamics and environmental variation is still poorly understood. It is known, however, that even mild environmental noise may induce large fluctuations in population abundances. This is due to a resonance effect that occurs in communities on the edge of stability. Here, we use a simple predator-prey model to explore the sensitivity of plankton communities to stochastic environmental fluctuations. Our results show that the magnitude of resonance depends on the timescale of intrinsic population dynamics relative to the characteristic timescale of the environmental fluctuations. Predator-prey communities with an intrinsic tendency to oscillate at a period T are particularly responsive to red noise characterized by a timescale of τ = T/2π. We compare these theoretical predictions with the timescales of temperature fluctuations measured in lakes and oceans. This reveals that plankton communities will be highly sensitive to natural temperature fluctuations. More specifically, we demonstrate that the relatively fast temperature fluctuations in shallow lakes fall largely within the range to which rotifers and cladocerans are most sensitive, while marine copepods and krill will tend to resonate more strongly with the slower temperature variability of the open ocean.

  10. Temperature-polarization correlations from tensor fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, R.G.; Coulson, D.; Turok, N.G. |

    1995-11-15

    We study the polarization-temperature correlations on the cosmic microwave sky resulting from an initial scale-invariant spectrum of tensor (gravity wave) fluctuations, such as those which might arise during inflation. The correlation function has the opposite sign to that for scalar fluctuations on large scales, raising the possibility of a direct determination of whether the microwave anisotropies have a significant tensor component. We briefly discuss the important problem of estimating the expected foreground contamination.

  11. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Thorlacius, Larus; Zarembo, Konstantin; Krikun, Alexander; Kedem, Yaron

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  12. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  13. Measurement of small temperature fluctuations at high average temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, James W.; Scholl, Marija S.

    1988-01-01

    Both absolute and differential temperature measurements were simultaneously performed as a function of time for a pixel on a high-temperature, multi-spectral, spatially and temporally varying infrared target simulator. A scanning laser beam was used to maintain a pixel at an on-the-average constant temperature of 520 K. The laser refresh rate of up to 1 kHz resulted in small-amplitude temperature fluctuations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of less than 1 K. The experimental setup to accurately measure the differential and the absolute temperature as a function of time is described.

  14. High-frequency fluctuations of surface temperatures in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Andreas; Meier, Fred; Scherer, Dieter

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an attempt to resolve fluctuations in surface temperatures at scales of a few seconds to several minutes using time-sequential thermography (TST) from a ground-based platform. A scheme is presented to decompose a TST dataset into fluctuating, high-frequency, and long-term mean parts. To demonstrate the scheme's application, a set of four TST runs (day/night, leaves-on/leaves-off) recorded from a 125-m-high platform above a complex urban environment in Berlin, Germany is used. Fluctuations in surface temperatures of different urban facets are measured and related to surface properties (material and form) and possible error sources. A number of relationships were found: (1) Surfaces with surface temperatures that were significantly different from air temperature experienced the highest fluctuations. (2) With increasing surface temperature above (below) air temperature, surface temperature fluctuations experienced a stronger negative (positive) skewness. (3) Surface materials with lower thermal admittance (lawns, leaves) showed higher fluctuations than surfaces with high thermal admittance (walls, roads). (4) Surface temperatures of emerged leaves fluctuate more compared to trees in a leaves-off situation. (5) In many cases, observed fluctuations were coherent across several neighboring pixels. The evidence from (1) to (5) suggests that atmospheric turbulence is a significant contributor to fluctuations. The study underlines the potential of using high-frequency thermal remote sensing in energy balance and turbulence studies at complex land-atmosphere interfaces.

  15. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Brower, D. L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI systems utilize large diameter imaging optics coupled with planar millimeter-wave imaging arrays to form multichannel ECE diagnostics with excellent spatial resolution. Combined with specially designed imaging optics, the use of these compact, low cost arrays has resulted in the excellent spatial resolution of the ECEI systems, the unique capability of two-dimensional measurements, and flexibility in the measurement of plasma fluctuations. Technical details and principles of this emerging diagnostic technique are described in this article. Illustrative experimental results are presented, together with a discussion of the further development of the diagnostic.

  16. GENERAL: Fluctuation of Mesoscopic RLC Circuit at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ji-Suo; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2008-09-01

    We consider the fluctuation of mesoscopic RLC circuit at finite temperature since a resistance always produces Joule heat when the circuit is working. By virtue of the thermo Geld dynamics and the coherent thermo state representation we show that the quantum mechanical zero-point fluctuations of both charge and current increase with the rising temperature and the resistance value.

  17. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  18. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    periods around 20 minutes. These periods are longer than those of the Sun, as expected for a star that is larger and heavier than the Sun. The figure accompanying this Press Release shows these oscillations in the form of a "power spectrum", i.e., the amount of temperature change at different values of the period. Most of the highest peaks correspond to the real oscillations in the star. The changes (fluctuations) of the temperature of Eta Bootis vary with the oscillation mode and, at the time of these observations, were mostly between 0.03 and 0.08 degrees. This diagramme provides the first strong evidence ever for solar-type oscillations in a star other than the Sun. An article with the detailed results will soon appear in the "Astronomical Journal". Agreement with Stellar Theory The measured periods of the main oscillation modes give important information about the interior of Eta Bootis. Theoretical models of the star have now been compared with these observations and the astronomers were pleased to find that the agreement is excellent, implying that current stellar theory is remarkably good. This shows that we apparently understand stars quite well, but there is of course still much to be learned. Future observations of this kind, with ground-based telescopes and possibly in a more distant future also from space, promise to open up a new and exciting way of studying stars. From now on, we will be able "to look inside" stars in great detail. Appendix: Spectral Analysis Dark spectral lines were first seen in the solar spectrum by the German physicist Johann Fraunhofer in 1814. Later, in the mid-nineteenth century, such lines were also seen in the spectra of other stars. It is now known that they are due to the upper, cooler layers in the solar and stellar atmospheres, whose atoms and molecules absorb the radiation from the hotter, deeper layers at specific wavelengths. These wavelengths serve as "footprints" of these atoms and molecules and allow astronomers to

  19. Fluctuations and disorder in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Gianni; Ivlev, Boris

    1994-02-01

    The special material parameters of the oxide superconductors lead to a dramatic increase of the importance of thermal and quantum fluctuations. The latter can be quantified by the Ginzburg number Gi = {[T c/ }/{H 2c(0)ɛξ 3(0)] 2/2 } and the quantum resistance Q u = {(e 2/ }/{h̵}) {[ϱN/}/{ɛξ(0)]}, where H c(0), ξ(0), and ϱ N denote the thermodynamic critical field, the planar coherence length (both linearly extrapolated to zero), and the planar normal resistivity. ɛ 2 = {m/}/{M} < 1 is the anisotropy parameter. In the high Tc's (specifically for YBCO) we have Gi ≅ 10 -2 and Qu ≅ 1 and thus these parameters are by orders of magnitude larger than in conventional low- Tc superconductors. The large fluctuations lead to the melting of the vortex lattice well below the upper critical field line. The inclusion of quenched disorder as parametrized by the critical current density ratio jc/ jo drastically changes the dynamic behavior of the vortex system ( jc and jo denote the depinning and depairing current densities). We discuss the equilibrium statistical mechanics (vortex lattice melting) and the dynamic behavior (creep) of the vortex system with a particular emphasis on the role of quantum fluctuations.

  20. Correlated fluctuations of daytime skin temperature and vigilance.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, Nico; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-02-01

    Skin temperature shows spontaneous ultradian fluctuations during everyday-life wakefulness. Previous work showed that mild manipulations of skin temperature affect human sleep and vigilance, presumably by influencing neuronal systems involved in both thermal sensing and arousal regulation. We therefore examined whether fluctuations in skin temperature are associated with those in vigilance level under conditions similar to everyday-life situations requiring sustained attention. Eight healthy participants (30.1 ± 8.1 years, M ± SD) participated in a 2-day protocol, during which vigilance and skin temperature were assessed 4 times per day in a silent, dimly lit, temperature-controlled room. Vigilance was assessed by measuring reaction speed and lapses on a novel sustained vigilance task specifically designed to increase lapse rate and range of reaction times. Skin temperature was sampled at 30-second intervals from 3 locations: distal, intermediate, and proximal temperatures were obtained from the middle finger (T(finger) ), the wrist (T(wrist)), and the infraclavicular area (T(chest)), respectively. Furthermore, 3 distal to proximal gradients were calculated. Mixed-effect regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of the fluctuations in temperatures and gradients and those in response speed and lapse probability. Especially the spontaneous fluctuations in proximal temperature were negatively associated with fluctuations in response speed and positively with lapse rate. If individual T(chest) temperature ranges were classified into 10 deciles, they accounted for 23% of the variance in response speed and 11% of the variance in lapse rate. The findings indicate coupling between the spontaneous fluctuations in skin temperature and vigilance during the day and are compatible with the hypothesis of overlap in brain networks involved in the regulation of temperature and vigilance. From an applied point of view, especially proximal skin temperature

  1. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  2. Analysis of the decay of temperature fluctuations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Lagrangian dispersion theory of Durbin (1980) is used to analyze experiments by Warhaft and Lumley (1978) and by Sreenivasan et al. (1980) on temperature fluctuations in grid-generated turbulence. Both theory and experiment show that the decay exponent m depends on the ratio of the initial length scales of velocity and temperature, although when this ratio is greater than 2.5 such dependence is negligible. The theory shows that m is not truly constant, but within the range covered by the experiments it is nearly so. The agreement between theory and experiment lends credence to the idea that the decay of fluctuations is controlled largely by turbulent relative dispersion.

  3. Fatty acid composition and extreme temperature tolerance following exposure to fluctuating temperatures in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Suring, Wouter; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-09-01

    Ectotherms commonly adjust their lipid composition to ambient temperature to counteract detrimental thermal effects on lipid fluidity. However, the extent of lipid remodeling and the associated fitness consequences under continuous temperature fluctuations are not well-described. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated temperature fluctuations on fatty acid composition and thermal tolerance. We exposed the springtail Orchesella cincta to two constant temperatures of 5 and 20°C, and a continuously fluctuating treatment between 5 and 20°C every 2 days. Fatty acid composition differed significantly between constant low and high temperatures. As expected, animals were most cold tolerant in the low temperature treatment, while heat tolerance was highest under high temperature. Under fluctuating temperatures, fatty acid composition changed with temperature initially, but later in the experiment fatty acid composition stabilized and closely resembled that found under constant warm temperatures. Consistent with this, heat tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was comparable to the constant warm treatment. Cold tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was intermediate compared to animals acclimated to constant cold or warmth, despite the fact that fatty acid composition was adjusted to warm conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that in animals acclimated to fluctuating temperatures an additional underlying mechanism is involved in the cold shock response. Other aspects of homeoviscous adaptation may protect animals during extreme cold. This paper forms a next step to fully understand the functioning of ectotherms in more thermally variable environments.

  4. Temperature fluctuations in canonical systems: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a quasiharmonic solid are conducted to elucidate the meaning of temperature fluctuations in canonical systems and validate a well-known but frequently contested equation predicting the mean square of such fluctuations. The simulations implement two virtual and one physical (natural) thermostat and examine the kinetic, potential, and total energy correlation functions in the time and frequency domains. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of quasiequilibrium states in which the system can be characterized by a well-defined temperature that follows the mentioned fluctuation equation. The emergence of such states is due to the wide separation of time scales between thermal relaxation by phonon scattering and slow energy exchanges with the thermostat. The quasiequilibrium states exist between these two time scales when the system behaves as virtually isolated and equilibrium.

  5. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.

    2011-04-15

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T{sub i}= 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within {approx}25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  6. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nedzelskiy, I S; Silva, C; Duarte, P; Fernandes, H

    2011-04-01

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T(i) = 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within ∼25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  7. OH* imager response to turbulence-induced temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Vargas, Fabio A.

    2016-12-01

    The layer of the excited state hydroxyl radical (OH*) is formed in the mesopause region by the reaction of ozone (O3) and atomic hydrogen (H). We derive the theoretical expressions for the OH* brightness and rotational temperature (T*) responses to high-frequency atmospheric temperature perturbations. The theory is used to calculate the 1-D and 2-D horizontal wave number spectra of the OH* and T* image fluctuations induced by atmospheric turbulence. By applying the theory to images of a breaking gravity wave packet, acquired by the Utah State University Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper, we show that existing infrared OH* imager technology can observe the evolution of gravity wave breakdown and characterize the resulting turbulent eddies in the source region and in the inertial subrange of the turbulence spectrum. For the example presented here, the RMS OH* brightness fluctuations induced by the gravity wave packet was 2.90% and by the associated turbulence was 1.07%. Unfortunately, the T* fluctuations induced by turbulence are usually too small to be observed in the OH* rotational temperature maps.

  8. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure.

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Hamed M; Zeeman, Grietje; van Loon, Wilko K P; Bot, Gerard P A; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-11-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 degrees C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature fluctuations has been studied. In the daily downward temperature fluctuation regime the temperatures of each reactor was reduced by 10 degrees C for 10 h while in the daily upward fluctuation regime the temperature of each reactor was increased 10 degrees C for 5 h. The results show that the methane production rate at 60 degrees C is lower than that at 50 degrees C at all experimental conditions of imposed HRT except when downward temperature fluctuations were applied at an HRT of 10 days. It also was found that the free ammonia concentration not only affects the acetate-utilising bacteria but also the hydrolysis and acidification process. The upward temperature fluctuation affects the maximum specific methanogenesis activity more severely as compared to imposed downward temperature fluctuations. The results clearly reveal the possibility of using available solar energy at daytime to heat up the reactor(s) without the need of heat storage during nights, especially at an operational temperature of 50 degrees C and at a 20 days HRT, and without the jeopardising of the overheating.

  9. Low-temperature quantum fluctuations in overdamped ratchets.

    PubMed

    Maier, Stefan A; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    At low temperatures and strong friction the time evolution of the density distribution in position follows a quantum Smoluchowski equation. Recently, also higher-order contributions of quantum fluctuations to drift and diffusion coefficients have been systematically derived. As a nontrivial situation to reveal the impact of subleading quantum corrections and to demonstrate convergence properties of the perturbation series, directed transport in ratchets is studied. It is shown that the perturbation series typically has a nonmonotonous behavior. Depending on symmetry properties higher-order contributions may even compensate current reversals induced by leading quantum fluctuations. This analysis demonstrates how to consistently treat the dynamics of overdamped quantum systems at low temperatures also in numerical applications.

  10. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow, Shallow Snow (30 cm) and Deep Snow (120 cm). Air temperatures during the winter period fluctuated frequently between +3 and -24 °C, and the No Snow soil temperatures reflected this variation closely, with the extreme minimum being slightly lower. Under 30 cm of snow, soil temperatures varied less and did not decrease below -12 °C. Those under deep snow were even more stable and did not decline below -2 °C. Despite these striking differences in winter thermal regimes, there were no clear differences in survival of the invertebrate fauna between treatments, including oribatid, prostigmatid and mesostigmatid mites, Araneae, Collembola, Nematocera larvae or Coleoptera. This indicates widespread tolerance, previously undocumented for the Araneae, Nematocera or Coleoptera, of

  11. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward by Fu and Pawlowski [Phys. Rev. D 92, 116006 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.116006 and Phys. Rev. D 93, 091501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.091501]. In the present work, we aim to improve the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and, in partitular, large densities, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov-loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results, and recent experimental data from STAR.

  12. Evaluation of short-term tracer fluctuations in groundwater and soil air in a two year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, Florian; Mayer, Simon; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    The application of gas tracers like noble gases (NGs), SF6 or CFCs in groundwater studies such as paleo temperature determination requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of reactive and inert gases in the soil air with which the infiltrating water equilibrates. Due to microbial gas consumption and production, NG partial pressures in soil air can deviate from atmospheric air, an effect that could bias noble gas temperatures estimates if not taken into account. So far, such an impact on NG contents in groundwater has not been directly demonstrated. We provide the first long-term study of the above mentioned gas tracers and physical parameters in both the saturated and unsaturated soil zone, sampled continuously for more than two years near Mannheim (Germany). NG partial pressures in soil air correlate with soil moisture and the sum value of O2+CO2, with a maximal significant enhancement of 3-6% with respect to atmospheric air during summer time. Observed seasonal fluctuations result in a mass dependent fractionation of NGs in soil air. Concentrations of SF6 and CFCs in soil air are determined by corresponding fluctuations in local atmospheric air, caused by industrial emissions. Arising concentration peaks are damped with increasing soil depth. Shallow groundwater shows short-term NG fluctuations which are smoothed within a few meters below the water table. A correlation between NG contents of soil air and of groundwater is observable during strong recharge events. However, there is no evidence for a permanent influence of seasonal variations of soil air composition on shallow groundwater. Fluctuating NG contents in shallow groundwater are rather determined by variations of soil temperature and water table level. Our data gives evidence for a further temperature driven equilibration of groundwater with entrapped air bubbles within the topmost saturated zone, which permanently occurs even some years after recharge. Local subsurface temperature fluctuations

  13. Measurement of temperature and density fluctuations in turbulence using an ultraviolet laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flow was examined. The approach used fluorescence of oxygen molecules which are selectively excited by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser beam. The strength of the fluorescence signal and its dependence on laser wavelength vary with the density and temperature of the air in the laser beam. Because fluorescence can be detected at 90 degrees from the beam propagation direction, spatial resolution in three dimensions, rather than path-integrated measurements can be achieved. With spatial resolutions of the order of a millimeter and at supersonic air velocities it is necessary to perform each measurement in a time of the order of a microsecond; this is possible by by using laser pulses of ten nanosecond duration. In this method atmospheric O2 is excited by the emission of a tunable ArF excimer laser, and the fluorescence, which spans the 210 to 420 range, is detected by an ultraviolet phototube.

  14. Producing small scale temperature fluctuations in an airstream.

    PubMed

    Schacher, G E; Fairall, C W

    1978-10-01

    A 4.5-microm ''hot'' wire is used to heat a low-speed airstream at frequencies from dc to 400 Hz. For dc excitation the thermal noise spectrum produced was white to a frequency of 2 kHz. ac heating of the wire up to a frequency of 400 Hz (800 Hz thermal fluctuation of the airstream) yielded a good thermal signal as far as 2 cm from the hot wire. Calculation shows excellent heat transfer between the wire and airstream. The technique is very useful for calibrating the frequency response of temperature sensors and for investigating turbulent heat transfer for various flow configurations.

  15. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Temperature fluctuation of the Iceland mantle plume through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spice, Holly E.; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Kirstein, Linda A.

    2016-02-01

    The newly developed Al-in-olivine geothermometer was used to find the olivine-Cr-spinel crystallization temperatures of a suite of picrites spanning the spatial and temporal extent of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), which is widely considered to be the result of a deep-seated mantle plume. Our data confirm that start-up plumes are associated with a pulse of anomalously hot mantle over a large spatial area before becoming focused into a narrow upwelling. We find that the thermal anomaly on both sides of the province at Baffin Island/West Greenland and the British Isles at ˜61 Ma across an area ˜2000 km in diameter was uniform, with Al-in-olivine temperatures up to ˜300°C above that of average mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) primitive magma. Furthermore, by combining our results with geochemical data and existing geophysical and bathymetric observations, we present compelling evidence for long-term (>107 year) fluctuations in the temperature of the Iceland mantle plume. We show that the plume temperature fell from its initial high value during the start-up phase to a minimum at about 35 Ma, and that the mantle temperature beneath Iceland is currently increasing.

  17. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of High Frequency Temperature Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2005-01-01

    A novel technique for measurement of high frequency temperature fluctuations in unseeded gas flows using molecular Rayleigh scattering is investigated. The spectrum of laser light scattered from molecules in a gas flow is resolved using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The width of the spectral peak is broadened by thermal motion of the molecules and hence is related to gas temperature. The interference fringe pattern containing spectral information is divided into four concentric regions using a series of mirrors angled with respect to one another. Light from each of these regions is directed towards photomultiplier tubes and sampled at 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows measurement of gas temperature. Independently monitoring the total scattered intensity provides a measure of gas density. This technique also has the potential to simultaneously measure a single component of flow velocity by monitoring the spectral peak location. Measurements of gas temperature and density are demonstrated using a low speed heated air jet surrounded by an unheated air co-flow. Mean values of temperature and density are shown for radial scans across the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Power spectra of temperature and density fluctuations at several locations in the jet are also shown. The instantaneous measurements have fairly high uncertainty; however, long data records provide highly accurate statistically quantities, which include power spectra. Mean temperatures are compared with thermocouple measurements as well as the temperatures derived from independent density measurements. The accuracy for mean temperature measurements was +/- 7 K.

  18. Impact of fine particulate fluctuation and other variables on Beijing's air quality index.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Lu, Shaowei; Li, Shaoning; Wang, Bing

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed fluctuation in Beijing's air quality over 328 days, based on air quality grades and air quality data from 35 atmospheric monitoring stations. Our results show the air over Beijing is subject to pollution 152 days of the year, or 46.34%. Among all pollutants, fine particulates, solid or liquid, 2.5 μm or less in size (PM2.5), appeared most frequently as the primary pollutant: 249 days, or 76% of the sample year (328 days). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and coarse particulates (PM10) cause the least pollution, appearing only 7 and 3 days, or 2 and 1% of the sample year, respectively. In Beijing, fine particulates like PM2.5 vary seasonally: 154.54 ± 18.60 in winter > 145.22 ± 18.61 in spring > 140.16 ± 20.76 in autumn > 122.37 ± 13.42 in summer. Air quality is best in August and worst in December, while various districts in Beijing experience different air quality. To be specific, from south to north and from west to east, air quality tends to improve. Meteorological elements have a constraining effect on air pollutants, which means there is a linear correlation between the air quality index and humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and temperature. Under a typical pollution scenario, the higher the air quality index (AQI) value, the lower the wind speed and the greater the relative humidity; the lower the AQI value, the higher the wind speed and lower the relative humidity. Analysis of influencing factors reveals that the air pollution is mainly particulate matter produced by burning coal, vehicle emissions, volatile oils and gas, fast development of food services, emissions from the surrounding region, and natural dust clouds formed in arid areas to the northwest. Topography affects the distribution of meteorological conditions, in turn varying air quality over the region from one location to another. Human activities also exercise impact on urban air quality with dual functions.

  19. [Responses of Chinese pine tree ring in Shenyang suburb (Fu Mausoleum) to global temperature fluctuation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ju; He, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chun-Tao; Fu, Yin-Dong; Tian, Wei; Liu, Tie-Hong

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, the correlations between the variations of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) tree ring width in Shenyang suburb (Fu Mausoleum) and the local temperature variables, Global Surface Air Temperature Anomaly (GSATA) from 1880 to 2004, Global Land-Ocean Temperature (GLOTI) from 1880 to 2004 and North Hemisphere Temperature Anomaly (NHTA) from 1880 to 2004 were studied. Some close correlations were detected, and the local temperature variables, GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA had some similar influences on the Chinese pine tree ring width. The air temperature in last winter (December and January) and in spring (April and May) affected the growth of Chinese pine significantly (P < 0.05). There existed a 3-8-year periodicity of the variation of Chinese pine tree ring width and the GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA, and the 19.3-year and 23.2-year quasi-periodicity of the variation of Chinese pine tree ring width corresponded with the 20.8-year quasi-periodicity of GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA. This study suggested that the Chinese pine tree ring width in Shenyang Fu Mausoleum had positive correlations with global-scale temperature fluctuation, and the temperature increase in the past had a positive effect on the Chinese pine growth.

  20. Temperature fluctuations as a source of brown dwarf variability

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Marley, Mark S.

    2014-04-20

    A number of brown dwarfs are now known to be variable with observed amplitudes as large as 10%-30% at some wavelengths. While spatial inhomogeneities in cloud coverage and thickness are likely responsible for much of the observed variability, it is possible that some of the variations arise from atmospheric temperature fluctuations instead of, or in addition to, clouds. To better understand the role that thermal variability might play we present a case study of brown dwarf variability using a newly developed one-dimensional, time-stepping model of atmospheric thermal structure. We focus on the effects of thermal perturbations, intentionally simplifying the problem through omission of clouds and atmospheric circulation. Model results demonstrate that thermal perturbations occurring deep in the atmosphere (at pressures greater than 10 bar) of a model T-dwarf can be communicated to the upper atmosphere through radiative heating via the windows in near-infrared water opacity. The response time depends on where in the atmosphere a thermal perturbation is introduced. We show that, for certain periodic perturbations, the emission spectrum can have complex time- and wavelength-dependent behaviors, including phase shifts in times of maximum flux observed at different wavelengths. Since different wavelengths probe different levels in the atmosphere, these variations track a wavelength-dependent set of radiative exchanges happening between different atmospheric levels as a perturbation evolves in time. We conclude that thermal—as well as cloud—fluctuations must be considered as possible contributors to the observed brown dwarf variability.

  1. Temperature reconstruction from the length fluctuations of small glaciers in the eastern Alps (northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana; Donnici, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a linear model computing the air temperature fluctuations from the measured glacier snout fluctuations has been applied, for the first time, to three small glaciers in the western Tauern Alps (eastern Alps) in the period 1929-2011. The considered glaciers, with areas between 0.2 and 1.3 km^2 , are characterized by relevant time variations of their morphology, length and slope. The model requires the knowledge of two parameters: the glacier climate sensitivity C_s and the glacier response time τ both depending on the glacier morphological characteristics and on the precipitation. Applied to the glaciers assuming C_s and τ as in the original formulation, it underestimates the temperature increase of {≈ } 1.8°C derived over the whole period from the in situ data. Given the characteristics of these small glaciers, these parameters have been recalibrated by means of a non-linear least-square regression using an independent set of glaciers. Their mean value is of about 210 m/K and 3.8 years respectively. With the recalibrated values of the new glacier climate sensitivity C^*_s and response time τ ^* , the temperature fluctuations derived by the model reproduce well those obtained from the observed temperatures computed over the hydrological year, with linear correlations between 0.8 and 0.9. The increase of the modeled mean temperature over the whole period fits in with that derived from observed temperature. Considering that the length fluctuations of these small glaciers affect significantly their slope and length, we tested the impact in the model of a time dependent formulation of C_s and τ : the results indicate slight improvements both in the values of the correlation between the reconstructed and the observed temperature fluctuations and in the global temperature increase. Given the above value of climate sensitivity, the large retreat of the small alpine glaciers threatens their survival within a few decades, but the morphological changes in

  2. Observing temperature fluctuations in humans using infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph; Scully, Christopher G.; Elster, Eric; Gorbach, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that functional infrared imaging is capable of detecting low frequency temperature fluctuations in intact human skin and revealing spatial, temporal, spectral, and time-frequency based differences among three tissue classes: microvasculature, large sub-cutaneous veins, and the remaining surrounding tissue of the forearm. We found that large veins have stronger contractility in the range of 0.005-0.06 Hz compared to the other two tissue classes. Wavelet phase coherence and power spectrum correlation analysis show that microvasculature and skin areas without vessels visible by IR have high phase coherence in the lowest three frequency ranges (0.005-0.0095 Hz, 0.0095-0.02 Hz, and 0.02-0.06 Hz), whereas large veins oscillate independently. PMID:23538682

  3. The dynamics of core temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations on TEXT-U

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, C.; Gandy, R.F.

    1995-05-03

    Core electron temperature fluctuations are measured in a tokamak plasma where some degree of time resolution is achieved. There is a strong correlation between the turbulence level and the phase of the sawtooth oscillation. A global linear relationship between the temperature fluctuation amplitude and the electron temperature gradient scale length is found. The enhancement in fluctuations at the sawtooth crash is correlated to a steepening of the electron temperature gradient created as the sawtooth heat pulse propagates outward.

  4. Improved Apparatus for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr; Dryden, H L

    1934-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in the design of the equipment associated with the hot-wire anemometer for the measurement of fluctuating air speeds in turbulent air flow, and presents the results of some experimental investigations dealing with the response of the hot wire to speed fluctuations of various frequencies. Attempts at measuring the frequency of the fluctuations encountered in the Bureau of Standards' 54-inch wind tunnel are also reported. In addition, the difficulties encountered in the use of such apparatus and the precautions found helpful in avoiding them are discussed.

  5. Variability of Winter Air Temperature in Mid-Latitude Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Cierniewski, J.; Jusem, J. C.; Przybylak, R.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Walczewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report extreme winter/early-spring air temperature (hereinafter temperature) anomalies in mid-latitude Europe, and to discuss the underlying forcing to these interannual fluctuations. Warm advection from the North Atlantic in late winter controls the surface-air temperature, as indicated by the substantial correlation between the speed of the surface southwesterlies over the eastern North Atlantic (quantified by a specific Index Ina) and the 2-meter level air temperatures (hereinafter Ts) over Europe, 45-60 deg N, in winter. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation drops drastically (quite often it is negative). This change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature: absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control. This forcing by maritime-air advection in winter was demonstrated in a previous publication, and is re-examined here in conjunction with extreme fluctuations of temperatures in Europe. We analyze here the interannual variability at its extreme by comparing warm-winter/early-spring of 1989/90 with the opposite scenario in 1995/96. For these two December-to-March periods the differences in the monthly mean temperature in Warsaw and Torun, Poland, range above 10 C. Short-term (shorter than a month) fluctuations of the temperature are likewise very strong. We conduct pentad-by-pentad analysis of the surface-maximum air temperature (hereinafter Tmax), in a selected location, examining the dependence on Ina. The increased cloudiness and higher amounts of total precipitable water, corollary effects to the warm low-level advection. in the 1989/90 winter, enhance the positive temperature anomalies. The analysis of the ocean surface winds is based on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) dataset; ascent rates, and over land wind data are from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF); maps of 2-m temperature, cloud

  6. Prediction of seasonal water-table fluctuations in La Pampa and Buenos Aires, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanco, Raúl; Kruse, Eduardo

    2001-07-01

    The fluctuation of the water table east of La Pampa province and northwest of Buenos Aires province, Argentina, influences agricultural production in the region because it is closely related to the alternation of dry and wet periods. Sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies have been used as predictors to forecast atmospheric variables in different regions of the world. The objective of this work is to present a simple model to forecast seasonal rainfall using SST distribution in the Pacific Ocean as a predictor. Once the relationship between precipitation and water-table fluctuations was established, a methodology for the prediction of water-table fluctuations was developed. A good agreement between observed and predicted water-table fluctuations was found when estimating water-table fluctuations in the summer and autumn seasons. Résumé. Les fluctuations de la nappe à l'est de la province de La Pampa et au nord-ouest de la province de Buenos Aires (Argentine) influence la production agricole de la région parce qu'elle est étroitement liée à l'alternance de saisons sèches et humides. Les anomalies de la température de surface de l'océan (SST) ont été utilisées comme prédicteurs pour prévoir les variables atmosphériques dans différentes régions du monde. L'objectif de ce travail est de présenter un modèle simple de prévision des précipitations saisonnières en utilisant comme prédicteur la distribution des SST dans l'Océan Pacifique. Une fois que la relation entre les fluctuations des précipitations et celles de la nappe a été établie, une méthodologie de prédiction des variations de la nappe a été mise au point. Un bon accord entre les variations de la nappe observées et celles prédites a été trouvé pour les estimations des variations de nappe en été et en automne. Resumen. La fluctuación del nivel freático al este de la provincia de La Pampa y al nordeste de la de Buenos Aires (Argentina) repercute en la producción agr

  7. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Yang, Chao-Chin E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  8. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  9. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James C. R.; Leijnse, Hidde; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. It has been shown that a straightforward heat transfer model can be employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. The methodology has been applied to Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree

  10. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in a heated air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature, velocity, and density of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. Power spectral density calculations of temperature, velocity, and density fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are demonstrated for various radial locations in the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Results are compared with constant current anemometry and pitot probe measurements at the same locations.

  11. The Relationship Between Air Temperature and Stream Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. C.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2001-05-01

    This study examined the relationship, both linear and non-linear, between air temperature and stream temperature in order to determine if air temperature can be used as an accurate predictor of stream temperature, if general relationships could be developed that apply to a large number of streams, and how changes in stream temperature associated with climate variability or climate warming might affect the dissolved oxygen level, and thus the quality of life, in some of these streams. Understanding the relationship between air temperature and water temperature is important if we want to predict how stream temperatures are likely to respond to the increase in surface air temperature that is occurring. Data from over 50 streams in 13 countries, mostly gathered by K-12 students in the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment), are examined. Only a few streams display a linear 1:1 air/water temperature trend. The majority of streams instead show an increase in water temperature of about 0.6 to 0.8 degrees for every 1-degree increase in air temperature. At some of these sites, where dissolved oxygen content is already low, an increase in summer stream temperatures of 2-3 degrees could cause the dissolved oxygen levels to fall into a critically low range. At some locations, such as near the source of a stream, water temperature does not change much despite wide ranges in air temperatures. The temperatures at these sites are likely to be least affected by surface warming. More data are needed in warmer climates, where the water temperature already gets above 25oC, in order to better examine the air/water temperature relationship under warmer conditions. Global average surface air temperature is expected to increase by 3-5oC by the middle of this century. Surface water temperature in streams, lakes and wetlands will likely increase as air temperature increases, although the change in water temperature may not be as large as the change in

  12. Effects of gas temperature fluctuations on the evolution of Nitrogenous species during coal devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.T.; Zhang, J.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of gas temperature fluctuations on the instantaneous evolution processes of nitrogenous species were investigated for pulverized coal particles undergoing devolatilization in a hot gas. The instantaneous mass variations of nitrogenous species released from the particles with diameters of 10-50 {mu} m were computed for different conditions. The instantaneous gas temperature was varied with time either in a simple harmonic way or in a random way. The calculated results showed that, under different time-average gas temperatures, the HCN evolution behaviors of particles with different diameters were all affected by the gas temperature fluctuations. The gas temperature fluctuations led to more rapid HCN release from the pulverized coal particles compared to the results obtained without gas temperature fluctuations. The effects were further enhanced by increasing the amplitude or intensity of the gas temperature fluctuations.

  13. Temporal structure of gas temperature fluctuations and ignition of fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevich, I. V.; Galdina, D. D.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies ignition of fine particles, i.e., irreversible growth of particle temperature from an exothermal heterogeneous reaction, with the rate approximated with the Arrhenius law. The particles are suspended in gas with fluctuating temperature, and heat transfer from the particle surface occurs according to the Newtonian law. The equations take into account the temporal structure of gas temperature fluctuations. Modern methods of functional analysis were applied for deriving a closed equation for the probability density function for the particle temperature distribution. The gas temperature fluctuations lessen the threshold for the particle ignition in the hot gas as compared with the deterministic variant. The equations for probability density function produce a closed system of conjugate equations for the average temperature and dispersion of particle temperature fluctuations. The results of simulation illustrate the phenomenon of self-speeding drift of particle temperature towards the temperature of ignition startup.

  14. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, A.; Robinson, J. C. R.; Leijnse, H.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Horn, B. K. P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. A straightforward heat transfer model is employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas.

  15. Squeezing the fundamental temperature fluctuations of a high-Q microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Lin, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Temperature fluctuations of an optical resonator underlie a fundamental limit of its cavity stability. Here we show that the fundamental temperature fluctuations of a high-Q microresonator can be suppressed remarkably by pure optical means without cooling the device temperature. An optical wave launched into the cavity is able to produce strong photothermal backaction which dramatically suppresses the spectral intensity of temperature fluctuations and squeezes its overall level by orders of magnitude. The proposed photothermal temperature squeezing is expected to significantly improve the stability of optical resonances, with potentially profound impact on broad applications of high-Q cavities in sensing, metrology, and nonlinear and quantum optics.

  16. Controlled-Temperature Hot-Air Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Materials that find applications in wind tunnels first tested in laboratory. Hot-Air Gun differs from commercial units in that flow rate and temperature monitored and controlled. With typical compressed-airsupply pressure of 25 to 38 psi (170 to 260 kPa), flow rate and maximum temperature are 34 stdft3/min (0.96 stdm3/min) and 1,090 degrees F (590 degrees C), respectively. Resembling elaborate but carefully regulated hot-air gun, setup used to apply blasts of air temperatures above 1,500 degrees F (815 degrees C) to test specimens.

  17. Controllable effects of quantum fluctuations on spin free-induction decay at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Pan, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations of local fields cause decoherence of quantum objects. Usually at high temperatures, thermal noises are much stronger than quantum fluctuations unless the thermal effects are suppressed by certain techniques such as spin echo. Here we report the discovery of strong quantum-fluctuation effects of nuclear spin baths on free-induction decay of single electron spins in solids at room temperature. We find that the competition between the quantum and thermal fluctuations is controllable by an external magnetic field. These findings are based on Ramsey interference measurement of single nitrogen-vacancy center spins in diamond and numerical simulation of the decoherence, which are in excellent agreement.

  18. Precipitation and Air Temperature Impact on Seasonal Variations of Groundwater Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitola, Ilva; Vircavs, Valdis; Abramenko, Kaspars; Lauva, Didzis; Veinbergs, Arturs

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify seasonal effects of precipitation and temperature on groundwater level changes in monitoring stations of the Latvia University of Agriculture - Mellupīte, Bērze and Auce. Groundwater regime and level fluctuations depend on climatic conditions such as precipitation intensity, evapotranspiration, surface runoff and drainage, as well as other hydrological factors. The relationship between precipitation, air temperature and groundwater level fluctuations could also lead and give different perspective of possible changes in groundwater quality. Using mathematical statistics and graphic-analytic methods it is concluded that autumn and winter precipitation has the dominant impact on groundwater level fluctuations, whereas spring and summer season fluctuations are more dependent on the air temperature.

  19. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  20. Air Temperature in the Undulator Hall

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    Various analyses have been performed recently to estimate the performance of the air conditioning (HVAC) system planned for the Undulator Hall. This reports summarizes the results and provides an upgrade plan to be used if new requirements are needed in the future. The estimates predict that with the planned loads the tunnel air temperature will be well within the allowed tolerance during normal operation.

  1. Temperature dependence of vibrational frequency fluctuation of N3- in D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayama, Jumpei; Ishihara, Akane; Banno, Motohiro; Ohta, Kaoru; Saito, Shinji; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation of the antisymmetric stretching mode of N3- in D2O by three-pulse infrared (IR) photon echo experiments. IR pump-probe measurements were also carried out to investigate the population relaxation and the orientational relaxation of the same band. It was found that the time-correlation function (TCF) of the frequency fluctuation of this mode is well described by a biexponential function with a quasistatic term. The faster decay component has a time constant of about 0.1 ps, and the slower component varies from 1.4 to 1.1 ps in the temperature range from 283 to 353 K. This result indicates that liquid dynamics related to the frequency fluctuation are not highly sensitive to temperature. We discuss the relationship between the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation and that of the molecular motion of the system to investigate the molecular origin of the frequency fluctuation of the solute. We compare the temperature dependence of the frequency fluctuation with that of other dynamics such as dielectric relaxation of water. In contrast to the Debye dielectric relaxation time of D2O, the two time constants of the TCF of the frequency fluctuation do not exhibit strong temperature dependence. We propose a simple theoretical model for the frequency fluctuation in solutions based on perturbation theory and the dipole-dipole interaction between the vibrational mode of the solute and the solvent molecules. This model suggests that the neighboring solvent molecules in the vicinity of the solute play an important role in the frequency fluctuation. We suggest that the picosecond component of the frequency fluctuation results from structural fluctuation of the hydrogen-bonding network in water.

  2. The Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed by the Hot-Wire Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, H L; Kuethe, A M

    1930-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer suggests itself as a promising method for measuring the fluctuating air velocities found in turbulent flow. The only obstacle is the presence of a lag due to the limited energy input which makes even a fairly small wire incapable of following rapid fluctuations with accuracy. This paper gives the theory of the lag and describes an experimental arrangement for compensating for the lag for frequencies up to 100 or more per second when the amplitude of the fluctuation is not too great. An experimental test of the accuracy of compensation and some results obtained with the apparatus in a wind-tunnel air stream are described. While the apparatus is very bulky in its present form, it is believed possible to develop a more portable arrangement. (author)

  3. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  4. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  5. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient (b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  6. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  7. Beam Energy Scan of Specific Heat Through Temperature Fluctuations in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Nandi, Basanta K.; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations may have two distinct origins, first, quantum fluctuations that are initial state fluctuations, and second, thermodynamical fluctuations. We discuss a method of extracting the thermodynamic temperature from the mean transverse momentum of pions, by using controllable parameters such as centrality of the system, and range of the transverse momenta. Event-by-event fluctuations in global temperature over a large phase space provide the specific heat of the system. We present Beam Energy Scan of specific heat from data, AMPT and HRG model prediction. Experimental results from NA49, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS and ALICE are combined to obtain the specific heat as a function of beam energy. These results are compared to calculations from AMPT event generator, HRG model and lattice calculations, respectively.

