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Sample records for air temperatures wind

  1. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  2. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J

    2010-10-19

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms.

  3. Temperature and Transpiration Resistances of Xanthium Leaves as Affected by Air Temperature, Humidity, and Wind Speed 1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, B. G.; Raschke, K.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1970-01-01

    Transpiration and temperatures of single, attached leaves of Xanthium strumarium L. were measured in high intensity white light (1.2 calories per square centimeter per minute on a surface normal to the radiation), with abundant water supply, at wind speeds of 90, 225, and 450 centimeters per second, and during exposure to moist and dry air. Partitioning of absorbed radiation between transpiration and convection was determined, and transpiration resistances were computed. Leaf resistances decreased with increasing temperature (down to a minimum of 0.36 seconds per centimeter). Silicone rubber replicas of leaf surfaces proved that the decrease was due to increased stomatal apertures. At constant air temperature, leaf resistances were higher in dry than in moist air with the result that transpiration varied less than would have been predicted on the basis of the water-vapor pressure difference between leaf and air. The dependence of stomatal conductance on temperature and moisture content of the air caused the following effects. At air temperatures below 35 C, average leaf temperatures were above air temperature by an amount dependent on wind velocity; increasing wind diminished transpiration. At air temperatures above 35 C, leaf temperatures were below air temperatures, and increasing wind markedly increased transpiration. Leaf temperatures equaled air temperature near 35 C at all wind speeds and in moist as well as in dry air. PMID:16657458

  4. Increases in air temperature can promote wind-driven dispersal and spread of plants.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Katul, Gabriel; Nathan, Ran; Schurr, Frank M

    2009-09-07

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) of seeds and pollen shapes the spatial dynamics of plant genotypes, populations and communities. Quantifying LDD is thus important for predicting the future dynamics of plants exposed to environmental changes. However, environmental changes can also alter the behaviour of LDD vectors: for instance, increasing air temperature may enhance atmospheric instability, thereby altering the turbulent airflow that transports seed and pollen. Here, we investigate temperature effects on wind dispersal in a boreal forest using a 10-year time series of micrometeorological measurements and a Lagrangian stochastic model for particle transport. For a wide range of dispersal and life history types, we found positive relations between air temperature and LDD. This translates into a largely consistent positive effect of +3 degrees C warming on predicted LDD frequencies and spread rates of plants. Relative increases in LDD frequency tend to be higher for heavy-seeded plants, whereas absolute increases in LDD and spread rates are higher for light-seeded plants for which wind is often an important dispersal vector. While these predicted increases are not sufficient to compensate forecasted range losses and environmental changes can alter plant spread in various ways, our results generally suggest that warming can promote wind-driven movements of plant genotypes and populations in boreal forests.

  5. Metabolic response to air temperature and wind in day-old mallards and a standard operative temperature scale.

    PubMed

    Bakken, G S; Reynolds, P S; Kenow, K P; Korschgen, C E; Boysen, A F

    1999-01-01

    Most duckling mortality occurs during the week following hatching and is often associated with cold, windy, wet weather and scattering of the brood. We estimated the thermoregulatory demands imposed by cold, windy weather on isolated 1-d-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings resting in cover. We measured O2 consumption and evaporative water loss at air temperatures from 5 degrees to 25 degrees C and wind speeds of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 m/s. Metabolic heat production increased as wind increased or temperature decreased but was less sensitive to wind than that of either adult passerines or small mammals. Evaporative heat loss ranged from 5% to 17% of heat production. Evaporative heat loss and the ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic heat production was significantly lower in rest phase. These data were used to define a standard operative temperature (Tes) scale for night or heavy overcast conditions. An increase of wind speed from 0.1 to 1 m/s decreased Tes by 3 degrees -5 degrees C.

  6. Metabolic response to air temperature and wind in day-old mallards and a standard operative temperature scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakken, G.S.; Reynolds, P.S.; Kenow, K.P.; Korschgen, C.E.; Boysen, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    Most duckling mortality occurs during the week following hatching and is often associated with cold, windy, wet weather and scattering of the brood. We estimated the thermoregulatory demands imposed by cold, windy weather on isolated 1-d-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings resting in cover. We measured O-2 consumption and evaporative water loss at air temperatures from 5 degrees to 25 degrees C and wind speeds of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mis. Metabolic heat production increased as wind increased or temperature decreased but was less sensitive to wind than that of either adult passerines or small mammals. Evaporative heat loss ranged from 5% to 17% of heat production. Evaporative heal loss and the ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic heat production was significantly lower in rest phase. These data were used to define a standard operative temperature (T-es) scale for night or heavy overcast conditions. An increase of wind speed from 0.1 to 1 mis decreased T-es by 3 degrees-5 degrees C.

  7. High-resolution daily gridded data sets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, Sven; Krähenmann, Stefan; Bissolli, Peter

    2016-10-01

    New high-resolution data sets for near-surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D data set (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data. By spatial interpolation of these station observations, grid data in a resolution of 0.044° (≈ 5km) on a rotated grid with virtual North Pole at 39.25° N, 162° W are derived. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al.(2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are used for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA-Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Variance explained by the regression ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 K and 1-1.5 ms-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters

  8. High-resolution daily gridded datasets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, S.; Krähenmann, S.; Bissolli, P.

    2015-08-01

    New high-resolution datasets for near surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are hourly SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D dataset (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data and various kinds of inhomogeneities. Grids in a resolution of 0.044° (5 km) are derived by spatial interpolation of these station data into the CORDEX area. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al. (2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are chosen for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Explained variance ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 °C and 1-1.5 m s-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters and daily mean wind speed, respectively. The datasets presented in this article are published at http://dx.doi.org/10.5676/DWD_CDC/DECREG0110v1.

  9. NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/ Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending...satellite retrieval algorithms. In addition to data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding

  10. Wind driven air pump

    SciTech Connect

    Beisel, V.A.

    1983-05-31

    An improved pump for lifting water from an underground source utilizes a wind motor for driving an oil-less air compressor eliminating oil contamination of ground water which is forced to the surface. The wind motor is movable to face the wind by means of a novel swivel assembly which also eliminates the formation and freezing of condensate within the airline from the compressor. The propeller blades of the wind motor and the tail section are formed from a pair of opposed convex air foil shaped surfaces which provide the propeller blades and the tail section with fast sensitivity to slight changes in wind direction and speed. A novel well tower for supporting the wind motor and compressor and for lifting the water from the underground source is an optional modification which requires no welding and eliminates the problem of condensate freezing in the airline going to the well. The wind driven air pump disclosed is lightweight, can be easily installed, is relatively inexpensive to produce and is virtually maintenance-free and capable of operating in winds exceeding 100 miles per hour.

  11. Instructions for observing air temperature, humidity, and direction and force of wind

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1892-01-01

    Description of instruments.-The temperature and humidity of the air are obtained from the simultaneous observation of a pair of mercurial thermometers termed the dry and the wet bulb. The air temperature is given by the dry-bulb thermometer, and the humidity is obtained from the combined readings of both. The wet-bulb thermometer differs from the dry-bulb thermometer only in having its bulb covered with thin muslin, which is wetted in pure water at each observation.The two thermometers are fastened in a light metal 'or wooden frame. To this frame is to be attached a stout cord for the whirling of the thermometers, which is an essential part of every observation.

  12. Modeling the uptake of neutral organic chemicals on XAD passive air samplers under variable temperatures, external wind speeds and ambient air concentrations (PAS-SIM).

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Hayward, Stephen J; Wania, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and demonstrate the utility of a fugacity-based model of XAD passive air samplers (XAD-PAS) designed to simulate the uptake of neutral organic chemicals under variable temperatures, external wind speeds and ambient air concentrations. The model (PAS-SIM) simulates the transport of the chemical across the air-side boundary layer and within the sampler medium, which is segmented into a user-defined number of thin layers. Model performance was evaluated using data for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a field calibration study (i.e., active and XAD-PAS data) conducted in Egbert, Ontario, Canada. With some exceptions, modeled PAS uptake curves are in good agreement with the empirical PAS data. The results are highly encouraging, given the uncertainty in the active air sampler data used as input and other uncertainties related to model parametrization (e.g., sampler-air partition coefficients, the influence of wind speed on sampling rates). The study supports the further development and evaluation of the PAS-SIM model as a diagnostic (e.g., to aid interpretation of calibration studies and monitoring data) and prognostic (e.g., to inform design of future passive air sampling campaigns) tool.

  13. A note on the correlation between circular and linear variables with an application to wind direction and air temperature data in a Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lototzis, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Droulia, F.; Tseliou, A.; Tsiros, I. X.

    2017-02-01

    There are several cases where a circular variable is associated with a linear one. A typical example is wind direction that is often associated with linear quantities such as air temperature and air humidity. The analysis of a statistical relationship of this kind can be tested by the use of parametric and non-parametric methods, each of which has its own advantages and drawbacks. This work deals with correlation analysis using both the parametric and the non-parametric procedure on a small set of meteorological data of air temperature and wind direction during a summer period in a Mediterranean climate. Correlations were examined between hourly, daily and maximum-prevailing values, under typical and non-typical meteorological conditions. Both tests indicated a strong correlation between mean hourly wind directions and mean hourly air temperature, whereas mean daily wind direction and mean daily air temperature do not seem to be correlated. In some cases, however, the two procedures were found to give quite dissimilar levels of significance on the rejection or not of the null hypothesis of no correlation. The simple statistical analysis presented in this study, appropriately extended in large sets of meteorological data, may be a useful tool for estimating effects of wind on local climate studies.

  14. Combined effects of wind and solar irradiance on the spatial variation of midday air temperature over a mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Ock; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Dae-Jun; Shim, Kyo Moon; Yun, Jin I.

    2015-08-01

    When the midday temperature distribution in a mountainous region was estimated using data from a nearby weather station, the correction of elevation difference based on temperature lapse caused a large error. An empirical approach reflecting the effects of solar irradiance and advection was suggested in order to increase the reliability of the results. The normalized slope irradiance, which was determined by normalizing the solar irradiance difference between a horizontal surface and a sloping surface from 1100 to 1500 LST on a clear day, and the deviation relationship between the horizontal surface and the sloping surface at the 1500 LST temperature on each day were presented as simple empirical formulas. In order to simulate the phenomenon that causes immigrant air parcels to push out or mix with the existing air parcels in order to decrease the solar radiation effects, an advection correction factor was added to exponentially reduce the solar radiation effect with an increase in wind speed. In order to validate this technique, we estimated the 1500 LST air temperatures on 177 clear days in 2012 and 2013 at 10 sites with different slope aspects in a mountainous catchment and compared these values to the actual measured data. The results showed that this technique greatly improved the error bias and the overestimation of the solar radiation effect in comparison with the existing methods. By applying this technique to the Korea Meteorological Administration's 5-km grid data, it was possible to determine the temperature distribution at a 30-m resolution over a mountainous rural area south of Jiri Mountain National Park, Korea.

  15. Air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction in the National Petroleum Reserve—Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction data collected on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2011 by the U.S. Department of the Interior's climate monitoring array, part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost. In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality control methodology. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans 68.5°N to 70.5°N and 142.5°W to 161°W, an area of roughly 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with provisional quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes several additional climate variables to be released in subsequent reports, including ground temperature and soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  16. On the opposing roles of air temperature and wind speed variability in flux estimation from remotely sensed land surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, G.; Albertson, J. D.; Kustas, W. P.; Li, F.; Anderson, M. C.

    2007-10-01

    In semi-arid regions the evapotranspiration rates depend on both the spatial distribution of the vegetation and the soil moisture, for a given radiation regime. Remote sensing can provide high resolution spatially distributed estimation (o ˜ 10-100 m) of land surface states. However, data on the near surface air properties are not readily available at the same resolution and are often taken as spatially uniform over a greater region. Concern for how this scale mismatch might lead to erroneous flux estimations motivates this effort. This paper examines the relative roles of variability in the two dominant atmospheric states, wind speed and air temperature, on the variability of the surface fluxes. The study is conducted with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), where the boundary conditions are given by a surface energy balance model based on remotely sensed land surface data. Simulations have been performed for the late morning hours of two clear-sky summer days during the SGP97 experiment with different wetness conditions over an area characterized by a high contrast in surface temperature, canopy cover, and roughness between vegetated and dry bare soil areas. Spatial variability in canopy density effects both the air temperature Ta, through the energy partitioning, and the wind speed U, via the roughness, leading to local variations at 5 m above the ground of the order of 1 K and 1 m/s, respectively. Simulations show that the Ta variability tends to decrease the sensible heat flux H (- 30 W/m2) over bare soil areas and to increase it (+30 W/m2) over dense vegetation, thus reducing the total variability of the surface fluxes relative to those that would be estimated for spatially constant Ta, as observed in previous studies. The variability in U tends to increase H over bare soil (+50 W/m2), while having negligible effects over the vegetation, thus increasing the spatial variance of surface fluxes. However, when considered

  17. Electrodynamics, wind and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    This RTOP provides for correlative meteorological wind and temperature measurements with atmospheric electrodynamic measurements. Meteorological rocketsondes were launched as part of a number of electrodynamic investigations in Alaska, Norway, Peru, Sweden, and at the Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. Measurements obtained as part of the MAC/Epsilon campaign during October 1987 from Andoya, Norway, were in conjunction with electric field, ion mobility, conductivity, and energy deposition studies. The measurements obtained between 30 and 90 km are to evaluate and correlate changes in the atmospheric electrical structure caused by the neutral wind and temperature, or changes in the neutral atmosphere resulting from electrical anomalies.

  18. Validation Test Report for NFLUX PRE: Validation of Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Precision and Accuracy for Assimilation into Global and Regional Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-02

    Test Report for NFLUX PRE: Validation of Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Precision and Accuracy for Assimilation into...THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation Test Report for NFLUX PRE: Validation of Specific Humidity, Surface Air...The regional algorithm products overlay the existing global product estimate. The location of the observations is tested to see if it falls within one

  19. The effect of wind velocity, air temperature and humidity on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hove, L. W. A.; Vredenberg, W. J.; Adema, E. H.

    The influence of wind velocity, air temperature and vapour pressure deficit of the air (VPD) on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was examined using a leaf chamber. The measurements suggested a transition in the properties of the leaf boundary layer at a wind velocity of 0.3-0.4 ms -1 which corresponds to a Recrit value of about 2000. At higher wind velocities the leaf boundary layer resistance ( rb) was 1.5-2 times lower than can be calculated from the theory. Nevertheless, the assessed relationships between rb and wind velocity appeared to be similar to the theoretical derived relationship for rb. The NH 3 flux and in particular the SO 2 flux into the leaf strongly increased at a VPD decline. The increase of the NH 3 flux could be attributed to an increase of the stomatal conductance ( gs). However, the increase of the SO 2 flux could only partly be explained by an increase of gs. An apparent additional uptake was also observed for the NH 3 uptake at a low temperature and VPD. The SO 2 flux was also influenced by air temperature which could be explained by a temperature effect on gs. The results suggest that calculation of the NH 3 and SO 2 flux using data of gs gives a serious understimation of the real flux of these gases into leaves at a low temperature and VPD.

  20. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve models for the bulk-skin temperature difference to the point where they could accurately and reliably apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. To accomplish this goal, work was conducted in three primary areas. These included production of an archive of available data sets containing measurements of the skin and bulk temperatures and associated environmental conditions, evaluation of existing skin layer models using the compiled data archive, and additional theoretical work on the development of an improved model using the data collected under diverse environmental conditions. In this work we set the basis for a new physical model of renewal type, and propose a parameterization for the temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean in which the effects of thermal buoyancy, wind stress, and microscale breaking are all integrated by means of the appropriate renewal time scales. Ideally, we seek to obtain a model that will accurately apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. A summary of the work in each of these areas is included in this report. A large amount of work was accomplished under the support of this grant. The grant supported the graduate studies of Sandra Castro and the preparation of her thesis which will be completed later this year. This work led to poster presentations at the 1999 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and 2000 IGARSS meeting. Additional work will be presented in a talk at this year's American Meteorological Society Air-Sea Interaction Meeting this May. The grant also supported Sandra Castro during a two week experiment aboard the R/P Flip (led by Dr. Andrew Jessup of the Applied Physics Laboratory) to help obtain additional shared data sets and to provide Sandra with a fundamental understanding of the physical processes needed in the models. In a related area, the funding also partially supported Dr. William Emery and Daniel

  1. Validation Test Report for NFLUX PRE: Validation of Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Precision and Accuracy for Assimilation into Global and Regional Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-17

    NRL/MR/7320--14-9523 Validation Test Report for NFLUX PRE: Validation of Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed...REPORT DATE 17 DEC 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Validation Test Report for NFLUX PRE...products overlay the existing global product estimate. The location of the observations is tested to see if it falls within one of the regional areas

  2. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  3. Continuous measurements of air change rates in an occupied house for 1 year: the effect of temperature, wind, fans, and windows.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Emmerich, S J; Howard-Reed, C

    2002-07-01

    A year-long investigation of air change rates in an occupied house was undertaken to establish the effects of temperature, wind velocity, use of exhaust fans, and window-opening behavior. Air change rates were calculated by periodically injecting a tracer gas (SF(6)) into the return air duct and measuring the concentration in 10 indoor locations sequentially every minute by a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Temperatures were also measured outdoors and in the 10 indoor locations. Relative humidity (RH) was measured outdoors and in five indoor locations every 5 min. Wind speed and direction in the horizontal plane were measured using a portable meteorological station mounted on the rooftop. Use of the thermostat-controlled attic fan was recorded automatically. Indoor temperatures increased from 21 degrees C in winter to 27 degrees C in summer. Indoor RH increased from 20% to 70% in the same time period. Windows were open only a few percent of the time in winter but more than half the time in summer. About 4600 hour-long average air change rates were calculated from the measured tracer gas decay rates. The mean (SD) rate was 0.65 (0.56) h(-1). Tracer gas decay rates in different rooms were very similar, ranging only from 0.62 to 0.67 h(-1), suggesting that conditions were well mixed throughout the year. The strongest influence on air change rates was opening windows, which could increase the rate to as much as 2 h(-1) for extended periods, and up to 3 h(-1) for short periods of a few hours. The use of the attic fan also increased air change rates by amounts up to 1 h(-1). Use of the furnace fan had no effect on air change rates. Although a clear effect of indoor-outdoor temperature difference could be discerned, its magnitude was relatively small, with a very large temperature difference of 30 degrees C (54 degrees F) accounting for an increase in the air change rate of about 0.6 h(-1). Wind speed and direction were found to have very

  4. Changes in Meteorological Parameters (i.e. UV and Solar Radiation, Air Temperature, Humidity and Wind Condition) during the Partial Solar Eclipse of 9 March 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramitha, B.; Zaen, R.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-03-01

    Solar eclipse is a spectacular phenomenon, which occurs when the position of the moon is between the sun and the earth. This phenomenon affects to the meteorological parameters, such as solar radiation, temperature, and humidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of partial solar eclipse of 9 March 2016 to the change of several meteorological parameters. In the experimental procedure, we used automatic weather station (AWS) in one of building in Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia in Bandung. Bandung was selected because this place experienced partial (88.89%) solar eclipse on 9 March 2016. The result showed that compared to normal day, meteorological parameters changed during the solar eclipse, such as decreases in the UV and solar radiation, increases in relative humidity, and changes in air temperature and wind condition.

  5. Ice core evidence of rapid air temperature increases since 1960 in alpine areas of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Susong, D.D.; Schuster, P.F.; Cecil, L.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Michel, R.L.; Kendall, C.

    2002-01-01

    Site-specific transfer functions relating delta oxygen 18 (δ18O) values in snow to the average air temperature (TA) during storms on Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) were used in conjunction with δ18O records from UFG ice cores to reconstruct long-term trends in air temperature from alpine areas in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Transfer functions were determined by using data collected from four seasonal snowpacks (1989-1990, 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000). The timing and amount of each storm was determined from an automated snowpack telemetry (SNOTEL) site, 22 km northeast of UFG, and ~1060 m in elevation below UFG. Statistically significant and positive correlations between δ18O values in the snow and TA were consistently found in three of the four seasonal snowpacks. The snowpack with the poor correlation was deposited in 1997-1998 during the 1997-1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). An ultrasonic snow-depth sensor installed on UFG provided valuable insights into site-specific storms and postdepositional processes that occur on UFG. The timing of storms recorded at the UFG and Cold Springs SNOTEL sites were similar; however, selected storms did not correlate. Snow from storms occurring after mid-October and followed by high winds was most susceptible to redeposition of snow. This removal of lower temperature snowfall could potentially bias the δ18O values preserved in ice core records to environmental conditions reflecting higher air temperatures and lower wind speeds. Transfer functions derived from seasonal snow cover on UFG were used to reconstruct TA values from δ18O values determined from two ice cores collected from UFG. Reconstructed air temperatures from the ice core data indicate an increase in TA of ~3.5oC from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s in the alpine areas of northwestern Wyoming. Reconstructed TA from the ice core records between the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA), mid-1800s, and the early 1990s indicate a TA increase of ~55oC. The

  6. Controlled-Temperature Hot-Air Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Materials that find applications in wind tunnels first tested in laboratory. Hot-Air Gun differs from commercial units in that flow rate and temperature monitored and controlled. With typical compressed-airsupply pressure of 25 to 38 psi (170 to 260 kPa), flow rate and maximum temperature are 34 stdft3/min (0.96 stdm3/min) and 1,090 degrees F (590 degrees C), respectively. Resembling elaborate but carefully regulated hot-air gun, setup used to apply blasts of air temperatures above 1,500 degrees F (815 degrees C) to test specimens.

  7. On the Opposing Roles of Air Temperature and Wind Speed Variability in Flux Estimation over Partially Vegetated Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid regions the evapotranspiration rates depend on both the spatial distribution of the vegetation and the soil moisture, for a given radiation regime. Remote sensing can provide high resolution spatially distributed estimation of land surface states. However, data on the near surface air p...

  8. Effects of ambient air temperature, humidity, and wind speed on seminal traits in Braford and Nellore bulls at the Brazilian Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Bremm, Carolina; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Fiorentini, Eduardo Custódio; McManus, Concepta; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Lopes, Rubia Branco; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioclimatic thermal stress assessed by Equivalent Temperature Index (ETI) and Temperature Humidity Index (THI) on Braford and Nellore bulls sperm quality during the reproductive seasons at the tropical region in the Brazilian Pantanal. We used 20 bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Five ejaculates per animal were collected using an electroejaculator. Temperature, air humidity, and wind speed data were collected every hour from the automatic weather station at the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images data were collected to assess the testicular temperature gradient in each animal. Data were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS and means were compared using Tukey's HSD test. The THI and ETI at 12 days (epididymal transit) were higher in January (89.7 and 28.5, respectively) and February (90.0 and 29.0, respectively) compared to other months ( P < 0.01). Total seminal defects differ only in Bradford bulls between the months of November and February. Nellore bulls had lower major defects (MaD) and total defects (TD) compared to Braford. Nellore bulls showed correlation between minor defects (MiD) and THI for 30 days (0.90) and 18 days (0.88; P < 0.05). Braford bulls showed correlation for MaD (0.89) in ETI for 12 days ( P < 0.05). Infrared thermography showed no difference between animals. Reproductive response to environmental changes is a consequence of Nellore and Braford adaptation to climate stress conditions. Both THI and ETI environmental indexes can be used to evaluate the morphological changes in the seminal parameters in Nellore or Braford bulls; however, more experiments should be performed focusing on larger sample numbers and also in reproductive assessment during the consecutive years to assess fertility potential.

  9. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  10. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m(2) of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  11. 6. VIEW OF FIVEFOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF FIVE-FOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND OPERATOR STATION IN FOREGROUND (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 19, Five-Foot Wind Tunnel, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. The New Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature Chart.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osczevski, Randall; Bluestein, Maurice

    2005-10-01

    The formula used in the U.S. and Canada to express the combined effect of wind and low temperature on how cold it feels was changed in November 2001. Many had felt that the old formula for equivalent temperature, derived in the 1960s from Siple and Passel's flawed but quite useful Wind Chill Index, unnecessarily exaggerated the severity of the weather. The new formula is based on a mathematical model of heat flow from the upwind side of a head-sized cylinder moving at walking speed into the wind. The paper details the assumptions that were made in generating the new wind chill charts. It also points out weaknesses in the concept of wind chill equivalent temperature, including its steady-state character and a seemingly paradoxical effect of the internal thermal resistance of the cylinder on comfort and equivalent temperature. Some improvements and alternatives are suggested.

  13. Musical intonation of wind instruments and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendri, G.; Valdan, M.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2015-05-01

    Wind musical instruments are affected in their intonation by temperature. We show how to account for these effects in a simple experiment, and provide results in languages accessible to both physics and music professionals.

  14. Musical Intonation of Wind Instruments and Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendri, G.; Valdan, M.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2015-01-01

    Wind musical instruments are affected in their intonation by temperature. We show how to account for these effects in a simple experiment, and provide results in languages accessible to both physics and music professionals.

  15. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is

  16. Investigation on wind energy-compressed air power system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guang-Zheng; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Wu, Gen-Mao

    2004-03-01

    Wind energy is a pollution free and renewable resource widely distributed over China. Aimed at protecting the environment and enlarging application of wind energy, a new approach to application of wind energy by using compressed air power to some extent instead of electricity put forward. This includes: explaining the working principles and characteristics of the wind energy-compressed air power system; discussing the compatibility of wind energy and compressor capacity; presenting the theoretical model and computational simulation of the system. The obtained compressor capacity vs wind power relationship in certain wind velocity range can be helpful in the designing of the wind power-compressed air system. Results of investigations on the application of high-pressure compressed air for pressure reduction led to conclusion that pressure reduction with expander is better than the throttle regulator in energy saving.

  17. Locating air quality monitoring station using wind impact area diagram.

    PubMed

    George, K V; Verma, P; Devotta, S

    2008-10-01

    In this study a new methodology is suggested to approximate the impact area downwind of an air pollution source, where air quality monitoring can be carried out to capture the maximum pollutant concentration. Hourly wind speed for a given month is grouped in to different wind speed ranges and the distance of pollutant travel is approximated from the average wind speed of that wind speed range. Since change in wind direction causes the impact distance to rotate, its rotation is approximated by the SD of wind direction change. Using this approach, area or region down wind of a source is determined and plotted. The pattern of monthly change of wind is better represented by the new type of diagram as compared to the wind rose diagram.

  18. Wintertime winds in and around the Ulaanbaatar metropolitan area in the presence of a temperature inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbat, Gantuya; Baik, Jong-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Temperature inversions are frequently observed in mountainous urban areas and can cause severe air pollution problems especially in wintertime. This study investigates wintertime winds in and around the Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, metropolitan area in the presence of a temperature inversion using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Seoul National University Urban Canopy Model (SNUUCM). Ulaanbaatar is located in complex terrain and in a nearly east-west-oriented valley. A wintertime scenario with clear skies, weak synoptic winds, and a temperature inversion under the influence of a Siberian high-pressure system is selected. Local winds are weak in the presence of the temperature inversion. In the daytime, weak mountain upslope winds develop, up-valley winds appear to be stronger in the urban area than in the surrounding areas, and channeling winds are produced in the main valley. The bottom of the temperature inversion layer rises up in the urban area, and winds below the bottom of the temperature inversion layer strengthen. In the nighttime, mountain downslope winds and down-valley winds develop. Urban effects in the presence of the temperature inversion are examined by comparing the results of simulations with and without the city. It is shown that in the daytime the urban area acts to elevate the bottom of the temperature inversion layer and weaken the strength of the temperature inversion layer. Winds east of the city weaken in the afternoon and down-valley winds develop later in the simulation with the city.

  19. United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Vertical Axis Wind Turbine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    from the Savonius starting turbine alone. -63- SECTION VII CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMIENDATIONS 1. CONCLUSIONS One objective of the USAF Academy Wind ...Rotors, SAND76-0131. Albuquerque: July 1977. 10. Oliver, R.C. and P.R. Nixon. "Design Procedure for Coupling Savonius and Darrieus Wind Turbines ", Air...CHART -4 ESL-TR-8048 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY (USAFAI VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE THOMAS E. KULLGREN DENNIS W. WIEDEMEIER DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

  20. Historical Air Temperatures Across the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa-Viviani, A.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on an analysis of daily temperature from over 290 ground-based stations across the Hawaiian Islands from 1905-2015. Data from multiple stations were used to model environmental lapse rates by fitting linear regressions of mean daily Tmax and Tmin on altitude; piecewise regressions were also used to model the discontinuity introduced by the trade wind inversion near 2150m. Resulting time series of both model coefficients and lapse rates indicate increasing air temperatures near sea level (Tmax: 0.09°C·decade-1 and Tmin: 0.23°C·decade-1 over the most recent 65 years). Evaluation of lapse rates during this period suggest Tmax lapse rates (~0.6°C·100m-1) are decreasing by 0.006°C·100m-1decade-1 due to rapid high elevation warming while Tmin lapse rates (~0.8°C·100m-1) are increasing by 0.002°C·100m-1decade-1 due to the stronger increase in Tmin at sea level versus at high elevation. Over the 110 year period, temperatures tend to vary coherently with the PDO index. Our analysis verifies warming trends and temperature variability identified earlier by analysis of selected index stations. This method also provides temperature time series we propose are more robust to station inhomogeneities.

  1. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. A large volume 2000 MPA air source for the radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, M

    1999-07-14

    An ultra-high pressure air source for a hypersonic wind tunnel for fluid dynamics and combustion physics and chemistry research and development must provide a 10 kg/s pure air flow for more than 1 s at a specific enthalpy of more than 3000 kJ/kg. The nominal operating pressure and temperature condition for the air source is 2000 MPa and 900 K. A radial array of variable radial support intensifiers connected to an axial manifold provides an arbitrarily large total high pressure volume. This configuration also provides solutions to cross bore stress concentrations and the decrease in material strength with temperature. [hypersonic, high pressure, air, wind tunnel, ground testing

  3. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James C. R.; Leijnse, Hidde; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. It has been shown that a straightforward heat transfer model can be employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. The methodology has been applied to Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree

  4. The Relationship Between Air Temperature and Stream Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. C.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2001-05-01

    This study examined the relationship, both linear and non-linear, between air temperature and stream temperature in order to determine if air temperature can be used as an accurate predictor of stream temperature, if general relationships could be developed that apply to a large number of streams, and how changes in stream temperature associated with climate variability or climate warming might affect the dissolved oxygen level, and thus the quality of life, in some of these streams. Understanding the relationship between air temperature and water temperature is important if we want to predict how stream temperatures are likely to respond to the increase in surface air temperature that is occurring. Data from over 50 streams in 13 countries, mostly gathered by K-12 students in the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment), are examined. Only a few streams display a linear 1:1 air/water temperature trend. The majority of streams instead show an increase in water temperature of about 0.6 to 0.8 degrees for every 1-degree increase in air temperature. At some of these sites, where dissolved oxygen content is already low, an increase in summer stream temperatures of 2-3 degrees could cause the dissolved oxygen levels to fall into a critically low range. At some locations, such as near the source of a stream, water temperature does not change much despite wide ranges in air temperatures. The temperatures at these sites are likely to be least affected by surface warming. More data are needed in warmer climates, where the water temperature already gets above 25oC, in order to better examine the air/water temperature relationship under warmer conditions. Global average surface air temperature is expected to increase by 3-5oC by the middle of this century. Surface water temperature in streams, lakes and wetlands will likely increase as air temperature increases, although the change in water temperature may not be as large as the change in

  5. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  6. Assessment of the effects of environmental radiation on wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2008-09-01

    Combinations of wind-driven convection and environmental radiation in cold weather, make the environment "feel" colder. The relative contributions of these mechanisms, which form the basis for estimating wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs), are studied over a wide range of environmental conditions. Distinction is made between direct solar radiation and environmental radiation. Solar radiation, which is not included in the analysis, has beneficial effects, as it counters and offsets some of the effects due to wind and low air temperatures. Environmental radiation effects, which are included, have detrimental effects in enhancing heat loss from the human body, thus affecting the overall thermal sensation due to the environment. The analysis is performed by a simple, steady-state analytical model of human-environment thermal interaction using upper and lower bounds of environmental radiation heat exchange. It is shown that, over a wide range of relevant air temperatures and reported wind speeds, convection heat losses dominate over environmental radiation. At low wind speeds radiation contributes up to about 23% of the overall heat loss from exposed skin areas. Its relative contributions reduce considerably as the time of the exposure prolongs and exposed skin temperatures drop. At still higher wind speeds, environmental radiation effects become much smaller contributing about 5% of the total heat loss. These values fall well within the uncertainties associated with the parameter values assumed in the computation of WCETs. It is also shown that environmental radiation effects may be accommodated by adjusting reported wind speeds slightly above their reported values.

  7. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows Hurricane Frances as captured by instruments onboard two different satellites: the AIRS infrared instrument onboard Aqua, and the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT. Both are JPL-managed instruments. AIRS data are used to create global three-dimensional maps of temperature, humidity and clouds, while scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction over the ocean.

    The red vectors in the image show Frances' surface winds as measured by SeaWinds on QuikSCAT. The background colors show the temperature of clouds and surface as viewed in the infrared by AIRS, with cooler areas pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red. The color scale on the right gives the temperatures in degrees Kelvin. (The top of the scale, 320 degrees Kelvin, corresponds to 117 degrees Fahrenheit, and the bottom, 180 degrees K is -135 degrees F.) The powerful circulation of this storm is evident from the combined data as well as the development of a clearly-defined central 'eye'. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the light blue areas reveal the cold clouds tops associated with strong thunderstorms embedded within the storm. In cloud-free areas the infrared signal comes from Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures.

    The power of the SeaWinds scatterometer data set lies in its ability to generate global maps of wind speed and direction, giving us a snapshot of how the atmosphere is circulating. Weather prediction centers, including the Tropical Prediction Center - a branch of NOAA that monitors the creation of ocean-born storms, use scatterometer data to help it 'see' where these storms are brewing so that warnings can be issued and the storms, with often erratic motions, can be tracked.

    While the SeaWinds instrument isn't designed to gather hurricane data, having difficulty seeing the surface in heavy rain, it's data can be used in combination with other data sets to give us an insight into these storms. In

  8. Evaluation of Vertically Resolved Water Winds from AIRS using Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Dobkowski, Edwin C.; Gregorich, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of wind velocity as a function of altitude is key to weather forecast improvements. The ability of hyperspectral sounders in principle to measure vertically resolved water winds, which has long been recognized, has been tested with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. AIRS retrievals of total column water above 300 mb have been correlated with the radiosonde upper-tropospheric wind velocity and moisture data. The excellent correlation is illustrated with results obtained from hurricane Katrina and from the western United States. AIRS is a hyperspectral infrared sounder in low Earth orbit. It was launched in May 2002. We illustrate the use of AIRS data for the measurement of upper tropospheric water by using the 2387/cm CO2 R-branch channel and the 1551/cm water vapor channel. The 2387/cm channel measures the temperature at 300 mb totally independent of water vapor. The weighting function of the 1551/cm channel peaks at 300 mb only under moist conditions; the peak shifts downward (higher temperature) for less water and upward (lower temperature) for more water. The difference between the brightness temperatures bt2387 and bt1551 cancels the local several degree weather related variability of the temperature and measures the component due to the water vapor at 300 mb.

  9. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, A.; Robinson, J. C. R.; Leijnse, H.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Horn, B. K. P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. A straightforward heat transfer model is employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas.

  10. Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of

  11. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  12. Variability of Winter Air Temperature in Mid-Latitude Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Cierniewski, J.; Jusem, J. C.; Przybylak, R.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Walczewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report extreme winter/early-spring air temperature (hereinafter temperature) anomalies in mid-latitude Europe, and to discuss the underlying forcing to these interannual fluctuations. Warm advection from the North Atlantic in late winter controls the surface-air temperature, as indicated by the substantial correlation between the speed of the surface southwesterlies over the eastern North Atlantic (quantified by a specific Index Ina) and the 2-meter level air temperatures (hereinafter Ts) over Europe, 45-60 deg N, in winter. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation drops drastically (quite often it is negative). This change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature: absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control. This forcing by maritime-air advection in winter was demonstrated in a previous publication, and is re-examined here in conjunction with extreme fluctuations of temperatures in Europe. We analyze here the interannual variability at its extreme by comparing warm-winter/early-spring of 1989/90 with the opposite scenario in 1995/96. For these two December-to-March periods the differences in the monthly mean temperature in Warsaw and Torun, Poland, range above 10 C. Short-term (shorter than a month) fluctuations of the temperature are likewise very strong. We conduct pentad-by-pentad analysis of the surface-maximum air temperature (hereinafter Tmax), in a selected location, examining the dependence on Ina. The increased cloudiness and higher amounts of total precipitable water, corollary effects to the warm low-level advection. in the 1989/90 winter, enhance the positive temperature anomalies. The analysis of the ocean surface winds is based on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) dataset; ascent rates, and over land wind data are from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF); maps of 2-m temperature, cloud

  13. Microwave temperature profiler for clear air turbulence prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining Richardson Number, Ri, or its reciprocal, RRi, for clear air prediction using measured potential temperature and determining the vertical gradient of potential temperature, d(theta)/dz. Wind vector from the aircraft instrumentation versus potential temperature, dW/D(theta), is determined and multiplies by d(theta)/dz to obtain dW/dz. Richardson number or its reciprocal is then determined from the relationship Ri = K(d theta)/dz divided by (dW/dz squared) for use in detecting a trend toward a threshold value for the purpose of predicting clear air turbulence. Other equations for this basic relationship are disclosed together with the combination of other atmospheric observables using multiple regression techniques.

  14. Parameterization of air sea gas fluxes at extreme wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Craig; D'Asaro, Eric

    2007-06-01

    Air-sea flux measurements of O 2 and N 2 obtained during Hurricane Frances in September 2004 [D'Asaro, E. A. and McNeil, C. L., 2006. Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds. Journal Marine Systems, this edition.] using air-deployed neutrally buoyant floats reveal the first evidence of a new regime of air-sea gas transfer occurring at wind speeds in excess of 35 m s - 1 . In this regime, plumes of bubbles 1 mm and smaller in size are transported down from near the surface of the ocean to greater depths by vertical turbulent currents with speeds up to 20-30 cm s - 1 . These bubble plumes mostly dissolve before reaching a depth of approximately 20 m as a result of hydrostatic compression. Injection of air into the ocean by this mechanism results in the invasion of gases in proportion to their tropospheric molar gas ratios, and further supersaturation of less soluble gases. A new formulation for air-sea fluxes of weakly soluble gases as a function of wind speed is proposed to extend existing formulations [Woolf, D.K, 1997. Bubbles and their role in gas exchange. In: Liss, P.S., and Duce, R.A., (Eds.), The Sea Surface and Global Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 173-205.] to span the entire natural range of wind speeds over the open ocean, which includes hurricanes. The new formulation has separate contributions to air-sea gas flux from: 1) non-supersaturating near-surface equilibration processes, which include direct transfer associated with the air-sea interface and ventilation associated with surface wave breaking; 2) partial dissolution of bubbles smaller than 1 mm that mix into the ocean via turbulence; and 3) complete dissolution of bubbles of up to 1 mm in size via subduction of bubble plumes. The model can be simplified by combining "surface equilibration" terms that allow exchange of gases into and out of the ocean, and "gas injection" terms that only allow gas to enter the ocean. The model was tested against the

  15. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  16. Air Temperature in the Undulator Hall

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    Various analyses have been performed recently to estimate the performance of the air conditioning (HVAC) system planned for the Undulator Hall. This reports summarizes the results and provides an upgrade plan to be used if new requirements are needed in the future. The estimates predict that with the planned loads the tunnel air temperature will be well within the allowed tolerance during normal operation.

  17. Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.; High, C.

    2008-02-01

    This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

  18. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  19. Jet engine powers large, high-temperature wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benham, T. F.; Mulliken, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Wind tunnel for large component testing uses a jet engine with afterburner to provide high temperatures /1200 degrees to 2000 degrees F/ and controlled high velocity gas. This economical wind tunnel can accommodate parts ten feet by ten feet or larger, and is a useful technique for qualitative information.

  20. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient (b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  1. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  2. Temperature Tunable Air-Gap Etalon Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Lunt, David L.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experimental measurements of a temperature tuned air-gap etalon filter. The filter exhibits temperature dependent wavelength tuning of 54 pm/C. It has a nominal center wavelength of 532 nm. The etalon filter has a 27 pm optical bandpass and 600 pm free spectral range (finesse approximately 22). The experimental results are in close agreement with etalon theory.

  3. Influence of Resistance Method on Motor Winding Temperature Rise Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this article is presentation of influences when measuring the motor winding temperature rise in the scope of safety testing of electrical appliances, with respect to conformity assessment. The temperature measurement in testing is one of the most defined fields of measurement, but it is very important how the measurement is performed. Standards only describe that the resistance method shall be used for determination of the temperature rise (heating) of the winding. The temperature rise is defined as the average temperature rise of the windings above the ambient (surrounding) temperature, at the specified load of the unit under test. It is not explicitly defined how to approach this measurement when using cooling characteristics of the winding for determination of the temperature rise. Since the extrapolation curve is used, the procedure is also very important to obtain a result as accurate as possible. It is important that measurement results and their associated uncertainties are correctly evaluated, and on that basis, appropriate conclusions of conformity of the product with specifications are made. The resistance method influence on the motor winding temperature rise measurement is a case study in this article. The article focuses on the measurement of the temperature rise of electrical motors used in electrical appliances according to the standard EN 60335-1, clause 11 (2002) (identical as standard IEC 60335-1, 2001). In this article, the influencing parameters are analyzed when measuring the temperature rise of electromotor winding. As a case study, concrete measurements are presented. The optimal time after which the performer has to start measurement of the cooling characteristics is analyzed, since the motors are typically mounted deep into appliances. Especially for a collector motor winding, it takes some time for a performer to be able to connect the measuring instrument to collector's lamellas because this contact has an important

  4. Integration of Wind Turbines with Compressed Air Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsie, I.; Marano, V.; Rizzo, G.; Moran, M.

