Science.gov

Sample records for air vapor pressure

  1. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures.

  2. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures. PMID:28090133

  3. Effect of air pressure differential on vapor flow through sample building walls

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.E. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    Laboratory scale experiments were performed on two small sample composite walls of typical building construction to determine the approximate opposing air pressure difference required to stop or significantly reduce the transmission of water vapor due to a water vapor pressure difference. The experiments used wall section samples between two controlled atmosphere chambers. One chamber was held at a temperature and humidity condition approximating that of a typical summer day, while the other chamber was controlled at a condition typical of indoor conditioned space. Vapor transmission data through the wall samples were obtained over a range of vapor pressure differentials and opposing air pressure differentials. The results show that increasing opposing air pressure differences decrease water vapor transmission, as expected, and relatively small opposing air pressure differentials are required for wall materials of small vapor permeability and large air permeability. The opposing air pressure that stopped or significantly reduced the flow of water vapor through the wall sample was determined experimentally and also compared to air pressures as predicted by an analytical model.

  4. Effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy under an artificial lighting condition.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Y; Shibuya, T; Kozai, T; Kubota, C

    1998-01-01

    In order to characterize environmental variables inside a plant canopy under artificial lighting in the CELSS, we investigated the effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy. Under a PPF of 500 micromoles m-2 s-1, air temperature was 2-3 degrees C higher, water vapor pressure was 0.6 kPa higher, and CO2 concentration was 25-35 micromoles mol-1 lower at heights ranging from 0 to 30 mm below the canopy than at a height 60 mm above the canopy. Increasing the PPF increased air temperature and water vapor pressure and decreased CO2 concentration inside the canopy. The air temperature was lower and the CO2 concentration was higher inside the canopy at an air velocity of 0.3 m s-1 than at an air velocity of 0.1 m s-1. The environmental variables inside the canopy under a high light intensity were characterized by higher air temperature, higher vapor pressure, and lower CO2 concentration than those outside the canopy.

  5. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  6. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  7. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  8. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  9. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  10. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  11. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges.

  12. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  13. Vapor Pressure of GB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    EDGEWOOD CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL CENTER U.S. ARMY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING COMMAND ECBC-TR-686 VAPOR PRESSURE OF GB James H. Buchanan...275 °C under a flow rate of 20 seem UHP -grade helium for 5 min and transferred to the ACEM 900 tenax focusing trap maintained at 40 °C. Transfer...a flow rate of 8.0 seem UHP grade helium for 5 min to affect sample transfer to the gas chromatographic column. The 15 m x 0.53 mm i.d. fused silica

  14. Cellulose δ18O is an index of leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD) in tropical plants

    PubMed Central

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Sachse, Dirk; Arndt, Stefan K.; Tu, Kevin P.; Farrington, Heraldo; Vitousek, Peter M.; Dawson, Todd E.

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose in plants contains oxygen that derives in most cases from precipitation. Because the stable oxygen isotope composition, δ18O, of precipitation is associated with environmental conditions, cellulose δ18O should be as well. However, plant physiological models using δ18O suggest that cellulose δ18O is influenced by a complex mix of both climatic and physiological drivers. This influence complicates the interpretation of cellulose δ18O values in a paleo-context. Here, we combined empirical data analyses with mechanistic model simulations to i) quantify the impacts that the primary climatic drivers humidity (ea) and air temperature (Tair) have on cellulose δ18O values in different tropical ecosystems and ii) determine which environmental signal is dominating cellulose δ18O values. Our results revealed that ea and Tair equally influence cellulose δ18O values and that distinguishing which of these factors dominates the δ18O values of cellulose cannot be accomplished in the absence of additional environmental information. However, the individual impacts of ea and Tair on the δ18O values of cellulose can be integrated into a single index of plant-experienced atmospheric vapor demand: the leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD). We found a robust relationship between VPD and cellulose δ18O values in both empirical and modeled data in all ecosystems that we investigated. Our analysis revealed therefore that δ18O values in plant cellulose can be used as a proxy for VPD in tropical ecosystems. As VPD is an essential variable that determines the biogeochemical dynamics of ecosystems, our study has applications in ecological-, climate-, or forensic-sciences. PMID:21245322

  15. Effects of air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit on storage of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the optimum air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for the storage of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, 3-day-old mated females were stored at air temperatures of 0, 5, 10, or 15 °C and VPDs of 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 kPa for 10, 20, or 30 days. At 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, 83 % of females survived after 30 days of storage; this percentage was the highest among all conditions. VPDs of 0.3 and 0.5 kPa regardless of air temperature, and an air temperature of 0 °C regardless of VPD were detrimental to the survival of the females during storage. Since the highest survival was observed at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, the effect of the storage duration on the post-storage quality of the stored females and their progeny was investigated at 25 °C to evaluate the effectiveness of the storage condition. The oviposition ability of the stored females, hatchability, and sex ratio of their progeny were not affected even when the storage duration was extended to 30 days. Although a slight decrease in the survival during the immature stages of progeny was observed when the storage duration was ≥20 days, the population growth of N. californicus may not be affected when individuals stored in these conditions are applied to greenhouses and agricultural fields. The results indicate that mated N. californicus females can be stored at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa VPD for at least 30 days.

  16. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  17. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  18. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  19. Droplet vaporization in supercritical pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Patrick V.; Peters, Bruce D.

    For most liquid-fueled combustion systems the behavior of the fuel as it is introduced to the combustion zone, often by spray injection, will have a significant impact on combustion. The subsequent combustion may be affected to a considerable degree by the initial spread of the liquid, break-up of larger fuel sheets and droplets into droplets of various sizes, droplet vaporization, and diffusion of gaseous fuel. Among the many factors which affect spray break-up and droplet vaporization are the environmental conditions into which the spray is introduced. For both diesel engines and rockets the environment pressure and temperature may be above the critical pressure and temperature of the injected fuel. In a compression-ignition internal combustion engine, the environment consists primarily of air, at pressures from 20 to 100 atmospheres and temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500 K. Even higher pressures are encountered in turbocharged diesels. A typical diesel reference fuel, dodecane, has a thermodynamic critical pressure of about 17 atmospheres, and a critical temperature of 600 K. Fuel is injected into a diesel engine environment in which ambient pressures exceed the critical pressure. While droplet temperatures are subcritical at first, they may rise to the critical temperature or higher. This paper will survey current understanding of supercritical pressure droplet vaporization. Specifically, the topics covered will include: liquid phase behavior; vapor phase behavior; thermodynamic and transport properties; droplet distribution and break-up; micro-explosions; and effects of microgravity.

  20. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion.

  1. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  2. Vapor Pressure Measurements in a Closed System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Mark

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method that uses a simple apparatus to measure vapor pressure versus temperature in a closed system, in which the total pressure is the vapor pressure of the liquid sample, is described. The use of this apparatus gives students a more direct picture of vapor pressure than the isoteniscope method and results have generally been quite…

  3. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J.; Poirier, M.

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  4. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  5. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  6. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  7. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  8. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  9. Vapor pressure of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-03-26

    Classical thermodynamics is assumed to be valid up to a certain length-scale, below which the discontinuous nature of matter becomes manifest. In particular, this must be the case for the description of the vapor pressure based on the Kelvin equation. However, the legitimacy of this equation in the nanoscopic regime can not be simply established, because the determination of the vapor pressure of very small droplets poses a challenge both for experiments and simulations. In this article we make use of a grand canonical screening approach recently proposed to compute the vapor pressures of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations. This scheme is applied to water droplets, to show that the applicability of the Kelvin equation extends to unexpectedly small lengths, of only 1 nm, where the inhomogeneities in the density of matter occur within spatial lengths of the same order of magnitude as the size of the object. While in principle this appears to violate the main assumptions underlying thermodynamics, the density profiles reveal, however, that structures of this size are still homogeneous in the nanosecond time-scale. Only when the inhomogeneity in the density persists through the temporal average, as it is the case for clusters of 40 particles or less, do the macroscopic thermodynamics and the molecular descriptions depart from each other.

  10. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  11. Vapor Pressure of N,N’-Diisopropylcarbodiimide (DICDI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    and unpublished data cited in this report. This report includes derived properties, such as volatility, temperature-dependent heats of vaporization...concentrations for quantitative toxicology evaluations and detector testing as well as the prediction of chemical removal efficiency by air filtration... systems . Vapor pressure data can also be useful for estimating the concentration of solution mixtures by quantitative analysis of head space. This

  12. Uniform, stable, and efficient planar-heterojunction perovskite solar cells by facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition under fully open-air conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Xia, Wei; Yuan, Chenchen; Cheng, Jigui; Lu, Yingwei

    2015-02-04

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attracted extensive attention due to their high efficiency and simple preparing process. Herein, a facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technology is first developed to fabricate PSCs, which can effectively reduce the over-rapid intercalating reaction rate and easily overcome this blocking issue during the solution process. As a result, the prepared uniform perovskite films exhibit good crystallization, strong absorption, and long carrier diffusion length. More strikingly, CH3NH3PbI3 absorbers by LPCVD demonstrate excellent moisture-resistant feature even under laser illumination and high-temperature conditions, which indicates that our proprietary method is very suitable for the future low-cost, nonvacuum production of the new generation photovoltaic devices. Finally, high efficiency of 12.73% is successfully achieved under fully open-air conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of efficient PSCs with such a high humidity above 60%.

  13. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  14. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  15. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  16. Measurements of octanol-air partition coefficients, vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of the (E) and (Z) isomers of the 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate as parameters of environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, César N; Chiappero, Malisa S; Montejano, Hernán A

    2015-11-01

    2-Ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate is one of the UVB blocking agents more widely used in a variety of industrial fields. There are more than one hundred industrial suppliers worldwide. Given the enormous annual consumption of octinoxate, problems that arise due to the accumulation of this compound in nature should be taken into consideration. The GC-RT was used in this work with the aim of determining the vapor pressure, enthalpies of vaporization and octanol-air partition coefficient, for the BBP, DOP, E- and Z-EHMC esters. The results showed that Z-EHMC is almost five times more volatile than E-EHMC. Moreover, BBP, Z-EHMC and E-EHMC can be classified as substances with a relatively low mobility since they lie within the range of 810 and log(PL/Pa)<-4, therefore, a low mobility can be expected. From these parameters, their particle-bound fraction and gas-particle partition coefficient were also derived.

  17. Pressure sensitivity of the vapor-cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Iyanu, Gebriel; Wang, He; Camparo, James

    2009-06-01

    Although atomic clocks have very low levels of frequency instability, they are nonetheless sensitive (albeit slightly) to various environmental parameters, including temperature, power supply voltage, and dc magnetic fields. In the terrestrial environment, however, atmospheric pressure (i.e., the air's molecular density) is not generally included in this list, because the air's density variations near the surface of the earth will typically have a negligible effect on the clock's performance. The situation is different, however, for clocks onboard satellites like Galileo, where manufacturing and testing are done at atmospheric pressure, while operation is in vacuum. The pressure sensitivity of atomic clocks, in particular vapor-cell atomic clocks, can therefore be of significance. Here, we discuss some of the ways in which changes in atmospheric pressure affect vapor-cell atomic clocks, and we demonstrate that, for one device, the pressure-sensitivity traces back to a pressure-induced change in the temperature of the clock's filter and resonance cells.

  18. The vapor pressure of iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, A. G.; Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1974-01-01

    Vapor pressure measurements have been made on pure iron pentacarbonyl between +31 and -19 C. The experimental results may be expressed by the logarithm of pressure (mm Hg) to the base 10 equals -(2096.7 K/T) + 8.4959, which corresponds to a heat of vaporization for the liquid carbonyl of delta H ? (9.588 plus or minus 0.12) kcal/mole. This result confirms and extends the earlier measurements made by Trautz and Badstuebner between 0 and 140 C. The need for careful purification of commercially available iron pentacarbonyl is emphasized, particularly for establishing the correct vapor pressure below 45 C.

  19. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    several assumptions that are not exact. These are, primarily, that heat of vaporization (the slope of the vapor pressure curve) does not vary with...account the variation in heat of vaporization with temperature, and accurately describes data over broad experimental ranges, thereby enabling...units; however, the fit determined using one unit system will only correspond to that using the same data in another unit system if unrounded values

  20. Vapor Pressure of 2-Chlorovinyl Dichloroarsine (Lewisite)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Streams of Compounds for Determining Vapor Pressure 11 3. Vapor Pressure of Lewisite I from Multiple Sources: Conant, Sumner , Lewis , Keyes, Price...of Lewisite I from Multiple Sources: Conant, •; Sumner , +; Lewis , 0; Keyes, •; Price, T; Baxter, A; Redemann, A; Mohler, < Mann, > ; Gibson, *; this...number of publications in the open literature by Green and Price,4 Lewis and Perkins,5 Mann and Pope, Mohler and Polya7 and Gibson and Johnson.8

  1. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of actinide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.; Kleinschmidt, P.D.; Haire, R.G.; Brown, D.

    1980-01-01

    Precise vapor pressure measurements by target collection/mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion techniques were combined with crystal entropy estimates to produce self-consistent free-enrgy functions, permitting calculation of heats, entropies and free energies from 298/sup 0/K to the highest temperatures of measurement. The vapor pressures and thermodyamics of vaporization of americium, curium, berkelium, and californium are compared in terms of electronic structure and bonding trends in the trans-plutonium elements. These resuslts are contrasted with the behavior of the early actinides, with attention to energy states and possible effects of f-electron bonding. 9 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Improved detection of low vapor pressure compounds in air by serial combination of single-sided membrane introduction with fiber introduction mass spectrometry (SS-MIMS-FIMS).