  8. Effect of Contraction on Turbulence and Temperature Fluctuations Generated by a Warm Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert R., Jr.; Corrsin, Stanley

    1959-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements were made of several statistical properties of approximately homogeneous and isotropic fields of turbulence and temperature fluctuations generated by a warm grid in a uniform airstream sent through a 4-to-1 contraction. These measurements were made both in the contraction and in the axisymmetric domain farther downstream. In addition to confirming the well-known turbulence anisotropy induced by strain, the data show effects on the skewnesses of both longitudinal velocity fluctuation (which has zero skewness in isotropic turbulence) and its derivative. The concomitant anisotropy in the temperature field accelerates the decay of temperature fluctuations.

  9. Effect of Fluctuations of Temperature During Frozen Storage on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yutaka; Okazaki, Emiko; Wada, Ritsuko

    The fluctuation in frozen storage temperature was set up by moving the minced meat from chub mackerel reversibly from the room of lower temperature to that of higher temperature for 7 hours every day during 180 days. The freeze denaturation of myofibrillar protein was studied in term the first-order rate (KD) of inactivation of myofibrillar Ca-ATPase. The freeze denaturation rate constant of the myofibrillar protein fluctuated between two different temperatures was same as or higher than the KD in case of constant temperature in higher temperature side.

  10. Temperature Tunable Air-Gap Etalon Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Lunt, David L.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experimental measurements of a temperature tuned air-gap etalon filter. The filter exhibits temperature dependent wavelength tuning of 54 pm/C. It has a nominal center wavelength of 532 nm. The etalon filter has a 27 pm optical bandpass and 600 pm free spectral range (finesse approximately 22). The experimental results are in close agreement with etalon theory.

  11. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yun, G S; Lee, W; Choi, M J; Kim, J B; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Tobias, B; Liang, T; Kong, X; Luhmann, N C; Donné, A J H

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  12. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  13. REGULATION OF ISOPRENE EMISSION RESPONSES TO RAPID LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emission from leaves is temperature dependent and may protect them from damage at high temperatures. We measured the temperature of white oak (Quercus alba L.) leaves at the top of the canopy. The largest changes in leaf temperature were associated with changes in solar ...

  14. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  15. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  16. Modeling monthly mean air temperature for Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Stape, José Luiz; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar; de Moraes Gonçalves, José Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    Air temperature is one of the main weather variables influencing agriculture around the world. Its availability, however, is a concern, mainly in Brazil where the weather stations are more concentrated on the coastal regions of the country. Therefore, the present study had as an objective to develop models for estimating monthly and annual mean air temperature for the Brazilian territory using multiple regression and geographic information system techniques. Temperature data from 2,400 stations distributed across the Brazilian territory were used, 1,800 to develop the equations and 600 for validating them, as well as their geographical coordinates and altitude as independent variables for the models. A total of 39 models were developed, relating the dependent variables maximum, mean, and minimum air temperatures (monthly and annual) to the independent variables latitude, longitude, altitude, and their combinations. All regression models were statistically significant ( α ≤ 0.01). The monthly and annual temperature models presented determination coefficients between 0.54 and 0.96. We obtained an overall spatial correlation higher than 0.9 between the models proposed and the 16 major models already published for some Brazilian regions, considering a total of 3.67 × 108 pixels evaluated. Our national temperature models are recommended to predict air temperature in all Brazilian territories.

  17. Morning Martian Atmospheric Temperature Gradients and Fluctuations Observed by Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, John D.; Haberle, R. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the most prominent atmospheric temperature fluctuations observed during Martian mornings by Mars Pathfinder and have concluded, based on comparisons with wind directions, that they appear to be a result of atmospheric heating associated with the Lander spacecraft. Also, we have examined the morning surface layer temperature lapse rates, which are found to decrease as autumn approaches at the Pathfinder location, and which have mean (and median) values as large as 7.3 K/m in the earlier portions of the Pathfinder landed mission. It is plausible that brief isolated periods with gradients twice as steep are associated with atmospheric heating adjacent to Lander air bag material. In addition, we have calculated the gradient with height of the structure function obtained with Mars Pathfinder, for Mars' atmospheric temperatures measured within about 1.3 m from the surface, assuming a power law dependence, and have found that these gradients superficially resemble those reported for the upper region of the terrestrial stable boundary layer.

  18. AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe viewed from the west, September 8, 2002. The isotherms in this map made from AIRS data show regions of the same temperature in the atmosphere.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Ultra-fast charge exchange spectroscopy for turbulent ion temperature fluctuation measurements on the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    A novel two-channel, high throughput, high efficiency spectrometer system has been developed to measure impurity ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations associated with long-wavelength turbulence and other plasma instabilities. The spectrometer observes the emission of the n= 8-7 hydrogenic transition of C{sup +5} ions ({lambda}{sub air}= 529.06 nm) resulting from charge exchange reactions between deuterium heating beams and intrinsic carbon. Novel features include a large, prism-coupled high-dispersion, volume-phase-holographic transmission grating and high-quantum efficiency, high-gain, low-noise avalanche photodiode detectors that sample emission at 1 MHz. This new diagnostic offers an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to earlier ion thermal turbulence measurements. Increased sensitivity is crucial for obtaining enough photon statistics from plasmas with much less impurity content. The irreducible noise floor set by photon statistics sets the ultimate sensitivity to plasma fluctuations. Based on the measured photon flux levels for the entire spectral line, photon noise levels for T(tilde sign){sub i}/T{sub i} and V(tilde sign){sub i}/V{sub i} of {approx}1% are expected, while statistical averaging over long data records enables reduction in the detectable plasma fluctuation levels to values less than that. Broadband ion temperature fluctuations are observed to near 200 kHz in an L-mode discharge. Cross-correlation with the local beam emission spectroscopy measurements demonstrates a strong coupling of the density and temperature fields, and enables the cross-phase measurements between density and ion temperature fluctuations.

  20. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  1. Impact of fluctuating temperatures on development of the koinobiont endoparasitoid Venturia canescens.

    PubMed

    Spanoudis, Christos G; Pappas, Christos S; Delpisi, Argyroula G; Andreadis, Stefanos S; Savopoulou-Soultani, Matilda

    2015-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the biology of Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) is well understood under constant temperature conditions, but less so under more natural, fluctuating conditions. Herein we studied the influence of fluctuating temperatures on biological parameters of V. canescens. Parasitized fifth-instar larvae of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were reared individually in incubators at six fluctuating temperature regimes (15-19.5°C with a mean of 17.6°C, 17.5-22.5°C with a mean of 19.8°C, 20-30°C with a mean of 22.7°C, 22.5-27.5°C with a mean of 25°C, 25.5-32.5°C with a mean of 28.3°C and 28.5-33°C with a mean of 30°C) until emergence and death of V. canescens adults. Developmental time from parasitism to adult eclosion, adult longevity and survival were recorded at each fluctuating temperature regime. In principle, developmental time decreased with an increase of the mean temperature of the fluctuating temperature regime. Upper and lower threshold temperatures for total development were estimated at 34.9 and 6.7°C, respectively. Optimum temperature for development and thermal constant were 28.6°C and 526.3 degree days, respectively. Adult longevity was also affected by fluctuating temperature, as it was significantly reduced at the highest mean temperature (7.0 days at 30°C) compared to the lowest one (29.4 days at 17.6°C). Survival was low at all tested fluctuating temperatures, apart from mean fluctuating temperature of 25°C (37%). Understanding the thermal biology of V. canescens under more natural conditions is of critical importance in applied contexts. Thus, predictions of biological responses to fluctuating temperatures may be used in population forecasting models which potentially influence decision-making in IPM programs.

  2. Effects of temperature fluctuations on cuttlebone formation of cuttlefish Sepia esculenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuhan; Zhang, Xiumei; Liu, Songlin; Chen, Siqing

    2012-07-01

    The morphological characteristics and the cuttlebone formation of Sepia esculenta exposed to different water temperature fluctuations were investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature fluctuation cycles (15 cycles, 60 d in total) consisted of the following three regimes of 4 d duration: keeping water temperature in 26°C for 3 d (Group A), 2 d (Group B), 0 d (Group C, control); then keeping water temperature in 16°C for the next 1, 2, 4 d. No significant difference in the survival rate was observed between the control and temperature fluctuation groups ( P >0.05). Lamellar depositions in a temperature fluctuation cycle were 2.45±0.02 for Group A, 2.00±0.02 for Group B, and 1.78±0.02 for Group C ( P< 0.05). The relationship between age and number of lamellas in the cuttlebone of S. esculenta under each water temperature fluctuation could be described as the linear model and the number of lamellas in the cuttlebone did not correspond to actual age. Group A had the highest cuttlebone growth index (CGI), the lowest locular index (LI), and inter-streak distances comparing with those of control group. However, the number of lamellas and LI or CGI showed a quadratic relationship for each temperature fluctuation group. In addition, temperature fluctuations caused the breakage of cuttlebone dark rings, which was considered a thermal mark. The position of the breakage in the dark rings was random. This thermal mark can be used as supplementary information for marking and releasing techniques.

  3. Spin fluctuations and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the cuprate superconductors, models of strongly correlated electronic systems, such as the Hubbard or t - J models, are commonly employed. To study these models, projected (Hubbard) operators have to be used. Due to the unconventional commutation relations for the Hubbard operators, a specific kinematical interaction of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations emerges. The interaction is induced by the intraband hopping with a coupling parameter of the order of the kinetic energy of electrons W which is much larger than the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J induced by the interband hopping. This review presents a consistent microscopic theory of spin excitations and superconductivity for cuprates where these interactions are taken into account within the Hubbard operator technique. The low-energy spin excitations are considered for the t-J model, while the electronic properties are studied using the two-subband extended Hubbard model where the intersite Coulomb repulsion V and electron-phonon interaction are taken into account.

  4. A thermodynamic fluctuation relation for temperature and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Curilef, S.

    2009-03-01

    The present work extends the well-known thermodynamic relation C = β2langδE2rang for the canonical ensemble. We start from the general situation of the thermodynamic equilibrium between a large but finite system of interest and a generalized thermostat, which we define in the course of the paper. The resulting identity langδβδErang = 1 + langδE2rang∂2S(E)/∂E2 can account for thermodynamic states with a negative heat capacity C < 0; at the same time, it represents a thermodynamic fluctuation relation that imposes some restrictions on the determination of the microcanonical caloric curve β(E) = ∂S(E)/∂E. Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of the present result for the development of new Monte Carlo methods and an apparent analogy with quantum mechanics.

  5. On Static Pressure Fluctuation between Sirocco Fan Blades in a Car Air-Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kato, Takaaki; Moriguchi, Yuu; Sakai, Masaharu; Ito, Kouji; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Nagata, Kouji; Kubo, Takashi

    In this study, special attention is directed to static pressure fluctuation in a sirocco fan for a car air-conditioning system, because it is expected that there is a close connection between the fluid noise and the pressure fluctuation. The final purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between the static pressure fluctuation between fan blades and the sound noise emitted to the outside of the fan, and to develop an air-conditioning system with highly low noise level. For this purpose, first of all, a new micro probe for the measurement of static pressure fluctuation has been developed. This new micro probe is composed of an L-type static pressure tube (the outer diameter is 0.5 mm and the inner diameter is 0.34 mm) and a very small pressure transducer. This probe exhibits a flat frequency response until approximately 2,000 Hz, and it is set between the blades of the fan rotating at 1,500 rpm. The measurements of the static pressure fluctuation between the blades have been performed, and the intensity of sound source was quantified from the second derivative of the phase-averaged static pressure fluctuation signals on the basis of Ribner's formula (Ribner 1962). The experiments have been made in two different modes, i.e., the cooling mode (FACE MODE) and the heating mode (FOOT MODE). It is shown that the static pressure increases rapidly as the blade approaches to the nose of the casing. It is also found that the sound source for FACE MODE shows the larger value than that for FOOT MODE as a whole. In particular, the largest intensity of sound source is observed when the blade approaches to the nose. From these results, it is confirmed that the present new static pressure probe is useful to specify the distributions of sound source in a sirocco fan.

  6. Magnetic Fluctuation Power Near Proton Temperature Anisotropy Instability Thresholds in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, S. D.; Kasper, J. C.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Salem, C.; Sundkvist, D.

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10{sup 6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta{sub ||} > or approx. 1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  7. Magnetic fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Bale, S D; Kasper, J C; Howes, G G; Quataert, E; Salem, C; Sundkvist, D

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10;{6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta_{ parallel} greater, similar1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  8. Brain temperature fluctuation: a reflection of functional neural activation.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon; Wise, Roy A

    2002-07-01

    Although it is known that relatively large increases in local brain temperature can occur during behaviour and in response to various novel, stressful and emotionally arousing environmental stimuli, the source of this heat is not clearly established. To clarify this issue, we monitored the temperature in three brain structures (dorsal and ventral striatum, cerebellum) and in arterial blood at the level of the abdominal aorta in freely moving rats exposed to several environmental challenges ranging from traditional stressors to simple sensory stimuli (cage change, tail pinch, exposure to another male rat, a female rat, a mouse or an unexpected sound). We found that brain temperature was consistently higher than arterial blood temperature, and that brain temperature increased prior to, and to a greater extent than, the increase in blood temperature evoked by each test challenge. Thus, the local metabolic consequences of widely correlated neural activity appear to be the primary source of increases in brain temperature and a driving force behind the associated changes in body temperature.

  9. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  10. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  11. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  12. Classical heat transport and spontaneous fluctuations associated with a temperature filament in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Alexander Thomas

    1999-11-01

    We study electron heat transport and spontaneous fluctuations during the DC injection of an electron beam by a 3 mm diameter crystal of LaB 6 at 20 eV and 200 mA, into a magnetized plasma with an ambient magnetic field of 500-1500 G. Thermalization of the beam current and subsequent transport of the electron heat creates a filamentary region about 1 cm wide, on the order of the electron skin depth, c/wpe. This ``temperature filament'' extends along the field about 5 m into the 10 m long, 40 cm wide plasma column, with a peak temperature 5-20 times greater than the 0.2-0.5 eV temperature of the bulk plasma. The plasma density, on the order of 1 × 1012 cm-3, is unperturbed in the filament because the energy of the beam is below the ionization potential of helium. In the temperature filament, under quiescent conditions, we observe simultaneous axial and radial electron heat transport that occurs at the classically predicted rates within the limits of uncertainty in the electron temperature measurement of about 20%. This is based on a comparison of space-time measurements of the filament temperature with the prediction of a computer code developed specifically to model 2-dimensional classical electron heat conduction in the beamheated filament. Langmuir probes were used to measure the temperature profile of the filament, and the spontaneous fluctuations in the filament region. Non-classical or so-called anomalous transport is observed after the onset of fluctuations. Initially these fluctuations are highly coherent with a frequency on the order of 0.1 fci and an m = 1 spiral shape in the x-y plane, having a density fluctuation amplitude, dn/n, of 20% and a magnetic fluctuation amplitude, δB/ B, of.01%. Measurements of the transverse magnetic fluctuation vectors confirm the m = 1 nature of the mode. These fluctuations are identified as drift- Alfven waves. Later in time, a low-frequency fluctuation occurs, on the order of.02 fci, which is confined to the radial center

  13. Effects of daily fluctuating temperatures on the Drosophila-Leptopilina boulardi parasitoid association.

    PubMed

    Delava, Emilie; Fleury, Frédéric; Gibert, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Koinobiont parasitoid insects, which maintain intimate and long-term relationships with their arthropod hosts, constitute an association of ectothermic organisms that is particularly sensitive to temperature variations. Because temperature shows pronounced natural daily fluctuations, we examined if experiments based on a constant temperature range can mask the real effects of the thermal regime on host-parasitoid interactions. The effects of two fluctuating thermal regimes on several developmental parameters of the Drosophila larval parasitoid Leptopilina boulardi were analyzed in this study. Regime 1 included a range of 16-23-16°C and regime 2 included a range of 16-21-26-21-16°C (mean temperature 20.1°C) compared to a 20.1°C constant temperature. Under an average temperature of 20.1°C, which corresponds to a cold condition of L. boulardi development, we showed that the success of parasitism is significantly higher under a fluctuating temperature regime than at constant temperature. A fluctuating regime also correlated with a reduced development time of the parasitoids. In contrast, the thermal regime did not affect the ability of Drosophila to resist parasitoid infestation. Finally, we demonstrated that daily temperature fluctuation prevented the entry into diapause for this species, which is normally observed at a constant temperature of 21°C. Overall, the results reveal that constant temperature experiments can produce misleading results, highlighting the need to study the thermal biology of organisms under fluctuating regimes that reflect natural conditions as closely as possible. This is particularly a major issue in host-parasitoid associations, which constitute a good model to understand the effect of climate warming on interacting species.

  14. Alternating-Current Equipment for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Recent electrical and mechanical improvements have been made in the equipment developed at the National Bureau of Standards for measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow. Data useful in the design of similar equipment are presented. The design of rectified alternating-current power supplies for such apparatus is treated briefly, and the effect of the power supplies on the performance of the equipment is discussed.

  15. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control.

  16. Survival of Apache Trout eggs and alevins under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased stream temperatures due to global climate change, livestock grazing, removal of riparian cover, reduction of stream flow, and urbanization will have important implications for fishes worldwide. Information exists that describes the effects of elevated water temperatures on fish eggs, but less information is available on the effects of fluctuating water temperatures on egg survival, especially those of threatened and endangered species. We tested the posthatch survival of eyed eggs and alevins of Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a threatened salmonid, in static temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27°C, and also in treatments with diel fluctuations of ±3°C around those temperatures. The LT50 for posthatch survival of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins was 17.1°C for static temperatures treatments and 17.9°C for the midpoints of ±3°C fluctuating temperature treatments. There was no significant difference in survival between static temperatures and fluctuating temperatures that shared the same mean temperature, yet there was a slight difference in LT50s. Upper thermal tolerance of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins is much lower than that of fry to adult life stages (22–23°C). Information on thermal tolerance of early life stages (eyed egg and alevin) will be valuable to those restoring streams or investigating thermal tolerances of imperiled fishes.

  17. Inverse heat conduction estimation of inner wall temperature fluctuations under turbulent penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhouchao; Lu, Tao; Liu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Turbulent penetration can occur when hot and cold fluids mix in a horizontal T-junction pipe at nuclear plants. Caused by the unstable turbulent penetration, temperature fluctuations with large amplitude and high frequency can lead to time-varying wall thermal stress and even thermal fatigue on the inner wall. Numerous cases, however, exist where inner wall temperatures cannot be measured and only outer wall temperature measurements are feasible. Therefore, it is one of the popular research areas in nuclear science and engineering to estimate temperature fluctuations on the inner wall from measurements of outer wall temperatures without damaging the structure of the pipe. In this study, both the one-dimensional (1D) and the two-dimensional (2D) inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) were solved to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. First, numerical models of both the 1D and the 2D direct heat conduction problem (DHCP) were structured in MATLAB, based on the finite difference method with an implicit scheme. Second, both the 1D IHCP and the 2D IHCP were solved by the steepest descent method (SDM), and the DHCP results of temperatures on the outer wall were used to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. Third, we compared the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall estimated by the 1D IHCP with those estimated by the 2D IHCP in four cases: (1) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 3°C, (2) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 30°C, (3) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 160°C, and (4) when the fluid temperatures inside the pipe were random from 50°C to 210°C.

  18. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, Markus; Croell, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A silicon crystal growth experiment has been accomplished using the floating-zone technique under microgravity on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 36). Measurements of temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone due to time dependent thermocapillary convection (Marangoni convection) and an observation of the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously performed during the experiment. Temperature fluctuations of about 0.5 - 0.7 C with a frequency range < 0.5Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuates considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: Growth rates up to 3 to 4mm/min, close to zero mm/min, as well as negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations, microscopic growth rates, and the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well, with main frequencies between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, and the characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies. At a position 3.4mm above the interface and 1.4mm inside the melt, equivalent to the sensor tip position in the experiment, temperature fluctuations up to 1.8 C and frequencies ? 0.25Hz were found in the simulations.

  19. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Benz, K. W.; Lichtensteiger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Several earlier (micro)g experiments have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed on the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Maran-goni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies f? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  20. Effects of temperature fluctuations of IUE data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B. E.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of IUE calibration lamp images shows that variation in the temperature of the scientific instrument causes shifts in the location of the spectral format with respect to the reseau grid on the detector and in the location of the reseaux themselves. In high dispersion, a camera head amplifier temperature difference of 6C corresponds to a shift of 4 pixels in the spectral format for LWR and 2 pixels for SWP along the dispersion direction. Shifts perpendicular to the disperson (for the same temperature difference) are less than one pixel for both cameras. In low dispersion spectra, the shifts are similar but orthogonal to those described above with the larger motion lying in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion. In both dispersion modes, the observed shifts are apparently independent of wavelength. In high dispersion, the constant pixel shift mimics a constant velocity error.

  1. Fluctuations of conserved charges at finite temperature from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Szabolcs; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sándor D.; Krieg, Stefan; Ratti, Claudia; Szabó, Kálman

    2012-01-01

    We present the full results of the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration on flavor diagonal and non-diagonal quark number susceptibilities with 2 + 1 staggered quark flavors, in a temperature range between 125 and 400 MeV. The light and strange quark masses are set to their physical values. Lattices with N t = 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 are used. We perform a continuum extrapolation of all observables under study. A Symanzik improved gauge and a stout-link improved staggered fermion action is utilized. All results are compared to the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions: good agreement is found in the temperature region below the transition.

  2. Maps of the little bangs through energy density and temperature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sumit Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2016-01-22

    Heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are often referred to as little bangs. We propose for the first time to map the heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies, similar to the maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation, using fluctuations of energy density and temperature in small phase space bins. We study the evolution of fluctuations at each stage of the collision using an event-by-event hydrodynamic framework. We demonstrate the feasibility of making fluctuation maps from experimental data and its usefulness in extracting considerable information regarding the early stages of the collision and its evolution.

  3. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  4. Measurements of temperature and pressure fluctuations in the T prime 2 cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A.; Dor, J. B.; Breil, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cold wire measurement of temperature fluctuations were made in a DERAT T'2 induction powered cryogenic wind tunnel for 2 types of liquid nitrogen injectors. Thermal turbulence measured in the tranquilization chamber depends to a great extent on the injector used; for fine spray of nitrogen drops, this level of turbulence seemed completely acceptable. Fluctuations in static pressure taken from the walls of the vein by Kulite sensors showed that there was no increase in aerodynamic noise during cryogenic gusts.

  5. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man-chang; Sun, Ke-wei; Zhang, Yong

    2006-03-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 degrees C to 20 degrees C suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions of 8.0 g/(L.d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 degrees C) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation; (3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation.

  6. Modeling air temperature changes in Northern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchin, A.; Korets, M.; Shvidenko, A.; Burenina, T.; Musokhranova, A.

    2014-11-01

    Based on time series (1950-2005) of monthly temperatures from 73 weather stations in Northern Asia (limited by 70-180° EL and 48-75° NL), it is shown that there are statistically significant spatial differences in character and intensity of the monthly and yearly temperature trends. These differences are defined by geomorphological and geographical parameters of the area including exposure of the territory to Arctic and Pacific air mass, geographic coordinates, elevation, and distances to Arctic and Pacific oceans. Study area has been divided into six domains with unique groupings of the temperature trends based on cluster analysis. An original methodology for mapping of temperature trends has been developed and applied to the region. The assessment of spatial patterns of temperature trends at the regional level requires consideration of specific regional features in the complex of factors operating in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-lithosphere-biosphere system.

  7. The bispectrum of cosmic string temperature fluctuations including recombination effects

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Donough; Hindmarsh, Mark E-mail: m.b.hindmarsh@sussex.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum from cosmic strings, including the contributions from the last scattering surface, using a well-established Gaussian model for the string energy-momentum correlation functions, and a simplified model for the cosmic fluid. We check our approximation for the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution against the bispectrum obtained from the full sky map of the cosmic string ISW signal used by the Planck team, obtaining good agreement. We validate our model for the last scattering surface contribution by comparing the predicted temperature power spectrum with that obtained from a full Boltzmann code treatment applied to the Unconnected Segment Model of a string network. We find that including the last scattering contribution has only a small impact on the upper limit on the string tension resulting from the bispectrum at Planck resolutions, and argue that the bispectrum is unlikely to be competitive with the power spectrum at any resolution.

  8. Zero-Temperature Fluctuations in Short-Range Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguin, L.-P.; Newman, C. M.; Stein, D. L.; Wehr, J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the energy difference restricted to a finite volume for certain pairs of incongruent ground states (if they exist) in the d-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass at zero temperature. We prove that the variance of this quantity with respect to the couplings grows proportionally to the volume in any d ≥ 2. An essential aspect of our result is the use of the excitation metastate. As an illustration of potential applications, we use this result to restrict the possible structure of spin glass ground states in two dimensions.

  9. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Foy, E.; Rowan, G.; Goldstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of probability theory to determine the effects of turbulent fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent combustion systems is briefly reviewed. Results are presented for the effect of species fluctuations in particular. It is found that turbulent fluctuations of species act to reduce the reaction rates, in contrast with the temperature fluctuations previously determined to increase Arrhenius reaction rate constants. For the temperature fluctuations, a criterion is set forth for determining if, in a given region of a turbulent flow field, the temperature can be expected to exhibit ramp like fluctuations. Using the above results, along with results previously obtained, a model is described for testing the effects of turbulent fluctuations of temperature and species on reaction rates in computer programs dealing with turbulent reacting flows. An alternative model which employs three variable probability density functions (temperature and two species) and is currently being formulated is discussed as well.

  10. Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleation in helium at ultralow temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleating droplets are studied in4He and3He-4He mixtures at ultralow temperatures in the dissipationless regime. We firstly discuss the droplet number density arising as quantum fluctuations and secondly derive the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a droplet in a metastable fluid. This equation, which is well-known in classical hydrodynamics, governs kinetics of domain growth at very low temperatures. Thirdly, the quantum nucleation rate is shown to be much enhanced by high-frequency acoustic or electric field, however small its amplitude is, when the period of oscillation 2π/ω is shorter than the time τ s of tunnelling through the potential barrier. Fourthly, we examine equilibrium fluctuations of a planar interface which macroscopically separates two phases. The correlation function of the interface displacement is shown to cross over from the classical expression into a newly found quantum expression as the temperature is lowered.

  11. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  12. Active suppression of air refractive index fluctuation using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Banh, Tuan Quoc; Ohkubo, Yuria; Murai, Yoshinosuke; Aketagawa, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Air refractive index fluctuation ({Delta}n{sub air}) is one of the largest uncertainty sources in precision interferometry systems that require a resolution of nanometer order or less. We introduce a method for the active suppression of {Delta}n{sub air} inside a normal air-environment chamber using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator. The temporal air refractive index (n{sub air}) at a local point is maintained constant with an expanded uncertainty of {approx}4.2x10{sup -9} (k=2), a sufficiently low uncertainty for precise measurements unaffected by {Delta}n{sub air} to be made inside a chamber.

  13. The importance of temperature fluctuations in understanding mosquito population dynamics and malaria risk

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is a key environmental driver of Anopheles mosquito population dynamics; understanding its central role is important for these malaria vectors. Mosquito population responses to temperature fluctuations, though important across the life history, are poorly understood at a population level. We used stage-structured, temperature-dependent delay-differential equations to conduct a detailed exploration of the impacts of diurnal and annual temperature fluctuations on mosquito population dynamics. The model allows exploration of temperature-driven temporal changes in adult age structure, giving insights into the population’s capacity to vector malaria parasites. Because of temperature-dependent shifts in age structure, the abundance of potentially infectious mosquitoes varies temporally, and does not necessarily mirror the dynamics of the total adult population. In addition to conducting the first comprehensive theoretical exploration of fluctuating temperatures on mosquito population dynamics, we analysed observed temperatures at four locations in Africa covering a range of environmental conditions. We found both temperature and precipitation are needed to explain the observed malaria season in these locations, enhancing our understanding of the drivers of malaria seasonality and how temporal disease risk may shift in response to temperature changes. This approach, tracking both mosquito abundance and age structure, may be a powerful tool for understanding current and future malaria risk.

  14. Global surface air temperatures - Update through 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1988-01-01

    Data from meteorological stations show that surface air temperatures in the 1980s are the warmest in the history of instrumental records. The four warmest years on record are all in the 1980s, with the warmest years in the analysis being 1981 and 1987. The rate of warming between the mid-1960s and the present is higher than that which occurrred in the previous period of rapid warming between the 1880s and 1940.

  15. Geographic variation in the flood-induced fluctuating temperature requirement for germination in Setaria parviflora seeds.

    PubMed

    Mollard, F P O; Insausti, P

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to search for specific seed germinative strategies related to flooding escape in Setaria parviflora, a common species across the Americas. For this purpose, we investigated induction after floods, in relation to fluctuating temperature requirements for germination in seeds from mountain, floodplain and successional grasslands. A laboratory experiment was conducted in which seeds were imbibed or immersed in water at 5°C. Seeds were also buried in flood-prone and upland grasslands and exhumed during the flooding season. Additionally, seeds were buried in flooded or drained grassland mesocosms. Germination of exhumed seeds was assayed at 25°C or at 20°C/30°C in the dark or in the presence of red light pulses. After submergence or soil flooding, a high fraction (>32%) of seeds from the floodplain required fluctuating temperatures to germinate. In contrast, seeds from the mountains showed maximum differences in germination between fluctuating and constant temperature treatment only after imbibition (35%) or in non-flooded soil conditions (40%). The fluctuating temperature requirement was not clearly related to the foregoing conditions in the successional grassland seeds. Maximum germination could also be attained with red light pulses to seeds from mountain and successional grasslands. Results show that the fluctuating temperature requirement might help floodplain seeds to germinate after floods, indicating a unique feature of the dormancy of S. parviflora seeds from floodplains, which suggests an adaptive advantage aimed at postponing emergence during inundation periods. In contrast, the fluctuating temperature required for germination among seeds from mountain and successional grasslands show its importance for gap detection.

  16. Global trends of measured surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surface air temperature measurements from available meteorological stations for the period of 1880-1985. It is shown that the network of meteorological stations is sufficient to yield reliable long-term, decadal, and interannual temperature changes for both the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere, despite the fact that most stations are located on the continents. The results indicate a global warming of about 0.5-0.7 C in the past century, with warming of similar magnitude in both hemispheres. A strong warming trend between 1965 and 1980 raised the global mean temperature in 1980 and 1981 to the highest level in the period of instrumental records. Selected graphs of the temperature change in each of the eight latitude zones are included.

  17. Biodegradation of Toluene Under Seasonal and Diurnal Fluctuations of Soil-Water Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh K; Shrestha, Shristi R; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2012-09-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different constant temperatures: 10°C, 21°C, and 30°C. These conditions were considered to represent (1) winter, (2) spring and/or autumn, and (3) summer seasons, respectively, at many polluted sites. Three additional sets of batch experiments were performed under fluctuating soil-water temperature cases (21<>10°C, 30<>21°C, and 10<>30°C) to mimic the day-night temperature patterns expected during the year. The batches were put at two different temperatures alternatively to represent the day (high-temperature) and night (low-temperature) times. The results of constant- and fluctuating-temperature experiments show that toluene degradation is strongly dependent on soil-water temperature level. An almost two-fold increase in toluene degradation time was observed for every 10°C decrease in temperature for constant-temperature cases. Under fluctuating-temperature conditions, toluene degraders were able to overcome the temperature stress and continued thriving during all considered weather scenarios. However, a slightly longer time was taken compared to the corresponding time at daily mean temperature conditions. The findings of this study are directly useful for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites having significant diurnal and seasonal variations of soil-water temperature.

  18. Temperature Dependence of Lithium Reactions with Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Roman; Skinner, C. H.; Koel, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Liquid lithium plasma facing components (PFCs) are being developed to handle long pulse, high heat loads in tokamaks. Wetting by lithium of its container is essential for this application, but can be hindered by lithium oxidation by residual gases or during tokamak maintenance. Lithium PFCs will experience elevated temperatures due to plasma heat flux. This work presents measurements of lithium reactions at elevated temperatures (298-373 K) when exposed to natural air. Cylindrical TZM wells 300 microns deep with 1 cm2 surface area were filled with metallic lithium in a glovebox containing argon with less than 1.6 ppm H20, O2, and N2. The wells were transferred to a hot plate in air, and then removed periodically for mass gain measurements. Changes in the surface topography were recorded with a microscope. The mass gain of the samples at elevated temperatures followed a markedly different behavior to that at room temperature. One sample at 373 K began turning red indicative of lithium nitride, while a second turned white indicative of lithium carbonate formation. Data on the mass gain vs. temperature and associated topographic changes of the surface will be presented. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  19. Temperature fluctuations and the thermodynamic determination of the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Y. Z.; Zorn, R.; Holderer, O.; Schmelzer, J. W. P.; Schick, C.; Donth, E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to decide which of the two possible thermodynamic expressions for the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids is the correct one. In the derivation of these two expressions, the occurrence of temperature fluctuations in the considered nanoscale subsystems is either included or neglected. Consequently, our analysis gives also an answer to the widely discussed problem whether temperature fluctuations have to be generally accounted for in thermodynamics or not. To this end, the characteristic length-scales at equal times and temperatures for propylene glycol were determined independently from AC calorimetry in both the above specified ways and from quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS), and compared. The result shows that the cooperative length determined from QENS coincides most consistently with the cooperativity length determined from AC calorimetry measurements for the case that the effect of temperature fluctuations is incorporated in the description. This conclusion indicates that—accounting for temperature fluctuations—the characteristic length can be derived by thermodynamic considerations from the specific parameters of the liquid at glass transition and that temperature does fluctuate in small systems.

  20. Tumor-dependent kinetics of partial pressure of oxygen fluctuations during air and oxygen breathing.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Navia, L Isabel; Yu, Daohai; Braun, Rod D; Brizel, David M; Secomb, Timothy W; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2004-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the kinetics of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) fluctuations in fibrosarcoma (FSA) and 9L tumors under air and O2 breathing conditions. The overall hypothesis was that key factors relating to oxygen tension fluctuations would vary between the two tumor types and as a function of the oxygen content of the breathing gas. To assist in the interpretation of the temporal data, spatial pO2 distributions were measured in 10 FSA and 8 9L tumors transplanted into the subcutis of the hind leg of Nembutal-anesthetized (50 mg/kg) Fischer 344 rats. Recessed-tip oxygen microelectrodes were inserted into the tumor, and linear pO2 measurements were recorded in 50-microm steps along a 3-mm path, and blood pressure was simultaneously measured via femoral arterial access. Additionally, pO2 was measured at a single location for 90 to 120 minutes in FSA (n=11) or 9L tumors (n=12). Rats were switched from air to 100% O2 breathing after 45 minutes. Temporal pO2 records were evaluated for their potential radiobiological significance by assessing the number of times they crossed a 10-mm-Hg threshold. In addition, the data were subjected to Fourier analysis for air and O2 breathing. FSA and 9L tumors had spatial median pO2 measurements of 4 and 1 mm Hg, respectively. 9L had more low pO2 measurements < or =2.5 mm Hg than did FSA, whereas between 2.5 and 10 mm Hg this pattern was reversed. Pimonidazole staining patterns in FSA and 9L tumors supported these results. Temporal pO2 instability was observed in all experiments during air and O2 breathing. Threshold analyses indicated that the 10 mm Hg threshold was crossed 2 to 5 times per hour, independent of tumor type. However, the magnitude of 9L pO2 fluctuations was approximately eight times greater than FSA fluctuations, as assessed with Fourier transform analysis (Wilcoxon, P < 0.005). O2 breathing significantly increased median pO2 in FSA from 3 to 8 mm Hg (P < 0.005) and caused a

  1. Effects of fluctuating temperature and food availability on reproduction and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Pearson, Phillip; Dawson, John; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2016-12-15

    Experimental studies on energetics and aging often remove two major factors that in part regulate the energy budget in a normal healthy individual: reproduction and fluctuating environmental conditions that challenge homeostasis. Here we use the cyclical parthenogenetic Daphnia pulex to evaluate the role of a fluctuating thermal environment on both reproduction and lifespan across six food concentrations. We test the hypotheses that (1) caloric restriction extends lifespan; (2) maximal reproduction will come with a cost of shortened lifespan; and (3) at a given food concentration, relative to a metabolically equivalent constant temperature environment a diel fluctuating thermal environment will alter the allocation of energy to reproduction and lifespan to maintain homeostasis. We did not identify a level of food concentration that extended lifespan in response to caloric restriction, and we found no cost of reproduction in terms of lifespan. Rather, the individuals at the highest food levels generally had the highest reproductive output and the longest lifespans, the individuals at the intermediate food level decreased reproduction and maintained lifespan, and the individuals at the three lower food concentrations had a decrease in reproduction and lifespan as would be predicted with increasing levels of starvation. Fluctuating temperature had no effect on lifespan at any food concentration, but delayed time to reproductive maturity and decreased early reproductive output at all food concentrations. This suggests that a fluctuating temperature regimen activates molecular pathways that alter energy allocation. The costs of fluctuating temperature on reproduction were not consistent across the lifespan. Statistical interactions for age of peak reproduction and lifetime fecundity suggest that senescence of the reproductive system may vary between temperature regimens at the different food concentrations.

  2. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  4. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  5. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  6. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Several pg experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  7. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, T.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    USA Several microgravity experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4 mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies ? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  8. Effects of rapid temperature fluctuations prior to breeding on reproductive efficiency in replacement gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we determined that rapidly cooling pigs after acute heat stress (HS) resulted in a pathological condition, and because rapid temperature fluctuations are often associated with reduced reproductive success in sows it lends itself to the hypothesis that these conditions may be linked. Study ...

  9. Analytical Comparisons of Tree Ring Data, Greenland Ice Core Temperatures and Temperature Fluctuations of the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, James; Roberts, Jim; Dahiya, Jai

    2012-10-01

    Embedded in various events on Earth are data that allow us to map the temperature of the Earth over many years. In this work we have chosen the temperature fluctuations in the Sargasso sea, the changing patterns in tree ring growth and temperature fluctuations in Greenland ice core samples for comparison with a goal to understanding the patterns in global warming. Signatures have been identified that predate the Industrial Revolution, which had been blamed for much of global warming, that indicate that Earth temperatures have enjoyed numerous intervals of both global warming and global cooling. The intention of this work is not to stir controversy but to make comparisons of scientific data and processes rather than rely on popular opinion or deduction by ``experts'' in climatology to explain global warming.

  10. Quantum suppression of fluctuations and temperatures of reconstructed A ˜ 30 quasi-projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, B. C.; Bonasera, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Zheng, H.; Cammarata, P. J.; Echeverria, A. J.; Heilborn, L.; Keksis, A. L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; Marini, P.; May, L. W.; McIntosh, A. B.; Richers, C.; Shetty, D. V.; Soisson, S. N.; Tripathi, R.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.

    2014-02-01

    Suppression of multiplicity fluctuations has been observed for three light fermions (protons, tritons and 3He) in the multifragmentation of reconstructed hot quasi-projectiles produced in collisions of 32S (45 MeV/nucleon) with 112Sn. This suppression, predicted by recent calculations, is attributed to Pauli blocking and has also been observed in experiments with trapped Fermi gases. Experimental results on nuclear temperature and density employing a quantal approach based on momentum and multiplicity fluctuations are also presented. The extracted temperatures show a noticeable reduction when compared to a similarly derived classical method. This reduction in temperature is in agreement with previous predictions indicating that classically derived methods overpredict nuclear temperature as they do not take into account the Fermi motion of the nucleons. The present results underline the role of quantum statistics in nuclear disassembly and suggest the need for proper quantum treatment when dealing with the thermodynamic properties of fragmenting heavy ions.