    2009-08-01

    Some of the major limitations of renewable energy sources are represented by their low power density and intermittent nature, largely depending upon local site and unpredictable weather conditions. These problems concur to increase the unit costs of wind power, so limiting their diffusion. By coupling storage systems with a wind farm, some of the major limitations of wind power, such as a low power density and an unpredictable nature, can be overcome. After an overview on storage systems, the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is analyzed, and the state of art on such systems is discussed. A Matlab/Simulink model of a hybrid power plant consisting of a wind farm coupled with CAES is then presented. The model has been successfully validated starting from the operating data of the McIntosh CAES Plant in Alabama. Time-series neural network-based wind speed forecasting are employed to determine the optimal daily operation strategy for the storage system. A detailed economic analysis has been carried out: investment and maintenance costs are estimated based on literature data, while operational costs and revenues are calculated according to energy market prices. As shown in the paper, the knowledge of the expected available energy is a key factor to optimize the management strategies of the proposed hybrid power plant, allowing to obtain environmental and economic benefits.

  5. A Wind Energy Powered Wireless Temperature Sensor Node

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuang; He, Xue-Feng; Li, Si-Yu; Cheng, Yao-Qing; Rao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    A wireless temperature sensor node composed of a piezoelectric wind energy harvester, a temperature sensor, a microcontroller, a power management circuit and a wireless transmitting module was developed. The wind-induced vibration energy harvester with a cuboid chamber of 62 mm × 19.6 mm × 10 mm converts ambient wind energy into electrical energy to power the sensor node. A TMP102 temperature sensor and the MSP430 microcontroller are used to measure the temperature. The power management module consists of LTC3588-1 and LT3009 units. The measured temperature is transmitted by the nRF24l01 transceiver. Experimental results show that the critical wind speed of the harvester was about 5.4 m/s and the output power of the harvester was about 1.59 mW for the electrical load of 20 kΩ at wind speed of 11.2 m/s, which was sufficient to power the wireless sensor node to measure and transmit the temperature every 13 s. When the wind speed increased from 6 m/s to 11.5 m/s, the self-powered wireless sensor node worked normally. PMID:25734649

  6. A wind energy powered wireless temperature sensor node.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; He, Xue-Feng; Li, Si-Yu; Cheng, Yao-Qing; Rao, Yang

    2015-02-27

    A wireless temperature sensor node composed of a piezoelectric wind energy harvester, a temperature sensor, a microcontroller, a power management circuit and a wireless transmitting module was developed. The wind-induced vibration energy harvester with a cuboid chamber of 62 mm × 19.6 mm × 10 mm converts ambient wind energy into electrical energy to power the sensor node. A TMP102 temperature sensor and the MSP430 microcontroller are used to measure the temperature. The power management module consists of LTC3588-1 and LT3009 units. The measured temperature is transmitted by the nRF24l01 transceiver. Experimental results show that the critical wind speed of the harvester was about 5.4 m/s and the output power of the harvester was about 1.59 mW for the electrical load of 20 kΩ at wind speed of 11.2 m/s, which was sufficient to power the wireless sensor node to measure and transmit the temperature every 13 s. When the wind speed increased from 6 m/s to 11.5 m/s, the self-powered wireless sensor node worked normally.

  7. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  8. Modeling monthly mean air temperature for Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Stape, José Luiz; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar; de Moraes Gonçalves, José Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    Air temperature is one of the main weather variables influencing agriculture around the world. Its availability, however, is a concern, mainly in Brazil where the weather stations are more concentrated on the coastal regions of the country. Therefore, the present study had as an objective to develop models for estimating monthly and annual mean air temperature for the Brazilian territory using multiple regression and geographic information system techniques. Temperature data from 2,400 stations distributed across the Brazilian territory were used, 1,800 to develop the equations and 600 for validating them, as well as their geographical coordinates and altitude as independent variables for the models. A total of 39 models were developed, relating the dependent variables maximum, mean, and minimum air temperatures (monthly and annual) to the independent variables latitude, longitude, altitude, and their combinations. All regression models were statistically significant ( α ≤ 0.01). The monthly and annual temperature models presented determination coefficients between 0.54 and 0.96. We obtained an overall spatial correlation higher than 0.9 between the models proposed and the 16 major models already published for some Brazilian regions, considering a total of 3.67 × 108 pixels evaluated. Our national temperature models are recommended to predict air temperature in all Brazilian territories.

  9. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  10. Comparison of Observed Temperature and Wind in Mountainous and Coastal Regions in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    For more than one year, temperature and wind are observed at several levels in three different environments in Korea. First site is located in a ski jump stadium in a mountain area and observations are performed at 5 heights. Second site is located in an agricultural land 1.4km inland from the seaside and the observing tower is 300m tall. Third site is located in the middle of sea 30km away from the seaside and the tower is 100m tall. The vertical gradients of air temperature are compared on the daily and seasonal bases. Not only the strengths of atmospheric stability are analyzed but also the times when the turnover of the signs of vertical gradients of temperature are occurred. The comparison is also applied to vertical gradients of wind speed and turning of wind direction due to surface slope and sea/land breeze. This study may suggest characteristics of local climate over different environments quantitatively.

  11. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  12. AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe viewed from the west, September 8, 2002. The isotherms in this map made from AIRS data show regions of the same temperature in the atmosphere.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, R.; Paterna, E.; Horender, S.; Crivelli, P.; Lehning, M.

    2015-10-01

    The longevity of perennial snow fields is not fully understood but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary layer decoupling limits the amount of (sensible and latent) heat that can be transmitted to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i) the temperature difference between the (melting) snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii) cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snow fields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat fluxes are measured using two-component hot wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest and drainage flows were decoupled from the surface enhancing atmospheric stability and promoting the cold-air pooling over the single snow patch. Further work is required to systematically and quantitatively describe the flux distribution for varying terrain geometry, wind speeds and air temperatures.

  14. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  15. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  16. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  17. Temperatures, winds, and composition in the saturnian system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Conrath, B. J.; Pearl, J. C.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Nixon, C. A.; Bezard, B.; Orton, G. S.; Spilker, L. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Owen, T. C.; Brasunas, J.; Segura, M. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Schinder, P. J.; Showalter, M. R.; Ferrari, C.

    2005-01-01

    Stratospheric temperatures on Saturn imply a strong decay of the equatorial winds with altitude. If the decrease in winds reported from recent Hubble Space Telescope images is not a temporal change, then the features tracked must have been at least 130 kilometers higher than in earlier studies. Saturn's south polar stratosphere is warmer than predicted from simple radiative models. The C/H ratio on Saturn is seven times solar, twice Jupiter's. Saturn's ring temperatures have radial variations down to the smallest scale resolved (100 kilometers). Diurnal surface temperature variations on Phoebe suggest a more porous regolith than on the jovian satellites.

  18. Temperatures, winds, and composition in the saturnian system.

    PubMed

    Flasar, F M; Achterberg, R K; Conrath, B J; Pearl, J C; Bjoraker, G L; Jennings, D E; Romani, P N; Simon-Miller, A A; Kunde, V G; Nixon, C A; Bézard, B; Orton, G S; Spilker, L J; Spencer, J R; Irwin, P G J; Teanby, N A; Owen, T C; Brasunas, J; Segura, M E; Carlson, R C; Mamoutkine, A; Gierasch, P J; Schinder, P J; Showalter, M R; Ferrari, C; Barucci, A; Courtin, R; Coustenis, A; Fouchet, T; Gautier, D; Lellouch, E; Marten, A; Prangé, R; Strobel, D F; Calcutt, S B; Read, P L; Taylor, F W; Bowles, N; Samuelson, R E; Abbas, M M; Raulin, F; Ade, P; Edgington, S; Pilorz, S; Wallis, B; Wishnow, E H

    2005-02-25

    Stratospheric temperatures on Saturn imply a strong decay of the equatorial winds with altitude. If the decrease in winds reported from recent Hubble Space Telescope images is not a temporal change, then the features tracked must have been at least 130 kilometers higher than in earlier studies. Saturn's south polar stratosphere is warmer than predicted from simple radiative models. The C/H ratio on Saturn is seven times solar, twice Jupiter's. Saturn's ring temperatures have radial variations down to the smallest scale resolved (100 kilometers). Diurnal surface temperature variations on Phoebe suggest a more porous regolith than on the jovian satellites.

  19. Wind Prediction Accuracy for Air Traffic Management Decision Support Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Rod; Green, Steve; Jardin, Matt; Schwartz, Barry; Benjamin, Stan

    2000-01-01

    The performance of Air Traffic Management and flight deck decision support tools depends in large part on the accuracy of the supporting 4D trajectory predictions. This is particularly relevant to conflict prediction and active advisories for the resolution of conflicts and the conformance with of traffic-flow management flow-rate constraints (e.g., arrival metering / required time of arrival). Flight test results have indicated that wind prediction errors may represent the largest source of trajectory prediction error. The tests also discovered relatively large errors (e.g., greater than 20 knots), existing in pockets of space and time critical to ATM DST performance (one or more sectors, greater than 20 minutes), are inadequately represented by the classic RMS aggregate prediction-accuracy studies of the past. To facilitate the identification and reduction of DST-critical wind-prediction errors, NASA has lead a collaborative research and development activity with MIT Lincoln Laboratories and the Forecast Systems Lab of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This activity, begun in 1996, has focussed on the development of key metrics for ATM DST performance, assessment of wind-prediction skill for state of the art systems, and development/validation of system enhancements to improve skill. A 13 month study was conducted for the Denver Center airspace in 1997. Two complementary wind-prediction systems were analyzed and compared to the forecast performance of the then standard 60 km Rapid Update Cycle - version 1 (RUC-1). One system, developed by NOAA, was the prototype 40-km RUC-2 that became operational at NCEP in 1999. RUC-2 introduced a faster cycle (1 hr vs. 3 hr) and improved mesoscale physics. The second system, Augmented Winds (AW), is a prototype en route wind application developed by MITLL based on the Integrated Terminal Wind System (ITWS). AW is run at a local facility (Center) level, and updates RUC predictions based on an

  20. Vandenberg Air Force Base Upper Level Wind Launch Weather Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman III ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The maximum wind speed and 1000-ft shear values for each sounding in each subseason were determined. To accurately calculate the PoV, the AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum shear datasets. Ultimately it was discovered that the maximum wind speeds follow a Gaussian distribution while the maximum shear values follow a lognormal distribution. These results were applied when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition to the requirements outlined in the original task plan, the AMU also included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on day of launch. The interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for this project was developed in

  1. A New Wind Profiler Trajectory Tool for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. B.; Senff, C. J.; Keane, A. N.; Koury, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL), and the Science and Technology Corporation have developed a new online tool for producing forward and backward trajectories from hourly wind profiles measured by a network of boundary-layer wind profilers. The tool is intended to aid scientists and forecasters in the planning and execution of field operations during the 2004 Northeast North Atlantic Air Quality Study. This study will involve an international consortium of agencies and will include upwards of a dozen of research aircraft and the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The purpose of this talk is to demonstrate the tool and collect feedback from scientific investigators, which we will use to modify the tool before the 2004 field study. In addition, we will present preliminary results from the 2002 New England Air Quality Study that demonstrate the value of using continuous profiler observations instead of numerical model initialization fields to calculate trajectories for the meteorologically complex coastal zone of New England. The trajectory tool uses the horizontal wind profiles measured by the profiler network that are collected in near-real time and archived at NOAA/ETL's facility in Boulder, Colorado. The vertical velocities are not used because of large uncertainty in the profiler's vertical velocity measurement. To calculate hourly trajectory positions, the horizontal winds are interpolated in space using an inverse distance squared weighting. Users may request altitude ranges for the trajectories as well as start and end times and trajectory starting/end points. Trajectories are plotted on a two dimensional map background and are color coded by their respective altitude range.

  2. A computer model of global thermospheric winds and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Roble, R. G.; Spencer, N. W.

    1987-01-01

    Output data from the NCAR Thermospheric GCM and a vector-spherical-harmonic (VSH) representation of the wind field are used in constructing a computer model of time-dependent global horizontal vector neutral wind and temperature fields at altitude 130-300 km. The formulation of the VSH model is explained in detail, and some typical results obtained with a preliminary version (applicable to December solstice at solar maximum) are presented graphically. Good agreement with DE-2 satellite measurements is demonstrated.

  3. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  4. Climatological summary of wind and temperature data for the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Schwartz, M.N.; Burk, K.W.; Kasper, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; Perrault, P.J.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents climatological summaries of wind and temperature data collected at the twenty-five monitoring stations operated by the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network. The climatological analyses presented here involve hourly averaged wind data collected over an 8-year period beginning in 1982 (fewer wind data are available for the several monitoring stations that began full-time operation after 1982) and hourly averaged air temperature data collected over 2-year period beginning in mid-1988. The tables and figures presented in this document illustrate the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological parameters across the Hanford Site and the surrounding areas. This information is useful for emergency response applications, routine meteorological forecasting, planning and scheduling operations, facility design, and environmental impact studies.

  5. Seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature and vegetation over northern Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slawsky, Lauren

    Operating wind turbines enhance near surface turbulence and alter the exchanges of surface energy, water, and momentum, thus affecting local micrometeorology. Climatic impacts of three wind farms in northern Illinois are assessed using land surface temperature (LST) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites for the period 2003-2013. Changes in LST between two periods (before and after construction of the wind turbines) and between wind farm pixels (WFPs) and nearby non wind farm pixels (NNWFPs) are quantified. An increase in LST is observed at nighttime over each wind farm, with the pattern of this warming effect generally spatially coupled with the wind turbines, while there is no apparent impact on daytime LST. The nighttime LST warming effect varies with the seasons, with the strongest warming in winter months of December, January, and February, and the tightest spatial coupling in summer months of June, July, and August. Analysis of seasonal variations in wind speeds from weather balloon sounding data taken at the 80 meter turbine hub height and Automated Surface Observing System hourly observations at 10 meters from nearby stations suggest stronger winds correspond to seasons with greater warming. The 12:00 Greenwich Mean Time (early morning in Illinois) soundings are representative of the nighttime boundary layer and exhibit strong temperature inversions across all seasons. This supports the idea that the observed warming effect is caused by warm air aloft brought down to the surface by the spinning turbine rotor blades. In addition, MODIS measured vegetation greenness is used to assess the potential impact of this warming on underlying vegetation growth. A decrease in vegetation greenness is seen, particularly during the summer peak growing season, indicating that the turbine enhanced turbulence may promote evapotranspiration and thus reduce soil moisture available for plant photosynthesis.

  6. Record low surface air temperature at Vostok station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John; Anderson, Phil; Lachlan-Cope, Tom; Colwell, Steve; Phillips, Tony; Kirchgaessner, AméLie; Marshall, Gareth J.; King, John C.; Bracegirdle, Tom; Vaughan, David G.; Lagun, Victor; Orr, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    The lowest recorded air temperature at the surface of the Earth was a measurement of -89.2°C made at Vostok station, Antarctica, at 0245 UT on 21 July 1983. Here we present the first detailed analysis of this event using meteorological reanalysis fields, in situ observations and satellite imagery. Surface temperatures at Vostok station in winter are highly variable on daily to interannual timescales as a result of the great sensitivity to intrusions of maritime air masses as Rossby wave activity changes around the continent. The record low temperature was measured following a near-linear cooling of over 30 K over a 10 day period from close to mean July temperatures. The event occurred because of five specific conditions that arose: (1) the temperature at the core of the midtropospheric vortex was at a near-record low value; (2) the center of the vortex moved close to the station; (3) an almost circular flow regime persisted around the station for a week resulting in very little warm air advection from lower latitudes; (4) surface wind speeds were low for the location; and (5) no cloud or diamond dust was reported above the station for a week, promoting the loss of heat to space via the emission of longwave radiation. We estimate that should a longer period of isolation occur the surface temperature at Vostok could drop to around -96°C. The higher site of Dome Argus is typically 5-6 K colder than Vostok so has the potential to record an even lower temperature.

  7. Sensitivity of New England Stream Temperatures to Air Temperature and Precipitation Under Projected Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Samal, N. R.; Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R. J.; Zuidema, S.; Prousevitch, A.; Glidden, S.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal response of streams and rivers to changing climate will influence aquatic habitat. This study examines the impact that changing climate has on stream temperatures in the Merrimack River, NH/MA USA using the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in the Earth System (FrAMES), a spatially distributed river network model driven by air temperature, air humidity, wind speed, precipitation, and solar radiation. Streamflow and water temperatures are simulated at a 45-second (latitude x longitude) river grid resolution for 135 years under historical and projected climate variability. Contemporary streamflow (Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient = 0.77) and river temperatures (Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient = 0.89) matched at downstream USGS gauge data well. A suite of model runs were made in combination with uniformly increased daily summer air temperatures by 2oC, 4 oC and 6 oC as well as adjusted precipitation by -40%, -30%, -20%, -10% and +10% as a sensitivity analysis to explore a broad range of potential future climates. We analyzed the summer stream temperatures and the percent of river length unsuitable for cold to warm water fish habitats. Impacts are greatest in large rivers due to the accumulation of river temperature warming throughout the entire river network. Cold water fish (i.e. brook trout) are most strongly affected while, warm water fish (i.e. largemouth bass) aren't expected to be impacted. The changes in stream temperatures under various potential climate scenarios will provide a better understanding of the specific impact that air temperature and precipitation have on aquatic thermal regimes and habitat.

  8. Modified temperature-anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Schlickeiser, R; Michno, M J; Ibscher, D; Lazar, M; Skoda, T

    2011-11-11

    The proton and electron temperature anisotropies in the solar wind are constrained by the instability thresholds for temperature-anisotropy-driven kinetic plasma instabilities. The modifications to the marginal instability conditions from accounting for the influence of damping connected with the collisional effects in the solar wind plasma are calculated for right- and left-handed polarized parallel propagating Alfvén waves and mirror and firehose fluctuations. These modifications provide tighter threshold constraints compared to the marginal thresholds but do not fully explain the observations at small values of the parallel plasma beta.

  9. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of Na narrowband wind-temperature lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Papen, G C; Pfenninger, W M; Simonich, D M

    1995-01-20

    The performance and measurement accuracy of Na narrowband wind-temperature lidar systems are characterized. Error budgets are derived that include several effects not previously reported, such as power-dependent spectral characteristics in the frequency reference, magnetic-field-dependent oscillator line strengths (Hanle effect), saturation, and optical pumping. It is shown that the overall system uncertainty is dependent on the power, pulse temporal characteristics, and beam divergence of the laser transmitter. Results indicate that even systems with significant saturation can produce accurate measurements, which implies the prospect of continuous daytime wind and temperature measurements on semidiurnal and diurnal time periods.

  11. Modeling air temperature changes in Northern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchin, A.; Korets, M.; Shvidenko, A.; Burenina, T.; Musokhranova, A.

    2014-11-01

    Based on time series (1950-2005) of monthly temperatures from 73 weather stations in Northern Asia (limited by 70-180° EL and 48-75° NL), it is shown that there are statistically significant spatial differences in character and intensity of the monthly and yearly temperature trends. These differences are defined by geomorphological and geographical parameters of the area including exposure of the territory to Arctic and Pacific air mass, geographic coordinates, elevation, and distances to Arctic and Pacific oceans. Study area has been divided into six domains with unique groupings of the temperature trends based on cluster analysis. An original methodology for mapping of temperature trends has been developed and applied to the region. The assessment of spatial patterns of temperature trends at the regional level requires consideration of specific regional features in the complex of factors operating in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-lithosphere-biosphere system.

  12. The Resistance of Spheres in Wind Tunnels and In Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, D L; Reid, E G

    1924-01-01

    To supplement the standardization tests now in progress at several laboratories, a broad investigation of the resistance of spheres in wind tunnels and free air has been carried out by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The subject has been classed in aerodynamic research, and in consequence there is available a great mass of data from previous investigations. This material was given careful consideration in laying out the research, and explanation of practically all the disagreement between former experiments has resulted. A satisfactory confirmation of Reynolds law has been accomplished, the effect of means of support determined, the range of experiment greatly extended by work in the new variable density wind tunnel, and the effects of turbulence investigated by work in the tunnels and by towing and dropping tests in free air. It is concluded that the erratic nature of most of the previous work is due to support interference and differing turbulence conditions. While the question of support has been investigated thoroughly, a systematic and comprehensive study of the effects of scale and quality of turbulence will be necessary to complete the problem, as this phase was given only general treatment.

  13. Mesopause region wind, temperature and airglow irradiance above Eureka, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Samuel; Ward, William E.; Vail, Christopher; Shepherd, Marianna

    2016-07-01

    The PEARL All Sky Imager (PASI, airglow images), the Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI, airglow irradiance and temperature) and the E-Region Wind Interferometer II (ERWIN2, wind, airglow irradiance and temperature) are co-located at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL)in Eureka, Nunavut (80 N, 86 W). These instruments view the wind, temperature and airglow irradiance of hydroxyl (all three) O2 (ERWIN2 and SATI), sodium (PASI), and oxygen green line (PASI and ERWIN2). The viewing locations and specific emissions of the various instruments differ. Nevertheless, the co-location of these instruments provides an excellent opportunity for case studies of specific events and for intercomparison between the different techniques. In this paper we discuss the approach we are using to combine observations from the different instruments. Case studies show that at times the various instruments are in good agreement but at other times they differ. Of particular interest are situations where gravity wave signatures are evident for an extended period of time and one such situation is presented. The discussion includes consideration of the filtering effect of viewing through airglow layers and the extent to which wind, airglow and temperature variations can be associated with the same gravity wave.

  14. Wind and Temperature Spectrometry of the Upper Atmosphere in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Wind and Temperature Spectrometry (WATS) is a new approach to measure the full wind vector, temperature, and relative densities of major neutral species in the Earth's thermosphere. The method uses an energy-angle spectrometer moving through the tenuous upper atmosphere to measure directly the angular and energy distributions of the air stream that enters the spectrometer. The angular distribution gives the direction of the total velocity of the air entering the spectrometer, and the energy distribution gives the magnitude of the total velocity. The wind velocity vector is uniquely determined since the measured total velocity depends on the wind vector and the orbiting velocity vector. The orbiting spectrometer moves supersonically, Mach 8 or greater, through the air and must point within a few degrees of its orbital velocity vector (the ram direction). Pointing knowledge is critical; for example, pointing errors 0.1 lead to errors of about 10 m/s in the wind. The WATS method may also be applied without modification to measure the ion-drift vector, ion temperature, and relative ion densities of major ionic species in the ionosphere. In such an application it may be called IDTS: Ion-Drift Temperature Spectrometry. A spectrometer-based coordinate system with one axis instantaneously pointing along the ram direction makes it possible to transform the Maxwellian velocity distribution of the air molecules to a Maxwellian energy-angle distribution for the molecular flux entering the spectrometer. This implementation of WATS is called the gas kinetic method (GKM) because it is applied to the case of the Maxwellian distribution. The WATS method follows from the recognition that in a supersonic platform moving at 8,000 m/s, the measurement of small wind velocities in the air on the order of a few 100 m/s and less requires precise knowledge of the angle of incidence of the neutral atoms and molecules. The same is true for the case of ion-drift measurements. WATS also

  15. Global surface air temperatures - Update through 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1988-01-01

    Data from meteorological stations show that surface air temperatures in the 1980s are the warmest in the history of instrumental records. The four warmest years on record are all in the 1980s, with the warmest years in the analysis being 1981 and 1987. The rate of warming between the mid-1960s and the present is higher than that which occurrred in the previous period of rapid warming between the 1880s and 1940.

  16. Global trends of measured surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surface air temperature measurements from available meteorological stations for the period of 1880-1985. It is shown that the network of meteorological stations is sufficient to yield reliable long-term, decadal, and interannual temperature changes for both the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere, despite the fact that most stations are located on the continents. The results indicate a global warming of about 0.5-0.7 C in the past century, with warming of similar magnitude in both hemispheres. A strong warming trend between 1965 and 1980 raised the global mean temperature in 1980 and 1981 to the highest level in the period of instrumental records. Selected graphs of the temperature change in each of the eight latitude zones are included.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Lithium Reactions with Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Roman; Skinner, C. H.; Koel, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Liquid lithium plasma facing components (PFCs) are being developed to handle long pulse, high heat loads in tokamaks. Wetting by lithium of its container is essential for this application, but can be hindered by lithium oxidation by residual gases or during tokamak maintenance. Lithium PFCs will experience elevated temperatures due to plasma heat flux. This work presents measurements of lithium reactions at elevated temperatures (298-373 K) when exposed to natural air. Cylindrical TZM wells 300 microns deep with 1 cm2 surface area were filled with metallic lithium in a glovebox containing argon with less than 1.6 ppm H20, O2, and N2. The wells were transferred to a hot plate in air, and then removed periodically for mass gain measurements. Changes in the surface topography were recorded with a microscope. The mass gain of the samples at elevated temperatures followed a markedly different behavior to that at room temperature. One sample at 373 K began turning red indicative of lithium nitride, while a second turned white indicative of lithium carbonate formation. Data on the mass gain vs. temperature and associated topographic changes of the surface will be presented. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  18. Air-sea interactions in sea surface temperature frontal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianezze, Joris; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reynaud, Thierry; Marié, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Garnier, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Representation of air-sea exchanges in coastal, regional and global models represent a challenge firstly due to the small scale of acting turbulent processes comparatively to the resolved scales of these models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of air-sea interactions at the turbulent process scales is still lacking. Many successful efforts are dedicated to measure the energy and mass exchanges between atmosphere and ocean, including the effect of surface waves. In comparison less efforts are brought to understand the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and the oceanic mixing layer. In this regard, we are developing research mainly based on ideal and realistic numerical simulations which resolve very small scales (horizontal resolutions from 1 to 100 meters) in using grid nesting technics and coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models. As a first step, the impact of marked gradients in sea surface temperatures (SST) on air-sea exchanges has been explored through realistic numerical simulations at 100m horizontal resolution. Results from simulations of a case observed during the FROMVAR experiment will be shown. The talk will mainly focus on the marked impact of SST front on the atmospheric boundary layer (stability and winds), the air-sea exchanges and surface parameters (rugosity, drag coefficient) Results will be also shown on the strong impact on the simulated atmosphere of small scale variability of SST field.

  19. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  20. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  1. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Temperature lapse rate as an adjunct to wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweifil, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Several meteorological parameters were examined to determine if measurable atmospheric conditions can improve windshear detection devices. Lapse rate, the temperature change with altitude, shows promise as being an important parameter in the prediction of severe wind shears. It is easily measured from existing aircraft instrumentation, and it can be important indicator of convective activity including thunderstorms and microbursts. The meteorological theory behind lapse rate measurement is briefly reviewed, and and FAA certified system is described that is currently implemented in the Honeywell Wind Shear Detection and Guidance System.

  3. Air temperature distribution over a debris covered glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicciotti, Francesca; Petersen, Lene; Wicki, Simon; Carenzo, Marco; Immerzeel, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Air temperature is a key control in the exchange of energy fluxes at the glacier-atmosphere interface and also the main input variable in many of the melt models (both energy balance or temperature-index type of models) currently used to predict glacier melt across a variety of scales. The commonly used approach to derive distributed temperature inputs is extrapolation from point measurements, often located outside the glacier surface, with a lapse rate that is assumed to be constant in time and uniform in space. Previous work for debris free glaciers has shown that lapse rates depend on several factors such as katabatic wind, humidity and the presence of clouds and that they vary in space and time. A dominant control however seems to be the presence of katabatic wind. For debris covered glaciers, the driving forces of air temperature are likely to be different but little is known because of the scarcity of field observations. Few preliminary studies have suggested that there is a strong coupling between surface and 2 m air temperature, while strong katabatic wind does not develop on debris covered tongues. In this study, we examine the variability in air temperature and lapse rates, as well as its atmospheric controls under different meteorological settings for the debris covered Lirung Glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas. We use a recently collected data set of air and surface temperature at a network of locations on the glacier tongue during the pre-monsoon season and the entire monsoon season of 2012. Additionally an AWS was installed on the glacier allowing the collection of meteorological observations. We investigate differences in air temperature during different climatic conditions (monsoon vs. dry period, upvalley vs. downvalley wind, cloudy vs. clear-sky, etc.). We identify the main controls on temperature and discuss how appropriate the application of a temperature lapse rate is over a debris covered glacier by investigating the correlation between

  4. The relationship between radiant heat, air temperature and thermal comfort at rest and exercise.

    PubMed

    Guéritée, Julien; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The aims of the present work were to investigate the relationships between radiant heat load, air velocity and body temperatures with or without coincidental exercise to determine the physiological mechanisms that drive thermal comfort and thermoregulatory behaviour. Seven male volunteers wearing swimming trunks in 18°C, 22°C or 26°C air were exposed to increasing air velocities up to 3 m s(-1) and self-adjusted the intensity of the direct radiant heat received on the front of the body to just maintain overall thermal comfort, at rest or when cycling (60 W, 60 rpm). During the 30 min of the experiments, skin and rectal temperatures were continuously recorded. We hypothesized that mean body temperature should be maintained stable and the intensity of the radiant heat and the mean skin temperatures would be lower when cycling. In all conditions, mean body temperature was lower when facing winds of 3 m s(-1) than during the first 5 min, without wind. When facing winds, in all but the 26°C air, the radiant heat was statistically higher at rest than when exercising. In 26°C air mean skin temperature was lower at rest than when exercising. No other significant difference was observed. In all air temperatures, high correlation coefficients were observed between the air velocity and the radiant heat load. Other factors that we did not measure may have contributed to the constant overall thermal comfort status despite dropping mean skin and body temperatures. It is suggested that the allowance to behaviourally adjust the thermal environment increases the tolerance of cold discomfort.

  5. Prediction of air temperature for thermal comfort of people in outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhua

    2007-05-01

    Current thermal comfort indices do not take into account the effects of wind and body movement on the thermal resistance and vapor resistance of clothing. This may cause public health problem, e.g. cold-related mortality. Based on the energy balance equation and heat exchanges between a clothed body and the outdoor environment, a mathematical model was developed to determine the air temperature at which an average adult, wearing a specific outdoor clothing and engaging in a given activity, attains thermal comfort under outdoor environment condition. The results indicated low clothing insulation, less physical activity and high wind speed lead to high air temperature prediction for thermal comfort. More accurate air temperature prediction is able to prevent wearers from hypothermia under cold conditions.

  6. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  7. Errors of five-day mean surface wind and temperature conditions due to inadequate sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legler, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface meteorological reports of wind components, wind speed, air temperature, and sea-surface temperature from buoys located in equatorial and midlatitude regions are used in a simulation of random sampling to determine errors of the calculated means due to inadequate sampling. Subsampling the data with several different sample sizes leads to estimates of the accuracy of the subsampled means. The number N of random observations needed to compute mean winds with chosen accuracies of 0.5 (N sub 0.5) and 1.0 (N sub 1,0) m/s and mean air and sea surface temperatures with chosen accuracies of 0.1 (N sub 0.1) and 0.2 (N sub 0.2) C were calculated for each 5-day and 30-day period in the buoy datasets. Mean values of N for the various accuracies and datasets are given. A second-order polynomial relation is established between N and the variability of the data record. This relationship demonstrates that for the same accuracy, N increases as the variability of the data record increases. The relationship is also independent of the data source. Volunteer-observing ship data do not satisfy the recommended minimum number of observations for obtaining 0.5 m/s and 0.2 C accuracy for most locations. The effect of having remotely sensed data is discussed.

  8. The relationship among air quality, mixing heights, and winds observed during the entire TexAQS-II field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Knoderer, C. A.; Zahn, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS-II) was designed to provide support for State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions. The SIP revisions outline strategies for improving air quality to meet the new federal 8-hr ozone standard and regional haze requirements. As part of TexAQS-II, a field study was conducted to collect air quality and meteorological data throughout eastern Texas from May 1, 2005, through October 15, 2006. As part of the field study, various organizations made upper-air meteorological measurements at several locations. These measurements were collected by twelve 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs), three 404 MHz RWPs, nine Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS), two sodars, and one lidar. These instruments provide vertically, horizontally, and temporally resolved wind, virtual temperature (Tv), and mixing height information. This presentation will address the three-dimensional and temporal characteristics of these parameters throughout the study domain for the entire study period and how these characteristic vary by season, month, and synoptic weather pattern. The presentation will also address how these characteristics influence regional and local air quality conditions throughout the study domain, including the relationship among various transport statistics, mixing height characteristics (e.g., time of peak mixing, morning mixing height growth rate, peak mixing height, average morning mixing height, etc.) and air quality. In addition, case studies will illustrate the finer-scale details of the relationship among the evolution of mixing heights, diurnal variability of winds, and air quality.

  9. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  10. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  11. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  12. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  14. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  16. 14 CFR 23.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air temperature control for each engine....

  17. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  18. Measurement of the temperature of a stator winding with fiber-optic sensors in bench tests of a turbogenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, E. I.; Lyamin, A. A.; Shelemba, I. S.

    2010-09-15

    The temperature of the elementary conductors of the stator winding of a 225 MW turbogenerator has been measured using miniature fiber-optic sensors, built in to the winding during manufacture. This is the first time that practical bench tests have been made in Russian electrical machine construction practice. The results of the experiment are used as the initial data for determining important parameters of the construction of turbogenerators with air cooling, namely, the thermal conductivity of the body insulation in the slot, and the heat-transfer coefficient in the front parts of the stator winding.

  19. Microspheres for laser velocimetry in high temperature wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorieshi, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of non-intrusive measurement techniques in wind tunnel experimentation has been a turning point in error free data acquisition. Laser velocimetry has been progressively implemented and utilized in various wind tunnels; e.g. subsonic, transonic, and supersonic. The success of the laser velocimeter technique is based on an accurate measurement of scattered light by seeding particles introduced into the flow stream in the wind tunnel. Therefore, application of appropriate seeding particles will affect, to a large extent the acquired data. The seeding material used depends on the type of experiment being run. Among the seeding material for subsonic tunnel are kerosene, Kaolin, and polystyrene. Polystyrene is known to be the best because of being solid particles, having high index of refraction, capable of being made both spherical and monodisperse. However for high temperature wind tunnel testing seeding material must have an additional characteristic that is high melting point. Typically metal oxide powders such as Al2O3 with melting point 3660 F are used. The metal oxides are, however polydispersed, have a high density, and a tendency to form large agglomerate that does not closely follow the flow velocity. The addition of flame phase silica to metal oxide helps to break up the agglomerates, yet still results in a narrow band of polydispersed seeding. The less desirable utility of metal oxide in high temperature wind tunnels necessitates the search for a better alternative particle seeding which this paper addresses. The Laser Velocimetry (LV) characteristic of polystyrene makes it a prime candidate as a base material in achieving the high temperature particle seeding inexpensively. While polystyrene monodisperse seeding particle reported has been successful in a subsonic wind tunnel, it lacks the high melting point and thus is not practically usable in a high temperature wind tunnel. It is well known that rise in melting point of polystyrene can be

  20. The Use of Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Molthan, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  1. Topographic and spatial impacts of temperature inversions on air quality using mobile air pollution surveys.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Julie; Corr, Denis; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the spatial and topographic effects of temperature inversions on air quality in the industrial city of Hamilton, located at the western tip of Lake Ontario, Canada. The city is divided by a 90-m high topographic scarp, the Niagara Escarpment, and dissected by valleys which open towards Lake Ontario. Temperature inversions occur frequently in the cooler seasons, exacerbating the impact of emissions from industry and traffic. This study used pollution data gathered from mobile monitoring surveys conducted over a 3-year period, to investigate whether the effects of the inversions varied across the city. Temperature inversions were identified with vertical temperature data from a meteorological tower located within the study area. We divided the study area into an upper and lower zone separated by the Escarpment and further into six zones, based on location with respect to the Escarpment and industrial and residential areas, to explore variations across the city. The results identified clear differences in the responses of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to temperature inversions, based on the topographic and spatial criteria. We found that pollution levels increased as the inversion strengthened, in the lower city. However, the results also suggested that temperature inversions identified in the lower city were not necessarily experienced in the upper city with the same intensity. Further, pollution levels in the upper city appeared to decrease as the inversion deepened in the lower city, probably because of an associated change in prevailing wind direction and lower wind speeds, leading to decreased long-range transport of pollutants.

  2. Ceramic and coating applications in the hostile environment of a high temperature hypersonic wind tunnel. [Langley 8-foot high temperature structures tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Karns, J. R.; Vasquez, P.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    A Mach 7, blowdown wind tunnel was used to investigate aerothermal structural phenomena on large to full scale high speed vehicle components. The high energy test medium, which provided a true temperature simulation of hypersonic flow at 24 to 40 km altitude, was generated by the combustion of methane with air at high pressures. Since the wind tunnel, as well as the models, must be protected from thermally induced damage, ceramics and coatings were used extensively. Coatings were used both to protect various wind tunnel components and to improve the quality of the test stream. Planned modifications for the wind tunnel included more extensive use of ceramics in order to minimize the number of active cooling systems and thus minimize the inherent operational unreliability and cost that accompanies such systems. Use of nonintrusive data acquisition techniques, such as infrared radiometry, allowed more widespread use of ceramics for models to be tested in high energy wind tunnels.

  3. Titan's Temperature and Zonal Wind Structure and Seasonal Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F.; Achterberg, Richard; Schinder, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Titan's atmosphere near 80 km (20 mbar) marks the transition between large radiative damping times at lower altitudes, where seasonal variations are muted, and small damping times higher up, where temperatures and winds vary significantly over the year. Cassini CIRS and Radio-Occultation measurements obtained in 2004-2016 have tracked the evolution of temperatures and winds in Titan's atmosphere from early northern winter to late spring. In winter, the northern hemisphere was characterized by cold temperatures at high latitudes in the lower stratosphere and a strong circumpolar vortex that extended to subtropical northern latitudes. At high altitudes over the north pole, there was an elevated stratopause with a temperature roughly 30 K above the seasonal average, associated with subsidence and adiabatic warming. As the northern hemisphere has moved toward summer the dissolution of the circumpolar vortex has been gradual, and there is no evidence of rapid distortion and disruption forced by planetary waves like that seen on Earth. During this time, the southern hemisphere has cooled fairly abruptly at high latitudes. A circumpolar vortex has formed in the stratosphere, but it is more compact than seen in the north, with maximum winds at 60°S. Potential vorticity maps now indicate steep meridional gradients at high southern latitudes, implying a barrier to efficient mixing between the polar region and lower latitudes. One of the curious features of Titan's temperatures has been the destabilization seen in the winter north polar region, where negative temperature gradients were observed between 80 and 100 km. As the southern hemisphere moves toward winter, temperatures retrieved from radio occultation soundings have shown the early development this phenomenon at high southernlatitudes. The cause of the destabilization in winter may be associated with a cloud of organic ices. However, the transition region near 80 km is also where the zonal winds exhibit a sharp

  4. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  5. Effect of wind and temperature gradients on received acoustic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brienzo, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of refraction due to wind and temperature gradients on energy received from low flying aircraft is examined. A series of helicopter and jet flyby's were recorded with a microphone array on two separate days, each with distinctly different meteorological conditions. Energy in the 100 to 200 Hertz band is shown as a function of aircraft range from the array, and compared with the output of the Fast Field Program.

  6. Perception of temperature and wind by users of public outdoor spaces: relationships with weather parameters and personal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria-João; Oliveira, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    We aim to understand the relationship between people's declared bioclimatic comfort, their personal characteristics (age, origin, clothing, activity and motivation, etc.) and the atmospheric conditions. To attain this goal, questionnaire surveys were made concurrently with weather measurements (air temperature, relative humidity, solar and long-wave radiation and wind speed) in two open leisure areas of Lisbon (Portugal), during the years 2006 and 2007. We analysed the desire expressed by the interviewees to decrease, maintain or increase the values of air temperature and wind speed, in order to improve their level of comfort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The preference for a different temperature depends on the season and is strongly associated with wind speed. Furthermore, a general decrease of discomfort with increasing age was also found. Most people declared a preference for lower wind speed in all seasons; the perception of wind shows significant differences depending on gender, with women declaring a lower level of comfort with higher wind speed. It was also found that the tolerance of warmer conditions is higher than of cooler conditions, and that adaptive strategies are undertaken by people to improve their level of comfort outdoors.

  7. Perception of temperature and wind by users of public outdoor spaces: relationships with weather parameters and personal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria-João; Oliveira, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    We aim to understand the relationship between people's declared bioclimatic comfort, their personal characteristics (age, origin, clothing, activity and motivation, etc.) and the atmospheric conditions. To attain this goal, questionnaire surveys were made concurrently with weather measurements (air temperature, relative humidity, solar and long-wave radiation and wind speed) in two open leisure areas of Lisbon (Portugal), during the years 2006 and 2007. We analysed the desire expressed by the interviewees to decrease, maintain or increase the values of air temperature and wind speed, in order to improve their level of comfort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The preference for a different temperature depends on the season and is strongly associated with wind speed. Furthermore, a general decrease of discomfort with increasing age was also found. Most people declared a preference for lower wind speed in all seasons; the perception of wind shows significant differences depending on gender, with women declaring a lower level of comfort with higher wind speed. It was also found that the tolerance of warmer conditions is higher than of cooler conditions, and that adaptive strategies are undertaken by people to improve their level of comfort outdoors.