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Handberg, Eric; Noll, Robert J; Kilgour, David P A; Cooks, R Graham

    2005-05-01

    The use of two methods in tandem, single-sided membrane introduction mass spectrometry (SS-MIMS) and fiber introduction mass spectrometry (FIMS), is presented as a technique for field analysis. The combined SS-MIMS-FIMS technique was employed in both a modified commercial mass spectrometer and a miniature mass spectrometer for the selective preconcentration of the explosive simulant o-nitrotoluene (ONT) and the chemical warfare agent simulant, methyl salicylate (MeS), in air. A home-built FIMS inlet was fabricated to allow introduction of the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber into the mass spectrometer chamber and subsequent desorption of the trapped compounds using resistive heating. The SS-MIMS preconcentration system was also home-built from commercial vacuum parts. Optimization experiments were done separately for each preconcentration system to achieve the best extraction conditions prior to use of the two techniques in combination. Improved limits of detection, in the low ppb range, were observed for the combination compared to FIMS alone, using several SS-MIMS preconcentration cycles. The SS-MIMS-FIMS response for both instruments was found to be linear over the range 50 to 800 ppb. Other parameters studied were absorption time profiles, effects of sample flow rate, desorption temperature, fiber background, memory effects, and membrane fatigue. This simple, sensitive, accurate, robust, selective, and rapid sample preconcentration and introduction technique shows promise for field analysis of low vapor pressure compounds, where analyte concentrations will be extremely low and the compounds are difficult to extract from a matrix like air.

  3. Improved Magnus` form approximation of saturation vapor pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Alduchov, O.A.; Eskridge, R.E.

    1997-11-01

    Relative humidity is usually measured in aerological observations and dew point depression is usually reported in upper-air reports. These variables must frequently be converted to other moisture variables in meteorological analysis. If relative humidity is converted to vapor pressure, most humidity variables can then be determined. Elliott and Gaffen reviewed the practices and procedures of the US radiosonde system. In their paper, a comparison of the relative errors was made between the saturation vapor pressure formulations of Tetens (1930), Goff-Gratch (1946), Wexler (1976), and Buck (1981). In this paper, the authors will expand the analysis of Elliott and Gaffen by deriving several new saturation vapor pressure formulas, and reviewing the various errors in these formulations. They will show that two of the new formulations of vapor pressure over water and ice are superior to existing formulas. Upper air temperature data are found to vary from about +50 C to {minus}80 C. This large variation requires a saturation vapor pressure equation to be accurate over a large temperature range. While the errors introduced by the use of relatively inaccurate conversion equations are smaller than the errors due to the instruments, dewpoint coding errors, and dewpoint conversion algorithms (Elliott and Gaffen, 1993); they introduce additional systematic errors in humidity data. The most precise formulation of vapor pressure over a plane surface of water was given by Wexler (1976). The relative errors of Tetens` (1930) formula and one due to Buck (1981) (Buck`s equation is recommended in the Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 3, 1991) are shown. The relative errors in this table are the predicted value minus the Wexler value divided by the Wexler value.

  4. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  5. Vapor pressures of the aqueous desiccants

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Luo, C.M.

    1999-09-01

    The vapor pressures of the aqueous desiccants lithium chloride, lithium bromide, calcium chloride, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and their mixtures were measured at their typical operating concentrations and at temperatures from 298 K to 313 K. The experimental data were fitted to an Antoine type of equation, ln[P(kPa)] = A {minus} B/[T(K) + C], where A, B, and C are constants and are concentration dependent. Vapor pressure data were further used to predict the effectiveness of dehumidification in liquid desiccant dehumidifiers.

  6. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) “Pascal” (Pa) is the standard international unit of vapor pressure and is defined as newtons per square... transpiration) procedures use a current of inert gas passed through or over the test material slowly enough to... variety of chemical types and structures, EPA has sponsored research and development work at...

  7. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  8. Vapor pressures of the polychlorinated naphthalenes

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.D.; Shiu, W.Y.; Wania, F.

    1999-05-01

    The vapor pressures of the supercooled liquid P{sub L} for 17 polychlorinated naphthalene congeners were determined as a function of temperature with a gas chromatographic retention time technique. The method was calibrated with vapor pressure data for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) which had been measured by other techniques. These data were employed to predict temperature-dependent vapor pressures for all polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) from a regression with published retention time indices. Enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub VAP}H and activity coefficients in 1-octanol were calculated for the PCNs and compared with those for polychlorinated biphenyls. Data analysis suggests that the dependence of P{sub L} and {Delta}{sub VAP}H on molecular size, as well as the partitioning behavior into 1-octanol of the PCNs, is very similar to that of coplanar PCBs, i.e., those congeners with no or only one chlorine substitution in the ortho positions. The affinity of these chemicals to 1-octanol increases with the degree of chlorination.

  9. Vapor Pressure, Vapor Composition and Fractional Vaporization of High Temperature Lavas on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Schaefer, L.; Kargel, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Observations show that Io's atmosphere is dominated by SO2 and other sulfur and sulfur oxide species, with minor amounts of Na, K, and Cl gases. Theoretical modeling and recent observations show that NaCl, which is produced volcanically, is a constituent of the atmosphere. Recent Galileo, HST and ground-based observations show that some volcanic hot spots on Io have extremely high temperatures, in the range 1400-1900 K. At similar temperatures in laboratory experiments, molten silicates and oxides have significant vapor pressures of Na, K, SiO, Fe, Mg, and other gases. Thus vaporization of these species from high temperature lavas on Io seems likely. We therefore modeled the vaporization of silicate and oxide lavas suggested for Io. Our results for vapor chemistry are reported here. The effects of fractional vaporization on lava chemistry are given in a companion abstract by Kargel et al.

  10. Performance testing and analysis of vertical ambient air vaporizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. S.; Singh, V. N.; Shah, M. I.; Acharya, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient air vaporizers are used to regasify cryogenic liquids at extremely low temperature (below -153°C). Frost formation occurs on it due to large temperature difference between ambient air and cryogenic fluid. Frosting induces additional load on equipment and reduces its heat transfer effectiveness. Hence, mechanical and thermal design of vaporizers account for frosting. An experimental set-up has been designed and effects of flow rate and ground clearance on the performance of ambient air vaporizers are evaluated. The flow rate is increased from the rated capacity of 500 Nm3/h to 640 Nm3/h and ground clearance is reduced from 500 mm to 175 mm. The above variations reduce the time duration for which gaseous nitrogen is delivered at temperature higher than 10.1°C (desired). Hence duty cycle reduces from eight hours to five hours. The other factors affecting performance such as fin configuration, fluid type, fluid pressure, intermittent flow nature and climatic conditions are assumed to be constant over the test duration. The decrement in outlet gas temperature (from 38 °C to 10.1°C) with corresponding increment in frost thickness leads to deterioration of performance of ambient air vaporizers.

  11. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher; Doering, Charles; Kripfgans, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be - 9 . 33 +/- 0 . 30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation. This research was supported by the Rackham Merit Fellowship, the University of Michigan Physics department, the University of Michigan's MCubed program, and NSF awards PHY-1205219 and DMS-1515161.

  12. Vapor pressure and vapor fractionation of silicate melts of tektite composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Louis S.; Carron, M.K.

    1964-01-01

    The total vapor pressure of Philippine tektite melts of approximately 70 per cent silica has been determined at temperatures ranging from 1500 to 2100??C. This pressure is 190 ?? 40 mm Hg at 1500??C, 450 ?? 50 mm at 1800??C and 850 ?? 70 mm at 2100?? C. Determinations were made by visually observing the temperature at which bubbles began to form at a constant low ambient pressure. By varying the ambient pressure, a boiling point curve was constructed. This curve differs from the equilibrium vapor pressure curve due to surface tension effects. This difference was evaluated by determining the equilibrium bubble size in the melt and calculating the pressure due to surface tension, assuming the latter to be 380 dyn/cm. The relative volatility from tektite melts of the oxides of Na, K, Fe, Al and Si has been determined as a function of temperature, total pressure arid roughly, of oxygen fugacity. The volatility of SiO2 is decreased and that of Na2O and K2O is increased in an oxygen-poor environment. Preliminary results indicate that volatilization at 2100??C under atmospheric pressure caused little or no change in the percentage Na2O and K2O. The ratio Fe3 Fe2 of the tektite is increased in ambient air at a pressure of 9 ?? 10-4 mm Hg (= 106.5 atm O2, partial pressure) at 2000??C. This suggests that tektites were formed either at lower oxygen pressures or that they are a product of incomplete oxidation of parent material with a still lower ferricferrous ratio. ?? 1964.

  13. 46 CFR 154.451 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.451 Section 154.451 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.451 Design vapor pressure. The Po (kPa) of...

  14. 46 CFR 154.451 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.451 Section 154.451 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.451 Design vapor pressure. The Po (kPa) of...

  15. 46 CFR 154.451 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.451 Section 154.451 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.451 Design vapor pressure. The Po (kPa) of...

  16. 46 CFR 154.451 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.451 Section 154.451 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.451 Design vapor pressure. The Po (kPa) of...

  17. 46 CFR 154.451 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.451 Section 154.451 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.451 Design vapor pressure. The Po (kPa) of...

  18. Vapor Pressure of Methyl Salicylate and n-Hexadecane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    VAPOR PRESSURE OF METHYL SALICYLATE AND N-HEXADECANE ECBC-TR-1184 David E. Tevault Leonard C. Buettner...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Mar 2000-Dec 2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vapor Pressure of Methyl Salicylate and n-Hexadecane 5a...ABSTRACT Vapor pressure data are reported for O-hydroxybenzoic acid, methyl ester, more commonly known as methyl salicylate (MeS), and n-hexadecane in

  19. The influence of vapor pressure of chemicals on dermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important route of entry for chemicals in occupational and consumer settings. Key to this exposure is the penetration of the skin's barrier, and key to this penetration is a chemical's vapor pressure. Until now, vapor pressure and its effects on the skin have yet to be widely studied. This review aims to provide some historical background on early work on dermal penetration for volatile materials, which has helped form later research into the effects of vapor pressure on chemical risk assessment for dermal exposures. This review should be the start of an investigation into more in-depth coverage of vapor pressure and current prediction models.

  20. Fuel Vapor Pressures and the Relation of Vapor Pressure to the Preparation of Fuel for Combustion in Fuel Injection Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, William F; Rothrock, A M

    1930-01-01

    This investigation on the vapor pressure of fuels was conducted in connection with the general research on combustion in fuel injection engines. The purpose of the investigation was to study the effects of high temperatures such as exist during the first stages of injection on the vapor pressures of several fuels and certain fuel mixtures, and the relation of these vapor pressures to the preparation of the fuel for combustion in high-speed fuel injection engines.

  1. Water Vapor Storage Change in the Canopy-Air Space of a Tall Deciduous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, C.; Dragoni, D.; Schmid, H.

    2005-05-01

    The ability of weather and climate models to predict humidity, cloud formation and precipitation critically depends on the exchange of water vapor between vegetation and the atmosphere. The canopy air-space in tall forests is deep enough to act as a buffer volume that is depleted at times of well developed turbulent mixing, and gets recharged in conditions of poor mixing. Recent studies have attributed biases in modeled vapor exchange to the misrepresentation or neglect of this mechanism. At the Morgan-Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site (Indiana, USA), water vapor exchange and the vapor storage change in the canopy air-space has been observed for the last six years. The objective of this work is to calculate vapor storage change fluxes in the canopy air-space from time increments of concentration profiles from data collected in 2003. We relate vapor storage change fluxes to measured environmental forcing quanitites, such as net radiation, ambient vapor pressure deficit, dew-point temperature depression, stability, and friction velocity to interpret the observed seasonal and daily patterns. Also, changes in water vapor storage rates are compared with measured latent heat fluxes to determine how the total forest-atmosphere vapor exchange is affected by the recharging and depletion of water vapor throughout the canopy air-space.

  2. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.438 Section 154.438 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A...

  3. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.438 Section 154.438 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A...

  4. 46 CFR 154.419 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.419 Section 154.419 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.419 Design vapor pressure. The Po of an integral tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  5. 46 CFR 154.419 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.419 Section 154.419 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.419 Design vapor pressure. The Po of an integral tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  6. 46 CFR 154.436 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.436 Section 154.436 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...-Membrane Tanks § 154.436 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a semi-membrane tank must not exceed 24.5...

  7. 46 CFR 154.419 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.419 Section 154.419 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.419 Design vapor pressure. The Po of an integral tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  8. 46 CFR 154.445 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.445 Section 154.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type B § 154.445 Design vapor pressure. If the surfaces of an independent tank type B...

  9. 46 CFR 154.419 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.419 Section 154.419 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.419 Design vapor pressure. The Po of an integral tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  10. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.438 Section 154.438 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A...

  11. 46 CFR 154.426 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.426 Section 154.426 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.426 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a membrane tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  12. 46 CFR 154.445 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.445 Section 154.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type B § 154.445 Design vapor pressure. If the surfaces of an independent tank type B...

  13. 46 CFR 154.445 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.445 Section 154.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type B § 154.445 Design vapor pressure. If the surfaces of an independent tank type B...

  14. 46 CFR 154.436 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.436 Section 154.436 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...-Membrane Tanks § 154.436 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a semi-membrane tank must not exceed 24.5...

  15. 46 CFR 154.436 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.436 Section 154.436 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...-Membrane Tanks § 154.436 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a semi-membrane tank must not exceed 24.5...

  16. 46 CFR 154.445 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.445 Section 154.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type B § 154.445 Design vapor pressure. If the surfaces of an independent tank type B...

  17. 46 CFR 154.426 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.426 Section 154.426 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.426 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a membrane tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  18. 46 CFR 154.436 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.436 Section 154.436 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...-Membrane Tanks § 154.436 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a semi-membrane tank must not exceed 24.5...

  19. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.438 Section 154.438 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A...

  20. 46 CFR 154.426 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.426 Section 154.426 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.426 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a membrane tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  1. 46 CFR 154.426 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.426 Section 154.426 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.426 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a membrane tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  2. 46 CFR 154.445 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.445 Section 154.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type B § 154.445 Design vapor pressure. If the surfaces of an independent tank type B...

  3. 46 CFR 154.426 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.426 Section 154.426 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.426 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a membrane tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  4. 46 CFR 154.419 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.419 Section 154.419 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Tanks § 154.419 Design vapor pressure. The Po of an integral tank must not exceed 24.5 kPa gauge...

  5. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.438 Section 154.438 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A...