  11. Fluctuation-induced conductivity of superconductors above the transition temperature - Regularization of the Maki diagram.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J.; Korenman, V.

    1972-01-01

    The Maki contribution to the conductivity above the superconducting transition temperature is regularized within the framework of the BCS theory. This is achieved through the renormalization of the impurity-scattering vertex by inclusion of the effects of pair fluctuations. The conductivity is evaluated for a thin film. It depends only on the reduced temperature and the normal resistance per square. Fair agreement is found with Al films over a wide temperature range. Agreement is not found with experiments on Bi, Pb, and Ga films, which apparently contain a strong additional pair-breaking effect. The temperature range in which interactions among fluctuations become important in the Maki conductivity is generally larger than that given by the Ginzburg criterion.

  12. Prediction of growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in milk during storage under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Yousef, Ahmed; Maleky, Farnaz

    2016-03-01

    Accurate prediction of growth of undesirable organisms (e.g., Pseudomonas fluorescens) in perishable foods (e.g., milk), held under sub-ideal storage conditions, can help ensure the quality and safety of these foods at the point of consumption. In this investigation, we inoculated sterile milk with P. fluorescens (~10(3) cfu/mL) and monitored inoculum growth behavior at constant and fluctuating storage temperatures. Three storage temperatures, 4 °C, 15 °C and 29 °C, were selected to simulate proper refrigeration conditions (4 °C) and temperature abuse, respectively. To simulate temperature fluctuation, milk held at 4 °C was subjected to temperature shifts to 15 °C or 29 °C for 4 to 6h. A modified logistic model was used to obtain the best-fit curve for the microbial growth under constant storage temperature. The specific growth rates at 4 °C, 15 °C, and 29 °C, obtained from experimental data, were 0.056 ± 0.00, 0.17 ± 0.05, and 0.46 ± 0.02 h(-1), respectively, and the lag time values were 29.5 ± 4.2, 12.7 ± 4.4, and 2.8 ± 0.3h, respectively. A model predicting bacterial growth under different temperature fluctuations was obtained using the growth parameters extracted from constant temperature experiments. Growth behavior predicted by the fluctuating temperature model and that obtained experimentally were in good agreement. Lag time exhibited a larger variation compared with specific growth rate, suggesting that it depends not only on growth temperature but also on the sample population and temperature gradient. Additionally, experimental data showed that changing the temperature during the lag phase induced an additional lag time before growth; however, no significant lag time was observed under the temperature fluctuation during the exponential phase. The results of this study provide information for precise shelf-life determination and reduction of food waste, particularly for milk and milk-containing food products.

  13. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  14. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  15. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  16. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  18. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  20. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  1. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  2. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Influence of atmospheric fluctuations of the induced temperature on the characteristics of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, Viktor A.; Smalikho, I. N.

    1987-10-01

    The expression for the function representing the second-order mutual coherence of a laser beam propagating in a turbulent atmosphere under thermal self-interaction conditions is derived in the aberration-free approximation. An analysis is made of the width of a beam, its wind refraction, and the radius of coherence as a function of the initial coherence of the radiation, of conditions of diffraction on the transmitting aperture, and of fluctuations of the wind velocity. It is shown that on increase in the power the coherence radius of cw laser radiation first increases because of thermal defocusing and then decreases due to the appearance (because of fluctuations of the wind velocity) of induced temperature inhomogeneities in air in the beam localization region. The conditions under which fluctuations of the induced temperature have a significant influence on the coherence of the radiation are determined.

  3. Historical Air Temperatures Across the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa-Viviani, A.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on an analysis of daily temperature from over 290 ground-based stations across the Hawaiian Islands from 1905-2015. Data from multiple stations were used to model environmental lapse rates by fitting linear regressions of mean daily Tmax and Tmin on altitude; piecewise regressions were also used to model the discontinuity introduced by the trade wind inversion near 2150m. Resulting time series of both model coefficients and lapse rates indicate increasing air temperatures near sea level (Tmax: 0.09°C·decade-1 and Tmin: 0.23°C·decade-1 over the most recent 65 years). Evaluation of lapse rates during this period suggest Tmax lapse rates (~0.6°C·100m-1) are decreasing by 0.006°C·100m-1decade-1 due to rapid high elevation warming while Tmin lapse rates (~0.8°C·100m-1) are increasing by 0.002°C·100m-1decade-1 due to the stronger increase in Tmin at sea level versus at high elevation. Over the 110 year period, temperatures tend to vary coherently with the PDO index. Our analysis verifies warming trends and temperature variability identified earlier by analysis of selected index stations. This method also provides temperature time series we propose are more robust to station inhomogeneities.

  4. The effects of fluctuating culture temperature on stress tolerance and antioxidase expression in Esteya vermicola.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-bo; Pang, Wen-xing; Yv, Xiao-na; Li, Jing-jie; Zhang, Yong-an; Sung, Chang-keun

    2015-02-01

    The endoparasitic nematophagous fungus, Esteya vermicola, has shown great potential as a biological control agent against the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Fluctuating culture temperatures can affect fungal yields and fungal tolerance to desiccation, UV radiation, H2O2, and heat stress, as well as antioxidase expression. To explore these effects, E. vermicola cultured under five temperature ranges, 26°C, 15-26°C, 26-35°C, 20-30°C, and 15-35°C, were compared. The cultures grown at lower temperatures showed better growth, stronger tolerance to desiccation, UV, and H2O2 stresses, and increased catalase expression, However, these cultures also showed weaker heat stress tolerance and lower superoxide dismutase expression than the higher-temperature cultures. In particular, the E. vermicola cultured at 20-30°C, i.e., fluctuating in a narrow range around the optimal temperature, showed the best performance. Therefore, for production in practical applications, this narrowly fluctuating, moderate temperature appears to be optimal for yield and stress tolerance in E. vermicola.

  5. Coupling of infraslow fluctuations in autonomic and central vigilance markers: skin temperature, EEG β power and ERP P300 latency.

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Jennifer R; Romeijn, Nico; Gómez-Herrero, Germán; Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    Even under thermoneutral conditions, skin temperature fluctuates spontaneously, most prominently at distal parts of the body. These fluctuations were shown to be associated with fluctuations in vigilance: mild manipulation of skin temperature during nocturnal sleep affects sleep depth and the power spectral density of the electroencephalogram (EEG), and fluctuations in skin temperature during daytime wakefulness are related to sleep propensity and task performance. The association of daytime skin temperature fluctuations with EEG markers of vigilance has not previously been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association between daytime fluctuations in skin temperature with those in two quantitative EEG measures: the power spectral density of background EEG, and the event related potential (ERP) elicited by visual stimuli. High-density EEG and skin temperature were obtained in eight healthy adults five times a day while they performed a visual sustained-attention task. Assessments were made after a night of normal sleep and after the challenge of a night of total sleep deprivation. Fluctuations in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient measured from the earlobe and mastoid were associated with fluctuations in parieto-occipital high beta band (20-40 Hz) power of the pre-stimulus background EEG, but only after sleep deprivation. The temperature fluctuations were moreover associated with fluctuations in the latency of the P300 elicited by the stimulus. The findings demonstrate close association between fluctuations in an autonomic correlate of the vigilance state (i.e. the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient), and fluctuations in central nervous system correlates of the vigilance state (i.e. background EEG and ERP). The findings are of theoretical and practical relevance for the assessment and manipulation of vigilance.

  6. Evidence for large temperature fluctuations in quasar accretion disks from spectral variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Agol, Eric; Dexter, Jason

    2014-03-10

    The well-known bluer-when-brighter trend observed in quasar variability is a signature of the complex processes in the accretion disk and can be a probe of the quasar variability mechanism. Using a sample of 604 variable quasars with repeat spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS), we construct difference spectra to investigate the physical causes of this bluer-when-brighter trend. The continuum of our composite difference spectrum is well fit by a power law, with a spectral index in excellent agreement with previous results. We measure the spectral variability relative to the underlying spectra of the quasars, which is independent of any extinction, and compare to model predictions. We show that our SDSS spectral variability results cannot be produced by global accretion rate fluctuations in a thin disk alone. However, we find that a simple model of an inhomogeneous disk with localized temperature fluctuations will produce power-law spectral variability over optical wavelengths. We show that the inhomogeneous disk will provide good fits to our observed spectral variability if the disk has large temperature fluctuations in many independently varying zones, in excellent agreement with independent constraints from quasar microlensing disk sizes, their strong UV spectral continuum, and single-band variability amplitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on quasar variability models and add to the mounting evidence that quasar accretion disks have large localized temperature fluctuations.

  7. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-03-01

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960-2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large ``V''-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this ``V''-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks.

  8. Gaussian fluctuations in the two-dimensional BCS-BEC crossover: finite temperature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighin, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2016-02-01

    The role of fluctuations is enhanced in lower dimensionality systems: in a two dimensions off- diagonal long-range order is destroyed by the fluctuations at any finite temperature, drastically modifying the critical properties with respect to the three-dimensional counterpart. Recently two-dimensional systems of interacting fermions have been the subject of Montecarlo studies and experimental investigations, in particular an ultracold gas of attractive fermions with a widely tunable interaction due to a Feshbach resonance has been realized and the Berezinskii- Kosterlitz-Thouless transition has been observed. The present work deals with the theoretical description of an ultracold Fermi gas: we discuss the role of Gaussian fluctuations of the order parameter in the equation of state, in particular we take into account the first sound velocity, showing that the inclusion of order parameter fluctuations is needed in order to get the correct composite-boson limit in the strong-coupling regime. The theory is also compared with experimental data. Finally we focus on the superfluid density in the weak-coupling, intermediate and strong-coupling regimes at finite temperature, through which the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless critical temperature is obtained.

  9. Fluctuations in air pollution give risk warning signals of asthma hospitalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have implicated that air pollution has been associated with asthma exacerbations. However, the key link between specific air pollutant and the consequent impact on asthma has not been shown. The purpose of this study was to quantify the fluctuations in air pollution time-series dynamics to correlate the relationships between statistical indicators and age-specific asthma hospital admissions. An indicators-based regression model was developed to predict the time-trend of asthma hospital admissions in Taiwan in the period 1998-2010. Five major pollutants such as particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) were included. We used Spearman's rank correlation to detect the relationships between time-series based statistical indicators of standard deviation, coefficient of variation, skewness, and kurtosis and monthly asthma hospitalization. We further used the indicators-guided Poisson regression model to test and predict the impact of target air pollutants on asthma incidence. Here we showed that standard deviation of PM10 data was the most correlated indicators for asthma hospitalization for all age groups, particularly for elderly. The skewness of O3 data gives the highest correlation to adult asthmatics. The proposed regression model shows a better predictability in annual asthma hospitalization trends for pediatrics. Our results suggest that a set of statistical indicators inferred from time-series information of major air pollutants can provide advance risk warning signals in complex air pollution-asthma systems and aid in asthma management that depends heavily on monitoring the dynamics of asthma incidence and environmental stimuli.

  10. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  11. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  12. Occupation number and fluctuations in the finite-temperature Bose-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Fleischhauer, M.; Olsen, M.K.

    2004-07-01

    We study the occupation numbers and number fluctuations of ultracold atoms in deep optical lattices for finite-temperatures within the Bose-Hubbard model. Simple analytical expressions for the mean occupation number and number fluctuations are obtained in the weak-hopping regime using an interpolation between results from different perturbation approaches in the Mott-insulator and superfluid phases. With this approach the magnitude of number fluctuations under a wide range of experimental conditions can be estimated and the properties of the finite-temperature phase diagram can be studied. These analytical results are compared to exact one-dimensional numerical calculations using a finite temperature variant of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method and found to have a high degree of accuracy. We find very good agreement, also in the crossover 'thermal' region. We also analyze the influence of finite temperature on the behavior of the system in the vicinity of the zero-temperature phase transition, in one, two, and three dimensions.

  13. Air Surface Temperature Correlation with Greenhouse Gases by Using Airs Data Over Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop algorithms for calculating the air surface temperature (AST). This study also aims to analyze and investigate the effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the AST value in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression is used to achieve the objectives of the study. Peninsular Malaysia has been selected as the research area because it is among the regions of tropical Southeast Asia with the greatest humidity, pockets of heavy pollution, rapid economic growth, and industrialization. The predicted AST was highly correlated ( R = 0.783) with GHGs for the 6-year data (2003-2008). Comparisons of five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the wet season (within 1.3 K). The in situ data ranged from 1 to 2 K. Validation results showed that AST ( R = 0.776-0.878) has values nearly the same as the observed AST from AIRS. We found that O3 during the wet season was indicated by a strongly positive beta coefficient (0.264-0.992) with AST. The CO2 yields a reasonable relationship with temperature with low to moderate beta coefficient (-0.065 to 0.238). The O3, CO2, and environmental variables experienced different seasonal fluctuations that depend on weather conditions and topography. The concentration of gases and pollution were the highest over industrial zones and overcrowded cities, and the dry season was more polluted compared with the wet season. These results indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis to investigate the effect of atmospheric GHGs on AST over Peninsular Malaysia. An algorithm that is capable of retrieving Peninsular Malaysian AST in all weather conditions with total uncertainties ranging from 1 to 2 K was developed.

  14. Upper temperature tolerance of loach minnow under acute, chronic, and fluctuating thermal regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widmer, A.M.; Carveth, C.J.; Bonar, Scott A.; Simms, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    We used four methods to estimate the upper lethal temperature of loach minnow Rhinichthys cobitis: the lethal thermal method (LTM), chronic lethal method (CLM), acclimated chronic exposure (ACE) method with static temperatures, and ACE method with diel temperature fluctuations. The upper lethal temperature of this species ranged between 32??C and 38??C, depending on the method and exposure time; however, temperatures as low as 28??C resulted in slowed growth compared with the control groups. In LTM trials, we increased temperatures 0.3??C/min and death occurred at 36.8 ?? 0.2??C (mean ?? SE) for fish (37-19 mm total length) acclimated to 30??C and at 36.4 ?? 0.07??C for fish acclimated to 25??C. In CLM trials, temperatures were increased more slowly (1??C/d), allowing fish to acclimate. Mean temperature at death was 33.4 ?? 0.1??C for fish 25-35 mm and 32.9 ?? 0.4??C for fish 45-50 mm. In the ACE experiment with static temperatures, we exposed fish for 30 d to four constant temperatures. No fish (20-40 mm) survived beyond 30 d at 32??C and the 30-d temperature lethal to 50% of the test animals was 30.6??C. Growth at static 28??C and 30??C was slower than growth at 25??C, suggesting that fish were stressed at sublethal temperatures. In ACE trials with diel temperature fluctuations of 4,6, and 10??C and a 32??C peak temperature, over 80% of fish (20-40 mm) survived 30 d. Although brief exposures to 32??C were not lethal, the growth of fish in the three fluctuating-temperature treatments was significantly less than the growth at the ambient temperature (25-29??C). To minimize thermal stress and buffer against temperature spikes, we recommend that loach minnow habitat be managed to avoid water temperatures above 28??C. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  15. Effects of fluctuating temperature on mortality, stress, and energy reserves of juvenile coho salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.E.; Gharrett, J.A.; Carls, M.G.; Rice, S.D.; Moles, A.; Korn, S.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of fluctuating diel temperature cycles on survival, growth, plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations, liver weight, and liver glycogen of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were determined. Temperature cycles (10-13/sup 0/, 9-15/sup 0/, 8-17/sup 0/, and 6.5-20/sup 0/C) were selected to stimulate observed temperatures in clear-cuts of southeastern Alaska. Different levels of feeding, including starvation, were used in each of the tests. LT50s (peak temperature within a cycle producing 50% mortality) were 28/sup 0/C for age-0 fish (350 mg) and 26/sup 0/ for age-II fish (22-g presmolts). Cyclic temperatures for 40 d, averaging 11/sup 0/C daily, did not influence growth of age-0 fish on any food ration as compared to controls held at a constant 11/sup 0/C. Plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations were significantly greater in fish maintained for 20 d in the 6.5-20/sup 0/C cycle but not different in fish in 10-13/sup 0/ and 9-15/sup 0/ cycles or a constant 11/sup 0/C. These elevated concentrations may be indicators of long-term stress. Plasma cortisol concentrations were lower in starved fish than in fed fish at all temperature regimes; however, fluctuating temperature did not enhance starvation effects on cortisol levels. Diel temperature cycles did not affect liver weights or liver glycogen concentrations.

  16. Concentration fluctuations in miscible polymer blends: Influence of temperature and chain rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-05-21

    In contrast to binary mixtures of small molecule fluids, homogeneous polymer blends exhibit relatively large concentration fluctuations that can strongly affect the transport properties of these complex fluids over wide ranges of temperatures and compositions. The spatial scale and intensity of these compositional fluctuations are studied by applying Kirkwood-Buff theory to model blends of linear semiflexible polymer chains with upper critical solution temperatures. The requisite quantities for determining the Kirkwood-Buff integrals are generated from the lattice cluster theory for the thermodynamics of the blend and from the generalization of the random phase approximation to compressible polymer mixtures. We explore how the scale and intensity of composition fluctuations in binary blends vary with the reduced temperature τ ≡ (T − T{sub c})/T (where T{sub c} is the critical temperature) and with the asymmetry in the rigidities of the components. Knowledge of these variations is crucial for understanding the dynamics of materials fabricated from polymer blends, and evidence supporting these expectations is briefly discussed.

  17. Influence of meteorological parameters and air pollution on hourly fluctuation of birch (Betula L.) and ash (Fraxinus L.) airborne pollen.

    PubMed

    Puc, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Pollen grains are one of the most important groups of atmospheric biological particles that originate allergic processes. Knowledge of intradiurnal variation of the atmospheric pollen may be useful for the treatment and prevention of pollen allergies. Intradiurnal fluctuation of hourly pollen counts in 24 h are related to the daily rhythm of anther opening, and modified by various interacting factors. Flowering and pollen production of individual species are influenced by genetic, phenological, ecological, meteorological and climatic factors. Estimation of the intradiurnal variability in the pollen count permits evaluation of the threat posed by allergens over a given area. Measurements performed in Szczecin over a period of 7 years (2006-2012) permitted analysis of hourly variation of the pollen count of birch (Betula) and ash (Fraxinus) in 24 h, and evaluation of the impact of weather conditions and the concentration of gas air pollutants on the intradiurnal patterns of both taxa. Aerobiological monitoring was conducted using a Hirst volumetric trap (Lanzoni VPPS 2000). Consecutive phases during the day were defined as 1, 5, 25, 50, 75, 95, 99% of annual total pollen. The analysis revealed that 50% of total daily pollen was noted at 14:00 for Betula and Fraxinus. The hourly distribution of birch pollen count skewed to the left and the majority of pollen of this taxon appears in the air in the first 12 hours of the day. However, for ash, the hourly distribution of pollen count skewed to the right. Statistically significant correlation was noted between the Betula and Fraxinus pollen concentration and the mean air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, air pressure, total radiation and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)).

  18. Variation in the urban vegetation, surface temperature, air temperature nexus.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Sheri A; Liang, Liyin L; Crum, Steven M; Feyisa, Gudina L; Wang, Jun; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2017-02-01

    Our study examines the urban vegetation - air temperature (Ta) - land surface temperature (LST) nexus at micro- and regional-scales to better understand urban climate dynamics and the uncertainty in using satellite-based LST for characterizing Ta. While vegetated cooling has been repeatedly linked to reductions in urban LST, the effects of vegetation on Ta, the quantity often used to characterize urban heat islands and global warming, and on the interactions between LST and Ta are less well characterized. To address this need we quantified summer temporal and spatial variation in Ta through a network of 300 air temperature sensors in three sub-regions of greater Los Angeles, CA, which spans a coastal to desert climate gradient. Additional sensors were placed within the inland sub-region at two heights (0.1m and 2m) within three groundcover types: bare soil, irrigated grass, and underneath citrus canopy. For the entire study region, we acquired new imagery data, which allowed calculation of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and LST. At the microscale, daytime Ta measured along a vertical gradient, ranged from 6 to 3°C cooler at 0.1 and 2m, underneath tall canopy compared to bare ground respectively. At the regional scale NDVI and LST were negatively correlated (p<0.001). Relationships between diel variation in Ta and daytime LST at the regional scale were progressively weaker moving away from the coast and were generally limited to evening and nighttime hours. Relationships between NDVI and Ta were stronger during nighttime hours, yet effectiveness of mid-day vegetated cooling increased substantially at the most arid region. The effectiveness of vegetated Ta cooling increased during heat waves throughout the region. Our findings suggest an important but complex role of vegetation on LST and Ta and that vegetation may provide a negative feedback to urban climate warming.

  19. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  9. Air temperature variation across the seed cotton dryer mixpoint

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen tests were conducted in six gins in the fall of 2008 to measure air temperature variation within various heated air seed cotton drying systems with the purpose of: checking validation of recommendations by a professional engineering society and measuring air temperature variation across the...

  10. AIR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN SEED COTTON DRYING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten tests were conducted in the fall of 2007 to measure air temperature variation within various heated air seed cotton drying systems with the purpose of: checking validation of recommendations by a professional engineering society and measuring air temperature variation across the airflow ductwork...

  11. Possible Economies in Air-Conditioning by Accepting Temperature Swings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, A. G.; Petherbridge, P.

    Public building air conditioning systems, which use constant and varying heat and cooling loads, are compared and investigated. Experiments indicated that constant temperature controls based on outside air temperature alone were inefficient. Ventilating a building with outside air and the methods of doing so are cited as being the most economical…

  12. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  13. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  14. Temperature fluctuations and infrared emission from dust particles in a hot gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small dust particles caused by electronic collisions with an ambient hot gas, is calculated. The dust-temperature distribution differs strongly from that derived on the basis of equilibrium heating models, peaking at lower temperatures in the stochastically heated case. The resulting infrared spectrum is broadened at short wavelengths, giving much more emission than expected from equilibrium calculations, and at long wavelengths exhibits a lower color temperature. Dust-temperature fluctuations are thus expected to play an important role in determining the infrared spectrum of dusty, X-ray-emitting plasmas. A power-law distribution of grain radii extended to very small grain sizes will have a distinct infrared spectrum characterized by an infrared excess at the Wien side of the spectrum. This excess emission represents a high-temperature component in the spectrum, resulting from the stochastic heating of very small dust particles. Its magnitude depends on the grain-size distribution and the temperature and density of the ambient hot gas. This excess emission may be observed by IRAS in supernova remnants and rich clusters of galaxies.

  15. Measurements of density, temperature, and their fluctuations in turbulent supersonic flow using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, and their turbulent fluctuation levels were obtained in the boundary layer of an unseeded, Mach 2 wind tunnel flow. The spectroscopic technique that was used to make the measurements is based on the combination of laser-induced oxygen fluorescence and Raman scattering by oxygen and nitrogen from the same laser pulse. Results from this demonstration experiment are compared with previous measurements obtained in the same facility using conventional probes and an earlier spectroscopic technique. Densities and temperatures measured with the current technique agree with the previous surveys to within 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The fluctuation amplitudes for both variables agree with the measurements obtained using the earlier spectroscopic technique and show evidence of an unsteady, weak shock wave that perturbs the boundary layer.

  16. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S. J.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  17. Finding new superconductors: the spin-fluctuation gateway to high Tc and possible room temperature superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Pines, David

    2013-10-24

    We propose an experiment-based strategy for finding new high transition temperature superconductors that is based on the well-established spin fluctuation magnetic gateway to superconductivity in which the attractive quasiparticle interaction needed for superconductivity comes from their coupling to dynamical spin fluctuations originating in the proximity of the material to an antiferromagnetic state. We show how lessons learned by combining the results of almost three decades of intensive experimental and theoretical study of the cuprates with those found in the decade-long study of a strikingly similar family of unconventional heavy electron superconductors, the 115 materials, can prove helpful in carrying out that search. We conclude that, since Tc in these materials scales approximately with the strength of the interaction, J, between the nearest neighbor local moments in their parent antiferromagnetic state, there may not be a magnetic ceiling that would prevent one from discovering a room temperature superconductor.

  18. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission.

    PubMed

    Freethy, S J; Conway, G D; Classen, I; Creely, A J; Happel, T; Köhn, A; Vanovac, B; White, A E

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  19. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  20. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-02-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  1. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated Electron Cyclotron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    First measurements of core (r/a < 0.95) turbulent electron temperature fluctuations made on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using a Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) technique are presented. Validation of gyro-kinetic models against measurements of the underlying turbulent micro-structure are essential for developing predictive capabilities for future devices. In tokamak plasmas, turbulent temperature fluctuations are sufficiently broadband ( 0.5 MHz) and low-amplitude ( 1%) that conventional radiometer techniques are fundamentally unable to detect them and a correlation technique is required to further extract the signals. An application of the spectral decorrelation method had been designed and built for AUG. This CECE radiometer shares an optical path with a reflectometer and is sensitive to wavenumbers perpendicular to the magnetic field k⊥ up to 0.76 cm-1 . An upgrade to the focusing mirror will increase this range to k⊥ up to 1.4 cm-1. Measurements in Helium plasmas have been made at three radial locations simultaneously, providing a profile of the temperature fluctuation amplitude in the outer core of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated heated L-mode plasmas. New results and future plans will be presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-SC0006419.

  2. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Garvey, C J; Bocahut, A; Sacquin-Mora, S; Digel, I; Schneider, G J; Natali, F; Artmann, G M; Zaccai, G

    2012-11-07

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits.

  3. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  4. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  5. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  6. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  7. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  8. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  9. Temperature dependence of universal fluctuations in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model.

    PubMed

    Palma, G

    2006-04-01

    We compute exact analytical expressions for the skewness and kurtosis in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model. These quantities correspond to the third and fourth normalized moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnetization of the model. From their behavior, we conclude that they depend explicitly on the system temperature even in the thermodynamic limit, and hence the PDF itself must depend on it. Our results correct the hypothesis called universal fluctuations, they confirm and extend previous results which showed a T dependence of the PDF, including perturbative expansions within the XY model up to first order in temperature.

  10. Modelling the impact of room temperature on concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Lyng, Nadja Lynge; Clausen, Per Axel; Lundsgaard, Claus; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2016-02-01

    Buildings contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a health concern for the building occupants. Inhalation exposure is linked to indoor air concentrations of PCBs, which are known to be affected by indoor temperatures. In this study, a highly PCB contaminated room was heated to six temperature levels between 20 and 30 C, i.e. within the normal fluctuation of indoor temperatures, while the air exchange rate was constant. The steady-state air concentrations of seven PCBs were determined at each temperature level. A model based on Clausius-Clapeyron equation, ln(P) = -ΔH/RT + a(0), where changes in steady-state air concentrations in relation to temperature, was tested. The model was valid for PCB-28, PCB-52 and PCB-101; the four other congeners were sporadic or non-detected. For each congener, the model described a large proportion (R(2)>94%) of the variation in indoor air PCB levels. The results showed that one measured concentration of PCB at a known steady-state temperature can be used to predict the steady-state concentrations at other temperatures under circumstances where e.g. direct sunlight does not influence temperatures and the air exchange rate is constant. The model was also tested on field data from a PCB remediation case in an apartment in another contaminated building complex where PCB concentrations and temperature were measured simultaneously and regularly throughout one year. The model fitted relatively well with the regression of measured PCB air concentrations, ln(P) vs. 1/T, at varying temperature between 16.3 and 28.2 °C, even though the measurements were carried out under uncontrolled environmental condition.

  11. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  12. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  13. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  14. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm(-1). The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  15. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  16. High-Reynolds-number turbulent-boundary-layer wall pressure fluctuations with skin-friction reduction by air injection.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Eric S; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steven L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2008-05-01

    The hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations that occur on the solid surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer are a common source of flow noise. This paper reports multipoint surface pressure fluctuation measurements in water beneath a high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer with wall injection of air to reduce skin-friction drag. The experiments were conducted in the U.S. Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9-m-long, 3.05-m-wide hydrodynamically smooth flat plate at freestream speeds up to 20 ms and downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers exceeding 200 x 10(6). Air was injected from one of two spanwise slots through flush-mounted porous stainless steel frits (approximately 40 microm mean pore diameter) at volume flow rates from 17.8 to 142.5 l/s per meter span. The two injectors were located 1.32 and 9.78 m from the model's leading edge and spanned the center 87% of the test model. Surface pressure measurements were made with 16 flush-mounted transducers in an "L-shaped" array located 10.7 m from the plate's leading edge. When compared to no-injection conditions, the observed wall-pressure variance was reduced by as much as 87% with air injection. In addition, air injection altered the inferred convection speed of pressure fluctuation sources and the streamwise coherence of pressure fluctuations.

  17. Ultrafast spectroscopy diagnostic to measure localized ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N.; Smith, D.; Winz, G.; Yan, Z.

    2010-10-15

    A dual-channel high-efficiency, high-throughput custom spectroscopic system has been designed and implemented at DIII-D to measure localized ion thermal fluctuations associated with drift wave turbulence. A large-area prism-coupled transmission grating and high-throughput collection optics are employed to observe C VI emission centered near {lambda}=529 nm. The diagnostic achieves 0.25 nm resolution over a 2.0 nm spectral band via eight discrete spectral channels. A turbulence-relevant time resolution of 1 {mu}s is achieved using cooled high-speed avalanche photodiodes and ultralow-noise preamplifiers. The system sensitivity is designed to provide measurements of normalized ion temperature fluctuations on the order of {delta}T{sub i}/T{sub i}{<=}1%.

  18. Spatio-statistical analysis of temperature fluctuation using Mann-Kendall and Sen's slope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta-ur-Rahman; Dawood, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    This article deals with the spatio-statistical analysis of temperature trend using Mann-Kendall trend model (MKTM) and Sen's slope estimator (SSE) in the eastern Hindu Kush, north Pakistan. The climate change has a strong relationship with the trend in temperature and resultant changes in rainfall pattern and river discharge. In the present study, temperature is selected as a meteorological parameter for trend analysis and slope magnitude. In order to achieve objectives of the study, temperature data was collected from Pakistan Meteorological Department for all the seven meteorological stations that falls in the eastern Hindu Kush region. The temperature data were analysed and simulated using MKTM, whereas for the determination of temperature trend and slope magnitude SSE method have been applied to exhibit the type of fluctuations. The analysis reveals that a positive (increasing) trend in mean maximum temperature has been detected for Chitral, Dir and Saidu Sharif met stations, whereas, negative (decreasing) trend in mean minimum temperature has been recorded for met station Saidu Sharif and Timergara. The analysis further reveals that the concern variation in temperature trend and slope magnitude is attributed to climate change phenomenon in the region.

  19. Movement of Five Nematode Species through Sand Subjected to Natural Temperature Gradient Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature gradient fluctuations that occur naturally as a result of heating and cooling of the soil surface were reproduced within 15-cm-d, 15-cm-long acrylic tubes filled with moist sand. Sunny and rainy periods during the late summer in eastern Texas were simulated. Five ecologically different nematode species were adapted to fluctuating temperatures for 20-36 hours at a simulated depth of 12.5 cm before being injected simultaneously into the centers of tubes at that depth. When heat waves were propagated horizontally to eliminate gravitational effects, the movement of Ditylenchus phyllobius, Steinernema glaseri, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora relative to the thermal surface was rapid and largely random. However, Rotylenchulus reniformis moved away from and Meloidogyne incognita moved toward the thermal surface. When heat waves were propagated upward or downward, responses to temperature were the same as when propagated horizontally, irrespective of gravity. The initial direction of movement 1.5 hours after introduction to 20-era-long tubes at five depths at five intervals within a 24-hour cycle indicated that M. incognita moved away from and R. reniformis moved toward the temperature to which last exposed. Differences in movement of the five species tested relative to gravity appeared related to body length, with the smallest nematodes moving downward and the largest moving upward. PMID:19279868

  20. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  1. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  2. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  3. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  5. Determination of humidity and temperature fluctuations based on MOZAIC data and parametrisation of persistent contrail coverage for general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K. M.; Schumann, U.; Smit, H. G. J.; Helten, M.; Zängl, G.

    1997-08-01

    Humidity and temperature fluctuations at pressure levels between 166 and 290 hPa on the grid scale of general circulation models for a region covered by the routes of airliners, mainly over the Atlantic, have been determined by evaluation of the data obtained with almost 2000 flights within the MOZAIC programme. It is found that the distributions of the fluctuations cannot be modelled by Gaussian distributions, because large fluctuations appear with a relatively high frequency. Lorentz distributions were used for the analytical representation of the fluctuation distributions. From these a joint probability distribution has been derived for simultaneous temperature and humidity fluctuations. This function together with the criteria for the formation and persistence of contrails are used to derive the maximum possible fractional coverage of persistent contrails in a grid cell of a GCM. This can be employed in a statistical formulation of contrail appearance in a climate model.

  6. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  7. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  8. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  9. Toxin production and growth of pathogens subjected to temperature fluctuations simulating consumer handling of cold cuts.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin; Rønning, Helene Thorsen; Granum, Per Einar; Møretrø, Trond; Hjerpekjøn, Marianne Røine; Langsrud, Solveig

    2014-08-18

    It is crucial for the quality and safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods to maintain the cold chain from production to consumption. The effect of temperature abuse related to daily meals and elevated refrigerator temperatures on the growth and toxin production of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus weihenstephanensis and Staphylococcus aureus and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica was studied. A case study with temperature loggings in the domestic environment during Easter and Christmas holidays was performed to select relevant time and temperature courses. A model for bacterial surface growth on food using nutrient agar plates exposed to variations in temperatures was used to simulate food stored at different temperatures and exposed to room temperature for short periods of time. The results were compared with predicted growth using the modeling tool ComBase Predictor. The consumers exposed their cold cuts to room temperatures as high as 26.5°C with an average duration of meals was 47 min daily for breakfast/brunch during the vacations. Short (≤ 2 h) daily intervals at 25°C nearly halved the time the different pathogens needed to reach levels corresponding to the levels associated with human infection or intoxication, compared with the controls continuously stored at refrigerator temperature. Although the temperature fluctuations affected growth of both B. weihenstephanensis and S. aureus, toxin production was only detected at much higher cell concentrations than what has been associated with human intoxications. Therefore, growth of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica was found to be the limiting factor for safety. In combination with data on temperature abuse in the domestic environment, modeling programs such as ComBase Predictor can be efficient tools to predict growth of some pathogens but will not predict toxin production.

  10. Electron Temperature Fluctuations Associated with the Weakly Coherent Mode in the Edge of I-mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Phillips, P.; Whyte, D. G.; Hubbard, A. E.; Sung, C.; Hughes, J. W.; Dominguez, A.; Terry, J.; Cziegler, I.

    2012-03-01

    New measurements of electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode (WCM) during improved mode, or I-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod are presented in this poster [A. E. White, et al. Nuclear Fusion, 51, 113005 (2011)]. The measurements are made with a 32-channel, high-resolution profile ECE radiometer. The WCM electron temperature fluctuations are localized to a 1 cm region inside the last closed flux surface. The WCM electron temperature fluctuation level is measured in several different I-mode discharges and is in the range 1-2%, which is up to an order of magnitude smaller than the WCM density fluctuation level. The WCM edge fluctuations observed in I-mode are believed to play a role in increasing particle transport but not energy transport in the edge of I-mode plasmas. The large difference between normalized density and electron temperature fluctuation amplitudes provides new evidence that the WCM fluctuations can separately affect energy and particle transport.

  11. Electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode in the edge of I-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Phillips, P.; Whyte, D. G.; Hubbard, A. E.; Sung, C.; Hughes, J. W.; Dominguez, A.; Terry, J.; Cziegler, I.

    2011-11-01

    New measurements of electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode (WCM) during improved mode, or I-mode plasmas (Whyte et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion. 50 105005) at Alcator C-Mod (Marmar et al 2007 Fusion. Sci. Technol. 51 3261) are presented in this paper. The measurements are made with a 32-channel, high-resolution profile electron cyclotron emission radiometer. The WCM electron temperature fluctuations are localized to a 1 cm region inside the last closed flux surface. The WCM electron temperature fluctuation level is measured in several different I-mode discharges and is in the range 1%<\\tilde T_e/T_e<2% , which is an order of magnitude smaller than the WCM density fluctuation level. The WCM edge fluctuations observed in I-mode are believed to play a role in increasing particle transport but not energy transport in the edge of I-mode plasmas. The large difference between normalized density and electron temperature fluctuation amplitudes provides new evidence that the WCM fluctuations can separately affect energy and particle transport.

  12. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  13. Air conditioner operation behaviour based on students' skin temperature in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Song, Gook-Sup; Lim, Jae-Han; Ahn, Tae-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    A total of 25 college students participated in a study to determine when they would use an air conditioner during a lecture in a university classroom. The ambient temperature and relative humidity were measured 75 cm above the floor every minute. Skin temperatures were measured every minute at seven points, according to the recommendation of Hardy and Dubois. The average clothing insulation value (CLO) of subjects was 0.53 ± 0.07 CLO. The mean air velocity in the classroom was 0.13 ± 0.028 m/s. When the subjects turned the air conditioner both on and off, the average ambient temperatures, relative humidity and mean skin temperatures were 27.4 and 23.7 °C (p = 0.000), 40.9 and 40.0% (p = 0.528) and 32.7 and 32.2 °C (p = 0.024), respectively. When the status of the air conditioner was changed, the differences of skin temperatures in core body parts (head, abdomen and thigh) were not statistically significant. However, in the extremities (mid-lower arm, hand, shin and instep), the differences were statistically significant. Subjects preferred a fluctuating environment to a constant temperature condition. We found that a changing environment does not affect classroom study.

  14. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, Douglas K.

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4-δ, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H $\\parallel$ c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below Tc, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the Tc0 vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La2-xSrxCuO4 (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to Tc. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance ξc becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near Hc2.

  15. Circadian fluctuation in heat production of young calves at different ambient temperatures in relation to posture.

    PubMed

    Schrama, J W; Noordhuizen, J P; Arieli, A; Brandsma, H A; van der Linden, J M; Verstegen, M W

    1994-03-01

    Circadian fluctuations in the effect of ambient temperature (Ta) on heat production (Htot) and its relation to posture were investigated in young calves in this study. Twenty-three 6-d-old Holstein-Friesian male calves were assigned to one of four Ta treatments: 5, 9, 13, or 18 degrees C. Heat production was measured per calf continuously every 9 min by indirect calorimetry for 5 d. The posture during these 9-min periods was derived from physical activity measurements by Doppler-radar meters. Heat production varied within a day; it was highest when calves were drinking (milk or water). The influence of Ta on Htot was larger for the light (including feeding periods) than for the dark phase of the day, being related to the larger Ta effect during the feeding periods. Lower critical temperatures (LCT) were 14.1, 15.2, and 16.8 degrees C and extra thermal heat productions below LCT (ETH) were 8.48, 8.28, and 11.55 kJ.kg-.75.d-1.C degrees-1 for the dark, the light (excluding feeding periods), and the feeding phase during the day, respectively. Time spent standing was not affected by Ta but varied during the day (24-h period). Averaged over Ta, 51% of the within day variation in Htot was accounted for by the calf's posture. Correction of Htot for the time spent standing reduced the difference in both ETH and LCT between phases of the day. The present study demonstrates that circadian fluctuations exist in the thermal requirements of young calves. Part of these fluctuations are related to within-day variation in time spent standing.

  16. A stage structured mosquito model incorporating effects of precipitation and daily temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2016-12-21

    An outbreak of dengue fever in Guangdong province in 2014 was the most serious outbreak ever recorded in China. Given the known positive correlation between the abundance of mosquitoes and the number of dengue fever cases, a stage structured mosquito model was developed to investigate the cause of the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 and its implications for outbreaks of the disease. Data on the Breteau index (number of containers positive for larvae per 100 premises investigated), temperature and precipitation were used for model fitting. The egg laying rate, the development rate and the mortality rates of immatures and adults were obtained from the estimated parameters. Moreover, effects of daily fluctuations of temperature on these parameters were obtained and the effects of temperature and precipitation were analyzed by simulations. Our results indicated that the abundance of mosquitoes depended not only on the total annual precipitation but also on the distribution of the precipitation. The daily mean temperature had a nonlinear relationship with the abundance of mosquitoes, and large diurnal temperature differences can reduce the abundance of mosquitoes. In addition, effects of increasing precipitation and temperature were interdependent. Our findings suggest that the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 was mainly caused by the distribution of the precipitation. In the perspective of mosquito control, our results reveal that it is better to clear water early and spray insecticide between April and August in case of limited resources.