  8. Equatorial thermospheric measurements of temperatures and winds at Arequipa, Peru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meriwether, J. W., Jr.; Biondi, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Enhancement of FPI temperatures above quiet levels was observed a few hours after the start of magnetic activity. Magnitude of this enhancement is about 300 degrees. This is followed by relaxation to prestorm levels. Apparent average offset of RPI temperatures from mass spectrometer incoherent scatter radar by 100 to 200 degrees for relatively quiet times is also observed. There was a definite suggestion of a midnight thermal enhancement for April and August data, with a magnitude of about 100 degrees, seen in both 1983 and 1984 observations. There was a definite enhancement of 6300A surface brightness in the south as compared with other directions, probably connected to the tropical airglow arcs. Meridional winds were small (less than 25 m/s) throughout night. Indication of northward migration of the observed 6300A enhancement in the evening hours as observations approach local winter solstice. This is probably related to the observed poleward (to the south) meridional wind (of magnitude 50 m/s) in this period. Zonal component of winds always eastward, but speed approaches zero sooner near equinox than at summer solstice. Typical magnitude at peak is of order 100 to 150 m/s. Suggestion of zonal wind increase after twilight and recovery of 6300A emission for April data. Origin not clear but may be related to midnight thermal enhancement. Meridional wind virtually zero for equinox in 1983; shows evening flow towards winter hemisphere in early evening for solstice data. Suggestion of post-midnight surge in April 1984 data. No major effects associated with magnetic storm activity, but a suggestion of decrease in zonal component below nominal levels.

  9. Impacts of coastal upwelling off east Vietnam on the regional winds system: An air-sea-land interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Lee, Chia-Ying; Ho, Chung-Ru; Kuo, Nan-Jung; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we analyze the influence of coastal upwelling off southeast Vietnam (CUEV) on local wind field using numerical simulations based on atmospheric model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF). Several scenarios are simulated by forcing identical model configurations with different SST fields. Based on simulation results, the relationship between CUEV and reduction of wind forcing is numerically evidenced. With the influence of a typical cold patch with a temperature drop of 3-5 °C, the local wind speeds can drop to less than 70% of original level. We find that the mechanism of response of the wind reduction to CUEV is enhancement of sea-breeze induced wind modulation. Onshore sea-breeze will enhance, while the contrast between land and sea is even more striking due to the contribution of a distinct coastal upwelling. This implies that air-sea-land interaction dominates the process of local wind system modulation in response to transient CUEV. This result sheds a new light on the air-sea interaction process within the SCS basin.

  10. Revised Wind Chill Index (The Development of a New Wind Chill Temperature Chart)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, Maurice

    2009-04-10

    It had been known for many years that the original wind chill temperature charts used by the weather services of Canada and the U.S. were flawed. This speaker applied modern heat transfer principles to the Antarctic research that was the basis for the original charts to demonstrate that the temperatures were much too cold. He then proposed an alternative model that would more accurately depict the effect of wind in cold weather on exposed skin. Media attention and an internet conference sponsored in Canada prompted the U.S. Weather Service to initiate a program to update their charts. This speaker and a Canadian researcher who worked with a similar approach were charged with developing a new chart. An algorithm was completed and the new chart was put into effect in Canada in October and in the U.S. in November, 2001.

  11. Revised Wind Chill Index (The Development of a New Wind Chill Temperature Chart)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, Maurice

    2002-04-10

    It had been known for many years that the original wind chill temperature charts used by the weather services of Canada and the U.S. were flawed. This speaker applied modern heat transfer principles to the Antarctic research that was the basis for the original charts to demonstrate that the temperatures were much too cold. He then proposed an alternative model that would more accurately depict the effect of wind in cold weather on exposed skin. Media attention and an internet conference sponsored in Canada prompted the U.S. Weather Service to initiate a program to update their charts. This speaker and a Canadian researcher who worked with a similar approach were charged with developing a new chart. An algorithm was completed and the new chart was put into effect in Canada in October and in the U.S. in November, 2001.

  12. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  13. Variation in the urban vegetation, surface temperature, air temperature nexus.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Sheri A; Liang, Liyin L; Crum, Steven M; Feyisa, Gudina L; Wang, Jun; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2017-02-01

    Our study examines the urban vegetation - air temperature (Ta) - land surface temperature (LST) nexus at micro- and regional-scales to better understand urban climate dynamics and the uncertainty in using satellite-based LST for characterizing Ta. While vegetated cooling has been repeatedly linked to reductions in urban LST, the effects of vegetation on Ta, the quantity often used to characterize urban heat islands and global warming, and on the interactions between LST and Ta are less well characterized. To address this need we quantified summer temporal and spatial variation in Ta through a network of 300 air temperature sensors in three sub-regions of greater Los Angeles, CA, which spans a coastal to desert climate gradient. Additional sensors were placed within the inland sub-region at two heights (0.1m and 2m) within three groundcover types: bare soil, irrigated grass, and underneath citrus canopy. For the entire study region, we acquired new imagery data, which allowed calculation of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and LST. At the microscale, daytime Ta measured along a vertical gradient, ranged from 6 to 3°C cooler at 0.1 and 2m, underneath tall canopy compared to bare ground respectively. At the regional scale NDVI and LST were negatively correlated (p<0.001). Relationships between diel variation in Ta and daytime LST at the regional scale were progressively weaker moving away from the coast and were generally limited to evening and nighttime hours. Relationships between NDVI and Ta were stronger during nighttime hours, yet effectiveness of mid-day vegetated cooling increased substantially at the most arid region. The effectiveness of vegetated Ta cooling increased during heat waves throughout the region. Our findings suggest an important but complex role of vegetation on LST and Ta and that vegetation may provide a negative feedback to urban climate warming.

  14. Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, C. David; Eisenbach, Stefan; Pospichal, Bernhard; Steinacker, Reinhold

    2004-11-01

    Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole in the eastern Alps are compared with pseudovertical temperature “soundings” from three lines of temperature dataloggers on the basin's northwest, southwest, and southeast sidewalls. Under stable nighttime conditions with low background winds, the pseudovertical profiles from all three lines were good proxies for free air temperature soundings over the basin center, with a mean nighttime cold temperature bias of about 0.4°C and a standard deviation of 0.4°C. Cold biases were highest in the upper basin where relatively warm air subsides to replace air that spills out of the basin through the lowest-altitude saddle. On a windy night, standard deviations increased to 1° 2°C. After sunrise, the varying exposures of the dataloggers to sunlight made the pseudovertical profiles less useful as proxies for free air soundings. The good correspondence between sidewall and free air temperatures during high-static-stability conditions suggests that sidewall soundings can be used to monitor temperatures, temperature gradients, and temperature inversion evolution in the sinkhole. Sidewall soundings can produce more frequent profiles at lower cost than can tethersondes or rawinsondes, and extension of these findings to other enclosed or semienclosed topographies may enhance future basic meteorological research or support applications studies in agriculture, forestry, air pollution, and land use planning.


  15. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  16. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 29.1157 Section 29.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 29.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1157 - Carburetor air temperature controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor air temperature controls. 25.1157 Section 25.1157 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Accessories § 25.1157 Carburetor air temperature controls. There must be a separate carburetor air...

  6. Air temperature variation across the seed cotton dryer mixpoint

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen tests were conducted in six gins in the fall of 2008 to measure air temperature variation within various heated air seed cotton drying systems with the purpose of: checking validation of recommendations by a professional engineering society and measuring air temperature variation across the...

  7. AIR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN SEED COTTON DRYING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten tests were conducted in the fall of 2007 to measure air temperature variation within various heated air seed cotton drying systems with the purpose of: checking validation of recommendations by a professional engineering society and measuring air temperature variation across the airflow ductwork...

  8. Possible Economies in Air-Conditioning by Accepting Temperature Swings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, A. G.; Petherbridge, P.

    Public building air conditioning systems, which use constant and varying heat and cooling loads, are compared and investigated. Experiments indicated that constant temperature controls based on outside air temperature alone were inefficient. Ventilating a building with outside air and the methods of doing so are cited as being the most economical…

  9. How the Plant Temperature Links to the Air Temperature in the Desert Plant Artemisia ordosica.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming-Han; Ding, Guo-Dong; Gao, Guang-Lei; Sun, Bao-Ping; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Wan, Li; Wang, De-Ying; Gui, Zi-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Plant temperature (Tp) is an important indicator of plant health. To determine the dynamics of plant temperature and self-cooling ability of the plant, we measured Tp in Artemisia ordosica in July, in the Mu Us Desert of Northwest China. Related factors were also monitored to investigate their effects on Tp, including environmental factors, such as air temperature (Ta), relative humidity, wind speed; and physiological factors, such as leaf water potential, sap flow, and water content. The results indicate that: 1) Tp generally changes in conjunction with Ta mainly, and varies with height and among the plant organs. Tp in the young branches is most constant, while it is the most sensitive in the leaves. 2) Correlations between Tp and environmental factors show that Tp is affected mainly by Ta. 3) The self-cooling ability of the plant was effective by midday, with Tp being lower than Ta. 4) Increasing sap flow and leaf water potential showed that transpiration formed part of the mechanism that supported self-cooling. Increased in water conductance and specific heat at midday may be additional factors that contribute to plant cooling ability. Therefore, our results confirmed plant self-cooling ability. The response to high temperatures is regulated by both transpiration speed and an increase in stem water conductance. This study provides quantitative data for plant management in terms of temperature control. Moreover, our findings will assist species selection with taking plant temperature as an index.

  10. Response of London's urban heat island to a marine air intrusion in an easterly wind regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemel, C.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2010-09-01

    London is long known to develop a pronounced urban heat island (UHI) resulting primarily from the storage of heat in the urban fabric during the day and released during the night, the differences in thermal and radiative properties of the surface between urban and rural areas, and lack of evapotranspiration in urban areas. Under calm, clear, and dry weather conditions, the difference in near-surface air temperature between two representative urban centre and rural locations at a given time typically reaches several degrees (i.e. warming) during the night and can be negative (i.e. cooling) during the day. Like the majority of large cities in the world, London is located in a coastal area. On certain occasions cooler marine air from the North Sea is advected across London by a sea breeze or easterly winds. In our work we examine the effects of a marine air intrusion, in an easterly wind regime, on the structure of London's UHI for a case study on 7 May 2008. For this purpose, numerical simulations with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model are performed for multiple nested domains with the innermost domain covering London and its rural surroundings at the kilometre scale. A sensitivity study is undertaken to assess how the categorisation of the urban land use and the parameterisation of the urban canopy in the model affect its performance characteristics for the near-surface air temperature field. The categorisation of the urban landuse, according to the fractional area that is built-up within each grid cell, is found to be key to capturing the spatial pattern of the temperature field. Using a multilayer rather than single layer urban canopy model improves the representation of the variability of the pattern and the intensity of the UHI. A notable outcome of this work is that the inclusion of building anthropogenic fluxes is comparatively less important as regards model performance for near-surface air temperature. The effects of the marine air intrusion on

  11. Compressed air energy storage system reservoir size for a wind energy baseload power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Wind generated electricity can be transformed from an intermittent to a baseload resource using an oversized wind farm in conjunction with a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system. The size of the storage reservoir for the CAES system (solution mined salt cavern or porous media) as a function of the wind speed autocorrelation time (C) has been examined using a Monte Carlo simulation for a wind class 4 (wind power density 450 W m{sup -2} at 50 m hub height) wind regime with a Weibull k factor of 2.5. For values of C typically found for winds over the US Great Plains, the storage reservoir must have a 60 to 80 hour capacity. Since underground reservoirs account for only a small fraction of total system cost, this larger storage reservoir has a negligible effect on the cost of energy from the wind energy baseload system. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Air pollution is pushing wind speed into a regulator of surface solar irradiance in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. W.; Yang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhao, N.; Zhang, J. H.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis in 27 cities across China shows that surface solar irradiance (SSI) and wind speed track similar decadal trends in 1961-2011, suggesting wind speed as a possible regulator of SSI. This assumption is further confirmed by the continuously widening gap in annually averaged daily SSI between windy and windless clear-sky days with worsening air pollution. Wider gaps are noted for more polluted cities and seasons. The gap in SSI between windy and windless conditions could therefore serve as a good indicator for air quality. The regulatory effect of wind speed on SSI starts to be important when air pollution index exceeds the boundary of 125. A plausible mechanism of wind speed regulating SSI through interactions with aerosols is proposed. There are two cut-off points of 2.5 m s-1 and 3.5 m s-1 wind speeds. Winds <2.5 m s-1 noticeably disperse air pollutants and thereby enhance SSI. Above the 2.5 m s-1 threshold, air pollution and SSI become largely insensitive to changing wind speeds. Winds in excess of 3.5 m s-1 could enhance aerosol concentration probably by inducing dust-storms, which in turn attenuate SSI.

  13. A 20-KW Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) at the Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe, Hawaii.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    NATIONAL BURLAU OF STANDARDS I963 A TN NO: N-1655 A 20-KW WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEM TITLE: (WECS) AT THE MARINE CORPS AI& STATION, KANEOHE, HAWAII...4 TITLE (o, S,,bIII1. S TYPE OF kEPORT II PERIOD COvERED A 20-KW WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEM Not final;Sep 78- Dec81 (WECS) AT THE MARINE CORPS AIR...from RepO) 18 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES • -1 19 KEY WORDS eComf-Ur o, ,e . s d. it ,e f , &1d Ide-,fs by bd, umb,) Wind energy conversion systems, wind energy , wind

  14. Predicted impacts of proton temperature anisotropy on solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2015-03-15

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the Alfvénic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scale cascade. We find that the nonlinear dynamics of the large-scale cascade is insensitive to the proton temperature anisotropy and that the instability-driven fluctuations are unlikely to cause significant nonlinear evolution of either the instability-driven fluctuations or the turbulent fluctuations of the large-scale cascade.

  15. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  16. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  17. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  18. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  19. Internal gravity wave-atmospheric wind interaction - A cause of clear air turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekofske, K.; Liu, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    The interaction between an internal gravity wave (IGW) and a vertical wind shear is discussed as a possible cause in the production of clear air turbulence in the free atmosphere. It is shown that under certain typical condition the interaction of an IGW with a background wind shear near a critical level provides a mechanism for depositing sufficient momentum in certain regions of the atmosphere to significantly increase the local mean wind shear and to lead to the production of turbulence.

  20. Arctic Strato-Mesospheric Temperature and Wind Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Upper stratosphere and mesosphere rocket measurements are actively used to investigate interaction between the neutral, electrical, and chemical atmospheres and between lower and upper layers of these regions. Satellite temperature measurements from HALOE and from inflatable falling spheres complement each other and allow illustrations of the annual cycle to 85 km altitude. Falling sphere wind and temperature measurements reveal variability that differs as a function of altitude, location, and time. We discuss the state of the Arctic atmosphere during the summer 2002 (Andoya, Norway) and winter 2003 (ESRANGE, Sweden) campaigns of MaCWAVE. Balloon-borne profiles to 30 km altitude and sphere profiles between 50 and 90 km show unique small-scale structure. Nonetheless, there are practical implications that additional measurements are very much needed to complete the full vertical profile picture. Our discussion concentrates on the distribution of temperature and wind and their variability. However, reliable measurements from other high latitude NASA programs over a number of years are available to help properly calculate mean values and the distribution of the individual measurements. Since the available rocket data in the Arctic's upper atmosphere are sparse the results we present are basically a snapshot of atmospheric structure.

  1. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. Application of the Wind Erosion Prediction System in the AIRPACT regional air quality modeling framework

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion of soil is a major concern of the agricultural community as it removes the most fertile part of the soil and thus degrades soil productivity. Furthermore, dust emissions due to wind erosion contribute to poor air quality, reduce visibility, and cause perturbations to regional radiation ...

  5. Simulation of the Impact of New Air-Based Ocean Surface Wind Measurements on H*Wind Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Atlas, Robert; Black, Peter; Case, Jonathan; Chen, Shuyi; Hood, Robbie; Jones, Linwood; Ruff, Chris; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The H'Wind analysis, a product of the Hurricane Research Division of NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, brings together wind measurements from a variety of observation platforms into an objective analysis of the distribution of wind speeds in a tropical cyclone. This product is designed to improve understanding of the extent and strength of the wind field, and to improve the assessment of hurricane intensity. See http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/data sub/wind.html. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a new airborne microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, NOAA Hurricane Research Division, the University of Central Florida and the University of Michigan. HIRad is being designed to enhance the real-time airborne ocean surface winds observation capabilities of NOAA and USAF Weather Squadron hurricane hunter aircraft using the operational airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). Unlike SFMR, which measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track directly beneath the aircraft, HIRad will provide images of the surface wind and rain field over a wide swath (approx. 3 x the aircraft altitude). The instrument is described in a paper presented to the Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Symposium. The present paper describes a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) in which measurements from the new instrument as well as those from existing instruments (air, surface, and space-based) are simulated from the output of a numerical model from the University of Miami and those results are used to construct H*Wind analyses. Evaluations will be presented on the impact of the HIRad instrument on H'Wind analyses, both in terms of adding it to the full suite of current measurements, as well as using it to replace instrument(s) that may not be functioning at the future tame the HIRad instrument is implemented.

  6. The Use of Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Molthan, Andrew; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    AIRS ozone and model PV analysis confirm the stratospheric air in RGB Air Mass imagery. Trajectories confirm winds south of the low were distinct from CCB driven winds. Cross sections connect the tropopause fold, downward motion, and high nearsurface winds. Comparison to conceptual models show Shapiro-Keyser features and sting jet characteristics were observed in a storm that impacted the U.S. East Coast. RGB Air Mass imagery can be used to identify stratospheric air and regions susceptible to tropopause folding and attendant non-convective winds.

  7. A simplified method for calculating temperature time histories in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.

    1976-01-01

    Average temperature time history calculations of the test media and tunnel walls for cryogenic wind tunnels have been developed. Results are in general agreement with limited preliminary experimental measurements obtained in a 13.5-inch pilot cryogenic wind tunnel.

  8. Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Eisenbach, Stefan; Pospichal, Bernhard; Steinacker, Reinhold

    2004-11-01

    Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km diameter limestone sinkhole in the Eastern Alps are compared with pseudo-vertical temperature ‘soundings’ from three lines of temperature data loggers on the basin’s northwest, southwest and southeast sidewalls. Under stable nighttime conditions with low background winds, the pseudo-vertical profiles from all three lines were good proxies for free air temperature soundings over the basin center, with a mean nighttime cold temperature bias of about 0.4°C and a standard deviation of 0.4°C. Cold biases were highest in the upper basin where relatively warm air subsides to replace air that spills out of the basin through the lowest altitude saddle. On a windy night, standard deviations increased to 1 - 2°C. After sunrise, the varying exposures of the data loggers to sunlight made the pseudo-vertical profiles less useful as proxies for free air soundings. The good correspondence between sidewall and free air temperatures during high static stability conditions suggests that sidewall soundings will prove useful in monitoring temperatures and vertical temperature gradients in the sinkhole. The sidewall soundings can produce more frequent profiles at less cost than tethersondes or rawinsondes, and provide valuable advantages for some types of meteorological analyses.

  9. Manual performance deterioration in the cold estimated using the wind chill equivalent temperature.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M

    2009-07-01

    Manual performance during work in cold and windy climates is severely hampered by decreased dexterity, but valid dexterity decrease predictors based on climatic factors are scarce. Therefore, this study investigated the decrease in finger- and hand dexterity and grip force for nine combinations of ambient temperature (-20, -10 and 0 degrees C) and wind speeds (0.2, 4 and 8 m x s(2)), controlled in a climatic chamber. Finger dexterity was determined by the Purdue pegboard test, hand dexterity by the Minnesota manual dexterity test and grip force by a hand dynamometer. Twelve subjects with average to low fat percentage were exposed to cold air for one hour with and without extra insulation by a parka. The subjects were clothed in standard work clothing of the Royal Netherlands Air Force for cold conditions. Extra insulation did affect cold sensation but not manual performance. The deterioration in manual performance appeared to be strongly dependent upon Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature (WCET) and the square root of exposure time (r=0.93 for group average). These simple models may be valuable to assess problems with work in the cold, but more work should be done to determine critical values in dexterity for a wide variety of operational tasks.

  10. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOEpatents

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  11. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  12. Regional change in snow water equivalent-surface air temperature relationship over Eurasia during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renguang; Chen, Shangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Present study investigates local relationship between surface air temperature and snow water equivalent (SWE) change over mid- and high-latitudes of Eurasia during boreal spring. Positive correlation is generally observed around the periphery of snow covered region, indicative of an effect of snow on surface temperature change. In contrast, negative correlation is usually found over large snow amount area, implying a response of snow change to wind-induced surface temperature anomalies. With the seasonal retreat of snow covered region, region of positive correlation between SWE and surface air temperature shifts northeastward from March to May. A diagnosis of surface heat flux anomalies in April suggests that the snow impact on surface air temperature is dominant in east Europe and west Siberia through modulating surface shortwave radiation. In contrast, atmospheric effect on SWE is important in Siberia and Russia Far East through wind-induced surface sensible heat flux change. Further analysis reveals that atmospheric circulation anomalies in association with snowmelt over east Siberia may be partly attributed to sea surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic and the atmospheric circulation anomaly pattern associated with snowmelt over Russia Far East has a close association with the Arctic Oscillation.

  13. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  14. Modeled dependence of wind and waves on ocean temperature in tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phibbs, S.; Toumi, R.

    2015-12-01

    A coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model is used to investigate the sensitivity of surface wind speed and significant wave height to ocean temperature for idealized tropical cyclones (TCs). More intense and larger TCs, with higher waves, form when ocean temperature is increased. The maximum significant wave height increases more than the maximum wind speed for TCs up to hurricane force wind. However, above hurricane force wind the change in maximum wind speed is similar or greater than the change in maximum significant wave height. This can be explained by the wind drag coefficient decreasing as wind speed exceeds hurricane force wind, so that the growth of waves is dampened. The areal footprint of wave height grows considerably more than the maximum as ocean temperature is increased. This suggests a large increase in the surface area of damaging waves generated by TCs may be the dominant impact of a future warmer ocean.

  15. Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.

    2006-03-23

    The United States Air Force Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratories (PMEL) calibrate over 1,000 anemometer probes per year. To facilitate a more efficient calibration process for probe-style anemometers, the Air Force Metrology and Calibration Program underwent an effort to modernize the existing PMEL bench top wind tunnels. Through a joint effort with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the performance of PMEL wind tunnels was improved. The improvement consisted of new high accuracy sensors, automatic data acquisition, and a software-driven calibration process. As part of the wind tunnel upgrades, an uncertainty analysis was completed, laser Doppler velocimeter profiling was conducted to characterize the velocities at probe locations in the wind tunnel, and pitot tube calibrations of the wind tunnel were verified. The bench top wind tunnel accuracy and repeatability has been measured for nine prototype wind tunnel systems and valuable field experience has been gained with these wind tunnels at the PMELs. This report describes the requirements for the wind tunnel improvements along with actual implementation strategies and details. Lessons-learned from the automation, the velocity profiling, and the software-driven calibration process will also be discussed.

  16. Temperature differences in the air layer close to a road surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, Jörgen; Gustavsson, Torbjörn; Karlsson, Maria

    2001-12-01

    In this study, profiles of temperature and humidity (<250 cm above the road and 5 m into the surroundings) have been used to examine the development of temperature differences in the air layer close to the road. Temperature, humidity and wind profiles were measured, together with net radiation and observations of road surface state, at a test site at Road 45, Surte, Sweden. Measured temperature differences were compared with present weather, preceding weather, surface status, wind direction and other parameters thought to be important for the development of temperature differences. The results showed that large temperature differences (1-3 °C between 250 cm and 10 cm above the road) occurred when there was a high risk of slipperiness caused by hoarfrost, snow or ice on the road. The temperature differences between different levels were associated with the exchange of humidity and temperature between the air layer and the road surface. The 10 cm level reflected the surface processes well. Higher levels were influenced by the surroundings because of turbulence and advection. This study emphasises the need for measurements to be taken at a height and place that reflects the processes at the road surface.

  17. Characteristics of wind velocity and temperature change near an escarpment-shaped road embankment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small.

  18. Investigation of the impact of extreme air temperature on river water temperature: case study of the heat episode 2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, Philipp; Trimmel, Heidelinde; Goler, Robert; Formayer, Herbert; Holzapfel, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water stream temperature is a relevant factor for water quality since it is an important driver of water oxygen content and in turn also reduces or increases stress on the aquatic fauna. The water temperature of streams is determined by the source and inflow water temperature, by the energy balance at the stream surface and by the hydrological regime of the stream. Main factors driving the energy balance of streams are radiation balance and air temperature which influences the sensitive and latent heat flux. The present study investigates the impact of the heat episode of summer 2013 on water temperature of two lowland rivers in south eastern Austria. Within the scope of the project BIO_CLIC routine measurements of water temperature at 33 locations alongside the rivers Pinka and Lafnitz have been performed since spring 2012. In addition meteorological measurements of global shortwave and longwave radiation, air temperature, wind and air humidity have been carried out during this time. For the same time period, data of discharge and water levels of both rivers were provided by the public hydrological office. The heat episode of summer 2013 started, according to the Kysely- definition, on 18 July and lasted until 14 August. The highest air temperature ever recorded in Austria was reported on 8 August at 40.5°C. In Güssing, which is located within the project area, 40.0 °C were recorded. In the lower reaches of the river Pinka, at the station Burg the monthly mean water temperature of August 2013 was with more than 22°C, 1°C higher than the mean water temperature of the same period of the previous years. At the same station, the maximum water temperature of 27.1°C was recorded on 29 July, 9 days prior to the air temperature record. Analysis shows that at the downstream stations the main driving parameter is solar radiation whereas at the upstream stations a better correlation between air temperature and water temperature is obtained. Using the extensive data set

  19. Impact of autumn SST in the Japan Sea on winter rainfall and air temperature in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Sun, Jilin; Wu, Dexing; Yi, Li; Wei, Dongni

    2015-08-01

    We studied the impact of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) in the Japan Sea and the sea area east of Japan on the winter rainfall and air temperature in Northeast (NE) China using the singular value decomposition (SVD) and empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The monthly-mean rainfall data observed at 160 stations in China, monthly-mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research and monthly-mean air temperature from the NCEP reanalysis during 1960-2011 were used. Correlation analysis indicates that the SSTAs in the Japan Sea in September may last for three or four months and are an important index for forecasting the winter rainfall and air temperature in NE China. Positive SSTAs in the central Japan Sea and in the sea area east of Tokyo correspond to positive rainfall anomaly and negative air temperature anomaly in NE China. With the rise of SST in the Japan Sea, a weak cyclone appears over the Japan Sea. The northeasterly wind transports water vapor from the Okhotsk to NE China, resulting in more rainfall and lower air temperature. Negative SSTA years are accompanied by warmer air temperature and less snow in NE China. The 1000 hPa geopotential height anomaly and wind anomaly fields are simulated by IAP-9L model, which supports the analysis results.

  20. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  1. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, Rebecca; Paterna, Enrico; Horender, Stefan; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The longevity of perennial snowfields is not fully understood, but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary-layer decoupling limit the amount of (sensible and latent) heat that can be transmitted from the atmosphere to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i) the temperature difference between the (melting) snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii) cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snowfields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat and momentum fluxes are measured using two-component hot-wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest, and the ambient flow was decoupled from the surface, enhancing near-surface atmospheric stability over the single snow patch.

  2. Granger causality estimate of information flow in temperature fields is consistent with wind direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2014-05-01

    Granger causality analysis is designed to quantify whether one time series is useful in forecasting another. We apply the time domain Granger causality analysis based on autoregressive processes to gridded daily surface air temperature data. For each grid-point pair, the direction and strength of the causal influence were computed with the one-day lag, effectively assessing the direction of the information flow in the temperature field. In order to remove the influence of different distances of the grid-points in the original angularly regular grid of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the data were transformed into an equidistant geodesic grid of 642 grid points. The strongest causalities have been found in the Northern Hemisphere's extratropics, where the temperature information is flowing eastward, in agreement with the prevailing westerlies. In contrast, only weak causalities have been observed in the tropics, which may be arising from higher spatio-temporal homogeneity. In the second step, we quantitatively compared this estimate of information flow with the actual wind directions from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data transformed onto the equidistant geodesic grid of 642 points. This was done for the surface layer and for the 850, 700, 500, 300 and 100hPa layers. The direction of the information flow matches the flow of the air masses, particularly well in the Northern Hemisphere's extratropics, i.e. for the strongest causalities. This agreement holds throughout the troposphere, slightly increasing with the height up to 500hPa level, then remains the same until bottom stratosphere. The agreement between the information flow in the air temperature field and the flow of air masses suggests the Granger causality as a suitable tools for constructing directed climate networks.

  3. Interpretation of combined wind profiler and aircraft-measured tropospheric winds and clear air turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, D. W.; Syrett, William J.; Fairall, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    In the first experiment, it was found that wind profilers are far better suited for the detailed examination of jet stream structure than are weather balloons. The combination of good vertical resolution with not previously obtained temporal resolution reveals structural details not seen before. Development of probability-derived shear values appears possible. A good correlation between pilot reports of turbulence and wind shear was found. In the second experiment, hourly measurements of wind speed and direction obtained using two wind profiling Doppler radars during two prolonged jet stream occurrences over western Pennsylvania were analyzed. In particular, the time-variant characteristics of derived shear profiles were examined. Profiler data dropouts were studied in an attempt to determine possible reasons for the apparently reduced performance of profiling radar operating beneath a jet stream. Richardson number and wind shear statistics were examined along with pilot reports of turbulence in the vicinity of the profiler.

  4. Baseload power production from wind turbine arrays coupled to compressed air energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succar, Samir

    An analysis is presented of compressed air energy storage (CAES) and its potential for mitigating the intermittency of wind power, facilitating access to remote wind resources and transforming wind into baseload power. Although CAES has traditionally served other grid support applications, it is also well suited for wind balancing applications due its ability to provide long duration storage, its fast ramp rates and its high part load efficiencies. In addition, geologies potentially suitable for CAES appear to be abundant in regions with high-quality wind resources. This is especially true of porous rock formations, which have the potential to be the least costly air storage option for CAES. The characteristics of formations suitable for CAES storage and the challenges associated with using air as a storage fluid are discussed. An optimization framework is developed for analyzing the cost of baseload plants comprised of wind turbine arrays backed by natural gas-fired generating capacity and/or CAES. The optimization model analyzes changes to key aspects of the system configuration such as the wind turbine rating, the relative capacities of the system components, the size of the CAES storage reservoir and the wind turbine spacing. The response of the optimal system configuration to changes in natural gas price, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions price, capital cost, and wind resource is also considered. Wind turbine rating is given focused attention because of its substantial impact on system configuration and output behavior. The generation cost of baseload wind is compared to that of other baseload options. To highlight the carbon-mitigation potential of baseload wind, the competition with coal power (with and without CO2 capture and storage, CCS) is given prominent attention. The ability of alternative options to compete under dispatch competition is explored thereby clarifying the extent to which baseload wind can defend high capacity factors in the market. This

  5. Spatial distribution of air temperature in Toruń (Central Poland) and its causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylak, Rajmund; Uscka-Kowalkowska, Joanna; Araźny, Andrzej; Kejna, Marek; Kunz, Mieczysław; Maszewski, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the results of an investigation into the air temperature pattern and development (including the urban heat island (UHI)) in Toruń (central Poland) are presented. For the analysis, daily mean temperature (Ti) as well as daily maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures for 2012 gathered for 20 sites, evenly distributed in the area of city, have been taken as source data. Additionally, in order to provide more extensive characteristics of the diversity of the air temperature in the study area, the diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the number of the so-called characteristic days were calculated as well. The impact of weather conditions (cloudiness and wind speed), atmospheric circulation, urban morphological parameters and land cover on the UHI in the study area was investigated. In Toruń, according to the present study, the average UHI intensity in 2012 was equal to 1.0 °C. The rise of cloudiness and wind speed led to a decrease of the magnitude of the UHI. Generally, in most cases, anticyclonic situations favour increased thermal contrast between rural and city areas, particularly in summer. Warm western circulation types significantly reduced temperature differences in the western side of the city and enlarged them in the eastern side of the city. Eastern cold types also have a similar influence on air temperature differences. Positive and statistically significant correlations have been found between the percentage of built-up areas (sealing factor) and air temperature. Conversely, sky view factor (SVF) reveals negative correlations which are statistically significant only for Tmin.

  6. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  7. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  8. Pattern recognition methods and air pollution source identification. [based on wind direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Directional air samplers, used for resolving suspended particulate matter on the basis of time and wind direction were used to assess the feasibility of characterizing and identifying emission source types in urban multisource environments. Filters were evaluated for 16 elements and X-ray fluorescence methods yielded elemental concentrations for direction, day, and the interaction of direction and day. Large numbers of samples are necessary to compensate for large day-to-day variations caused by wind perturbations and/or source changes.

  9. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  10. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  11. Retrieval of air temperatures from crowd-sourced battery temperatures of cell phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate air temperature observations are important for urban meteorology, for example to study the urban heat island and adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. The number of available temperature observations is often relatively limited. A new development is presented to derive temperature information for the urban canopy from an alternative source: cell phones. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. Results are presented for Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree Celsius. This shows that monitoring air temperatures employing an Android application holds great promise. Since 75% of the world's population has a cell phone, 20% of the land surface of the earth has cellular telephone coverage, and 500 million devices use the Android operating system, there is a huge potential for measuring air temperatures employing cell phones. This could eventually lead to real-time world-wide temperature maps.

  12. A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  13. Air emissions due to wind and solar power.

    PubMed

    Katzenstein, Warren; Apt, Jay

    2009-01-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) encourage large-scale deployment of wind and solar electric power. Their power output varies rapidly, even when several sites are added together. In many locations, natural gas generators are the lowest cost resource available to compensate for this variability, and must ramp up and down quickly to keep the grid stable, affecting their emissions of NOx and CO2. We model a wind or solar photovoltaic plus gas system using measured 1-min time-resolved emissions and heat rate data from two types of natural gas generators, and power data from four wind plants and one solar plant. Over a wide range of renewable penetration, we find CO2 emissions achieve approximately 80% of the emissions reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions. Using steam injection, gas generators achieve only 30-50% of expected NOx emissions reductions, and with dry control NOx emissions increase substantially. We quantify the interaction between state RPSs and NOx constraints, finding that states with substantial RPSs could see significant upward pressure on NOx permit prices, if the gas turbines we modeled are representative of the plants used to mitigate wind and solar power variability.

  14. Characterization of Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Anti-icing in a Low-Temperature Wind Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Swarctz, Christopher; Alijallis, Elias; Hunter, Scott Robert; Simpson, John T; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a closed loop low-temperature wind tunnel was custom-built and uniquely used to investigate the anti-icing mechanism of superhydrophobic surfaces in regulated flow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and water moisture particle sizes. Silica nanoparticle-based hydrophobic coatings were tested as superhydrophobic surface models. During tests, images of ice formation were captured by a camera and used for analysis of ice morphology. Prior to and after wind tunnel testing, apparent contact angles of water sessile droplets on samples were measured by a contact angle meter to check degradation of surface superhydrophobicity. A simple peel test was also performed to estimate adhesion of ice on the surfaces. When compared to an untreated sample, superhydrophobic surfaces inhibited initial ice formation. After a period of time, random droplet strikes attached to the superhydrophobic surfaces and started to coalesce with previously deposited ice droplets. These sites appear as mounds of accreted ice across the surface. The appearance of the ice formations on the superhydrophobic samples is white rather than transparent, and is due to trapped air. These ice formations resemble soft rime ice rather than the transparent glaze ice seen on the untreated sample. Compared to untreated surfaces, the icing film formed on superhydrophobic surfaces was easy to peel off by shear flows.

  15. Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Turner, R. W.; Prusa, J.; Bitzer, R. J.; Finley, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complementary conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States are presented, and these provide insights into the temporal and spatial changes in the shelter temperature. The observations indicated near-surface temperature drops of as much as 6 C. Numerical model simulations for this eclipse event, which provide a complementary evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature drops, predict similar decreases. Interrelationships between the temperature drop, degree of solar irradiance reduction, and timing of the peak eclipse are also evaluated for late spring, summer, and winter sun conditions. These simulations suggest that for total eclipses the drops in shelter temperature in midlatitudes can be as high as 7 C for a spring morning eclipse.

  16. Monitored summer peak attic air temperatures in Florida residences

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.S.; Sherwin, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has analyzed measured summer attic air temperature data taken for some 21 houses (three with two different roof configurations) over the last several years. The analysis is in support of the calculation within ASHRAE Special Project 152P, which will be used to estimate duct system conductance gains that are exposed to the attic space. Knowledge of prevailing attic thermal conditions are critical to the duct heat transfer calculations for estimation of impacts on residential cooling system sizing. The field data were from a variety of residential monitoring projects that were classified according to intrinsic differences in roofing configurations and characteristics. The sites were occupied homes spread around the state of Florida. There were a variety of different roofing construction types, roof colors, and ventilation configurations. Data at each site were obtained from June 1 to September 30 according to the ASHRAE definition of summer. The attic air temperature and ambient air temperature were used for the data analysis. The attic air temperature was measured with a shielded type-T thermocouple at mid-attic height, halfway between the decking and insulation surface. The ambient air temperature was obtained at each site by thermocouples located inside a shielded exterior enclosure at a 3 to 4 m (10--12 ft) height. The summer 15-minute data from each site were sorted by the average ambient air temperature into the top 2.5% of the observations of the highest temperature. Within this limited group of observations, the average outside air temperature, attic air temperature, and coincident difference were reported.

  17. Solar activity influence on air temperature regimes in caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Penka; Mikhalev, Alexander; Stoev, Alexey

    Cave atmospheres are generally included in the processes that happen in the external atmosphere as circulation of the cave air is connected with the most general circulation of the air in the earth’s atmosphere. Such isolated volumes as the air of caves are also influenced by the variations of solar activity. We discuss cave air temperature response to climate and solar and geomagnetic activity for four show caves in Bulgaria studied for a period of 46 years (1968 - 2013). Everyday noon measurements in Ledenika, Saeva dupka, Snezhanka and Uhlovitsa cave have been used. Temperatures of the air in the zone of constant temperatures (ZCT) are compared with surface temperatures recorded at meteorological stations situated near about the caves - in the towns of Vratsa, Lovech, Peshtera and Smolyan, respectively. For comparison, The Hansen cave, Middle cave and Timpanogos cave from the Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah, USA situated nearly at the same latitude have also been examined. Our study shows that the correlation between cave air temperature time series and sunspot number is better than that between the cave air temperature and Apmax indices; that t°ZCT is rather connected with the first peak in geomagnetic activity, which is associated with transient solar activity (CMEs) than with the second one, which is higher and connected with the recurrent high speed streams from coronal holes. Air temperatures of all examined show caves, except the Ledenika cave, which is ice cave show decreasing trends. On the contrary, measurements at the meteorological stations show increasing trends in the surface air temperatures. The trend is decreasing for the Timpanogos cave system, USA. The conclusion is that surface temperature trends depend on the climatic zone, in which the cave is situated, and there is no apparent relation between temperatures inside and outside the caves. We consider possible mechanism of solar cosmic rays influence on the air temperatures in caves

  18. Propagation Effects of Wind and Temperature on Acoustic Ground Contour Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.

    2006-01-01

    Propagation characteristics for varying wind and temperature atmospheric conditions are identified using physically-limiting propagation angles to define shadow boundary regions. These angles are graphically illustrated for various wind and temperature cases using a newly developed ray-tracing propagation code.

  19. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1991 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free-drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components of the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  20. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1990 are proposed with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (US) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components on the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation values are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  1. Associations of endothelial function and air temperature in diabetic subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: Epidemiological studies consistently show that air temperature is associated with changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the association remain largely unknown. As one index of endothelial functio...

  2. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  3. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  4. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... location must be within 10 cm of the engine intake system (i.e., the air cleaner, for most engines.) (b... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19...