  6. 46 CFR 154.436 - Design vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure. 154.436 Section 154.436 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...-Membrane Tanks § 154.436 Design vapor pressure. The Po of a semi-membrane tank must not exceed 24.5...

  7. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study.

  8. The hysteretic evapotranspiration - vapor pressure deficit relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.; Yang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Diurnal hysteresis between evapotranspiration (ET) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was reported in many ecosystems but justification for its onset and magnitude remain incomplete with biotic and abiotic factors invoked as possible explanations. To place these explanations within a mathematical framework, ';rate-dependent' hysteresis originating from a phase angle difference between periodic input and output time series is first considered. Lysimeter evaporation (E) measurements from wet bare soils and model calculations using the Penman equation demonstrate that the E-VPD hysteresis emerges without any biotic effects due to a phase angle difference (or time lag) between net radiation the main driver of E, and VPD. Modulations originating from biotic effects on the ET-VPD hysteresis were then considered. The phase angle difference representation earlier employed was mathematically transformed into a storage problem and applied to the soil-plant system. The transformed system shows that soil moisture storage within the root zone can produce an ET-VPD hysteresis prototypical of those generated by phase-angle differences. To explore the interplay between all the lags in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and phase angle differences among forcing and response variables, a detailed soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) model was developed and applied to a grassland ecosystem. The results of the SPAC model suggest that the hysteresis magnitude depends on the radiation-VPD lag. The soil moisture dry-down simulations also suggest that modeled root water potential and leaf water potential are both better indicators of the hysteresis magnitude than soil moisture, suggesting that plant water status is the main factor regulating the hysteretic relation between ET and VPD. Hence, the genesis and magnitude of the ET-VPD hysteresis are controlled directly by both biotic factors and abiotic factors such as time lag between radiation and VPD originating from boundary layer processes

  9. Preconcentrator with high volume chiller for high vapor pressure particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L

    2013-10-22

    Apparatus and method for collecting particles of both high and low vapor pressure target materials entrained in a large volume sample gas stream. Large volume active cooling provides a cold air supply which is mixed with the sample gas stream to reduce the vapor pressure of the particles. In embodiments, a chiller cools air from ambient conditions to 0-15.degree. C. with the volumetric flow rate of the cold air supply being at least equal to the volumetric flow rate of the sample gas stream. In further embodiments an adsorption media is heated in at least two stages, a first of which is below a threshold temperature at which decomposition products of the high vapor pressure particle are generated.

  10. One-Component Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagrams in the Presence of Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio; Martire, Daniel O.; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2010-01-01

    One-component phase diagrams are good approximations to predict pressure-temperature ("P-T") behavior of a substance in the presence of air, provided air pressure is not much higher than the vapor pressure. However, at any air pressure, and from the conceptual point of view, the use of a traditional "P-T" phase diagram is not strictly correct. In…

  11. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1988-05-24

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled. 2 figs.

  12. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  13. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled.

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-59 - Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL. 30.10-59 Section 30.10-59...-59 Reid vapor pressure—TB/ALL. The term Reid vapor pressure means the vapor pressure of a liquid at a....01-3), Method of Test for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products. This Standard is available...

  15. 46 CFR 30.10-59 - Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL. 30.10-59 Section 30.10-59...-59 Reid vapor pressure—TB/ALL. The term Reid vapor pressure means the vapor pressure of a liquid at a....01-3), Method of Test for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products. This Standard is available...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-59 - Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reid vapor pressure-TB/ALL. 30.10-59 Section 30.10-59...-59 Reid vapor pressure—TB/ALL. The term Reid vapor pressure means the vapor pressure of a liquid at a....01-3), Method of Test for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products. This Standard is available...

  17. A Simple Experiment for Determining Vapor Pressure and Enthalpy of Vaporization of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Gerald S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, calculations, and sample results are described for a freshman chemistry experiment in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is introduced as a means of describing the variation of vapor pressure with temperature and for determining enthalpy of vaporization. (Author/SK)

  18. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  19. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND AIR SPARGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging, also called "in situ air stripping and in situ volatilization" injects air into the saturated zone to strip away volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in groundwater and adsorbed to soil. hese volatile contaminants transfer in a vapor phase to the unsaturated ...

  20. Vapor pressure deficit effects on leaf area expansion and transportation of soybean subjected to soil drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD) and soil water deficit on transpiration rate (TR) of plants are well understood but their effects on plant leaf area expansion (PLAE) are less defined. Both PLAE and TR are unaffected by soil drying until the fraction transpirable soil water (FT...

  1. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  2. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass ...prescription bottles , and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author)

  3. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykoski, R. T.

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass prescription bottles, and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author/RH)

  4. Henry's law constant, octanol-air partition coefficient and supercooled liquid vapor pressure of carbazole as a function of temperature: application to gas/particle partitioning in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Banu; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    2006-02-01

    The Henry's law constant for carbazole was experimentally determined between 5 and 35 degrees C using a gas-stripping technique. The following equation was obtained for dimensionless Henry's law constant (H') versus temperature (T, K): ln H' = -3982(T,K)(-1) + 1.01. Temperature-dependent octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and supercooled liquid vapor pressures (PL,Pa) of carbazole were also determined using the GC retention time method. The temperature dependence of KOA and PL were explained by the following: log KOA = 4076/(T,K) - 5.65, log PL(Pa) = -3948(T,K)(- 1) + 11.48. The gas and particle-phase carbazole concentrations measured previously in Chicago, IL in 1995 was used for gas/particle partitioning modeling. Octanol based absorptive partitioning model consistently underpredicted the gas/particle partition coefficients (Kp) for all sampling periods. However, overall there was a good agreement between the measured Kp and soot-based model predictions.

  5. The Vapor Pressure of Uranium Hexafluoride,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-04-12

    thermostat and a brass sylphon bellows for the measurement of pressure by a null method. The pressure above an atmosphere was read on a multiple mercury manometer using dibutylphthalate as a piston liquid. p2

  6. A numerical study of high-pressure droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1992-08-01

    The evaporation of single, spherical fuel droplets in a high-pressure, high-temperature environment has been studied numerically. The model is fully transient in both the liquid and the vapor phases. Transport properties are functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, and vary throughout the liquid droplet and the vapor boundary layer. Equilibrium at the liquid-vapor interface is calculated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and accounts for diffusion of the gas into the liquid droplet. The Peng-Robinson equation of state is also used to calculate the enthalpy of vaporization of the fuel species as well as the liquid and vapor mixture densities. The proposed model is compared with data obtained for a variety of liquids. Transient effects in both the liquid and vapor phases are found to have a large effect on the droplet heatup and vaporization process. At very high temperature and pressure conditions the droplets were found to reach their thermodynamic critical mixing point in a totally transient process.

  7. Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Approaches

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed a technology transfer document regarding management and treatment of vapor intrusion into building structures. This document describes the range of mitigation technologies available.

  8. Microfluidic vapor-diffusion barrier for pressure reduction in fully closed PCR modules.

    PubMed

    Czilwik, G; Schwarz, I; Keller, M; Wadle, S; Zehnle, S; von Stetten, F; Mark, D; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-02-21

    Microfluidic systems for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) should be fully closed to avoid vapor loss and to exclude the risk of contaminating the laboratory environment. In closed systems however, the high temperatures of up to 95 °C associated with PCR cause high overpressures up to 100 kPa, dominated by the increase of vapor partial pressure upon evaporation. Such high overpressures pose challenges to the mechanical stability of microfluidic chips as well as to the liquid handling in integrated sample-to-answer systems. In this work, we drastically reduce the pressure increase in fully closed PCR systems by integrating a microchannel that serves as a vapor-diffusion barrier (VDB), separating the liquid-filled PCR chamber from an auxiliary air chamber. In such configurations, propagation of vapor from the PCR chamber into the auxiliary air chamber and as a consequence the increase of pressure is limited by the slow diffusion process of vapor through the VDB. At temperature increase from 23 °C to 95 °C, we demonstrate the reduction of overpressure from more than 80 kPa without the VDB to only 35 kPa with the VDB. We further demonstrate proper function of VDB and its easy integration with downstream processes for PCR based nucleic acid amplification within centrifugal microfluidics. Without integration of the VDB, malfunction due to pressure-induced delamination of the microfluidic chip occurred.

  9. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  10. Determination of octanol-air partition coefficients and supercooled liquid vapor pressures of PAHs as a function of temperature: Application to gas-particle partitioning in an urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Eylem; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    Octanol-air partition coefficients ( KOA) for 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined as a function of temperature using the gas chromatographic retention time method. log KOA values at 25° ranged over six orders of magnitude, between 6.34 (acenaphthylene) and 12.59 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene). The determined KOA values were within factor of 0.7 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene) to 15.1 (benz[ a]anthracene) of values calculated as the ratio of octanol-water partition coefficient to dimensionless Henry's law constant. Supercooled liquid vapor pressures ( PL) of 13 PAHs were also determined using the gas chromatographic retention time technique. Activity coefficients in octanol calculated using KOA and PL ranged between 3.2 and 6.2 indicating near-ideal solution behavior. Atmospheric concentrations measured in this study in Izmir, Turkey were used to investigate the partitioning of PAHs between particle and gas-phases. Experimental gas-particle partition coefficients ( Kp) were compared to the predictions of KOA absorption and KSA (soot-air partition coefficient) models. Octanol-based absorptive partitioning model predicted lower partition coefficients especially for relatively volatile PAHs. Ratios of measured/modeled partition coefficients ranged between 1.1 and 15.5 (4.5±6.0, average±SD) for KOA model. KSA model predictions were relatively better and measured to modeled ratios ranged between 0.6 and 5.6 (2.3±2.7, average±SD).

  11. A vapor pressure thermometer for use in muscle microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Nielsen, Poul M F; Hunter, Ian W; Taberner, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of the energy consumption of isolated cardiac trabeculae requires highly sensitive temperature sensors. In this paper we describe and characterize an initial prototype of a vapor pressure thermometer being designed and built for application to muscle microcalorimetry. The device exploits the change in vapor pressure with temperature of a solvent and the change in pressure with volume of a gas. The sensor achieves a sensitivity of 86 μm/K and a resolution of 3.6 μK. Predictions from a finite element model of the expected displacement compare favorably with the tests performed.

  12. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  13. Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric uranium dioxide at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David W.; Leibowitz, Leonard

    1982-02-01

    Thermodynamic functions of the gaseous species, thermodynamic functions of the condensed phase, and an oxygen-potential model have been combined to calculate the vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with condensed-phase UO 2-x for 1500⩽T⩽6000 K and 0⩽ x ⩽0.5. A method for extending the oxygen-potential model of Blackburn to the liquid region has been derived and evaluated. Results of these calculations show that the oxygen-to-uranium ratio of the vapor is larger than that of the condensed phase with which it is in equilibrium for most of the ranges of T and x of interest. Near 6000 K the vapor is very oxygen-rich so that the composition of the condensed phase would be changed considerably by even a few percent vaporization. In general, the vapor in equilibrium with UO 2-x is poorly approximated at UO 2(g); the species U, UO, UO 3, O 2, and O each have higher partial pressures than UO 2 for some conditions. The calculated total pressures at high temperatures are in good agreement with those recommended by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR).

  14. Evaporation rate and vapor pressure of selected polymeric lubricating oils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    A recently developed ultrahigh-vacuum quartz spring mass sorption microbalance has been utilized to measure the evaporation rates of several low-volatility polymeric lubricating oils at various temperatures. The evaporation rates are used to calculate the vapor pressures by the Langmuir equation. A method is presented to accurately estimate extended temperature range evaporation rate and vapor pressure data for polymeric oils, incorporating appropriate corrections for the increases in molecular weight and the change in volatility of the progressively evaporating polymer fractions. The logarithms of the calculated data appear to follow linear relationships within the test temperature ranges, when plotted versus 1000/T. These functions and the observed effusion characteristics of the fluids on progressive volatilization are useful in estimating evaporation rate and vapor pressure changes on evaporative depletion.

  15. Vapor Pressure of Bis-(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine (HN1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen mustard Vesicant HN1 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME...compounds for determining vapor pressures. The arrows indicate the direction of flow of the nitrogen carrier gas ...INTRODUCTION The nitrogen mustards (HN1, HN2, and HN3) are similar to sulfur mustard (HD) in their physical properties and physiological effects. All

  16. Distillation device supplies cesium vapor at constant pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Shefsiek, P. K.

    1968-01-01

    Distillation apparatus in the form of a U tube supplies small amounts of pure cesium vapor at constant pressure to a thermionic converter. The upstream leg of the U tube is connected to a vacuum pump to withdraw noncondensable impurities, the bottom portion serves as a reservoir for the liquid cesium.

  17. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  18. Molecular beam source for high vapor pressure materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.H.; Schetzina, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    A molecular beam source for deposition of high vapor pressure materials in MBE systems is described. The source consists of a collimating effusion cell of original design which is heated by a temperature-controlled Radak II oven (Luxel Corporation). Construction details of the source are given along with calibration and performance data.

  19. New class of compounds have very low vapor pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, C. A.; Gruen, D. M.

    1967-01-01

    Magnesium hexahydrate tetrachlorometallates are 50-volume-percent water, have a high melting point and possess a low vapor pressure. These new compounds are relatively noncorrosive, thermally stable, and water soluble but not hygroscopic. They may have potential applications as cooling fluids.

  20. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2017-02-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  1. Vapor pressure of perfluoroalkylalkanes: the role of the dipole.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Pedro; Das, Gaurav; McCabe, Clare; Filipe, Eduardo J M

    2015-01-29

    The vapor pressure of four liquid perfluoroalkylalkanes (CF3(CF2)n(CH2)mCH3; n = 3, m = 4,5,7; n = 5, m = 5) was measured as a function of temperature between 278 and 328 K. Molar enthalpies of vaporization were calculated from the experimental data, and the results were compared with data from the literature for the corresponding alkanes and perfluoroalkanes. The heterosegmented statistical associating fluid theory was used to interpret the results at the molecular level both with and without the explicit inclusion of the dipolar nature of the molecules. Additionally, ab initio calculations were performed for all perfluoroalkylalkanes studied to determine the dipole moment to be used in the theoretical calculations. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a dipolar term is essential for describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of perfluoroalkylalkanes. It is also shown that vapor-liquid equilibria in these compounds result from a subtle balance between dipolar interactions, which decrease the vapor pressure, and the relatively weak dispersive interactions between the hydrogenated and fluorinated segments.