  17. Multi-fractal scaling comparison of the Air Temperature and the Surface Temperature over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Jiping; Liu, Xinwei; Li, Fei

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and temporal multi-scaling behaviors between the daily Air Temperature (AT) and the Surface Temperature (ST) over China are compared in about 60-yr observations by Multi-fractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) method. The different fractal phenomena and diversity features in the geographic distribution are found for the AT and ST series using MF-DFA. There are more multi-fractal features for the AT records but less for ST. The respective geographic sites show important scaling differences when compared to the multi-fractal signatures of AT with ST. An interval threshold for 95% confidence level is obtained by shuffling the AT records and the ST records. For the AT records, 93% of all observed stations shows the strong multi-fractal behaviors. In addition, the multi-fractal characteristics decrease with increasing latitude in South China and are obviously strong along the coast. The multi-fractal behaviors of the AT records between the Yangtze River and Yellow River basin and in most regions of Northwest China seem to be weak and not significant, even single mono-fractal features. However, for the ST records, the geographical distributions of multi-fractal phenomenon seem to be in disorder which account for 81% of the stations. The weak multi-fractal behaviors of the ST records are concentrated in North China, most regions of Northeast China.

  18. How to detect fluctuating stripes in the high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Bindloss, I. P.; Fradkin, E.; Oganesyan, V.; Tranquada, J. M.; Kapitulnik, A.; Howald, C.

    2003-10-01

    This article discusses fluctuating order in a quantum disordered phase proximate to a quantum critical point, with particular emphasis on fluctuating stripe order. Optimal strategies are derived for extracting information concerning such local order from experiments, with emphasis on neutron scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy. These ideas are tested by application to two model systems—an exactly solvable one-dimensional (1D) electron gas with an impurity, and a weakly interacting 2D electron gas. Experiments on the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which can be analyzed using these strategies are extensively reviewed. The authors adduce evidence that stripe correlations are widespread in the cuprates. They compare and contrast the advantages of two limiting perspectives on the high-temperature superconductor: weak coupling, in which correlation effects are treated as a perturbation on an underlying metallic (although renormalized) Fermi-liquid state, and strong coupling, in which the magnetism is associated with well-defined localized spins, and stripes are viewed as a form of micro phase separation. The authors present quantitative indicators that the latter view better accounts for the observed stripe phenomena in the cuprates.

  19. An ultrasonic air temperature measurement system with self-correction function for humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-Chieh; Liao, Teh-Lu

    2005-02-01

    This paper proposes an ultrasonic measurement system for air temperature with high accuracy and instant response. It can measure the average temperature of the environmental air by detecting the changes of the speed of the ultrasound in the air. The changes of speed of sound are computed from combining variations of time-of-flight (TOF) from a binary frequency shift-keyed (BFSK) ultrasonic signal and phase shift from continuous waves [11]. In addition, another proposed technique for the ultrasonic air temperature measurement is the self-correction functionality within a highly humid environment. It utilizes a relative humidity/water vapour sensor and applies the theory of how sound speed changes in a humid environment. The proposed new ultrasonic air temperature measurement has the capability of self-correction for the environment variable of humidity. Especially under the operational environment with high fluctuations of various humidity levels, the proposed system can accurately self-correct the errors on the conventional ultrasonic thermometer caused by the changing density of the vapours in the air. Including the high humidity effect, a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrates that in dry air (relative humidity, RH = 10%) without humidity correction, it is accurate to ±0.4 °C from 0 °C to 80 °C, while in highly humid air (relative humidity, RH = 90%) with self-correction functionality, it is accurate to ±0.3 °C from 0 °C to 80 °C with 0.05% resolution and temperature changes are instantly reflected within 100 ms.

  20. Note: Demonstration of an external-cavity diode laser system immune to current and temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyu; Yin, Longfei; Zhuang, Wei; Luo, Bin; Dang, Anhong; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate an external-cavity laser system using an anti-reflection coated laser diode as gain medium with about 60 nm fluorescence spectrum, and a Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as frequency-selecting element with a transmission bandwidth of 1.3 GHz. With 6.4% optical feedback, a single stable longitudinal mode is obtained with a linewidth of 69 kHz. The wavelength of this laser is operating within the center of the highest transmission peak of FADOF over a diode current range from 55 mA to 142 mA and a diode temperature range from 15 °C to 35 °C, thus it is immune to the fluctuations of current and temperature.

  1. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  2. Dynamics of Air Temperature, Velocity and Ammonia Emissions in Enclosed and Conventional Pig Housing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. I.; Park, K.-H.; Jeon, J. H.; Choi, H. L.; Barroga, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the dynamics of air temperature and velocity under two different ventilation and housing systems during summer and winter in Korea. The NH3 concentration of both housing systems was also investigated in relation to the pig’s growth. The ventilation systems used were; negative pressure type for the enclosed pig house (EPH) and natural airflow for the conventional pig house (CPH). Against a highly fluctuating outdoor temperature, the EPH was able to maintain a stable temperature at 24.8 to 29.1°C during summer and 17.9 to 23.1°C during winter whilst the CPH had a wider temperature variance during summer at 24.7 to 32.3°C. However, the temperature fluctuation of the CPH during winter was almost the same with that of EPH at 14.5 to 18.2°C. The NH3 levels in the CPH ranged from 9.31 to 16.9 mg/L during summer and 5.1 to 19.7 mg/L during winter whilst that of the EPH pig house was 7.9 to 16.1 mg/L and 3.7 to 9.6 mg/L during summer and winter, respectively. These values were less than the critical ammonia level for pigs with the EPH maintaining a lower level than the CPH in both winter and summer. The air velocity at pig nose level in the EPH during summer was 0.23 m/s, enough to provide comfort because of the unique design of the inlet feature. However, no air movement was observed in almost all the lower portions of the CPH during winter because of the absence of an inlet feature. There was a significant improvement in weight gain and feed intake of pigs reared in the EPH compared to the CPH (p<0.05). These findings proved that despite the difference in the housing systems, a stable indoor temperature was necessary to minimize the impact of an avoidable and highly fluctuating outdoor temperature. The EPH consistently maintained an effective indoor airspeed irrespective of season; however the CPH had defective and stagnant air at pig nose level during winter. Characteristics of airflow direction and pattern were consistent relative to

  3. Retrieval of air temperatures from crowd-sourced battery temperatures of cell phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate air temperature observations are important for urban meteorology, for example to study the urban heat island and adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. The number of available temperature observations is often relatively limited. A new development is presented to derive temperature information for the urban canopy from an alternative source: cell phones. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. Results are presented for Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree Celsius. This shows that monitoring air temperatures employing an Android application holds great promise. Since 75% of the world's population has a cell phone, 20% of the land surface of the earth has cellular telephone coverage, and 500 million devices use the Android operating system, there is a huge potential for measuring air temperatures employing cell phones. This could eventually lead to real-time world-wide temperature maps.

  4. Growth and lipid accumulation in three Chlorella strains from different regions in response to diurnal temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weinan; Zou, Shanmei; He, Meilin; Fei, Cong; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Shiyan; Chen, Bo; Wang, Changhai

    2016-02-01

    It was economically feasible to screen strains adaptive to wide temperature fluctuation for outdoor cultivation without temperature control. In this research, three Chlorella strains from arctic glacier, desert soil and temperate native lake were isolated and identified. The growth, biochemical composition, lipid content and fatty acid composition of each strain cultured under the mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations were compared. All the three Chlorella strains showed desirable abilities of accumulating lipid under diurnal temperature fluctuations and their fatty acid profiles were suitable for biodiesel production, although the growth and biochemical composition were seemed to be region-specific. The highest lipid content was at 51.83±2.49% DW, 42.80±2.97% DW and 36.13±2.27% DW under different temperature fluctuation of 11 °C, 25 °C, 7 °C, respectively. The results indicated that the three Chlorella strains could be promising biodiesel feedstock for outdoor cultivation by the cultural mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations.

  5. Modelling spoilage of fresh turbot and evaluation of a time-temperature integrator (TTI) label under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Nuin, Maider; Alfaro, Begoña; Cruz, Ziortza; Argarate, Nerea; George, Susie; Le Marc, Yvan; Olley, June; Pin, Carmen

    2008-10-31

    Kinetic models were developed to predict the microbial spoilage and the sensory quality of fresh fish and to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial time-temperature integrator (TTI) label, Fresh Check(R), to monitor shelf life. Farmed turbot (Psetta maxima) samples were packaged in PVC film and stored at 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. Microbial growth and sensory attributes were monitored at regular time intervals. The response of the Fresh Check device was measured at the same temperatures during the storage period. The sensory perception was quantified according to a global sensory indicator obtained by principal component analysis as well as to the Quality Index Method, QIM, as described by Rahman and Olley [Rahman, H.A., Olley, J., 1984. Assessment of sensory techniques for quality assessment of Australian fish. CSIRO Tasmanian Regional Laboratory. Occasional paper n. 8. Available from the Australian Maritime College library. Newnham. Tasmania]. Both methods were found equally valid to monitor the loss of sensory quality. The maximum specific growth rate of spoilage bacteria, the rate of change of the sensory indicators and the rate of change of the colour measurements of the TTI label were modelled as a function of temperature. The temperature had a similar effect on the bacteria, sensory and Fresh Check kinetics. At the time of sensory rejection, the bacterial load was ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g. The end of shelf life indicated by the Fresh Check label was close to the sensory rejection time. The performance of the models was validated under fluctuating temperature conditions by comparing the predicted and measured values for all microbial, sensory and TTI responses. The models have been implemented in a Visual Basic add-in for Excel called "Fish Shelf Life Prediction (FSLP)". This program predicts sensory acceptability and growth of spoilage bacteria in fish and the response of the TTI at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. The program is freely

  6. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique has been developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  7. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  8. Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Turner, R. W.; Prusa, J.; Bitzer, R. J.; Finley, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complementary conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States are presented, and these provide insights into the temporal and spatial changes in the shelter temperature. The observations indicated near-surface temperature drops of as much as 6 C. Numerical model simulations for this eclipse event, which provide a complementary evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature drops, predict similar decreases. Interrelationships between the temperature drop, degree of solar irradiance reduction, and timing of the peak eclipse are also evaluated for late spring, summer, and winter sun conditions. These simulations suggest that for total eclipses the drops in shelter temperature in midlatitudes can be as high as 7 C for a spring morning eclipse.

  9. Monitored summer peak attic air temperatures in Florida residences

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.S.; Sherwin, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has analyzed measured summer attic air temperature data taken for some 21 houses (three with two different roof configurations) over the last several years. The analysis is in support of the calculation within ASHRAE Special Project 152P, which will be used to estimate duct system conductance gains that are exposed to the attic space. Knowledge of prevailing attic thermal conditions are critical to the duct heat transfer calculations for estimation of impacts on residential cooling system sizing. The field data were from a variety of residential monitoring projects that were classified according to intrinsic differences in roofing configurations and characteristics. The sites were occupied homes spread around the state of Florida. There were a variety of different roofing construction types, roof colors, and ventilation configurations. Data at each site were obtained from June 1 to September 30 according to the ASHRAE definition of summer. The attic air temperature and ambient air temperature were used for the data analysis. The attic air temperature was measured with a shielded type-T thermocouple at mid-attic height, halfway between the decking and insulation surface. The ambient air temperature was obtained at each site by thermocouples located inside a shielded exterior enclosure at a 3 to 4 m (10--12 ft) height. The summer 15-minute data from each site were sorted by the average ambient air temperature into the top 2.5% of the observations of the highest temperature. Within this limited group of observations, the average outside air temperature, attic air temperature, and coincident difference were reported.

  10. Effect of Diurnal Fluctuating versus Constant Temperatures on Germination of 445 Species from the Eastern Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Baskin, Jerry M.; Baskin, Carol C.; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen; Ma, Miaojun

    2013-01-01

    Germination response to fluctuating temperatures is a mechanism by which seeds detect gaps in vegetation canopies and depth of burial in soil, and it is very important for plants. Thus, studies on the effect of fluctuating temperature on germination at the community level are valuable for understanding community structure and biodiversity maintenance. We determined the effects of two alternating temperatures (5/25°C and 10/20°C) and one constant temperature (15°C) on seed germination of 445 species in a grassland community on the eastern Tibet Plateau. Seed mass was determined for each species, and data on habitat, type of life cycle, altitudinal distribution and functional group (graminoids or forbs) were obtained from the literature. Taking all species into account, alternating temperatures increased germination percentages regardless of amplitude. Overall, species growing in disturbed ground showed a significant germination response to temperature fluctuation, but those living in Alpine/subalpine meadow, forest margin /scrub, marshland and dry sunny slope habitats did not. Species distributed only at high elevations (>2000m) did not show a significant germination response to temperature fluctuation, whereas those occurring at both high and low elevations had a significant positive response. Germination of annuals/biennials was significantly promoted by 5/25°C, but not by 10/20°C, whereas germination of perennials was significantly promoted by both 5/25°C and 10/20°C. Small-seeded species were more likely than large-seeded species to respond positively to fluctuating temperatures. Germination of forbs had a positive response to temperature fluctuation, but germination of graminoids did not. Regeneration ability by seeds for about 36% of the species studied in the grassland can be increased by temperature fluctuation. The differential response among species to alternating vs. constant temperatures helps maintain community structure and biodiversity. A

  11. Solar activity influence on air temperature regimes in caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Penka; Mikhalev, Alexander; Stoev, Alexey

    Cave atmospheres are generally included in the processes that happen in the external atmosphere as circulation of the cave air is connected with the most general circulation of the air in the earth’s atmosphere. Such isolated volumes as the air of caves are also influenced by the variations of solar activity. We discuss cave air temperature response to climate and solar and geomagnetic activity for four show caves in Bulgaria studied for a period of 46 years (1968 - 2013). Everyday noon measurements in Ledenika, Saeva dupka, Snezhanka and Uhlovitsa cave have been used. Temperatures of the air in the zone of constant temperatures (ZCT) are compared with surface temperatures recorded at meteorological stations situated near about the caves - in the towns of Vratsa, Lovech, Peshtera and Smolyan, respectively. For comparison, The Hansen cave, Middle cave and Timpanogos cave from the Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah, USA situated nearly at the same latitude have also been examined. Our study shows that the correlation between cave air temperature time series and sunspot number is better than that between the cave air temperature and Apmax indices; that t°ZCT is rather connected with the first peak in geomagnetic activity, which is associated with transient solar activity (CMEs) than with the second one, which is higher and connected with the recurrent high speed streams from coronal holes. Air temperatures of all examined show caves, except the Ledenika cave, which is ice cave show decreasing trends. On the contrary, measurements at the meteorological stations show increasing trends in the surface air temperatures. The trend is decreasing for the Timpanogos cave system, USA. The conclusion is that surface temperature trends depend on the climatic zone, in which the cave is situated, and there is no apparent relation between temperatures inside and outside the caves. We consider possible mechanism of solar cosmic rays influence on the air temperatures in caves

  12. Associations of endothelial function and air temperature in diabetic subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: Epidemiological studies consistently show that air temperature is associated with changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the association remain largely unknown. As one index of endothelial functio...

  13. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  14. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  15. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... location must be within 10 cm of the engine intake system (i.e., the air cleaner, for most engines.) (b... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19...

  16. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  17. Steady state RANS simulations of temperature fluctuations in single phase turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kickhofel, J.; Fokken, J.; Kapulla, R.; Prasser, H. M.

    2012-07-01

    Single phase turbulent mixing in nuclear power plant circuits where a strong temperature gradient is present is known to precipitate pipe failure due to thermal fatigue. Experiments in a square mixing channel offer the opportunity to study the phenomenon under simple and easily reproducible boundary conditions. Measurements of this kind have been performed extensively at the Paul Scherrer Inst. in Switzerland with a high density of instrumentation in the Generic Mixing Experiment (GEMIX). As a fundamental mixing phenomena study closely related to the thermal fatigue problem, the experimental results from GEMIX are valuable for the validation of CFD codes striving to accurately simulate both the temperature and velocity fields in single phase turbulent mixing. In the experiments two iso-kinetic streams meet at a shallow angle of 3 degrees and mix in a straight channel of square cross-section under various degrees of density, temperature, and viscosity stratification over a range of Reynolds numbers ranging from 5*10{sup 3} to 1*10{sup 5}. Conductivity measurements, using wire-mesh and wall sensors, as well as optical measurements, using particle image velocimetry, were conducted with high temporal and spatial resolutions (up to 2.5 kHz and 1 mm in the case of the wire mesh sensor) in the mixing zone, downstream of a splitter plate. The present paper communicates the results of RANS modeling of selected GEMIX tests. Steady-state CFD calculations using a RANS turbulence model represent an inexpensive method for analyzing large and complex components in commercial nuclear reactors, such as the downcomer and reactor pressure vessel heads. Crucial to real world applicability, however, is the ability to model turbulent heat fluctuations in the flow; the Turbulent Heat Flux Transport model developed by ANSYS CFX is capable, by implementation of a transport equation for turbulent heat fluxes, of readily modeling these values. Furthermore, the closure of the turbulent heat

  18. Information entropy of activation process: Application for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Activation process for unimolecular reaction has been considered by means of radiation theory. The formulae of information entropy of activation have been derived for the Boltzmann-Arrhenius model and the activation process model (APM). The physical meaning of this entropy has been determined. It is a measure of conversion of thermal radiation energy to mechanical energy that moves atoms in a molecule during elementary activation act. It is also a measure of uncertainty of this energy conversion. The uncertainty is due to unevenness of distribution function representing the activation process. It has been shown that Arrhenius dependence is caused by the entropy change. Efficiency comparison of the two models under consideration for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule structure shows that the APM should be favored over the Boltzmann-Arrhenius one.

  19. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  20. Damage Evolution in Al Wire Bonds Subjected to a Junction Temperature Fluctuation of 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyakwa, Pearl A.; Yang, Li; Arjmand, Elaheh; Evans, Paul; Corfield, Martin R.; Johnson, C. Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonically bonded heavy Al wires subjected to a small junction temperature fluctuation under power cycling from 40°C to 70°C were investigated using a non-destructive three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray tomography evaluation approach. The occurrence of irreversible deformation of the microstructure and wear-out under such conditions were demonstrated. The observed microstructures consist of interfacial and inter-granular cracks concentrated in zones of stress intensity, i.e., near heels and emanating from interface precracks. Interfacial voids were also observed within the bond interior. Degradation rates of `first' and `stitch' bonds are compared and contrasted. A correlative microscopy study combining perspectives from optical microscopy with the x-ray tomography results clarifies the damage observed. An estimation of lifetime is made from the results and discussed in the light of existing predictions.

  1. The effects of eggshell temperature fluctuations during incubation on welfare status and gait score of broilers.

    PubMed

    Ipek, A; Sozcu, A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of different eggshell temperatures (EST); low (33.3 to 36.7°C), control (37.8 to 38.2°C), and high (38.9 to 40.0°C) during 10 to 18 days of incubation on welfare status including foot pad dermatitis (FPD), hock dermatitis (HD) and feathering status, and gait score in broilers. Score 2, 4, and 5 of FPD were found to be similar among the treatment groups, whereas a score of 3 was found to be higher in the control and high EST groups (27.7% and 29.2%) compred to the low EST group (16.9%). The eggshell temperature fluctuations were significantly affected the incidence of HD, whereas broiler sex did not. All of the broilers in the high EST group had HD with various scores, while a percentage of 21.1% and 6.9% of broilers had the score 1 of HD in the low and control EST groups, respectively. Feathering status showed a difference between body parts including wing, neck, back, and vent and also a general mean score of broilers from low EST treatment had the highest score for feathering. A higher incidence of gait score was observed in broilers from the control EST treatment than low and high EST groups. This can be attributed to a higher live weight of broilers from the control EST group. On the other hand, the incidence of a gait score of 3 and 4 was found for broilers from control and high EST treatment groups. Male and female broilers from the high EST group had the higher gait score. In conclusion, gait score and welfare status of broilers were affected by fluctuations in EST between 10 and 18 days of incubation.

  2. High Lapse Rates in AIRS Retrieved Temperatures in Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian; Olsen, Edward T.; Fishbein, Evan

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment, on NASA's Aqua spacecraft, uses a combination of infrared and microwave observations to retrieve cloud and surface properties, plus temperature and water vapor profiles comparable to radiosondes throughout the troposphere, for cloud cover up to 70%. The high spectral resolution of AIRS provides sensitivity to important information about the near-surface atmosphere and underlying surface. A preliminary analysis of AIRS temperature retrievals taken during January 2003 reveals extensive areas of superadiabatic lapse rates in the lowest kilometer of the atmosphere. These areas are found predominantly east of North America over the Gulf Stream, and, off East Asia over the Kuroshio Current. Accompanying the high lapse rates are low air temperatures, large sea-air temperature differences, and low relative humidities. Imagery from a Visible / Near Infrared instrument on the AIRS experiment shows accompanying clouds. These lines of evidence all point to shallow convection in the bottom layer of a cold air mass overlying warm water, with overturning driven by heat flow from ocean to atmosphere. An examination of operational radiosondes at six coastal stations in Japan shows AIRS to be oversensitive to lower tropospheric lapse rates due to systematically warm near-surface air temperatures. The bias in near-surface air temperature is seen to be independent of sea surface temperature, however. AIRS is therefore sensitive to air-sea temperature difference, but with a warm atmospheric bias. A regression fit to radiosondes is used to correct AIRS near-surface retrieved temperatures, and thereby obtain an estimate of the true atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast in five subtropical regions across the north Pacific. Moving eastward, we show a systematic shift in this air-sea temperature differences toward more isothermal conditions. These results, while preliminary, have implications for our understanding of heat flow from ocean to

  3. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passaro, Andrea; LaGraff, John E.; Oldfield, Martin L. G.; Biagioni, Leonardo; Moss, Roger W.; Battelle, Ryan T.; Povinelli, Louis A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The present research concerns the development of high-frequency pressure and temperature probes and related instrumentation capable of performing spectral characterization of unsteady pressure and temperature fluctuations over the 0.05 20 kHz range, at the exit of a gas turbine combustor operating at conditions close to nominal ones for large power generation turbomachinery. The probes used a transient technique pioneered at Oxford University; in order to withstand exposure to the harsh environment the probes were fitted on a rapid injection and cooling system jointly developed by Centrospazio CPR and Syracuse University. The experimental runs were performed on a large industrial test rig being operated by ENEL Produzione. The achieved results clearly show the satisfactory performance provided by this diagnostic tool, even though the poor location of the injection port prevented the tests from yielding more insight of the core flow turbulence characteristics. The pressure and temperature probes survived several dozen injections in the combustor hot jet, while consistently providing the intended high frequency performance. The apparatus was kept connected to the combustor during long duration firings, operating as an unobtrusive, self contained, piggy-back experiment: high frequency flow samplings were remotely recorded at selected moments corresponding to different combustor operating conditions.

  4. Spectral analysis of temperature and Brunt-Vaisala frequency fluctuations observed by radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, T.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that vertical wave number spectra of wind velocity and temperture fluctuations in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are fairly well explained by a saturated gravity wave spectrum. But N(2) (N:Brunt-Vaisala (BV) frequency) spectra seem to be better for testing the scaling of the vertical wave number spectra in layers with different stratifications, beause its energy density is proportional only to the background value of N(2), while that for temperature depends on both the BV frequency and the potential temperature. From temperature profiles observed in June to August 1987 over the MU Observatory, Japan, by using a radiosonde with 30 m height resolution, N(2) spectra are determined in the 2 to 8.5 km (troposphere) and 18.5 to 25 km (lower stratosphere) ranges. Although individual spectra show fairly large day-by-day variability, the slope of the median of 34 spectra agrees reasonably with the theoretical value of -1 in the wave number range of 6 x 10(-4) similar to 3 x 10(-3) (c/m). The ratio of the spectral energy between these two height regions is about equal to the ratio of N(2), consistent with the prediction of saturated gravity wave theory.

  5. Stable and fluctuating temperature effects on the development rate and survival of two malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the biology of malaria vector mosquitoes is crucial to understanding many aspects of the disease, including control and future outcomes. The development rates and survival of two Afrotropical malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus, are investigated here under conditions of constant and fluctuating temperatures. These data can provide a good starting point for modelling population level consequences of temperature change associated with climate change. For comparative purposes, these data were considered explicitly in the context of those available for the third African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Methods Twenty five replicates of 20–30 eggs were placed at nine constant and two fluctuating temperatures for development rate experiments and survival estimates. Various developmental parameters were estimated from the data, using standard approaches. Results Lower development threshold (LDT) for both species was estimated at 13-14°C. Anopheles arabiensis developed consistently faster than An. funestus. Optimum temperature (Topt) and development rate at this temperature (μmax) differed significantly between species for overall development and larval development. However, Topt and μmax for pupal development did not differ significantly between species. Development rate and survival of An. funestus was negatively influenced by fluctuating temperatures. By contrast, development rate of An. arabiensis at fluctuating temperatures either did not differ from constant temperatures or was significantly faster. Survival of this species declined by c. 10% at the 15°C to 35°C fluctuating temperature regime, but was not significantly different between the constant 25°C and the fluctuating 20°C to 30°C treatment. By comparison, previous data for An. gambiae indicated fastest development at a constant temperature of 28°C and highest survival at 24°C. Conclusions The three most important African malaria vectors all differ

  6. Ambient air temperature effects on the temperature of sewage sludge composting process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-fei; Chen, Tong-bin; Gao, Ding; Huang, Ze-chun

    2005-01-01

    Using data obtained with a full-scale sewage sludge composting facility, this paper studied the effects of ambient air temperature on the composting temperature with varying volume ratios of sewage sludge and recycled compost to bulking agent. Two volume ratios were examined experimentally, 1: 0: 1 and 3: 1: 2. The results show that composting temperature was influenced by ambient air temperature and the influence was more significant when composting was in the temperature rising process: composting temperature changed 2.4-6.5 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 13 degrees C. On the other hand, the influence was not significant when composting was in the high-temperature and/or temperature falling process: composting temperature changed 0.75-1.3 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 8-15 degrees C. Hysteresis effect was observed in composting temperature's responses to ambient air temperature. When the ventilation capability of pile was excellent (at a volume ratio of 1:0:1), the hysteresis time was short and ranging 1.1-1.2 h. On the contrary, when the proportion of added bulking agent was low, therefore less porosity in the substrate (at a volume ratio of 3:1:2), the hysteresis time was long and ranging 1.9-3.1 h.

  7. Effect of Initial Mixture Temperature on Flame Speed of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds based on the outer edge of the shadow cast by the laminar Bunsen cone were determined as functions of composition for methane-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -132 degrees to 342 degrees c and for propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -73 degrees to 344 degrees c. The data showed that maximum flame speed increased with temperature at an increasing rate. The percentage change in flame speed with change in initial temperature for the three fuels followed the decreasing order, methane, propane, and ethylene. Empirical equations were determined for maximum flame speed as a function of initial temperature over the temperature range covered for each fuel. The observed effect of temperature on flame speed for each of the fuels was reasonably well predicted by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or the square-root law of Tanford and Pease.

  8. Development of a Technique for Measuring Local Electric Field Fluctuations in High Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. G.; Bakken, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Rhodes, A. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel diagnostic for measuring local electric field fluctuations in high temperature plasmas is being developed. It employs high-speed measurements of the spectral separation and/or line intensities of the motional Stark effect (MSE) Hα multiplet emitted from a low divergence, 80 keV diagnostic neutral beam. A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) coupled to a 500 kHz CMOS camera provides the high resolution ( 0.025 nm) and throughput (<=0.1 cm2str) required for the measurement. The Fizeau fringe pattern produced by the SHS provides the Fourier transform of the input spectrum. Line broadening due to the large collection lens at the tokamak can be compensated by phase correcting the resulting fringe pattern. Based on simple tokamak turbulence scalings, Ẽ /EMSE 10-3 is expected for the core plasma in present experiments. To observe these low fluctuation levels, cross-correlation between adjacent spatial points and/or simultaneously measured ñ will be employed to suppress photon noise that is comparable to the turbulent signal. The SHS Littrow wavenumber and grating constant can be chosen to reduce the number of detectors needed to resolve changes in the input spectrum. This allows multi-spatial point measurements using 4-6 discrete photodiodes each, with no loss in sensitivity to Ẽ /EMSE . To validate this diagnostic concept, the diagnostic neutral beam will be fired into a magnetized target plasma (B <=0.5 T) comparable to a tokamak edge, with Ẽ applied parallel or perpendicular to EMSE via biased electrodes. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  9. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made either... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES...

  10. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  11. Effects of fluctuating moisture and temperature regimes on the persistence of quiescent conidia of Isaria fumosorosea.

    PubMed

    Bouamama, N; Vidal, C; Fargues, J

    2010-10-01

    Conidia of Isaria fumosorosea were submitted to three regimes of temperature and moisture to simulate microclimatic conditions which prevail in temperate (43% RH and 28 degrees C to 98% RH and 15 degrees C), subtropical (75% RH and 35 degrees C to 98% RH and 25 degrees C), and arid areas (13% RH and 40 degrees C to 33% RH and 15 degrees C) with daily fluctuating cycles. Germination, conidial viability, and virulence to Spodoptera frugiperda larvae were less affected after 20 days exposure under temperate cycling conditions than under arid and subtropical conditions. Exposure of conidia for 20 days to constant nocturnal simulated conditions of any tested regime weakly affected conidial persistence, whereas diurnal conditions exerted the most detrimental effects of high temperatures. However, when tested at both 45 degrees C and 50 degrees C at 33% RH for 160 h, the persistence of I. fumosorosea conidia was relatively higher than expected. These results emphasize that climatic conditions prevailing in environments and ecological fitness of fungal isolates have to be taken into account for assessing microbial control strategies.

  12. Similar metabolic rate-temperature relationships after acclimation at constant and fluctuating temperatures in caterpillars of a sub-Antarctic moth.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Haupt, Tanya M; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-02-01

    Temperature compensation in whole-animal metabolic rate is one of the responses thought, controversially, to characterize insects from low temperature environments. Temperature compensation may either involve a change in absolute values of metabolic rates or a change in the slope of the metabolic rate - temperature relationship. Moreover, assessments of compensation may be complicated by animal responses to fluctuating temperatures. Here we examined whole animal metabolic rates, at 0 °C, 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, in caterpillars of the sub-Antarctic moth, Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Tineidae), following one week acclimations to 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, and fluctuating temperatures of 0-10 °C, 5-15 °C, and 10-20 °C. Over the short term, temperature compensation was found following acclimation to 5 °C, but the effect size was small (3-14%). By comparison with caterpillars of 13 other lepidopteran species, no effect of temperature compensation was present, with the relationship between metabolic rate and temperature having a Q10 of 2 among species, and no effect of latitude on temperature-corrected metabolic rate. Fluctuating temperature acclimations for the most part had little effect compared with constant temperatures of the same mean value. Nonetheless, fluctuating temperatures of 5-15 °C resulted in lower metabolic rates at all test temperatures compared with constant 10 °C acclimation, in keeping with expectations from the literature. Absence of significant responses, or those of large effect, in metabolic rates in response to acclimation, may be a consequence of the unpredictable temperature variation over the short-term on sub-Antarctic Marion Island, to which P. marioni is endemic.

  13. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  14. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ˜30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of 1/f behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy {E}{{a}}˜ 35 meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  15. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2016-11-11

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ∼30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of [Formula: see text] behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy [Formula: see text] meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  16. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU-A are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm, is now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC in the routine generation of geophysical parameters derived from AIRS/AMSU data. A major innovation in Version 5 is the ability to generate case-by-case level-by-level error estimates delta T(p) for retrieved quantities and the use of these error estimates for Quality Control. We conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using the NASA GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The model was run at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 deg. latitude X 0.67 deg longitude with 72 vertical levels. These experiments were run during four different seasons, each using a different year. The AIRS temperature profiles were presented to the GEOS-5 analysis as rawinsonde profiles, and the profile error estimates delta (p) were used as the uncertainty for each measurement in the data assimilation process. We compared forecasts analyses generated from the analyses done by assimilation of AIRS temperature profiles with three different sets of thresholds; Standard, Medium, and Tight. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature profiles significantly improve 5-7 day forecast skill compared to that obtained without the benefit of AIRS data in all of the cases studied. In addition, assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature soundings performs better than assimilation of AIRS observed radiances. Based on the experiments shown, Tight Quality Control of AIRS temperature profile performs best

  17. Physiological fluctuations in brain temperature as a factor affecting electrochemical evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Lenoir, Magalie

    2013-05-15

    The rate of any chemical reaction or process occurring in the brain depends on temperature. While it is commonly believed that brain temperature is a stable, tightly regulated homeostatic parameter, it fluctuates within 1-4 °C following exposure to salient arousing stimuli and neuroactive drugs, and during different behaviors. These temperature fluctuations should affect neural activity and neural functions, but the extent of this influence on neurochemical measurements in brain tissue of freely moving animals remains unclear. In this Review, we present the results of amperometric evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in awake, behaving rats and discuss how naturally occurring fluctuations in brain temperature affect these measurements. While this temperature contribution appears to be insignificant for glucose because its extracellular concentrations are large, it is a serious factor for electrochemical evaluations of glutamate, which is present in brain tissue at much lower levels, showing smaller phasic fluctuations. We further discuss experimental strategies for controlling the nonspecific chemical and physical contributions to electrochemical currents detected by enzyme-based biosensors to provide greater selectivity and reliability of neurochemical measurements in behaving animals.

  18. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  19. Temperature effect on titanium nitride nanometer thin film in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Z. H.; Xu, B. X.; Hu, J. F.; Ji, R.; Toh, Y. T.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, Y. F.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a promising alternative plasmonic material to conventional novel metals. For practical plasmonic applications under the influence of air, the temperature-dependent optical properties of TiN thin films in air and its volume variation are essential. Ellipsometric characterizations on a TiN thin film at different increasing temperatures in ambient air were conducted, and optical constants along with film thickness were retrieved. Below 200 °C, the optical properties varied linearly with temperature, in good agreement with other temperature dependent studies of TiN films in vacuum. The thermal expansion coefficient of the TiN thin film was determined to be 10.27  ×  10‑6 °C‑1. At higher temperatures, the TiN thin film gradually loses its metallic characteristics and has weaker optical absorption, impairing its plasmonic performance. In addition, a sharp increase in film thickness was observed at the same time. Changes in the optical properties and film thickness with temperatures above 200 °C were revealed to result from TiN oxidation in air. For the stability of TiN-based plasmonic devices, operation temperatures of lower than 200 °C, or measures to prevent oxidation, are required. The present study is important to fundamental physics and technological applications of TiN thin films.

  20. Simulated Seasonal Photoperiods and Fluctuating Temperatures Have Limited Effects on Blood Feeding and Life History in Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Westby, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors change seasonally and impact life history in temperate-zone ectotherms. Temperature and photoperiod are factors that change in predictable ways. Most studies testing for effects of temperature on vectors use constant temperatures and ignore potential correlated effects of photoperiod. In two experiments, we tested for effects of larval rearing environments creating ecologically relevant temperatures and photoperiods simulating early and late season conditions (June and August), or constant temperatures (cool and warm) with the June or August photoperiods, respectively. We determined effects on survivorship, development, size, and a composite performance index in a temperate-zone population of Aedes triseriatus (Say). We followed cohorts of resulting females, all held under the same environmental conditions, to assess carry-over effects of rearing conditions for larvae on longevity, blood feeding, and egg production. Larval survivorship was affected by treatment in one experiment. Development time was greater in the June and cool treatments, but the constant and fluctuating temperatures did not differ. Significantly larger mosquitoes were produced in fluctuating versus constant temperature treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on the composite performance index. Adult female longevity was lower after rearing at constant versus fluctuating temperature, but there was no difference between June and August, nor did size affect longevity. There was no effect of treatments on blood feeding and a limited effect on egg production. We conclude that seasonal temperatures and photoperiods during development have limited effects on this population of A. triseriatus and find little evidence of strong effects of fluctuating versus constant temperatures. PMID:26336255

  1. Finite-temperature and finite-time scaling of the directed polymer free energy with respect to its geometrical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; Bustingorry, Sebastian; Lecomte, Vivien; Schehr, Grégory; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2012-09-01

    We study the fluctuations of the directed polymer in 1+1 dimensions in a Gaussian random environment with a finite correlation length ξ and at finite temperature. We address the correspondence between the geometrical transverse fluctuations of the directed polymer, described by its roughness, and the fluctuations of its free energy, characterized by its two-point correlator. Analytical arguments are provided in favor of a generic scaling law between those quantities, at finite time, nonvanishing ξ, and explicit temperature dependence. Numerical results are in good agreement both for simulations on the discrete directed polymer and on a continuous directed polymer (with short-range correlated disorder). Applications to recent experiments on liquid crystals are discussed.

  2. Soil temperature prediction from air temperature for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, D.; Kundu, D. K.; Pal, Soumen; Pal, Susanto; Chakraborty, A. K.; Jha, A. K.; Mazumdar, S. P.; Saha, R.; Bhattacharyya, P.

    2017-01-01

    Soil temperature is an important factor in biogeochemical processes. On-site monitoring of soil temperature is limited in spatiotemporal scale as compared to air temperature data inventories due to various management difficulties. Therefore, empirical models were developed by taking 30-year long-term (1985-2014) air and soil temperature data for prediction of soil temperatures at three depths (5, 15, 30 cm) in morning (0636 Indian standard time) and afternoon (1336 Indian standard time) for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain. At 5 cm depth, power and exponential regression models were best fitted for daily data in morning and afternoon, respectively, but it was reverse at 15 cm. However, at 30 cm, exponential models were best fitted for both the times. Regression analysis revealed that in morning for all three depths and in afternoon for 30 cm depth, soil temperatures (daily, weekly, and monthly) could be predicted more efficiently with the help of corresponding mean air temperature than that of maximum and minimum. However, in afternoon, prediction of soil temperature at 5 and 15 cm depths were more precised for all the time intervals when maximum air temperature was used, except for weekly soil temperature at 15 cm, where the use of mean air temperature gave better prediction.

  3. Local atom-number fluctuations in quantum gases at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Klawunn, M.; Recati, A.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the number fluctuations in small cells of quantum gases pointing out important deviations from the thermodynamic limit fixed by the isothermal compressibility. Both quantum and thermal fluctuations in weakly as well as highly compressible fluids are considered. For the two-dimensional (2D) superfluid Bose gas we find a significant quenching of fluctuations with respect to the thermodynamic limit, in agreement with recent experimental findings. An enhancement of the thermal fluctuations is instead predicted for the 2D dipolar superfluid Bose gas, which becomes dramatic when the size of the sample cell is of the order of the wavelength of the rotonic excitation induced by the interaction.

  4. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)(sub rms) (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)(sub rms) (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)(sup 1/2) = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to R(exp n). The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 14.3(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K (12.8(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55)(n = 1.53(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.4(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K (15.8(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55) (n = 1.22(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely

  5. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.; Mather, J. C.; Lubin, P.; Loewenstein, K.; Lineweaver, C.; Keegstra, P.; Kaita, E.; Jackson, P. D.; Cheng, E. S.