  5. Air sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds measured by autonomous oceanographic floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; McNeil, Craig

    2007-06-01

    Measurements of the air-sea fluxes of N 2 and O 2 were made in winds of 15-57 m s - 1 beneath Hurricane Frances using two types of air-deployed neutrally buoyant and profiling underwater floats. Two "Lagrangian floats" measured O 2 and total gas tension (GT) in pre-storm and post-storm profiles and in the actively turbulent mixed layer during the storm. A single "EM-APEX float" profiled continuously from 30 to 200 m before, during and after the storm. All floats measured temperature and salinity. N 2 concentrations were computed from GT and O 2 after correcting for instrumental effects. Gas fluxes were computed by three methods. First, a one-dimensional mixed layer budget diagnosed the changes in mixed layer concentrations given the pre-storm profile and a time varying mixed layer depth. This model was calibrated using temperature and salinity data. The difference between the predicted mixed layer concentrations of O 2 and N 2 and those measured was attributed to air-sea gas fluxes FBO and FBN. Second, the covariance flux FCO( z) = < wO 2'>( z) was computed, where w is the vertical motion of the water-following Lagrangian floats, O 2' is a high-pass filtered O 2 concentration and <>( z) is an average over covariance pairs as a function of depth. The profile FCO( z) was extrapolated to the surface to yield the surface O 2 flux FCO(0). Third, a deficit of O 2 was found in the upper few meters of the ocean at the height of the storm. A flux FSO, moving O 2 out of the ocean, was calculated by dividing this deficit by the residence time of the water in this layer, inferred from the Lagrangian floats. The three methods gave generally consistent results. At the highest winds, gas transfer is dominated by bubbles created by surface wave breaking, injected into the ocean by large-scale turbulent eddies and dissolving near 10-m depth. This conclusion is supported by observations of fluxes into the ocean despite its supersaturation; by the molar flux ratio FBO/ FBN, which is

  6. Air sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds measured by autonomous oceanographic floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; McNeil, Craig

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the air-sea fluxes of N 2 and O 2 were made in winds of 15-57 m s - 1 beneath Hurricane Frances using two types of air-deployed neutrally buoyant and profiling underwater floats. Two "Lagrangian floats" measured O 2 and total gas tension (GT) in pre-storm and post-storm profiles and in the actively turbulent mixed layer during the storm. A single "EM-APEX float" profiled continuously from 30 to 200 m before, during and after the storm. All floats measured temperature and salinity. N 2 concentrations were computed from GT and O 2 after correcting for instrumental effects. Gas fluxes were computed by three methods. First, a one-dimensional mixed layer budget diagnosed the changes in mixed layer concentrations given the pre-storm profile and a time varying mixed layer depth. This model was calibrated using temperature and salinity data. The difference between the predicted mixed layer concentrations of O 2 and N 2 and those measured was attributed to air-sea gas fluxes FBO and FBN. Second, the covariance flux FCO( z) = < wO 2'>( z) was computed, where w is the vertical motion of the water-following Lagrangian floats, O 2' is a high-pass filtered O 2 concentration and <>( z) is an average over covariance pairs as a function of depth. The profile FCO( z) was extrapolated to the surface to yield the surface O 2 flux FCO(0). Third, a deficit of O 2 was found in the upper few meters of the ocean at the height of the storm. A flux FSO, moving O 2 out of the ocean, was calculated by dividing this deficit by the residence time of the water in this layer, inferred from the Lagrangian floats. The three methods gave generally consistent results. At the highest winds, gas transfer is dominated by bubbles created by surface wave breaking, injected into the ocean by large-scale turbulent eddies and dissolving near 10-m depth. This conclusion is supported by observations of fluxes into the ocean despite its supersaturation; by the molar flux ratio FBO/ FBN, which is

  7. Air/ground wind shear information integration: Flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1992-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA wind shear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne wind shear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a wind shear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. High level microburst products were extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the wind shear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in the core of each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which in situ 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne in situ measurements. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurement would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the feasibility of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  8. High Lapse Rates in AIRS Retrieved Temperatures in Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian; Olsen, Edward T.; Fishbein, Evan

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment, on NASA's Aqua spacecraft, uses a combination of infrared and microwave observations to retrieve cloud and surface properties, plus temperature and water vapor profiles comparable to radiosondes throughout the troposphere, for cloud cover up to 70%. The high spectral resolution of AIRS provides sensitivity to important information about the near-surface atmosphere and underlying surface. A preliminary analysis of AIRS temperature retrievals taken during January 2003 reveals extensive areas of superadiabatic lapse rates in the lowest kilometer of the atmosphere. These areas are found predominantly east of North America over the Gulf Stream, and, off East Asia over the Kuroshio Current. Accompanying the high lapse rates are low air temperatures, large sea-air temperature differences, and low relative humidities. Imagery from a Visible / Near Infrared instrument on the AIRS experiment shows accompanying clouds. These lines of evidence all point to shallow convection in the bottom layer of a cold air mass overlying warm water, with overturning driven by heat flow from ocean to atmosphere. An examination of operational radiosondes at six coastal stations in Japan shows AIRS to be oversensitive to lower tropospheric lapse rates due to systematically warm near-surface air temperatures. The bias in near-surface air temperature is seen to be independent of sea surface temperature, however. AIRS is therefore sensitive to air-sea temperature difference, but with a warm atmospheric bias. A regression fit to radiosondes is used to correct AIRS near-surface retrieved temperatures, and thereby obtain an estimate of the true atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast in five subtropical regions across the north Pacific. Moving eastward, we show a systematic shift in this air-sea temperature differences toward more isothermal conditions. These results, while preliminary, have implications for our understanding of heat flow from ocean to

  9. Surface wind, pressure and temperature fields near tornadic and non-tornadic narrow cold-frontal rainbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Parker, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Narrow cold frontal rainbands (NCFRs) occur frequently in the UK and other parts of northwest Europe. At the surface, the passage of an NCFR is often marked by a sharp wind veer, abrupt pressure increase and a rapid temperature decrease. Tornadoes and other instances of localised wind damage sometimes occur in association with meso-gamma-scale vortices (sometimes called misocyclones) that form along the zone of abrupt horizontal wind veer (and associated vertical vorticity) at the leading edge of the NCFR. Using one-minute-resolution data from a mesoscale network of automatic weather stations, surface pressure, wind and temperature fields in the vicinity of 12 NCFRs (five of which were tornadic) have been investigated. High-resolution surface analyses were obtained by mapping temporal variations in the observed parameters to equivalent spatial variations, using a system velocity determined by analysis of the radar-observed movement of NCFR precipitation segments. Substantial differences were found in the structure of surface wind and pressure fields close to tornadic and non-tornadic NCFRs. Tornadic NCFRs exhibited a large wind veer (near 90°) and strong pre- and post-frontal winds. These attributes were associated with large vertical vorticity and horizontal convergence across the front. Tornadoes typically occurred where vertical vorticity and horizontal convergence were increasing. Here, we present surface analyses from selected cases, and draw comparisons between the tornadic and non-tornadic NCFRs. Some Doppler radar observations will be presented, illustrating the development of misocyclones along parts of the NCFR that exhibit strong, and increasing, vertical vorticity stretching. The influence of the stability of the pre-frontal air on the likelihood of tornadoes will also be discussed.

  10. Ambient air temperature effects on the temperature of sewage sludge composting process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-fei; Chen, Tong-bin; Gao, Ding; Huang, Ze-chun

    2005-01-01

    Using data obtained with a full-scale sewage sludge composting facility, this paper studied the effects of ambient air temperature on the composting temperature with varying volume ratios of sewage sludge and recycled compost to bulking agent. Two volume ratios were examined experimentally, 1: 0: 1 and 3: 1: 2. The results show that composting temperature was influenced by ambient air temperature and the influence was more significant when composting was in the temperature rising process: composting temperature changed 2.4-6.5 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 13 degrees C. On the other hand, the influence was not significant when composting was in the high-temperature and/or temperature falling process: composting temperature changed 0.75-1.3 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 8-15 degrees C. Hysteresis effect was observed in composting temperature's responses to ambient air temperature. When the ventilation capability of pile was excellent (at a volume ratio of 1:0:1), the hysteresis time was short and ranging 1.1-1.2 h. On the contrary, when the proportion of added bulking agent was low, therefore less porosity in the substrate (at a volume ratio of 3:1:2), the hysteresis time was long and ranging 1.9-3.1 h.

  11. Impact of traffic flows and wind directions on air pollution concentrations in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkook; Guldmann, Jean-Michel

    2011-05-01

    Vehicle emissions are responsible for a substantial share of urban air pollution concentrations. Various integrated air quality modeling systems have been developed to analyze the consequences of air pollution caused by traffic flows. However, the quantitative relationship between vehicle-kilometers-traveled (VKT) and pollution concentrations while considering wind direction effects has rarely been explored in the context of land-use regression models (LUR). In this research, VKTs occurring within circular buffers around air pollution monitoring stations are simulated, using a traffic assignment model, and weighted by eight wind directions frequencies. The relationships between monitored pollution concentrations and weighted VKTs are estimated using regression analysis. In general, the wind direction weighted VKT variable increases the explanatory power of the models, particularly for nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide. The case of ozone is more complex, due to the effects of solar radiation, which appears to overwhelm the effects of wind direction in the afternoon hours. The statistical significance of the weighted VKT variable is high, which makes the models appropriate for impact analysis of traffic flow growth.

  12. A laser Doppler system for the remote sensing of boundary layer winds in clear air conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T. R.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Morrison, L. K.; Thomson, J. A. L.; Cliff, W. C.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The system discussed uses a laser Doppler radar in combination with a velocity azimuth display mode of scanning to determine the three-dimensional wind field in the atmospheric boundary layer. An attractive feature of this CW monostatic system is that the ambient aerosol provides a 'sufficient' scattering target to permit operation under clear air conditions. Spatial resolution is achieved by focusing.

  13. Identifying Stratospheric Air Intrusions and Associated Hurricane-Force Wind Events over the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malloy, Kelsey; Folmer, Michael J.; Phillips, Joseph; Sienkiewicz, Joseph M.; Berndt, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: Ocean data is sparse: reliance on satellite imagery for marine forecasting; Ocean Prediction Center (OPC) –“mariner’s weather lifeline”. Responsible for: Pacific, Atlantic, Pacific Alaska surface analyses –24, 48, 96 hrs.; Wind & wave analyses –24, 48, 96 hrs.; Issue warnings, make decisions, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite –R Series (now GOES-16), Compared to the old GOES: 3 times spectral resolution, 4 times spatial resolution, 5 times faster coverage; Comparable to Japanese Meteorological Agency’s Himawari-8, used a lot throughout this research. Research Question: How can integrating satellite data imagery and derived products help forecasters improve prognosis of rapid cyclogenesis and hurricane-force wind events? Phase I –Identifying stratospheric air intrusions: Water Vapor –6.2, 6.9, 7.3 micron channels; Airmass RGB Product; AIRS, IASI, NUCAPS total column ozone and ozone anomaly; ASCAT (A/B) and AMSR-2 wind data.

  14. On The Suitability of Air Temperature as a Predictive Tool for Lake Surface Temperature in a Changing Climate: A Case Study for Lake Tahoe, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, N.; Piccolroaz, S.; Hook, S. J.; Toffolon, M.; Lenters, J. D.; Schladow, G.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to predict surface water temperature is essential toward understanding how future climate scenarios will impact inland water bodies such as lakes. Numerous predictive models have been developed to perform this task although many require inputs whose future model prediction is usually associated with large uncertainties, such as e.g., precipitation, cloudiness, wind and radiative fluxes. Conversely, air temperature is one of the most widely available variables in projections from Global Climate Models (GCMs). The predictive model air2water relies solely on air temperature data to predict lake surface temperature. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that air2water can be used as a predictive tool for climate change scenarios through a case study focused on Lake Tahoe, CA/NV, USA. Lake Tahoe has been selected due to extensive historical in-situ measurements that have been collected at that location since 1967 which we utilize to calibrate and validate air2water, and evaluate its performance. For model runs, we utilize different sources of air temperature data (buoys, land-based weather stations, GCMs) to establish how robustly air2water performs. We employ air temperature data from a combination of global gridded datasets including Climate Research Unit (CRU) TS3.21 (historical), and GCM output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) model (future) with representative concentration pathways of 4.5 and 8.5. Here, we present results from air2water predictions of the relationship between air and water temperature that demonstrate how this model is able to replicate trends on seasonal and interannual timescales. This finding shows promise toward understanding the impacts of future climate change on lakes and to expanding our study to lake surface temperatures globally.

  15. Analysis on atmospheric pressure, temperature, and wind speed profiles during total solar eclipse 9 March 2016 using time series clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septem Riza, Lala; Wihardi, Yaya; Nurdin, Enjang Ali; Dwi Ardi, Nanang; Puji Asmoro, Cahyo; Wijaya, Agus Fany Chandra; Aria Utama, Judhistira; Bayu Dani Nandiyanto, Asep

    2016-11-01

    Air temperature, pressure, and wind speed measurements on the surface taken during the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) of March 9, 2016, are made. They were taken in Terentang Beach, Bangka Island, Indonesia. In this paper, we propose to analyze them by using time series clustering. The following steps are conducted: data collecting, splitting, smoothing, distance calculation, and clustering. The final results show cluster memberships of the three parameters on 3 time frames: one day before, the TSE day, and one day after. After doing some simulations, it can be seen that the profiles of temperature and pressure on the TSE day are on the same cluster while the wind-speed profile on the TSE day is the same as on the one day after.

  16. Effect of Initial Mixture Temperature on Flame Speed of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds based on the outer edge of the shadow cast by the laminar Bunsen cone were determined as functions of composition for methane-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -132 degrees to 342 degrees c and for propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -73 degrees to 344 degrees c. The data showed that maximum flame speed increased with temperature at an increasing rate. The percentage change in flame speed with change in initial temperature for the three fuels followed the decreasing order, methane, propane, and ethylene. Empirical equations were determined for maximum flame speed as a function of initial temperature over the temperature range covered for each fuel. The observed effect of temperature on flame speed for each of the fuels was reasonably well predicted by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or the square-root law of Tanford and Pease.

  17. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made either... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES...

  18. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  19. Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were

  20. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  1. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU-A are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm, is now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC in the routine generation of geophysical parameters derived from AIRS/AMSU data. A major innovation in Version 5 is the ability to generate case-by-case level-by-level error estimates delta T(p) for retrieved quantities and the use of these error estimates for Quality Control. We conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using the NASA GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The model was run at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 deg. latitude X 0.67 deg longitude with 72 vertical levels. These experiments were run during four different seasons, each using a different year. The AIRS temperature profiles were presented to the GEOS-5 analysis as rawinsonde profiles, and the profile error estimates delta (p) were used as the uncertainty for each measurement in the data assimilation process. We compared forecasts analyses generated from the analyses done by assimilation of AIRS temperature profiles with three different sets of thresholds; Standard, Medium, and Tight. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature profiles significantly improve 5-7 day forecast skill compared to that obtained without the benefit of AIRS data in all of the cases studied. In addition, assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature soundings performs better than assimilation of AIRS observed radiances. Based on the experiments shown, Tight Quality Control of AIRS temperature profile performs best

  2. Weather and climate needs for Lidar observations from space and concepts for their realization. [wind, temperature, moisture, and pressure data needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D.; Korb, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The spectrum of weather and climate needs for Lidar observations from space is discussed with emphasis on the requirements for wind, temperature, moisture, and pressure data. It is shown that winds are required to realistically depict all atmospheric scales in the tropics and the smaller scales at higher latitudes, where both temperature and wind profiles are necessary. The need for means to estimate air-sea exchanges of sensible and latent heat also is noted. A concept for achieving this through a combination of Lidar cloud top heights and IR cloud top temperatures of cloud streets formed during cold air outbreaks over the warmer ocean is outlined. Recent theoretical feasibility studies concerning the profiling of temperatures, pressure, and humidity by differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) from space and expected accuracies are reviewed. An alternative approach to Doppler Lidar wind measurements also is presented. The concept involves the measurement of the displacement of the aerosol backscatter pattern, at constant heights, between two successive scans of the same area, one ahead of the spacecraft and the other behind it a few minutes later. Finally, an integrated space Lidar system capable of measuring temperature, pressure, humidity, and winds which combines the DIAL methods with the aerosol pattern displacement concept is described.

  3. Brushless exciters using a high temperature superconducting field winding

    DOEpatents

    Garces, Luis Jose; Delmerico, Robert William; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Parslow, John Harold; Sanderson, Harold Copeland; Sinha, Gautam

    2008-03-18

    A brushless exciter for a synchronous generator or motor generally includes a stator and a rotor rotatably disposed within the stator. The rotor has a field winding and a voltage rectifying bridge circuit connected in parallel to the field winding. A plurality of firing circuits are connected the voltage rectifying bridge circuit. The firing circuit is configured to fire a signal at an angle of less than 90.degree. or at an angle greater than 90.degree.. The voltage rectifying bridge circuit rectifies the AC voltage to excite or de-excite the field winding.

  4. Outdoor air temperature and mortality in The Netherlands: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Kunst, A E; Looman, C W; Mackenbach, J P

    1993-02-01

    Death rates become progressively higher when outdoor air temperature rises above or falls below 20-25 degrees C. This study addresses the question of whether this relation is largely attributable to the direct effects of exposure to heat and cold on the human body in general, and on the circulatory system in particular. The association between daily mortality and daily temperatures in the Netherlands in the period 1979-1987 was examined by controlling for influenza incidence, air pollution, and "season"; distinguishing lag periods; examining effect modification by wind speed and relative humidity; and distinguishing causes of death. Important direct effects of exposure to cold and heat on mortality were suggested by the following findings: 1) control for influenza incidence reduced cold-related mortality by only 34% and reduced heat-related mortality by 23% (the role of air pollution and "season" was negligible); 2) 62% of the "unexplained" cold-related mortality, and all heat-related mortality, occurred within 1 week; and 3) effect modification by wind speed was in the expected direction. The finding that 57% of "unexplained" cold-related mortality and 26% of the "unexplained" heat-related mortality was attributable to cardiovascular diseases suggests that direct effects are only in part the result of increased stress on the circulatory system. For heat-related mortality, direct effects on the respiratory system are probably more important. For cold-related mortality, the analysis yielded evidence of an important indirect effect involving increased incidence of influenza and other respiratory infections.

  5. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  6. Temperature effect on titanium nitride nanometer thin film in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Z. H.; Xu, B. X.; Hu, J. F.; Ji, R.; Toh, Y. T.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, Y. F.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a promising alternative plasmonic material to conventional novel metals. For practical plasmonic applications under the influence of air, the temperature-dependent optical properties of TiN thin films in air and its volume variation are essential. Ellipsometric characterizations on a TiN thin film at different increasing temperatures in ambient air were conducted, and optical constants along with film thickness were retrieved. Below 200 °C, the optical properties varied linearly with temperature, in good agreement with other temperature dependent studies of TiN films in vacuum. The thermal expansion coefficient of the TiN thin film was determined to be 10.27  ×  10‑6 °C‑1. At higher temperatures, the TiN thin film gradually loses its metallic characteristics and has weaker optical absorption, impairing its plasmonic performance. In addition, a sharp increase in film thickness was observed at the same time. Changes in the optical properties and film thickness with temperatures above 200 °C were revealed to result from TiN oxidation in air. For the stability of TiN-based plasmonic devices, operation temperatures of lower than 200 °C, or measures to prevent oxidation, are required. The present study is important to fundamental physics and technological applications of TiN thin films.

  7. Air concentrations of organochlorine compounds related to wind direction and compared with biota concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Egebaeck, A.L.; Wideqvist, U.; Asplund, L.; Strandell, M.; Alsberg, T.; Litzen, K.; Eriksson, U.; Haeggberg, L.; Zakrisson, S.; Oisson, M.; Bignert, A.

    1995-12-31

    Persistent organic compounds are long-range transported by air. Air samples were collected at two background meteorological stations, one southern at Gotland in the central Baltic and one northern, close to the polar circle. The collection was a part of the Swedish Dioxin Survey Project. Air sampling was carried out from fall 1990 to spring 1991 using a high-volume sampler. Air trajectories suggesting stable weather conditions decided which samples to be analyzed for e.g. PCBs, polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCN), chloroparaffines, HCHs and Toxaphene. The gas-phase concentrations of the seven PCB congeners 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, 180 were in the low pg/m{sup 3} range, while the concentration of the nonortho PCB 77 was about two orders of magnitude lower. High concentrations were usually correlated with SW winds and low concentrations with N to NW winds. Air masses coming from N to both sampling sites, resulted in nearly equal concentrations of the seven PCB congeners. PCNs were found in the gas phase of all samples at the pg/m{sup 3} level (total PCNs). The relative concentrations of the various contaminants were compared between air and four biological matrices collected in the vicinity of the air sampling locations. Cod, Herring and Herring feeding Guillemot from the Baltic and Pike from the northern sampling site were all collected within the Swedish National Monitoring Program.

  8. Soil temperature prediction from air temperature for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, D.; Kundu, D. K.; Pal, Soumen; Pal, Susanto; Chakraborty, A. K.; Jha, A. K.; Mazumdar, S. P.; Saha, R.; Bhattacharyya, P.

    2017-01-01

    Soil temperature is an important factor in biogeochemical processes. On-site monitoring of soil temperature is limited in spatiotemporal scale as compared to air temperature data inventories due to various management difficulties. Therefore, empirical models were developed by taking 30-year long-term (1985-2014) air and soil temperature data for prediction of soil temperatures at three depths (5, 15, 30 cm) in morning (0636 Indian standard time) and afternoon (1336 Indian standard time) for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain. At 5 cm depth, power and exponential regression models were best fitted for daily data in morning and afternoon, respectively, but it was reverse at 15 cm. However, at 30 cm, exponential models were best fitted for both the times. Regression analysis revealed that in morning for all three depths and in afternoon for 30 cm depth, soil temperatures (daily, weekly, and monthly) could be predicted more efficiently with the help of corresponding mean air temperature than that of maximum and minimum. However, in afternoon, prediction of soil temperature at 5 and 15 cm depths were more precised for all the time intervals when maximum air temperature was used, except for weekly soil temperature at 15 cm, where the use of mean air temperature gave better prediction.

  9. The effect of humidity on ionic wind velocity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, She; Nobelen, J. C. P. Y.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the evolution of portable electronics and LED lightning system, advances in air cooling technologies must also keep pace. Active cooling by ionic wind, which is usually generated by corona discharge, can greatly reduce the noise and lifetime issues compared to the mechanical fans. The wind is induced when a gas discharge is formed, and neutral molecules gain their energy by the momentum transfer of ion-neutral collisions. However, there is few discussion about the effect of gas composition such as humidity on the wind generation and the physical mechanism is not clear. In the experiment, a positive 5-20 kV DC voltage is applied to the needle-cylinder electrodes with separation of 20 mm. The ionic wind velocity is measured by hot wire anemometry. As the relative humidity (RH) in the ambient air increases, the velocity is found to be severely inhibited. The current is also measured between the cylinder electrode and earth. The results show that the DC component of corona current decreases when RH increases. Since both the discharge current and the ion mobility are reduced when RH increases, their combined effects determine the ionic wind velocity. This work is supported by STW project 13651.

  10. Ocean Winds and Turbulent Air-Sea Fluxes Inferred From Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.; Gille, Sarah T.; Jackson, Daren L.; Roberts, J. Brent; Wick, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-sea turbulent fluxes determine the exchange of momentum, heat, freshwater, and gas between the atmosphere and ocean. These exchange processes are critical to a broad range of research questions spanning length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers and time scales from hours to decades. Examples are discussed (section 2). The estimation of surface turbulent fluxes from satellite is challenging and fraught with considerable errors (section 3); however, recent developments in retrievals (section 3) will greatly reduce these errors. Goals for the future observing system are summarized in section 4. Surface fluxes are defined as the rate per unit area at which something (e.g., momentum, energy, moisture, or CO Z ) is transferred across the air/sea interface. Wind- and buoyancy-driven surface fluxes are called surface turbulent fluxes because the mixing and transport are due to turbulence. Examples of nonturbulent processes are radiative fluxes (e.g., solar radiation) and precipitation (Schmitt et al., 2010). Turbulent fluxes are strongly dependent on wind speed; therefore, observations of wind speed are critical for the calculation of all turbulent surface fluxes. Wind stress, the vertical transport of horizontal momentum, also depends on wind direction. Stress is very important for many ocean processes, including upper ocean currents (Dohan and Maximenko, 2010) and deep ocean currents (Lee et al., 2010). On short time scales, this horizontal transport is usually small compared to surface fluxes. For long-term processes, transport can be very important but again is usually small compared to surface fluxes.

  11. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  12. Cloud Patterns and the Upper Air Wind Field,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    34DZ" with respect to the other air. Or, if moisture, dust, or smoke is introduced into the flow upstrean from "DZ", then "DZ" acts as a southeastern...34DZ" results in matter such as dust, smoke , or moisture in the system to be vertically thickest in a band along the DZ axis. It may become thicker by...sunrise. Sometimes during summer or late spring when the low level enviroment is very moist, the outflow boundaries from the convection will continue to

  13. Correlation of air temperature above water-air sections with the forecasted low level clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, N. Sh.; Malikov, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    As a case study approach the development of low clouds forecasting methods in correlation with air temperature transformational variations on the sections "water-air" is surveyed. It was evident, that transformational variations of air temperature mainly depend on peculiarities and value of advective variations of temperature. DT is the differences of initial temperature on section water-air in started area, from contrast temperature of water surface along a trajectory of movement of air masses and from the temperature above water surface in a final point of a trajectory. Main values of transformational variations of air temperature at advection of a cold masses is 0.530C•h, and at advection of warm masses is -0.370C•h. There was dimensionless quantity K determined and implemented into practice which was characterized with difference of water temperature in forecasting point and air temperature in an initial point in the ratio of dew-points deficiency at the forecasting area. It follows, that the appropriate increasing or decreasing of K under conditions of cold and warm air masses advection, contributes decreasing of low clouds level. References: Abramovich K.G.: Conditions of development and forecasting of low level clouds. vol. #78, 124 pp., Hydrometcenter USSR 1973. Abramovich K.G.: Variations of low clouds level // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 5, 30-41, Moscow, 1968. Budiko M.I.: Empirical assessment of climatic changes toward the end of XX century // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. #12, 5-13, Moscow, 1999. Buykov M.V.: Computational modeling of daily evolutions of boundary layer of atmosphere at the presence of clouds and fog // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 4, 35-44, Moscow, 1981. Huseynov N.Sh. Transformational variations of air temperature above Caspian Sea / Proceedings of Conference On Climate And Protection of Environment, 118-120, Baku, 1999. Huseynov N.Sh.: Consideration of advective and transformational variations of air temperature in

  14. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  15. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  16. Meristem temperature substantially deviates from air temperature even in moderate environments: is the magnitude of this deviation species-specific?

    PubMed

    Savvides, Andreas; van Ieperen, Wim; Dieleman, Janneke A; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2013-11-01

    Meristem temperature (Tmeristem ) drives plant development but is hardly ever quantified. Instead, air temperature (Tair ) is usually used as its approximation. Meristems are enclosed within apical buds. Bud structure and function may differ across species. Therefore, Tmeristem may deviate from Tair in a species-specific way. Environmental variables (air temperature, vapour pressure deficit, radiation, and wind speed) were systematically varied to quantify the response of Tmeristem . This response was related to observations of bud structure and transpiration. Tomato and cucumber plants were used as model plants as they are morphologically distinct and usually growing in similar environments. Tmeristem substantially deviated from Tair in a species-specific manner under moderate environments. This deviation ranged between -2.6 and 3.8 °C in tomato and between -4.1 and 3.0 °C in cucumber. The lower Tmeristem observed in cucumber was linked with the higher transpiration of the bud foliage sheltering the meristem when compared with tomato plants. We here indicate that for properly linking growth and development of plants to temperature in future applications, for instance in climate change scenarios studies, Tmeristem should be used instead of Tair , as a species-specific trait highly reliant on various environmental factors.

  17. Predicting the Turbulent Air-Sea Surface Fluxes, Including Spray Effects, from Weak to Strong Winds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    from Moon et al. (2007) and Mueller and Veron (2009) are not much different from our main straight-line result (6) for UN10 above 20 m/s...model the air-sea drag as a consequence of just wind-wave coupling. That is, Moon et al. (2007) and Mueller and Veron (2009) modeled the surface stress... Veron evidently realized that they were predicting u* to be a linear function of UN10 in high winds.) In other words, exotic processes like sea

  18. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  19. Air Modeling - Observational Meteorological Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Observed meteorological data for use in air quality modeling consist of physical parameters that are measured directly by instrumentation, and include temperature, dew point, wind direction, wind speed, cloud cover, cloud layer(s), ceiling height,

  20. An examination of boundary layer structure under the influence of the gap winds in Urumqi, China, during air pollution episode in winter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Xia, Xiangao; Xin, Yu; Ma, Yufen; Yang, Jing; Li, Jinglin; Yang, Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    Tethered-sonde measurements of atmospheric profiles were performed at Urumuqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, from 29 December 2008 to 14 January 2009. The data were used to examine the boundary layer structure during this severe air pollution period. Diurnal evolution of local wind flow near Urumqi was simulated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). Measurements from operational radiosonde data showed that a southeasterly elevated low-level jet often intruded upon Urumqi through the middle Tianshan Mountain pass to the south of the city. The tethered-sonde measurements showed that calm and northwesterly winds prevailed near the surface in Urumqi, whereas the southeasterly winds of relatively higher speed were dominant above approximately 400 m. Both temperature inversion and humidity inversion frequently occured during day and nighttime. Temperature inversion intensity could sharply rise as the stronger elevated southeasterly gale (ESEG) happened. Model simulations showed that the winds near the surface around Urumqi remained calm during nighttime and developed toward the mountains during daytime. As cool airflow in the basin confronted the southeasterly winds from the pass in the lower layer, they formed a convergence line around Urumqi city, which was not favor for dilution of air pollutants.

  1. Wind estimation using air data probe measurements to evaluate meteorological measurements made during Space Shuttle entries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. M.; Findlay, J. T.; Compton, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Deterministic and weighted least squares methods for obtaining estimates of the horizontal winds encountered during the Shuttle entry phase are described. The estimates are based on in situ Air Data System (ADS) measurements of angle-of-attack, side-slip angle and true airspeed, in conjunction with inertial trajectory parameters obtained from the post flight trajectory reconstruction. Accuracies in the wind estimates obtained from each method are assessed using both theoretical arguments and flight results. Comparisons of derived winds with meteorological measurements taken during the first three Shuttle entries have demonstrated: (1) the usefulness of the wind estimators for evaluating meteorological measurements below 50 kft, and (2) the potential for adequate wind determinations in the absence of independent wind measurements. Comparisons of STS-3 flight-derived L/D versus predicted values from the LaRC aerodynamic data base are presented from 50 kft to touchdown. These results exemplify the importance of such determinations to enhance the ongoing Shuttle aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic research.

  2. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  3. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  4. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published "new" WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a "gold standard" for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  5. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published “new” WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a “gold standard” for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  6. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  7. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  8. Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements with a twin Doppler lidar in Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Wind and temperature measurements are fundamental to understand atmospheric dynamics. However, a wide altitude range of the middle atmosphere from about 15 to 70 km is hard to access by remote sensing instruments: the absence of free electrons prevents radar measurements, and the optical depth prevents satellite remote sensing over the whole altitude range. In-situ measurements by rockets allow only sporadic snapshots, while balloons are not able to ascent high enough. Our Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) in Northern Norway (69° N, 16° E) allows to measure temperatures, aerosols, and wind speed simultaneously. By applying two independently steerable telescopes we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components at once. The wind retrieval currently allows wind measurements in aerosol free parts of the middle atmosphere up to 85 km altitude without external calibration. The temporal and spatial resolution is 1 h and 3 km, respectively. We present case studies from campaigns conducted in the last three years. For validation we use measurements of vertical wind speed, which is close to zero for long integration times, simultaneous measurements of the same horizontal wind component with both telescopes or other remote sensing techniques operating at the limits of the instruments altitude range. The case studies include data recorded during stratospheric warmings and during periods of enhanced wave activity. Wave signatures are clearly visible in time-height sections of temperature and horizontal wind.

  9. Variation of the average 'freezing-in' temperature of oxygen ions with solar wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Vogt, C.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the average oxygen ionization equilibrium as a function of speed of the solar wind are presented. At low solar wind speeds they indicate a coronal temperature at the freezing-in point of (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 6th K. At speeds above 450 km/sec the apparent temperature starts to rise rapidly. This rise is tentatively interpreted in terms of a lack of thermodynamic equilibrium in the source region.

  10. A Numerical Model Study of Nocturnal Drainage Flows with Strong Wind and Temperature Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Bunker, S.

    1989-07-01

    A second-moment turbulence-closure model described in Yamada and Bunker is used to simulate nocturnal drainage flows observed during the 1984 ASCOT field expedition in Brush Creek, Colorado. In order to simulate the observed strong wind directional shear and temperature gradients, two modifications are added to the model. The strong wind directional shear was maintained by introducing a `nudging' term in the equation of motion to guide the modeled winds in the layers above the ridge top toward the observed wind direction. The second modification was accomplished by reformulating the conservation equation for the potential temperature in such a way that only the deviation from the horizontally averaged value was prognostically computed.The vegetation distribution used in this study is undoubtedly crude. Nevertheless, the present simulation suggests that tall tree canopy can play an important role in producing inhomogeneous wind distribution, particularly in the levels below the canopy top.

  11. Pulsed positive streamer discharges in air at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Kamakura, Taku

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air pulsed positive streamer discharges are generated in a 13 mm point-plane gap in the temperature range of 293 K-1136 K, and the effect of temperature on the streamer discharges is studied. When the temperature is increased, the product of applied voltage and temperature VT proportional to the reduced electric field can be used as a primary parameter that determines some discharge parameters regardless of temperature. For a given VT, the transferred charge per pulse, streamer diameter, product of discharge energy and temperature, and length of secondary streamer are almost constant regardless of T, whereas the streamer velocity decreases with increasing T and the decay rate of the discharge current is proportional to 1/T. The N2(C) emission intensity is approximately determined by the discharge energy independent of T. These results are useful to predict the streamer discharge and its reactive species production when the ambient temperature is increased.

  12. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  13. Modeling daily average stream temperature from air temperature and watershed area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, N. L.; Hunt, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Habitat restoration efforts within watersheds require spatial and temporal estimates of water temperature for aquatic species especially species that migrate within watersheds at different life stages. Monitoring programs are not able to fully sample all aquatic environments within watersheds under the extreme conditions that determine long-term habitat viability. Under these circumstances a combination of selective monitoring and modeling are required for predicting future geospatial and temporal conditions. This study describes a model that is broadly applicable to different watersheds while using readily available regional air temperature data. Daily water temperature data from thirty-eight gauges with drainage areas from 2 km2 to 2000 km2 in the Sonoma Valley, Napa Valley, and Russian River Valley in California were used to develop, calibrate, and test a stream temperature model. Air temperature data from seven NOAA gauges provided the daily maximum and minimum air temperatures. The model was developed and calibrated using five years of data from the Sonoma Valley at ten water temperature gauges and a NOAA air temperature gauge. The daily average stream temperatures within this watershed were bounded by the preceding maximum and minimum air temperatures with smaller upstream watersheds being more dependent on the minimum air temperature than maximum air temperature. The model assumed a linear dependence on maximum and minimum air temperature with a weighting factor dependent on upstream area determined by error minimization using observed data. Fitted minimum air temperature weighting factors were consistent over all five years of data for each gauge, and they ranged from 0.75 for upstream drainage areas less than 2 km2 to 0.45 for upstream drainage areas greater than 100 km2. For the calibration data sets within the Sonoma Valley, the average error between the model estimated daily water temperature and the observed water temperature data ranged from 0.7

  14. An Optimization Approach to Analyzing the Effect of Supply Water and Air Temperatures in Planning an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi

    In planning an air conditioning system, supply water and air temperatures are important factors from the viewpoint of cost reduction. For example, lower temperature supply water and air reduce the coefficient of performance of a refrigeration machine, and increase the thickness of heat insulation material. However, they enable larger temperature differences, and reduce equipment sizes and power demand. The purposes of this paper are to propose an optimal planning method for a cold air distribution system, and to analyze the effect of supply water and air temperatures on the long-term economics through a numerical study for an office building. As a result, it is shown that the proposed method effectively determines supply water and air temperatures for a cold air distribution system, and that the influence of supply air temperature is larger than that of supply water temperature on the long-term economics.

  15. Air supply using an ionic wind generator in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kilsung; Li, Longnan; Park, Byung Ho; Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Daejoong

    2015-06-01

    A new air supply is demonstrated for a portable polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The air supply is an ionic wind generator (IWG) with a needle-to-cylinder configuration. The IWG supplies air to the portable PEMFC owing to momentum transfer to the air by charged molecules generated by the corona discharge from a high applied potential. There is no difference in the performance of the PEMFC when compressed air and the IWG are used as the air supply. For the varying interelectrode distance, IWG performance is varied and measured in terms of the flow rate and current. At the interelectrode distance of 9.0 mm, the air flow rate is a suitable for the portable PEMFC with low power consumption. When the IWG is used to supply air to the portable PEMFC, it is found that the flow rate per unit power consumed decreases with the applied voltage, the gross power generation monotonously increases with the applied voltage, and the highest net power (268 mW) is obtained at the applied voltage of 8.5 kV. The parasitic power ratio reaches a minimum value of ∼0.06 with the applied IWG voltage of 5.5 kV.

  16. Arctic air may become cleaner as temperatures rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-10-01

    The air in the Arctic is cleaner during summer than during winter. Previous studies have shown that for light-scattering pollutants, this seasonal cycle is due mainly to summer precipitation removing pollutants from the air during atmospheric transport from midlatitude industrial and agricultural sources. With new measurements from Barrow, Alaska, and Alert, Nunavut, Canada, Garrett et al. extended previous research to show that light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are also efficiently removed by seasonal precipitation. Precipitation removes these particles from the air most efficiently at high humidities and relatively warm temperatures, suggesting that as the Arctic gets warmer and wetter in the future, the air and snow might also become cleaner.

  17. Close correlation between global air temperature change and polar motion during 1962-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei; Zhu, Lin; Gong, He; Shao, Yaping

    2016-10-01

    Polar motion is an important Earth orientation parameter, but our understanding of its relation to global climate change is highly uncertain. In this study, we examine the links between polar motion excitation and annual mean air temperature during the period of 1962-2013 and discuss the possible responsible mechanisms. The regions of positive correlation correspond well with the warming centers. Spectral analysis shows that they have strong signals at similar frequencies. Strong correlations are also found between the polar motion and surface air pressure and vertical integrated zonal wind. This implies that polar motion serves as an important indicator of global climate change, and thus, the feedbacks between the solid Earth and the climate system deserve careful considerations.

  18. Pioneer 10 observation of the solar wind proton temperature heliocentric gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Solar wind isotropic proton temperatures as measured out to 12.2 AU heliocentric distance by the Ames plasma analyzer aboard Pioneer 10 are presented as consecutive averages over three Carrington solar rotations and discussed. The weighted least-squares fit of average temperature to heliocentric radial distance, R, yields the power law R sup -.52. These average proton temperatures are not correlated as well with Pioneer 10's heliocentric radial distance (-.85) as are the corresponding average Zurich sunspot numbers R sub z (-.95). Consequently, it is difficult to isolate the spatial gradient in the Pioneer 10 solar wind proton temperatures using that data alone.

  19. Flame Speeds of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures at Low Initial Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Heimel, Sheldon

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds were determined for methane-air, propane-air, and ethylene-air mixtures at -73 C and for methane-air mixtures at -132 C. The data extend the curves of maximum flame speed against initial mixture temperature previously established for the range from room temperature to 344 C. Empirical equations for maximum flame speed u(cm/ sec) as a function of initial mixture temperature T(sub O) were determined to be as follows: for methane, for T(sub O) from 141 to 615 K, u = 8 + 0.000160 T(sub O)(exp 2.11); for propane, for T(sub O) from 200 to 616 K, u = 10 + 0.000342 T(sub O)(exp 2.00); for ethylene, for T(sub O) from 200 to 617 K, u = 10 + 0.00259 T(sub O)(exp 1.74). Relative flame speeds at low initial temperatures were predicted within approximately 20 percent by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or by the diffusion theory of Tanford and Pease. The same order was found previously for high initial temperatures. The low-temperature data were also found to extend the linear correlations between maximum flame speed and calculated equilibrium active-radical concentrations, which were established by the previously reported high-temperature data.

  20. Application of fuzzy logic to the control of wind tunnel settling chamber temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Humphreys, Gregory L.

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fuzzy Logic Controllers (FLC's) to the control of nonlinear processes, typically controlled by a human operator, is a topic of much study. Recent application of a microprocessor-based FLC to the control of temperature processes in several wind tunnels has proven to be very successful. The control of temperature processes in the wind tunnels requires the ability to monitor temperature feedback from several points and to accommodate varying operating conditions in the wind tunnels. The FLC has an intuitive and easily configurable structure which incorporates the flexibility required to have such an ability. The design and implementation of the FLC is presented along with process data from the wind tunnels under automatic control.

  1. Thermal responses and perceptions under distinct ambient temperature and wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Wind conditions are widely recognized to influence the thermal states of humans. In this study, we investigated the relationship between wind conditions and thermal perception and energy balance in humans. The study participants were exposed for 20 min to 3 distinct ambient temperatures, wind speeds, and wind angles. During the exposure, the skin temperatures as a physiological reaction and mental reactions of the human body were measured and the energy balance was calculated based on the human thermal-load method. The results indicate that the human thermal load is an accurate indicator of human thermal states under all wind conditions. Furthermore, wind speed and direction by themselves do not account for the human thermal experience. Because of the thermoregulation that occurs to prevent heat loss and protect the core of the body, a low skin temperature was maintained and regional differences in skin temperature were detected under cool ambient conditions. Thus, the human thermal load, which represents physiological parameters such as skin-temperature change, adequately describes the mixed sensation of the human thermal experience.

  2. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  3. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  4. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  5. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  6. Assessment of two-temperature kinetic model for ionizing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1987-01-01

    A two-temperature chemical-kinetic model for air is assessed by comparing theoretical results with existing experimental data obtained in shock-tubes, ballistic ranges, and flight experiments. In the model, named the TTv model, one temperature (T) is assumed to characterize the heavy-particle translational and molecular rotational energies, and another temperature (Tv) to characterize the molecular vibrational, electron translational, and electronic excitation energies. The theoretical results for nonequilibrium air flow in shock tubes are obtained using the computer code STRAP (Shock-Tube Radiation Program), and for flow along the stagnation streamline in the shock layer over spherical bodies using the newly developed code STRAP (Stagnation-Point Radiation Program). Substantial agreement is shown between the theoretical and experimental results for relaxation times and radiative heat fluxes. At very high temperatures the spectral calculations need further improvement. The present agreement provides strong evidence that the two-temperature model characterizes principal features of nonequilibrium air flow. New theoretical results using the model are presented for the radiative heat fluxes at the stagnation point of a 6-m-radius sphere, representing an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle, over a range of free-stream conditions. Assumptions, approximations, and limitations of the model are discussed.

  7. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  8. Application Documents for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    List of application documents for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  9. Comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    List of comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  10. Can air temperature be used to project influences of climate change on stream temperature?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Safeeq, Mohammad; Dunham, Jason B.; Johnson, Sherri L.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, lack of data on stream temperature has motivated the use of regression-based statistical models to predict stream temperatures based on more widely available data on air temperatures. Such models have been widely applied to project responses of stream temperatures under climate change, but the performance of these models has not been fully evaluated. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the performance of two widely used linear and nonlinear regression models that predict stream temperatures based on air temperatures. We evaluated model performance and temporal stability of model parameters in a suite of regulated and unregulated streams with 11–44 years of stream temperature data. Although such models may have validity when predicting stream temperatures within the span of time that corresponds to the data used to develop them, model predictions did not transfer well to other time periods. Validation of model predictions of most recent stream temperatures, based on air temperature–stream temperature relationships from previous time periods often showed poor performance when compared with observed stream temperatures. Overall, model predictions were less robust in regulated streams and they frequently failed in detecting the coldest and warmest temperatures within all sites. In many cases, the magnitude of errors in these predictions falls within a range that equals or exceeds the magnitude of future projections of climate-related changes in stream temperatures reported for the region we studied (between 0.5 and 3.0 °C by 2080). The limited ability of regression-based statistical models to accurately project stream temperatures over time likely stems from the fact that underlying processes at play, namely the heat budgets of air and water, are distinctive in each medium and vary among localities and through time.