  2. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  3. Low temperature measurement of the vapor pressures of planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary observations and proper modeling of planetary atmospheres are critically upon accurate laboratory data for the chemical and physical properties of the constitutes of the atmospheres. It is important that these data are taken over the appropriate range of parameters such as temperature, pressure, and composition. Availability of accurate, laboratory data for vapor pressures and equilibrium constants of condensed species at low temperatures is essential for photochemical and cloud models of the atmospheres of the outer planets. In the absence of such data, modelers have no choice but to assume values based on an educated guess. In those cases where higher temperature data are available, a standard procedure is to extrapolate these points to the lower temperatures using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Last summer the vapor pressures of acetylene (C2H2) hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and cyanoacetylene (HC3N) was measured using two different methods. At the higher temperatures 1 torr and 10 torr capacitance manometers were used. To measure very low pressures, a technique was used which is based on the infrared absorption of thin film (TFIR). This summer the vapor pressure of acetylene was measured the TFIR method. The vapor pressure of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured using capacitance manometers. Results for H2O agree with literature data over the common range of temperature. At the lower temperatures the data lie slightly below the values predicted by extrapolation of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Thin film infrared (TFIR) data for acetylene lie significantly below the values predicted by extrapolation. It is hoped to bridge the gap between the low end of the CM data and the upper end of the TFIR data in the future using a new spinning rotor gauge.

  4. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure.

  5. Temperature dependences of saturated vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization of n-pentyl esters of dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnova, S. V.; Krasnykh, E. L.; Levanova, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    The saturated vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of n-pentyl esters of linear C2-C6 dicarboxylic acids are determined by the transpiration method in the temperature range of 309.2-361.2 K. The dependences of enthalpies of vaporization on the number of carbon atoms in the molecule and on the retention indices have been determined. The predictive capabilities of the existing calculation schemes for estimation of enthalpy of vaporization of the studied compounds have been analyzed.

  6. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Biblarz, Oscar

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

  7. On Localized Vapor Pressure Gradients Governing Condensation and Frost Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2016-08-23

    Interdroplet vapor pressure gradients are the driving mechanism for several phase-change phenomena such as condensation dry zones, interdroplet ice bridging, dry zones around ice, and frost halos. Despite the fundamental nature of the underlying pressure gradients, the majority of studies on these emerging phenomena have been primarily empirical. Using classical nucleation theory and Becker-Döring embryo formation kinetics, here we calculate the pressure field for all possible modes of condensation and desublimation in order to gain fundamental insight into how pressure gradients govern the behavior of dry zones, condensation frosting, and frost halos. Our findings reveal that in a variety of phase-change systems the thermodynamically favorable mode of nucleation can switch between condensation and desublimation depending upon the temperature and wettability of the surface. The calculated pressure field is used to model the length of a dry zone around liquid or ice droplets over a broad parameter space. The long-standing question of whether the vapor pressure at the interface of growing frost is saturated or supersaturated is resolved by considering the kinetics of interdroplet ice bridging. Finally, on the basis of theoretical calculations, we propose that there exists a new mode of frost halo that is yet to be experimentally observed; a bimodal phase map is developed, demonstrating its dependence on the temperature and wettability of the underlying substrate. We hope that the model and predictions contained herein will assist future efforts to exploit localized vapor pressure gradients for the design of spatially controlled or antifrosting phase-change systems.

  8. A survey and new measurements of ice vapor pressure at temperatures between 170 and 250K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, James; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    New measurements of ice vapor pressures at temperatures between 170 and 250 K are presented and published vapor pressure data are summarized. An empirical vapor pressure equation was derived and allows prediction of vapor pressures between 170 k and the triple point of water with an accuracy of approximately 2 percent. Predictions obtained agree, within experimental uncertainty, with the most reliable equation derived from thermodynamic principles.

  9. Low vapor pressure braze alloys for thermionic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    The evaluation of cesium diode electrode materials called for braze fillers with very low vapor pressures and a wide range of melting points. Binary alloys of low vapor pressure refractory metals were chosen to fill this need. These alloys of Th, Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, and W have reported melting point minima or eutectics from 1,510 K to above 3,000 K. Preliminary data are compiled on the use of several of these braze alloys. Melting points and surface wetting on a Ta base are given. Results of brazing Ir, LaB6, Nb, Re, W, and Zr-22 wt % ZrO2 materials into Ta and Nb-1% Zr bases are presented. Current braze usage is summarized.

  10. Characterization of an ultra-low vapor pressure ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, T.; Raj, K.; Tsuda, S.

    2002-11-01

    A Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) based ferrofluid was characterized. The finished ferrofluid had the magnetization and viscosity values of 450 G and 9625 cP respectively at 27°C. It was found to have low volatility, long life, and stability under combined high temperature and magnetic field. These properties qualify the material for use in bakeable magnetic fluid seals for clean UHV environments. A novel method was used to measure the vapor pressure of the ferrofluid as a function of time and temperature. The room temperature vapor pressure of the subject ferrofluid was measured as 3×10 -10 mmHg after 1 h of exposure to high vacuum. It decayed to 3×10 -11 mmHg after 5 h and 3×10 -12 mmHg after 450 h.

  11. Low vapor pressure braze alloys for thermionic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results in the use of some low-vapor-pressure braze alloys are reported; these are binary alloys of refractory metals (Th, Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, W) with vapor pressures below 0.1 nanotorr at 1500 K or 10 microtorr at 2000 K. The melting point minima or eutectics of the alloys range from 1510 K to above 3000 K. Melting points and surface wetting on a Ta base are given. Results are presented on brazing of Ir, LaB6, Nb, Re, W, and ZrO2 (with 22 wt % Zr) into a Ta base or a Nb-1% Zr base. The results are applicable in electrode screening programs for thermionic cesium diodes.

  12. 46 CFR 154.405 - Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. 154.405... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.405 Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. (a) The design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank must be equal to or greater than the MARVS. (b) The Po of a...

  13. 46 CFR 154.405 - Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. 154.405... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.405 Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. (a) The design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank must be equal to or greater than the MARVS. (b) The Po of a...

  14. 46 CFR 39.2013 - High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T... CONTROL SYSTEMS Equipment and Installation § 39.2013 High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships—T/ALL. Each tankship with a vapor collection system must be fitted with a pressure-sensing...

  15. 46 CFR 39.2013 - High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T... CONTROL SYSTEMS Equipment and Installation § 39.2013 High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships—T/ALL. Each tankship with a vapor collection system must be fitted with a pressure-sensing...

  16. 46 CFR 154.405 - Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. 154.405... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.405 Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. (a) The design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank must be equal to or greater than the MARVS. (b) The Po of a...

  17. 46 CFR 154.405 - Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. 154.405... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.405 Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. (a) The design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank must be equal to or greater than the MARVS. (b) The Po of a...

  18. 46 CFR 154.405 - Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. 154.405... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.405 Design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank. (a) The design vapor pressure (Po) of a cargo tank must be equal to or greater than the MARVS. (b) The Po of a...

  19. Air exchange rates and alternative vapor entry pathways to inform vapor intrusion exposure risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Willett, Evan J; Shirazi, Elham; Pennell, Kelly G

    2016-11-12

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is a term used to describe indoor air (IA) contamination that occurs due to the migration of chemical vapors in the soil and groundwater. The overall vapor transport process depends on several factors such as contaminant source characteristics, subsurface conditions, building characteristics, and general site conditions. However, the classic VI conceptual model does not adequately account for the physics of airflow around and inside a building and does not account for chemical emissions from alternative "preferential" pathways (e.g. sewers and other utility connections) into IA spaces. This mini-review provides information about recent research related to building air exchange rates (AERs) and alternative pathways to improve the accuracy of VI exposure risk assessment practices. First, results from a recently published AER study for residential homes across the United States (US) are presented and compared to AERs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The comparison shows considerable differences in AERs when season, location, building age, and other factors are considered. These differences could directly impact VI assessments by influencing IA concentration measurements. Second, a conceptual model for sewer gas entry into buildings is presented and a summary of published field studies is reported. The results of the field studies suggest that alternative pathways for vapors to enter indoor spaces warrant consideration. Ultimately, the information presented in this mini-review can be incorporated into a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach for assessing site-specific VI exposure risks.

  20. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  1. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  2. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  3. Vapor Pressure of Aluminum Chloride Systems. 3. Vapor Pressure of Aluminum Chloride-Sodium Chloride Melts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-23

    were all as described previously (10). A .XCp/R log T(1, 2). mercury manometer was used as n additional external piessure The data were least-squares...the use of a mercury manometer and a NMLeod gauge, respectively, for pressure measurement; all other pressure measurements were made with a

  4. Vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary coal tars. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1 - September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.; Oja, V.; Lilly, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    The vapor pressure correlations that exist at present for coal tars are very crude and they are not considered reliable to even an order of magnitude. This project seeks to address this important gap in the near term by direct measurement of vapor pressures of coal tar fractions, by application of well-established techniques and modifications thereof. The principal objectives of the program are to: (1) obtain data on the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of tars from a range of ranks of coal; (2) develop correlations based on a minimum set of conveniently measurable characteristics of the tars; and (3) develop equipment that would allow performing such measurements in a reliable, straightforward fashion. During this quarter we have extended the work on measurements of vapor pressures of coal tars, using the continuous Knudsen effusion technique. These results need further analysis and therefore in this report we describe only the general idea behind the technique, and also show some typical results.

  5. Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    4/11/2012 1 Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Todd McAlary and Hester Groenevelt, Geosyntec... Intrusion to Indoor Air 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...10-6 risk (ppb) Vapour pressure (atm) Water solubility (g/l) 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 110 400 0.16 1.33 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene

  6. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  7. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  8. The predictable influence of soil temperature and barometric pressure changes on vapor intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, David L.; McRae, Mary F.

    2017-02-01

    Intrusion of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase has impacted many buildings in many different locations. Various building and environmental factors such as buoyancy of heated air and changes in barometric pressure can influence indoor air concentrations due to vapor intrusion in these buildings resulting in seasonal and daily variability. One environmental factor that previous research has not adequately addressed is soil temperature. In this study we present two northern region study sites where the seasonal trends in indoor air VOC concentrations positively correlate with soil temperature, and short-term (days) variations are associated with barometric pressure changes. We present simple and multivariate linear relationships of indoor air concentrations as a function of soil temperature and barometric pressure. Results from this study show that small changes in soil temperature can result in relatively large changes in indoor air VOC concentrations where the gas phase VOCs are sourced from non-aqueous phase liquids contained in the soil. We use the results from this study to show that a five degree Celsius increase in soil temperature, a variation in soil temperature that is possible in many climatic regions, results in a two-fold increase in indoor air VOC concentrations. Additionally, analysis provides insight into how building ventilation, diffusion, and the relative rate of soil-gas flow across the slab both from the subsurface into the building and from the building into the subsurface impact short term variations in concentrations. With these results we are able to provide monitoring recommendations for practitioners.

  9. 40 CFR 60.482-4a - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 60.482-4a Section 60.482-4a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. 40 CFR 63.165 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 63.165 Section 63.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  11. 40 CFR 60.482-4a - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 60.482-4a Section 60.482-4a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 40 CFR 60.482-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 2006 § 60.482-4 Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas/vapor service shall be operated with no detectable emissions... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices...

  13. 40 CFR 60.482-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 2006 § 60.482-4 Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas/vapor service shall be operated with no detectable emissions... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices...

  14. 40 CFR 63.165 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 63.165 Section 63.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  15. 40 CFR 265.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 265.1054 Section 265.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  16. 40 CFR 60.482-4a - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 60.482-4a Section 60.482-4a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  17. 40 CFR 60.482-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., 2006 § 60.482-4 Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas/vapor service shall be operated with no detectable emissions... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices...

  18. 40 CFR 60.482-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 2006 § 60.482-4 Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas/vapor service shall be operated with no detectable emissions... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices...

  19. 40 CFR 265.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 265.1054 Section 265.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  20. 40 CFR 63.165 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 63.165 Section 63.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  1. 40 CFR 60.482-4a - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 60.482-4a Section 60.482-4a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  2. 40 CFR 63.165 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 63.165 Section 63.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  3. 40 CFR 63.165 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 63.165 Section 63.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  4. 40 CFR 60.482-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 2006 § 60.482-4 Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas/vapor service shall be operated with no detectable emissions... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices...

  5. 40 CFR 265.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 265.1054 Section 265.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  6. 40 CFR 265.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 265.1054 Section 265.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  7. 40 CFR 60.482-4a - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 60.482-4a Section 60.482-4a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  8. 40 CFR 265.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 265.1054 Section 265.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  9. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  10. Tested Demonstrations. Gasoline Vapor: An Invisible Pollutant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Edgar R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a demonstration concerning the air pollution aspects of gasoline vapor which provides an estimation of the vapor pressure of test fuel, the molecular weight of the vapor, and illustrates a method of controlling the pollution. (SL)

  11. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  12. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  13. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  14. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  15. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  16. Precision ozone calibration system based on vapor pressures of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1987-01-01

    A precision ozone calibration system for stratospheric research has been developed and evaluated. Vapor pressures above solid ozone are mixed with a carrier gas (N2) to produce stratospheric ozone mixing ratios at total pressures of 1 to cover 20 torr. The uncertainty in the ozone mixing ratios is approximately + or - 1.5 percent, the stability of ozone is + or - 0.3 percent. Experiments to be calibrated may sample the gas mixture over a wide range of flow rates; the maximum throughput of gas with corrections of less than 1 percent to ozone is about 200 torr 1/min. A mass spectrometer system continuously monitors the purity and stability of the N2-O3 gas mixture.