    1994-12-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)rms (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)rms (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)1/2 = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to Rn. The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 14.3+5.2-3.3 micro-K (12.8+5.2-3.3 micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42+0.49-0.55 (n = 1.53+0.49-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 17.4+7.5-5.2 micro-K (15.8+7.5-5.2 micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11+0.60-0.55 (n = 1.22+0.60-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.6 +/- 1.6 micro-K (18.2 +/- 1.6 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.11 +/- 0.40 (1.22 +/- 0.40). Our best

  6. Correlation of air temperature above water-air sections with the forecasted low level clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, N. Sh.; Malikov, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    As a case study approach the development of low clouds forecasting methods in correlation with air temperature transformational variations on the sections "water-air" is surveyed. It was evident, that transformational variations of air temperature mainly depend on peculiarities and value of advective variations of temperature. DT is the differences of initial temperature on section water-air in started area, from contrast temperature of water surface along a trajectory of movement of air masses and from the temperature above water surface in a final point of a trajectory. Main values of transformational variations of air temperature at advection of a cold masses is 0.530C•h, and at advection of warm masses is -0.370C•h. There was dimensionless quantity K determined and implemented into practice which was characterized with difference of water temperature in forecasting point and air temperature in an initial point in the ratio of dew-points deficiency at the forecasting area. It follows, that the appropriate increasing or decreasing of K under conditions of cold and warm air masses advection, contributes decreasing of low clouds level. References: Abramovich K.G.: Conditions of development and forecasting of low level clouds. vol. #78, 124 pp., Hydrometcenter USSR 1973. Abramovich K.G.: Variations of low clouds level // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 5, 30-41, Moscow, 1968. Budiko M.I.: Empirical assessment of climatic changes toward the end of XX century // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. #12, 5-13, Moscow, 1999. Buykov M.V.: Computational modeling of daily evolutions of boundary layer of atmosphere at the presence of clouds and fog // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 4, 35-44, Moscow, 1981. Huseynov N.Sh. Transformational variations of air temperature above Caspian Sea / Proceedings of Conference On Climate And Protection of Environment, 118-120, Baku, 1999. Huseynov N.Sh.: Consideration of advective and transformational variations of air temperature in

  7. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  8. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  9. Atomic configuration and properties of austenitic steels at finite temperature: Effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, A. V.; Dehghani, M.

    2016-09-01

    High-temperature atomic configurations of fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with alloy composition close to austenitic steel are studied in statistical thermodynamic simulations with effective interactions obtained in ab initio calculations. The latter are done taking longitudinal spin fluctuations (LSF) into consideration within a quasiclassical phenomenological model. It is demonstrated that the magnetic state affects greatly the alloy properties, and in particular, it is shown that the LSF substantially modify the bonding and interatomic interactions of fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys even at ambient conditions. The calculated atomic short-range order is in reasonable agreement with existing experimental data for Fe0.56Cr0.21Ni0.23 , which has strong preference for the (001)-type ordering between Ni and Cr atoms. A similar ordering tendency is found for the Fe0.75Cr0.17Ni0.08 alloy composition, which approximately corresponds to the widely used 304 and 316 austenitic steel grades.

  10. Electron temperature fluctuations changes associated with ELM suppression by RMP in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; Wang, G.; Rhodes, T.; Peebles, W.

    2015-11-01

    New results in this presentation show an increase in broadband electron temperature fluctuations (T~e) during ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). This measurement is obtained via correlation ECE (CECE) near the top of the pedestal (ρ ~ 0.9 - 0.96). This T~e increase is significant, (>40%), and occurs after the ELM suppression but not between ELMS. This may imply an increase in thermal transport facilitated by the increased T~e levels. Considering that the changes in gradient scale length during ELMs with RMP are complicated, it is possible that the mechanism responsible for changing T~e is different compared to previously observed changes in ñe [G. R. McKee et al NF 2013]. This possibility, and the nature of the T~e , will be studied through profile analysis and linear gyrokinetic analysis using TGLF [J. E. Kinsey et al PoP 2008]. In addition, the relation between the T~e and an observed low frequency coherent mode will be investigated. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  12. Quark number fluctuations at finite temperature and finite chemical potential via the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xian-yin; Qin, Si-xue; Liu, Yu-xin

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the quark number fluctuations up to the fourth order in the matter composed of two light flavor quarks with isospin symmetry and at finite temperature and finite chemical potential using the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach of QCD. In order to solve the quark gap equation, we approximate the dressed quark-gluon vertex with the bare one and adopt both the Maris-Tandy model and the infrared constant (Qin-Chang) model for the dressed gluon propagator. Our results indicate that the second, third, and fourth order fluctuations of net quark number all diverge at the critical endpoint (CEP). Around the CEP, the second order fluctuation possesses obvious pump while the third and fourth order ones exhibit distinct wiggles between positive and negative. For the Maris-Tandy model and the Qin-Chang model, we give the pseudocritical temperature at zero quark chemical potential as Tc=146 MeV and 150 MeV, and locate the CEP at (μEq,TE)=(120,124) MeV and (124,129) MeV, respectively. In addition, our results manifest that the fluctuations are insensitive to the details of the model, but the location of the CEP shifts to low chemical potential and high temperature as the confinement length scale increases.

  13. Pulsed positive streamer discharges in air at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Kamakura, Taku

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air pulsed positive streamer discharges are generated in a 13 mm point-plane gap in the temperature range of 293 K-1136 K, and the effect of temperature on the streamer discharges is studied. When the temperature is increased, the product of applied voltage and temperature VT proportional to the reduced electric field can be used as a primary parameter that determines some discharge parameters regardless of temperature. For a given VT, the transferred charge per pulse, streamer diameter, product of discharge energy and temperature, and length of secondary streamer are almost constant regardless of T, whereas the streamer velocity decreases with increasing T and the decay rate of the discharge current is proportional to 1/T. The N2(C) emission intensity is approximately determined by the discharge energy independent of T. These results are useful to predict the streamer discharge and its reactive species production when the ambient temperature is increased.

  14. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: impacts on surface air temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  15. Fundamental study of FC-72 pool boiling surface temperature fluctuations and bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Alison R.

    A heater designed to monitor surface temperature fluctuations during pool boiling experiments while the bubbles were simultaneously being observed has been fabricated and tested. The heat source was a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) layer commercially deposited on a fused quartz substrate. Four copper-nickel thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) on the heater surface measured the surface temperature, while a thin layer of sapphire or fused silica provided electrical insulation between the TFTCs and the ITO. The TFTCs were micro-fabricated using the liftoff process to deposit the nickel and copper metal films. The TFTC elements were 50 mum wide and overlapped to form a 25 mum by 25 mum junction. TFTC voltages were recorded by a DAQ at a sampling rate of 50 kHz. A high-speed CCD camera recorded bubble images from below the heater at 2000 frames/second. A trigger sent to the camera by the DAQ synchronized the bubble images and the surface temperature data. As the bubbles and their contact rings grew over the TFTC junction, correlations between bubble behavior and surface temperature changes were demonstrated. On the heaters with fused silica insulation layers, 1--2°C temperature drops on the order of 1 ms occurred as the contact ring moved over the TFTC junction during bubble growth and as the contact ring moved back over the TFTC junction during bubble departure. These temperature drops during bubble growth and departure were due to microlayer evaporation and liquid rewetting the heated surface, respectively. Microlayer evaporation was not distinguished as the primary method of heat removal from the surface. Heaters with sapphire insulation layers did not display the measurable temperature drops observed with the fused silica heaters. The large thermal diffusivity of the sapphire compared to the fused silica was determined as the reason for the absence of these temperature drops. These findings were confirmed by a comparison of temperature drops in a 2-D simulation of

  16. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  17. Modeling daily average stream temperature from air temperature and watershed area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, N. L.; Hunt, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Habitat restoration efforts within watersheds require spatial and temporal estimates of water temperature for aquatic species especially species that migrate within watersheds at different life stages. Monitoring programs are not able to fully sample all aquatic environments within watersheds under the extreme conditions that determine long-term habitat viability. Under these circumstances a combination of selective monitoring and modeling are required for predicting future geospatial and temporal conditions. This study describes a model that is broadly applicable to different watersheds while using readily available regional air temperature data. Daily water temperature data from thirty-eight gauges with drainage areas from 2 km2 to 2000 km2 in the Sonoma Valley, Napa Valley, and Russian River Valley in California were used to develop, calibrate, and test a stream temperature model. Air temperature data from seven NOAA gauges provided the daily maximum and minimum air temperatures. The model was developed and calibrated using five years of data from the Sonoma Valley at ten water temperature gauges and a NOAA air temperature gauge. The daily average stream temperatures within this watershed were bounded by the preceding maximum and minimum air temperatures with smaller upstream watersheds being more dependent on the minimum air temperature than maximum air temperature. The model assumed a linear dependence on maximum and minimum air temperature with a weighting factor dependent on upstream area determined by error minimization using observed data. Fitted minimum air temperature weighting factors were consistent over all five years of data for each gauge, and they ranged from 0.75 for upstream drainage areas less than 2 km2 to 0.45 for upstream drainage areas greater than 100 km2. For the calibration data sets within the Sonoma Valley, the average error between the model estimated daily water temperature and the observed water temperature data ranged from 0.7

  18. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  19. An Optimization Approach to Analyzing the Effect of Supply Water and Air Temperatures in Planning an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi

    In planning an air conditioning system, supply water and air temperatures are important factors from the viewpoint of cost reduction. For example, lower temperature supply water and air reduce the coefficient of performance of a refrigeration machine, and increase the thickness of heat insulation material. However, they enable larger temperature differences, and reduce equipment sizes and power demand. The purposes of this paper are to propose an optimal planning method for a cold air distribution system, and to analyze the effect of supply water and air temperatures on the long-term economics through a numerical study for an office building. As a result, it is shown that the proposed method effectively determines supply water and air temperatures for a cold air distribution system, and that the influence of supply air temperature is larger than that of supply water temperature on the long-term economics.

  20. Seasonal Fluctuations in Air Pollution in Dazaifu, Japan, and Effect of Long-Range Transport from Mainland East Asia.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Souleymane; Minami, Hiroki; Abe, Maho; Hasei, Tomohiro; Sera, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Funasaka, Kunihiro; Asakawa, Daichi; Watanabe, Masanari; Honda, Naoko; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the seasonal fluctuations in air pollution and the effect of long-range transport, we collected airborne particles (n=118) at Dazaifu in Fukuoka, Japan, from June 2012 to May 2013 and measured Pb and SO4(2-), which are indicators of the long-range transport of anthropogenic air pollutants, as well as their mutagenicity, and other factors. The levels of airborne particles, Pb, and SO4(2-) were very high on March 4, 8, 9, and 19, and May 13, 21, and 22, 2013. The backward trajectories indicated that air masses had arrived from the Gobi Desert and northern China on those days. The mutagenicity of airborne particles was examined using the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium YG1024. Highly mutagenic airborne particles were mostly collected in winter, and most of them showed high activity both with and without S9 mix. High levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were found in many samples that showed high mutagenicity. For the samples collected on January 30, February 21, and March 4, the levels of Pb, SO4(2-), PAHs, and mutagenicity were high, and the backward trajectories indicated that air masses present on those days had passed through northern or central China. The Japan Meteorological Agency registered Asian dust events at Fukuoka on March 8, 9, and 19, 2013. The results of the present study suggest that high levels of anthropogenic air pollutants were transported with Asian dust. Similarly, long-range transport of air pollutants including mutagens occurred on days when Asian dust events were not registered.

  1. Arctic air may become cleaner as temperatures rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-10-01

    The air in the Arctic is cleaner during summer than during winter. Previous studies have shown that for light-scattering pollutants, this seasonal cycle is due mainly to summer precipitation removing pollutants from the air during atmospheric transport from midlatitude industrial and agricultural sources. With new measurements from Barrow, Alaska, and Alert, Nunavut, Canada, Garrett et al. extended previous research to show that light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are also efficiently removed by seasonal precipitation. Precipitation removes these particles from the air most efficiently at high humidities and relatively warm temperatures, suggesting that as the Arctic gets warmer and wetter in the future, the air and snow might also become cleaner.

  2. Clarifying the role of fire heat and daily temperature fluctuations as germination cues for Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Victor M.; Baeza, M. Jaime; Blanes, M. Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims This study aims to determine the role that both direct effects of fire and subsequent daily temperature fluctuations play in the seed bank dynamics of obligate seeders from the Mediterranean Basin. The short yet high soil temperatures experienced due to passage of fire are conflated with the lower, but longer, temperatures experienced by daily fluctuations which occur after removing vegetation. These germination cues are able to break seed dormancy, but it is difficult to assess their specific level of influence because they occur consecutively after summer fires, just before the flush of germination in the wet season (autumn). Methods By applying experimental fires, seed treatments were imposed that combined fire exposure/non-fire exposure with exposure to microhabitats under a gradient of disturbance (i.e. gaps opened by fire, mechanical brushing and intact vegetation). The seeds used were representative of the main families of obligate seeders (Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus and Rosmarinus officinalis). Specifically, an assessment was made of (1) the proportion of seeds killed by fire, (2) seedling emergence under field conditions and (3) seeds which remained ungerminated in soil. Key Results For the three species studied, the factors that most influenced seedling emergence and seeds remaining ungerminated were microhabitats with higher temperature fluctuations after fire (gaps opened by fire and brushing treatments). The direct effect of fire decreased the seedling emergence of U. parviflorus and reduced the proportion of seeds of R. officinalis remaining ungerminated. Conclusions The relevance of depleting vegetation (and subsequent daily temperature fluctuation in summer) suggests that studies focusing on lower temperature thresholds for breaking seed dormancy are required. This fact also supports the hypothesis that the seeding capacity in Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders may have evolved as a response to a wide range of

  3. Local burst model of CMB temperature fluctuations: scattering in primordial hydrogen lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovich, V. K.; Grachev, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    The propagation of an instantaneous burst of isotropic radiation from the time of its onset at some redshift z 0 to the time of its detection at the present epoch (at z = 0) is considered within the framework of a flat Universe. Thomson scattering by free electrons and scattering in primordial hydrogen lines (H α, H β, P α, and P β) are believed to be the sources of opacity, with the single-scattering albedo in the lines being calculated by taking into account the deexcitation of the upper levels of the transitions being considered under the action of background blackbody radiation. The profiles of these lines in the burst spectrum at the present epoch have been constructed for various z0 at various distances from the burst center. To a first approximation, these profiles do not depend on the burst radiation spectrum and intensity. It is shown that the lines are purely absorption ones at a sufficiently large distance, but an emission component can appear with decreasing distance, which strengthens as the distance decreases, while the absorption component weakens. The absorption depth in the combined profile can reach 2 ×10-4 for the H α and H β lines and 7 × 10-6 for the P α and P β lines. In this case, the relative amplitude of the temperature fluctuations lies within the range 10-7-10-9. The calculations have been performed for bursts with different characteristic initial sizes. At the same z 0, the hydrogen line profiles essentially coincide for sizes smaller than some value, and the contrast of the lines decreases with increasing burst size for greater ones.

  4. Estrous cycle fluctuations in sex and ingestive behavior are accentuated by exercise or cold ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abdulhay, Amir; Benton, Noah A; Klingerman, Candice M; Krishnamoorthy, Kaila; Brozek, Jeremy M; Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". In female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), low circulating levels of ovarian steroids are associated with increased food hoarding and decreased sexual motivation, but these effects are exaggerated in food-restricted females. To determine whether cold ambient temperature has the same effects as food restriction, groups of hamsters were fed ad libitum while they were housed at either 5 °C or 22 °C, and then tested for behavior for 90 min on each day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 22 °C, high levels of sexual motivation and low levels of food hoarding were seen every day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 5 °C, high levels of sexual motivation were restricted to the periovulatory day. On the three nonestrous days, these females showed high levels of food hoarding, but not food intake. A separate cohort of females were provided with access to running wheels and housed at 22 °C. They showed high levels of sexual motivation restricted to the periovulatory day, similar to the pattern of sexual motivation seen in cold-housed females. Unlike cold-housed females, those with running wheels showed low levels of food hoarding and high levels of food intake. Food restriction, cold housing, and access to wheels had no significant effect on plasma estradiol or progesterone concentrations, but significantly decreased plasma leptin concentrations. All three energetic challenges unmask estrous cycle fluctuations in sexual motivation that are obscured in laboratory conditions, i.e., isolation in a small cage with an overabundance of food.

  5. Flame Speeds of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures at Low Initial Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Heimel, Sheldon

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds were determined for methane-air, propane-air, and ethylene-air mixtures at -73 C and for methane-air mixtures at -132 C. The data extend the curves of maximum flame speed against initial mixture temperature previously established for the range from room temperature to 344 C. Empirical equations for maximum flame speed u(cm/ sec) as a function of initial mixture temperature T(sub O) were determined to be as follows: for methane, for T(sub O) from 141 to 615 K, u = 8 + 0.000160 T(sub O)(exp 2.11); for propane, for T(sub O) from 200 to 616 K, u = 10 + 0.000342 T(sub O)(exp 2.00); for ethylene, for T(sub O) from 200 to 617 K, u = 10 + 0.00259 T(sub O)(exp 1.74). Relative flame speeds at low initial temperatures were predicted within approximately 20 percent by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or by the diffusion theory of Tanford and Pease. The same order was found previously for high initial temperatures. The low-temperature data were also found to extend the linear correlations between maximum flame speed and calculated equilibrium active-radical concentrations, which were established by the previously reported high-temperature data.

  6. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  7. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the fluid inclusions could have formed under the present thermal conditions. The majority of fluid inclusions studied must have formed during one or more times in the past when temperatures fluctuated in response to the emplacement of nearby dikes and their subsequent cooling. -from Authors

  8. Superconducting transition temperatures and coherence length in non-s-wave pairing materials correlated with spin-fluctuation mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angilella, G. G.; March, N. H.; Pucci, R.

    2002-03-01

    Following earlier work on electron or hole liquids flowing through assemblies with magnetic fluctuations, we have recently exposed a marked correlation of the superconducting temperature Tc, for non-s-wave pairing materials, with coherence length ξ and effective mass m*. The very recent study of Abanov et al. [Europhys. Lett. 54, 488 (2001)] and the prior investigation of Monthoux and Lonzarich [Phys. Rev. B 59, 14 598 (1999)] have each focused on the concept of a spin-fluctuation temperature Tsf, which again is intimately related to Tc. For the d-wave pairing via antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in the cuprates, these studies are brought into close contact with our own work, and the result is that kBTsf~ħ2/m*ξ2. This demonstrates that ξ is also determined by such antiferromagnetic spin-fluctuation mediated pair interaction. The coherence length in units of the lattice spacing is then essentially given in the cuprates as the square root of the ratio of two characteristic energies, namely, the kinetic energy of localization of a charge carrier of mass m* in a specified magnetic correlation length to the hopping energy. The quasi-two-dimensional ruthenate Sr2RuO4, with Tc~1.3 K, has p-wave spin-triplet pairing and so is also briefly discussed here.

  9. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  10. Assessment of two-temperature kinetic model for ionizing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1987-01-01

    A two-temperature chemical-kinetic model for air is assessed by comparing theoretical results with existing experimental data obtained in shock-tubes, ballistic ranges, and flight experiments. In the model, named the TTv model, one temperature (T) is assumed to characterize the heavy-particle translational and molecular rotational energies, and another temperature (Tv) to characterize the molecular vibrational, electron translational, and electronic excitation energies. The theoretical results for nonequilibrium air flow in shock tubes are obtained using the computer code STRAP (Shock-Tube Radiation Program), and for flow along the stagnation streamline in the shock layer over spherical bodies using the newly developed code STRAP (Stagnation-Point Radiation Program). Substantial agreement is shown between the theoretical and experimental results for relaxation times and radiative heat fluxes. At very high temperatures the spectral calculations need further improvement. The present agreement provides strong evidence that the two-temperature model characterizes principal features of nonequilibrium air flow. New theoretical results using the model are presented for the radiative heat fluxes at the stagnation point of a 6-m-radius sphere, representing an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle, over a range of free-stream conditions. Assumptions, approximations, and limitations of the model are discussed.

  11. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  12. Can air temperature be used to project influences of climate change on stream temperature?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Safeeq, Mohammad; Dunham, Jason B.; Johnson, Sherri L.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, lack of data on stream temperature has motivated the use of regression-based statistical models to predict stream temperatures based on more widely available data on air temperatures. Such models have been widely applied to project responses of stream temperatures under climate change, but the performance of these models has not been fully evaluated. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the performance of two widely used linear and nonlinear regression models that predict stream temperatures based on air temperatures. We evaluated model performance and temporal stability of model parameters in a suite of regulated and unregulated streams with 11–44 years of stream temperature data. Although such models may have validity when predicting stream temperatures within the span of time that corresponds to the data used to develop them, model predictions did not transfer well to other time periods. Validation of model predictions of most recent stream temperatures, based on air temperature–stream temperature relationships from previous time periods often showed poor performance when compared with observed stream temperatures. Overall, model predictions were less robust in regulated streams and they frequently failed in detecting the coldest and warmest temperatures within all sites. In many cases, the magnitude of errors in these predictions falls within a range that equals or exceeds the magnitude of future projections of climate-related changes in stream temperatures reported for the region we studied (between 0.5 and 3.0 °C by 2080). The limited ability of regression-based statistical models to accurately project stream temperatures over time likely stems from the fact that underlying processes at play, namely the heat budgets of air and water, are distinctive in each medium and vary among localities and through time.

  13. Bacterial responses to fluctuations and extremes in temperature and brine salinity at the surface of Arctic winter sea ice.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Wintertime measurements near Barrow, Alaska, showed that bacteria near the surface of first-year sea ice and in overlying saline snow experience more extreme temperatures and salinities, and wider fluctuations in both parameters, than bacteria deeper in the ice. To examine impacts of such conditions on bacterial survival, two Arctic isolates with different environmental tolerances were subjected to winter-freezing conditions, with and without the presence of organic solutes involved in osmoprotection: proline, choline, or glycine betaine. Obligate psychrophile Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H suffered cell losses under all treatments, with maximal loss after 15-day exposure to temperatures fluctuating between -7 and -25 °C. Osmoprotectants significantly reduced the losses, implying that salinity rather than temperature extremes presents the greater stress for this organism. In contrast, psychrotolerant Psychrobacter sp. strain 7E underwent miniaturization and fragmentation under both fluctuating and stable-freezing conditions, with cell numbers increasing in most cases, implying a different survival strategy that may include enhanced dispersal. Thus, the composition and abundance of the bacterial community that survives in winter sea ice may depend on the extent to which overlying snow buffers against extreme temperature and salinity conditions and on the availability of solutes that mitigate osmotic shock, especially during melting.

  14. Microwave temperature profiler for clear air turbulence prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining Richardson Number, Ri, or its reciprocal, RRi, for clear air prediction using measured potential temperature and determining the vertical gradient of potential temperature, d(theta)/dz. Wind vector from the aircraft instrumentation versus potential temperature, dW/D(theta), is determined and multiplies by d(theta)/dz to obtain dW/dz. Richardson number or its reciprocal is then determined from the relationship Ri = K(d theta)/dz divided by (dW/dz squared) for use in detecting a trend toward a threshold value for the purpose of predicting clear air turbulence. Other equations for this basic relationship are disclosed together with the combination of other atmospheric observables using multiple regression techniques.

  15. CARS Temperature and Species Measurements For Air Vehicle Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.; Grisch, Frederic; Klimenko, Dmitry; Clauss, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method has recently been used in the United States and Europe to probe several different types of propulsion systems for air vehicles. At NASA Langley Research Center in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor, representative of a scramjet engine. At Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and mole fractions of N2, O2 and CO2, in the exhaust stream of a liquid-fueled, gas-turbine combustor. At ONERA in France and the DLR in Germany researchers have used CARS to measure temperature and species concentrations in cryogenic LOX-H2 rocket combustion chambers. The primary aim of these measurements has been to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  16. Impacts of Lowered Urban Air Temperatures on Precursor Emission and Ozone Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Taha, Haider; Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    1998-09-01

    Meteorological, photochemical, building-energy, and power plant simulations were performed to assess the possible precursor emission and ozone air quality impacts of decreased air temperatures that could result from implementing the "cool communities" concept in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Two pathways are considered. In the direct pathway, a reduction in cooling energy use translates into reduced demand for generation capacity and, thus, reduced precursor emissions from electric utility power plants. In the indirect pathway, reduced air temperatures can slow the atmospheric production of ozone as well as precursor emission from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. The simulations suggest small impacts on emissions following implementation of cool communities in the SoCAB. In summer, for example, there can be reductions of up to 3% in NOx emissions from in-basin power plants. The photochemical simulations suggest that the air quality impacts of these direct emission reductions are small. However, the indirect atmospheric effects of cool communities can be significant. For example, ozone peak concentrations can decrease by up to 11% in summer and population-weighted exceedance exposure to ozone above the California and National Ambient Air Quality Standards can decrease by up to 11 and 17%, respectively. The modeling suggests that if these strategies are combined with others, such as mobile-source emission control, the improvements in ozone air quality can be substantial.

  17. The Effects of Air Pollution and Temperature on COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Nadia N.; McCormack, Meredith C.; Kim, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects 12–16 million people in the United States and is the third-leading cause of death. In developed countries, smoking is the greatest risk factor for the development of COPD, but other exposures also contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Several studies suggest, though are not definitive, that outdoor air pollution exposure is linked to the prevalence and incidence of COPD. Among individuals with COPD, outdoor air pollutants are associated with loss of lung function and increased respiratory symptoms. In addition, outdoor air pollutants are also associated with COPD exacerbations and mortality. There is much less evidence for the impact of indoor air on COPD, especially in developed countries in residences without biomass exposure. The limited existing data suggests that indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide concentrations are linked to increased respiratory symptoms among patients with COPD. In addition, with the projected increases in temperature and extreme weather events in the context of climate change there has been increased attention to the effects of heat exposure. Extremes of temperature—both heat and cold—have been associated with increased respiratory morbidity in COPD. Some studies also suggest that temperature may modify the effect of pollution exposure and though results are not conclusive, understanding factors that may modify susceptibility to air pollution in patients with COPD is of utmost importance. PMID:26683097

  18. Requirements for high-temperature air-cooled central receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. D.; Copeland, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    The design of solar thermal central receivers will be shaped by the end user's need for energy. This paper identifies the requirements for receivers supplying heat for industrial processes or electric power generation in the temperature range 540 to 1000(0)C and evaluates the effects of the requirements on air cooled central receivers. Potential IPH applications are identified as large baseload users that are located some distance from the receiver. In the electric power application, the receiver must supply heat to a pressurized gas power cycle. The difficulty in providing cost effective thermal transport and thermal storage for air cooled receivers is a critical problem.

  19. A spatial length scale analysis of turbulent temperature and velocity fluctuations within and above an orchard canopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.S.; Miller, D.R.; Anderson, D.E.; Cionco, R.M.; Lin, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent flow within and above an almond orchard was measured with three-dimensional wind sensors and fine-wire thermocouple sensors arranged in a horizontal array. The data showed organized turbulent structures as indicated by coherent asymmetric ramp patterns in the time series traces across the sensor array. Space-time correlation analysis indicated that velocity and temperature fluctuations were significantly correlated over a transverse distance more than 4m. Integral length scales of velocity and temperature fluctuations were substantially greater in unstable conditions than those in stable conditions. The coherence spectral analysis indicated that Davenport's geometric similarity hypothesis was satisfied in the lower frequency region. From the geometric similarity hypothesis, the spatial extents of large ramp structures were also estimated with the coherence functions.

  20. Climate change and river temperature sensitivity to warmer nighttime vs. warmer daytime air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diabat, M.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the July river temperature response to atmospheric warming over the diurnal cycle in a 36 km reach of the upper Middle Fork John Day River of Oregon, USA. The physical model Heat Source was calibrated and used to run 3 different cases of increased air temperature during July: 1) uniform increase over the whole day ("delta method"), 2) warmer daytime, and 3) warmer nighttime. All 3 cases had the same mean daily air temperatures - a 4 °C increase relative to 2002. Results show that the timing of air temperature increases has a significant effect on the magnitude, timing and duration of changes in water temperatures relative to current conditions. In all cases, river temperatures in the lower reach increased by at least 1.1 °C . For the delta case, water temperature increases never exceeded 2.3 °C. In contrast, under the warmer daytime case, water temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 6.6 hours/day on average, with the largest increases occurring during mid-day. In the warmer night case the river temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 4.3 hours/day on average with the largest increases occurring around midnight. In addition, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the delta case increased the water temperature by an average of 1.9 °C uniformly during daytime and nighttime. Still, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer daytime case increased water temperature by an average of at least 1.6 °C during the daytime and by an average of up to 2.5 °C during the nighttime, while an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer nighttime case increased the water temperature by an average of at least 1.4 °C during the nighttime and by an average of up to 2.4 °C during the daytime. The spatial response of temperature was different for each case. The lower 13 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the delta case, while only the lower 6 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the warmer daytime case

  1. Short-Scale Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron-Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Kaye, S.; Davis, W.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Yuh, H.; Lee, W.; Park, H.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment indicate the existence of turbulent fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k?e 0:1 0:4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length nearly equal to the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from a linear gyrokinetic stability code support the conjecture that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron-temperature gradient.

  2. Interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope performance owing to temperature-induced index fluctuations in the fiber: effect on bias modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Sverre; Bløtekjær, Kjell

    1995-06-01

    An analysis of the noise floor owing to temperature-induced index fluctuations in the fiber of a dynamically biased interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope is presented. A comparison with shot noise indicates that, for a harmonic bias modulation, thermal noise in the fiber dominates for fiber lengths longer than \\similar 1 - 2km when practical source power levels are considered. The noise can be reduced or eliminated by the proper choice of modulation frequency or waveform.

  3. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  4. Evaluating CMIP5 models using AIRS tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian H.; Teixeira, Joao; Manning, Evan; Hearty, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents the climatological mean features of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) monthly mean tropospheric air temperature (ta, K) and specific humidity (hus, kg/kg) products as part of the Obs4MIPs project and compares them to those from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for validation and 16 models from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) for CMIP5 model evaluation. MERRA is warmer than AIRS in the free troposphere but colder in the boundary layer with differences typically less than 1 K. MERRA is also drier (~10%) than AIRS in the tropical boundary layer but wetter (~30%) in the tropical free troposphere and the extratropical troposphere. In particular, the large MERRA-AIRS specific humidity differences are mainly located in the deep convective cloudy regions indicating that the low sampling of AIRS in the cloudy regions may be the main reason for these differences. In comparison to AIRS and MERRA, the sixteen CMIP5 models can generally reproduce the climatological features of tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity well, but several noticeable biases exist. The models have a tropospheric cold bias (around 2 K), especially in the extratropical upper troposphere, and a double-ITCZ problem in the troposphere from 1000 hPa to 300 hPa, especially in the tropical Pacific. The upper-tropospheric cold bias exists in the most (13 of 16) models, and the double-ITCZ bias is found in all 16 CMIP5 models. Both biases are independent of the reference dataset used (AIRS or MERRA).

  5. Record low surface air temperature at Vostok station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John; Anderson, Phil; Lachlan-Cope, Tom; Colwell, Steve; Phillips, Tony; Kirchgaessner, AméLie; Marshall, Gareth J.; King, John C.; Bracegirdle, Tom; Vaughan, David G.; Lagun, Victor; Orr, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    The lowest recorded air temperature at the surface of the Earth was a measurement of -89.2°C made at Vostok station, Antarctica, at 0245 UT on 21 July 1983. Here we present the first detailed analysis of this event using meteorological reanalysis fields, in situ observations and satellite imagery. Surface temperatures at Vostok station in winter are highly variable on daily to interannual timescales as a result of the great sensitivity to intrusions of maritime air masses as Rossby wave activity changes around the continent. The record low temperature was measured following a near-linear cooling of over 30 K over a 10 day period from close to mean July temperatures. The event occurred because of five specific conditions that arose: (1) the temperature at the core of the midtropospheric vortex was at a near-record low value; (2) the center of the vortex moved close to the station; (3) an almost circular flow regime persisted around the station for a week resulting in very little warm air advection from lower latitudes; (4) surface wind speeds were low for the location; and (5) no cloud or diamond dust was reported above the station for a week, promoting the loss of heat to space via the emission of longwave radiation. We estimate that should a longer period of isolation occur the surface temperature at Vostok could drop to around -96°C. The higher site of Dome Argus is typically 5-6 K colder than Vostok so has the potential to record an even lower temperature.

  6. Mosselbay environmental conditions and sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Annette; Andò, Sergio; Frenzel, Peter; Kugel, Martin; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Schefuß, Enno; Zabel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    our current stage of research, we attribute this to a southward shift of the SHW and a strengthening in Aghulas current speed during this period. Cohen, A.L. and Tyson, P.D., 1995. Sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Holocene off the south coast of Africa: implications for terrestrial climate and rainfall. The Holocene 5 (3), 304-312.

  7. Studies on air-borne fungi at Qena. II. Diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, H M; Moubasher, A H; Swelim, M A

    1981-01-01

    The air-borne fungi displayed diurnal periodicities. The total count of fungi exhibited double-peaked pattern, one at 6 a.m. and the other at 18 p.m. (the higher). Aspergillus diurnal activities were almost parallel to those of total fungi. Cladosporium showed on main peak at 18 p.m. Penicillium and Alternaria displayed some pattern of diurnal activity and their maxima were observed.

  8. Temperature and Transpiration Resistances of Xanthium Leaves as Affected by Air Temperature, Humidity, and Wind Speed 1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, B. G.; Raschke, K.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1970-01-01

    Transpiration and temperatures of single, attached leaves of Xanthium strumarium L. were measured in high intensity white light (1.2 calories per square centimeter per minute on a surface normal to the radiation), with abundant water supply, at wind speeds of 90, 225, and 450 centimeters per second, and during exposure to moist and dry air. Partitioning of absorbed radiation between transpiration and convection was determined, and transpiration resistances were computed. Leaf resistances decreased with increasing temperature (down to a minimum of 0.36 seconds per centimeter). Silicone rubber replicas of leaf surfaces proved that the decrease was due to increased stomatal apertures. At constant air temperature, leaf resistances were higher in dry than in moist air with the result that transpiration varied less than would have been predicted on the basis of the water-vapor pressure difference between leaf and air. The dependence of stomatal conductance on temperature and moisture content of the air caused the following effects. At air temperatures below 35 C, average leaf temperatures were above air temperature by an amount dependent on wind velocity; increasing wind diminished transpiration. At air temperatures above 35 C, leaf temperatures were below air temperatures, and increasing wind markedly increased transpiration. Leaf temperatures equaled air temperature near 35 C at all wind speeds and in moist as well as in dry air. PMID:16657458

  9. Recent variations of sea ice and air temperature in high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, W.L.; Walsh, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Feedbacks resulting from the retreat of sea ice and snow contribute to the polar amplification of the greenhouse warming projected by global climate models. A gridded sea-ice database, for which the record length is now approaching four decades for the Arctic and two decades for the Antarctic, is summarized here. The sea-ice fluctuations derived from the data set are characterized by (1) temporal scales of several seasons to several years and (2) spatial scales of 30[degrees]-180[degrees] of longitude. The ice data are examined in conjunction with air temperature data for evidence of recent climate change in the polar regions. The arctic sea-ice variations over the past several decades are compatible with the corresponding air temperatures, which show a distinct warming that is strongest over northern land areas during the winter and spring. The temperature trends over the sub arctic seas are smaller and even negative in the southern Greenland region. Statistically significant decreases of the summer extent of arctic ice are apparent in the sea-ice data, and new summer minima have been achieved three times in the past 15 years. There is no significant trend of ice extent in the Arctic during winter or in the Antarctic during any season. The seasonal and geographical changes of sea-ice coverage are consistent with the more recent greenhouse experiments performed with coupled atmosphere-ocean models.

  10. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  11. Temperature Variations Recorded During Interinstitutional Air Shipments of Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Eric; Pineda, Fernando J; Watson, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive guidelines and regulations that govern most aspects of rodent shipping, few data are available on the physical environment experienced by rodents during shipment. To document the thermal environment experienced by mice during air shipments, we recorded temperatures at 1-min intervals throughout 103 routine interinstitutional shipments originating at our institution. We found that 49.5% of shipments were exposed to high temperatures (greater than 29.4 °C), 14.6% to low temperatures (less than 7.2 °C), and 61% to temperature variations of 11 °C or more. International shipments were more likely than domestic shipments to experience temperature extremes and large variations in temperature. Freight forwarders using passenger airlines rather than their own airplanes were more likely to have shipments that experienced temperature extremes or variations. Temperature variations were most common during stopovers. Some airlines were more likely than others to experience inflight temperature extremes or swings. Most domestic shipments lasted at least 24 h, whereas international shipments lasted 48 to 72 h. Despite exposure to high and low temperatures, animals in all but 1 shipment arrived alive. We suggest that simple measures, such as shipping at night during hot weather, provision of nesting material in shipping crates, and specifying aircraft cargo-hold temperatures that are suitable for rodents, could reduce temperature-induced stress. Measures such as additional training for airport ground crews, as previously recommended by the American Veterinary Medical Association, could further reduce exposure of rodents to extreme ambient temperatures during airport stopovers. PMID:18210996

  12. Global surface air temperature variations: 1851-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Raper, S.C.B.; Kelly, P.M.

    1986-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to combine station surface air temperature data into an average for the Northern Hemisphere. Fewer attempts have been made for the Southern Hemisphere because of the unavailability of data from the Antarctic mainland before the 1950s and the uncertainty of making a hemispheric estimate based solely on land-based analyses for a hemisphere that is 80% ocean. Past estimates have been based largely on data from the World Weather Records (Smithsonian Institution, 1927, 1935, 1947, and U.S. Weather Bureau, 1959-82) and have been made without considerable effort to detect and correct station inhomogeneities. Better estimates for the Southern Hemisphere are now possible because of the availability of 30 years of climatological data from Antarctica. The mean monthly surface air temperature anomalies presented in this package for the than those previously published because of the incorporation of data previously hidden away in archives and the analysis of station homogeneity before estimation.

  13. Evidence of Lunar Phase Influence on Global Surface Air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Ebby; Susskind, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a newly available 20-year record of satellite-derived surface air temperature are composited with respect to the lunar phase. Polar regions exhibit strong lunar phase modulation with higher temperatures occurs near full moon and lower temperatures at new moon, in agreement with previous studies. The polar response to the apparent lunar forcing is shown to be most robust in the winter months when solar influence is minimum. In addition, the response appears to be influenced by ENSO events. The highest mean temperature range between full moon and new moon in the polar region between 60 deg and 90 deg latitude was recorded in 1983, 1986/87, and 1990/91. Although the largest lunar phase signal is in the polar regions, there is a tendency for meridional equatorward progression of anomalies in both hemispheres so that the warning in the tropics occurs at the time of the new moon.

  14. Antarctic Sea ice variations and seasonal air temperature relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherly, John W.; Walsh, John E.; Zwally, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Data through 1987 are used to determine the regional and seasonal dependencies of recent trends of Antarctic temperature and sea ice. Lead-lag relationships involving regional sea ice and air temperature are systematically evaluated, with an eye toward the ice-temperature feedbacks that may influence climatic change. Over the 1958-1087 period the temperature trends are positive in all seasons. For the 15 years (l973-l987) for which ice data are available, the trends are predominantly positive only in winter and summer, and are most strongly positive over the Antarctic Peninsula. The spatially aggregated trend of temperature for this latter period is small but positive, while the corresponding trend of ice coverage is small but negative. Lag correlations between seasonal anomalies of the two variables are generally stronger with ice lagging the summer temperatures and with ice leading the winter temperatures. The implication is that summer temperatures predispose the near-surface waters to above-or below-normal ice coverage in the following fall and winter.

  15. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    PubMed

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context.