  11. CARS Temperature and Species Measurements For Air Vehicle Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.; Grisch, Frederic; Klimenko, Dmitry; Clauss, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method has recently been used in the United States and Europe to probe several different types of propulsion systems for air vehicles. At NASA Langley Research Center in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor, representative of a scramjet engine. At Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and mole fractions of N2, O2 and CO2, in the exhaust stream of a liquid-fueled, gas-turbine combustor. At ONERA in France and the DLR in Germany researchers have used CARS to measure temperature and species concentrations in cryogenic LOX-H2 rocket combustion chambers. The primary aim of these measurements has been to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  12. Trend analysis of air temperature and precipitation time series over Greece: 1955-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marougianni, G.; Melas, D.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Feidas, H.; Zanis, P.; Anandranistakis, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a database of air temperature and precipitation time series from the network of Hellenic National Meteorological Service has been developed in the framework of the project GEOCLIMA, co-financed by the European Union and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" of the Research Funding Program COOPERATION 2009. Initially, a quality test was applied to the raw data and then missing observations have been imputed with a regularized, spatial-temporal expectation - maximization algorithm to complete the climatic record. Next, a quantile - matching algorithm was applied in order to verify the homogeneity of the data. The processed time series were used for the calculation of temporal annual and seasonal trends of air temperature and precipitation. Monthly maximum and minimum surface air temperature and precipitation means at all available stations in Greece were analyzed for temporal trends and spatial variation patterns for the longest common time period of homogenous data (1955 - 2010), applying the Mann-Kendall test. The majority of the examined stations showed a significant increase in the summer maximum and minimum temperatures; this could be possibly physically linked to the Etesian winds, because of the less frequent expansion of the low over the southeastern Mediterranean. Summer minimum temperatures have been increasing at a faster rate than that of summer maximum temperatures, reflecting an asymmetric change of extreme temperature distributions. Total annual precipitation has been significantly decreased at the stations located in western Greece, as well as in the southeast, while the remaining areas exhibit a non-significant negative trend. This reduction is very likely linked to the positive phase of the NAO that resulted in an increase in the frequency and persistence of anticyclones over the Mediterranean.

  13. Asphalted Road Temperature Variations Due to Wind Turbine Cast Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Arnay, Rafael; Acosta, Leopoldo; Sigut, Marta; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is a technique that in certain circumstances allows one to avoid the removal of dynamic shadows in the visible spectrum making use of images in the infrared spectrum. This technique emerged from a real problem concerning the autonomous navigation of a vehicle in a wind farm. In this environment, the dynamic shadows cast by the wind turbines' blades make it necessary to include a shadows removal stage in the preprocessing of the visible spectrum images in order to avoid the shadows being misclassified as obstacles. In the thermal images, dynamic shadows completely disappear, something that does not always occur in the visible spectrum, even when the preprocessing is executed. Thus, a fusion on thermal and visible bands is performed. PMID:22291541

  14. Asphalted road temperature variations due to wind turbine cast shadows.

    PubMed

    Arnay, Rafael; Acosta, Leopoldo; Sigut, Marta; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is a technique that in certain circumstances allows one to avoid the removal of dynamic shadows in the visible spectrum making use of images in the infrared spectrum. This technique emerged from a real problem concerning the autonomous navigation of a vehicle in a wind farm. In this environment, the dynamic shadows cast by the wind turbines' blades make it necessary to include a shadows removal stage in the preprocessing of the visible spectrum images in order to avoid the shadows being misclassified as obstacles. In the thermal images, dynamic shadows completely disappear, something that does not always occur in the visible spectrum, even when the preprocessing is executed. Thus, a fusion on thermal and visible bands is performed.

  15. Impacts of Lowered Urban Air Temperatures on Precursor Emission and Ozone Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Taha, Haider; Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    1998-09-01

    Meteorological, photochemical, building-energy, and power plant simulations were performed to assess the possible precursor emission and ozone air quality impacts of decreased air temperatures that could result from implementing the "cool communities" concept in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Two pathways are considered. In the direct pathway, a reduction in cooling energy use translates into reduced demand for generation capacity and, thus, reduced precursor emissions from electric utility power plants. In the indirect pathway, reduced air temperatures can slow the atmospheric production of ozone as well as precursor emission from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. The simulations suggest small impacts on emissions following implementation of cool communities in the SoCAB. In summer, for example, there can be reductions of up to 3% in NOx emissions from in-basin power plants. The photochemical simulations suggest that the air quality impacts of these direct emission reductions are small. However, the indirect atmospheric effects of cool communities can be significant. For example, ozone peak concentrations can decrease by up to 11% in summer and population-weighted exceedance exposure to ozone above the California and National Ambient Air Quality Standards can decrease by up to 11 and 17%, respectively. The modeling suggests that if these strategies are combined with others, such as mobile-source emission control, the improvements in ozone air quality can be substantial.

  16. Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in the middle atmosphere with a twin Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Luebken, Franz-Josef; Fiedler, Jens; Hildebrand, Jens

    2012-07-01

    Wind and temperature measurements are essential for understanding the atmospheric dynamics, e.g. mean circulation and wave perturbations. However in a wide altitude range of the middle atmosphere, from about 15 km to 70 km, temperatures and especially the wind is hard to measure: The absence of free electrons prevents radar measurements, and the optical depth prevents satellite remote sensing to cover the whole altitude range. In-situ measurements by rockets allow only sporadic snapshots, while meteorological balloons are not able to ascend to altitudes above 40 km. The Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research station in Northern Norway (69N, 16E) allows to measure temperatures, aerosols, and wind speeds simultaneously. Using two independently steerable telescopes and lasers we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components at once. Using strong spatial and spectral filtering the observations can be performed even under sunlit conditions. The wind retrieval currently allows wind measurements in aerosol free parts of the middle atmosphere up to 85 km altitude without external calibration. The temporal and spatial resolution is 1 h and 3 km, respectively. We present case studies from campaigns conducted in the last three years. For validation we use measurements of vertical wind speed, and simultaneous measurements of the same horizontal wind component with both telescopes. The case studies include data recorded during a stratospheric warming and during periods of enhanced wave activity. Wave signatures are clearly visible in time-height sections of temperature and horizontal wind and can be combined to investigate the wave propagation.

  17. The Effects of Air Pollution and Temperature on COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Nadia N.; McCormack, Meredith C.; Kim, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects 12–16 million people in the United States and is the third-leading cause of death. In developed countries, smoking is the greatest risk factor for the development of COPD, but other exposures also contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Several studies suggest, though are not definitive, that outdoor air pollution exposure is linked to the prevalence and incidence of COPD. Among individuals with COPD, outdoor air pollutants are associated with loss of lung function and increased respiratory symptoms. In addition, outdoor air pollutants are also associated with COPD exacerbations and mortality. There is much less evidence for the impact of indoor air on COPD, especially in developed countries in residences without biomass exposure. The limited existing data suggests that indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide concentrations are linked to increased respiratory symptoms among patients with COPD. In addition, with the projected increases in temperature and extreme weather events in the context of climate change there has been increased attention to the effects of heat exposure. Extremes of temperature—both heat and cold—have been associated with increased respiratory morbidity in COPD. Some studies also suggest that temperature may modify the effect of pollution exposure and though results are not conclusive, understanding factors that may modify susceptibility to air pollution in patients with COPD is of utmost importance. PMID:26683097

  18. LOCATING NEARBY SOURCES OF AIR POLLUTION BY NONPARAMETRIC REGRESSION OF ATMOSPHERIC CONCENTRATIONS ON WIND DIRECTION. (R826238)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship of the concentration of air pollutants to wind direction has been determined by nonparametric regression using a Gaussian kernel. The results are smooth curves with error bars that allow for the accurate determination of the wind direction where the concentrat...

  19. Role of Wind and Sea Surface Temperature Over Moisture Source Region in Determining the Stable Isotopic Ratios in Rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, P.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Rainwater stable isotope ratio is controlled by several factors such as distance from the coast, latitudinal location, altitudes, temperature and amount of rainfall (Dansgard 1964;Rozanski 1993). Amount of rainfall plays a significant role in controlling the distribution of stable isotopes especially in the tropics experiencing seasonal precipitation from monsoonal wind circulation. In recent years with more observations on rainfall stable isotopes being documented from tropical regions, the effect of parameters like wind, sea surface temperature, drop size distribution on stable isotopic composition of rainwater are better understood (Wright et al 2001;Vochon et al 2009; Rao et al 2006; Srivastava et al 2012). The isotopic compositions of 2010 ISMR (Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall) from Bangalore, India along with a few other observations of similar kind retrieved from the literatures are studied for amount effect relationship. Bangalore region provide nice opportunity to understand the different monsoonal influence due to its location ( ~300 km ) from coastal boundaries in east and west. The air parcel back trajectories obtained from NOAA HYSPLIT shows Arabian Sea region as the prominent source of moisture for the rainfall occurring during Southwest Monsoon (SWM). In this study we investigated the role of Sea Surface temperature (SST) and wind conditions over the moisture source and its effect on the intra seasonal variability of rainfall isotopic composition recorded at Bangalore region. The isotope analysis of δ18O in rainwater during the Indian summer monsoon rainfall shows a range of values from 2.77‰ to -9.07‰ over a period covering June to September. The observations fail to establish any relationship between stable isotope ratio and rainfall amount. We observed that the temporal variability of SST and wind over Arabian Sea region having strong role in driving the isotopic composition of rainwater. The relationship between SST and isotope ratio is found

  20. New results on equatorial thermospheric winds and temperatures from Ethiopia, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesema, Fasil; Mesquita, Rafael; Meriwether, John; Damtie, Baylie; Nigussie, Melessew; Makela, Jonathan; Fisher, Daniel; Harding, Brian; Yizengaw, Endawoke; Sanders, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of equatorial thermospheric winds, temperatures, and 630 nm relative intensities were obtained using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), which was recently deployed at Bahir Dar University in Ethiopia (11.6° N, 37.4° E, 3.7° N magnetic). The results obtained in this study cover 6 months (53 nights of useable data) between November 2015 and April 2016. The monthly-averaged values, which include local winter and equinox seasons, show the magnitude of the maximum monthly-averaged zonal wind is typically within the range of 70 to 90 ms-1 and is eastward between 19:00 and 21:00 LT. Compared to prior studies of the equatorial thermospheric wind for this local time period, the magnitude is considerably weaker as compared to the maximum zonal wind speed observed in the Peruvian sector but comparable to Brazilian FPI results. During the early evening, the meridional wind speeds are 30 to 50 ms-1 poleward during the winter months and 10 to 25 ms-1 equatorward in the equinox months. The direction of the poleward wind during the winter months is believed to be mainly caused by the existence of the interhemispheric wind flow from the summer to winter hemispheres. An equatorial wind surge is observed later in the evening and is shifted to later local times during the winter months and to earlier local times during the equinox months. Significant night-to-night variations are also observed in the maximum speed of both zonal and meridional winds. The temperature observations show the midnight temperature maximum (MTM) to be generally present between 00:30 and 02:00 LT. The amplitude of the MTM was ˜ 110 K in January 2016 with values smaller than this in the other months. The local time difference between the appearance of the MTM and a pre-midnight equatorial wind was generally 60 to 180 min. A meridional wind reversal was also observed after the appearance of the MTM (after 02:00 LT). Climatological models, HWM14 and MSIS-00, were compared to the

  1. Requirements for high-temperature air-cooled central receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. D.; Copeland, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    The design of solar thermal central receivers will be shaped by the end user's need for energy. This paper identifies the requirements for receivers supplying heat for industrial processes or electric power generation in the temperature range 540 to 1000(0)C and evaluates the effects of the requirements on air cooled central receivers. Potential IPH applications are identified as large baseload users that are located some distance from the receiver. In the electric power application, the receiver must supply heat to a pressurized gas power cycle. The difficulty in providing cost effective thermal transport and thermal storage for air cooled receivers is a critical problem.

  2. Peak Wind Forecasts for the Launch-Critical Wind Towers on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred

    2011-01-01

    This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds arc an important forecast clement for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the statistics in the current peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool includes onshore and offshore flow climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  3. Influence of Geomagnetic and IMF conditions on High Latitude Upper Atmospheric winds and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.; Emmert, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the climatological behavior of upper atmospheric winds (horizontal and vertical) and temperatures above Alaska by combining line-of-sight Doppler shifts of 630 nm optical emissions recorded during the 2011 and 2012 winters using a ground based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W). The wide field of view covered a large geographic region above Alaska. This field was divided in software into multiple zones (115 used here), allowing independent spectra to be sampled from many directions simultaneously. As a result, it is capable of recording the wind field's spatial variations over a wide geographic region with high spatial resolution, and to resolve these variations over time. Although such climatological studies have been performed previously using satellites, models, and narrow field Fabry-Perot interferometers, there are no published climatological studies of thermospheric winds and temperatures using either SDI data or any other technique with comparable geographic coverage and resolution. Wind summary dial plots were produced to depict the climatology of the horizontal winds and temperatures for different geomagnetic conditions and orientation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Results show that horizontal winds and temperatures had a strong dependence on geospace activity and orientation of IMF. The latitudinal shears in horizontal winds were stronger when geomagnetic conditions were active compared to the latitudinal shears for quiet conditions. Also, shears appeared earlier over Poker Flat when geomagnetic conditions were active. The latitudinal shears showed more dependence on IMF when geomagnetic conditions were active than they did during quieter conditions. F-region temperatures were higher under active geomagnetic conditions than during quiet conditions. They were also observed to be higher in pre-magnetic midnight sector (duskside) than they were post

  4. Climate change and river temperature sensitivity to warmer nighttime vs. warmer daytime air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diabat, M.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the July river temperature response to atmospheric warming over the diurnal cycle in a 36 km reach of the upper Middle Fork John Day River of Oregon, USA. The physical model Heat Source was calibrated and used to run 3 different cases of increased air temperature during July: 1) uniform increase over the whole day ("delta method"), 2) warmer daytime, and 3) warmer nighttime. All 3 cases had the same mean daily air temperatures - a 4 °C increase relative to 2002. Results show that the timing of air temperature increases has a significant effect on the magnitude, timing and duration of changes in water temperatures relative to current conditions. In all cases, river temperatures in the lower reach increased by at least 1.1 °C . For the delta case, water temperature increases never exceeded 2.3 °C. In contrast, under the warmer daytime case, water temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 6.6 hours/day on average, with the largest increases occurring during mid-day. In the warmer night case the river temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 4.3 hours/day on average with the largest increases occurring around midnight. In addition, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the delta case increased the water temperature by an average of 1.9 °C uniformly during daytime and nighttime. Still, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer daytime case increased water temperature by an average of at least 1.6 °C during the daytime and by an average of up to 2.5 °C during the nighttime, while an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer nighttime case increased the water temperature by an average of at least 1.4 °C during the nighttime and by an average of up to 2.4 °C during the daytime. The spatial response of temperature was different for each case. The lower 13 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the delta case, while only the lower 6 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the warmer daytime case

  5. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height and pressure for 0-120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Barnett, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a monthly mean climatology of zonal mean temperature, zonal wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 deg S-80 deg N) for 0-120 km which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. This climatology reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as the lowering and cooling of the mesopause and the lowering and warming of the stratopause during the summer months at high latitudes. A series of zonal wind profiles is also presented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The two data sets compare well below 80 km, with some general seasonal trend agreement observed above 80 km. The zonal wind at the equator presented here simulates the observed features of the semiannual oscillation in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere.

  6. Facial cold-induced vasodilation and skin temperature during exposure to cold wind.

    PubMed

    Brajkovic, Dragan; Ducharme, Michel B

    2006-04-01

    One purpose of this study was to characterize the facial skin temperature and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) response of 12 subjects (six males and six females) during exposure to cold wind (i.e., -10 to 10 degrees C; 2, 5, and 8 m/s wind speed). This study found that at each wind speed, facial skin temperature decreased as ambient temperature decreased. The percentage of subjects showing facial CIVD decreased significantly at an ambient temperature above -10 degrees C. A similar CIVD percentage was observed between 0 degrees C dry and 10 degrees C wet (face sprayed with fine water mist) at each wind speed. No CIVDs were observed during the 10 degrees C dry condition at any wind speed. The incidence of CIVD response was more uniform across facial sites when there was a greater cold stress (i.e., -10 degrees C and 8 m/s wind). Another objective of the study was to examine the effect of the thermal state of the body (as reflected by core temperature) on the facial skin temperature response during rest and exercise. This study found that nose skin temperature was significantly higher in exercising subjects with an elevated core temperature even though there was no significant difference in face skin temperature between the two conditions. Therefore, this finding suggests that acral regions of the face, such as the nose, are more sensitive to changes in the thermal state of the body, and hence will stay warmer relative to other parts of the face during exercise in the cold.

  7. Evaluating CMIP5 models using AIRS tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian H.; Teixeira, Joao; Manning, Evan; Hearty, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents the climatological mean features of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) monthly mean tropospheric air temperature (ta, K) and specific humidity (hus, kg/kg) products as part of the Obs4MIPs project and compares them to those from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for validation and 16 models from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) for CMIP5 model evaluation. MERRA is warmer than AIRS in the free troposphere but colder in the boundary layer with differences typically less than 1 K. MERRA is also drier (~10%) than AIRS in the tropical boundary layer but wetter (~30%) in the tropical free troposphere and the extratropical troposphere. In particular, the large MERRA-AIRS specific humidity differences are mainly located in the deep convective cloudy regions indicating that the low sampling of AIRS in the cloudy regions may be the main reason for these differences. In comparison to AIRS and MERRA, the sixteen CMIP5 models can generally reproduce the climatological features of tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity well, but several noticeable biases exist. The models have a tropospheric cold bias (around 2 K), especially in the extratropical upper troposphere, and a double-ITCZ problem in the troposphere from 1000 hPa to 300 hPa, especially in the tropical Pacific. The upper-tropospheric cold bias exists in the most (13 of 16) models, and the double-ITCZ bias is found in all 16 CMIP5 models. Both biases are independent of the reference dataset used (AIRS or MERRA).

  8. Simultaneous Global Pressure and Temperature Measurement Technique for Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature luminescent coatings are being developed and applied for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping in conventional-type hypersonic wind tunnels, providing global pressure as well as Global aeroheating measurements. Together, with advanced model fabrication and analysis methods, these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles. The current status in development of simultaneous pressure- and temperature-sensitive coatings and measurement techniques for hypersonic wind tunnels at Langley Research Center is described. and initial results from a feasibility study in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel are presented.

  9. What are the relative roles of heating and cooling in generating solar wind temperature anisotropies?

    PubMed

    Maruca, B A; Kasper, J C; Bale, S D

    2011-11-11

    Temperature anisotropy in the solar wind results from a combination of mechanisms of anisotropic heating (e.g., cyclotron-resonant heating and dissipation of kinetic Alfvén waves) and cooling (e.g., Chew-Goldberger-Low double-adiabatic expansion). In contrast, anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the cyclotron, mirror, and firehose instabilities limit the allowable departure of the plasma from isotropy. This study used data from the Faraday cups on the Wind spacecraft to examine scalar temperature and temperature components of protons. Plasma unstable to the mirror or firehose instability was found to be about 3-4 times hotter than stable plasma. Since anisotropy-driven instabilities are not understood to heat the plasma, these results suggest that heating processes are more effective than cooling processes at creating and maintaining proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind.

  10. Investigation of Low-temperature Solders for Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of high Reynolds number cryogenic wind tunnels has forced alteration of manufacturing and assembly techniques and eliminated usage of many materials associated with conventional wind tunnel models. One of the techniques affected is soldering. Solder alloys commonly used for wind tunnel models are susceptible to low-temperature embrittlement and phase transformation. The low-temperature performance of several solder alloys is being examined during research and development activities being conducted in support of design and fabrication of cryogenic wind tunnel models. Among the properties examined during these tests are shear strength, surface quality, joint stability, and durability when subjected to dynamic loading. Results of these tests and experiences with recent models are summarized.

  11. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-03-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with an uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 (standard error) and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard-error uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the Global Positioning System, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that the new laser air-motion sensor, combined with parametrized fits to correction factors for the measured dynamic and ambient pressure, provides a measurement of temperature that is independent of any other temperature sensor.

  12. THz Limb Sounder (TLS) for Lower Thermospheric Wind, Oxygen Density, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium(LTE) at altitudes up to 350km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP)mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  13. THz limb sounder (TLS) for lower thermospheric wind, oxygen density, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at altitudes up to 350 km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP) mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  14. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height, and pressure for 0 - 120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Barnett, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A monthly mean climatology is presented of temperature, wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 S to 80 N) for 0 to 210 km, which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. The purpose is to provide a reference for various atmospheric research and analysis activities. Data sources and methods of computation are described; in general, hydrostatic and thermal wind balance are maintained at all levels and latitudes. As observed in a series of cross-sectional plots, this climatology accurately reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as equatorial wind and the general structure of the tropopause, stratopause, and mesopause. A series of zonal wind profiles is also represented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The temperature and zonal wind climatology at stratospheric levels is compared with corresponding data from the National Meteorological Center, and general agreement is observed between the two data sets. Tables of the climatological values as a function of latitude and height for each month are contained in Appendix B, and are also available in floppy disk.

  15. Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Air Flow on Fungal Growth Rate on Loaded Ventilation Filters.

    PubMed

    Tang, W; Kuehn, T H; Simcik, Matt F

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the fungal growth ratio on loaded ventilation filters under various temperature, relative humidity (RH), and air flow conditions in a controlled laboratory setting. A new full-size commercial building ventilation filter was loaded with malt extract nutrients and conidia of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in an ASHRAE Standard 52.2 filter test facility. Small sections cut from this filter were incubated under the following conditions: constant room temperature and a high RH of 97%; sinusoidal temperature (with an amplitude of 10°C, an average of 23°C, and a period of 24 hr) and a mean RH of 97%; room temperature and step changes between 97% and 75% RH, 97% and 43% RH, and 97% and 11% RH every 12 hr. The biomass on the filter sections was measured using both an elution-culture method and by ergosterol assay immediately after loading and every 2 days up to 10 days after loading. Fungal growth was detected earlier using ergosterol content than with the elution-culture method. A student's t-test indicated that Cladosporium sphaerospermum grew better at the constant room temperature condition than at the sinusoidal temperature condition. By part-time exposure to dry environments, the fungal growth was reduced (75% and 43% RH) or even inhibited (11% RH). Additional loaded filters were installed in the wind tunnel at room temperature and an RH greater than 95% under one of two air flow test conditions: continuous air flow or air flow only 9 hr/day with a flow rate of 0.7 m(3)/s (filter media velocity 0.15 m/s). Swab tests and a tease mount method were used to detect fungal growth on the filters at day 0, 5, and 10. Fungal growth was detected for both test conditions, which indicates that when temperature and relative humidity are optimum, controlling the air flow alone cannot prevent fungal growth. In real applications where nutrients are less sufficient than in this laboratory study, fungal growth rate may be reduced under the same operating conditions.

  16. Air pollution, lagged effects of temperature, and mortality: The Netherlands 1979-87.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenbach, J P; Looman, C W; Kunst, A E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore whether the apparent low threshold for the mortality effects of air pollution could be the result of confounding. DESIGN--The associations between mortality and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were analysed taking into account potential confounding factors. SETTING--The Netherlands, 1979-87. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--The number of deaths listed by the day on which the death occurred and by the cause of death were obtained from the Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics. Mortality from all causes and mortality from four large groups of causes (neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, and external causes) were related to the daily levels of SO2 air pollution and potential confounders (available from various sources) using log-linear regression analysis. Variables considered as potential confounders were: average temperature; difference between maximum and minimum temperatures; amount of precipitation; air humidity; wind speed; influenza incidence; and calendar year, month, and weekday. Both lagged and unlagged effects of the meteorological and influenza variables were considered. Average temperature was represented by two variables--'cold', temperatures below 16.5 degrees C, and 'warm', those above 16.5 degrees C--to allow for the V shaped relation between temperature and mortality. The positive regression coefficient for the univariate effect of SO2 density on mortality from all causes dwindles to close to zero when all potential confounding variables are taken into account. The most important of these represents the lagged (one to five days) effect of low temperatures. Low temperatures have strong lagged effects on mortality, and often precede relatively high SO2 densities in the Netherlands. Results were similar for separate causes of death. While univariate associations suggest an effect of air pollution on mortality in all four cause of death groups, multivariate analyses show these effects, including that on mortality from

  17. Calculation of geopotential and temperature fields from an array of nearly continuous wind observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Anthes, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy is studied of temperature estimates derived from the divergence equation when wind observations of various spatial and temporal resolutions and accuracies are available. The basic data set used is the high resolution model data set used by Kuo and Anthes (1984a) in observing systems simulation experiments (OSSE) designed to estimate the errors in heat and moisture budgets (Kuo and Anthes, 1984b) calculated from the AVE-SESAME-1979 spatial observational network. This model data set is modified in ways to simulate wind observations that appear feasible from an operational regional network of wind profilers.

  18. Measuring Thermospheric Winds and Temperatures Near the Equator: Evidence for the Development of an Inertial Instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriwether, J. W.; Larsen, M. F.; Sanders, S.; Makela, J. J.; Fisher, D. J.; Harding, B. J.; Navarro, L.; Milla, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of thermospheric winds and temperatures near the geomagnetic equator for the regions of northeastern Brazil and central Peru show evidence for the development of meridional wind gradients for each of the two regions. Also evident is the result that the zonal winds are higher in speed for the Peru measurements when compared with the zonal winds measured in Brazil. Within the 4 degree latitude separation of Arequipa and Jicamarca, the zonal winds observed are generally the same. The Brazil site shows a difference in the meridional winds across a spatial separation of 500 km of about 20 to 40 ms-1 decrease from south to north. This gradient is seen consistently during the local summer months. Comparison of Brazil and Peru zonal winds for simultaneous nightly measurements and for averaged monthly results shows the zonal winds in the mid-evening period (21-23 LT) are generally faster by about 30 to 75 ms-1 for the Peru site which is located near or at the geomagnetic equator. These results are interpreted in terms of an inertial instability mechanism that is activated as a result of a steady state unbalanced flow. The theory of fluid dynamics applied to the thermosphere indicates that near the geographic equator where the Coriolis parameter f approaches zero, the neutral medium becomes unstable developing wave structure that may transport momentum and energy into both zonal and meridional directions.

  19. Wind speed and temperature trends impacts on reference evapotranspiration in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Lorena; Viola, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the impacts of both temperature and wind speed trends on reference evapotranspiration have been assessed using as a case study the Southern Italy, which present a wide variety of combination of such climatic variables trends in terms of direction and magnitude. The existence of statistically significant trends in wind speed and temperature from observational datasets, measured in ten stations over Southern Italy during the period 1968-2004, has been investigated. Time series have been examined using the Mann-Kendall nonparametric statistical test in order to detect possible evidences of wind speed and temperature trends at different temporal resolution and significance level. Once trends have been examined and quantified, the effects of these trends on seasonal reference evapotranspiration have been evaluated using the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith equation. Results quantified the effects of extrapolated temperature and wind speed trends on reference evapotranspiration. Where these climatic drivers are on the same direction, reference evapotranspiration generally increases during the growing season due to a nonlinear overlapping of effects. Whereas wind speed decreases and temperature increases, there is a sort of counterbalancing effect between the two considered climatic forcing in determining future reference evapotranspiration.

  20. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  1. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s-1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  2. Temperature Variations Recorded During Interinstitutional Air Shipments of Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Eric; Pineda, Fernando J; Watson, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive guidelines and regulations that govern most aspects of rodent shipping, few data are available on the physical environment experienced by rodents during shipment. To document the thermal environment experienced by mice during air shipments, we recorded temperatures at 1-min intervals throughout 103 routine interinstitutional shipments originating at our institution. We found that 49.5% of shipments were exposed to high temperatures (greater than 29.4 °C), 14.6% to low temperatures (less than 7.2 °C), and 61% to temperature variations of 11 °C or more. International shipments were more likely than domestic shipments to experience temperature extremes and large variations in temperature. Freight forwarders using passenger airlines rather than their own airplanes were more likely to have shipments that experienced temperature extremes or variations. Temperature variations were most common during stopovers. Some airlines were more likely than others to experience inflight temperature extremes or swings. Most domestic shipments lasted at least 24 h, whereas international shipments lasted 48 to 72 h. Despite exposure to high and low temperatures, animals in all but 1 shipment arrived alive. We suggest that simple measures, such as shipping at night during hot weather, provision of nesting material in shipping crates, and specifying aircraft cargo-hold temperatures that are suitable for rodents, could reduce temperature-induced stress. Measures such as additional training for airport ground crews, as previously recommended by the American Veterinary Medical Association, could further reduce exposure of rodents to extreme ambient temperatures during airport stopovers. PMID:18210996

  3. Spatial structures of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity observed by aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbach, Christoph; Schween, Jan; Crewell, Susanne; Geiss, Heiner; Neininger, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    During the FLUXPAT campaigns in 2008 and 2009 the MetAir Dimona research aricraft performed several fligths above a patchy, agricultural dominated landscape near Juelich/Germany. The measurements are aimed to capture the variability of water vapor and CO2 and derive turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer close to the ground. Flights took place at two main levels around 150 m and 250 m above ground. Agriculture in this region is dominated by two different crops: sugar beet and wheat. Flights were scheduled in April and August as at these times of the year strong contrasts can be found between different fields. In April sugar beet is usually just seeded whereas wheat already forms a closed canopy. In August wheat unlike sugar beat is already harvested. We analyse the correlation lengths (L*) of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity on flight legs. L* is the median of the power spectrum i.e. 50 percent of the variance is in structures larger than L*. For the different quantities L* shows different behaviours during the day and between different flight levels. The structure lengthscales of CO2 have a large dependency on daytime and strongly decrease during noon and afternoon. We will present some approaches to explain this behaviour.

  4. Global surface air temperature variations: 1851-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Raper, S.C.B.; Kelly, P.M.

    1986-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to combine station surface air temperature data into an average for the Northern Hemisphere. Fewer attempts have been made for the Southern Hemisphere because of the unavailability of data from the Antarctic mainland before the 1950s and the uncertainty of making a hemispheric estimate based solely on land-based analyses for a hemisphere that is 80% ocean. Past estimates have been based largely on data from the World Weather Records (Smithsonian Institution, 1927, 1935, 1947, and U.S. Weather Bureau, 1959-82) and have been made without considerable effort to detect and correct station inhomogeneities. Better estimates for the Southern Hemisphere are now possible because of the availability of 30 years of climatological data from Antarctica. The mean monthly surface air temperature anomalies presented in this package for the than those previously published because of the incorporation of data previously hidden away in archives and the analysis of station homogeneity before estimation.

  5. Using Wind and Temperature Fields to Study Dehydration Mechanisms in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna; Miller, Timothy; Robertson, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    The tropics are the main region for troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST) of air. One of the dominant mechanisms that control tropical TST of water vapor is freeze-drying by the cold tropical tropopause. This mechanism is supported by evidence from satellite observations of the "tape recorder", where seasonal changes in stratospheric water vapor are in phase with seasonal changes in tropopause temperatures in the tropics. Over the last few years, however, the concept of the tropical tropopause has evolved from a single material surface to a layer called the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). A recent hypothesis on dehydration mechanisms suggests that dehydration and entry point into the stratosphere are not always co-located (Holton and Gettelman, 2001). Instead, dehydration can occur during horizontal advection through Lagrangian 'cold pools', or coldest regions along a parcel's trajectory, as air ascends within the TTL while the entry point into the stratosphere occurs at a different geographical location. In this study, we investigate the impact that these Lagrangian cold pools have on TTL moisture. For this purpose, we use in situ measurements of TTL water vapor obtained aboard NASA's WB-57 aircraft over the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and we compare these measurements to minimum saturation water vapor mixing ratios obtained from three-dimensional backward trajectory calculations. Aircraft measurements show frequent unsaturated conditions, which suggest that the entry value of stratospheric water vapor in this region was not set by local saturation conditions. Trajectory calculations, driven by both ECMWF operational analysis and reanalysis winds and temperature fields, are used to explore the impact (e.g., geographical location, timing, dehydration magnitude) of the Lagrangian cold pools intercepted by the parcels sampled by the aircraft. We find noteworthy differences in the location of the Lagrangian cold pools using the two ECMWF data sets, namely

  6. Influence of tropical wind on global temperature from months to decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.; Fyfe, John C.; Swart, Neil C.; Lee, Warren G.; England, Matthew H.

    2016-10-01

    Using an Earth System Model and observations we analyze the sequence of events connecting episodes of trade wind strengthening (or weakening) to global mean surface temperature (GMST) cooling (or warming), with tropical ocean wave dynamics partially setting the time scale. In this sequence tropical west Pacific wind stress signals lead equatorial east Pacific thermocline depth signals which lead tropical east Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) signals which lead GMST signals. Using the anthropogenic, natural and tropical wind signals extracted from our simulations in a multivariate linear regression with observed GMST makes clear the balance that exists between anthropogenic warming and tropical wind-induced cooling during the recent warming slowdown, and between volcanic cooling and tropical wind-induced warming during the El Chichón and Pinatubo eruptions. Finally, we find an anticorrelation between global-mean temperatures in the near-surface (upper ˜ 100 m) and subsurface (˜ 100-300 m) ocean layers, linked to wind-driven interannual to decadal variations in the strength of the subtropical cell overturning in the upper Pacific Ocean.

  7. Evidence of Lunar Phase Influence on Global Surface Air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Ebby; Susskind, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a newly available 20-year record of satellite-derived surface air temperature are composited with respect to the lunar phase. Polar regions exhibit strong lunar phase modulation with higher temperatures occurs near full moon and lower temperatures at new moon, in agreement with previous studies. The polar response to the apparent lunar forcing is shown to be most robust in the winter months when solar influence is minimum. In addition, the response appears to be influenced by ENSO events. The highest mean temperature range between full moon and new moon in the polar region between 60 deg and 90 deg latitude was recorded in 1983, 1986/87, and 1990/91. Although the largest lunar phase signal is in the polar regions, there is a tendency for meridional equatorward progression of anomalies in both hemispheres so that the warning in the tropics occurs at the time of the new moon.

  8. The Use of Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Moltham, A. L.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of non-convective winds associated with passing extratropical cyclones and the formation of the sting jet in North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe has been gaining interest. Sting jet research has been limited to North Atlantic cyclones that impact Europe because it is known to occur in Shapiro-Keyser cyclones and theory suggests it does not occur in Norwegian type cyclones. The global distribution of sting jet cyclones is unknown and questions remain as to whether cyclones with Shapiro-Keyser characteristics that impact the United States develop features similar to the sting jet. Therefore unique National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) products were used to analyze an event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) ozone data were used in conjunction with NASA's global Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis and higher-resolution regional 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) data to analyze the role of stratospheric air in producing high winds. The RGB Air Mass imagery and a new AIRS ozone anomaly product were used to confirm the presence of stratospheric air. Plan view and cross sectional plots of wind, potential vorticity, relative humidity, omega, and frontogenesis were used to analyze the relationship between stratospheric air and high surface winds during the event. Additionally, the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to plot trajectories to determine the role of the conveyor belts in producing the high winds. Analyses of new satellite products, such as the RGB Air Mass imagery, show the utility of future GOES-R products in forecasting non-convective wind events.

  9. Two decades of temperature-time monitoring experiment: air - ground surface - shallow subsurface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Dedecek, Petr; Safanda, Jan; Kresl, Milan

    2014-05-01

    Long-term observations (1994-2013) of air and shallow ground temperatures at borehole Prague-Sporilov (50º02'28.5"E, 14º28'40.2"N, 274 m a.s.l.) have been thoroughly analyzed to understand the relationship between these quantities and to describe the mechanism of heat transport at the land-atmosphere boundary layer. Data provided a surprisingly small mean ground-air temperature offset of only 0.31 K with no clear annual course and with the offset value changing irregularly even on a daily scale. Such value is substantially lower than similar values (1-2 K and more) found elsewhere, but may well characterize a mild temperate zone, when all so far available information referred rather to southern locations. Borehole data were correlated with similar observations in a polygon-site under four types of surface conditions (grass, soil, sand and asphalt) completed with registration of meteorological variables (wind direction & velocity, air & soil humidity, direct & reflected solar radiation, precipitation and snow cover). The "thermal orbits" technique proved to be an effective tool for the fast qualitative diagnostics of the thermal regime in the subsurface (conductive versus non-conductive).

  10. The Houston Urban Heat Island: Surface Temperature, Aerosol Mixing Layer Height, and Surface Wind Field Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, L. S.; Senff, C. J.

    2007-12-01

    Both Dallas and Houston, Texas have comprehensive networks of surface meteorology and chemistry sensors. The similarities of the networks and lack of terrain in Dallas and Houston allow for the comparison of their urban heat islands (UHI). The Dallas UHI, unperturbed by thermal flows driven by the land/sea temperature difference, is a well-defined phenomenon over the summers of 2000-2006. Including all weather conditions, the average nighttime T(urban) - T(rural) temperature difference was between 1.5° and 2.0° C and the average daytime difference was ~ 1.0° C. Analysis of Houston temperature data, however, revealed a different picture due to the bay and gulf breezes. While the Houston UHI was a distinct phenomenon, even when including all weather conditions, the bay or gulf breeze modified the Houston UHI by cooling the city. Average nighttime T(urban) - T(rural) temperature differences in Houston were between 1.75° and 2.75° C. However, during the day, the rural areas to the north and west of the city were often warmer than the downtown area during afternoon hours as a result of the sea breeze. Averaging the Houston T(urban) - T(rural) temperature differences over the summers of 2000-2006 indicated a very small urban-rural temperature difference between 1400 to 1600 LST. In some individual years, such as 2000, 2003, 2005 and 2006, the urban areas were actually cooler than the rural areas, on average, in the mid-afternoon. These years had more bay breeze/gulf breeze activity to cool the urban area. We will also look at how land use, the UHI, and boundary-layer winds impact the horizontal distribution of boundary layer heights over the Houston area, as calculated from backscatter measurements from TOPAZ, an ozone and aerosol profiling lidar deployed on a NOAA Twin Otter in the summer of 2006 during the Texas Air Quality Study II.

  11. Antarctic Sea ice variations and seasonal air temperature relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherly, John W.; Walsh, John E.; Zwally, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Data through 1987 are used to determine the regional and seasonal dependencies of recent trends of Antarctic temperature and sea ice. Lead-lag relationships involving regional sea ice and air temperature are systematically evaluated, with an eye toward the ice-temperature feedbacks that may influence climatic change. Over the 1958-1087 period the temperature trends are positive in all seasons. For the 15 years (l973-l987) for which ice data are available, the trends are predominantly positive only in winter and summer, and are most strongly positive over the Antarctic Peninsula. The spatially aggregated trend of temperature for this latter period is small but positive, while the corresponding trend of ice coverage is small but negative. Lag correlations between seasonal anomalies of the two variables are generally stronger with ice lagging the summer temperatures and with ice leading the winter temperatures. The implication is that summer temperatures predispose the near-surface waters to above-or below-normal ice coverage in the following fall and winter.

  12. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  13. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-2: Effects of Communications Delays and Winds in Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Communications Delays and Winds on Air Traffic Controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth East-side airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from self-separation algorithms displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Simulation System. Winds tested did not affect the acceptability ratings. Communications delays tested included 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS.

  14. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  15. Daily Air Temperature and Electricity Load in Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valor, Enric; Meneu, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente

    2001-08-01

    Weather has a significant impact on different sectors of the economy. One of the most sensitive is the electricity market, because power demand is linked to several weather variables, mainly the air temperature. This work analyzes the relationship between electricity load and daily air temperature in Spain, using a population-weighted temperature index. The electricity demand shows a significant trend due to socioeconomic factors, in addition to daily and monthly seasonal effects that have been taken into account to isolate the weather influence on electricity load. The results indicate that the relationship is nonlinear, showing a `comfort interval' of ±3°C around 18°C and two saturation points beyond which the electricity load no longer increases. The analysis has also revealed that the sensitivity of electricity load to daily air temperature has increased along time, in a higher degree for summer than for winter, although the sensitivity in the cold season is always more significant than in the warm season. Two different temperature-derived variables that allow a better characterization of the observed relationship have been used: the heating and cooling degree-days. The regression of electricity data on them defines the heating and cooling demand functions, which show correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.87, and predicts electricity load with standard errors of estimate of ±4% and ±2%, respectively. The maximum elasticity of electricity demand is observed at 7 cooling degree-days and 9 heating degree-days, and the saturation points are reached at 11 cooling degree-days and 13 heating degree-days, respectively. These results are helpful in modeling electricity load behavior for predictive purposes.

  16. Long integral temperature Brillouin sensor for off- shore wind energy power supply lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintela, M. A.; Ullán, A.; Quintela, A.; Galindez, C.; Perez-Herrera, R. A.; López-Amo, M.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    A hybrid Erbium-Brillouin fiber laser sensor to measure the temperature along 22 km fiber is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A multi-line laser oscillation is induced by the Brillouin gain of different concatenated transducer fiber sections placed in the ring cavity. Integral temperature measurements of each fiber section are obtained through each laser line. This sensor can be used to monitor the temperature of off-shore wind energy power cables.

  17. Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailovic, D. T.; Alapaty, K.; Lalic, B.; Arsenic, I.; Rajkovic, B.; Malinovic, S.