  17. New Nickel Vapor Pressure Measurements: Possible Implications for Nebular Condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Meibom, A.; Ferguson, F. T.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2004-01-01

    Temperatures high enough to vaporize even refractory solids existed in the midplane of the solar nebula during its earliest evolutionary stages and played an important role in the processing of materials that went into the formation of the inner planets and asteroids. A variety of such high-T materials have been identified in primitive chondritic meteorites. These include chemically zoned FeNi metal grains that are generally believed to have formed directly by gas-solid condensation from a gas of approximately solar composition. These FeNi particles provide important information about the times scales of formation and physical transport mechanisms in the nebula, as well as formation temperature, pressure and gas chemistry. Currently, however, the interpretation of the chemical signatures in these FeNi particles rests on less than perfect information about the condensation sequence of siderophile elements. For example much, if not all, of the thermodynamic data for the vapor pressures of moderately refractory metals , such as Fe, Ni and Co, do not cover the desired temperature range. As a result, quite large extrapolations are needed. These extrapolations can be complex and uncertain due to factors such as oxygen fugacity or the presence of hydrogen gas.

  18. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  19. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  20. Investigation on high temperature vapor pressure of UO 2 containing simulated fission-product elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Ohtsubo, A.; Ishii, T.

    1984-06-01

    During the hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) of a fast breeder reactor (FBR), the temperature of the fuel would rise above 3000 K. The experimental data concerning the saturated fuel vapor pressure are necessary for the analysis of the HCDA. In this study, the UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag, or Sn was used to simulate the irradiated fuel in the FBR. The saturated vapor pressure of pure UO 2 and UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag, or Sn at 3000 to 5000 K was measured dynamically with a pulse laser and a torsion pendulum. The surface of a specimen on the pendulum was heated to eject vapor by the injection of a giant pulse ruby laser beam. The pressure of the ejected vapor was measured by both the maximum rotation angle of the pendulum and the duration of vapor ejection. The saturated vapor pressure was theoretically calculated by using the ejected vapor pressure. The surface temperature of the specimen was estimated from the irradiated energy density measured with a laser energy meter. The saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 at 3640 to 5880 K measured in this study was near the extrapolated value of Ackermann's low temperature data. The vapor pressure of UO 2 containing Cs, Ba, Ag or Sn was higher than that of UO 2. The saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 and a solid fission products system was calculated by using these experimental data.

  1. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  2. Measuring Vapor Pressure with an Isoteniscope: A Hands-on Introduction to Thermodynamic Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenqian; Haslam, Andrew J.; Macey, Andrew; Shah, Umang V.; Brechtelsbauer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid or azeotropic mixture, and its fluid phase diagram, can be achieved with an isoteniscope and an industrial grade digital pressure sensor using the experimental method reported in this study. We describe vapor-pressure measurements of acetone and n-hexane and their azeotrope, and how the…

  3. 40 CFR 63.1030 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 63.1030 Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The... section, each pressure relief device in gas and vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1030 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 63.1030 Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The... section, each pressure relief device in gas and vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  5. 40 CFR 264.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 264.1054 Section 264.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1011 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator... section, each pressure relief device in gas or vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  7. 40 CFR 61.242-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 61.242-4 Section 61.242-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  8. 40 CFR 264.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 264.1054 Section 264.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1030 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 63.1030 Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The... section, each pressure relief device in gas and vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  10. 40 CFR 264.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 264.1054 Section 264.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  11. 40 CFR 61.242-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 61.242-4 Section 61.242-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  12. 40 CFR 61.242-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 61.242-4 Section 61.242-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1030 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 63.1030 Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The... section, each pressure relief device in gas and vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1030 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 63.1030 Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The... section, each pressure relief device in gas and vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  15. 40 CFR 264.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 264.1054 Section 264.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1011 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator... section, each pressure relief device in gas or vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  17. 40 CFR 264.1054 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 264.1054 Section 264.1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1011 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator... section, each pressure relief device in gas or vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  19. 40 CFR 61.242-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 61.242-4 Section 61.242-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1011 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator... section, each pressure relief device in gas or vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  1. 40 CFR 61.242-4 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Except during pressure releases, each pressure relief device in gas... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 61.242-4 Section 61.242-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1011 - Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pressure relief devices in gas and vapor service standards. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator... section, each pressure relief device in gas or vapor service shall be operated with an instrument reading... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pressure relief devices in gas...

  3. Hurricane Isabel, Amount of Atmospheric Water Vapor Observed By AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These false-color images show the amount of atmospheric water vapor observed by AIRS two weeks prior to the passage of Hurricane Isabel, and then when it was a Category 5 storm. The region shown includes parts of South America and the West Indies. Puerto Rico is the large island below the upper left corner.

    Total water vapor represents the depth of a layer if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to condense and fall to the surface. The color bar on the right sides of the plots give the thickness of this layer in millimeters (mm). The first image, from August 28, shows typical tropical water vapor amounts over the ocean: between roughly 25 and 50 mm, or 1 to 2 inches. The highest values of roughly 80 mm, seen as a red blob over South America, corresponds to intense thunderstorms. Thunderstorms pull in water vapor from surrounding regions and concentrate it, with much of it then falling as rain.

    Figure 1 shows total water during the passage of Hurricane Isabel on September 13. The storm is apparent: the ring of moderate values surrounding a very strong maximum of 100 mm. Total water of more than 80 mm is unusual, and these values correspond to the intense thunderstorms contained within Isabel. The thunderstorms--and the large values of total water--are fed by evaporation from the ocean in the hurricane's high winds. The water vapor near the center of the storm does not remain there long, since hurricane rain rates as high 50 mm (2 inches) per hour imply rapid cycling of the water we observe. Away from the storm the amount of total water vapor is rather low, associated with fair weather where air that ascended near the storm's eye returns to earth, having dropped its moisture as rain. Also seen in the second images are two small regions of about 70 mm of total water over south America. These are yet more thunderstorms, though likely much more benign than those in Isabel.

    The

  4. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710... Operating Requirements § 154.1710 Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. When a vessel is carrying acetaldehyde, butadiene, ethylene oxide, or vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that air is: (a)...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710... Operating Requirements § 154.1710 Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. When a vessel is carrying acetaldehyde, butadiene, ethylene oxide, or vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that air is: (a)...

  6. Referred Air Method 25E: Determination of a Vapor Phase Organic Concentration in Waste Samples

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This method is applicable for determining the vapor pressure of waste. The headspace vapor of the sample is analyzed for carbon content by a headspace analyzer, which uses a flame ionization detector (FID).

  7. Importance of extracting solvent vapor pressure in headspace liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xue; Yang, Cui; Ren, Chunyan; Li, Donghao

    2008-09-26

    Of the many parameters that affect the enrichment factors in headspace liquid-phase microextraction, in this study, we systematically investigated the influence of the vapor pressure of the extracting solvent. Seven extracting solvents with different vapor pressures were selected and tested. It was found that the vapor pressure of the extracting solvent dramatically affects the enrichment factor and the factor was increasing by decreasing the extracting solvent vapor pressure under given experimental conditions. The result was validated for volatile organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls.

  8. 250W diode laser for low pressure Rb vapor pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvyaznyy, A.; Venus, G.; Smirnov, V.; Mokhun, O.; Koulechov, V.; Hostutler, D.; Glebov, L.

    2010-02-01

    The diode pumped alkali vapor lasers operating at subatmospheric pressure require developing of a new generation of high-power laser diode sources with about 10 GHz wide emission spectrum. The latest achievements in the technology of volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass opened new opportunities for the design and fabrication of compact external cavity laser diodes, diode bars and stacks with reflecting VBGs as output couplers. We present a diode laser system providing up to 250 W output power and emission spectral width of 20 pm (FWHM) at the wavelength of 780 nm. The stability and position of an emission wavelength is determined by the resonant wavelength of a VBG which is controlled by temperature. Stability of an emitting wavelength is within 5 pm. Thermal tuning of the wavelength provides maximum overlapping of emitting line with absorption spectrum of a Rb (rubidium)- cell. The designed system consists of 7 modules tuned to the same wavelength corresponding to D2 spectral line of Rb87 or Rb85 and coupled to a single output fiber. Analogous systems could be used for other Rb isotopes spectral lines as well as for lasers based on other alkali metal vapors (Cs and K) or any agents with narrow absorption lines.

  9. Molecular weight of aquatic fulvic acids by vapor pressure osmometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The molecular weights of aquatic fulvic acids extracted from five rivers were determined by vapor pressure osmometry with water and tetrahydrofuran as solvents. The values obtained ranged from 500 to 950 dallons, indicating that the molecular weights of aquatic fulvic acids are not as great as has been suggested in some other molecular weight studies. The samples were shown to be relatively monodisperse from radii of gyration measurements determined by small angle x-ray scattering. THF affords greater precision and accuracy than H2O in VPO measurements, and was found to be a suitable solvent for the determination of molecular weight of aquatic fulvic acid because it obviates the dissociation problem. An inverse correlation was observed with these samples between the concentration of Ca++ and Mg++ in the river water and the radii of gyration and molecular weights of the corresponding fulvic acid samples. ?? 1987.

  10. The vapor pressures of solid and liquid ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1986-01-01

    Vapor pressures of solid and liquid ozone have been measured over a temperature range 87 to below 66 K. The experiment was performed under flow conditions, and the gas was analyzed by a precision mass spectrometer system. In the range of solid ozone two forms, supercooled and crystalline ozone, were found. A least-square fit of the data for crystalline ozone resulted in the equation log P(torr) = A + B/T, where A = 10.460 and B = -1021.6. The estimated uncertainty of the data is + or - 1.0 percent. A triple-point temperature of 79.6 + or - 0.3 K was found where supercooled and crystalline ozone data intersect.

  11. Vapor pressure isotope effect in liquid methylene fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, A.; Ishida, T.

    1986-10-01

    The vapor pressures of the isotopic methylene fluorides /sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/, /sup 12/CD/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and /sup 13/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/ have been measured at temperatures between 149 and 244/sup 0/K by differential manometric techniques in a precision cryostat. Over the entire temperature range of the measurements, P(/sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/) > P(/sup 12/CD/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and P(/sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/) < P(/sup 13/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/). The data are best represented by T 1n(f/sub c//f/sub g/) = (632.26 +- 97.62)/T + (19.175 +- 1.016) - (0.0532 +- 0.0025)T for the D/H effect and by T 1n(f/sub c//f/sub g/) = -(31.64 +- 1.97)/T - (0.4069 +- 0.0107) for the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C effect. A series of calculations using Wilson's FG matrix method and a modified Schachtschneider-Snyder program resulted in temperature dependent interactions between the HCF angle bending motions and the molecular rotations about the z and y axes. These interactions in the liquid give satisfactory explanation of the D/H and /sup 13/C//sup 12/C vapor pressure isotope effects, spectroscopic data, and are qualitatively consistent with the structure of CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/ clusters obtained by ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  12. Vapor-pressure isotope effects in liquid methylene fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, A.

    1987-01-01

    The vapor pressures of the isotopic methylene fluorides /sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/, /sup 12/CD/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and /sup 13/CH''F/sub 2/ have been measured at temperatures between 149 and 244 K by differential manometric techniques in a precision cryostat. Over the entire temperature range of the measurements, P(/sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/) > P(/sup 12/CD/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and P(/sup 12/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/) < P(/sup 13/CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/). The data are best represented by T ln(f/sub c//f/sub g/) = (632.26 +/- 97.62)/T + (19.175 +/- 1.016) - (0.0532 +/- 0.0025)T for the D/H effect and by T ln(f/sub c//f/sub g/) = -(31.64 +/- 1.97)/T-(0.4069 +/- 0.0107) for the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C effect. A series of calculations using Wilson's FG matrix method and a modified Schachtschneider-Snyder program resulted in temperature dependent interactions between the HCF angle bending motions and the molecular rotations about the z and y axes. These interactions in the liquid give satisfactory explanation of the D/H and /sup 13/C//sup 12/C vapor pressure isotope effects, spectroscopic data, and are qualitatively consistent with the structure of CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/ clusters obtained by ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  13. The sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite on the surface of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Hong; Fegley, Bruce

    1998-02-01

    The total pressure and molecular speciation of sulfur vapor (dominantly S2) over pyrite at Venus surface temperatures (≈ 390-470°C) are important for modeling atmospheric chemistry and geochemistry of sulfur gases and minerals on Venus. The sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite in CO2 and CO2 gas mixtures, which are relevant to Venus, has not been previously measured. Instead, previous measurements were generally done in closed systems, such as sealed, evacuated silica tubes. We measured the sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite in an open system where carrier gas is flowing through a gas mixing furnace, from 441 to 591°C in He, N2, CO2, and CO2-SO2-CO mixtures using a standard technique, the transpiration method (Merton, U. and Bell, W. E. (1967) The transpiration method. In The Characterization of High Temperature Vapors, ed. J. W. Margrave, pp. 91-114. Wiley, New York). The data show that the sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite is the same in inert gas and in CO2-bearing gases. Our data also agree with literature vapor pressure data. Thermodynamic calculations show that the laboratory vapor pressure data are also valid at Venus surface pressures (≈ 50-100 bar). Finally, we present recommended values for the sulfur vapor pressure and calculate the molecular speciation of sulfur vapor over pyrite at Venus surface temperatures.

  14. The sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite on the surface of Venus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong; Fegley, Bruce

    1998-07-01

    The total pressure and molecular speciation of sulfur vapor (dominantly S 2) over pyrite at Venus surface temperatures (≈ 390-470°C) are important for modeling atmospheric chemistry and geochemistry of sulfur gases and minerals on Venus. The sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite in CO 2 and CO 2 gas mixtures, which are relevant to Venus, has not been previously measured. Instead, previous measurements were generally done in closed systems, such as sealed, evacuated silica tubes. We measured the sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite in an open system where carrier gas is flowing through a gas mixing furnace, from 441 to 591°C in He, N 2, CO 2, and CO 2SO 2CO mixtures using a standard technique, the transpiration method (Merton, U. and Bell, W. E. (1967) The transpiration method. In The Characterization of High Temperature Vapors, ed. J. W. Margrave, pp. 91-114. Wiley, New York). The data show that the sulfur vapor pressure over pyrite is the same in inert gas and in CO 2-bearing gases. Our data also agree with literature vapor pressure data. Thermodynamic calculations show that the laboratory vapor pressure data are also valid at Venus surface pressures (≈ 50-100 bar). Finally, we present recommended values for the sulfur vapor pressure and calculate the molecular speciation of sulfur vapor over pyrite at Venus surface temperatures.