  16. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in mice. III. Acute and chronic effects of CAPs on heart rate, heart-rate fluctuation, and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Nadziejko, Christine; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    Normal mice (C57) and mice prone to develop atherosclerosis (ApoE-/-) were implanted with electrocardiograph (EKG), core body temperature, and motion transmitters were exposed daily for 6 h to Tuxedo, NY, concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) for 5 day/wk during the spring and summer of 2003. The series of 5-min EKG monitoring and body-temperature measurements were obtained for each animal in the CAPs and filtered air sham exposure groups. Our hypothesis was that chronic exposure could cause cumulative health effects. We used our recently developed nonparametric method to estimate the daily time periods that mean heart rates (HR), body temperature, and physical activity differed significantly between the CAPs and sham exposed group. CAPs exposure most affected heart rate between 1:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. With the response variables being the average heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity, we adopted a two-stage modeling approach to obtain the estimates of chronic and acute effects on the changes of these three response variables. In the first stage, a time-varying model estimated daily crude effects. In the second stage, the true means of the estimated crude effects were modeled with a polynominal function of time for chronic effects, a linear term of daily CAPs exposure concentrations for acute effects, and a random component for unknown noise. A Bayesian framework combined these two stages. There were significant decreasing patterns of HR, body temperature, and physical activity for the ApoE-/- mice over the 5 mo of CAPs exposure, with smaller and nonsignificant changes for the C57 mice. The chronic effect changes of the three response variables for ApoE-/- mice were maximal in the last few weeks. There was also a significant relationship between CAPs exposure concentration and short-term changes of heart rate in ApoE-/- mice during exposure. Response variables were also defined for examining fluctuations of 5-min heart rates within long (i.e., 3-6 h

  17. Correlation Electron Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade: Cross Machine Comparisons and Transport Model Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Creely, A. J.; Freethy, S.; Cao, N.; Conway, G. D.; Goerler, T.; Happel, T.; Howard, N. T.; Inman, C.; Rice, J. E.; Rodriguez Fernandez, P.; Sung, C.; C-Mod, Alcator; Upgrade, Asdex

    2016-10-01

    Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostics have been developed for Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade. Measurements of long wavelength (ktheta rhos <0.5) electron temperature fluctuations have been measured in the core plasma (0.5 temperature fluctuations, and the correlation with density fluctuations, which can be measured with coupled radiometer / reflectometer diagnostics, provide valuable constraints on gyrokinetic models. Recent results in transport model validation at both C-Mod and AUG are presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grants DE-SC0006419 and DEFC02-99ER54512-CMOD.

  18. Daily Air Temperature and Electricity Load in Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valor, Enric; Meneu, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente

    2001-08-01

    Weather has a significant impact on different sectors of the economy. One of the most sensitive is the electricity market, because power demand is linked to several weather variables, mainly the air temperature. This work analyzes the relationship between electricity load and daily air temperature in Spain, using a population-weighted temperature index. The electricity demand shows a significant trend due to socioeconomic factors, in addition to daily and monthly seasonal effects that have been taken into account to isolate the weather influence on electricity load. The results indicate that the relationship is nonlinear, showing a `comfort interval' of ±3°C around 18°C and two saturation points beyond which the electricity load no longer increases. The analysis has also revealed that the sensitivity of electricity load to daily air temperature has increased along time, in a higher degree for summer than for winter, although the sensitivity in the cold season is always more significant than in the warm season. Two different temperature-derived variables that allow a better characterization of the observed relationship have been used: the heating and cooling degree-days. The regression of electricity data on them defines the heating and cooling demand functions, which show correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.87, and predicts electricity load with standard errors of estimate of ±4% and ±2%, respectively. The maximum elasticity of electricity demand is observed at 7 cooling degree-days and 9 heating degree-days, and the saturation points are reached at 11 cooling degree-days and 13 heating degree-days, respectively. These results are helpful in modeling electricity load behavior for predictive purposes.

  19. Effect of fluctuations on time-averaged multi-line NO-LIF thermometry measurements of the gas-phase temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroughi, Omid M.; Kronemayer, Helmut; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-09-01

    Multi-line NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry enables accurate gas-phase temperature imaging in combustion systems through least-squares fitting of excitation spectra. The required excitation wavelength scan takes several minutes which systematic biases the results in case of temperature fluctuations. In this work, the effect of various types (linear, Gaussian and bimodal) and amplitudes of temperature fluctuations is quantified based on simulated NO-LIF excitation spectra. Temperature fluctuations of less than ±5 % result in a negligible error of less than ±1 % in temperature for all cases. Bimodal temperature distributions have the largest effect on the determined temperature. Symmetric temperature fluctuations around 900 K have a negligible effect. At lower mean temperatures, fluctuations cause a positive bias leading to over-predicted mean temperatures, while at higher temperatures the bias is negative. The results of the theoretical analysis were applied as a guide for interpreting experimental multi-line NO-LIF temperature measurements in a mildly turbulent pilot-plant scale flame reactor dedicated for nanoparticle synthesis.

  20. Sensitivity of New England Stream Temperatures to Air Temperature and Precipitation Under Projected Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Samal, N. R.; Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R. J.; Zuidema, S.; Prousevitch, A.; Glidden, S.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal response of streams and rivers to changing climate will influence aquatic habitat. This study examines the impact that changing climate has on stream temperatures in the Merrimack River, NH/MA USA using the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in the Earth System (FrAMES), a spatially distributed river network model driven by air temperature, air humidity, wind speed, precipitation, and solar radiation. Streamflow and water temperatures are simulated at a 45-second (latitude x longitude) river grid resolution for 135 years under historical and projected climate variability. Contemporary streamflow (Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient = 0.77) and river temperatures (Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient = 0.89) matched at downstream USGS gauge data well. A suite of model runs were made in combination with uniformly increased daily summer air temperatures by 2oC, 4 oC and 6 oC as well as adjusted precipitation by -40%, -30%, -20%, -10% and +10% as a sensitivity analysis to explore a broad range of potential future climates. We analyzed the summer stream temperatures and the percent of river length unsuitable for cold to warm water fish habitats. Impacts are greatest in large rivers due to the accumulation of river temperature warming throughout the entire river network. Cold water fish (i.e. brook trout) are most strongly affected while, warm water fish (i.e. largemouth bass) aren't expected to be impacted. The changes in stream temperatures under various potential climate scenarios will provide a better understanding of the specific impact that air temperature and precipitation have on aquatic thermal regimes and habitat.

  1. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  2. On extreme rainfall intensity increases with air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Gaal, Ladislav; Szolgay, Jan; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The water vapour holding capacity of air increases at about 7% per degree C according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. This is one of the arguments why a warmer future atmosphere, being able to hold more moisture, will generate higher extreme precipitation intensities. However, several empirical studies have recently demonstrated an increase in extreme rain intensities with air temperature above CC rates, in the range 7-14% per degree C worldwide (called super-CC rates). This was observed especially for shorter duration rainfall, i.e. in hourly and finer resolution data (e.g. review in Westra et al., 2014). The super-CC rate was attributed to positive feedbacks between water vapour and the updraft dynamics in convective clouds and lateral supply (convergence) of moisture. In addition, mixing of storm types was shown to be potentially responsible for super-CC rates in empirical studies. Assuming that convective events are accompanied by lightning, we will show on a large rainfall dataset in Switzerland (30 year records of 10-min and 1-hr data from 59 stations) that while the average rate of increase in extreme rainfall intensity (95th percentile) is 6-7% in no-lightning events and 8-9% in lightning events, it is 11-13% per degree C when all events are combined (Molnar et al., 2015). These results are relevant for climate change studies which predict shifts in storm types in a warmer climate in some parts of the world. The observation that extreme rain intensity and air temperature are positively correlated has consequences for the stochastic modelling of rainfall. Most current stochastic models do not explicitly include a direct rain intensity-air temperature dependency beyond applying factors of change predicted by climate models to basic statistics of precipitation. Including this dependency explicitly in stochastic models will allow, for example in the nested modelling approach of Paschalis et al. (2014), the random cascade disaggregation routine to be

  3. Air-sea interactions in sea surface temperature frontal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianezze, Joris; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reynaud, Thierry; Marié, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Garnier, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Representation of air-sea exchanges in coastal, regional and global models represent a challenge firstly due to the small scale of acting turbulent processes comparatively to the resolved scales of these models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of air-sea interactions at the turbulent process scales is still lacking. Many successful efforts are dedicated to measure the energy and mass exchanges between atmosphere and ocean, including the effect of surface waves. In comparison less efforts are brought to understand the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and the oceanic mixing layer. In this regard, we are developing research mainly based on ideal and realistic numerical simulations which resolve very small scales (horizontal resolutions from 1 to 100 meters) in using grid nesting technics and coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models. As a first step, the impact of marked gradients in sea surface temperatures (SST) on air-sea exchanges has been explored through realistic numerical simulations at 100m horizontal resolution. Results from simulations of a case observed during the FROMVAR experiment will be shown. The talk will mainly focus on the marked impact of SST front on the atmospheric boundary layer (stability and winds), the air-sea exchanges and surface parameters (rugosity, drag coefficient) Results will be also shown on the strong impact on the simulated atmosphere of small scale variability of SST field.

  4. Effects of fluctuating moisture and temperature regimes on the infection potential of Beauveria bassiana for Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Fargues, J; Luz, C

    2000-04-01

    The effect of both moisture and temperature on the infective potential of Beauveria bassiana to the Chagas' disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus, was studied under fluctuating regimes. At constant 25 degrees C, contaminated first-instar nymphs exposed to increasing daily periods of initial exposure to 97% RH, followed by transfer to reduced humidity (43, 53, 75, and 86% RH), showed a significant reduction in mortality when the 97% RH exposure time declined from 12 to 8 h per day. The duration of disease incubation depended on the daily 97% RH exposure time. Under fluctuating regimes of both humidity (97% RH versus 75% RH) and temperature (15/28, 20/25, 25/28, and 25/35 degrees C), first-instar mortality was affected by weather conditions, daily 97% RH exposure time (8, 12, and 16 h per day), and number of temperature and humidity fluctuations before transferring tested insects to constant unfavorable conditions. In most cases, at 12/12 h alternating cycles, high and rapid mortality required five cycles. Under these fluctuating regimes, fungus-induced mortality and mortality time were similarly affected in third- and fifth-instar nymphs by the daily 97% RH exposure time. Despite a lower susceptibility of older larval stages, mortality rates in insects exposed for at least 12 h per day at 97% RH remained very high except at 15 degrees C. Moisture and temperature regimes at 12/12 h cycling significantly affected the dose-mortality response in first-instar nymphs. The most favorable conditions consisted of 97%-20 degrees C combined with either 75%-25 degrees C or 43%-25 degrees C. Under less favorable alternating conditions (lower and higher temperatures) the amounts of inoculum required for killing 50% of first-instar nymphs were 10 or 20 times higher. From a vector control standpoint, daily high humidity appears to be the most crucial climatic constraint. B. bassiana has the potential to control R. prolixus populations with applications made during the rainy seasons

  5. Studies on air-borne fungi at Qena. I. Seasonal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Moubasher, A H; Abdel-Fattah, H M; Swelim, M A

    1981-01-01

    73 species which belong to 24 genera were collected in 200 and 35 exposures made during the period May 1976-October 1977 at each of two levels (2 m and 20 m). The air-borne fungi showed seasonal periodicities and the highest incidence was recovered in spring and autumn and the least in the summer. Aspergillus was the dominating genus. 17 species were collected at the two levels of which A. niger and A. flavus were the most common. Other common genera were Cladosporium which was represented by C. herbarum, C. cladosporioides, C. sphaerospermum, and C. macrocarpum. 7 species of Curvularia were identified of which C. pallescens was the most frequent at the low and C. spicifera at the high level. Drechslera was represented by 6 species of which D. halodes was the most common at the two levels. Only one Alternaria species, A. alternata was isolated at both levels. 10 Penicillium were recovered, P. notatum was the most frequently one isolated at the two levels. Many fungal spore showers of Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Curvularia, and Alternaria were recorded during the experimental period.

  6. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  7. Significance of High-Speed Air Temperature Measurements in the Sampling Cell of a Closed-Path Gas Analyzer with a Short Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathilankal, James; Fratini, Gerardo; Burba, George

    2015-04-01

    Eddy covariance gas analyzers measure gas content in a known volume, thus essentially measuring gas density. The fundamental flux equation, however, is based on the dry mole fraction. The relationship between dry mole fraction and density is regulated by the ideal gas law describing the processes of temperature- and pressure-related expansions and contractions, and by the law of partial pressures, describing the process of dilution. As a result, this relationship depends on water vapor content, temperature and pressure of the air sample. If the instrument is able to output precise high-speed dry mole fraction, the flux processing is significantly simplified and WPL density terms accounting for the air density fluctuations are no longer required. This should also lead to the reduction in uncertainties associated with the density terms resulting from the eddy covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes used in these terms. In this framework, three main measurement approaches may be considered: Open-path approach Outputting correct high-speed dry mole fraction from the open-path instrument is difficult because of complexities with maintaining reliable fast temperature measurements integrated over the entire measuring path, and also because of extraordinary challenges with accurate measurements of fast pressure in the open air flow. Classical long-tube closed-path approach For instruments utilizing traditional long-tube closed-path design, with tube length 1000 or more times the tube diameter, the fast dry mole fraction can be used successfully when instantaneous fluctuations in the air temperature of the sampled air are effectively dampened to negligible levels, instantaneous pressure fluctuations are regulated or negligible, and water vapor is measured simultaneously with gas or the air sample is dried. Short-tube closed-path approach, the enclosed design For instruments with a short-tube enclosed design, most - but not all - of the temperature

  8. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  13. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  14. Pd-modified Reactive Air Braze for Increased Melting Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2005-03-01

    Complex high temperature devices such as planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) stacks often require a two-step sealing process. For example, in pSOFC stacks the oxide ceramic fuel cell plates might be sealed into metallic support frames in one step. Then the frames with the fuel plates sealed to them would be joined together in a separate sealing step to form the fuel cell stack. In this case, the initial seal should have a sufficiently high solidus temperature that it will not begin to remelt at the sealing temperature of the material used for the subsequent sealing step. Previous experience has indicated that, when heated at a rate of 10°C/min, Ag-CuO reactive air braze (RAB) compositions have solidus and liquidus temperatures in the approximate range of 925 to 955°C. Therefore, compositionally modifying the original Ag-CuO braze with Pd-additions such that the solidus temperature of the new braze is between 1025 and 1050°C would provide two RAB compositions with a difference in melting points large enough to allow reactive air brazing of both sets of seals in the fuel cell stack. This study determines the appropriate ratio of Pd to Ag in RAB required to achieve a solidus in the desired range and discusses the wettability of the resulting Pd-Ag-CuO brazes on YSZ substrates. The interfacial microstructures and flexural strengths of Pd-Ag-CuO joints in YSZ will also be presented.

  15. Model-based estimation of changes in air temperature seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Trigo, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Seasonality is a ubiquitous feature in climate time series. Climate change is expected to involve not only changes in the mean of climate parameters but also changes in the characteristics of the corresponding seasonal cycle. Therefore the identification and quantification of changes in seasonality is a highly relevant topic in climate analysis, particularly in a global warming context. However, the analysis of seasonality is far from a trivial task. A key challenge is the discrimination between long-term changes in the mean and long-term changes in the seasonal pattern itself, which requires the use of appropriate statistical approaches in order to be able to distinguish between overall trends in the mean and trends in the seasons. Model based approaches are particularly suitable for the analysis of seasonality, enabling to assess uncertainties in the amplitude and phase of seasonal patterns within a well defined statistical framework. This work addresses the changes in the seasonality of air temperature over the 20th century. The analysed data are global air temperature values close to surface (2m above ground) and mid-troposphere (500 hPa geopotential height) from the recently developed 20th century reanalysis. This new 3-D Reanalysis dataset is available since 1891, considerably extending all other Reanalyses currently in use (e.g. NCAR, ECWMF), and was obtained with the Ensemble Filter (Compo et al., 2006) by assimilation of pressure observations into a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model that includes the radiative effects of historical time-varying CO2 concentrations, volcanic aerosol emissions and solar output variations. A modeling approach based on autoregression (Barbosa et al, 2008; Barbosa, 2009) is applied within a Bayesian framework for the estimation of a time varying seasonal pattern and further quantification of changes in the amplitude and phase of air temperature over the 20th century. Barbosa, SM, Silva, ME, Fernandes, MJ

  16. Synergistic effect of daily temperature fluctuations and matching light-dark cycle enhances population growth and synchronizes oviposition behavior in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    Liefting, Maartje; Cosijn, Jarno; Ellers, Jacintha

    2017-01-01

    Some major aspects of insect life, like development time and reproduction, can benefit from fluctuating temperatures rather than a constant temperature regime. The benefit of fluctuating temperature has generally been attributed to the non-linear properties of the relationship of many life history traits with temperature. Daily temperature rise, however, usually coincide with the light phase of the photoperiodic cycle and there could be a benefit in linking daily temperature fluctuations with light and dark phases e.g. to anticipate the change in temperature. Such synergistic effects have primarily been studied in the light of activity patterns and gene expression, but have not yet been shown to extend to population dynamics and aspects of individual fitness like oviposition behavior. We therefore explored possible synergistic effects on life history traits of the springtail Orchesella cincta. We first test the primary effect of ecologically relevant temperature fluctuations of different amplitudes on population growth and total population mass. The slowest population growth was observed in the constant temperature regime treatment and the highest population growth in the regime with high amplitude fluctuations. In a second experiment, population growth and oviposition rhythm were measured under four different regimes; a constant light and temperature regime, thermoperiod only, photoperiod only and thermoperiod and photoperiod aligned as under natural conditions. The regime in which thermoperiod was aligned with photoperiod resulted in a higher population growth than could be realized by either factor alone. Also, significantly fewer eggs were laid in the constant temperature/light regime than in the other three regimes, strongly suggesting that this regime is stressful to O. cincta. Additionally, the fraction of eggs laid at night was highest in the regime with the combined temperature and light cycle. In conclusion, our results show that under these experimental

  17. On the definition of temperature and its fluctuations in small systems.

    PubMed

    Boltachev, Grey Sh; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2010-10-07

    An analysis of the limits of applicability of the thermodynamic definition of temperature to small systems is given. It is shown that the classical thermodynamic definition, (dS/dU)=1/T (S being the entropy, U the energy, and T the absolute temperature), is not applicable to small systems. It results in an uncertainty in the definition of temperature of the order O(1/N), where N is the number of particles in the system. An alternative definition of temperature is proposed based on the statistical-mechanical description of ensembles of particles. Applying this definition to perfect gases, a rigorous expression for the distribution of temperatures is obtained valid also for small systems and even in the limit N→1. In contrast to alternative approaches based on the thermodynamic definition of temperature, this distribution retains the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with respect to temperature (equality of average temperature of the small system and temperature of the thermostat) also for small systems resolving in this way a widely discussed in the past problem between thermodynamics and its statistical-mechanical interpretation. Further, a generalization of this distribution to nonideal systems of interacting particles is developed. The results are applied to an interpretation of recent molecular dynamics simulations of argon condensation. Some further consequences and different possible definitions of temperature for macroscopic systems are discussed briefly as well.

  18. DDT in fuel air mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Card, J.; Rival, D.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in fuel air mixtures at initial temperatures up to 573 K and pressures up to 2 atm. The fuels investigated include hydrogen, ethylene, acetylene and JP-10 aviation fuel. The experiments were performed in a 3.1-m long, 10-cm inner-diameter heated detonation tube equipped with equally spaced orifice plates. Ionization probes were used to measure the flame time-of-arrival from which the average flame velocity versus propagation distance could be obtained. The DDT composition limits and the distance required for the flame to transition to detonation were obtained from this flame velocity data. The correlation developed by Veser et al. (run-up distance to supersonic flames in obstacle-laden tubes. In the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Hazards, Prevention and Mitigation of Industrial Explosions, France (2002)) for the flame choking distance proved to work very well for correlating the detonation run-up distance measured in the present study. The only exception was for the hydrogen air data at elevated initial temperatures which tended to fall outside the scatter of the hydrocarbon mixture data. The DDT limits obtained at room temperature were found to follow the classical d/λ = 1 correlation, where d is the orifice plate diameter and λ is the detonation cell size. Deviations found for the high-temperature data could be attributed to the one-dimensional ZND detonation structure model used to predict the detonation cell size for the DDT limit mixtures. This simple model was used in place of actual experimental data not currently available.

  19. Diagnosis of equilibrium magnetic profiles, current transport, and internal structures in a reversed-field pinch using electron temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, Eli

    Due to long fast ion confinement times, neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) yields large fast ion populations with substantial density gradients. Novel application of the unique high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has enabled characterization of a newly observed beam-driven instability, and detailed measurement of equilibrium changes caused by the fast ion population. While previous work has focused on high-frequency energetic particle modes (EPMs), recent observations indicate that fast ions drive a bursting instability near the plasma rotation frequency under appropriate conditions. The mode chirps strongly, with a frequency of approximately 7 kHz in the plasma reference frame at peak amplitude. Bursts are correlated with EPM activity and core neutral particle analyzer signals drop by 30% during a burst, suggesting that this mode participates in avalanches of the higher frequency EPMs and drives enhanced fast ion transport. Electron temperature fluctuations correlated with this low-frequency mode exhibit a core-peaked structure with a sensitive dependence on the safety factor q. Although this mode has not yet been positively identified, its characteristics and internal structure are suggestive of an internal kink (fishbone) or beta-induced Alfven eigenmode. In addition to driving EPMs, the large fast ion population also modifies the current profile. An increase in on-axis current density driven by NBI is offset by a reduction in the mid-radius, leading to net-zero current drive. This results in a slight flattening of the safety factor profile, observed by precise measurement of the rational surface locations of the dominant tearing modes; these are identified from the phase flip in correlated electron temperature fluctuations recorded by Thomson scattering. For the core n = 6 rational surface, an inward shift of 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm is observed, with an estimated reduction in q0 of 5%. This technique provides a

  20. Quantitative reconstruction of temperature in northern Japan for the last 2000 years and the influential factors to determine climatic fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahata, Hodaka; Hatta, Yoshiki; Ota, Yuki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Habu, Junko

    2016-04-01

    A coastal sedimentary core at St. 5 in Uchiura Bay in northern Japan provided an opportunity to quantitatively estimate terrestrial atmospheric temperatures (AT) using the alkenone proxy because of their strong correlation with summer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (r2 >0.90). In other words, when we can estimate SST, we can reconstruct AT quantitatively at high time resolution (10-30 years for the last 2K). During the last two millennia, SSTs fluctuated by 4.9 °C before 20 century, reaching two maximum in 1820 AD (22.3°C) and 760 AD (22.0 °C) and two minima around 145 AD (17.4 °C) and 1080 AD (17.4 °C). The SST profile is generally consistent with those obtained from western and central Japan by us (3 sites) and from East Asia by Cook (2013) but shows some differences. Although the MWP (Medieval Warm Period) was not identified in this study because a cold climate prevailed in 990-1100 AD. Particularly low temperatures around 1000-1100 AD can be verified by historical documents from in and around the ancient capital city of Kyoto (Ishii, 2002). The reconstructed SOI (Southern Oscillation Index) data suggest that the equatorial Pacific was predominantly in an El Niño phase in 900-1200 AD. Under modern conditions, during an El Niño episode, the Pacific high is weakened, with reduced atmospheric pressure in the western North Pacific in the vicinity of Japan. This results in an enhanced Okhotsk high, which tends to be accompanied by a cold and cloudy/rainy summer in Japan. A cold climate was definitely observed in 1550-1700 AD, which almost corresponded to the LIA (Little Ice Age). A cold event around 1650 AD can be attributed to big eruptions at Komagatake. This resulted in severe cold type of famine, which is evidenced by historical documents. Because several factors, including external forcing (e.g., solar activity) and internal forcing (e.g., volcanic activity, ENSO, and the Asian monsoon), can affect the climate, we compared SST fluctuations with each of

  1. Effects of long-period solar activity fluctuation on temperature and pressure of the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubashev, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    The present state of research on the influence of solar sunspot activity on tropospheric temperature and pressure is reviewed. The existence of an 11-year temperature cycle of 5 different types is affirmed. A cyclic change in atmospheric pressure, deducing characteristic changes between 11-year cycles is discussed. The existence of 80-year and 5-to-6-year cycles of temperature is established, and physical causes for birth are suggested.

  2. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  3. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, David J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30–40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and −0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis. PMID:20685714

  4. Novel mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecules: role of thermodynamic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Teslenko, V I; Petrov, E G; Verkhratsky, A; Krishtal, O A

    2010-04-30

    A novel physical mechanism is proposed to explain the temperature-independent transition reactions in molecular systems. The mechanism becomes effective in the case of conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states. It is shown that at room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As an example, a physical interpretation of temperature-independent onset of P2X{3} receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes is provided.

  5. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  6. Modeling the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity values.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; Fernández, Pablo S; George, Susan; Pin, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    The dynamic model for the growth of a bacterial population described by Baranyi and Roberts (J. Baranyi and T. A. Roberts, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was applied to model the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity (a(w)) values. To model the duration of the lag phase, the dependence of the parameter h(0), which quantifies the amount of work done during the lag period, on the previous and current environmental conditions was determined experimentally. This parameter depended not only on the magnitude of the change between the previous and current environmental conditions but also on the current growth conditions. In an exponentially growing population, any change in the environment requiring a certain amount of work to adapt to the new conditions initiated a lag period that lasted until that work was finished. Observations for several scenarios in which exponential growth was halted by a sudden change in the temperature and/or a(w) were in good agreement with predictions. When a population already in a lag period was subjected to environmental fluctuations, the system was reset with a new lag phase. The work to be done during the new lag phase was estimated to be the workload due to the environmental change plus the unfinished workload from the uncompleted previous lag phase.

  7. Modeling the Lag Period and Exponential Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Conditions of Fluctuating Temperature and Water Activity Values▿

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; Fernández, Pablo S.; George, Susan; Pin, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model for the growth of a bacterial population described by Baranyi and Roberts (J. Baranyi and T. A. Roberts, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was applied to model the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity (aw) values. To model the duration of the lag phase, the dependence of the parameter h0, which quantifies the amount of work done during the lag period, on the previous and current environmental conditions was determined experimentally. This parameter depended not only on the magnitude of the change between the previous and current environmental conditions but also on the current growth conditions. In an exponentially growing population, any change in the environment requiring a certain amount of work to adapt to the new conditions initiated a lag period that lasted until that work was finished. Observations for several scenarios in which exponential growth was halted by a sudden change in the temperature and/or aw were in good agreement with predictions. When a population already in a lag period was subjected to environmental fluctuations, the system was reset with a new lag phase. The work to be done during the new lag phase was estimated to be the workload due to the environmental change plus the unfinished workload from the uncompleted previous lag phase. PMID:20208022

  8. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    1988-01-01

    Boundary layer flow and turbulence transport analyses to study the influence of the free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction around the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a turbulent flow are presented. The analyses are formulated with the turbulent boundary layer equations, the Reynolds stress transport equations and the k - epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling. The analyses are used to calculate the time-averaged turbulence double correlations, the mean flow properties, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction with an isotropic turbulence in the freestream. The analytical results are described and compared with the existing experimental measurements. Depending on the free-stream turbulence properties, the turbulence kinetic energy can increase or decrease as the flow moves toward the surface. However, the turbulence kinetic energy induces large Reynolds normal stresses at the boundary layer edge. The Reynolds normal stresses change the boundary layer profiles of the time-averaged double correlations of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction. The free-stream turbulence dissipation rate can affect the stagnation-point heat transfer rate but the influence of the free-stream temperature fluctuation on the heat transfer rate is insignificant.

  9. Assessing surface air temperature variability using quantile regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. A.; Sterin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Many researches in climate change currently involve linear trends, based on measured variables. And many of them only consider trends in mean values, whereas it is clear, that not only means, but also whole shape of distribution changes over time and requires careful assessment. For example extreme values including outliers may get bigger, while median has zero slope.Quantile regression provides a convenient tool, that enables detailed analysis of changes in full range of distribution by producing a vector of quantile trends for any given set of quantiles.We have applied quantile regression to surface air temperature observations made at over 600 weather stations across Russian Federation during last four decades. The results demonstrate well pronounced regions with similar values of significant trends in different parts of temperature value distribution (left tail, middle part, right tail). The uncertainties of quantile trend estimations for several spatial patterns of trends over Russia are estimated and analyzed for each of four seasons.For temperature trend estimation over vast territories, quantile regression is an effort consuming approach, but is more informative than traditional instrument, to assess decadal evolution of temperature values, including evolution of extremes.Partial support of ERA NET RUS ACPCA joint project between EU and RBRF 12-05-91656-ЭРА-А is highly appreciated.

  10. Boundary layer fluctuations and their effects on mean and variance temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou; Tong, Penger

    2016-12-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the mean temperature profile θ (z ) and temperature variance profile η (z ) near the lower conducting plate of a specially designed quasi-two-dimensional cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The measured θ (z ) is found to have a universal scaling form θ (z /δ ) with varying thermal boundary layer (BL) thickness δ , and its functional form agrees well with the recently derived BL equation by Shishkina et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 114302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.114302]. The measured η (z ) , on the other hand, is found to have a scaling form η (z /δ ) only in the near-wall region with z /δ ≲2 . Based on the experimental findings, we derive a BL equation for η (z /δ ) , which is in good agreement with the experimental results. These BL equations thus provide a common framework for understanding the effect of BL fluctuations.

  11. Effect of constant and fluctuating temperature on daily melatonin production by eyecups from Rana perezi.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, A I; Alonso-Gómez, A L; Alonso-Bedate, M; Delgado, M J

    1997-04-01

    We analysed the effect of daily temperature cycles in relation to constant temperature on day/night melatonin synthesis in frog eyecups in culture. Eyecups were cultured for 24 h under 12L:12D photoperiod and two thermal regimes, constant temperature (25, 15 and 5 degrees C) and thermoperiod (WL/CD, thermophase coinciding with photophase and cryophase coinciding with scotophase; and CL/WD, cryophase coinciding with photophase and thermophase coinciding with scotophase). A negative correlation between ocular serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity and culture temperature for both diurnal and nocturnal activities has been observed. This effect of increased ocular activity at low temperature is more pronounced than the well-known stimulatory effect of darkness, and it does not depend on the photoperiod phase. The lack of interactions between the phase of photoperiod and culture temperature indicates that the effects of both factors are independent. Night-time temperature is the key factor in determining the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm in the Rana perezi retina. However, daytime temperature can not counteract the inhibitory effect of light on ocular melatonin synthesis.

  12. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging.

  13. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging. PMID:27789976

  14. Effectiveness of an air-cooled vest using selected air temperature and humidity combinations.

    PubMed

    Pimental, N A; Cosimini, H M; Sawka, M N; Wenger, C B

    1987-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an air-cooled vest in reducing thermal strain of subjects exercising in the heat (49 degrees C dry bulb (db), 20 degrees C dew point (dp] in chemical protective clothing. Four male subjects attempted 300-min heat exposures at two metabolic rates (175 and 315 W) with six cooling combinations--control (no vest) and five different db and dp combinations. Air supplied to the vest at 15 scfm ranged from 20-27 degrees C db, 7-18 degrees C dp; theoretical cooling capacities were 498-687 W. Without the vest, endurance times were 118 min (175 W) and 73 min (315 W). Endurance times with the vest were 300 min (175 W) and 242-300 min (315 W). The five cooling combinations were similarly effective in reducing thermal strain and extending endurance time, although there was a trend for the vest to be more effective when supplied with air at the lower dry bulb temperature. At 175 W, subjects maintained a constant body temperature; at 315 W, the vest's ability to extend endurance is limited to about 5 hours.

  15. Imitating seasonal temperature fluctuations for the H2S corrosion of 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, A.; Babaiee, M.; Pakshir, M.

    2013-07-01

    Temperature fluctuations are inevitable in sour oil and gas production. In this study, the H2S corrosion of 304L and 316L alloys was investigated at pH 3 and temperatures of 20-60 °C using DC and AC electrochemical techniques. Two-fold increases in the corrosion rates of both alloys were reported with increases in temperature to 60 °C. In the 304L alloy, the surface layer was observed to be 3% rougher and 34% thicker than that of the 316L alloy. The two alloys exhibited different corrosion behaviors in the temperature ranges of 20-40 °C and 40-60 °C. Although the 316L alloy revealed a greater corrosion resistance at the free potential condition, the passivation on the 304L alloy was significantly greater than that of the 316L alloy at 40 °C and 15 ppm H2S. The FeS2 and combined FeS2-MoS2 compounds contributed to the surface layer constituents in the 304L and 316L alloys, respectively. The increase in temperature kinetically provided more favorable conditions for FeS2 than MoS2 formation, i.e. it had a relatively constructive effect on the 304L alloy passivation.

  16. Temperature preference and reproductive fitness of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus exposed to constant and fluctuating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Podrabsky, Jason E; Clelen, Dustin; Crawshaw, Larry I

    2008-04-01

    Austrofundulus limnaeus thrive in ephemeral ponds that may experience temperatures spanning a range of over 20 degrees C on a daily basis. We hypothesized that A. limnaeus may have mechanisms, either behavioral or physiological, that allow them to support successful reproduction in this environment. To evaluate this hypothesis, we exposed male and female adult A. limnaeus to constant 26 degrees C and cycling 21-37 degrees C acclimation regimes in the laboratory and then determined their temperature preference and reproductive fitness. Temperature preference was determined using a thermal gradient. We demonstrated that A. limnaeus is capable of accurate behavioral thermoregulation, has a final thermal preferendum near 26 degrees C, and exhibits a daily cycle of temperature preference. Exposure to a cycling temperature regime has an acute effect on thermal preference that differs between the sexes. Reproductive capability was negatively affected by the cyclic temperature exposure. These findings suggest that thermal partitioning between males and females may be a natural part of the ecology of A. limnaeus. In addition, it appears that behavioral thermoregulation, or partitioning of reproductive events to the cool parts of the thermoperiod, are likely to be critical to support successful reproduction in natural populations of A. limnaeus.

  17. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and

  18. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangul, F. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ramli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  19. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  20. Progress Toward a New Technique for Measuring Local Electric Field Fluctuations in High Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Liben, M. M.; Thompson, D. S.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic measuring local Ez(r,t) fluctuations is being developed at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. A novel multiple volume phase holographic grating spectrometer, designed to have high resolution (0.25Å) and high étendue (U = 0.01cm2-ster), measures the line separation of the π components of the Hα motional Stark spectrum of emitted beam light. The spectra are recorded at high frequency (fNy ~ 500kHz) by a high speed CMOS imaging detector. The groove density of the objective grating is varied linearly along its surface to counter geometric Doppler broadening. A low divergence (Ω ~ 0.5o) , 80kV, 2.5A H0 diagnostic neutral beam is being deployed on Pegasus. The beam uses a washer-stack arc ion source to maximize full energy species fraction in the injected neutral beam. Laboratory tests of the ion source demonstrate stable, repeatable plasmas with Te <= 20eV and ne ~ 5x1017m-3, sufficient to sustain a 6mA/cm2 current density at the focal plane for up to 20ms. A three phase resonant converter power supply, with low amplitude (δV/80kV ~ 0.05%), high frequency (frip ~ 280kHz) ripple, is in development to provide the 80kV accelerator power. This research supported by US D.O.E. Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  1. Study of Ram-air Heat Exchangers for Reducing Turbine Cooling-air Temperature of a Supersonic Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Livingood, John N B; Eckert, Ernst R G

    1956-01-01

    The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude of 70,000 feet. A compressor-bleed-air weight flow of 2.7 pounds per second was assumed for the coolant; ram air was considered as the other fluid. Pressure drops and inlet states of both fluids were prescribed, and ranges of compressor-bleed-air temperature reductions and of the ratio of compressor-bleed to ram-air weight flows were considered.

  2. Daily temperature fluctuations unpredictably influence developmental rate and morphology at a critical early larval stage in a frog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental temperature has profound consequences for early amphibian development and many field and laboratory studies have examined this. Most laboratory studies that have characterized the influence of temperature on development in amphibians have failed to incorporate the realities of diel temperature fluctuations (DTF), which can be considerable for pond-breeding amphibians. Results We evaluated the effects of different ecologically relevant ranges of DTF compared with effects of constant temperatures on development of embryos and larvae of the Korean fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis). We constructed thermal reaction norms for developmental stage, snout- vent length, and tail length by fitting a Gompertz-Gaussian function to measurements taken from embryos after 66 hours of development in 12 different constant temperature environments between 14°C and 36°C. We used these reaction norms as null models to test the hypothesis that developmental effects of DTF are more than the sum of average constant temperature effects over the distribution of temperatures experienced. We predicted from these models that growth and differentiation would be positively correlated with average temperature at low levels of DTF but not at higher levels of DTF. We tested our prediction in the laboratory by rearing B. orientalis embryos at three average temperatures (20°C, 24°C, and 28°C) and four levels of thermal variation (0°C, 6°C, 13°C, and 20°C). Several of the observed responses to DTF were significantly different from both predictions of the model and from responses in constant temperature treatments at the same average temperatures. At an average temperature of 24°C, only the highest level of DTF affected differentiation and growth rates, but at both cooler and warmer average temperatures, moderate DTF was enough to slow developmental and tail growth rates. Conclusions These results demonstrate that both the magnitude of DTF range and thermal

  3. Effect of production microclimate on female thermal state with increased temperature and air humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machablishvili, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal state of women during the effect of high air temperature and relative humidity with a varying degree of physical loads was studied. Parameters for air temperature, relative humidity, and air movement were established. It was established that in women the thermo-regulatory stress occurs at lower air temperatures and with lower physical loads than in men. The accumulation of heat in women was revealed with lower air temperature than in men. It is concluded that to preserve the normal physiological state of the female organism it is necessary to create more favorable microclimate conditions and decrease the physical loads.

  4. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, R.; Zahradníček, P.; Pišoft, P.; Štěpánek, P.; Bělínová, M.; Dobrovolný, P.

    2012-04-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenized (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles, as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones, are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than one year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7a (a = year) and 17.9-18.4a were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2a for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI) may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  5. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, Rudolf; Zahradníček, Pavel; Pišoft, Petr; Štěpánek, Petr; Bělínová, Monika; Dobrovolný, Petr

    2012-10-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenised (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than 1 year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation, while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7 and 17.9-18.4 years were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2 years for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI), may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  6. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  7. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J

    2010-10-19

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms.

  8. The effect of Holocene temperature fluctuations on the evolution and ecology of Neotoma (woodrats) in Idaho and northwestern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2003-03-01

    Animals respond to climatic change by adapting or by altering distributional patterns. How an animal responds is influenced by where it is positioned within its geographic range; the probability of extirpation is increased near range boundaries. Here, we examine the impact of Holocene climatic fluctuations on a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat ( Neotoma cinerea), at five locations within south central Idaho and northwestern Utah. Previous work demonstrated that woodrats adapt to temperature shifts by altering body size. We focus here on the relationship between body mass, temperature, and location within the geographic range. Body mass is estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. Overall, we find the predicted phenotypic response to climate change: animals were larger during cold periods, and smaller during warmer episodes. However, we also identify several time periods when changes in environmental temperature exceeded the adaptive flexibility of N. cinerea. A smaller-bodied species, the desert woodrat ( N. lepida) apparently invaded lower elevation sites during the mid-Holocene, despite being behaviorally and physically subordinate to N. cinerea. Analysis of contemporary patterns of body size and thermal tolerances for both woodrat species suggests this was because of the greater heat tolerance of N. lepida. The robust spatial relationship between contemporary body size and ambient temperature is used as a proxy to reconstruct local climate during the Holocene.

  9. The effect of Holocene temperature fluctuations on the evolution and ecology of Neotoma (woodrats) in Idaho and northwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, F.A.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Animals respond to climatic change by adapting or by altering distributional patterns. How an animal responds is influenced by where it is positioned within its geographic range; the probability of extirpation is increased near range boundaries. Here, we examine the impact of Holocene climatic fluctuations on a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea), at five locations within south central Idaho and northwestern Utah. Previous work demonstrated that woodrats adapt to temperature shifts by altering body size. We focus here on the relationship between body mass, temperature, and location within the geographic range. Body mass is estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. Overall, we find the predicted phenotypic response to climate change: Animals were larger during cold periods, and smaller during warmer episodes. However, we also identify several time periods when changes in environmental temperature exceeded the adaptive flexibility of N. cinerea. A smaller-bodied species, the desert woodrat (N. lepida) apparently invaded lower elevation sites during the mid-Holocene, despite being behaviorally and physically subordinate to N. cinerea. Analysis of contemporary patterns of body size and thermal tolerances for both woodrat species suggests this was because of the greater heat tolerance of N. lepida. The robust spatial relationship between contemporary body size and ambient temperature is used as a proxy to reconstruct local climate during the Holocene. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  10. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; ...

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  11. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; Chavis, Aaron R.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Edmundson, Scott J.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as a function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.