    2004-10-01

    A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The proposed method, based on K theory, is assessed using data measured in a maize canopy. The air temperature inside the canopy is determined diagnostically by a method based on detailed consideration of 1) calculations of turbulent fluxes, 2) the shape of the wind and turbulent transfer coefficient profiles, and 3) calculation of the aerodynamic resistances inside tall grass canopies. An expression for calculating the turbulent transfer coefficient inside sparse tall grass canopies is also suggested, including modification of the corresponding equation for the wind profile inside the canopy. The proposed calculations of K-theory parameters are tested using the Land Air Parameterization Scheme (LAPS). Model outputs of air temperature inside the canopy for 8 17 July 2002 are compared with micrometeorological measurements inside a sunflower field at the Rimski Sancevi experimental site (Serbia). To demonstrate how changes in the specification of canopy density affect the simulation of air temperature inside tall grass canopies and, thus, alter the growth of PBL height, numerical experiments are performed with LAPS coupled with a one-dimensional PBL model over a sunflower field. To examine how the turbulent transfer coefficient inside tall grass canopies over a large domain represents the influence of the underlying surface on the air layer above, sensitivity tests are performed using a coupled system consisting of the NCEP Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model and LAPS.


  18. A 2-Liter, 2000 MPa Air Source for the Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Costantino, M; Lofftus, D

    2002-05-30

    The A2 LITE is a 2 liter, 2000 MPa, 750 K ultra-high pressure (UHP) vessel used to demonstrate UHP technology and to provide an air flow for wind tunnel nozzle development. It is the largest volume UHP vessel in the world. The design is based on a 100:1 pressure intensification using a hydraulic ram as a low pressure driver and a three-layer compound cylinder UHP section. Active control of the 900 mm piston stroke in the 63.5 mm bore permits pressure-time profiles ranging from static to constant pressure during flow through a 1 mm throat diameter nozzle for 1 second.

  19. On extreme rainfall intensity increases with air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Gaal, Ladislav; Szolgay, Jan; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The water vapour holding capacity of air increases at about 7% per degree C according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. This is one of the arguments why a warmer future atmosphere, being able to hold more moisture, will generate higher extreme precipitation intensities. However, several empirical studies have recently demonstrated an increase in extreme rain intensities with air temperature above CC rates, in the range 7-14% per degree C worldwide (called super-CC rates). This was observed especially for shorter duration rainfall, i.e. in hourly and finer resolution data (e.g. review in Westra et al., 2014). The super-CC rate was attributed to positive feedbacks between water vapour and the updraft dynamics in convective clouds and lateral supply (convergence) of moisture. In addition, mixing of storm types was shown to be potentially responsible for super-CC rates in empirical studies. Assuming that convective events are accompanied by lightning, we will show on a large rainfall dataset in Switzerland (30 year records of 10-min and 1-hr data from 59 stations) that while the average rate of increase in extreme rainfall intensity (95th percentile) is 6-7% in no-lightning events and 8-9% in lightning events, it is 11-13% per degree C when all events are combined (Molnar et al., 2015). These results are relevant for climate change studies which predict shifts in storm types in a warmer climate in some parts of the world. The observation that extreme rain intensity and air temperature are positively correlated has consequences for the stochastic modelling of rainfall. Most current stochastic models do not explicitly include a direct rain intensity-air temperature dependency beyond applying factors of change predicted by climate models to basic statistics of precipitation. Including this dependency explicitly in stochastic models will allow, for example in the nested modelling approach of Paschalis et al. (2014), the random cascade disaggregation routine to be

  20. A wave tank study of the dependence of X band cross sections on wind speed and water temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Mary Ruth; Keller, William C.; Plant, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying the water temperature, wind speed, and wind stress on the values of backscatter were investigated using measurements of normalized radar cross sections of wind-generated waves, made at X band for both vertical and horizontal polarization for incidence angles 10, 28, 48, and 68 deg. The experiment was conducted using the Naval Research Laboratory wind-wave tank. Measurements made for a wide range of wind speeds and water temperatures are compared with results of backscattering models currently in use.

  1. Impact of aerosol on air temperature in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.

    2010-08-01

    This work uses MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data observed over Kuwait during the 7-year interval 2000-2007. The values of AOT and the Ångström wavelength exponent ( α) show a clear annual cycle. These data are categorized into two catalogues in terms of the values of the AOT of the 870 nm channel ( τ870). One catalogue (71 days) includes days with high values of AOT ( τ870 ≥ 0.75). The most probable "modal" value of α for these days is 0.52. The other catalogue (1162 days) consists of the background days with a modal value ~ 1.1 for the exponent α. This analysis is extended to include water vapor content (WVC), surface wind speed (V), visibility (Vis) and the diurnal temperature range (DTR). Chree's method of superposed-epoch analysis is applied to these parameters in order to compare the variation in the daily averages during days with high AOT values with respect to background days. The high values of AOT during the 71 days are positively correlated with aerosol size, near-surface winds and poor visibility. This concludes that the aerosol particles during these days were mostly dust. The mean daily value of the DTR (Δ T) and visibility reduced significantly during these days. This reduction on DTR is a direct result of increasing the atmospheric opacity due to the presence of dust.

  2. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  3. A parametric study of wind chill equivalent temperatures by a dimensionless steady-state analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    A first order analytical approximation of steady-state heat conduction in a hollow cylinder exchanging heat at its external surface by convection with a cold and windy environment is presented. The model depicts the thermal behavior of certain body elements, e.g., head/face, when exposed to such environments. The results are presented by dimensionless parameters and facilitate the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs). The effects of several variables on determining WCETs were studied using specific examples, leading to the following generalizations: (1) the conditions assumed for "calm" wind speed appear to be a dominant factor in determining WCET; (2) the effects, on both (skin) surface temperature and on WCET, of a 1°C change in environmental temperature appear to be more pronounced than those of a 1 m/s change in wind speed; (3) similarly, predicted WCETs are more sensitive to the geometrical dimensions assumed for the modeled entity than they are to wind speeds; and (4) tissue thermal conductivity, the angle at which the convective heat transfer coefficient is measured relative to wind direction, and the factor used to establish "effective" wind speeds in the domain occupied by humans relative to reported values, all seem to have relatively small effects on the determination of WCET. These conclusions strongly suggest, among other things, that for any given combination of environmental conditions, wind chill indices may best be presented as ranges rather than as single values. This seems to apply even when worst-case scenarios are considered. Also emphasized is the need for careful and realistic selection of all the parameter values used in the determination of WCETs.

  4. Investigation of a recent extreme-high temperature event in the Tokyo metropolitan are using numerical simulations: the potential role of a 'hybrid' foehn wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yuya; Kusaka, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 39.8 °C occurred at 1420 Japan Standard Time (JST) 24 June 2011 in Kumagaya located 60-km northwest of central Tokyo. This extreme temperature, the third-highest ever recorded in Kumagaya, forced 70 people in the local prefecture to be rushed to hospitals due to heat stroke. The day had westerly winds in the inland area of Tokyo and localized rainfall in the windward direction over the Chubu Mountains. Thus, the extreme high temperature (EHT) may have been influenced by a traditional foehn wind. But, as in Takane and Kusaka (2011), other EHT event occurred in 2007 may have been caused by a complex mechanism involving a combination of several types of foehn winds. Determining the mechanism requires the use of extensive observations and numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to clarify quantitatively the mechanism of the EHT event on 24 June 2011, with a particular focus on the possible contributions of several combinations of foehn wind types. The contributions to temperature increase are analysed using a heat budget analysis of the control volume, a backward trajectory analysis, a Lagrangian energy budget analysis, an Eulerian forward tracer analysis, and an analysis of diabatic heating from the surface. In 2011 EHT event, surface air temperatures exceeding 37.0 °C were recorded in and around Kumagaya, an area just north of the convergence line between westerly winds from the Chubu Mountains (complex terrains) and southwesterly sea breeze from the Pacific Ocean. To determine the mechanism of this EHT event, we applied various analyses using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model Version 3.1.1. The WRF model successfully reproduces the physical features of the wind and temperature distributions and diurnal variations. To quantitatively evaluate the mechanism underlying the temperature change in the mixed layer on high-temperature area, we analyze the heat budget of a control volume

  5. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  10. Pd-modified Reactive Air Braze for Increased Melting Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2005-03-01

    Complex high temperature devices such as planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) stacks often require a two-step sealing process. For example, in pSOFC stacks the oxide ceramic fuel cell plates might be sealed into metallic support frames in one step. Then the frames with the fuel plates sealed to them would be joined together in a separate sealing step to form the fuel cell stack. In this case, the initial seal should have a sufficiently high solidus temperature that it will not begin to remelt at the sealing temperature of the material used for the subsequent sealing step. Previous experience has indicated that, when heated at a rate of 10°C/min, Ag-CuO reactive air braze (RAB) compositions have solidus and liquidus temperatures in the approximate range of 925 to 955°C. Therefore, compositionally modifying the original Ag-CuO braze with Pd-additions such that the solidus temperature of the new braze is between 1025 and 1050°C would provide two RAB compositions with a difference in melting points large enough to allow reactive air brazing of both sets of seals in the fuel cell stack. This study determines the appropriate ratio of Pd to Ag in RAB required to achieve a solidus in the desired range and discusses the wettability of the resulting Pd-Ag-CuO brazes on YSZ substrates. The interfacial microstructures and flexural strengths of Pd-Ag-CuO joints in YSZ will also be presented.

  11. Directional gravity wave momentum fluxes in the stratosphere derived from high-resolution AIRS temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, M.; Hoffmann, L.; Preusse, P.

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties in modeling the stratospheric circulation, global observations of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) vectors are required for comparison with distributions of resolved and parametrized GWMF in global models. For the first time, we derive GWMF vectors globally from data of a nadir-viewing satellite instrument: we apply a 3-D method to an Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature data set that was optimized for gravity wave (GW) analysis. For January 2009, the resulting distributions of GW amplitudes and of net GWMF highlight the importance of GWs in the polar vortex and the summertime subtropics. Net GWMF is preferentially directed opposite to the background wind, and, interestingly, it is dominated by large-amplitude GWs of relatively long horizontal wavelength. For convective GW sources, these large horizontal scales are in contradiction with traditional thoughts. However, the observational filter effect needs to be kept in mind when interpreting the results.

  12. An Evaluation of Wind Turbine Technology at Peterson Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    gearbox /bearings efficiency - 14 - The average velocity of wind affects wind turbine performance and increases with altitude. Average wind velocity...electricity cannot be generated and if its velocity is too high, then the turbines can sustain damage from the extreme wind conditions . Generally, wind ...AN EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE TECHNOLOGY

  13. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  14. Cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel: effects of wind on snow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, Hannu

    2015-08-01

    Wintertime cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel or a long lake can become destructive if the related bands of heavy snowfall hit onto land. The forcing for such bands is studied with a 2D numerical model set across an east-west sea channel at 60oN (`Gulf of Finland'), varying the basic geostrophic wind V g. Without any V g opposite coastal land breezes emerge with convergence. This results in a quasi-steady rising motion w max ~ 7.5 cm/s at 600 m in the middle of the gulf, which can force a snow band. During weak V g, the rising motion is reduced but least so for winds from 60o to 80o (~ENE), when modest alongshore bands could exist near the downstream (Estonian) coast. During V g of 4-6 m/s from any direction, the land breezes and rising motions are reduced more effectively, so snow bands are not expected during moderate basic flow. In contrast, during a strong V g of 20-25 m/s from 110o to 120o (~ESE) the land breeze perturbations are intense with w max up to 15-18 cm/s. The induced alongshore bands of heavy snowfall are located in these cases at the sea but quite close to the downstream (Finnish) coast. They can suddenly make a landfall if the basic wind turns clockwise.

  15. Volcanic plumes and wind: Jetstream interaction examples and implications for air traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursik, M. I.; Kobs, S. E.; Burns, A.; Braitseva, O. A.; Bazanova, L. I.; Melekestsev, I. V.; Kurbatov, A.; Pieri, D. C.

    2009-09-01

    Volcanic plumes interact with the wind at all scales. On smaller scales, wind affects local eddy structure; on larger scales, wind shapes the entire plume trajectory. The polar jets or jetstreams are regions of high [generally eastbound] winds that span the globe from 30 to 60° in latitude, centered at an altitude of about 10 km. They can be hundreds of kilometers wide, but as little as 1 km in thickness. Core windspeeds are up to 130 m/s. Modern transcontinental and transoceanic air routes are configured to take advantage of the jetstream. Eastbound commercial jets can save both time and fuel by flying within it; westbound aircraft generally seek to avoid it. Using both an integral model of plume motion that is formulated within a plume-centered coordinate system (BENT) as well as the Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), we have calculated plume trajectories and rise heights under different wind conditions. Model plume trajectories compare well with the observed plume trajectory of the Sept 30/Oct 1, 1994, eruption of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, for which measured maximum windspeed was 30-40 m/s at about 12 km. Tephra fall patterns for some prehistoric eruptions of Avachinsky Volcano, Kamchatka, and Inyo Craters, CA, USA, are anomalously elongated and inconsistent with simple models of tephra dispersal in a constant windfield. The Avachinsky deposit is modeled well by BENT using a windspeed that varies with height. Two potentially useful conclusions can be made about air routes and volcanic eruption plumes under jetstream conditions. The first is that by taking advantage of the jetstream, aircraft are flying within an airspace that is also preferentially occupied by volcanic eruption clouds and particles. The second is that, because eruptions with highly variable mass eruption rate pump volcanic particles into the jetstream under these conditions, it is difficult to constrain the tephra grain size distribution and mass loading

  16. The Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (WTS) in the Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, F. A.; Vancil, B.; Nicholas, A.; Zaruba, C.; Beasley, L.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturization efforts in new spectrometers for ionosphere/thermosphere investigations of the ion-drifts and neutral winds and corresponding temperatures make possible very light (about 250 g) packages consuming less than 0.4 W. Previously described, our approach measures the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms and molecules (or ions) in two perpendicular planes; using those distributions to determine the full wind vector, the temperature and the relative densities of O and N2, as required for the ANDE mission. The measurements require two separate electron impact ion sources each with its own electron beam cathode. We have developed a low-temperature thermionic emission cathode that delivers 1 mA electron current at 80 mW power, making it possible to operate neutral wind-temperature experiments for the first time with powers less than 0.5 W. Advances in the ion optics of the energy-angle spectrometer enhance the energy resolution-aperture product more than a factor of 3 to enable energy resolutions of a few percent with large apertures. With these technology improvements it is now possible to obtain the full neutral wind vector, temperature and O/N2, density ratio once per second in a 250g/0.4W package with sensitivity up to about 500 km altitude in the thermosphere. We will describe the WTS as deployed in ANDE and show simulated data with the non-linear least squares analysis to illustrate expected performance of the WTS in the estimated errors in the three components of the wind, the temperature, and the relative densities.

  17. Model-based estimation of changes in air temperature seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Trigo, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Seasonality is a ubiquitous feature in climate time series. Climate change is expected to involve not only changes in the mean of climate parameters but also changes in the characteristics of the corresponding seasonal cycle. Therefore the identification and quantification of changes in seasonality is a highly relevant topic in climate analysis, particularly in a global warming context. However, the analysis of seasonality is far from a trivial task. A key challenge is the discrimination between long-term changes in the mean and long-term changes in the seasonal pattern itself, which requires the use of appropriate statistical approaches in order to be able to distinguish between overall trends in the mean and trends in the seasons. Model based approaches are particularly suitable for the analysis of seasonality, enabling to assess uncertainties in the amplitude and phase of seasonal patterns within a well defined statistical framework. This work addresses the changes in the seasonality of air temperature over the 20th century. The analysed data are global air temperature values close to surface (2m above ground) and mid-troposphere (500 hPa geopotential height) from the recently developed 20th century reanalysis. This new 3-D Reanalysis dataset is available since 1891, considerably extending all other Reanalyses currently in use (e.g. NCAR, ECWMF), and was obtained with the Ensemble Filter (Compo et al., 2006) by assimilation of pressure observations into a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model that includes the radiative effects of historical time-varying CO2 concentrations, volcanic aerosol emissions and solar output variations. A modeling approach based on autoregression (Barbosa et al, 2008; Barbosa, 2009) is applied within a Bayesian framework for the estimation of a time varying seasonal pattern and further quantification of changes in the amplitude and phase of air temperature over the 20th century. Barbosa, SM, Silva, ME, Fernandes, MJ

  18. A PV view of the zonal mean distribution of temperature and wind in the extratropical troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    The dependence of the temperature and wind distribution of the zonal mean flow in the extratropical troposphere on the gradient of pontential vorticity along isentropes is examined. The extratropics here refer to the region outside the Hadley circulation. Of particular interest is whether the distribution of temperature and wind corresponding to a constant potential vorticity (PV) along isentropes resembles the observed, and the implications of PV homogenization along isentropes for the role of the tropics. With the assumption that PV is homogenized along isentropes, it is found that the temperature distribution in the extratropical troposphere may be determined by a linear, first-order partial differential equation. When the observed surface temperature distribution and tropical lapse rate are used as the boundary conditions, the solution of the equation is close to the observed temperature distribution except in the upper troposphere adjacent to the Hadley circulation, where the troposphere with no PV gradient is considerably colder. Consequently, the jet is also stronger. It is also found that the meridional distribution of the balanced zonal wind is very sensitive to the meridional distribution of the tropopause temperature. The result may suggest that the requirement of the global momentum balance has no practical role in determining the extratropical temperature distribution. The authors further investigated the sensitivity of the extratropical troposphere with constant PV along isentropes to changes in conditions at the tropical boundary (the edge of the Hadley circulation). It is found that the temperature and wind distributions in the extratropical troposphere are sensitive to the vertical distribution of PV at the tropical boundary. With a surface distribution of temperature that decreases linearly with latitude, the jet maximum occurs at the tropical boundary and moves with it. The overall pattern of wind distribution is not sensitive to the change of

  19. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  20. Developing a Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, WInifred; Roeder, William

    2007-01-01

    This conference presentation describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  1. Air-Loads Prediction of a UH-60A Rotor inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Romander, Ethan A.; Potsdam, Mark; Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    2010-01-01

    The presented research extends the capability of a loose coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structure dynamics (CSD) code to calculate the flow-field around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. Comparison of predicted air-load results for a full-scale UH-60A rotor recently tested inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center and in free-air flight are made for three challenging flight data points from the earlier conducted UH-60A Air-loads Program. Overall results show that the extension of the coupled CFD/CSD code to the wind-tunnel environment is generally successful.

  2. The use of wind fields in a land use regression model to predict air pollution concentrations for health exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, M. A.; Blair, R.; Finkelstein, N.; Brook, J. R.; Sahsuvaroglu, T.; Beckerman, B.; Zhang, L.; Jerrett, M.

    A methodology is developed to include wind flow effects in land use regression (LUR) models for predicting nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) concentrations for health exposure studies. NO 2 is widely used in health studies as an indicator of traffic-generated air pollution in urban areas. Incorporation of high-resolution interpolated observed wind direction from a network of 38 weather stations in a LUR model improved NO 2 concentration estimates in densely populated, high traffic and industrial/business areas in Toronto-Hamilton urban airshed (THUA) of Ontario, Canada. These small-area variations in air pollution concentrations that are probably more important for health exposure studies may not be detected by sparse continuous air pollution monitoring network or conventional interpolation methods. Observed wind fields were also compared with wind fields generated by Global Environmental Multiscale-High resolution Model Application Project (GEM-HiMAP) to explore the feasibility of using regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields in LUR models when observed data are either sparse or not available. While GEM-HiMAP predicted wind fields well at large scales, it was unable to resolve wind flow patterns at smaller scales. These results suggest caution and careful evaluation of regional weather forecasting model simulated wind fields before incorporating into human exposure models for health studies. This study has demonstrated that wind fields may be integrated into the land use regression framework. Such integration has a discernable influence on both the overall model prediction and perhaps more importantly for health effects assessment on the relative spatial distribution of traffic pollution throughout the THUA. Methodology developed in this study may be applied in other large urban areas across the world.

  3. Wind-driven variability in sea surface temperature front distribution in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelao, Renato M.; Wang, Yuntao

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneous satellite-derived observations from 2002 to 2009 are used to quantify the relation between sea surface temperature (SST) fronts and ocean winds in the California Current System (CCS). An edge-detection algorithm is applied to SST observations to generate monthly maps of frontal probabilities. Empirical orthogonal decompositions reveal that the seasonal evolution of fronts in the CCS is strongly related to the seasonal evolution of coastal alongshore wind stress. The seasonal development of SST fronts is remarkably different to the north and to the south of Cape Mendocino, however. While fronts to the north of the cape extend for hundreds of kilometers from the coast peaking during summer and fall, when upwelling winds are stronger off northern California and Oregon, the region to the south of Cape Mendocino is characterized by high frontal activity during spring in a much narrower band close to the coast. Throughout the region, anomalies in the intensity of upwelling-favorable wind stress are followed by anomalies in frontal activity. The width and speed of the widening of the region of high frontal activity are also related to coastal alongshore wind stress. Interannual variability in the timing of the widening of the region of high frontal activity in the lee of Cape Blanco compared to the timing of the spring transition to upwelling-favorable winds may be related to the wind stress curl distribution in the lee of the cape. Stronger upwelling-favorable wind stress curl anomalies lead to early widening of the region of high frontal activity.

  4. DDT in fuel air mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Card, J.; Rival, D.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in fuel air mixtures at initial temperatures up to 573 K and pressures up to 2 atm. The fuels investigated include hydrogen, ethylene, acetylene and JP-10 aviation fuel. The experiments were performed in a 3.1-m long, 10-cm inner-diameter heated detonation tube equipped with equally spaced orifice plates. Ionization probes were used to measure the flame time-of-arrival from which the average flame velocity versus propagation distance could be obtained. The DDT composition limits and the distance required for the flame to transition to detonation were obtained from this flame velocity data. The correlation developed by Veser et al. (run-up distance to supersonic flames in obstacle-laden tubes. In the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Hazards, Prevention and Mitigation of Industrial Explosions, France (2002)) for the flame choking distance proved to work very well for correlating the detonation run-up distance measured in the present study. The only exception was for the hydrogen air data at elevated initial temperatures which tended to fall outside the scatter of the hydrocarbon mixture data. The DDT limits obtained at room temperature were found to follow the classical d/λ = 1 correlation, where d is the orifice plate diameter and λ is the detonation cell size. Deviations found for the high-temperature data could be attributed to the one-dimensional ZND detonation structure model used to predict the detonation cell size for the DDT limit mixtures. This simple model was used in place of actual experimental data not currently available.

  5. Observed impacts of wind farms on land surface temperature in Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Zhao, X.; Wu, D.; Zhao, W.; Wei, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: The wind turbine industry in china has experienced a dramatic increase in recent years and wind farms (WFs) have an impact on the underlying surface conditions of climate system. This paper assesses the impacts of wind farms by analyzing the variations of the land surface temperature (LST) data for the period of 2003-2014 over a region consisted of 1097 turbines in the Huitengxile Wind Farm, the largest wind farm in Asia. We first compare the spatial coupling between the geographic layouts of the WFs and the spatial patterns of LST changes of two periods (post- versus pre- wind turbines construction) and then employ the difference of LST between WF pixels and surrounding non-WF pixels to quantify the effects of WFs. The results reveal that the LST at daytime increases by 0.52-0.86°C in winter, spring and autumn and decreases by about 0.56°C in summer over the WFs on average, with the spatial pattern of this warming or cooling generally coupled with the geographic distribution of the wind turbines, while the changes in LST at nighttime are much noisier. The daytime LST warming or cooling effects vary with seasons, and the strongest warming and tightest spatial coupling are in autumn months of September-November. The seasonal variations in albedo due to the construction of wind turbines are primarily responsible for the daytime LST changes. Areal mean decreases in winter, spring and autumn and increase in summer in albedo are observed over the WFs and the spatial pattern and magnitude of the changes in albedo couple very well with the layouts of the wind turbines. The increase (decrease) in albedo over the WFs indicates that WFs across the Huitengxile grassland absorb less (more) incoming radiation, thus resulting in a decrease (increase) in LST at daytime. The inter-annual variations in areal mean LST differences at daytime are highly correlated with those in areal mean albedo differences for all four seasons (R2=0.48~0.67). Our findings are in contrast

  6. A temperature inversion-induced air pollution process as analyzed from Mie LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wanning; Zha, Yong; Zhang, Jiahua; Gao, Jay; He, Junliang

    2014-05-01

    A severe air pollution event in the Xianlin District of Nanjing City, China during 23-24 December 2012 was analyzed in terms of aerosol extinction coefficient and AOT retrieved from Mie scattering LiDAR data, in conjunction with in situ particulate concentrations measured near the Earth's surface, and the Weather Research Forecast-derived meteorological conditions. Comprehensive analyses of temperature, humidity, wind direction and velocity, and barometric pressure led to the conclusion that this pollution event was caused by advection inversion. In the absence of temperature inversion, the atmosphere at a height of 0.15 km has a relatively large extinction coefficient. In situ measured particulates exhibited a very large diurnal range. However, under the influence of turbulences, AOT was rather stable with a value <0.2 at an altitude below 0.8 km. Advection inversion appeared at 9:00 AM on 24 December, and did not dissipate until 22:00 PM. This temperature inversion, to some degree, inhibited the dispersion of near-surface particulates. Affected by this temperature inversion, the atmospheric extinction coefficient near the surface became noticeably larger. Near-surface particulates hardly varied at a concentration around 0.2mg/m(3). AOT at an altitude below 0.8 km rose to 0.31.

  7. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  8. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  9. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  10. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  11. Assessing surface air temperature variability using quantile regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. A.; Sterin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Many researches in climate change currently involve linear trends, based on measured variables. And many of them only consider trends in mean values, whereas it is clear, that not only means, but also whole shape of distribution changes over time and requires careful assessment. For example extreme values including outliers may get bigger, while median has zero slope.Quantile regression provides a convenient tool, that enables detailed analysis of changes in full range of distribution by producing a vector of quantile trends for any given set of quantiles.We have applied quantile regression to surface air temperature observations made at over 600 weather stations across Russian Federation during last four decades. The results demonstrate well pronounced regions with similar values of significant trends in different parts of temperature value distribution (left tail, middle part, right tail). The uncertainties of quantile trend estimations for several spatial patterns of trends over Russia are estimated and analyzed for each of four seasons.For temperature trend estimation over vast territories, quantile regression is an effort consuming approach, but is more informative than traditional instrument, to assess decadal evolution of temperature values, including evolution of extremes.Partial support of ERA NET RUS ACPCA joint project between EU and RBRF 12-05-91656-ЭРА-А is highly appreciated.

  12. A Transverse Flux High-Temperature Superconducting Generator Topology for Large Direct Drive Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keysan, Ozan; Mueller, Markus A.

    The cost and mass of an offshore wind turbine power-train can be reduced by using high-temperature superconducting generators, but for a successful commercial design the superconducting generator should be as reliable as its alternatives. In this paper, we present a novel transverse flux superconducting generator topology which is suitable for low-speed, high-torque applications. The generator is designed with a stationary superconducting field winding and a variable reluctance claw pole motor for simplified mechanical structure and maximum reliability. 3D FEA simulation results of a 70 kW prototype is presented.

  13. Latitudinal and longitudinal variability of mesospheric winds and temperatures during stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, P.; Singer, W.; Keuer, D.; Hocking, W. K.; Kunze, M.; Murayama, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Continuous MF and meteor radar observations allow detailed studies of winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) as well as temperatures around the mesopause. This height region is characterized by a strong variability in winter due to enhanced planetary wave activity and related stratospheric warming events, which are distinct coupling processes between lower, middle and upper atmosphere. Here the variability of mesospheric winds and temperatures is discussed in relation with major and minor stratospheric warmings as observed during winter 2005/06 in comparison with results during winter 1998/99. Our studies are based on MF radar wind measurements at Andenes (69°N, 16°E), Poker Flat (65°N, 147°W) and Juliusruh (55°N, 13°E) as well as on meteor radar observations of winds and temperatures at Resolute Bay (75°N, 95°W), Andenes (69°N, 16°E) and Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E). Additionally, energy dissipation rates have been estimated from spectral width measurements using a 3 MHz Doppler radar near Andenes. Particular attention is directed to the changes of winds, turbulence and the gravity wave activity in the mesosphere in relation to the planetary wave activity in the stratosphere. Observations indicate an enhancement of planetary wave 1 activity in the mesosphere at high latitudes during major stratospheric warmings. Daily mean temperatures derived from meteor decay times indicate that strong warming events are connected with a cooling of the 90 km region by about 10 20 K. The onset of these cooling processes and the reversals of the mesospheric circulation to easterly winds occur some days before the changes of the zonal circulation in the stratosphere start indicating a downward propagation of the circulation disturbances from the MLT region to the stratosphere and troposphere during the stratospheric warming events. The short-term reversal of the mesospheric winds is followed by a period of strong westerly winds connected with enhanced

  14. Effectiveness of an air-cooled vest using selected air temperature and humidity combinations.

    PubMed

    Pimental, N A; Cosimini, H M; Sawka, M N; Wenger, C B

    1987-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an air-cooled vest in reducing thermal strain of subjects exercising in the heat (49 degrees C dry bulb (db), 20 degrees C dew point (dp] in chemical protective clothing. Four male subjects attempted 300-min heat exposures at two metabolic rates (175 and 315 W) with six cooling combinations--control (no vest) and five different db and dp combinations. Air supplied to the vest at 15 scfm ranged from 20-27 degrees C db, 7-18 degrees C dp; theoretical cooling capacities were 498-687 W. Without the vest, endurance times were 118 min (175 W) and 73 min (315 W). Endurance times with the vest were 300 min (175 W) and 242-300 min (315 W). The five cooling combinations were similarly effective in reducing thermal strain and extending endurance time, although there was a trend for the vest to be more effective when supplied with air at the lower dry bulb temperature. At 175 W, subjects maintained a constant body temperature; at 315 W, the vest's ability to extend endurance is limited to about 5 hours.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  16. Magnetic Fluctuation Power Near Proton Temperature Anisotropy Instability Thresholds in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, S. D.; Kasper, J. C.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Salem, C.; Sundkvist, D.

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10{sup 6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta{sub ||} > or approx. 1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  17. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-12-28

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼10(15) J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase.

  18. Magnetic fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Bale, S D; Kasper, J C; Howes, G G; Quataert, E; Salem, C; Sundkvist, D

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10;{6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta_{ parallel} greater, similar1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  19. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-01-01

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼1015 J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase. PMID:26074645

  20. Terahertz Limb Sounder for Lower Thermosphere Wind, Temperature, and Atomic Oxygen Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Wu, D. L.; Mehdi, I.; Schlecht, E.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of a high-sensitivity heterodyne spectrometer operating at Terahertz (THz) frequency for global lower thermospheric neutral wind, temperature and atomic oxygen density measurements from a low earth orbit. The instrument, THz Limb Sounder (TLS) is aimed to provide, for the first time, global neutral wind/temperature/density profile measurements globally during day and night, with focus at altitudes of 100-150 km where most of the ion-neutral energy/momentum couplings take place. It is an ambient-temperature Schottky diode based all solid-state heterodyne spectrometer designed to extend the limb sounding technique employed by Microwave Limb Sounder for density/temperature/wind measurements by measuring the Doppler line shape of atomic oxygen (OI) fine structure emission at 2.06THz. This atomic oxygen line emission is very bright and distributed nearly uniformly globally (at all latitudes including high latitude aurora particle precipitation regions) and temporally (at all local times during both day and night), thus ideal for thermospheric remote sensing. TLS is an ambient-temperature Schottky diode based heterodyne receiver system The TLS instrument concept, measurement methodology, receiver performance, and the expected measurement capability will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. Multivariate reconstruction of missing data in sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and wind satellite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvera-AzcáRate, A.; Barth, A.; Beckers, J.-M.; Weisberg, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    An empirical orthogonal function-based technique called Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) is used in a multivariate approach to reconstruct missing data. Sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration, and QuikSCAT winds are used to assess the benefit of a multivariate reconstruction. In particular, the combination of SST plus chlorophyll, SST plus lagged SST plus chlorophyll, and SST plus lagged winds have been studied. To assess the quality of the reconstructions, the reconstructed SST and winds have been compared to in situ data. The combination of SST plus chlorophyll, as well as SST plus lagged SST plus chlorophyll, significantly improves the results obtained by the reconstruction of SST alone. All the experiments correctly represent the SST, and an upwelling/downwelling event in the West Florida Shelf reproduced by the reconstructed data is studied.

  2. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and

  3. Simulation of ideal-gas flow by nitrogen and other selected gases at cryogenic temperatures. [transonic flow in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The real gas behavior of nitrogen, the gas normally used in transonic cryogenic tunnels, is reported for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion, normal shocks, boundary layers, and interactions between shock waves and boundary layers. The only difference in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas which may limit the minimum operating temperature of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels occur at total pressures approaching 9 atm and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature. These pressure differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Alternative cryogenic test gases were also analyzed. Differences between air and an ideal diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those for nitrogen and should present no difficulty. However, differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. It is concluded that helium and cryogenic hydrogen would not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal diatomic gas.

  4. Air Surface Temperature Correlation with Greenhouse Gases by Using Airs Data Over Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop algorithms for calculating the air surface temperature (AST). This study also aims to analyze and investigate the effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the AST value in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression is used to achieve the objectives of the study. Peninsular Malaysia has been selected as the research area because it is among the regions of tropical Southeast Asia with the greatest humidity, pockets of heavy pollution, rapid economic growth, and industrialization. The predicted AST was highly correlated ( R = 0.783) with GHGs for the 6-year data (2003-2008). Comparisons of five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the wet season (within 1.3 K). The in situ data ranged from 1 to 2 K. Validation results showed that AST ( R = 0.776-0.878) has values nearly the same as the observed AST from AIRS. We found that O3 during the wet season was indicated by a strongly positive beta coefficient (0.264-0.992) with AST. The CO2 yields a reasonable relationship with temperature with low to moderate beta coefficient (-0.065 to 0.238). The O3, CO2, and environmental variables experienced different seasonal fluctuations that depend on weather conditions and topography. The concentration of gases and pollution were the highest over industrial zones and overcrowded cities, and the dry season was more polluted compared with the wet season. These results indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis to investigate the effect of atmospheric GHGs on AST over Peninsular Malaysia. An algorithm that is capable of retrieving Peninsular Malaysian AST in all weather conditions with total uncertainties ranging from 1 to 2 K was developed.

  5. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangul, F. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ramli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  6. Retrieving mesopause temperature and line-of-sight wind from full-diurnal-cycle Na lidar observations.

    PubMed

    Krueger, David A; She, Chiao-Yao; Yuan, Tao

    2015-11-10

    Narrowband Na lidar measurement of mesopause region temperatures were pioneered by Fricke and von Zahn in 1985, in 1990 by She et al. at Colorado State University (CSU), with upgrades to measure both temperature and wind in 1994, and under sunlit conditions in 1996 with 24 h continuous observational capability in 2002. This paper details the assumptions and procedures for the retrieval of mesopause region temperatures, line-of-sight winds, and sodium densities from day and night signals from the CSU narrowband Na lidar. The Hanle effect and the effect of the pulsed laser line shape function on the accuracy of temperature and LOS wind retrieval are also discussed.

  7. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  8. Numerical modeling on air quality in an urban environment with changes of the aspect ratio and wind direction.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2013-06-01

    Due to heavy traffic emissions within an urban environment, air quality during the last decade becomes worse year by year and hazard to public health. In the present work, numerical modeling of flow and dispersion of gaseous emissions from vehicle exhaust in a street canyon were investigated under changes of the aspect ratio and wind direction. The three-dimensional flow and dispersion of gaseous pollutants were modeled using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model which was numerically solved using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The diffusion flow field in the atmospheric boundary layer within the street canyon was studied for different aspect ratios (W/H=1/2, 3/4, and 1) and wind directions (θ=90°, 112.5°, 135°, and 157.5°). The numerical models were validated against wind tunnel results to optimize the turbulence model. The numerical results agreed well with the wind tunnel results. The simulation demonstrated that the minimum concentration at the human respiration height within the street canyon was on the windward side for aspect ratios W/H=1/2 and 1 and wind directions θ=112.5°, 135°, and 157.5°. The pollutant concentration level decreases as the wind direction and aspect ratio increase. The wind velocity and turbulence intensity increase as the aspect ratio and wind direction increase.

  9. Fluid simulations of mirror constraints on proton temperature anisotropy in solar wind turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laveder, D.; Marradi, L.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    2011-09-01

    Non-resonant ion perpendicular heating by low-frequency kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence, together with the constraining effect of the mirror instability on the developing temperature anisotropy observed in the solar wind, are simulated for the first time in a self-consistent way using a fluid model retaining low-frequency kinetic effects. This model which does not include solar wind expansion, concentrates on the influence of small-scale turbulence. It provides a sufficiently refined description of Landau damping and finite Larmor corrections to accurately capture the transverse dynamics at sub-ionic scales, including the self-regulating influence of the developing mirror modes. A fit of the simulation results with the usual mirror-instability threshold is obtained, reproducing the frontier of the slow solar wind WIND/SWE data in the (T$\\perp$i/T$\\parallel$i, β$\\parallel$i) diagram. The quality of the fit is improved in the presence of a small amount of collisions, which suggests that the deviations from bi-Maxwellianity in the slow solar wind are weak enough not to significantly affect the mirror threshold.

  10. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  11. Study of Ram-air Heat Exchangers for Reducing Turbine Cooling-air Temperature of a Supersonic Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Livingood, John N B; Eckert, Ernst R G

    1956-01-01

    The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude The sizes and weights of the cores of heat exchangers were determined analytically for possible application for reducing turbine cooling-air temperatures of an engine designed for a Mach number of 2.5 and an altitude of 70,000 feet. A compressor-bleed-air weight flow of 2.7 pounds per second was assumed for the coolant; ram air was considered as the other fluid. Pressure drops and inlet states of both fluids were prescribed, and ranges of compressor-bleed-air temperature reductions and of the ratio of compressor-bleed to ram-air weight flows were considered.

  12. Effect of production microclimate on female thermal state with increased temperature and air humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machablishvili, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal state of women during the effect of high air temperature and relative humidity with a varying degree of physical loads was studied. Parameters for air temperature, relative humidity, and air movement were established. It was established that in women the thermo-regulatory stress occurs at lower air temperatures and with lower physical loads than in men. The accumulation of heat in women was revealed with lower air temperature than in men. It is concluded that to preserve the normal physiological state of the female organism it is necessary to create more favorable microclimate conditions and decrease the physical loads.

  13. Face temperature and cardiorespiratory responses to wind in thermoneutral and cool subjects exposed to -10 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Gavhed, D; Mäkinen, T; Holmér, I; Rintamäki, H

    2000-11-01

    The effects of the thermal state of the body (slightly cool and neutral) and moderate wind speeds on face temperature, blood pressure, respiratory function and pain sensation during cold exposure were studied on eight healthy male subjects. They were dressed in cold-protective clothing and preconditioned at + 20 degrees C (TN) and -5 degrees C (CO) for 60 min, then exposed to -10 degrees C and 0 m x s(-1) (NoW), 1 (W1) and 5 (W5) m x s(-1) wind for 30 min. Thus, each individual was exposed six times. The exposure to wind entailed a combination of strong cooling of the bare face and mild body cooling. The forehead, cheek and nose temperatures decreased during cold exposure, and the decrease was greater at higher air velocities (P < 0.0001). All subjects reported pain sensations at 5 m x s(-1). At the end of exposure only the nose temperature was significantly lower in CO than in TN subjects; it was about 2 degrees C and reached 0 degrees C in two experiments. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) increased significantly by 7.7 and 5.9 mmHg, respectively, during preconditioning at -5 degrees C, but did not change at + 20 degrees C. SBP and DBP increased during exposure to -10 degrees C in TN by approximately 9 mmHg. However, the total average increase of blood pressure (1-90 min) was similar in TN and CO (SBP 15 mmHg and DBP 13 mmHg). SBP and DBP increased more during exposure to 5 m x s(-1) at -10 degrees C than NoW. Blood pressure responses as observed in this study (SBP and DBP up to 51 and 45 mmHg, respectively) are potential health risks for hypertensive individuals and angina patients. Respiratory functions (FVC, FEV1) were reduced by about 3% by the cold (-5 and -10 degrees C) compared to pre-experiment values. Furthermore, the Wind Chill Index seems to underestimate the cooling power of 5 m x s(-1) at -10 degrees C of bare skin (e.g. face). Therefore it needs to be revised and we suggest that it is expanded to include risk

  14. Characterization of waviness in wind turbine blades using air coupled ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Dayal, Vinay; Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Gross, Andrew

    2011-06-23

    Waviness in glass fiber reinforced composite is of great interest in composite research, since it results in the loss of stiffness. Several NDE techniques have been used previously to detect waviness. This work is concerned with waves normal to the plies in a composite. Air-coupled ultrasonics was used to detect waviness in thick composites used in the manufacturing of wind turbine blades. Composite samples with different wave aspect ratios were studied. Different wavy samples were characterized, and a three step process was developed to make sure the technique is field implementable. This gives us a better understanding of the effect of waviness in thick composites, and how it affects the life and performance of the composite.