  15. Nanosecond Glow and Spark Discharges in Ambient Air and in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe; Rusterholtz, Diane; Sainct, Florent; Xu, Da; Lacoste, Deanna; Stancu, Gabi; Pai, David

    2013-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges are one of the most energy efficient ways to produce active species in atmospheric pressure gases. In both air and water vapor, three discharge regimes can be obtained: 1) corona, with light emission just around the anode, 2) glow, corresponding to a diffuse nonequilibrium plasma, and 3) spark, characterized by higher temperatures and higher active species densities. The glow regime was initially obtained in air preheated at 2000 K. Based on a model defining the transition between glow and spark, we recently succeeded in obtaining a stable glow in ambient air at 300 K, using a judicious combination of electrode geometry, pulse duration, pulse frequency, and applied voltage. We will present these results and describe the characteristics of the discharge obtained in room air. The spark regime was also studied. NRP sparks induce ultrafast gas heating (about 1000 K in 20 ns) and high oxygen dissociation (up to 50% dissociation of O2) . This phenomenon can be explained by a two-step process involving the excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by exothermic dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. The characteristics of NRP discharges in water vapor will also be discussed. This work is supported by the ANR PREPA program (grant number ANR-09-BLAN-0043).

  16. Monitoring Air Circulation Under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygalov, Vadim

    Adequate air circulation is required for controlled environments to maintain uniform temperature and humidity control, and hence the ability to measure air flow accurately is important. Human and associated life support habitats (e.g.,. plant production systems) for future space missions will likely be operated at pressures less than 100 kPa to minimize gas leakage and structural mass. Under such reduced pressures, the outputs from conventional anemometers for monitoring air flow can change and require re-calibration. These effects of atmospheric pressure on different types of air flow measurements are not completely understood; hence we compared the performance of several air flow sensors across a range of hypobaric pressures. Sensors included a propeller type anemometer, a hot-wire anemometer, and a Pitot-tube based device. Theoretical schematics (including mathematical models) underlying these measurements were developed. Results demonstrated that changes in sensor outputs were predictable based on their operating principles, and that corrections could be developed for sensors calibrated under normal Earth atmosphere pressure ( 100 kPa) and then used at different pressures. The potential effects of hypobaric atmospheres and their altered air flows on plant physiology are also discussed.

  17. SERDP and ESTCP Workshop on Vapor Intrusion into Indoor Air from Contaminated Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    mitigating radon and volatile organic compound (VOC) subsurface vapor intrusion. These projects have determined that vapor concentrations can be highly...Validation of More Cost-Effective Methods for Mitigating Radon and VOC Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Todd McAlary Geosyntec 1045 Morning

  18. Discrete electronic-vibrational fluorescence spectra in the low-pressure phenanthrene and naphthacene vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirumyants, S.O.; Kozlov, V.K.; Vandyukov, E.A.

    1986-10-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been paid to developing methods for analysis and control of air pollutants. In this work the results of the study on quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenathrene and naphthacene in the gas phase are presented. Despite the fact that phenanthrene is a stereoisomer of anthracene, the shapes and intensities of their absorption and fluorescence spectra are markedly different. The oscillator strength of the first electronic transition in anthracene vapors is 50 times larger than that for the phenanthrene vapor (0.1 and 0.002, respectively). Therefore, the studies of the quasiline fluorescence spectrum of the phenanthrene vapor required a long exposition period (from 7 to 31 h) during the photographic detection. It is known that phenanthrene exhibits a characteristic quasiline spectrum in the 34584000-A range in frozen solutions. The authors have also investigated the possibility of obtaining structured quasiline vapor spectra for a more complex aromatic compound such as naphthacene which comprises four benzyl rings. In conclusion, the quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenanthrene and naphthacene in the gas phase have been obtained for the first time. In certain experimental conditions, phenanthrene and naphthacene emit wellresolved quasiline spectra which are dependent on the excitation frequency, temperature, and vapor pressure. For both compounds there is a frequency range for quasiline fluorescence excitation for which a shift of the quasiline spectrum occurs if the excitation frequency is changed within that range. Also more accurate values for the frequencies of the O-O electronic transition in phenanthrene and naphthacene have been obtained. Diagrams are included.

  19. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  20. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  1. 40 CFR 65.111 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 65.111 Section 65.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  2. 40 CFR 65.111 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 65.111 Section 65.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  3. 40 CFR 65.111 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 65.111 Section 65.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  4. 40 CFR 65.111 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 65.111 Section 65.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  5. 40 CFR 65.111 - Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. (a) Compliance schedule. The owner or operator shall comply... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Pressure relief devices in gas/vapor service. 65.111 Section 65.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  6. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; Biblarz, O.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process. 2 figures.

  7. Analysis of crude oil vapor pressures at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudeen, David Keith; Lord, David L.

    2005-08-01

    Crude oil storage caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are solution-mined from subsurface salt domes along the U.S. Gulf Coast. While these salt domes exhibit many attractive characteristics for large-volume, long-term storage of oil such as low cost for construction, low permeability for effective fluids containment, and secure location deep underground, they also present unique technical challenges for maintaining oil quality within delivery standards. The vapor pressures of the crude oils stored at SPR tend to increase with storage time due to the combined effects of geothermal heating and gas intrusion from the surrounding salt. This presents a problem for oil delivery offsite because high vapor-pressure oil may lead to excessive atmospheric emissions of hydrocarbon gases that present explosion hazards, health hazards, and handling problems at atmospheric pressure. Recognizing this potential hazard, the U.S. Department of Energy, owner and operator of the SPR, implemented a crude oil vapor pressure monitoring program that collects vapor pressure data for all the storage caverns. From these data, DOE evaluates the rate of change in vapor pressures of its oils in the SPR. Moreover, DOE implemented a vapor pressure mitigation program in which the oils are degassed periodically and will be cooled immediately prior to delivery in order to reduce the vapor pressure to safe handling levels. The work described in this report evaluates the entire database since its origin in 1993, and determines the current levels of vapor pressure around the SPR, as well as the rate of change for purposes of optimizing both the mitigation program and meeting safe delivery standards. Generally, the rate of vapor pressure increase appears to be lower in this analysis than reported in the past and, problematic gas intrusion seems to be limited to just a few caverns. This being said, much of the current SPR inventory exceeds vapor pressure delivery guidelines and must be

  8. Application of quantitative structure-property relationship analysis to estimate the vapor pressure of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Mohammad; Coelho, Leandro dos Santos; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Ortiz, Erlinda V; Duchowicz, Pablo R

    2016-06-01

    The application of molecular descriptors in describing Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) for the estimation of vapor pressure (VP) of pesticides is of ongoing interest. In this study, QSPR models were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to predict the vapor pressure values of 162 pesticides. Several feature selection methods, namely the replacement method (RM), genetic algorithms (GA), stepwise regression (SR) and forward selection (FS), were used to select the most relevant molecular descriptors from a pool of variables. The optimum subset of molecular descriptors was used to build a QSPR model to estimate the vapor pressures of the selected pesticides. The Replacement Method improved the predictive ability of vapor pressures and was more reliable for the feature selection of these selected pesticides. The results provided satisfactory MLR models that had a satisfactory predictive ability, and will be important for predicting vapor pressure values for compounds with unknown values. This study may open new opportunities for designing and developing new pesticide.

  9. Hydrogen bonding and vapor pressure isotope effect of deuterioisomeric methanethiols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, H.; Szydlowski, J.; Dill-Staffenberger, L.

    1981-04-16

    Wilson parameters, activity coefficients, association constants, and other thermodynamic functions which are derived from isothermal vapor pressure measurements between 223 and 293 K for binary mixtures of CH/sub 3/SH, CH/sub 3/SD, CS/sub 3/SH, and CD/sub 3/SD with n-hexane show the weakness of the hydrogen and the deuterium bonds of methanethiol. As far as these functions depend on the association model used for the calculation, the relation of their values to those obtained for the corresponding amines and alcohols under the same conditions attests the weak methanethiol association. While for the more strongly associated methylamines and methanols a greater energy of the deuterium bond compared to the hydrogen bond has clearly been observed, the differences between the thermodynamic functions of the systems with the SH compounds and of those with the SD compounds are insignificant. This observation as well as the fact that the vapor pressure ratios P-(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are only slightly greater than unity, that the ratios P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are even greater than P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and that the changes of these ratios with temperature and dilution are small in comparison to the strong increase of the corresponding quotients of the methylamines and the methanols are the consequence of the weak methanethiol association. P(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are represented by equations of the type ln P/sub D/ P/sub H/ = -A/T/sup 2/ + B/T where A and B are nearly additive. The low values of A and B for CH/sub 3/SD/CH/sub 3/SH in comparison to the high values for CH/sub 3/ND/sub 2//CH/sub 3/NH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/OD/CH/sub 3/OH reflect the weakness of the methanethiol hydrogen bonds. The constants can be related to the thermochemical and the spectroscopic data reported in the literature.

  10. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  11. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-02

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (μg m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) × M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed.

  12. Determination of cadmium vapor pressure over dichromium cadmium tetraselenide by the atomic absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'skii, N.K.; Ochertyanova L.I.; Zhegalinka, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    By the atomic absorption method one measures the light absorption by the vapor of the investigated element as a function of the temperature of the evaporating surface. To measure vapor pressure the authors use cadmium selenide of the purity grade, which was recrystallized by sublimitation. The optical density of the vapor over cadmium selenide was determined in the temperature range 820-890 K. Using atomic spectroscopy the vapor pressure of cadmium over cadmium selenide was determined in dichromium cadmium tetraselenide with different amounts of deviation from stoichiometry at 790-880 deg. The results are compared with the literature data.

  13. U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Vapor Pressure Committee 2009 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Ray; Eldredge, Lisa; DeLuca, Charles; Mihalik, Patrick; Maldonado, Julio; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith; Berndsen, Gerard

    2010-05-01

    This report comprises an annual summary of activities under the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Vapor Pressure Committee in FY2009. The committee provides guidance to senior project management on the issues of crude oil vapor pressure monitoring nd mitigation. The principal objectives of the vapor pressure program are, in the event of an SPR drawdown, to minimize the impact on the environment and assure worker safety and public health from crude oil vapor emissions. The annual report reviews key program areas ncluding monitoring program status, mitigation program status, new developments in measurements and modeling, and path forward including specific recommendations on cavern sampling for the next year. The contents of this report were first presented to SPR senior anagement in December 2009, in a deliverable from the vapor pressure committee. The current SAND report is an adaptation for the Sandia technical audience.

  14. Portable Cathode-Air Vapor-Feed Electrochemical Medical Oxygen Concentrator (OC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Missions on the International Space Station and future space exploration will present significant challenges to crew health care capabilities, particularly in the efficient utilization of onboard oxygen resources. Exploration vehicles will require lightweight, compact, and portable oxygen concentrators that can provide medical-grade oxygen from the ambient cabin air. Current pressure-swing adsorption OCs are heavy and bulky, require significant start-up periods, operate in narrow temperature ranges, and require a liquid water feed. Lynntech, Inc., has developed an electrochemical OC that operates with a cathode-air vapor feed, eliminating the need for a bulky onboard water supply. Lynntech's OC is smaller and lighter than conventional pressure-swing OCs, is capable of instant start-up, and operates over a temperature range of 5-80 C. Accomplished through a unique nanocomposite proton exchange membrane and catalyst technology, the unit delivers 4 standard liters per minute of humidified oxygen at 60 percent concentration. The technology enables both ambient-pressure operating devices for portable applications and pressurized (up to 3,600 psi) OC devices for stationary applications.

  15. Pluto's atmosphere - Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor-pressure equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1989-01-01

    Viking spacecraft radio-occultation measurements indicate that, irrespective of substantial differences, the polar ice cap regions on Mars have inversions similar to those of Pluto, and may also share vapor pressure equilibrium characteristics at the surface. This temperature-inversion phenomenon occurs in a near-surface boundary layer; surface pressure-temperature may correspond to the vapor-pressure equilibrium with CH4 ice, or the temperature may be slightly higher to match the value derived from IRAS data.

  16. Reappraisal of disparities between osmolality estimates by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit methods.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J

    2004-02-15

    As a response to recent expression of concern about possible unreliability of vapor pressure deficit measurements (K. Kiyosawa, Biophys. Chem. 104 (2003) 171-188), the results of published studies on the temperature dependence of the osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions are shown to account for the observed discrepancies between osmolality estimates obtained by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit osmometry--the cause of the concern.

  17. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  18. 46 CFR 39.20-13 - High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-13 High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships—T/ALL. Each tankship vapor collection system must be fitted with a pressure sensing device that... system; and (3) Alarms at a low pressure of not less than four inches water gauge (0.144 psig) for...

  19. 46 CFR 39.20-13 - High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-13 High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships—T/ALL. Each tankship vapor collection system must be fitted with a pressure sensing device that... system; and (3) Alarms at a low pressure of not less than four inches water gauge (0.144 psig) for...

  20. 40 CFR 63.7944 - How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vapor pressure of my remediation material? 63.7944 Section 63.7944 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Performance Tests § 63.7944 How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material? (a) You must determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of your...

  1. 40 CFR 63.7944 - How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vapor pressure of my remediation material? 63.7944 Section 63.7944 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Performance Tests § 63.7944 How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material? (a) You must determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of your...

  2. 40 CFR 63.7944 - How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vapor pressure of my remediation material? 63.7944 Section 63.7944 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Performance Tests § 63.7944 How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material? (a) You must determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of your...

  3. 40 CFR 63.7944 - How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vapor pressure of my remediation material? 63.7944 Section 63.7944 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Performance Tests § 63.7944 How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material? (a) You must determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of your...