  12. The effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action (SDA) and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis). The critical thermal maxima (CTmax), critical thermal minima (CTmin), lethal thermal maxima (LTmax), lethal thermal minima (LTmin), critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and fast-start escape response after 30 d acclimation to three constant temperatures (15, 20 and 25 °C) and one diel-fluctuating temperature (20±5 °C) were measured. In addition, feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) were measured. The diel-fluctuating temperature group showed lower CTmin than the 20 °C group but a similar CTmax, indicating a wider thermal scope. SDA linearly increased with the temperature. Temperature variation between 20 and 25 °C had little effect on either swimming or growth performance. However, fish in the 15 °C group exhibited much poorer swimming and growth performance than those in the 20 °C group. Ucrit decreased slightly under low acclimation temperature due to the pronounced improvement in swimming efficiency under cold temperature. Fish in the diel-fluctuating temperature group fed more but exhibited similar SGR compared to 20 °C group, possibly due in part to an increase in energy expenditure to cope with the temperature fluctuation. The narrower thermal scope and lower CTmax of Chinese bream together with the conservation of CTmax with temperature acclimation, suggests that local water temperature elevations may have more profound effects on Chinese bream than on other fish species in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  13. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage

    PubMed Central

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75–85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy. PMID:26428064

  14. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage.

    PubMed

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06 g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75-85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy.

  15. Combustion and gasification characteristics of pulverized coal using high-temperature air

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaoka, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kiga, T.; Kosaka, H.; Iwahashi, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, K.; Mochida, S.

    1998-07-01

    In order to confirm performance of high-temperature-air combusting of pulverized coal, laboratory-scale combustion and gasification tests of coal were conducted changing air temperature and oxygen concentration in the air. Theses were conducted in a drop tube furnace of 200mm in inside diameter and 2,000mm in length. The furnace was heated by ceramic heater up to 1,300 C. A high-temperature air preheater utilizing the HRS (High Cycle Regenerative Combustion System) was used to obtain high-temperature combustion air. As the results, NOx emission was reduced when pulverized coal was fired with high-temperature-air. On the other hand, by lower oxygen concentration in combustion air diluted by nitrogen, NOx emission slightly decreased while became higher under staging condition.

  16. Consistent Temperature Coupling with Thermal Fluctuations of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain – internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity – are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance. PMID:23300586

  17. Measured temperature fluctuations and Reynolds number in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with varying roughness size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yichao; Xia, Keqing

    2016-11-01

    We present measurements of the temperature fluctuations σT and of the Reynolds number Re in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in cylindrical cell with pyramid-shaped rough top and bottom plates. To study the effects of roughness size, we varied a roughness parameter λ, defined as a single roughness height h (kept at a constant of 8 mm) over its base width d, from 0.5 to 4.0. Fluorinert Liquid FC-770 was used as the working fluid with the Rayleigh number Ra varying from 4.49 × 109 to 9.94 × 1010 and Prandtl number Pr kept at 23.34. It is found that σT in both cell center and sidewall increases dramatically with λ. The scaling exponent of the normalized σT with respect to Ra increases from -0.16 to -0.09 at cell center and -0.23 to -0.08 near sidewall when λ is increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The Reynolds number Re based on the circulation time of the large-scale circulation (LSC) also increases with λ, suggesting a faster LSC. The scaling exponent of Re with respect to Ra increases from 0.47 to 0.55 with λ increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The study reveals that the flow and temperature fluctuations are very sensitive to the perturbation induced by rough plate with vary λ. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grant Council under Grant Number N_CUHK437/15.

  18. Experimental study of the decrease in the temperature of an air/water-cooled turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A. A.; Sereda, A. V.; Shaiakberov, V. F.; Iskakov, K. M.; Shatalov, Iu. S.

    Results of the full-scale testing of an air/water-cooled deflector-type turbine blade are reported. Data on the decrease in the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade are presented and compared with the calculated values. An analysis of the results indicates that the use of air/water cooling makes it possible to significantly reduce the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade with practically no increase in the engine weight and dimensions.

  19. How the Plant Temperature Links to the Air Temperature in the Desert Plant Artemisia ordosica.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming-Han; Ding, Guo-Dong; Gao, Guang-Lei; Sun, Bao-Ping; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Wan, Li; Wang, De-Ying; Gui, Zi-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Plant temperature (Tp) is an important indicator of plant health. To determine the dynamics of plant temperature and self-cooling ability of the plant, we measured Tp in Artemisia ordosica in July, in the Mu Us Desert of Northwest China. Related factors were also monitored to investigate their effects on Tp, including environmental factors, such as air temperature (Ta), relative humidity, wind speed; and physiological factors, such as leaf water potential, sap flow, and water content. The results indicate that: 1) Tp generally changes in conjunction with Ta mainly, and varies with height and among the plant organs. Tp in the young branches is most constant, while it is the most sensitive in the leaves. 2) Correlations between Tp and environmental factors show that Tp is affected mainly by Ta. 3) The self-cooling ability of the plant was effective by midday, with Tp being lower than Ta. 4) Increasing sap flow and leaf water potential showed that transpiration formed part of the mechanism that supported self-cooling. Increased in water conductance and specific heat at midday may be additional factors that contribute to plant cooling ability. Therefore, our results confirmed plant self-cooling ability. The response to high temperatures is regulated by both transpiration speed and an increase in stem water conductance. This study provides quantitative data for plant management in terms of temperature control. Moreover, our findings will assist species selection with taking plant temperature as an index.

  20. Topographic and spatial impacts of temperature inversions on air quality using mobile air pollution surveys.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Julie; Corr, Denis; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the spatial and topographic effects of temperature inversions on air quality in the industrial city of Hamilton, located at the western tip of Lake Ontario, Canada. The city is divided by a 90-m high topographic scarp, the Niagara Escarpment, and dissected by valleys which open towards Lake Ontario. Temperature inversions occur frequently in the cooler seasons, exacerbating the impact of emissions from industry and traffic. This study used pollution data gathered from mobile monitoring surveys conducted over a 3-year period, to investigate whether the effects of the inversions varied across the city. Temperature inversions were identified with vertical temperature data from a meteorological tower located within the study area. We divided the study area into an upper and lower zone separated by the Escarpment and further into six zones, based on location with respect to the Escarpment and industrial and residential areas, to explore variations across the city. The results identified clear differences in the responses of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to temperature inversions, based on the topographic and spatial criteria. We found that pollution levels increased as the inversion strengthened, in the lower city. However, the results also suggested that temperature inversions identified in the lower city were not necessarily experienced in the upper city with the same intensity. Further, pollution levels in the upper city appeared to decrease as the inversion deepened in the lower city, probably because of an associated change in prevailing wind direction and lower wind speeds, leading to decreased long-range transport of pollutants.

  1. Environmentally sound thermal energy extraction from coal and wastes using high temperature air combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kunio

    1999-07-01

    High temperature air combustion is one of promising ways of burning relatively low BTU gas obtained from gasification of low grade coal or wastes. In this report, the author proposes a new power generation system coupled with high temperature air gasification of coal/wastes and high temperature air combustion of the syngas from coal/wastes. This system is realized by employing Multi-staged Enthalpy Extraction Technology (MEET). The basic idea of the MEET system is that coal or wastes are gasified with high temperature air of about 1,000 C, then the generated syngas is cooled in a heat recovery boiler to be cleaned-up in a gas cleanup system (desulfurization, desalinization and dust removal). Part of thermal energy contained in this cleaned-up syngas is used for high temperature air preheating, and the complete combustion of the fuel gas is done using also high temperature air for driving gas turbines or steam generation in a boiler.

  2. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R2=0.946 and R2=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  3. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-08-15

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R(2)=0.946 and R(2)=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses.

  4. Temperature fluctuation in Rayleigh-Bénard convection: Logarithmic vs power-law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Hao; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the rms temperature (σT) profile in two regions inside a large aspect ratio (Γ = 4 . 2) rectangular Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell. The Rayleigh number (Ra) is from 3 . 2 ×107 to 1 . 9 ×108 at fixed Prandtl number (Pr = 4 . 34). It is found that, in one region, where the boundary layer is sheared by a large-scale wind, σT versus the distance (z) above the bottom plate, obeys power law over one decade, whereas in another region, where plumes concentrate and move upward (plume-ejection region), the profile of σT has a logarithmic dependence on z. When normalized by a typical temperature scale θ*, the profiles of σT at different Rayleigh numbers collapse onto a single curve, indicating a university of σT profile with respect to Ra . This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grant Council under Grant Number N_CUHK437/15.

  5. A study of radiometric surface temperatures: Their fluctuations, distribution and meaning. [Voves, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrier, A.; Itier, B.; Boissard, P. (Principal Investigator); Goillot, C.; Belluomo, P.; Valery, P.

    1980-01-01

    A consecutive night and day flight and measurements on the ground, were made in the region of Voves, south of Chartres. The statistical analysis of the thermal scanner data permitted the establishment of criteria for the homogeneity of surfaces. These criteria were used in defining the surface temperature values which are most representative for use in an energy balance approach to evapotranspiration (day) and heat balance (night). For a number of maize fields that airborne thermal scanner data permitted a detailed energy analysis of different fields of a same crop to be carried out. Such a detailed analysis was not necessary for a calculation of crop evapotranspiration which could be evaluated from the mean temperature of the crop surface. A differential analysis day night is of interest for enhancing the contrast between types of surfaces, as well as for a better definition of the daily energy balance. It should be stressed that, for a homogeneous region, a study such as the present one, could be carried out on a relatively small part of the total surface, as the results for a surface of 2.5 x 2 sq km were not significantly different from those obtained from a surface three times larger.

  6. Simultaneous Measurement of Air Temperature and Humidity Based on Sound Velocity and Attenuation Using Ultrasonic Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motegi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, an acoustic technique for air temperature and humidity measurement in moist air is described. The previous ultrasonic probe can enable the estimation of temperature from sound velocity in dry air by making use of the relationship between sound velocity and temperature. However, temperature measurement using the previous ultrasonic probe is not suitable in moist air because sound velocity also depends on humidity, and the temperature estimated from the sound velocity measured in moist air must be adjusted. Moreover, a method of humidity measurement by using only an ultrasonic probe has not been established. Thus, we focus on sound attenuation, which depends on temperature and humidity. Our proposed technique utilizes two parameters, sound velocity and attenuation, and can measure both temperature and humidity simultaneously. The acoustic technique for temperature and humidity measurement has the advantages that instantaneous temperature and humidity can be measured, and the measurement is not affected by thermal radiation because air itself is used as a sensing element. As an experiment, temperature and humidity are measured in a chamber, and compared with the reference values. The experimental results indicate the achievement of a practical temperature measurement accuracy of within +/-0.5 K in moist air, of which the temperature is 293-308 K and relative humidity (RH) is 50-90% RH, and the simultaneous measurement of temperature and humidity.

  7. Zero field splitting fluctuations induced phase relaxation of Gd3+ in frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Raitsimring, A.; Dalaloyan, A.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Meade, T.; Goldfarb, D.

    2015-01-01

    Distance measurements using double electron–electron resonance (DEER) and Gd3+ chelates for spin labels (GdSL) have been shown to be an attractive alternative to nitroxide spin labels at W-band (95 GHz). The maximal distance that can be accessed by DEER measurements and the sensitivity of such measurements strongly depends on the phase relaxation of Gd3+ chelates in frozen, glassy solutions. In this work, we explore the phase relaxation of Gd3+-DOTA as a representative of GdSL in temperature and concentration ranges typically used for W-band DEER measurements. We observed that in addition to the usual mechanisms of phase relaxation known for nitroxide based spin labels, GdSL are subjected to an additional phase relaxation mechanism that features an increase in the relaxation rate from the center to the periphery of the EPR spectrum. Since the EPR spectrum of GdSL is the sum of subspectra of the individual EPR transitions, we attribute this field dependence to transition dependent phase relaxation. Using simulations of the EPR spectra and its decomposition into the individual transition subspectra, we isolated the phase relaxation of each transition and found that its rate increases with |ms|. We suggest that this mechanism is due to transient zero field splitting (tZFS), where its magnitude and correlation time are scaled down and distributed as compared with similar situations in liquids. This tZFS induced phase relaxation mechanism becomes dominant (or at least significant) when all other well-known phase relaxation mechanisms, such as spectral diffusion caused by nuclear spin diffusion, instantaneous and electron spin spectral diffusion, are significantly suppressed by matrix deuteration and low concentration, and when the temperature is sufficiently low to disable spin lattice interaction as a source of phase relaxation. PMID:25442776

  8. Zero field splitting fluctuations induced phase relaxation of Gd3+ in frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsimring, A.; Dalaloyan, A.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Meade, T.; Goldfarb, D.

    2014-11-01

    Distance measurements using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and Gd3+ chelates for spin labels (GdSL) have been shown to be an attractive alternative to nitroxide spin labels at W-band (95 GHz). The maximal distance that can be accessed by DEER measurements and the sensitivity of such measurements strongly depends on the phase relaxation of Gd3+ chelates in frozen, glassy solutions. In this work, we explore the phase relaxation of Gd3+-DOTA as a representative of GdSL in temperature and concentration ranges typically used for W-band DEER measurements. We observed that in addition to the usual mechanisms of phase relaxation known for nitroxide based spin labels, GdSL are subjected to an additional phase relaxation mechanism that features an increase in the relaxation rate from the center to the periphery of the EPR spectrum. Since the EPR spectrum of GdSL is the sum of subspectra of the individual EPR transitions, we attribute this field dependence to transition dependent phase relaxation. Using simulations of the EPR spectra and its decomposition into the individual transition subspectra, we isolated the phase relaxation of each transition and found that its rate increases with |ms|. We suggest that this mechanism is due to transient zero field splitting (tZFS), where its magnitude and correlation time are scaled down and distributed as compared with similar situations in liquids. This tZFS induced phase relaxation mechanism becomes dominant (or at least significant) when all other well-known phase relaxation mechanisms, such as spectral diffusion caused by nuclear spin diffusion, instantaneous and electron spin spectral diffusion, are significantly suppressed by matrix deuteration and low concentration, and when the temperature is sufficiently low to disable spin lattice interaction as a source of phase relaxation.

  9. Compression-ignition Engine Performance at Altitudes and at Various Air Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H

    1937-01-01

    Engine test results are presented for simulated altitude conditions. A displaced-piston combustion chamber on a 5- by 7-inch single cylinder compression-ignition engine operating at 2,000 r.p.m. was used. Inlet air temperature equivalent to standard altitudes up to 14,000 feet were obtained. Comparison between performance at altitude of the unsupercharged compression-ignition engine compared favorably with the carburetor engine. Analysis of the results for which the inlet air temperature, inlet air pressure, and inlet and exhaust pressure were varied indicates that engine performance cannot be reliably corrected on the basis of inlet air density or weight of air charge. Engine power increases with inlet air pressure and decreases with inlet air temperatures very nearly as straight line relations over a wide range of air-fuel ratios. Correction factors are given.

  10. Integrity of Ceramic Parts Predicted When Loads and Temperatures Fluctuate Over Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2004-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, and being considered for use, for a wide variety of high performance applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts for unmanned aerial vehicles, auxiliary power units, and distributed power generation. Other applications include thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In order for these high-technology ceramics to be used successfully for structural applications that push the envelope of materials capabilities, design engineers must consider that brittle materials are designed and analyzed differently than metallic materials. Unlike ductile metals, brittle materials display a stochastic strength response because of the combination of low fracture toughness and the random nature of the size, orientation, and distribution of inherent microscopic flaws. This plus the fact that the strength of a component under load may degrade over time because of slow crack growth means that a probabilistic-based life-prediction methodology must be used when the tradeoffs of failure probability, performance, and useful life are being optimized. The CARES/Life code (which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center) predicts the probability of ceramic components failing from spontaneous catastrophic rupture when these components are subjected to multiaxial loading and slow crack growth conditions. Enhancements to CARES/Life now allow for the component survival probability to be calculated when loading and temperature vary over time.

  11. Boundary layer fluctuations and their effects on mean and variance temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou; Tong, Penger

    2016-11-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the mean temperature profile θ (z) and temperature variance profile η (z) near the lower conducting plate of a specially designed quasi-two-dimensional cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The measured θ (z) is found to have a universal scaling form θ (z / δ) with varying thermal boundary layer (BL) thickness δ, and its functional form agrees well with the recently derived BL equation by Shishkina et al. The measured η (z) , on the other hand, is found to have a scaling form η (z / δ) only in the near-wall region with z / δ < 2 . Based on the experimental findings, we derive a new BL equation for η (z / δ) , which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The new BL equations thus provide a common framework for understanding the effect of BL fluctuations. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR and by the China Thousand Young Talents Program.

  12. Oxygen consumption in the shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, exposed to fluctuating temperatures and food contaminated with the diaromatic petroleum hydrocarbon, dimethylnaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, T. M.

    1983-04-01

    Oxygen consumption rates ( V˙o 2) in the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio were determined after a 32 day exposure to fluctuating temperatures (FT) (18-22°C) and/or dimethylnaphthalene (DMN)-contaminated food (0·24 μg DMN g wet wt -1) and again after a 16 day recovery period of stable temperatures (20°C) and uncontaminated food. Ingestion of DMN-contaminated food for 32 days resulted in elevated V˙>o 2 in shrimp exposed to declining oxygen concentrations. After the 32 day exposure period, FT had no significant effect on V˙o 2 at 15, 20 and 25°C, tissue V˙o 2 and V˙o 2 in declining oxygen. Hemolymph copper concentrations were significantly depressed in shrimp exposed to DMN-contaminated food. After the 16 day recovery period, shrimp from the FT regime exhibited depressed V˙o 2 when exposed to 25°C but not to 15°C. These depressed respiratory rates were offset by the stimulatory effect of DMN-contaminated food. These respiration studies were generally unproductive in explaining the previously reported effects of FT and DMN-contaminated food on the survival of P. pugio under hypoxic conditions.

  13. Impact of Air Temperature and SST Variability on Cholera Incidence in Southeastern Africa, 1971-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Shlomit

    2010-05-01

    Poisson regression model is suggested: log{E(CHOLt)} = b0+b1×Xt+b2×Xt-1 where: CHOLt = the number of new cases of cholera in year t Xt / Xt-1 = the climate covariate measured in year t/t-1. (b0,b1) = the coefficients. A first order autocorrelation, AR1 = cor(Yt, Yt-1) is taken into account in the estimation using Generalized Estimating Equations. b1 and b2 quantify the association of CHOL and X, i.e. if Xt or Xt-1 increase by one unit, the mean of Yt is expected to increase in exp{b1} or exp{b2} times, respectively (multiplicative model). The results showed a significant exponential increase of cholera rates in humans during the study period, with an estimate of exp(b1)=1.08 (p-value = 0.02). Associations have been found between the annual increase of the air temperature in southeastern Africa and the cholera incidence in the same area. Linkages were found also for a wider scale, with the air temperature anomaly of the Southern Hemisphere, with an estimate of exp(b1)=1.18 (p-value = 0.04) and exp(b1)=1.26 (p-value = 0.006) for the previous year. Significant linkages were detected between the annual cholera rate and the annual western Indian Ocean' SST , with exp(b1) = 1.31 (p-value = 0.01) for the current year and exp(b1) = 1.23 (p-value = 0.05) for the previous year. Linkages were found also for the hemispheric scale, with the SST anomaly. The increase of global temperature may influence the temporal fluctuations of cholera, as well as potentially increasing the frequency and duration of its outbreaks. Despite future uncertainty, the climate variability has to be considered in predicting further cholera outbreaks in Africa. This may help to promote better, more efficient preparedness. For more details: Paz, S. 2010. Impact of Temperature Variability on Cholera Incidence in Southeastern Africa, 1971-2006. EcoHealth, in press.

  14. Short-term effects of air temperature on plasma metabolite concentrations in patients undergoing cardiac cattheterization.

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown associations between air temperature and cardiovascular health outcomes. Metabolic dysregulation might also play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.OBJECTIVES: To investigate short-term temperature effects on metabol...

  15. Rainfall Prediction using Soil and Air Temperature in a Tropical Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Tessy P.; Renuka, G.

    2007-07-01

    An attempt is made to establish a linkage between soil and air temperature and south-west monsoon rainfall at Pillicode (12°12'N,75°10'E) a tropical station in north Kerala. The dependence of monsoon rainfall on pre-monsoon soil temperature decreases as the depth of the soil increases. A regression equation has been developed for the estimation of monsoon rainfall using pre-monsoon soil and air temperature. The results show that sub soil temperature along with air temperature can be used for forecasting the monsoon level.

  16. A High Temperature-Dependent Mitochondrial Lipase EXTRA GLUME1 Promotes Floral Phenotypic Robustness against Temperature Fluctuation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu’e; Xu, Ting; Guo, Feifei; Tang, Huashan; Li, Xiang; Wang, Pengfei; Qian, Wenfeng; Xue, Yongbiao

    2016-01-01

    The sessile plants have evolved diverse intrinsic mechanisms to control their proper development under variable environments. In contrast to plastic vegetative development, reproductive traits like floral identity often show phenotypic robustness against environmental variations. However, it remains obscure about the molecular basis of this phenotypic robustness. In this study, we found that eg1 (extra glume1) mutants of rice (Oryza savita L.) showed floral phenotypic variations in different growth locations resulting in a breakdown of floral identity robustness. Physiological and biochemical analyses showed that EG1 encodes a predominantly mitochondria-localized functional lipase and functions in a high temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that numerous environmentally responsive genes including many floral identity genes are transcriptionally repressed in eg1 mutants and OsMADS1, OsMADS6 and OsG1 genetically act downstream of EG1 to maintain floral robustness. Collectively, our results demonstrate that EG1 promotes floral robustness against temperature fluctuation by safeguarding the expression of floral identify genes through a high temperature-dependent mitochondrial lipid pathway and uncovers a novel mechanistic insight into floral developmental control. PMID:27367609

  17. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  2. One-Component Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagrams in the Presence of Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio; Martire, Daniel O.; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2010-01-01

    One-component phase diagrams are good approximations to predict pressure-temperature ("P-T") behavior of a substance in the presence of air, provided air pressure is not much higher than the vapor pressure. However, at any air pressure, and from the conceptual point of view, the use of a traditional "P-T" phase diagram is not strictly correct. In…

  3. Comparison of three approaches to model grapevine organogenesis in conditions of fluctuating temperature, solar radiation and soil water content

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, B.; Loi, C.; Christophe, A.; Cournède, P. H.; Lecoeur, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims There is increasing interest in the development of plant growth models representing the complex system of interactions between the different determinants of plant development. These approaches are particularly relevant for grapevine organogenesis, which is a highly plastic process dependent on temperature, solar radiation, soil water deficit and trophic competition. Methods The extent to which three plant growth models were able to deal with the observed plasticity of axis organogenesis was assessed. In the first model, axis organogenesis was dependent solely on temperature, through thermal time. In the second model, axis organogenesis was modelled through functional relationships linking meristem activity and trophic competition. In the last model, the rate of phytomer appearence on each axis was modelled as a function of both the trophic status of the plant and the direct effect of soil water content on potential meristem activity. Key Results The model including relationships between trophic competition and meristem behaviour involved a decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE) for the simulations of organogenesis by a factor nine compared with the thermal time-based model. Compared with the model in which axis organogenesis was driven only by trophic competition, the implementation of relationships between water deficit and meristem behaviour improved organogenesis simulation results, resulting in a three times divided RMSE. The resulting model can be seen as a first attempt to build a comprehensive complete plant growth model simulating the development of the whole plant in fluctuating conditions of temperature, solar radiation and soil water content. Conclusions We propose a new hypothesis concerning the effects of the different determinants of axis organogenesis. The rate of phytomer appearance according to thermal time was strongly affected by the plant trophic status and soil water deficit. Futhermore, the decrease in meristem

  4. Startup of air-cooled condensers and dry cooling towers at low temperatures of the cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Shifrin, B. A.; Yankov, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of startup and performance of air-cooled condensers (ACC) and dry cooling towers (DCT) at low cooling air temperatures are considered. Effects of the startup of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures are described. Different options of the ACC heating up are analyzed, and examples of existing technologies are presented (electric heating, heating up with hot air or steam, and internal and external heating). The use of additional heat exchanging sections, steam tracers, in the DCT design is described. The need for high power in cases of electric heating and heating up with hot air is noted. An experimental stand for research and testing of the ACC startup at low temperatures is described. The design of the three-pass ACC unit is given, and its advantages over classical single-pass design at low temperatures are listed. The formation of ice plugs inside the heat exchanging tubes during the start-up of ACC and DCT at low cooling air temperatures is analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of the steam flow rate, steam nozzle distance from the heat-exchange surface, and their orientation in space on the metal temperature were collected, and test results are analyzed. It is noted that the surface temperature at the end of the heat up is almost independent from its initial temperature. Recommendations for the safe start-up of ACCs and DCTs are given. The heating flow necessary to sufficiently heat up heat-exchange surfaces of ACCs and DCTs for the safe startup is estimated. The technology and the process of the heat up of the ACC with the heating steam external supply are described by the example of the startup of the full-scale section of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures of the cooling air, and the advantages of the proposed start-up technology are confirmed.

  5. Effects of Outside Air Temperature on Movement of Phosphine Gas in Concrete Elevator Bins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies that measured the movement and concentration of phosphine gas in upright concrete bins over time indicated that fumigant movement was dictated by air currents, which in turn, were a function of the difference between the average grain temperature and the average outside air temperature durin...

  6. Correction of Temperatures of Air-Cooled Engine Cylinders for Variation in Engine and Cooling Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Pinkel, Benjamin; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1939-01-01

    Factors are obtained from semiempirical equations for correcting engine-cylinder temperatures for variation in important engine and cooling conditions. The variation of engine temperatures with atmospheric temperature is treated in detail, and correction factors are obtained for various flight and test conditions, such as climb at constant indicated air speed, level flight, ground running, take-off, constant speed of cooling air, and constant mass flow of cooling air. Seven conventional air-cooled engine cylinders enclosed in jackets and cooled by a blower were tested to determine the effect of cooling-air temperature and carburetor-air temperature on cylinder temperatures. The cooling air temperature was varied from approximately 80 degrees F. to 230 degrees F. and the carburetor-air temperature from approximately 40 degrees F. to 160 degrees F. Tests were made over a large range of engine speeds, brake mean effective pressures, and pressure drops across the cylinder. The correction factors obtained experimentally are compared with those obtained from the semiempirical equations and a fair agreement is noted.

  7. Predicting seed cotton moisture content from changes in drying air temperature - second year

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mathematical model was used to predict seed cotton moisture content in the overhead section of a cotton gin. The model took into account the temperature, mass flow, and specific heat of both the air and seed cotton. Air temperatures and mass flows were measured for a second year at a commercial g...

  8. Layers of air in the water beneath the floating fern Salvinia are exposed to fluctuations in pressure.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic, hierarchically structured, technical surfaces (Lotus-effect) are of high scientific and economic interest because of their remarkable properties. Recently, the immense potential of air-retaining superhydrophobic surfaces, for example, for low-friction transport of fluids and drag-reducing coatings of ships has begun to be explored. A major problem of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the Lotus-effect is the limited persistence of the air retained, especially under rough conditions of flow. However, there are a variety of floating or diving plant and animal species that possess air-retaining surfaces optimized for durable water-repellency (Salvinia-effect). Especially floating ferns of the genus Salvinia have evolved superhydrophobic surfaces capable of maintaining layers of air for months. Apart from maintaining stability under water, the layer of air has to withstand the stresses of water pressure (up to 2.5 bars). Both of these aspects have an application to create permanent air layers on ships' hulls. We investigated the effect of pressure on air layers in a pressure cell and exposed the air layer to pressures of up to 6 bars. We investigated the suppression of the air layer at increasing pressures as well as its restoration during decreases in pressure. Three of the four examined Salvinia species are capable of maintaining air layers at pressures relevant to the conditions applying to ships' hulls. High volumes of air per surface area are advantageous for retaining at least a partial Cassie-Baxter-state under pressure, which also helps in restoring the air layer after depressurization. Closed-loop structures such as the baskets at the top of the "egg-beater hairs" (see main text) also help return the air layer to its original level at the tip of the hairs by trapping air bubbles.

  9. Prediction of air temperature in the aircraft cabin under different operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volavý, F.; Fišer, J.; Nöske, I.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the air temperature in the aircraft cabin by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. The simulations are performed on the CFD model which is based on geometry and cabin interior arrangement of the Flight Test Facility (FTF) located at Fraunhofer IBP, Germany. The experimental test flights under three different cabin temperatures were done in FTF and the various data were gathered during these flights. Air temperature in the cabin was measured on probes located near feet, torso and head of each passenger and also surface temperature and air temperature distributed from inlets were measured. The data were firstly analysed in order to obtain boundary conditions for cabin surfaces and inlets. Then the results of air temperature from the simulations were compared with measured data. The suitability and accuracy of the CFD approach for temperature prediction is discussed.

  10. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  11. Air temperature "singularities" as a tool for the comprehension of the climate diversity in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzyna, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    Air temperature "singularities" were used to study climate diversity in Europe. The basis of analysis were data of mean daily air temperature for 50-years period (1951-2000) from 66 European meteorological stations. Multiyear mean air temperature values were counted for the each day of the year at first (29th February was omitted). Next a theoretical sine curve of annual air temperature course was created with help of the Fourier's analysis for the each station. Differences between theoretical and observed mean vales of daily air temperatures were counted in the next step. The biggest of these differences (below the lower quartile and above the upper quartile) lasting at least 3 days can be treated as thermal "singularities". A cluster analysis was used to find similarities of the singularities occurrence in analyzed stations. As a result 8 clusters were distinguished representing regions with different thermal "singularities" occurrence pattern.

  12. Modeling subcanopy incoming longwave radiation to seasonal snow using air and tree trunk temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Clare; Rutter, Nick; Zahner, Franziska; Jonas, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Data collected at three Swiss alpine forested sites over a combined 11 year period were used to evaluate the role of air temperature in modeling subcanopy incoming longwave radiation to the snow surface. Simulated subcanopy incoming longwave radiation is traditionally partitioned into that from the sky and that from the canopy, i.e., a two-part model. Initial uncertainties in predicting longwave radiation using the two-part model resulted from vertical differences in measured air temperature. Above-canopy (35 m) air temperatures were higher than those within (10 m) and below (2 m) canopy throughout four snow seasons (December-April), demonstrating how the forest canopy can act as a cold sink for air. Lowest model root-mean-square error (RMSE) was using above-canopy air temperature. Further investigation of modeling subcanopy longwave radiation using above-canopy air temperature showed underestimations, particularly during periods of high insolation. In order to explicitly account for canopy temperatures in modeling longwave radiation, the two-part model was improved by incorporating a measured trunk view component and trunk temperature. Trunk temperature measurements were up to 25°C higher than locally measured air temperatures. This three-part model reduced the RMSE by up to 7.7 W m-2 from the two-part air temperature model at all sensor positions across the 2014 snowmelt season and performed particularly well during periods of high insolation when errors from the two-part model were up to 40 W m-2. A parameterization predicting tree trunk temperatures using measured air temperature and incoming shortwave radiation demonstrate a simple method that can be applied to provide input to the three-part model across midlatitude coniferous forests.

  13. Impact of Surface Air Temperature and Snow Cover Depth on the Upper Soil Temperature Variations in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyukov, A. B.; Sherstyukov, B. G.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2007-12-01

    A study of the impact of climate changes during for the last four decades on soil temperatures at depths up to 3.2 meters has been conducted for the territory of Russia. For the 1965-2004 period, we compiled and analyzed data from all Russian meteorological stations with long-term soil temperature observations at depths 80, 160 and 320 cm. Traditionally, these stations also observe a complete set of standard meteorological variables (that include surface air temperature and extensive monitoring of snow cover characteristics). This allowed us to investigate the impact of surface air temperatures and snow depth variations on soil temperatures in the upper soil layer, to quantify it using statistical analyses of multi-dimensional 40-year-long time series at 164 locations throughout the country, and assess the representativeness of the obtained results. Three-dimensional spatial distributions of regression and correlation coefficients were mapped for warm and cold seasons separately as well as for the entire year, and thereafter analyzed. In the permafrost zone we found special features in these fields that distinctively separate the permafrost zone from the remaining territory. In this zone, soil temperatures are practically uncorrelated with surface air temperatures and variations of the snow depth controls soil temperature variations (with R2 up to 0.5) Quantitative estimates of the contribution of mid-annual air temperature and snow cover depth in the long-term changes of mid-annual soil temperatures across the Russia territory were received. We found that the prevailing influence on soil temperature variations in the European part was surface air temperatures and in the Asian part of Russia was snow cover depth. Furthermore, increase of the winter snow depth in the permafrost zone (by preserving the heat accumulated in the warm season) promotes annual soil temperature increase and therefore may foster the further permafrost degradation associated with ongoing

  14. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  15. Relationship between the Arctic oscillation and surface air temperature in multi-decadal time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi L.; Tamura, Mina

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simple energy balance model (EBM) was integrated in time, considering a hypothetical long-term variability in ice-albedo feedback mimicking the observed multi-decadal temperature variability. A natural variability was superimposed on a linear warming trend due to the increasing radiative forcing of CO2. The result demonstrates that the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend can offset with each other to show the warming hiatus for some period. It is also stressed that the rapid warming during 1970-2000 can be explained by the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend at least within the simple model. The key process of the fluctuating planetary albedo in multi-decadal time scale is investigated using the JRA-55 reanalysis data. It is found that the planetary albedo increased for 1958-1970, decreased for 1970-2000, and increased for 2000-2012, as expected by the simple EBM experiments. The multi-decadal variability in the planetary albedo is compared with the time series of the AO mode and Barents Sea mode of surface air temperature. It is shown that the recent AO negative pattern showing warm Arctic and cold mid-latitudes is in good agreement with planetary albedo change indicating negative anomaly in high latitudes and positive anomaly in mid-latitudes. Moreover, the Barents Sea mode with the warm Barents Sea and cold mid-latitudes shows long-term variability similar to planetary albedo change. Although further studies are needed, the natural variabilities of both the AO mode and Barents Sea mode indicate some possible link to the planetary albedo as suggested by the simple EBM to cause the warming hiatus in recent years.

  16. Logarithmic spatial variations and universal f-1 power spectra of temperature fluctuations in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P M; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-05-02

    We report measurements of the temperature variance σ(2)(z,r) and frequency power spectrum P(f,z,r) (z is the distance from the sample bottom and r the radial coordinate) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) for Rayleigh numbers Ra = 1.6 × 10(13) and 1.1 × 10(15) and for a Prandtl number Pr ≃ 0.8 for a sample with a height L = 224 cm and aspect ratio D/L=0.50 (D is the diameter). For z/L ≲ 0.1 σ(2)(z,r) was consistent with a logarithmic dependence on z, and there was a universal (independent of Ra, r, and z) normalized spectrum which, for 0.02 ≲ fτ(0) ≲ 0.2, had the form P(fτ(0)) = P(0)(fτ(0))(-1) with P(0) = 0.208 ± 0.008 a universal constant. Here τ(0) = sqrt[2R] where R is the radius of curvature of the temperature autocorrelation function C(τ) at τ = 0. For z/L ≃ 0.5 the measurements yielded P(fτ(0))∼(fτ(0))(-α) with α in the range from 3/2 to 5/3. All the results are similar to those for velocity fluctuations in shear flows at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, suggesting the possibility of an analogy between the flows that is yet to be determined in detail.

  17. Infrequent cavity-forming fluctuations in HPr from Staphylococcus carnosus revealed by pressure- and temperature-dependent tyrosine ring flips

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Mineyuki; Li, Hua; Yamada, Hiroaki; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Hengstenberg, Wolfgang; Gronwald, Wolfram; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2004-01-01

    Infrequent structural fluctuations of a globular protein is seldom detected and studied in detail. One tyrosine ring of HPr from Staphylococcus carnosus, an 88-residue phosphocarrier protein with no disulfide bonds, undergoes a very slow ring flip, the pressure and temperature dependence of which is studied in detail using the on-line cell high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance technique in the pressure range from 3 MPa to 200 MPa and in the temperature range from 257 K to 313 K. The ring of Tyr6 is buried sandwiched between a β-sheet and α-helices (the water-accessible area is less than 0.26 nm2), its hydroxyl proton being involved in an internal hydrogen bond. The ring flip rates101~105 s−1 were determined from the line shape analysis of Hδ1, δ2 and Hɛ1,ɛ2 of Tyr6, giving an activation volume ΔV‡ of 0.044 ± 0.008 nm3 (27 mL mol−1), an activation enthalpy ΔH‡ of 89 ± 10 kJ mol−1, and an activation entropy ΔS‡ of 16 ± 2 JK−1 mol−1. The ΔV‡ and ΔH‡ values for HPr found previously for Tyr and Phe ring flips of BPTI and cytochrome c fall within the range of ΔV‡ of 28 to 51 mL mol−1 and ΔH‡ of 71 to 155 kJ mol−1. The fairly common ΔV‡ and ΔH‡ values are considered to represent the extra space or cavity required for the ring flip and the extra energy required to create a cavity, respectively, in the core part of a globular protein. Nearly complete cold denaturation was found to take place at 200 MPa and 257 K independently from the ring reorientation process. PMID:15557257

  18. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  19. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  20. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three data sets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~ 2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  1. Coexistence of magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity in the pnictide high temperature superconductor SmFeAsO1-xFx measured by muon spin rotation.

    PubMed

    Drew, A J; Pratt, F L; Lancaster, T; Blundell, S J; Baker, P J; Liu, R H; Wu, G; Chen, X H; Watanabe, I; Malik, V K; Dubroka, A; Kim, K W; Rössle, M; Bernhard, C

    2008-08-29

    Muon spin rotation experiments were performed on the pnictide high temperature superconductor SmFeAsO1-xFx with x=0.18 and 0.3. We observed an unusual enhancement of slow spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition which suggests that the spin fluctuations contribute to the formation of an unconventional superconducting state. An estimate of the in-plane penetration depth lambda ab(0)=190(5) nm was obtained, which confirms that the pnictide superconductors obey an Uemura-style relationship between Tc and lambda ab(0);(-2).

  2. A comparison of urban heat islands mapped using skin temperature, air temperature, and apparent temperature (Humidex), for the greater Vancouver area.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung Chak; Knudby, Anders; Xu, Yongming; Hodul, Matus; Aminipouri, Mehdi

    2016-02-15

    Apparent temperature is more closely related to mortality during extreme heat events than other temperature variables, yet spatial epidemiology studies typically use skin temperature (also known as land surface temperature) to quantify heat exposure because it is relatively easy to map from satellite data. An empirical approach to map apparent temperature at the neighborhood scale, which relies on publicly available weather station observations and spatial data layers combined in a random forest regression model, was demonstrated for greater Vancouver, Canada. Model errors were acceptable (cross-validated RMSE=2.04 °C) and the resulting map of apparent temperature, calibrated for a typical hot summer day, corresponded well with past temperature research in the area. A comparison with field measurements as well as similar maps of skin temperature and air temperature revealed that skin temperature was poorly correlated with both air temperature (R(2)=0.38) and apparent temperature (R(2)=0.39). While the latter two were more similar (R(2)=0.87), apparent temperature was predicted to exceed air temperature by more than 5 °C in several urban areas as well as around the confluence of the Pitt and Fraser rivers. We conclude that skin temperature is not a suitable proxy for human heat exposure, and that spatial epidemiology studies could benefit from mapping apparent temperature, using an approach similar to the one reported here, to better quantify differences in heat exposure that exist across an urban landscape.

  3. UF-CHERS Measurements of Ion Temperature and Toroidal Rotation Fluctuations Associated with the Edge Harmonic Oscillation in Quiescent H-mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Grierson, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    The UF-CHERS (Ultra Fast CHarge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy) diagnostic at DIII-D measures local, long-wavelength ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations at turbulence-relevant spatiotemporal scales from emission of the CVI n=8 ->7 transition. During Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) plasmas, which offer ELM-free improved confinement, UF-CHERS measurements observed coherent, low frequency (fo 10kHz) pedestal oscillations in Ti and vtor at the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO) frequency while several modes between 35-75 kHz are suppressed when the EHO appears. Although broadband ion temperature and density fluctuations were reduced by the EHO, the toroidal rotation showed increased fluctuation amplitude. Investigating ion temperature and toroidal fluctuations associated with the EHO may provide insights into the saturated instability driving the EHO. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and NSF GRFP Grant DGE-1256259.