  15. Shaping the solar wind temperature anisotropy by the interplay of electron and proton instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Elhanbaly, A.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of nonthermal characteristics like kinetic, e.g., temperature, anisotropies and suprathermal populations (enhancing the high energy tails of the velocity distributions) are revealed by the in-situ observations in the solar wind indicating quasistationary states of plasma particles out of thermal equilibrium. Large deviations from isotropy generate kinetic instabilities and growing fluctuating fields which should be more efficient than collisions in limiting the anisotropy (below the instability threshold) and explain the anisotropy limits reported by the observations. The present paper aims to decode the principal instabilities driven by the temperature anisotropy of electrons and protons in the solar wind, and contrast the instability thresholds with the bounds observed at 1 AU for the temperature anisotropy. The instabilities are characterized using linear kinetic theory to identify the appropriate (fastest) instability in the relaxation of temperature anisotropies A_{e,p} = T_{e,p,perp}/ T _{e,p,allel} ≠1. The analysis focuses on the electromagnetic instabilities driven by the anisotropic protons (Ap lessgtr1) and invokes for the first time a dynamical model to capture the interplay with the anisotropic electrons by correlating the effects of these two species of plasma particles, dominant in the solar wind. ;

  16. Consideration of Conductive Motor Winding Materials at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Groh, Henry C., III

    2015-01-01

    A brief history of conductive motor winding materials is presented, comparing various metal motor winding materials and their properties in terms of conductivity, density and cost. The proposed use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and composites incorporating CNTs is explored as a potential way to improve motor winding conductivity, density, and reduce motor size which are important to electric aircraft technology. The conductivity of pure Cu, a CNT yarn, and a dilute Cu-CNT composite was measured at room temperature and at several temperatures up to 340 C. The conductivity of the Cu-CNT composite was about 3 percent lower than pure copper's at all temperatures measured. The conductivity of the CNT yarn was about 200 times lower than copper's, however, the yarn's conductivity dropped less with increasing temperature compared to Cu. It is believed that the low conductivity of the yarn is due primarily to high interfacial resistances and the presence of CNTs with low, semiconductor like electrical properties (s-CNT). It is believed the conductivity of the CNT-Cu composite could be improved by not using s-CNT, and instead using only CNTs with high, metallic like electrical properties (m-CNT); and by increasing the vol% m-CNTs.

  17. Outdoor temperature, precipitation, and wind speed affect physical activity levels in children: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicholas M.; Myer, Gregory D.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Woo, Jessica G.; Khoury, Philip R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Daniels, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate effects of local weather conditions on physical activity in early childhood. Methods Longitudinal prospective cohort study of 372 children, 3 years old at enrollment, drawn from a major US metropolitan community. Accelerometer-measured (RT3) physical activity was collected every 4 months over 5 years and matched with daily weather measures: day length, heating/cooling degrees (degrees mean temperature < 65°F or ≥ 65°F, respectively), wind, and precipitation. Mixed regression analyses, adjusted for repeated measures, were used to test the relationship between weather and physical activity. Results Precipitation and wind speed were negatively associated with total physical activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity (P<0.0001). Heating and cooling degrees were negatively associated with total physical activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity and positively associated with inactivity (all P<0.0001), independent of age, sex, race, BMI, day length, wind, and precipitation. For every 10 additional heating degrees there was a five-minute daily reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. For every additional 10 cooling degrees there was a 17-minute reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Inclement weather (higher/lower temperature, greater wind speed, more rain/snow) is associated with less physical activity in young children. These deleterious effects should be considered when planning physical activity research, interventions, and policies. PMID:25423667

  18. Intraseasonal variability of air temperature over the mid-high latitude Eurasia in boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuangyan; Li, Tim

    2016-10-01

    The intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of air temperature over the mid- and high-latitude Eurasia in boreal winter was investigated by NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data. It is found that the intraseasonal temperature disturbances exhibit maximum variability near the surface in the region of 50°-75°N, 80°‒120°E and they propagate southeastwards at average zonal and meridional phase speeds of 3.2 and 2.5 m s-1, respectively. The low-level temperature signal is tightly coupled with upper-tropospheric height anomalies, and both propagate southeastward in a similar phase speed. A diagnosis of the temperature budget reveals that the southeastward propagation is primarily attributed to the advection of the temperature anomaly by the mean wind. A wave activity flux analysis indicates that the southeastward propagating wave train is likely a result of Rossby wave energy propagation. The source of the Rossby wave train appears at the high latitude Europe/Atlantic sector, where maximum wave activity flux convergence resides. During its southeastward journey, the ISO perturbation gains energy from the mean flow through both kinetic and potential energy conversions. A physics-based empirical model was constructed to predict the intraseasonal temperature anomaly over southeast China. The major predictability source is the southeastward-propagating ISO signal. The data for 1979‒2003 were used as a training period to construct the empirical model. A 10-yr (2004‒2013) independent forecast shows that the model attains a useful skill of up to 25 days.

  19. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  20. Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming; Tian, Yuhong; Baidya Roy, Somnath; Dai, Yongjiu; Chen, Haishan

    2013-07-01

    This paper analyzes seasonal and diurnal variations of MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) data at ~1.1 km for the period of 2003-2011 over a region in West-Central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms are located. Seasonal anomalies are created from MODIS Terra (~10:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. local solar time) and Aqua (~1:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. local solar time) LSTs, and their spatiotemporal variability is analyzed by comparing the LST changes between wind farm pixels (WFPs) and nearby non wind farm pixels (NNWFPs) using different methods under different quality controls. Our analyses show consistently that there is a warming effect of 0.31-0.70 °C at nighttime for the nine-year period during which data was collected over WFPs relative to NNWFPs, in all seasons for both Terra and Aqua measurements, while the changes at daytime are much noisier. The nighttime warming effect is much larger in summer than winter and at ~10:30 p.m. than ~1:30 a.m. and hence the largest warming effect is observed at ~10:30 p.m. in summer. The spatial pattern and magnitude of this warming effect couple very well with the geographic distribution of wind turbines and such coupling is stronger at nighttime than daytime and in summer than winter. Together, these results suggest that the warming effect observed in MODIS over wind farms are very likely attributable to the development of wind farms. This inference is consistent with the increasing number of operational wind turbines with time during the study period, the diurnal and seasonal variations in the frequency of wind speed and direction distribution, and the changes in near-surface atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) conditions due to wind farm operations. The nocturnal ABL is typically stable and much thinner than the daytime ABL and hence the turbine enhanced vertical mixing produces a stronger nighttime effect. The stronger wind speed and the higher frequency of the wind

  1. Comparison of Time-periodic Variations in Temperature and Wind from Meteorological Rockets and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Although the Meteorological Rocket Network operated by or in cooperation with th United States has decreased from fourteen to nine stations in the past five years, there have been many observations accumulated in the ten years since CIRA 1972 was prepared with data up to 1969. The mean, annual and semiannual variations of temperature and wind are presented and special attention is directed to the polar semiannual wave. The results are compared with the Oxford SCR-PMR five year data set, the CDC-SCR seven year data, and CIRA 1972 with respect to both temperature and zonal winds, as far as presently available. The agreement among the data sets is very good.

  2. Measurements of temperature and pressure fluctuations in the T prime 2 cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A.; Dor, J. B.; Breil, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cold wire measurement of temperature fluctuations were made in a DERAT T'2 induction powered cryogenic wind tunnel for 2 types of liquid nitrogen injectors. Thermal turbulence measured in the tranquilization chamber depends to a great extent on the injector used; for fine spray of nitrogen drops, this level of turbulence seemed completely acceptable. Fluctuations in static pressure taken from the walls of the vein by Kulite sensors showed that there was no increase in aerodynamic noise during cryogenic gusts.

  3. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Š.; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the temperature of solar wind particles and their anisotropies is particularly important for understanding the origin of their deviations from thermal equilibrium and the effects this has. In the absence of energetic events, the velocity distribution of electrons reveals a dual structure with a thermal (Maxwellian) core and a suprathermal (kappa) halo. This article presents a detailed observational analysis of these two components, providing estimations of their temperatures and temperature anisotropies, and decoding any potential interdependence that their properties may indicate. The dataset used in this study includes more than 120 000 of the distributions measured by three missions in the ecliptic within an extended range of heliocentric distances from 0.3 to over 4 AU. The core temperature is found to decrease with the radial distance, while the halo temperature slightly increases, clarifying an apparent contradiction in previous observational analyses and providing valuable clues about the temperature of the kappa-distributed populations. For low values of the power-index kappa, these two components manifest a clear tendency to deviate from isotropy in the same direction, which seems to confirm the existence of mechanisms with similar effects on both components, e.g., the solar wind expansion, or the particle heating by the fluctuations. However, the existence of plasma states with anticorrelated anisotropies of the core and halo populations and the increase in their number for high values of the power-index kappa suggest a dynamic interplay of these components, mediated, most probably, by the anisotropy-driven instabilities.

  4. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  5. Combustion and gasification characteristics of pulverized coal using high-temperature air

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaoka, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kiga, T.; Kosaka, H.; Iwahashi, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, K.; Mochida, S.

    1998-07-01

    In order to confirm performance of high-temperature-air combusting of pulverized coal, laboratory-scale combustion and gasification tests of coal were conducted changing air temperature and oxygen concentration in the air. Theses were conducted in a drop tube furnace of 200mm in inside diameter and 2,000mm in length. The furnace was heated by ceramic heater up to 1,300 C. A high-temperature air preheater utilizing the HRS (High Cycle Regenerative Combustion System) was used to obtain high-temperature combustion air. As the results, NOx emission was reduced when pulverized coal was fired with high-temperature-air. On the other hand, by lower oxygen concentration in combustion air diluted by nitrogen, NOx emission slightly decreased while became higher under staging condition.

  6. High Spectral Resolution Infrared Studies of Titan: Winds, Temperature and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Hewagama, T.; Annen, J.; Buhl, D.; Sonnabend, G.; Delgado, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Results from the most recent analyses of resolved ethane Line emission profiles from the stratosphere of Titan, measured before (2003) [1, 2], near the time of (2005) [3, 4], and after (2008) Huygens descent, will be presented. Wind velocity, temperature and ethane abundance are retrieved from 11.7 micron measurements at spectral resolving, powers > 1000000 using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) interfaced with the 8.2 meter Subaru telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Retrieved wind velocities (approx.190 m/s at 230 km) from Doppler shifts of measured emission lines are compared to previous infrared heterodyne studies and compared to results front either direct wired measurements - Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment [5], Doppler shifts of reflected visible radiation [6], and mm-wave investigations [7]. Comparison to indirect wind retrievals from stellar occultation [8] observations and Cassini CIRS thermal maps [9] is also made, An empirical altitude-dependent wired model will be presented. The narrow ethane emission lines are analyzed to retrieve the ethane mole fraction and an attempt is made to evaluate the altitude distribution of ethane in the stratosphere for thermal profiles derived from measurements from Cassini and Huygens. Resultant ethane altitude distributions will be discussed and comparison to results front earlier HIPWAC and other remote sensing measurements and from contemporaneous Cassini/Huygens investigations [10, 11] will be made. Preliminary comparison suggests temporal or spatial variability in the line emission and retrieved ethane abundance in Titan's stratosphere:. Possible detection of minor hydrocarbon constituents and evidence of possible probing of Titan's mesosphere and of mesospheric wind shear will be discussed.

  7. Experimental study of the decrease in the temperature of an air/water-cooled turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A. A.; Sereda, A. V.; Shaiakberov, V. F.; Iskakov, K. M.; Shatalov, Iu. S.

    Results of the full-scale testing of an air/water-cooled deflector-type turbine blade are reported. Data on the decrease in the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade are presented and compared with the calculated values. An analysis of the results indicates that the use of air/water cooling makes it possible to significantly reduce the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade with practically no increase in the engine weight and dimensions.

  8. Multidecadal wind-driven shifts in northwest Pacific temperature, salinity, O2, and PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Eun Young; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Young-Gyu; Park, Young-Hyang; Dunne, John; Chang, Kyung-Il

    2016-11-01

    The North Pacific gyre boundaries are characterized by stark contrasts in physical and biogeochemical properties. Meridional movement of gyre boundaries, influenced by climate change, can therefore exert a large influence not only on marine ecosystems but also on climate. We examine the evidence for wind-driven southward shifts in subsurface temperature, salinity, PO4, and O2 within the northwest Pacific from the 1950s to the 2000s. Gyre boundary shifts can explain 30-60% of temperature and salinity trends zonally averaged in the northwest Pacific and observed PO4 and O2 trends along the 137°E and 144°E meridians. The close tie between the wind-driven shifts in gyre boundaries and the tracer distributions is further supported by results from an eddy-resolving (0.1° × 0.1°) Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model, suggesting that the physical and biogeochemical properties averaged within the northwest Pacific gyre boundaries closely follow the latitude changes of the zero Sverdrup stream function with lags of 0 to 3 years. The gyre shift effect on tracer distribution is poorly represented in a coarse resolution (1° × 1°) model due partly to poor representations of fronts and eddies. This study suggests that future changes in northwest Pacific PO4 and O2 content may depend not only on ocean temperature and stratification but also on the ocean gyre response to winds.

  9. Wind and water tunnel testing of a morphing aquatic micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Robert; Ortega Ancel, Alejandro; Kovač, Mirko

    2017-02-06

    Aerial robots capable of locomotion in both air and water would enable novel mission profiles in complex environments, such as water sampling after floods or underwater structural inspections. The design of such a vehicle is challenging because it implies significant propulsive and structural design trade-offs for operation in both fluids. In this paper, we present a unique Aquatic Micro Air Vehicle (AquaMAV), which uses a reconfigurable wing to dive into the water from flight, inspired by the plunge diving strategy of water diving birds in the family Sulidae. The vehicle's performance is investigated in wind and water tunnel experiments, from which we develop a planar trajectory model. This model is used to predict the dive behaviour of the AquaMAV, and investigate the efficacy of passive dives initiated by wing folding as a means of water entry. The paper also includes first field tests of the AquaMAV prototype where the folding wings are used to initiate a plunge dive.

  10. Thermal zonal winds in the Venus mesosphere from the Venus Express temperature soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccialli, Arianna; Titov, Dmitri; Tellmann, Silvia; Migliorini, Alessandra; Read, Peter; Grassi, Davide; Paetzold, Martin; Haeusler, Bernd; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    The Venus mesosphere (60-100 km altitude) is a transition region characterized by extremely complex dynamics: strong retrograde zonal winds dominate in the troposphere and lower meso-sphere while a solar-antisolar circulation can be observed in the upper mesosphere. The super-rotation extends from the surface up to the cloud top (˜65 km altitude) with wind speeds of only a few meters per second near the surface and reaching a maximum value of ˜100 m s-1 at cloud top, corresponding to a rotation period of ˜4 Earth days (˜60 times faster than Venus itself). The solar-antisolar circulation is driven by the day-night contrast in solar heating, and occurs above 110 km altitude with speeds of 120 m s-1 . The processes responsible for maintain-ing the zonal super-rotation in the lower atmosphere and its transition to the solar-antisolar circulation in the upper atmosphere are still poorly understood (Schubert et al.,2007). Different techniques have been used to obtain direct observations of wind at various altitudes: tracking of clouds in ultraviolet (UV) and near infrared (NIR) images give information on wind speeds at the cloud top (Moissl et al., 2009; Sanchez-Lavega et al., 2008) and within the clouds (˜47 km, ˜61 km) (Sanchez-Lavega et al., 2008) while ground-based measurements of Doppler shifts in the CO2 band at 10 µm (Sornig et al., 2008) and in several CO millimiter lines (Rengel et al., 2008) provide wind speeds above the clouds up to ˜110 km altitude. The deep atmosphere from the surface up to the cloud top has been investigated through the Doppler tracking of descent probes and balloons (Counselman et al., 1980; Kerzhanovich and Limaye, 1985). In the mesosphere, between 45-85 km of altitude, where direct observations of wind are not possible, the zonal wind field can be derived from the vertical temperature structure using a special approximation of the thermal wind equation: based on cyclostrophic balance. Previous studies (Leovy, 1973; Newman et al

  11. Environmentally sound thermal energy extraction from coal and wastes using high temperature air combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kunio

    1999-07-01

    High temperature air combustion is one of promising ways of burning relatively low BTU gas obtained from gasification of low grade coal or wastes. In this report, the author proposes a new power generation system coupled with high temperature air gasification of coal/wastes and high temperature air combustion of the syngas from coal/wastes. This system is realized by employing Multi-staged Enthalpy Extraction Technology (MEET). The basic idea of the MEET system is that coal or wastes are gasified with high temperature air of about 1,000 C, then the generated syngas is cooled in a heat recovery boiler to be cleaned-up in a gas cleanup system (desulfurization, desalinization and dust removal). Part of thermal energy contained in this cleaned-up syngas is used for high temperature air preheating, and the complete combustion of the fuel gas is done using also high temperature air for driving gas turbines or steam generation in a boiler.

  12. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R2=0.946 and R2=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  13. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-08-15

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R(2)=0.946 and R(2)=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses.

  14. Simulation of pressure and temperature responses for the 20 Inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation of the pressure and temperature responses of the 20 inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) is developed. The simulation models the tunnel system as a set of lumped parameter volumes connected by flow regulating elements such as valves and nozzles. Simulated transient responses of temperature and pressure for the five boundary points of the 20 inch SWT operating map are produced from their respective initial conditions, tunnel operating conditions, heater input power, and valve positions. Upon reaching steady state, a linearized model for each operating point is determined. Both simulated and actual tunnel responses are presented for comparison.

  15. Simultaneous Measurement of Air Temperature and Humidity Based on Sound Velocity and Attenuation Using Ultrasonic Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motegi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, an acoustic technique for air temperature and humidity measurement in moist air is described. The previous ultrasonic probe can enable the estimation of temperature from sound velocity in dry air by making use of the relationship between sound velocity and temperature. However, temperature measurement using the previous ultrasonic probe is not suitable in moist air because sound velocity also depends on humidity, and the temperature estimated from the sound velocity measured in moist air must be adjusted. Moreover, a method of humidity measurement by using only an ultrasonic probe has not been established. Thus, we focus on sound attenuation, which depends on temperature and humidity. Our proposed technique utilizes two parameters, sound velocity and attenuation, and can measure both temperature and humidity simultaneously. The acoustic technique for temperature and humidity measurement has the advantages that instantaneous temperature and humidity can be measured, and the measurement is not affected by thermal radiation because air itself is used as a sensing element. As an experiment, temperature and humidity are measured in a chamber, and compared with the reference values. The experimental results indicate the achievement of a practical temperature measurement accuracy of within +/-0.5 K in moist air, of which the temperature is 293-308 K and relative humidity (RH) is 50-90% RH, and the simultaneous measurement of temperature and humidity.

  16. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  17. Mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiankang; Han, Yuli; Sun, Dongsong; Xia, Haiyun; Shu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Ruocan; Shangguan, Mingjia; Guo, Jie

    2014-08-25

    A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on the molecular double-edge technique is developed for measuring wind velocity in the middle atmosphere up to 60 km. The lidar uses three lasers with a mean power of 17.5 W at 355 nm each and three 1 m diameter telescopes to receive the backscattered echo: one points to zenith for vertical wind component and temperature measurement; the two others pointing toward east and north are titled at 30° from the zenith for zonal and meridional wind component, respectively. The Doppler shift of the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the double-edge channels of a triple Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tuned to either side of the emitted laser line. The third channel of FPI is used for frequency locking and a locking accuracy of 1.8 MHz RMS (root-mean-square) at 355 nm over 2 hours is realized, corresponding to a systematic error of 0.32 m/s. In this paper, we present detailed technical evolutions on system calibration. To validate the performance of the lidar, comparison experiments was carried out in December 2013, which showed good agreement with radiosondes but notable biases with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts) in the height range of overlapping data. Wind observation over one month performed in Delhi (37.371° N, 97.374° E), northwest of China, demonstrated the stability and robustness of the system.

  18. Saturn's seasonal winds and temperature: The effect of the ring system on the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnet, Christopher Dwight

    The radiative properties of Saturn's rings (insolation shadowing, insolation scattering, and thermal emission) were incorporated into a seasonal, zonally-averaged, radiative-dynamical model to investigate the magnitude of small seasonal fluctuations in the troposphere and stratosphere of Saturn. Although the radiative time constant is large in Saturn's troposphere and stratosphere, the rings induce significant latitudinal insolation gradients resulting in potential disturbances in the upper stratosphere. The results of the model are compared to the Pioneer and Voyager Radio Sub-System (RSS) vertical temperature profile measurements and to the Voyager Infrared Interferometric Spectrometer (IRIS) latitudinal temperature profile measurements. In the upper stratosphere (1 to 30 mBar) the heating is dominated by methane and the model can be directly compared to the Voyager data. Below the temperature minimum the radiative time constant is sufficiently long to strongly dampen seasonal variations, however, the temperature excursions seen in the IRIS data are significantly larger than those predicted by the radiative model. The thermal effects of the strong Saturnian zonal winds are simulated with a first-order dynamical model to provide some insight into the lower boundary conditions. The remaining differences between the model and the Voyager IRIS data-sets are used to estimate the quantity of aerosol required near the tropopause region. The magnitudes of the wind and temperature perturbations, caused by the radiative effects of Saturn's rings, are discussed in the context of the future Hubble Space Telescope and the planned Cassini Saturnian Orbiter missions.

  19. Fire and grazing effects on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Lance T; Wester, David B; Mitchell, Robert B; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D

    2005-01-01

    Selective grazing of burned patches can be intense if animal distribution is not controlled and may compound the independent effects of fire and grazing on soil characteristics. Our objectives were to quantify the effects of patch burning and grazing on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature in sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia Torr.) mixed prairie. We selected 24, 4-ha plots near Woodward, OK. Four plots were burned during autumn (mid-November) and four during spring (mid-April), and four served as nonburned controls for each of two years. Cattle were given unrestricted access (April-September) to burned patches (<2% of pastures) and utilization was about 78%. Wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature were measured monthly. Wind erosion varied by burn, year, and sampling height. Wind erosion was about 2 to 48 times greater on autumn-burned plots than nonburned plots during the dormant period (December-April). Growing-season (April-August) erosion was greatest during spring. Erosion of spring-burned sites was double that of nonburned sites both years. Growing-season erosion from autumn-burned sites was similar to nonburned sites except for one year with a dry April-May. Soil water content was unaffected by patch burn treatments. Soils of burned plots were 1 to 3 degrees C warmer than those of nonburned plots, based on mid-day measurements. Lower water holding and deep percolation capacity of sandy soils probably moderated effects on soil water content and soil temperature. Despite poor growing conditions following fire and heavy selective grazing of burned patches, no blowouts or drifts were observed.

  20. Multiscale Covariability of Surface Wind, Humidity and Temperature in the Subtropical Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fildier, Benjamin; Collins, William

    2016-04-01

    Trade cumulus and stratocumulus clouds in oceanic subtropical regions are sources of much uncertainty in current global climate model (GCM) simulations. Errors in low cloud fraction and rain amounts are a result of inadequate parameterizations for describing the small-scale boundary layer processes specific to the convective and cloud-formation dynamics of those regions. While most cloud parameterization techniques do consider sub-grid scale variability in specific humidity (q), the significant fluctuations in temperature (T) and wind speed (u) in the boundary layer are still often neglected. In order to better acknowledge the interactions of these fields with cloud and convection, understanding their codependence seems crucial. For example, using the negative correlations between T and q on large scales has helped to improve cloud parameterizations, and wind shear is known to modulate cloud layer decoupling and affect the liquid water path (LWP). While numerous studies document the spatial properties of T , q and u independently through power spectra and multifractal analyses, the covariation between these three variables and their spatial increments - and how these relationships change across spatial scales - has not been adequately and quantitatively characterized. The present work focuses on the spatial covariability and multiscale coupling between fluctuations in q, T and u in the marine boundary layer and seeks to understand which pieces of information are required for better predicting LWP on a variety of scales from a few tens to a few hundred kms. We use remote-sensing measurements of thermodynamic variables from MODIS and surface wind estimates from QuikSCAT. The scale-by-scale covariability of two variables is quantified through their Fourier and wavelet cross spectra, using Haar wavelets; these spectra permit the calculation of multiscale coupling exponents when appropriate. Results from this study are threefold: (1) we quantify the contributions of

  1. Novel insights into the dynamics of cold-air drainage and pooling on a gentle slope from fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Lena; Sigmund, Armin; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Urban climate can benefit from cold-air drainage as it may help alleviate the urban heat island. In contrast, stable cold-air pools can damage plants especially in rural areas. In this study, we examined the dynamics of cold-air drainage and pooling in a peri-urban setting over a period of 47 days along a 170 m long slope with an inclination of 1.3° located in the Ecological Botany Gardens of the University of Bayreuth. Air and soil temperatures were measured using distributed temperature sensing of an 2-dimensional fiber-optic array at six heights (-2 cm to 100 cm) along the slope sampling every 1 min and every 1 m. Ancillary measurements of winds, turbulence intensity and momentum exchange were collected using two ultrasonic anemometers installed at 0.1 m and 17 m height at the center of the transect. We hypothesized that cold-air drainage, here defined as a gravity-driven density flow near the bottom originating from local radiative cooling of the surface, is decoupled from non-local flows and can thus be predicted from the local topography. The nocturnal data were stratified by classes of longwave radiation balance, wind speed, and wind direction at 0.1 m agl. The four most abundant classes were tested further for decoupling of wind velocities and directions between 17 and 0.1 m. We further computed the vertical and horizontal temperature perturbations of the fiber-optic array as evaluated for these cases, as well as subject the temperature data to a multiresolution decomposition to investigate the spatial two-point correlation coefficient along the transect. Finally, the cold pool intensity was calculated. The results revealed none of the four most abundant classes followed classical textbook knowledge of locally produced cold-air drainage. Instead, we found that the near-surface flow was strongly forced by two possibly competing non-local flow modes. The first mode caused weak (< 0.4 ms-1) near-surface winds directed perpendicular to the local slope and

  2. Compression-ignition Engine Performance at Altitudes and at Various Air Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H

    1937-01-01

    Engine test results are presented for simulated altitude conditions. A displaced-piston combustion chamber on a 5- by 7-inch single cylinder compression-ignition engine operating at 2,000 r.p.m. was used. Inlet air temperature equivalent to standard altitudes up to 14,000 feet were obtained. Comparison between performance at altitude of the unsupercharged compression-ignition engine compared favorably with the carburetor engine. Analysis of the results for which the inlet air temperature, inlet air pressure, and inlet and exhaust pressure were varied indicates that engine performance cannot be reliably corrected on the basis of inlet air density or weight of air charge. Engine power increases with inlet air pressure and decreases with inlet air temperatures very nearly as straight line relations over a wide range of air-fuel ratios. Correction factors are given.

  3. Narrowband lidar technique for sodium temperature and Doppler wind observations of the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Richard E.; Gardner, Chester S.; She, Chiao-Yao

    1991-01-01

    A new two-frequency lidar for measuring mesospheric Na temperature profiles is described that uses a stabilized CW single-mode dye laser oscillator (rms frequency jitter less than 1 MHz) followed by a pulsed dye power amplifier (140 MHz FWHM linewidth) that is pumped by an injection-locked Nd:YAG laser. The laser oscillator is tuned to the two operating freqencies by observing the Doppler-free structure of the Na D2 fluorescence spectrum in a vapor cell. The lidar technique and initial observations of the temperature profile between 82 and 102 km at Ft. Collins, CO are described. Absolute temperature accuracies at the Na layer peak of better than + or - 3 K with a vertical resolution of 1 km and an integration period of approximately 5 min were achieved in this initial experiment. Finally, a multiple frequency technique for the simultaneous measurement of both temperature and Doppler wind profiles is discussed.

  4. Thermospheric nighttime wind and temperature analysis from some 2014 stormy nights monitored at Oukaimeden Observatory by RENOIR instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounhir, Aziza; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; Kaab, Mohamed; Makela, Jonathan J.; Harding, Brian; Fisher, Daniel J.; Lagheryeb, Amine; Khalifa, Malki; Lazrek, Mohamed; Daassou, Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we report on the thermospheric winds and temperatures over Oukaimeden Observatory in Morocco in some stormy nights during the year 2014. These results are based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) measurements of Doppler shifts and Doppler broadenings of the 630.0nm spectral emission and pertain to the lower thermosphere region, near 250km altitude. This FPI is a part of RENOIR experiment installed thanks to scientific cooperation program with university of Illinois Urbana (USA).The storm energy input modify the global circulation in the thermosphere resulting in significant changes in the ionospheric plasma properties. Thermospheric and ionospheric storms are closely connected.We first set up the climatological behavior of the thermospheric winds and temperature during quiet nights. These results will be presented in this session in a separate abstract (M. Kaab & Z. Benkhaldoun et al) . Then we investigate the departure of the winds and the temperatures from their climatological behavior during some magnetic storms. The winds present many features. We can notice westward winds and an enhancement of the equatorward winds with sometimes an appearance of a poleward component. We also notice a significant increase of the temperature that last several hours. By looking trough the geomagnetic indices we investigate the delay of thermospheric storm time in our region and its effects on the winds and temperature patterns.

  5. Bivariate ensemble model output statistics approach for joint forecasting of wind speed and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Sándor; Möller, Annette

    2017-02-01

    Forecast ensembles are typically employed to account for prediction uncertainties in numerical weather prediction models. However, ensembles often exhibit biases and dispersion errors, thus they require statistical post-processing to improve their predictive performance. Two popular univariate post-processing models are the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and the ensemble model output statistics (EMOS). In the last few years, increased interest has emerged in developing multivariate post-processing models, incorporating dependencies between weather quantities, such as for example a bivariate distribution for wind vectors or even a more general setting allowing to combine any types of weather variables. In line with a recently proposed approach to model temperature and wind speed jointly by a bivariate BMA model, this paper introduces an EMOS model for these weather quantities based on a bivariate truncated normal distribution. The bivariate EMOS model is applied to temperature and wind speed forecasts of the 8-member University of Washington mesoscale ensemble and the 11-member ALADIN-HUNEPS ensemble of the Hungarian Meteorological Service and its predictive performance is compared to the performance of the bivariate BMA model and a multivariate Gaussian copula approach, post-processing the margins with univariate EMOS. While the predictive skills of the compared methods are similar, the bivariate EMOS model requires considerably lower computation times than the bivariate BMA method.

  6. Bivariate ensemble model output statistics approach for joint forecasting of wind speed and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Sándor; Möller, Annette

    2016-06-01

    Forecast ensembles are typically employed to account for prediction uncertainties in numerical weather prediction models. However, ensembles often exhibit biases and dispersion errors, thus they require statistical post-processing to improve their predictive performance. Two popular univariate post-processing models are the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and the ensemble model output statistics (EMOS). In the last few years, increased interest has emerged in developing multivariate post-processing models, incorporating dependencies between weather quantities, such as for example a bivariate distribution for wind vectors or even a more general setting allowing to combine any types of weather variables. In line with a recently proposed approach to model temperature and wind speed jointly by a bivariate BMA model, this paper introduces an EMOS model for these weather quantities based on a bivariate truncated normal distribution. The bivariate EMOS model is applied to temperature and wind speed forecasts of the 8-member University of Washington mesoscale ensemble and the 11-member ALADIN-HUNEPS ensemble of the Hungarian Meteorological Service and its predictive performance is compared to the performance of the bivariate BMA model and a multivariate Gaussian copula approach, post-processing the margins with univariate EMOS. While the predictive skills of the compared methods are similar, the bivariate EMOS model requires considerably lower computation times than the bivariate BMA method.

  7. Tracing Trajectories of Air Parcels Transported through Spatially Resolved Horizontal Neutral Wind Fields Observed in the Thermosphere above Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.

    2014-12-01

    Transport by fluid flow is a very complex problem. Any type of velocity gradient introduces distortion of the original air masses which, over time, can become extraordinarily severe. In Earth's thermosphere, it is however widely presumed that viscosity hinders both horizontal and vertical wind shears, and hence rapidly attenuates any gradients that might occur over distances shorter than synoptic scales. As a result, particle trajectories predicted by current models are often relatively simple, so that transport effects only slowly disperse and mix air masses. This means that regions of perturbed chemical composition, formed for example by intense aurora, would be expected to remain intact for many hours or even days. However, our observations show that this simple picture does not hold in practice; wind fields in the thermosphere have much more local-scale structure than predicated by models, at least in the auroral zone. These local small scale structures complicate air parcel trajectories enormously, relative to typical expectations. In Alaska, three Scanning Doppler Imaging Fabry-Perot interferometers are currently in operation. A single SDI instrument can simultaneously observe the thermospheric wind's line-of-sight component in 115 (typically) independent look directions. From these data it is possible to reconstruct time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the horizontal vector wind field, and use these to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories over time. Tracing parcel trajectories through a given geographic location maps where they will go from there (forward tracing in time) and where they come from previously (history of parcels or tracing back in time). Results show that transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local scale wind gradients that are actually observed is far more complicated than what current models typically predict.

  8. The Wind, Temperature, and Surface Pressure on Pluto from a Pluto General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, A. M.; Gulbis, A.

    2011-12-01

    A variety of methods have been used to derive Pluto's atmospheric temperature, composition, and surface pressure from spectra and stellar occultation data, while wind is less easily determined. Gravity wave dissipation has been investigated [1] in the 18 March 2007 stellar occultation dataset [2], demonstrating that wind is occurring in the form of perturbations about a mean. Rossby waves have also been proposed [2] as an explanation to the 2007 dataset; however the method was used incorrectly. General circulation models (GCMs) are a ubiquitous tool in the field of planetary atmospheres to solve for the global state of the atmosphere in a physically consistent manner, but only recently have they began to be developed for Pluto. We use a Pluto version of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) GCM to solve for the first time for wind, temperature, and surface pressure globally in Pluto's atmosphere. The Pluto version of the MIT GCM (PGCM) uses the MIT GCM dynamical core [3] with a radiative-conductive model [4]. It includes vertical thermal conduction and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium heating and cooling by methane at 3.3 um and 7.6 um, respectively. We perform a parameter sweep with methane volume mixing ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1% and initial global mean surface pressures of 6-26 ubar. We ran the model from rest starting in the model year 1973. We compared the PGCM results with occultation data from the years 1988, 2002, 2006, and 2007. Model light curves were calculated from the PGCM temperature output (averaged at 90 day intervals) at the corresponding date and Pluto latitudes of each occultation. The match between data and PGCM is better than between data and the radiative-conductive equilibrium solution (i.e. no wind), but the PGCM light curves contain wave-like features while the data do not. We do not believe that this feature represents an atmospheric wave; rather, it is numerical noise known to occur in 2D GCMs. The PGCM-predicted zonal

  9. [Dust storms trend in the Capital Circle of China over the past 50 years and its correlation with temperature, precipitation and wind].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-fu; Tang, Hai-ping

    2005-01-01

    The trends of number of dust storm days of the selected 11 meteorological stations from their established year to 2000 as well as their correlations with temperature, precipitation and wind are revealed. The number of dust storm days of the Capital Circle of China is distinctly variable in space and time. The numbers of dust storm days of the western area are far more than those of the eastern area. The interannual variability of number of dust storm days is remarkable. The number of dust storm days of the following 7 stations, Erlianhaote, Abaga, Xilinhaote, Fengning, Zhangjiakou, Huailai and Beijing, declined along the past decades, but those of the other four stations had no significant upward or downward trends. There is a marked seasonality of the number of dust storm days, and the maximum was in April. The correlation between number of dust storm days and number of days of mean wind velocity > 5 m/s, which is critical wind velocity to entrain sand into the air, was strongest among the three climatic factor. There were significant positive correlations between the number of dust storm days and number of days of mean wind velocity > 5 m/s in 6 stations. The second strongest climatic factor correlated with the number of dust storm days is temperature. There are significant negative correlations between the number of dust storm days and mean annual temperature, mean winter temperature, mean spring temperature in 3 or 4 stations. The correlation between the number of dust storm days and precipitation is weakest. Only one station, Zhurihe, showes significant negative correlation between the number of dust storm days and spring rainfall. There are 4 stations whose number of dust storm days don't significantly correlate with the climate. In the end, the spatial-temporal variability of dust storms and its relation with climate in the Capital Circle of China were discussed thoroughly.

  10. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  11. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  12. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, Dorian F.; Ferret, Antoine; Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-11-15

    A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of ion acceleration. Using a wire-plate configuration as a reference, we have focused on improving the topography of the electric field to (1) separate the ionization and acceleration zones in space, and (2) guide the trajectory of charged particles as parallel to the median axis as possible. In the proposed wire-cylinder-plate setup, a dc corona discharge is generated in the space between a wire and two cylinders. The ions produced by the corona then drift past the cylinders and into a channel between two plates, where they undergo acceleration. To maximize the ionic wind it is found that the geometric configuration must be as compact as possible and that the voltage applied must be right below breakdown. Experimentally, the optimized wire-plate reference setup provides a maximum flow velocity of 8 m s{sup -1}, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.034 m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.24 N m{sup -1}. The wire-cylinder-plate configuration provides a maximum flow velocity of 10 m s{sup -1}, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.041 m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.35 N m{sup -1}. This 46% increase in thrust is obtained by increasing the electric power per unit electrode length by only 16% (from 175 to 210 W m{sup -1}), which confirms the gain in efficiency obtained with the decoupled system. In comparison with a simple wire-wire corona configuration, the wire-cylinder-plate configuration increases the ionic wind velocity by up to a factor of 3, and the thrust by an order of magnitude.

  13. Cabin air temperature of parked vehicles in summer conditions: life-threatening environment for children and pets calculated by a dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Johannes; Schmerold, Ivo; Wimmer, Kurt; Schauberger, Günther

    2016-07-01

    In vehicles that are parked, no ventilation and/or air conditioning takes place. If a vehicle is exposed to direct solar radiation, an immediate temperature rise occurs. The high cabin air temperature can threaten children and animals that are left unattended in vehicles. In the USA, lethal heat strokes cause a mean death rate of 37 children per year. In addition, temperature-sensitive goods (e.g. drugs in ambulances and veterinary vehicles) can be adversely affected by high temperatures. To calculate the rise of the cabin air temperature, a dynamic model was developed that is driven by only three parameters, available at standard meteorological stations: air temperature, global radiation and wind velocity. The transition from the initial temperature to the constant equilibrium temperature depends strongly on the configuration of the vehicle, more specifically on insulation, window area and transmission of the glass, as well as on the meteorological conditions. The comparison of the model with empirical data showed good agreement. The model output can be applied to assess the heat load of children and animals as well as temperature-sensitive goods, which are transported and/or stored in a vehicle.

  14. Design and Laboratory Tests of a Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) Interferometer for Upper Atmospheric Wind and Temperature Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-06

    interferometer for upper atmospheric wind and temperature observations of the O[1D] 630 nm emission. The monolithic interferometer has no moving parts, a large...Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) interferometer for upper atmospheric wind and temperature observations of the O[1D] 630 nm emission. The monolithic ...To date the instruments of choice have been Fabry-Perot [1–3] and wide-angle Michelson interferometers [4]. The technical difficulties associated

  15. Stratospheric Horizontal Wavenumber Spectra of Winds, Potential Temperature, and Atmospheric Tracers Observed by High-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Newman, Paul A.; Lait, Leslie; Chan, K. R.; Loewenstein, Max; Proffitt, Michael H.; Gary, Bruce L.

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal wavenumber power spectra of vertical and horizontal wind velocities, potential temperatures, and ozone and N(2)O mixing ratios, as measured in the mid-stratosphere during 73 ER-2 flights (altitude approx. 20km) are presented. The velocity and potential temperature spectra in the 100 to 1-km wavelength range deviate significantly from the uniform -5/3 power law expected for the inverse energy-cascade regime of two-dimensional turbulence and also for inertial-range, three-dimensional turbulence. Instead, steeper spectra approximately consistent with a -3 power law are observed at horizontal scales smaller than 3 km for all velocity components as well as potential temperature. Shallower spectra are observed at scales longer than 6 km. For horizontal velocity and potential temperature the spectral indices at longer scales are between -1.5 and -2.0. For vertical velocity the spectrum at longer scales become flat. It is argued that the observed velocity and potential temperature spectra are consistent with gravity waves. At smaller scales, the shapes are also superficially consistent with a Lumley-Shur-Weinstock buoyant subrange of turbulence and/or nonlinear gravity waves. Contemporaneous spectra of ozone and N(sub 2)O mixing ratio in the 100 to 1-km wavelength range do conform to an approximately uniform -5/3 power law. It is argued that this may reflect interactions between gravity wave air-parcel displacements and laminar or filamentary structures in the trace gas mixing ratio field produced by enstropy-cascading two-dimensional turbulence.

  16. Short-term effects of air temperature on plasma metabolite concentrations in patients undergoing cardiac cattheterization.

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown associations between air temperature and cardiovascular health outcomes. Metabolic dysregulation might also play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.OBJECTIVES: To investigate short-term temperature effects on metabol...

  17. Rainfall Prediction using Soil and Air Temperature in a Tropical Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Tessy P.; Renuka, G.

    2007-07-01

    An attempt is made to establish a linkage between soil and air temperature and south-west monsoon rainfall at Pillicode (12°12'N,75°10'E) a tropical station in north Kerala. The dependence of monsoon rainfall on pre-monsoon soil temperature decreases as the depth of the soil increases. A regression equation has been developed for the estimation of monsoon rainfall using pre-monsoon soil and air temperature. The results show that sub soil temperature along with air temperature can be used for forecasting the monsoon level.

  18. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  19. Gravity waves in simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in the strato- and mesosphere with a twin Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-01

    Wind and temperature measurements are fundamental to understand atmospheric dynamics. However, a wide altitude range of the middle atmosphere from about 15 to 70 km is hard to access by remote sensing instruments: the absence of free electrons prevents radar measurements, and the optical depth prevents satellite remote sensing over the whole altitude range. In-situ measurements by rockets allow only sporadic snapshots, while balloons are not able to ascent high enough. Our Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) in Northern Norway (69° N, 16° E) allows to measure temperatures, aerosols, and wind speed simultaneously. By applying two independently steerable telescopes we are able to measure altitude profiles of two wind components at once. The wind retrieval currently allows wind measurements in aerosol free parts of the middle atmosphere up to 80 km altitude without external calibration. The temporal and spatial resolution is 1 h and 3 km, respectively. We present case studies which include data recorded during stratospheric warmings and during periods of enhanced wave activity. Wave signatures are clearly visible in time-height sections of temperature and horizontal wind and can be combined to deduce parameters of the wave, like propagation and energy density. We present also mean temperatures and winds from lidar measurements performed during the winter seasons 2009-2012 and discuss their importance for wave propagation.

  20. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.670 NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX intake-air humidity...