  4. 40 CFR 63.7944 - How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vapor pressure of my remediation material? 63.7944 Section 63.7944 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Performance Tests § 63.7944 How do I determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of my remediation material? (a) You must determine the maximum HAP vapor pressure of your...

  5. Evaporation monitoring and composition control of alloy systems with widely differing vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; McClelland, M.A.; Meier, T.

    1994-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing sensors and controls to improve and extend electron beam materials processing technology to alloy systems with constituents of widely varying vapor pressure. The approach under development involves using tunable lasers to measure the density and composition of the vapor plume. A laser based vaporizer control system for vaporization of a uranium-iron alloy has been previously demonstrated in multi-hundred hour, high rate vaporization experiments at LLNL. This paper reviews the design and performance of the uranium vaporization sensor and control system and discusses the extension of the technology to monitoring of uranium vaporization. Data is presented from an experiment in which titanium wire was fed into a molten niobium pool. Laser data is compared to deposited film composition and film cross sections. Finally, the potential for using this technique for composition control in melting applications is discussed.

  6. Apparatus to measure the vapor pressure of slowly decomposing compounds from 1 Pa to 105 Pa

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an apparatus and method for measuring vapor pressures in the range from 1 Pa to 105 Pa. Its three distinctive elements are : (1) the static pressure measurements were made with only a small temperature difference between the vapor and the condensed phase, (2) the sample was degassed in situ, and (3) the temperature range extended up to 200 °C. The apparatus was designed to measure metal-organic precursors, which often are toxic, pyrophoric, or unstable. Vapor pressures are presented for naphthalene, ferrocene, diethyl phthalate, and TEMAH (tetrakisethylmethylaminohafnium). Also presented are data for the temperature-dependent decomposition rate of TEMAH. PMID:27274567

  7. Building pressurization control with rooftop air conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, S.

    1982-10-01

    The modulated exhaust fan appears to be the most cost effective positive means to maintain close building pressure control with rooftop air conditioning, but because building construction and applications vary, every building's pressure control needs must be analyzed. Requirements will vary from no relief to barometric dampers to return fans to modulated exhaust fans. As heating and cooling costs continue to rise and tighter building codes prevail, proper selection of building pressure control is one area that must be monitored more carefully by the HVAC system designer.

  8. Reid vapor-pressure regulation of gasoline, 1987-1990. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Butters, R.A.

    1990-09-30

    Although it is generally only a summertime problem, smog, as represented by its criteria pollutant, ozone, is currently the number one air pollution problem in the United States. Major contributors to smog formation are the various Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which react with other chemicals in the atmosphere to form the ozone and other harmful chemicals known as smog. Gasoline is a major source of VOC's, not only as it is burned in car engines, but as it evaporates. Gasoline evaporates in storage tanks, as it is transferred during loading and refueling operations, and in automobiles, both while they are running and while parked in the driveway. In 1987, the United States Environmental Protection Agency began an almost unprecedented effort to reduce the evaporative quality of commercial gasolines by mandating reductions in its Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP).

  9. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m(3) and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an "Imminent Hazard" condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed.

  10. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D.; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M.; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m3 and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an “Imminent Hazard” condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed. PMID:23950637

  11. Dynamics of a Spherical Vapor/Gas Bubble in Varying Pressure Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hisanobu; Kameda, Masaharu

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the radial motion of cavitation bubbles. The heat and mass transports including phase change are formulated precisely. In order to reduce the computational cost without loss of the important thermo-fluid phenomena, two simplifications are employed: time-dependent bubble radius is described using the Rayleigh-Plesset equation; the pressure in the bubble is assumed to be uniform in space. For validation of the model, the transient radial motion of an air bubble in water is observed experimentally. A shock tube is used to make the sudden pressure reduction from atmospheric to below the saturated vapor pressure. The bubble radius is measured by high-speed photography, in which an interferomtric laser imaging technique is used for accurate determination of the initial bubble radius. The radial motion is successfully predicted by using this model. The temperature reduction at the bubble wall is a predominant factor on the bubble growth rate under superheated conditions, even if the liquid temperature is close to room temperature. The numerical result indicates that the growth rate is very sensitive to initial bubble radius, ambient pressure, and liquid temperature.

  12. Knudsen vapor pressure measurements on pure materials and solutions dispersed in porous media: molded nitroglycerin tablets.

    PubMed

    Pikal, M J; Lukes, A L

    1976-09-01

    The gravimetric Knudsen method for vapor pressure measurement may be subject to serious systematic errors when the sample: (a) consists of the volatile component dispersed in an inert porous matrix and/or (b) contains a dissolved polymeric solute. Vaporization of water present as an impurity in the matrix may result in an appreciable "background" mass loss, and "nonequilibrium effects" may be present; i.e., The vapor of interest may be unable to escape from the sample rapidly enough to maintain the equilibrium vapor pressure in the Knudsen cell. Methods for eliminating the interference due to background effects are described, and a theoretical analysis of nonequilibrium effects is presented. The essential validity of the theories for nonequilibrium effects and the effectiveness of the methods for circumventing background effects were verified by experimental studies with molded nitroglycerin tablets. With nitroglycerin tablets, accurate Knudsen vapor pressure data may be obtained using the modified procedures and data analysis presented in this report.

  13. Transport of Carbon Tetrachloride in a Fractured Vadose Zone due to Atmospheric Pressure Fluctuations, Diffusion, and Vapor Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Downs, W.; Falta, R. W.; Housley, T.

    2005-12-01

    DNAPL sources of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vapors are of interest at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The site is underlain by thick fractured basalt that includes sedimentary interbeds, each are a few meters thick. Daily atmospheric pressure fluctuations serve as driving forces for CT vapor transport in the subsurface. Other important transport processes for vapor movement include gas-phase diffusion and density-driven transport. The objective of this research is to investigate the influence and relative importance of these processes on gaseous transport of CT. Gas pressure and vapor concentration measurements were conducted at various depths in two wells. A numerical multiphase flow model (TOUGH2), calibrated to field pressure data, is used to conduct sensitivity analyses to elucidate the importance of the different transport mechanisms. Results show that the basalt is highly permeable to vertical air flow. The pressure dampening occurs mainly in the sedimentary interbeds. Model-calibrated permeability values for the interbeds are similar to those obtained in a study by the U.S. Geological Survey for shallow sediments, and an order of magnitude higher than column-scale values obtained by previous studies conducted by INEEL scientists. The transport simulations indicate that considering the effect of barometric pressure changes is critical to simulating transport of pollutants in the vadose zone above the DNAPL source. Predicted concentrations can be orders of magnitude smaller than actual concentrations if the effect is not considered. Below the DNAPL vapor source, accounting for density and diffusion alone would yield acceptable results provided that a 20% error in concentrations are acceptable, and that simulating concentrations trends (and not actual concentrations) is the primary goal.

  14. Organic solvents vapor pressure and relative humidity effects on the phase transition rate of α and β forms of tegafur.

    PubMed

    Petkune, Sanita; Bobrovs, Raitis; Actiņš, Andris

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relative humidity (RH) and solvent vapor pressure effects on the phase transition dynamics between tegafur polymorphic forms that do not form hydrates and solvates. The commercially available α and β modifications of 5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-uracil, known as the antitumor agent tegafur, were used as model materials for this study. While investigating the phase transitions of α and β tegafur under various partial pressures of methanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and water vapor, it was determined that the phase transition rate increased in the presence of solvent vapors, even though no solvates were formed. By increasing the relative air humidity from 20% to 80%, the phase transition rate constant of α and β tegafur was increased about 60 times. After increasing the partial pressure of methanol, n-propanol, or n-butanol vapor, the phase transition rate constant did not change, but the extent of phase transformation was increased. In the homologous row of n-alcohols, the phase transition rate constant decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The dependence of phase transformation extent versus the RH corresponded to the polymolecular adsorption isotherm with a possible capillary condensation effect.

  15. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules.

  16. Saturated vapor pressure above the amalgam of alkali metals in discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical and numerical analysis of the evaporation process of two-component compounds in vapors of alkali metals in discharge lamps is presented. Based on the developed mathematical model of calculation of saturated vapor pressure of the metal above the amalgam, dependences of mass fractions of the components in the discharge volume on design parameters and thermophysical characteristics of the lamp are obtained.

  17. Accurate determination of the vapor pressure of potassium using optical absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirinzadeh, B.; Wang, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The vapor pressure of potassium has been measured in absorption using a CW tunable laser and calibrated against the accurate radiative lifetime of the 4s-4p doublet of potassium. An accurate value of 20,850 + or - 30 cal/mol for the heat of vaporization (from the liquid phase) at the melting point was determined.

  18. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines.

  19. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  20. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  1. Determination of Optimal Vapor Pressure Data by the Second and Third Law Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kunihisa

    2016-01-01

    Though equilibrium vapor pressures are utilized to determine thermodynamic properties of not only gaseous species but also condensed phases, the obtained data often disagree by a factor of 100 and more. A new data analysis method is proposed using the so-called second and third law procedures to improve accuracy of vapor pressure measurements. It was found from examination of vapor pressures of cesium metaborate and silver that the analysis of the difference between the second and third law values can result in determination of an optimal data set. Since the new thermodynamic method does not require special techniques and or experiences in dealing with measured data, it is reliable and versatile to improve the accuracy of vapor pressure evaluation. PMID:28101442

  2. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  3. Determination of Optimal Vapor Pressure Data by the Second and Third Law Methods.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kunihisa

    2016-01-01

    Though equilibrium vapor pressures are utilized to determine thermodynamic properties of not only gaseous species but also condensed phases, the obtained data often disagree by a factor of 100 and more. A new data analysis method is proposed using the so-called second and third law procedures to improve accuracy of vapor pressure measurements. It was found from examination of vapor pressures of cesium metaborate and silver that the analysis of the difference between the second and third law values can result in determination of an optimal data set. Since the new thermodynamic method does not require special techniques and or experiences in dealing with measured data, it is reliable and versatile to improve the accuracy of vapor pressure evaluation.

  4. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  5. Long-term evaluation of the controlled pressure method for assessment of the vapor intrusion pathway.

    PubMed

    Holton, Chase; Guo, Yuanming; Luo, Hong; Dahlen, Paul; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Johnson, Paul C

    2015-02-17

    Vapor intrusion (VI) investigations often require sampling of indoor air for evaluating occupant risks, but can be confounded by temporal variability and the presence of indoor sources. Controlled pressure methods (CPM) have been proposed as an alternative, but temporal variability of CPM results and whether they are indicative of impacts under natural conditions have not been rigorously investigated. This study is the first involving a long-term CPM test at a house having a multiyear high temporal resolution indoor air data set under natural conditions. Key observations include (a) CPM results exhibited low temporal variability, (b) false-negative results were not obtained, (c) the indoor air concentrations were similar to the maximum concentrations under natural conditions, and (d) results exceeded long-term average concentrations and emission rates under natural conditions by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Thus, the CPM results were a reliable indicator of VI occurrence and worst-case exposure regardless of day or time of year of the CPM test.

  6. Liquid-propellant droplet vaporization and combustion in high pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    In order to correct the deficiencies of existing models for high-pressure droplet vaporization and combustion, a fundamental investigation into this matter is essential. The objective of this research are: (1) to acquire basic understanding of physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the vaporization and combustion of isolated liquid-propellant droplets in both stagnant and forced-convective environments; (2) to establish droplet vaporization and combustion correlations for the study of liquid-propellant spray combustion and two-phase flowfields in rocket motors; and (3) to investigate the dynamic responses of multicomponent droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient flow oscillations.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING PROTOCOL TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to develop a methodology for sub-slab sampling to support the EPA guidance and vapor intrusion investigations after vapor intrusion has been established at a site. Methodologies for sub-slab air sampling are currently lacking in ref...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION USING INDOOR AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method for evaluating vapor intrusion using indoor and sub-slab air measurement and at the same time directly assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion in 15 homes and one business near the former R...

  9. Correcting "static" measurements of vapor pressure for time dependence due to diffusion and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Berg, Robert F

    2015-12-10

    The static method for measuring vapor pressure assumes that the sample is pure and that its temperature is steady and uniform. In practice, the measured pressure may be time dependent due to evaporative cooling after pumping on the sample, transpiration of the sample in a temperature gradient, or diffusion of an impurity out of the sample. An impurity cannot be avoided if the sample is decomposing. This article identifies and quantifies various causes of time dependence, and it includes an analysis that can obtain the vapor pressure from the time-dependent pressure of a decomposing sample. The analysis was applied to measurements of TEMAH (tetrakisethylmethylaminohafnium), whose decomposition continuously generated a volatile impurity. The corrected vapor pressures obtained for three TEMAH samples at 39 °C agreed to within ±1 %, even though the partial pressure of the impurity was as much as 7 times larger.

  10. Determination of vapor pressures for nonpolar and semipolar organic compounds from gas chromatographic retention data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Foreman, W.T.; Tuschall, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Vapor pressures for nonpolar and moderately polar organochlorine, pyrethroid, and organophosphate insecticides, phthalate esters, and organophosphate flame retardants were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC). Organochlorines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with known liquid-phase vapor pressures (P??L) (standard compounds) were chromatographed along with two reference compounds n-C20 (elcosane) and p,p???-DDT on a 1.0-m-long poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonded-phase (BP-1) column to determine their vapor pressures by GC (P??GC). A plot of log P??L vs log P??GC for standard compounds was made to establish a correlation between measured and literature values, and this correlation was then used to compute P??L of test compounds from their measured P??GC. P??L of seven major components of technical chlordane, endosulfan and its metabolites, ??-hexachlorocyclohexane, mirex, and two components of technical toxaphene were determined by GC. This method provides vapor pressures within a factor of 2 of average literature values for nonpolar compounds, similar to reported interlaboratory precisions of vapor pressure determinations. GC tends to overestimate vapor pressures of moderately polar compounds. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  11. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  12. Vapor pressure measurements on low-volatility terpenoid compounds by the concatenated gas saturation method.