  4. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  5. Air-Cooled Design of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.; Rosen, Micha; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan; Cavalcante, Celio L.

    2004-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts. This paper discusses the mechanical design and the results of thermal model validation tests of a TSAC that uses air as the cooling medium.

  6. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  7. Attribution of precipitation changes on ground-air temperature offset: Granger causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Bodri, Louise

    2016-06-01

    This work examines the causal relationship between the value of the ground-air temperature offset and the precipitation changes for monitored 5-min data series together with their hourly and daily averages obtained at the Sporilov Geophysical Observatory (Prague). Shallow subsurface soil temperatures were monitored under four different land cover types (bare soil, sand, short-cut grass and asphalt). The ground surface temperature (GST) and surface air temperature (SAT) offset, ΔT(GST-SAT), is defined as the difference between the temperature measured at the depth of 2 cm below the surface and the air temperature measured at 5 cm above the surface. The results of the Granger causality test did not reveal any evidence of Granger causality for precipitation to ground-air temperature offsets on the daily scale of aggregation except for the asphalt pavement. On the contrary, a strong evidence of Granger causality for precipitation to the ground-air temperature offsets was found on the hourly scale of aggregation for all land cover types except for the sand surface cover. All results are sensitive to the lag choice of the autoregressive model. On the whole, obtained results contain valuable information on the delay time of ΔT(GST-SAT) caused by the rainfall events and confirmed the importance of using autoregressive models to understand the ground-air temperature relationship.

  8. Validation of AIRS V6 Surface Temperature over Greenland with GCN and NOAA Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Hearty, Thomas; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Susskind, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This work compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRSAMSU (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A) Version 6 and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 5 derived surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based surface temperature measurements, we re-projected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) to 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) into the same grid but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. Using this approach, the spatial comparison between the monthly mean AIRS Ts and MODIS IST is in good agreement with RMS 2K for May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in the MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net (GCN) and NOAA stations. The coherent time series of surface temperature evident in the correlation between AIRS Ts and GCN temperatures suggest that at monthly time scales both observations capture the same climate signal over Greenland. It is also suggested that AIRS surface air temperature (Ta) can be used to estimate the boundary layer inversion.

  9. Investigation of the impact of extreme air temperature on river water temperature: case study of the heat episode 2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, Philipp; Trimmel, Heidelinde; Goler, Robert; Formayer, Herbert; Holzapfel, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water stream temperature is a relevant factor for water quality since it is an important driver of water oxygen content and in turn also reduces or increases stress on the aquatic fauna. The water temperature of streams is determined by the source and inflow water temperature, by the energy balance at the stream surface and by the hydrological regime of the stream. Main factors driving the energy balance of streams are radiation balance and air temperature which influences the sensitive and latent heat flux. The present study investigates the impact of the heat episode of summer 2013 on water temperature of two lowland rivers in south eastern Austria. Within the scope of the project BIO_CLIC routine measurements of water temperature at 33 locations alongside the rivers Pinka and Lafnitz have been performed since spring 2012. In addition meteorological measurements of global shortwave and longwave radiation, air temperature, wind and air humidity have been carried out during this time. For the same time period, data of discharge and water levels of both rivers were provided by the public hydrological office. The heat episode of summer 2013 started, according to the Kysely- definition, on 18 July and lasted until 14 August. The highest air temperature ever recorded in Austria was reported on 8 August at 40.5°C. In Güssing, which is located within the project area, 40.0 °C were recorded. In the lower reaches of the river Pinka, at the station Burg the monthly mean water temperature of August 2013 was with more than 22°C, 1°C higher than the mean water temperature of the same period of the previous years. At the same station, the maximum water temperature of 27.1°C was recorded on 29 July, 9 days prior to the air temperature record. Analysis shows that at the downstream stations the main driving parameter is solar radiation whereas at the upstream stations a better correlation between air temperature and water temperature is obtained. Using the extensive data set

  10. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  11. Microbial community changes during different empty bed residence times and operational fluctuations in an air diffusion reactor for odor abatement.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisa; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl; Lebrero, Raquel

    2017-03-08

    The succession of bacterial and fungal populations was assessed in an activated sludge (AS) diffusion bioreactor treating a synthetic malodorous emission containing H2S, toluene, butanone and alpha-pinene. Microbial community characteristics (bacterial and fungal diversity, richness, evenness and composition) and bioreactor function relationships were evaluated at different empty bed residence times (EBRTs) and after process fluctuations and operational failures (robustness test). For H2S, butanone and toluene, the bioreactor showed a stable and efficient abatement performance regardless of the EBRT and fluctuations applied, while low alpha-pinene removals were observed. While no clear positive or negative relationship between community characteristics and bioreactor functions was observed, ecological parameters such as evenness and community dynamics seemed to be of importance for maintaining reactor stability. The optimal degree of evenness of the inoculum likely contributed to the high robustness of the system towards the fluctuations imposed. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Fungi (Hypocreales, Chaeatothyriales) were the most abundant groups retrieved from the AS system with a putative key role in the degradation of butanone and toluene. Typical H2S and alpha-pinene degraders were not retrieved from the system. The inoculation of P. fluorescens, a known alpha-pinene degrader, to the system did not result in the enhancement of the degradation of this compound. This strain was likely outcompeted by the microorganisms already adapted to the AS environment.

  12. Controlled simulation of optical turbulence in a temperature gradient air chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Italo; Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence simulator is built and characterized for in-lab optical wave propagation with controlled strength of the refractive-index fluctuations. The temperature gradients are generated by a sequence of heat guns with controlled individual strengths. The temperature structure functions are measured in two directions transverse to propagation path with the help of a thermocouple array and used for evaluation of the corresponding refractive-index structure functions of optical turbulence.

  13. Geographical and Geomorphological Effects on Air Temperatures in the Columbia Basin's Signature Vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, L.; Pogue, K. R.; Bader, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon is one of the most productive grape-growing areas in the United States. Wines produced in this region are influenced by their terroir - the amalgamation of physical and cultural elements that influence grapes grown at a particular vineyard site. Of the physical factors, climate, and in particular air temperature, has been recognized as a primary influence on viticulture. Air temperature directly affects ripening in the grapes. Proper fruit ripening, which requires precise and balanced levels of acid and sugar, and the accumulation of pigment in the grape skin, directly correlates with the quality of wine produced. Many features control air temperature within a particular vineyard. Elevation, latitude, slope, and aspect all converge to form complex relationships with air temperatures; however, the relative degree to which these attributes affect temperatures varies between regions and is not well understood. This study examines the influence of geography and geomorphology on air temperatures within the American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) of the Columbia Basin in eastern Washington and Oregon. The premier vineyards within each AVA, which have been recognized for producing high-quality wine, were equipped with air temperature monitoring stations that collected hourly temperature measurements. A variety of temperature statistics were calculated, including daily average, maximum, and minimum temperatures. From these values, average diurnal variation and growing degree-days (10°C) were calculated. A variety of other statistics were computed, including date of first and last frost and time spent below a minimum temperature threshold. These parameters were compared to the vineyard's elevation, latitude, slope, aspect, and local topography using GPS, ArcCatalog, and GIS in an attempt to determine their relative influences on air temperatures. From these statistics, it was possible to delineate two trends of temperature variation

  14. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system. PMID:25250390

  15. Modeling validation and control analysis for controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14 °C, 0006 kg(w)/kg(da) in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  16. Perceiving nasal patency through mucosal cooling rather than air temperature or nasal resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Blacker, Kara; Luo, Yuehao; Bryant, Bruce; Jiang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Adequate perception of nasal airflow (i.e., nasal patency) is an important consideration for patients with nasal sinus diseases. The perception of a lack of nasal patency becomes the primary symptom that drives these patients to seek medical treatment. However, clinical assessment of nasal patency remains a challenge because we lack objective measurements that correlate well with what patients perceive. The current study examined factors that may influence perceived patency, including air temperature, humidity, mucosal cooling, nasal resistance, and trigeminal sensitivity. Forty-four healthy subjects rated nasal patency while sampling air from three facial exposure boxes that were ventilated with untreated room air, cold air, and dry air, respectively. In all conditions, air temperature and relative humidity inside each box were recorded with sensors connected to a computer. Nasal resistance and minimum airway cross-sectional area (MCA) were measured using rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, respectively. General trigeminal sensitivity was assessed through lateralization thresholds to butanol. No significant correlation was found between perceived patency and nasal resistance or MCA. In contrast, air temperature, humidity, and butanol threshold combined significantly contributed to the ratings of patency, with mucosal cooling (heat loss) being the most heavily weighted predictor. Air humidity significantly influences perceived patency, suggesting that mucosal cooling rather than air temperature alone provides the trigeminal sensation that results in perception of patency. The dynamic cooling between the airstream and the mucosal wall may be quantified experimentally or computationally and could potentially lead to a new clinical evaluation tool.

  17. Analysis of surface air temperature variations and local urbanization effects on central Yunnan Plateau, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunling; Wu, Zhijie; Liu, Xuelian; Deng, Fuying

    2016-10-01

    With the surface air temperature (SAT) data at 37 stations on Central Yunnan Plateau (CYP) for 1961-2010 and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime light data, the temporal-spatial patterns of the SAT trends are detected using Sen's Nonparametric Estimator of Slope approach and MK test, and the impact of urbanization on surface warming is analyzed by comparing the differences between the air temperature change trends of urban stations and their corresponding rural stations. Results indicated that annual mean air temperature showed a significant warming trend, which is equivalent to a rate of 0.17 °C/decade during the past 50 years. Seasonal mean air temperature presents a rising trend, and the trend was more significant in winter (0.31 °C/decade) than in other seasons. Annual/seasonal mean air temperature tends to increase in most areas, and higher warming trend appeared in urban areas, notably in Kunming city. The regional mean air temperature series was significantly impacted by urban warming, and the urbanization-induced warming contributed to approximately 32.3-62.9 % of the total regional warming during the past 50 years. Meantime, the urbanization-induced warming trend in winter and spring was more significant than that in summer and autumn. Since 1985, the urban heat island (UHI) intensity has gradually increased. And the urban temperatures always rise faster than rural temperatures on the CYP.

  18. Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, C. David; Eisenbach, Stefan; Pospichal, Bernhard; Steinacker, Reinhold

    2004-11-01

    Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole in the eastern Alps are compared with pseudovertical temperature “soundings” from three lines of temperature dataloggers on the basin's northwest, southwest, and southeast sidewalls. Under stable nighttime conditions with low background winds, the pseudovertical profiles from all three lines were good proxies for free air temperature soundings over the basin center, with a mean nighttime cold temperature bias of about 0.4°C and a standard deviation of 0.4°C. Cold biases were highest in the upper basin where relatively warm air subsides to replace air that spills out of the basin through the lowest-altitude saddle. On a windy night, standard deviations increased to 1° 2°C. After sunrise, the varying exposures of the dataloggers to sunlight made the pseudovertical profiles less useful as proxies for free air soundings. The good correspondence between sidewall and free air temperatures during high-static-stability conditions suggests that sidewall soundings can be used to monitor temperatures, temperature gradients, and temperature inversion evolution in the sinkhole. Sidewall soundings can produce more frequent profiles at lower cost than can tethersondes or rawinsondes, and extension of these findings to other enclosed or semienclosed topographies may enhance future basic meteorological research or support applications studies in agriculture, forestry, air pollution, and land use planning.


  19. Combustion of Gaseous Fuels with High Temperature Air in Normal- and Micro-gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.; Gupta, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is determine the effect of air preheat temperature on flame characteristics in normal and microgravity conditions. We have obtained qualitative (global flame features) and some quantitative information on the features of flames using high temperature combustion air under normal gravity conditions with propane and methane as the fuels. This data will be compared with the data under microgravity conditions. The specific focus under normal gravity conditions has been on determining the global flame features as well as the spatial distribution of OH, CH, and C2 from flames using high temperature combustion air at different equivalence ratio.

  20. Thermal Coupling Between Air and Ground Temperatures in the CMIP5 Historical and Future Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, A.; Cuesta-Valero, F. J.; Smerdon, J. E.; Beltrami, H.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal coupling between air and ground temperatures is investigated herein for General Circulation Models (GCMs) that participated in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). For each simulation, we evaluate the regional relationship between air and ground temperatures to study surface energy fluxes and the attenuation of the annual temperature signal across the air-ground interface and into the shallow subsurface for North America. Our results show that the transport of energy across the air-ground interface and into the shallow subsurface is different across GCMs and is dependent on the land surface models that each employs. The variability of the difference between air and ground temperatures is high among simulations and is not dependent on the depth of the bottom boundary of the subsurface soil model. The difference between air and ground temperatures differs significantly from observations. Additionally, while the variability among GCMs can be explained by the physics of the land surface models, the regional variability of the air-ground coupling is associated with the model treatment of soil properties as well as snow and vegetation processes within GCMs. The difference between air and ground temperatures at high latitudes within the majority of the CMIP5 models is directly proportional to the amount of snow on the ground, due to the insulating effect of snow cover. On the other hand, the difference between air and ground temperatures at low latitudes within some of the CMIP5 models is inversely proportional to the vegetation cover (leaf area index), due to changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. The large variability among GCMs and the marked dependency of the results on the choice of the land-surface model illustrates the need for improving the simulation of air-ground coupling in land-surface models towards a robust simulation of near-surface processes, such as permafrost and soil carbon stability within GCMs.

  1. Multichannel temperature controller for hot air solar house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an electronic controller that is optimized to operate a hot air solar system. Thermal information is obtained from copper constantan thermocouples and a wall-type thermostat. The signals from the thermocouples are processed through a single amplifier using a multiplexing scheme. The multiplexing reduces the component count and automatically calibrates the thermocouple amplifier. The processed signals connect to some simple logic that selects one of the four operating modes. This simple, inexpensive, and reliable scheme is well suited to control hot air solar systems.

  2. High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppae, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

    2011-11-01

    We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlen equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement.

  3. Effect of optimizing supply water temperature and air volume on a VAV system

    SciTech Connect

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Ito, Koichi; Yokoyama, Ryohei

    1999-07-01

    An optimal planning method is proposed for an air conditioning system composed of heat pump chillers and variable air volume (VAV) units. Supply water temperature, supply air volume, and thickness of heat insulation material are determined optimally so as to minimize the annual total cost of the system in consideration of equipment capacities and annual operation for the cooling load varying through a year. Through a numerical study on the system planned for an office building, influences of supply water/air temperatures and air volume on the system are investigated from the viewpoint of long-term economics. As a result, it is shown that the annual energy charge of the optimal VAV system can be reduced considerably in comparison with that of the optimal constant air volume (CAV) system, and that the effect of the energy conservation of the former system is large enough.

  4. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  5. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  6. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  7. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  8. Improved Temperature Sounding and Quality Control Methodology Using AIRS/AMSU Data: The AIRS Science Team Version 5 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John M.; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm in terms of its three most significant improvements over the methodology used in the AIRS Science Team Version 4 retrieval algorithm. Improved physics in Version 5 allows for use of AIRS clear column radiances in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profiles T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations are now used primarily in the generation of clear column radiances .R(sub i) for all channels. This new approach allows for the generation of more accurate values of .R(sub i) and T(p) under most cloud conditions. Secondly, Version 5 contains a new methodology to provide accurate case-by-case error estimates for retrieved geophysical parameters and for channel-by-channel clear column radiances. Thresholds of these error estimates are used in a new approach for Quality Control. Finally, Version 5 also contains for the first time an approach to provide AIRS soundings in partially cloudy conditions that does not require use of any microwave data. This new AIRS Only sounding methodology, referred to as AIRS Version 5 AO, was developed as a backup to AIRS Version 5 should the AMSU-A instrument fail. Results are shown comparing the relative performance of the AIRS Version 4, Version 5, and Version 5 AO for the single day, January 25, 2003. The Goddard DISC is now generating and distributing products derived using the AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm. This paper also described the Quality Control flags contained in the DISC AIRS/AMSU retrieval products and their intended use for scientific research purposes.

  9. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  10. Preliminary verification of instantaneous air temperature estimation for clear sky conditions based on SEBAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shanyou; Zhou, Chuxuan; Zhang, Guixin; Zhang, Hailong; Hua, Junwei

    2017-02-01

    Spatially distributed near surface air temperature at the height of 2 m is an important input parameter for the land surface models. It is of great significance in both theoretical research and practical applications to retrieve instantaneous air temperature data from remote sensing observations. An approach based on Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to retrieve air temperature under clear sky conditions is presented. Taking the meteorological measurement data at one station as the reference and remotely sensed data as the model input, the research estimates the air temperature by using an iterative computation. The method was applied to the area of Jiangsu province for nine scenes by using MODIS data products, as well as part of Fujian province, China based on four scenes of Landsat 8 imagery. Comparing the air temperature estimated from the proposed method with that of the meteorological station measurement, results show that the root mean square error is 1.7 and 2.6 °C at 1000 and 30 m spatial resolution respectively. Sensitivity analysis of influencing factors reveals that land surface temperature is the most sensitive to the estimation precision. Research results indicate that the method has great potentiality to be used to estimate instantaneous air temperature distribution under clear sky conditions.

  11. A Review of the Thermodynamic, Transport, and Chemical Reaction Rate Properties of High-temperature Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C Frederick; Heims, Steve P

    1958-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of high temperature air, and the reaction rates for the important chemical processes which occur in air, are reviewed. Semiempirical, analytic expressions are presented for thermodynamic and transport properties of air. Examples are given illustrating the use of these properties to evaluate (1) equilibrium conditions following shock waves, (2) stagnation region heat flux to a blunt high-speed body, and (3) some chemical relaxation lengths in stagnation region flow.

  12. Assessing the Potential of the AIRS Retrieved Surface Temperature for 6-Hour Average Temperature Forecast in River Forecast Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Theobald, M.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Hearty, T. J.; Esfandiari, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Producing timely and accurate water forecast and information is the mission of National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS RFCs) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The river forecast system in RFCs requires average surface temperature in the fixed 6-hour period 000-0600, 0600-1200, 1200-1800, and 1200-0000 UTC. The current logic of RFC temperature forecast relies on ingest of point values of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. Meanwhile, the mean temperature for the 6-hour period is estimated from a weighted average of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder on board the Aqua satellite which was launched in May 2002 and follows a Sun-synchronous polar orbit. It is aimed to produce high resolution atmospheric profile and surface atmospheric parameters. As Aqua crosses the equator at about 1330 and 0130 local time, the AIRS retrieved surface temperature may represent daytime maximum and nighttime minimum value. Comparing to point observation from surface weather stations which are often sparse over the less-populated area and are unevenly distributed, satellite may obtain better area averaged observation. This test study assesses the potential of using AIRS retrieved surface temperature to forecast 6-hour average temperature for NWS RFCs. The California Nevada RFC is selected due to the poor coverage of surface observation in the mountainous region and spring snow melting. The study focuses on the March to May spring season when water from snowpack melting often plays important role in flood. AIRS retrieved temperature and surface weather station data set will be used to derive statistical weighting coefficient for 6-hour average temperature forecast. The resulting forecast biases and errors will be the main indicators of the potential usage. All study results will be presented in the meeting.

  13. Transport properties of high-temperature air in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Capitelli, M.; Catalfamo, C.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-15

    Transport properties of equilibrium air plasmas in a magnetic field are calculated with the Chapman-Enskog method. The range considered for the temperature is [50-50 000] K and for the magnetic induction is [0-300] T.

  14. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effects on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  15. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effect on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  16. High-temperature stabilization by air of a pyrophoric catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Krylova, A.V.; Ustimenko, G.A.

    1982-12-01

    The reaction of a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia with air at 480 to 520/sup 0/C leads to the formation on the surface of a thin protective oxide structure that eliminates its pyrophoric character. High-temperature stabilization by air is a considerably faster process than passivation and leads to the production of catalysts with increased resistance to oxidation.

  17. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  18. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of Quality-controlled AIRS Temperature Retrievals under Partially Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.; Brin, E.; Riishojgaard, L.; Liu, E.; Terry, J.; Jusem, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board the Aqua satellite has been long recognized as an important contributor towards the improvement of weather forecasts. At this time only a small fraction of the total data produced by AIRS is being used by operational weather systems. In fact, in addition to effects of thinning and quality control, the only AIRS data assimilated are radiance observations of channels unaffected by clouds. Observations in mid-lower tropospheric sounding AIRS channels are assimilated primarily under completely clear-sky conditions, thus imposing a very severe limitation on the horizontal distribution of the AIRS-derived information. In this work it is shown that the ability to derive accurate temperature profiles from AIRS observations in partially cloud-contaminated areas can be utilized to further improve the impact of AIRS observations in a global model and forecasting system. The analyses produced by assimilating AIRS temperature profiles obtained under partial cloud cover result in a substantially colder representation of the northern hemisphere lower midtroposphere at higher latitudes. This temperature difference has a strong impact, through hydrostatic adjustment, in the midtropospheric geopotential heights, which causes a different representation of the polar vortex especially over northeastern Siberia and Alaska. The AIRS-induced anomaly propagates through the model's dynamics producing improved 5-day forecasts.

  19. Improving forecast skill by assimilation of quality-controlled AIRS temperature retrievals under partially cloudy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, O.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.; Brin, E.; Liu, E.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Terry, J.; Jusem, J. C.

    2008-04-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board the Aqua satellite is now recognized as an important contributor towards the improvement of weather forecasts. At this time only a small fraction of the total data produced by AIRS is being used by operational weather systems. In fact, in addition to effects of thinning and quality control, the only AIRS data assimilated are radiance observations of channels unaffected by clouds. Observations in mid-lower tropospheric sounding AIRS channels are assimilated primarily under completely clear-sky conditions, thus imposing a very severe limitation on the horizontal distribution of the AIRS-derived information. In this work it is shown that the ability to derive accurate temperature profiles from AIRS observations in partially cloud-contaminated areas can be utilized to further improve the impact of AIRS observations in a global model and forecasting system. The analyses produced by assimilating AIRS temperature profiles obtained under partial cloud cover result in a substantially colder representation of the northern hemisphere lower midtroposphere at higher latitudes. This temperature difference has a strong impact, through hydrostatic adjustment, in the midtropospheric geopotential heights, which causes a different representation of the polar vortex especially over northeastern Siberia and Alaska. The AIRS-induced anomaly propagates through the model's dynamics producing improved 5-day forecasts.

  20. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored.

  1. Increasing influence of air temperature on upper Colorado River streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodhouse, Connie A.; Pederson, Gregory T.; Morino, Kiyomi; McAfee, Stephanie A.; McCabe, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This empirical study examines the influence of precipitation, temperature, and antecedent soil moisture on upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) water year streamflow over the past century. While cool season precipitation explains most of the variability in annual flows, temperature appears to be highly influential under certain conditions, with the role of antecedent fall soil moisture less clear. In both wet and dry years, when flow is substantially different than expected given precipitation, these factors can modulate the dominant precipitation influence on streamflow. Different combinations of temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture can result in flow deficits of similar magnitude, but recent droughts have been amplified by warmer temperatures that exacerbate the effects of relatively modest precipitation deficits. Since 1988, a marked increase in the frequency of warm years with lower flows than expected, given precipitation, suggests continued warming temperatures will be an increasingly important influence in reducing future UCRB water supplies.

  2. Increasing influence of air temperature on upper Colorado River streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Connie A.; Pederson, Gregory T.; Morino, Kiyomi; McAfee, Stephanie A.; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    This empirical study examines the influence of precipitation, temperature, and antecedent soil moisture on upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) water year streamflow over the past century. While cool season precipitation explains most of the variability in annual flows, temperature appears to be highly influential under certain conditions, with the role of antecedent fall soil moisture less clear. In both wet and dry years, when flow is substantially different than expected given precipitation, these factors can modulate the dominant precipitation influence on streamflow. Different combinations of temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture can result in flow deficits of similar magnitude, but recent droughts have been amplified by warmer temperatures that exacerbate the effects of relatively modest precipitation deficits. Since 1988, a marked increase in the frequency of warm years with lower flows than expected, given precipitation, suggests continued warming temperatures will be an increasingly important influence in reducing future UCRB water supplies.

  3. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  4. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  5. Temporal fluctuations of the Sea Surface Temperature and Chlorophyll-a along of coral reef systems located on the Western coastal zone of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Salas Pérez, José; Ocaña Valencia, Angel; González Gandara, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    On the coastal zone of the western Gulf of Mexico (GM), there are a variety of coral reef systems which are influenced by river discharge and macro-scale circulation of the GM. The goal of this study is determine if the main fluctuations of the chlorophyll-a and sea surface temperature values (measured from monthly satellite images of sensors Aqua Modis and NOAA-AVHRR in the period of 2008-2011) in coral reef systems, are determined by river discharges or macro-scale circulation of the basin. Moreover determine if the temporal fluctuations of those parameters are correlated between them and thus asses the relationship between them. The most norther coral reef system (Lobos) is classified as mesotrophic-eutrophic. The middle coral reef system (Tuxpan) is ranked as oligotrophic-mesotrophic. Toward the southern region of the western littoral of the GM the coral reefs systems (PNSAV and Coatzacoalcos) are classified as eutrophic. Regarding to Sea Surface Temperature (SST) fluctuations, all coral reef systems showed an almost similar behavior, winter is the season with cool waters (19-23°C). Then in spring, the temperature values increases to about 25°C. Summer season have warm waters (29-30°C). Slightly different, fall decrease their water temperatures to 28°C. The northern coral reef systems (Lobos-Tuxpan) are colder than that the coral reef systems of the southern region (PNSAV-Coatzacoalcos). Those fluctuations, in chlorophyll-a and SST are induced by cyclonic and anticyclonic gyres generated in the Loop current, which impact in the northern region, while the southern region is influenced by river discharge and the presence of a cyclonic gyre of the Campeche bay. But northern and southern coral reef systems are mainly affected by waters of the northern GM advected by winds blowing from the north, mainly in winter.

  6. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, D. J.; Gilbert, C.; Thierry, A.-M.; Currie, J.; Le Maho, Y.; Ancel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40′ S 140° 01′ E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate. PMID:23466479

  7. Cavity Ring Down Absorption of Oxygen in Air as a Temperature Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares, Carlos; Nyaupane, Parashu R.

    2016-06-01

    The A-band of oxygen has been measured at low resolution at temperatures between 90 K and 373 K using the phase shift cavity ring down (PS-CRD) technique. For temperatures between 90 K and 295 K, the PS-CRD technique presented here involves an optical cavity attached to a cryostat. The static cell and mirrors of the optical cavity are all inside a vacuum chamber at the same temperature of the cryostat. The temperature of the cell can be changed between 77 K and 295 K. For temperatures above 295 K, a hollow glass cylindrical tube without windows has been inserted inside an optical cavity to measure the temperature of air flowing through the tube. The cavity consists of two highly reflective mirrors which are mounted parallel to each other and separated by a distance of 93 cm. In this experiment, air is passed through a heated tube. The temperature of the air flowing through the tube is determined by measuring the intensity of the oxygen absorption as a function of the wavenumber. The A-band of oxygen is measured between 298 K and 373 K, with several air flow rates. Accuracy of the temperature measurement is determined by comparing the calculated temperature from the spectra with the temperature obtained from a calibrated thermocouple inserted at the center of the tube.

  8. Statistical temperature profile retrievals in clear-air using passive 118-GHz O2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Johnson, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The clean-air temperature profile accuracy yielded by a localized linear statistical retrieval operator applied to passive aircraft-based 118-GHz spectra is demonstrated. A comparison of the statistically and physically derived correlation coefficients of antenna temperature and kinetic temperature furnishes a physical justification of the statistical retrieval technique. The atmospheric temperature mean and covariance significantly depend on such geophysical parameters as latitude, longitude, local season, and time, as well as the prevailing meteorological state and orographic effects.

  9. An Air Temperature Cloud Height Precipitation Phase Determination Scheme for Surface Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiccabrino, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many hydrological and ecological models use simple surface temperature threshold equations rather than coupling with a complex meteorological model to determine if precipitation is rain or snow. Some comparative studies have found, the most common rain/snow threshold variable, air temperature to have more precipitation phase error than dew-point or wet-bulb temperature, which account for the important secondary role of humidity in the melting and sublimation processes. However, just like surface air temperature, surface humidity is often effected by soil conditions and vegetation and is therefore not always representative of the atmospheric humidity precipitation falls through. A viable alternative to using surface humidity as a proxy for atmospheric moisture would be to adjust the rain snow threshold for changes in cloud height. The height of a cloud base above the ground gives the depth of an unsaturated layer. An unsaturated atmospheric layer should have much different melting and sublimation rates than a saturated cloud layer. Therefore, rain and snow percentages at a given surface air temperature should change with the height of the lowest cloud base. This study uses hourly observations from 12 U.S. manually augmented meteorological stations located in the Great Plains and Midwest upwind or away from major water bodies in relatively flat areas in an attempt to limit geographical influences. The surface air temperature threshold for the ground to 200 feet (under 100m) was 0.0°C, 0.6°C for 300-600 feet (100-200m), 1.1°C for 700-1200 feet (300-400m), 1.7°C for 1300-2000 feet (500-600m), and 2.2°C for 2100-3300 feet (700-1000m). Total precipitation error for these cloud height air temperature thresholds reduced the error from the single air temperature threshold 1.1°C by 15% from 14% to 12% total error between -2.2°C and 3.9°C. These air temperature cloud height thresholds resulted in 1.5% less total error than the dew-point temperature threshold 0.0

  10. Data Assimilation Experiments Using Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AIRS data. The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains a number of significant improvements over Version 4. Two very significant improvements are described briefly below. 1) The AIRS Science Team Radiative Transfer Algorithm (RTA) has now been upgraded to accurately account for effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium on the AIRS observations. This allows for use of AIRS observations in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval algorithm during both day and night. Following theoretical considerations, tropospheric temperature profile information is obtained almost exclusively from clear column radiances in the 4.3 micron CO2 band in the AIRS Version 5 temperature profile retrieval step. These clear column radiances are a derived product that are indicative of radiances AIRS channels would have seen if the field of view were completely clear. Clear column radiances for all channels are determined using tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations. This approach allows for the generation of accurate values of clear column radiances and T(p) under most cloud conditions. 2) Another very significant improvement in Version 5 is the ability to generate accurate case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates for the atmospheric temperature profile, as well as for channel-by-channel clear column radiances. These error estimates are used for quality control of the retrieved products. Based on error estimate thresholds, each temperature profiles is assigned a characteristic pressure, pg, down to which the profile is characterized as good for use for data assimilation purposes. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AIRS quality controlled temperature profiles using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system, consisting of the NCEP GSI analysis coupled with the

  11. Two major volcanic cooling episodes derived from global marine air temperature, AD 1807-1827

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenoweth, Michael

    A new data set of global marine air temperature data for the years 1807-1827 is used to show the impact of volcanic eruptions in ˜ 1809 (unlocated) and 1815 (Tambora, Indonesia). Both eruptions produced cooling exceeding that after Krakatoa, Indonesia (1883) and Pinatubo, Philippines (1991). The ˜1809 eruption is dated to March-June 1808 based on a sudden cooling in Malaysian temperature data and maximum cooling of marine air temperature in 1809. Two large-scale calibrated proxy temperature records, one from tree-ring-density data, the other using multi-proxy sources are compared to the marine air temperature data. Correlation is highest with maximum latewood density data and lowest with the multi-proxy data.

  12. Potential Fluctuations at Low Temperatures in Mesoscopic-Scale SmTiO3/SrTiO3/SmTiO3 Quantum Well Structures.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Will J; Isaac, Brandon; Marshall, Patrick; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhou, Panpan; Stemmer, Susanne; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-03-28

    Heterointerfaces of SrTiO3 with other transition metal oxides make up an intriguing family of systems with a bounty of coexisting and competing physical orders. Some examples, such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3, support a high carrier density electron gas at the interface whose electronic properties are determined by a combination of lattice distortions, spin-orbit coupling, defects, and various regimes of magnetic and charge ordering. Here, we study electronic transport in mesoscale devices made with heterostructures of SrTiO3 sandwiched between layers of SmTiO3, in which the transport properties can be tuned from a regime of Fermi-liquid like resistivity (ρ ∝ T(2)) to a non-Fermi liquid (ρ ∝ T(5/3)) by controlling the SrTiO3 thickness. In mesoscale devices at low temperatures, we find unexpected voltage fluctuations that grow in magnitude as T is decreased below 20 K, are suppressed with increasing contact electrode size, and are independent of the drive current and contact spacing distance. Magnetoresistance fluctuations are also observed, which are reminiscent of universal conductance fluctuations but not entirely consistent with their conventional properties. Candidate explanations are considered, and a mechanism is suggested based on mesoscopic temporal fluctuations of the Seebeck coefficient. An improved understanding of charge transport in these model systems, especially their quantum coherent properties, may lead to insights into the nature of transport in strongly correlated materials that deviate from Fermi liquid theory.

  13. Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Eisenbach, Stefan; Pospichal, Bernhard; Steinacker, Reinhold

    2004-11-01

    Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km diameter limestone sinkhole in the Eastern Alps are compared with pseudo-vertical temperature ‘soundings’ from three lines of temperature data loggers on the basin’s northwest, southwest and southeast sidewalls. Under stable nighttime conditions with low background winds, the pseudo-vertical profiles from all three lines were good proxies for free air temperature soundings over the basin center, with a mean nighttime cold temperature bias of about 0.4°C and a standard deviation of 0.4°C. Cold biases were highest in the upper basin where relatively warm air subsides to replace air that spills out of the basin through the lowest altitude saddle. On a windy night, standard deviations increased to 1 - 2°C. After sunrise, the varying exposures of the data loggers to sunlight made the pseudo-vertical profiles less useful as proxies for free air soundings. The good correspondence between sidewall and free air temperatures during high static stability conditions suggests that sidewall soundings will prove useful in monitoring temperatures and vertical temperature gradients in the sinkhole. The sidewall soundings can produce more frequent profiles at less cost than tethersondes or rawinsondes, and provide valuable advantages for some types of meteorological analyses.

  14. Air temperature distribution over a debris covered glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicciotti, Francesca; Petersen, Lene; Wicki, Simon; Carenzo, Marco; Immerzeel, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Air temperature is a key control in the exchange of energy fluxes at the glacier-atmosphere interface and also the main input variable in many of the melt models (both energy balance or temperature-index type of models) currently used to predict glacier melt across a variety of scales. The commonly used approach to derive distributed temperature inputs is extrapolation from point measurements, often located outside the glacier surface, with a lapse rate that is assumed to be constant in time and uniform in space. Previous work for debris free glaciers has shown that lapse rates depend on several factors such as katabatic wind, humidity and the presence of clouds and that they vary in space and time. A dominant control however seems to be the presence of katabatic wind. For debris covered glaciers, the driving forces of air temperature are likely to be different but little is known because of the scarcity of field observations. Few preliminary studies have suggested that there is a strong coupling between surface and 2 m air temperature, while strong katabatic wind does not develop on debris covered tongues. In this study, we examine the variability in air temperature and lapse rates, as well as its atmospheric controls under different meteorological settings for the debris covered Lirung Glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas. We use a recently collected data set of air and surface temperature at a network of locations on the glacier tongue during the pre-monsoon season and the entire monsoon season of 2012. Additionally an AWS was installed on the glacier allowing the collection of meteorological observations. We investigate differences in air temperature during different climatic conditions (monsoon vs. dry period, upvalley vs. downvalley wind, cloudy vs. clear-sky, etc.). We identify the main controls on temperature and discuss how appropriate the application of a temperature lapse rate is over a debris covered glacier by investigating the correlation between

  15. Dependence of radon levels in Postojna Cave on outside air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorič, A.; Zidanšek, A.; Vaupotič, J.

    2011-05-01

    Postojna Cave is the largest of 21 show caves in Slovenia. The radon concentration there was measured continuously in the Great Mountain hall from July 2005 to October 2009 and ranged from about 200 Bq m-3 in winter to about 3 kBq m-3 in summer. The observed seasonal pattern of radon concentration is governed by air movement due to the difference in external and internal air densities, controlled mainly by air temperature. The cave behaves as a large chimney and in the cold period, the warmer cave air is released vertically through cracks and fissures to the colder outside atmosphere, enabling the inflow of fresh air with low radon levels. In summer the ventilation is minimal or reversed and the air flows from the higher to the lower openings of the cave. Our calculations have shown that the effect of the difference between outside and cave air temperatures on radon concentration is delayed for four days, presumably because of the distance of the measurement point from the lower entrance (ca. 2 km). A model developed for predicting radon concentration on the basis of outside air temperature has been checked and found to be successful.

  16. Application of high temperature air heaters to advanced power generation cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T R; Boss, W H; Chapman, J N

    1992-03-01

    Recent developments in ceramic composite materials open up the possibility of recuperative air heaters heating air to temperatures well above the feasible with metal tubes. A high temperature air heater (HTAH) has long been recognized as a requirement for the most efficient MHD plants in order to reach high combustor flame temperatures. The application of gas turbines in coal-fired plants of all types has been impeded because of the problems in cleaning exhaust gas sufficiently to avoid damage to the turbine. With a possibility of a HTAH, such plants may become feasible on the basis of air turbine cycles, in which air is compressed and heated in the HTAH before being applied to turbine. The heat exchanger eliminates the need for the hot gas cleanup system. The performance improvement potential of advanced cycles with HTAH application including the air turbine cycle in several variations such as the DOE program on ``Coal-Fired Air Furnace Combined Cycle...,`` variations originated by the authors, and the MHD combined cycle are presented. The status of development of ceramic air heater technology is included.

  17. Thermal Coupling between Air and Ground Temperatures in the CMIP5 Historical and Future Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, Almudena; José Cuesta-Valero, Francisco; Beltrami, Hugo; Smerdon, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The decadal-scale thermal coupling between air and ground temperatures across North America is examined for 32 General Circulation Models (GCMs) from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). For each simulation, we evaluate the relationship between air and ground temperatures. Our results show that the transport of energy across the air-ground interface differs from observations, and among GCMs depending on each model's land-surface component. While the decadal variability among GCMs can be explained by the physics and parameterizations of each land-surface model, the spatial variability of the air-ground coupling for the historical and future simulations is associated with model treatment of the soil thermal properties as well as with processes associated with snow and vegetation cover within GCMs. The difference between air and ground temperatures at high latitudes within the majority of the CMIP5 models is related to the insulating effect of snow cover. On the other hand, the difference between air and ground temperatures at low latitudes within some of the CMIP5 models is inversely proportional to the leaf area index, due to changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. The large variability among GCMs and the marked dependency of the results on the choice of the land-surface model illustrates the need for improving the simulation of air-ground coupling in land-surface models towards a robust simulation of near-surface processes, such as permafrost and soil carbon stability within GCMs.

  18. Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

  19. Influence of intake air temperature on internal combustion engine operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Raţiu, S.; Hepuţ, T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents three methods for reduce thermal losses in the intake system with improvement of airflow and thermal protection. In the experiment are involved two patented devices conceived by the author and one PhD theme device: 1- Dynamic device for air transfer, 2-Integrated thermal deflector, and, 3-Advanced thermal protection. The tests were carried on different vehicle running in real traffic and in the Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, within the specialization “Road vehicle” belonging to the Faculty of Engineering Hunedoara, component of Politehnica University of Timişoara. The results have been processed and compared whit the ones obtained without these devices.

  20. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels: The AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002 together with ASMU-A and HSB to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmosphere sounding system (Pagano et al 2003). The theoretical approach used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of clouds in the AIRS Science Team Version 3 at-launch algorithm, and that used in the Version 4 post-launch algorithm, have been published previously. Significant theoretical and practical improvements have been made in the analysis of AIRS/AMSU data since the Version 4 algorithm. Most of these have already been incorporated in the AIRS Science Team Version 5 algorithm (Susskind et al 2010), now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains three significant improvements over Version 4. Improved physics in Version 5 allowed for use of AIRS clear column radiances (R(sub i)) in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profiles T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations were used primarily in the generation of clear column radiances (R(sub i)) for all channels. This new approach allowed for the generation of accurate Quality Controlled values of R(sub i) and T(p) under more stressing cloud co