  5. One-Component Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagrams in the Presence of Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio; Martire, Daniel O.; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2010-01-01

    One-component phase diagrams are good approximations to predict pressure-temperature ("P-T") behavior of a substance in the presence of air, provided air pressure is not much higher than the vapor pressure. However, at any air pressure, and from the conceptual point of view, the use of a traditional "P-T" phase diagram is not strictly correct. In…

  6. Wind-Based Navigation of a Hot-air Balloon on Titan: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furfaro, Roberto; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Elfes, Alberto; Reh, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Current analysis of data streamed back to Earth by the Cassini spacecraft features Titan as one of the most exciting places in the solar system. NASA centers and universities around the US, as well as the European Space Agency, are studying the possibility of sending, as part of the next mission to this giant moon of Saturn, a hot-air balloon (Montgolfier-type) for further and more in-depth exploration. The basic idea would be to design a reliable, semi-autonomous, and yet cheap Montgolfier capable of using continuous flow of waste heat from a power source to lift the balloon and sustain its altitude in the Titan environment. In this paper we study the problem of locally navigating a hot-air balloon in the nitrogen-based Titan atmosphere. The basic idea is to define a strategy (i.e. design of a suitable guidance system) that allows autonomous and semi-autonomous navigation of the balloon using the available (and partial) knowledge of the wind structure blowing on the saturnian satellite surface. Starting from first principles we determined the appropriate thermal and dynamical models describing (a) the vertical dynamics of the balloon and (b) the dynamics of the balloon moving on a vertical plane (2-D motion). Next, various non-linear fuzzy-based control strategies have been evaluated, analyzed and implemented in MATLAB to numerically simulate the capability of the system to simultaneously maintain altitude, as well as a scientifically desirable trajectory. We also looked at the ability of the balloon to perform station keeping. The results of the simulation are encouraging and show the effectiveness of such a system to cheaply and effectively perform semiautonomous exploration of Titan.

  7. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300°C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  8. Airborne Wind Energy: Implementation and Design for the U.S. Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    11 2.3. Jet Streams & Global Wind Patterns...3. A typical jet stream pattern, with two jet streams per hemisphere 17 ............... 14 Figure 4. Wind power density (kW/m 2 ) that was...turbines and airfoils in energy production; in wind towers, limited blade portions (red) contribute predominantly to power production; the kite

  9. Startup of air-cooled condensers and dry cooling towers at low temperatures of the cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Shifrin, B. A.; Yankov, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of startup and performance of air-cooled condensers (ACC) and dry cooling towers (DCT) at low cooling air temperatures are considered. Effects of the startup of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures are described. Different options of the ACC heating up are analyzed, and examples of existing technologies are presented (electric heating, heating up with hot air or steam, and internal and external heating). The use of additional heat exchanging sections, steam tracers, in the DCT design is described. The need for high power in cases of electric heating and heating up with hot air is noted. An experimental stand for research and testing of the ACC startup at low temperatures is described. The design of the three-pass ACC unit is given, and its advantages over classical single-pass design at low temperatures are listed. The formation of ice plugs inside the heat exchanging tubes during the start-up of ACC and DCT at low cooling air temperatures is analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of the steam flow rate, steam nozzle distance from the heat-exchange surface, and their orientation in space on the metal temperature were collected, and test results are analyzed. It is noted that the surface temperature at the end of the heat up is almost independent from its initial temperature. Recommendations for the safe start-up of ACCs and DCTs are given. The heating flow necessary to sufficiently heat up heat-exchange surfaces of ACCs and DCTs for the safe startup is estimated. The technology and the process of the heat up of the ACC with the heating steam external supply are described by the example of the startup of the full-scale section of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures of the cooling air, and the advantages of the proposed start-up technology are confirmed.

  10. Effects of Outside Air Temperature on Movement of Phosphine Gas in Concrete Elevator Bins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies that measured the movement and concentration of phosphine gas in upright concrete bins over time indicated that fumigant movement was dictated by air currents, which in turn, were a function of the difference between the average grain temperature and the average outside air temperature durin...

  11. Correction of Temperatures of Air-Cooled Engine Cylinders for Variation in Engine and Cooling Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Pinkel, Benjamin; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1939-01-01

    Factors are obtained from semiempirical equations for correcting engine-cylinder temperatures for variation in important engine and cooling conditions. The variation of engine temperatures with atmospheric temperature is treated in detail, and correction factors are obtained for various flight and test conditions, such as climb at constant indicated air speed, level flight, ground running, take-off, constant speed of cooling air, and constant mass flow of cooling air. Seven conventional air-cooled engine cylinders enclosed in jackets and cooled by a blower were tested to determine the effect of cooling-air temperature and carburetor-air temperature on cylinder temperatures. The cooling air temperature was varied from approximately 80 degrees F. to 230 degrees F. and the carburetor-air temperature from approximately 40 degrees F. to 160 degrees F. Tests were made over a large range of engine speeds, brake mean effective pressures, and pressure drops across the cylinder. The correction factors obtained experimentally are compared with those obtained from the semiempirical equations and a fair agreement is noted.

  12. Predicting seed cotton moisture content from changes in drying air temperature - second year

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mathematical model was used to predict seed cotton moisture content in the overhead section of a cotton gin. The model took into account the temperature, mass flow, and specific heat of both the air and seed cotton. Air temperatures and mass flows were measured for a second year at a commercial g...

  13. System and method for monitoring and controlling stator winding temperature in a de-energized AC motor

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin [Kenosha, WI; Luebke, Charles John [Sussex, WI; Habetler, Thomas G [Snellville, GA; Zhang, Pinjia [Atlanta, GA; Becker, Scott K [Oak Creek, WI

    2011-12-27

    A system and method for measuring and controlling stator winding temperature in an AC motor while idling is disclosed. The system includes a circuit having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of a multi-phase AC motor. The circuit further includes a plurality of switching devices to control current flow and terminal voltages in the multi-phase AC motor and a controller connected to the circuit. The controller is configured to activate the plurality of switching devices to create a DC signal in an output of the motor control device corresponding to an input to the multi-phase AC motor, determine or estimate a stator winding resistance of the multi-phase AC motor based on the DC signal, and estimate a stator temperature from the stator winding resistance. Temperature can then be controlled and regulated by DC injection into the stator windings.

  14. Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

    2012-08-01

    We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China (31.5 °N, 117 °E). Patterned after the Colorado State University (CSU) narrowband sodium lidar with a dye laser-based transmitter, the USTC sodium temperature/wind lidar was deployed with a number of technical improvements that facilitate automation and ease of operation; these include a home constructed pulsed dye amplifier (PDA), a beam-steering system, a star-tracking program, and an electronic timing control. With the averaged power of ∼1.2 W output from PDA and the receiving telescope diameter of 0.76 m, our lidar system has a power aperture product of ∼0.55 Wm(2) and is comparable to the CSU and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) sodium lidar systems. The uncertainties of typical measurements induced by photon noise and laser locking fluctuation for the temperature and wind with a 2 km vertical and 15 min temporal resolutions under the nighttime clear sky condition are estimated to be ∼1.0 K and ∼1.5 m/s, respectively, at the sodium peak (e.g., 91 km), and 8 K and 10 m/s, respectively, at both sodium layer edges (e.g., 81 km and 105 km). The USTC narrowband sodium lidar has been operated regularly during the night since November 2011. Using the initial data collected, we demonstrate the reliability and suitability of these high resolution and precision datasets for studying the wave perturbations in the mesopause region.

  15. Prediction of air temperature in the aircraft cabin under different operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volavý, F.; Fišer, J.; Nöske, I.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the air temperature in the aircraft cabin by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. The simulations are performed on the CFD model which is based on geometry and cabin interior arrangement of the Flight Test Facility (FTF) located at Fraunhofer IBP, Germany. The experimental test flights under three different cabin temperatures were done in FTF and the various data were gathered during these flights. Air temperature in the cabin was measured on probes located near feet, torso and head of each passenger and also surface temperature and air temperature distributed from inlets were measured. The data were firstly analysed in order to obtain boundary conditions for cabin surfaces and inlets. Then the results of air temperature from the simulations were compared with measured data. The suitability and accuracy of the CFD approach for temperature prediction is discussed.

  16. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  17. Temperature and wind measurements and model atmospheres of the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. R.; Bui, T. P.; Scott, S. G.; Bowen, S. W.; Dean-Day, J.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Meteorological Measurement System provides accurate in situ measurements of atmospheric state variables. During the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) the ER-2 flew over the polar region on 14 occasions in January and February, 1989. Vertical temperature profiles, during aircraft takeoff at about 60 deg N and during midflight descent and ascent at high latitudes, are presented. Latitudinal variations of the horizontal wind measurement are illustrated and discussed. Based on observation data, model atmospheres at 60 deg and 75 deg N, representative of the environment of the AASE campaign, are developed.

  18. Solar wind: A possible factor driving the interannual sea surface temperature tripolar mode over North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ziniu; Li, Delin

    2016-06-01

    The effect of solar wind (SW) on the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) in boreal winter is examined through an analysis of observational data during 1964-2013. The North Atlantic SSTs show a pronounced meridional tripolar pattern in response to solar wind speed (SWS) variations. This pattern is broadly similar to the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of interannual variations in the wintertime SSTs over North Atlantic. The time series of this leading EOF mode of SST shows a significant interannual period, which is the same as that of wintertime SWS. This response also appears as a compact north-south seesaw of sea level pressure and a vertical tripolar structure of zonal wind, which simultaneously resembles the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the overlying atmosphere. As compared with the typical low SWS winters, during the typical high SWS winters, the stratospheric polar night jet (PNJ) is evidently enhanced and extends from the stratosphere to the troposphere, even down to the North Atlantic Ocean surface. Notably, the North Atlantic Ocean is an exclusive region in which the SW signal spreads downward from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Thus, it seems that the SW is a possible factor for this North Atlantic SST tripolar mode. The dynamical process of stratosphere-troposphere coupling, together with the global atmospheric electric circuit-cloud microphysical process, probably accounts for the particular downward propagation of the SW signal.

  19. Air temperature "singularities" as a tool for the comprehension of the climate diversity in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzyna, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    Air temperature "singularities" were used to study climate diversity in Europe. The basis of analysis were data of mean daily air temperature for 50-years period (1951-2000) from 66 European meteorological stations. Multiyear mean air temperature values were counted for the each day of the year at first (29th February was omitted). Next a theoretical sine curve of annual air temperature course was created with help of the Fourier's analysis for the each station. Differences between theoretical and observed mean vales of daily air temperatures were counted in the next step. The biggest of these differences (below the lower quartile and above the upper quartile) lasting at least 3 days can be treated as thermal "singularities". A cluster analysis was used to find similarities of the singularities occurrence in analyzed stations. As a result 8 clusters were distinguished representing regions with different thermal "singularities" occurrence pattern.

  20. INSTABILITY-DRIVEN LIMITS ON HELIUM TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN THE SOLAR WIND: OBSERVATIONS AND LINEAR VLASOV ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.; Gary, S. Peter

    2012-04-01

    Kinetic microinstabilities in the solar wind arise when the plasma deviates too far from thermal equilibrium. Previously published work has provided strong evidence that the cyclotron, mirror, and parallel and oblique firehose instabilities limit proton (i.e., ionized hydrogen) temperature anisotropy. However, few studies have thoroughly explored whether a less-abundant ion species can also trigger these instabilities. This study considered the possibility of similar instability-driven limits on {alpha}-particle (i.e., fully ionized helium) temperature anisotropy. Linear Vlasov analysis was used to derive the expected threshold conditions for instabilities driven by {alpha}-particle temperature anisotropy. Measurements in situ of {alpha}-particle temperature anisotropy from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups were found to be consistent with the limits imposed by these instability thresholds. This strongly suggests that {alpha}-particles, which only constitute {approx}5% of ions in the solar wind, can drive an instability if their temperature anisotropy becomes sufficiently extreme.

  1. Modeling subcanopy incoming longwave radiation to seasonal snow using air and tree trunk temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Clare; Rutter, Nick; Zahner, Franziska; Jonas, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Data collected at three Swiss alpine forested sites over a combined 11 year period were used to evaluate the role of air temperature in modeling subcanopy incoming longwave radiation to the snow surface. Simulated subcanopy incoming longwave radiation is traditionally partitioned into that from the sky and that from the canopy, i.e., a two-part model. Initial uncertainties in predicting longwave radiation using the two-part model resulted from vertical differences in measured air temperature. Above-canopy (35 m) air temperatures were higher than those within (10 m) and below (2 m) canopy throughout four snow seasons (December-April), demonstrating how the forest canopy can act as a cold sink for air. Lowest model root-mean-square error (RMSE) was using above-canopy air temperature. Further investigation of modeling subcanopy longwave radiation using above-canopy air temperature showed underestimations, particularly during periods of high insolation. In order to explicitly account for canopy temperatures in modeling longwave radiation, the two-part model was improved by incorporating a measured trunk view component and trunk temperature. Trunk temperature measurements were up to 25°C higher than locally measured air temperatures. This three-part model reduced the RMSE by up to 7.7 W m-2 from the two-part air temperature model at all sensor positions across the 2014 snowmelt season and performed particularly well during periods of high insolation when errors from the two-part model were up to 40 W m-2. A parameterization predicting tree trunk temperatures using measured air temperature and incoming shortwave radiation demonstrate a simple method that can be applied to provide input to the three-part model across midlatitude coniferous forests.

  2. Impact of Surface Air Temperature and Snow Cover Depth on the Upper Soil Temperature Variations in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyukov, A. B.; Sherstyukov, B. G.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2007-12-01

    A study of the impact of climate changes during for the last four decades on soil temperatures at depths up to 3.2 meters has been conducted for the territory of Russia. For the 1965-2004 period, we compiled and analyzed data from all Russian meteorological stations with long-term soil temperature observations at depths 80, 160 and 320 cm. Traditionally, these stations also observe a complete set of standard meteorological variables (that include surface air temperature and extensive monitoring of snow cover characteristics). This allowed us to investigate the impact of surface air temperatures and snow depth variations on soil temperatures in the upper soil layer, to quantify it using statistical analyses of multi-dimensional 40-year-long time series at 164 locations throughout the country, and assess the representativeness of the obtained results. Three-dimensional spatial distributions of regression and correlation coefficients were mapped for warm and cold seasons separately as well as for the entire year, and thereafter analyzed. In the permafrost zone we found special features in these fields that distinctively separate the permafrost zone from the remaining territory. In this zone, soil temperatures are practically uncorrelated with surface air temperatures and variations of the snow depth controls soil temperature variations (with R2 up to 0.5) Quantitative estimates of the contribution of mid-annual air temperature and snow cover depth in the long-term changes of mid-annual soil temperatures across the Russia territory were received. We found that the prevailing influence on soil temperature variations in the European part was surface air temperatures and in the Asian part of Russia was snow cover depth. Furthermore, increase of the winter snow depth in the permafrost zone (by preserving the heat accumulated in the warm season) promotes annual soil temperature increase and therefore may foster the further permafrost degradation associated with ongoing

  3. An in situ-based analysis of the relationship between land surface "skin" and screen-level air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Elizabeth Jane

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between land surface temperatures (LST) and screen-level air temperatures (T2m) using in situ observations from 19 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) deployments located in a range of geographical regimes. The diurnal cycle is resolved using 1 min observations: a particular focus of the study is on the relationship between daily extremes of LST (LSTmax, LSTmin) and T2m (Tmax, Tmin). Temperature differences are analyzed with respect to cloud, wind speed, and snow cover. Under cloud-free, low wind speed conditions, daytime LST is often several degrees Celsius (°C) higher than T2m at low-to-middle latitudes and at high latitudes during the summer months. In contrast, LST and T2m are often close (e.g., within 2°C) under cloudy and/or moderate-to-high wind speed conditions or when solar insolation is low or absent. LSTmin and Tmin are generally well correlated (r > 0.8, often r > 0.9), while seasonal correlations between LSTmax and Tmax are weaker (r > 0.6, often r > 0.8). At high latitudes, LST and T2m are well coupled in spring/autumn/winter; the relationship between LST and T2m tends to weaken with decreasing latitude. The timing of daily extremes is also investigated and it is found that LSTmin and Tmin typically occur close to sunrise, with Tmin occurring slightly after LSTmin. LSTmax occurs close to solar noon, with Tmax typically occurring 1-3 hours later. This study will inform temperature data users on differences between LST and T2m and aid development of methods to estimate T2m using satellite LSTs.

  4. Seasonal Variability of Saturn's Tropospheric Temperatures, Winds and Para-H2 from Cassini Far-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, P. G. J; Achterberg, R. K.; Orton, G. S.; Flasar, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Far-IR 16-1000 micrometer spectra of Saturn's hydrogen-helium continuum measured by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) are inverted to construct a near-continuous record of upper tropospheric (70-700 mbar) temperatures and para-H2 fraction as a function of latitude, pressure and time for a third of a saturnian year (2004-2014, from northern winter to northern spring). The thermal field reveals evidence of reversing summertime asymmetries superimposed onto the belt/zone structure. The temperature structure is almost symmetric about the equator by 2014, with seasonal lag times that increase with depth and are qualitatively consistent with radiative climate models. Localised heating of the tropospheric hazes (100-250 mbar) create a distinct perturbation to the temperature profile that shifts in magnitude and location, declining in the autumn hemisphere and growing in the spring. Changes in the para-H2 (f(sub p)) distribution are subtle, with a 0.02-0.03 rise over the spring hemisphere (200-500 mbar) perturbed by (i) low-f(sub p) air advected by both the springtime storm of 2010 and equatorial upwelling; and (ii) subsidence of high-f(sub p) air at northern high latitudes, responsible for a developing north-south asymmetry in f(sub p). Conversely, the shifting asymmetry in the para-H2 disequilibrium primarily reflects the changing temperature structure (and hence the equilibrium distribution of f(sub p)), rather than actual changes in f(sub p) induced by chemical conversion or transport. CIRS results interpolated to the same point in the seasonal cycle as re-analysed Voyager-1 observations (early northern spring) show qualitative consistency from year to year (i.e., the same tropospheric asymmetries in temperature and f(sub p)), with the exception of the tropical tropopause near the equatorial zones and belts, where downward propagation of a cool temperature anomaly associated with Saturn's stratospheric oscillation could potentially perturb tropopause

  5. Seasonal variability of Saturn's tropospheric temperatures, winds and para-H2 from Cassini far-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Achterberg, R. K.; Orton, G. S.; Flasar, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Far-IR 16-1000 μ m spectra of Saturn's hydrogen-helium continuum measured by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) are inverted to construct a near-continuous record of upper tropospheric (70-700 mbar) temperatures and para-H2 fraction as a function of latitude, pressure and time for a third of a saturnian year (2004-2014, from northern winter to northern spring). The thermal field reveals evidence of reversing summertime asymmetries superimposed onto the belt/zone structure. The temperature structure is almost symmetric about the equator by 2014, with seasonal lag times that increase with depth and are qualitatively consistent with radiative climate models. Localised heating of the tropospheric hazes (100-250 mbar) create a distinct perturbation to the temperature profile that shifts in magnitude and location, declining in the autumn hemisphere and growing in the spring. Changes in the para-H2 (fp) distribution are subtle, with a 0.02-0.03 rise over the spring hemisphere (200-500 mbar) perturbed by (i) low-fp air advected by both the springtime storm of 2010 and equatorial upwelling; and (ii) subsidence of high-fp air at northern high latitudes, responsible for a developing north-south asymmetry in fp . Conversely, the shifting asymmetry in the para-H2 disequilibrium primarily reflects the changing temperature structure (and hence the equilibrium distribution of fp), rather than actual changes in fp induced by chemical conversion or transport. CIRS results interpolated to the same point in the seasonal cycle as re-analysed Voyager-1 observations (early northern spring) show qualitative consistency from year to year (i.e., the same tropospheric asymmetries in temperature and fp), with the exception of the tropical tropopause near the equatorial zones and belts, where downward propagation of a cool temperature anomaly associated with Saturn's stratospheric oscillation could potentially perturb tropopause temperatures, para-H2 and winds. Quantitative

  6. A novel multi-beam correlation lidar for wind profiling and plume tracking for air quality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    Various types of in-situ and remote sensing techniques are being utilized for measuring air quality parameters. In this paper, the development and testing of a novel three beam multifunctional direct detection lidar for air quality applications will be discussed. Operating at 1030 nm wavelength, this lidar is a nanosecond class direct detection system with three transceivers and is capable of tracking the motion of aerosol structures using elastic backscatter. Designed with scalable and modular elements and advanced algorithms and graphical user display, this lidar is tripod mounted and measures three component (3D) winds by cross correlation of aerosol backscatter from three near-parallel beams. Besides extracting multi-component wind data, the system is designed provide various atmospheric elements including turbulence. Performance of this lidar in regard to crosswind profiling has been validated with ultrasonic anemometers under low and high wind conditions. From the field data, it shown that this lidar is capable of providing relatively high spatial resolution (<1.2 m) and line-of-sight error less than 0.1 m/s over a range of greater than 2 km. With a maximum operational range of over 15 km, this lidar was recently used to study effluents from a smokestack. The results of our plume tracking study will be presented and follow-on applications for studying air emissions due to hydraulic fracturing or fracking, will be discussed.

  7. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  8. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three data sets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~ 2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  9. Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2010-12-31

    This project added a new airflow enhancement technology to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal power plant. Airflow parameters and efficiency improvement for the main plant cooling process using the applied technology were determined and compared with the capabilities of existing systems. The project required significant planning and pre-test execution in order to reach the required Air Cooled Condenser system configuration for evaluation. A host Power Plant ACC system had to be identified, agreement finalized, and addition of the SPX ACC Wind Guide Technology completed on that site. Design of the modification, along with procurement, fabrication, instrumentation, and installation of the new airflow enhancement technology were executed. Baseline and post-modification cooling system data was collected and evaluated. The improvement of ACC thermal performance after SPX wind guide installation was clear. Testing of the improvement indicates there is a 5% improvement in heat transfer coefficient in high wind conditions and 1% improvement at low wind speed. The benefit increased with increasing wind speed. This project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  10. Static voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding of air-core spiral strip transformer and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-bo; Liu, Jin-liang; Cheng, Xin-bing; Zhang, Yu

    2011-09-01

    The static voltage distribution between winding turns has great impact on output characteristics and lifetime of the air-core spiral strip pulse transformer (ACSSPT). In this paper, winding inductance was calculated by electromagnetic theory, so that the static voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding of ACSSPT was analyzed conveniently. According to theoretical analysis, a voltage gradient because of the turn-to-turn capacitance was clearly noticeable across the ground turns. Simulation results of Pspice and CST EM Studio codes showed that the voltage distribution between turns of secondary winding had linear increments from the output turn to the ground turn. In experiment, the difference in increased voltage between the ground turns and the output turns of a 20-turns secondary winding is almost 50%, which is believed to be responsible for premature breakdown of the insulation, particularly between the ground turns. The experimental results demonstrated the theoretical analysis and simulation results, which had important value for stable and long lifetime ACSSPT design. A new ACSSPT with improved structure has been used successfully in intense electron beam accelerators steadily.

  11. Optical air data systems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Loren M. (Inventor); Tang, Shoou-yu (Inventor); Acott, Phillip E. (Inventor); Spaeth, Lisa G. (Inventor); O'Brien, Martin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems and methods for sensing air includes at least one, and in some embodiments three, transceivers for projecting the laser energy as laser radiation to the air. The transceivers are scanned or aligned along several different axes. Each transceiver receives laser energy as it is backscattered from the air. A computer processes signals from the transceivers to distinguish molecular scattered laser radiation from aerosol scattered laser radiation and determines air temperatures, wind speeds, and wind directions based on the scattered laser radiation. Applications of the system to wind power site evaluation, wind turbine control, traffic safety, general meteorological monitoring and airport safety are presented.

  12. Draft Permit & Supporting Documentation for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    List of draft permit & supporting documentation for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  13. Public Hearing & Comment Period Document(s) for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    List of public hearing & comment period document(s) for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  14. Final Permit Documents for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    List of finla permit documents for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  15. Gravity Wave Variance in LIMS Temperatures. Part I: Variability and Comparison with Background Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Gille, John C.

    1994-09-01

    Small-scale features in temperature data from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere satellite experiment are isolated by subtracting profiles of globally mapped temperatures (containing zonal waves 0-6) from inverted temperature profiles. These features are interpreted as internal gravity waves. The preponderance of the variance is associated with the longest wavelengths, corresponding to the lowest frequencies (inertio-gravity waves). The data include approximately 2000 daily soundings between late October 1978 and late May 1979, all longitudes, latitudes from about 65°S to 85°N, and altitudes from the tropopause to the middle mesosphere (pressures from 100 to 0.1 mb). Zonal-mean gravity wave variance is compared with background winds, and variance maps are presented for five one-week periods: early November, early January, early February, late March, and early May. Time-height plots of zonal mean wave variance and background winds in the latitude bands 45°-55°S, 5°S-5°N, and 45°-55°N are also presented. Variance ranges from about 2.0 K2 in the northern late spring lower stratosphere to about 315 K2 in the northern late fall mesosphere. The Northern Hemisphere gravity wave variance field undergoes an approximate twofold increase between fall and early winter, but the maximum remains quasi-stationary; during the same period the mesospheric jet moves by several thousand kilometers. The Northern Hemisphere gravity wave field is strongly distorted by the late January minor warming, and decreases gradually between early March and late May. The tropical gravity wave variance is approximately constant with time below 40 km, but shows an increasingly strong semiannual signal above 40 km. The tropical maximum extends through January and February but is confined in altitude near 60 km. Southern Hemisphere variance decreases toward a broad minimum in January and February, but climbs rapidly after the autumnal equinox. The gravity wave variance fields during

  16. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  17. Maintenance of coastal surface blooms by surface temperature stratification and wind drift.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de la Torre, Mary Carmen; Maske, Helmut; Ochoa, José; Almeda-Jauregui, César O

    2013-01-01

    Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS), the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters.

  18. Maintenance of Coastal Surface Blooms by Surface Temperature Stratification and Wind Drift

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-de la Torre, Mary Carmen; Maske, Helmut; Ochoa, José; Almeda-Jauregui, César O.

    2013-01-01

    Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS), the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters. PMID:23593127

  19. Carbon isotope evidence for the latitudinal distribution and wind speed dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Randerson, James T.; Primeau, François W.; Gruber, Nicolas; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2006-11-01

    The air-sea gas transfer velocity is an important determinant of the exchange of gases, including CO2, between the atmosphere and ocean, but the magnitude of the transfer velocity and what factors control it remains poorly known. Here, we use oceanic and atmospheric observations of 14C and 13C to constrain the global mean gas transfer velocity as well as the exponent of its wind speed dependence, utilizing the distinct signatures left by the air-sea exchange of 14CO2 and 13CO2. While the atmosphere and ocean inventories of 14CO2 and 13CO2 constrain the mean gas transfer velocity, the latitudinal pattern in the atmospheric and oceanic 14C and 13C distributions contain information about the wind speed dependence. We computed the uptake of bomb 14C by the ocean for different transfer velocity patterns using pulse response functions from an ocean general circulation model, and evaluated the match between the predicted bomb 14C concentrations and observationally based estimates for the 1970s-1990s. Using a wind speed climatology based on satellite measurements, we solved either for the best-fit global relationship between gas exchange and mean wind speed or for the mean gas transfer velocity over each of 11 ocean regions. We also compared the predicted consequences of different gas exchange relationships on the rate of change and interhemisphere gradient of 14C in atmospheric CO2 with tree-ring and atmospheric measurements. Our results suggest that globally, the dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity on wind speed is close to linear, with an exponent of 0.5 +/- 0.4, and that the global mean gas transfer velocity at a Schmidt number of 660 is 20 +/- 3 cm/hr, similar to the results of previous analyses. We find that the air-sea flux of 13C estimated from atmosphere and ocean observations also suggests a lower than quadratic dependence of gas exchange on wind speed.

  20. A comparison of urban heat islands mapped using skin temperature, air temperature, and apparent temperature (Humidex), for the greater Vancouver area.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung Chak; Knudby, Anders; Xu, Yongming; Hodul, Matus; Aminipouri, Mehdi

    2016-02-15

    Apparent temperature is more closely related to mortality during extreme heat events than other temperature variables, yet spatial epidemiology studies typically use skin temperature (also known as land surface temperature) to quantify heat exposure because it is relatively easy to map from satellite data. An empirical approach to map apparent temperature at the neighborhood scale, which relies on publicly available weather station observations and spatial data layers combined in a random forest regression model, was demonstrated for greater Vancouver, Canada. Model errors were acceptable (cross-validated RMSE=2.04 °C) and the resulting map of apparent temperature, calibrated for a typical hot summer day, corresponded well with past temperature research in the area. A comparison with field measurements as well as similar maps of skin temperature and air temperature revealed that skin temperature was poorly correlated with both air temperature (R(2)=0.38) and apparent temperature (R(2)=0.39). While the latter two were more similar (R(2)=0.87), apparent temperature was predicted to exceed air temperature by more than 5 °C in several urban areas as well as around the confluence of the Pitt and Fraser rivers. We conclude that skin temperature is not a suitable proxy for human heat exposure, and that spatial epidemiology studies could benefit from mapping apparent temperature, using an approach similar to the one reported here, to better quantify differences in heat exposure that exist across an urban landscape.

  1. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  2. A Geosynchronous Lidar System for Atmospheric Winds, Temperature, and Moisture Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, Dave; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A geosynchronous Lidar would enable synoptic measurement of atmospheric winds; temperature; and moisture, which are key first-order variables of the Earth's weather equation. Simultaneous measurement of these parameters at fast revisit rates promises large advancements in our weather predictive skills. Such capabilities would: a) yield greatly improved initial conditions for models, b) make obsolete existing (discrete) measurement approaches which are both costly and cumbersome, and c) obviate the use of numerical techniques needed to correct data obtained using present methods. Additionally, simultaneous synoptic Lidar observations would lead to improvements in model parameters, and in our knowledge of small-scale weather processes. A Dial Lidar system could simultaneously measure winds, temperatures, and humidity through a combination of Doppler and Differential Absorption techniques. Also, such a system would provide basic aerosol (dry dust) measurement capabilities that could have an impact on Earth radiation budget measurements. On the technical side, a geosynchronous Lidar DAR system would require transmit optics of a few meters in diameter, a hundred meter diameter receive telescope, fineness of both optical systems scaled to the wavelength, and scanning for the transmit system. Potential technology issues include optical quality of large transmit and receive telescope optics, the large detector area needed, the transmit scanning system, signal detection (S/N ratio of detector system) for the extremely weak return signal at GEO, and power demands in the KW range.

  3. Investigation of the Air-Wave-Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar: Analyses of the HRDL Data Taken using DYNAMO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-07

    07-10-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 08/17/2012-08/16/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea ...of our initially proposed work. The move to examining the ABL using data taken from the CIRPAS TODWL (Twin Otter Doppler Wind Lidar) remains...Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar: Analyses of the HRDL data taken during DYNAMO George

  4. Air-Cooled Design of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.; Rosen, Micha; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan; Cavalcante, Celio L.

    2004-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts. This paper discusses the mechanical design and the results of thermal model validation tests of a TSAC that uses air as the cooling medium.

  5. Temperature and horizontal wind measurements on the ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. R.; Scott, S. G.; Bui, T. P.; Bowen, S. W.; Day, J.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of temperature, pressure, potential temperature, and horizontal wind measurements is discussed in connection with the use of Meteorological Measurement System data in the AAOE. The vertical distribution of temperature measurements and latitudinal variations of the zonal wind for 12 flights over Antarctica during the 1987 AAOE campaign are summarized. Model atmospheres from 0 to 32 km at 70 deg and 55 deg S for the August-September period are constructed. Above the 420 K isentropic surface, the polar vortex remains strong throughout August and September of 1987.

  6. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  7. Multi-fractal scaling comparison of the Air Temperature and the Surface Temperature over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Jiping; Liu, Xinwei; Li, Fei

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and temporal multi-scaling behaviors between the daily Air Temperature (AT) and the Surface Temperature (ST) over China are compared in about 60-yr observations by Multi-fractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) method. The different fractal phenomena and diversity features in the geographic distribution are found for the AT and ST series using MF-DFA. There are more multi-fractal features for the AT records but less for ST. The respective geographic sites show important scaling differences when compared to the multi-fractal signatures of AT with ST. An interval threshold for 95% confidence level is obtained by shuffling the AT records and the ST records. For the AT records, 93% of all observed stations shows the strong multi-fractal behaviors. In addition, the multi-fractal characteristics decrease with increasing latitude in South China and are obviously strong along the coast. The multi-fractal behaviors of the AT records between the Yangtze River and Yellow River basin and in most regions of Northwest China seem to be weak and not significant, even single mono-fractal features. However, for the ST records, the geographical distributions of multi-fractal phenomenon seem to be in disorder which account for 81% of the stations. The weak multi-fractal behaviors of the ST records are concentrated in North China, most regions of Northeast China.

  8. Physics of High-Temperature Air. Part. 2. Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    2MAiW ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Many people have helped with identifying the specific topics addressed in both parts of this document, with reviewing one or more...in the wind and are eventually deposited as radioactive fallout, which produces a serious long-term health hazard for people (see ENW, 1977, Ch. 9...34 produce some damage, while some long- term injuries to people are caused by radioactive fallout. Some representative damage radii on the ground for a

  9. The seasonal vertical distribution of the Saharan Air Layer and its modulation by the wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamalis, C.; Chédin, A.; Pelon, J.; Capelle, V.

    2013-11-01

    winter and 9 m deg-1 in summer. Spring and fall present similar characteristics for both mean altitude and geometrical thickness. Wind plays a major role not only for the transport of dust within the SAL but also by sculpting it. During winter, the trade winds transport SAL towards South America, while in spring and summer they bring dust-free maritime air masses mainly from the North Atlantic up to about 50° W below the SAL. The North Atlantic westerlies, with their southern border occurring between 15 and 30° N (depending on the season, the longitude and the altitude), prevent the SAL from developing further northward. In addition, their southward shift with altitude gives SAL its characteristic oval shape in the northern part. The effective dry deposition velocity of dust particles is estimated to be 0.07 cm s-1 in winter, 0.14 cm s-1 in spring, 0.2 cm s-1 in summer and 0.11 cm s-1 in fall. Finally, the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) is observed to collocate with the maximum dust load of the SAL, and this might promote the differential advection for SAL parts, especially during summer.

  10. Attribution of precipitation changes on ground-air temperature offset: Granger causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Bodri, Louise

    2016-06-01

    This work examines the causal relationship between the value of the ground-air temperature offset and the precipitation changes for monitored 5-min data series together with their hourly and daily averages obtained at the Sporilov Geophysical Observatory (Prague). Shallow subsurface soil temperatures were monitored under four different land cover types (bare soil, sand, short-cut grass and asphalt). The ground surface temperature (GST) and surface air temperature (SAT) offset, ΔT(GST-SAT), is defined as the difference between the temperature measured at the depth of 2 cm below the surface and the air temperature measured at 5 cm above the surface. The results of the Granger causality test did not reveal any evidence of Granger causality for precipitation to ground-air temperature offsets on the daily scale of aggregation except for the asphalt pavement. On the contrary, a strong evidence of Granger causality for precipitation to the ground-air temperature offsets was found on the hourly scale of aggregation for all land cover types except for the sand surface cover. All results are sensitive to the lag choice of the autoregressive model. On the whole, obtained results contain valuable information on the delay time of ΔT(GST-SAT) caused by the rainfall events and confirmed the importance of using autoregressive models to understand the ground-air temperature relationship.

  11. Validation of AIRS V6 Surface Temperature over Greenland with GCN and NOAA Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Hearty, Thomas; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Susskind, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This work compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRSAMSU (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A) Version 6 and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 5 derived surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based surface temperature measurements, we re-projected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) to 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) into the same grid but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. Using this approach, the spatial comparison between the monthly mean AIRS Ts and MODIS IST is in good agreement with RMS 2K for May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in the MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net (GCN) and NOAA stations. The coherent time series of surface temperature evident in the correlation between AIRS Ts and GCN temperatures suggest that at monthly time scales both observations capture the same climate signal over Greenland. It is also suggested that AIRS surface air temperature (Ta) can be used to estimate the boundary layer inversion.

  12. Intra-seasonal Oscillations (ISO) of Zonal-Mean Meridional Winds and Temperatures as Measured by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans G.; Reber, Carl A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on an empirical analysis of measurements with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the UARS spacecraft in the upper mesosphere (95 km), persistent and regular intra-seasonal oscillations (ISO) with periods of about 2 to 4 months have recently been reported in the zonal-mean meridional winds. Similar oscillations have also been discussed independently in a modeling study, and they were attributed to wave-mean-flow interactions. The observed and modeled meridional wind ISOs were largely confined to low latitudes. We report here an analysis of concurrent temperature measurements on UARS, which produces oscillations similar to those seen in the meridional winds. Although the temperature oscillations are observed at lower altitudes (55 km), their phase variations with latitude are qualitatively consistent with the inferred properties seen in the meridional winds and thus provide independent evidence for the existence of ISOs in the mesosphere.

  13. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  14. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of air-sea gas transfer velocity and near surface turbulence at low to moderate winds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Liao, Q.; Fillingham, J. H.; Bootsma, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Parameterization of air-sea gas transfer velocity was routinely made with wind speed. Near surface turbulent dissipation rate has been shown to have better correlation with the gas transfer velocity in a variety of aquatic environments (i.e., the small eddy model) while wind speed is low to moderate. Wind speed model may underestimate gas transfer velocity at low to moderate winds when the near surface turbulence is produced by other environmental forcing. We performed a series of field experiments to measure the CO2 transfer velocity, and the statistics of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface using a novel floating PIV and chamber system. The small eddy model was evaluated and the model coefficient was found to be a non-constant, and it varies with the local turbulent level (figure 1). Measure results also suggested an appropriate scaling of the vertical dissipation profile immediately below the interface under non-breaking conditions, which can be parameterized by the wind shear, wave height and wave age (figure 2). Figure 1. Relation between the coefficient of the small eddy model and dissipation rate. The data also include Chu & Jirka (2003) and Vachon et al. (2010). The solid regression line: α = 0.188log(ɛ)+1.158 Figure 2. Non-dimensional dissipation profiles. Symbols: measured data with the floating PIV. Solid line: regression of measured data with a -0.79 decaying rate. Dash line with -2 slope: Terray et al. (1996) relation. Dash line with two layer structure: Siddiqui & Loewen (2007) relation.

  16. Transition from downward to upward air-sea momentum transfer in swell-dominated light wind condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Högström, Ulf; Rutgersson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric and surface wave data from two oceanic experiments carried out on FLIP and ASIS platforms are analysed in order to identify swell-related effects on the momentum exchange during low wind speed conditions. The RED experiment was carried out on board an R/P Floating Instrument Platform, FLIP, anchored north east of the Hawaiian island Oahu with sonic anemometers at four levels: 5.1 m, 6.9 m, 9.9 m and 13.8 m respectively. The meteorological conditions were characterized by north- easterly trade wind and with swell present during most of the time. During swell the momentum flux was directed downwards meaning a positive contribution to the stress. The FETCH experiment was carried out in the Gulf of Lion in the north-western Mediterranean Sea. On the ASIS (air-sea interaction spar) buoy a sonic anemometer was mounted at 7 m above the mean surface level. During strong swell conditions the momentum flux was directed upwards meaning a negative contribution to the stress in this case. The downward momentum flux is shown to be a function of the orbital circulation while the upward momentum flux is a function of wave height. The dividing wind speed is found to be 3.5 m/s Conclusion: Wind speed > 3.5 m/s creates waves (ripples) and thus roughness. Combination of orbital motion and asymmetric structure of ripples lead to flow perturbation and downward transport of negative momentum. With low wind speed (no ripples but viscosity) circulations will form above the crest and the trough with opposite direction which will cause a pressure drop in the vertical direction and an upward momentum transport from the water to the air.

  17. The effects of the variations in sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the estimation of average wind speed by SEASAT-SASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The average wind speeds from the scatterometer (SASS) on the ocean observing satellite SEASAT are found to be generally higher than the average wind speeds from ship reports. In this study, two factors, sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability, are identified which affect microwave scatter and, therefore, wave development. The problem of relating satellite observations to a fictitious quantity, such as the neutral wind, that has to be derived from in situ observations with models is examined. The study also demonstrates the dependence of SASS winds on sea surface temperature at low wind speeds, possibly due to temperature-dependent factors, such as water viscosity, which affect wave development.

  18. Temperature and Wind Measurements in Venus Lower Thermosphere between 2007 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Pia; Sornig, Manuela; Wischnewski, Carolin; Sonnabend, Guido; Stangier, Tobias; Herrmann, Maren; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Pätzold, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The structure of Venus atmosphere and its thermal and dynamical behavior was intensely studied during the past decade by groundbased and the space mission Venus Express. A comprehensive understanding of the atmosphere, however, is still missing. Direct measurements of atmospheric parameters on various time scales and at different locations across the planet are essential for better understanding and to validate global circulation models. Line-resolved spectroscopy of infrared CO2 transitions provides a powerful tool to accomplish measurements of temperature and wind speed within the neutral atmosphere, using Doppler line-broadening and Doppler shift. Temperature is the motor to drive circulation, and wind speed is the result. Measuring both provides both the basis and an empirical test for circulation models. Non-LTE emission lines at 10 µm that originate from a pressure level of 1μbar, ~110 km altitude, probe the lower thermosphere and are measurable at high spectral resolution using the infrared heterodyne spectrometers THIS (University of Cologne), HIPWAC (NASA GSFC) and MILAHI (Tohoku University).Thermal and dynamical structures on the Venus day side are retrieved using a newly developed method that considers the influence of the spectrometer field-of-view (FoV) and the dispersion of spectral properties across the FoV. New conclusions from the ground-based observing campaigns between 2007 and 2015 will be presented based on this retrieval methodology. The spatial resolution on the planetary disk is different for each campaign, depending on the apparent diameter of the planet and the diffraction-limited FoV of the telescope. Previously, a comparison of the observing campaigns was limited due to the difference in spatial resolution. The new retrieval method enables comparing observations with different observing geometry. The observations yield a large quantity of temperature and wind measurements at different positions on the planetary disk, which supports