    PubMed

    Widegren, Jason A; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes plays a central role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), which have important effects on the weather and climate. However, models of SOA formation have large uncertainties. One reason for this is that SOA formation depends directly on the vapor pressures of the monoterpene oxidation products, but few vapor pressures have been reported for these compounds. As a result, models of SOA formation have had to rely on estimated values of vapor pressure. To alleviate this problem, we have developed the concatenated gas saturation method, which is a simple, reliable, high-throughput method for measuring the vapor pressures of low-volatility compounds. The concatenated gas saturation method represents a significant advance over traditional gas saturation methods. Instead of a single saturator and trap, the concatenated method uses several pairs of saturators and traps linked in series. Consequently, several measurements of vapor pressure can be made simultaneously, which greatly increases the rate of data collection. It also allows for the simultaneous measurement of a control compound, which is important for ensuring data quality. In this paper we demonstrate the use of the concatenated gas saturation method by determination of the vapor pressures of five monoterpene oxidation products and n-tetradecane (the control compound) over the temperature range 283.15-313.15 K. Over this temperature range, the vapor pressures ranged from about 0.5 Pa to about 70 Pa. The standard molar enthalpies of vaporization or sublimation were determined by use of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation.

  13. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  14. Contributions to the Data on Theoretical Metallurgy. 3. The Free Energies of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures of Inorganic Substances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1935-01-01

    1k. Some Properties of Pure HIHSO. Jour. Am. Chem. S5oc., vol. 55, 1933, p. 3057. 226. Lzwie, G. N., AND RANDALL, M. Thermodynamics and the Free Energy... Properties of Pure Hydrogen Per- oxide . V. Vapor Pressure. Jour. Am. Chem. Soc., Vol. 46, 1924. P. 2693. 229. MAins, C.ILNE MAS,0 Sulphur Dioxide and Its...heats at high temperatures (200) of inorganic substances. These earlier papers contain the data necessary for writing the thermodynamic equations for

  15. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

  16. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  17. Simple Method To Measure the Vapor Pressure of Phthalates and Their Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoxing; Eichler, Clara M A; Chen, Shengyang; Little, John C

    2016-09-20

    Phthalates and alternative plasticizers are semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), an important class of indoor pollutants that may have significant adverse effects on human health. Unfortunately, models that predict emissions of and the resulting exposure to SVOCs have substantial uncertainties. One reason is that the characteristics governing emissions, transport, and exposure are usually strongly dependent on vapor pressure. Furthermore, available data for phthalates exhibit significant variability, and vapor pressures for the various alternatives are usually unavailable. For these reasons, a new approach based on modeling of the evaporation process was developed to determine vapor pressures of phthalates and alternate plasticizers. A laminar flow forced convection model was used in the design of a partial saturator (PS) tube. The mass transfer mechanisms in the PS tube are accurately modeled and enable the determination of vapor pressure even when the carrier gas is not completely saturated, avoiding the complicated procedure to establish vapor saturation. The measured vapor pressures ranged from about 10(-2) to 10(-7) Pa. Compared to the traditional gas saturation method, the model-based approach is advantageous in terms of both predictability and simplicity. The knowledge provides new insight into experimental design and a sound basis for further method development.

  18. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Soil Vapor Extraction & Air Sparging

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically, approximately one-quarter of Superfund source control projects have involved soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sorbed to soil in the unsaturated (vadose) zone.

  19. ADVANCES IN INDOOR AIR VAPOR INTRUSION: GUIDANCE AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ongoing efforts between the Office of Research and Development and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response have included technical guidance support, field demonstration activities, data analysis, and technology transfer activities in evaluating the impacts of vapor intru...

  20. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  1. Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

    2014-03-25

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  2. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  3. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  4. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  7. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  8. Assessment of the Accuracy of Pharmacy Students’ Compounded Solutions Using Vapor Pressure Osmometry

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effectiveness of using a vapor pressure osmometer to measure the accuracy of pharmacy students’ compounding skills. Design. Students calculated the theoretical osmotic pressure (mmol/kg) of a solution as a pre-laboratory exercise, compared their calculations with actual values, and then attempted to determine the cause of any errors found. Assessment. After the introduction of the vapor pressure osmometer, the first-time pass rate for solution compounding has varied from 85% to 100%. Approximately 85% of students surveyed reported that the instrument was valuable as a teaching tool because it objectively assessed their work and provided immediate formative assessment. Conclusions. This simple technique of measuring compounding accuracy using a vapor pressure osmometer allowed students to see the importance of quality control and assessment in practice for both pharmacists and technicians. PMID:23610476

  9. Assessment of the accuracy of pharmacy students' compounded solutions using vapor pressure osmometry.

    PubMed

    Kolling, William M; McPherson, Timothy B

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVE. To assess the effectiveness of using a vapor pressure osmometer to measure the accuracy of pharmacy students' compounding skills. DESIGN. Students calculated the theoretical osmotic pressure (mmol/kg) of a solution as a pre-laboratory exercise, compared their calculations with actual values, and then attempted to determine the cause of any errors found. ASSESSMENT. After the introduction of the vapor pressure osmometer, the first-time pass rate for solution compounding has varied from 85% to 100%. Approximately 85% of students surveyed reported that the instrument was valuable as a teaching tool because it objectively assessed their work and provided immediate formative assessment. CONCLUSIONS. This simple technique of measuring compounding accuracy using a vapor pressure osmometer allowed students to see the importance of quality control and assessment in practice for both pharmacists and technicians.

  10. THE BACTERICIDAL ACTION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL VAPOR ON MICROORGANISMS SUSPENDED IN AIR. I

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, O. H.; Bigg, Edward; Puck, Theodore T.; Miller, Benjamin F.

    1942-01-01

    It has been found that propylene glycol vapor dispersed into the air of an enclosed space produces a marked and rapid bactericidal effect on microorganisms introduced into such an atmosphere in droplet form. Concentrations of 1 gm. of propylene glycol vapor in two to four million cc. of air produced immediate and complete sterilization of air into which pneumococci, streptococci, staphylococci, H. influenzae, and other microorganisms as well as influenza virus had been sprayed. With lesser concentrations of propylene glycol, rapid and marked reduction in the number of air-borne bacteria occurred, but complete sterilization of the air required a certain interval of time. Pronounced effects on both pneumococci and hemolytic streptococci were observed when concentrations as low as 1 gm. of glycol to fifty million cc. of air were employed. Numerous control tests showed that failure of the glycol-treated microorganisms to grow on the agar plates was due to actual death of the bacteria. The means by which propylene glycol vapor produces its effect on droplet-borne bacteria is discussed and data relating the bactericidal properties of propylene glycol in vitro to the lethal action of its vapor is presented. Atmospheres containing propylene glycol vapor are invisible, odorless, and non-irritating. This glycol is essentially non-toxic when given orally and intravenously. Tests on possible deleterious effects of breathing propylene glycol containing atmospheres over long periods of time are being carried out. PMID:19871209

  11. Vapor Pressure of Aqueous Solutions of Electrolytes Reproduced with Coarse-Grained Models without Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Perez Sirkin, Yamila A; Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damian A

    2016-06-14

    The vapor pressure of water is a key property in a large class of applications from the design of membranes for fuel cells and separations to the prediction of the mixing state of atmospheric aerosols. Molecular simulations have been used to compute vapor pressures, and a few studies on liquid mixtures and solutions have been reported on the basis of the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method in combination with atomistic force fields. These simulations are costly, making them impractical for the prediction of the vapor pressure of complex materials. The goal of the present work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the use of the grand canonical screening approach ( Factorovich , M. H. J. Chem. Phys. 2014 , 140 , 064111 ) to compute the vapor pressure of solutions and to extend the methodology for the treatment of systems without a liquid-vapor interface and (2) to investigate the ability of computationally efficient high-resolution coarse-grained models based on the mW monatomic water potential and ions described exclusively with short-range interactions to reproduce the relative vapor pressure of aqueous solutions. We find that coarse-grained models of LiCl and NaCl solutions faithfully reproduce the experimental relative pressures up to high salt concentrations, despite the inability of these models to predict cohesive energies of the solutions or the salts. A thermodynamic analysis reveals that the coarse-grained models achieve the experimental activity coefficients of water in solution through a compensation of severely underestimated hydration and vaporization free energies of the salts. Our results suggest that coarse-grained models developed to replicate the hydration structure and the effective ion-ion attraction in solution may lead to this compensation. Moreover, they suggest an avenue for the design of coarse-grained models that accurately reproduce the activity coefficients of solutions.

  12. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  13. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  14. Major Upgrades to the AIRS Version-6 Water Vapor Profile Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This research is a continuation of part of what was shown at the last AIRS Science Team Meeting and the AIRS 2015 NetMeeting. AIRS Version 6 was finalized in late 2012 and is now operational. Version 6 contained many significant improvements in retrieval methodology compared to Version 5. Version 6 retrieval methodology used for the water vapor profile q(p) and ozone profile O3(p) retrievals is basically unchanged from Version 5, or even from Version 4. Subsequent research has made significant improvements in both water vapor and O3 profiles compared to Version 6.

  15. Expedited soil remediation employing soil vapor extraction and bioventing at Castle Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hoge, J.

    1996-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) involves in-situ removal and treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the vadose zone. An SVE system includes vent wells screened in the areas of highest contamination, a piping network connecting the vent wells to a SVE treatment unit, blower(s), and a treatment unit. Typical treatment units include granular activated carbon, catalytic oxidation (catox), thermal oxidation and internal combustion (IC) engines. The type of treatment unit selected is a function of the characteristics of the incoming vapor stream. The blower(s) apply vacuum to selected vent wells, resulting in propagation of a pressure gradient some distance from the wells. This is known as the radius of influence. The zone of remediation within this radius of influence is the distance from the well where sufficient flow velocity exists such that timely clean up of VOCs from the vadose zone can occur. Bioventing is most effective in removing petroleum hydrocarbons with less than 10 carbon chains (C10+). Bioventing involves passive or active injection of air into the subsurface, thus promoting the natural biodegradation of residual petroleum hydrocarbons. Passive injection involves opening vent wells to the atmosphere. Active injection is performed by connecting blowers to vent wells, or the existing piping manifold, and injecting air. Bioventing is most effective in promoting natural biodegradation of residual hydrocarbons in compounds with more than C10+ carbon chains. Factors effecting bioventing performance include: (1) Microorganisms (capable of producing enzymes that can degrade the contamination), (2) Energy source (carbon), (3) Electron acceptor (oxygen), (4) Soil moisture, (5) pH, (6) Nutrients, (7) Soil temperature, and (8) Absence of compounds toxic to microorganisms.

  16. Solid vapor pressure for five heavy PAHs via the Knudsen effusion method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2011-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds resulting from incomplete combustion and many fuel processing operations, and they are commonly found as subsurface environmental contaminants at sites of former manufactured gas plants. Knowledge of their vapor pressures is the key to predict their fate and transport in the environment. The present study involves five heavy PAHs, i.e. benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which are all as priority pollutants classified by the US EPA. The vapor pressures of these heavy PAHs were measured by using Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of 364 K to 454 K. The corresponding values of the enthalpy of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The enthalpy of fusion for the 5 PAHs was also measured by using differential scanning calorimetry and used to convert earlier published sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure data to solid vapor pressure in order to compare with the present results. These adjusted values do not agree with the present measured actual solid vapor pressure values for these PAHs, but there is good agreement between present results and other earlier published sublimation data.

  17. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1993-04-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950{degree}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  18. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. ); Banerjee, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950[degree]C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  19. Buoyancy-Driven Heat Transfer During Application of a Thermal Gradient for the Study of Vapor Deposition at Low Pressure Using and Ideal Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Hung, R. J.; Paley, M. S.; Penn, B. G.; Long, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to determine heat transfer during vapor deposition of source materials under a variety of orientations relative to gravitational accelerations. The model demonstrates that convection can occur at total pressures as low as 10-2 mm Hg. Through numerical computation, using physical material parameters of air, a series of time steps demonstrates the development of flow and temperature profiles during the course of vapor deposition. These computations show that in unit gravity vapor deposition occurs by transport through a fairly complicated circulating flow pattern when applying heat to the bottom of the vessel with parallel orientation with respect to the gravity vector. The model material parameters for air predict the effect of kinematic viscosity to be of the same order as thermal diffusivity, which is the case for Prandtl number approx. 1 fluids. Qualitative agreement between experiment and the model indicates that 6-(2-methyl-4-nitroanilino)-2,4-hexadiyn-l-ol (DAMNA) at these pressures indeed approximates an ideal gas at the experiment temperatures, and may validate the use of air physical constants. It is apparent that complicated nonuniform temperature distribution in the vapor could dramatically affect the homogeneity, orientation, and quality of deposited films. The experimental test i's a qualitative comparison of film thickness using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy on films generated in appropriately oriented vapor deposition cells. In the case where heating of the reaction vessel occurs from the top, deposition of vapor does not normally occur by convection due to a stable stratified medium. When vapor deposition occurs in vessels heated at the bottom, but oriented relative to the gravity vector between these two extremes, horizontal thermal gradients induce a complex flow pattern. In the plane parallel to the tilt axis, the flow pattern is symmetrical and opposite in direction from that where the vessel is

  20. Estimation of the vapor pressure of petroleum distillate fractions from gas chromatographic data

    SciTech Connect

    Eggertsen, F.T.; Nygard, N.R.; Nickoley, L.D.

    1980-11-01

    The vapor pressure of petroleum distillate fractions is estimated conveniently by applying ideal gas and solution laws to gas chromatographic data. The vapor pressure is computed as a summation of the partial pressures for carbon number groups in the chromatogram, each partial pressure being derived as the product of mole fraction, determined from the chromatogram, and saturation pressure, calculated using the Antoine equation. A rapid method of computation with a programmable calculator was used. The method assumes approximate conformance to Raoult's and Dalton's laws relating to partial pressures from a solution. The results generally agree well with values obtained manometrically. Advantages of the method are the general availability of suitable gas chromatographic equipment, convenience and speed of the procedure and calculations, applicability over a wide range of volatility, freedom from temperature equilibration problems, and small sample requirement. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Vapor pressure of ionic liquids at low temperatures from AC-chip-calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Ahrenberg, Mathias; Beck, Martin; Neise, Christin; Keßler, Olaf; Kragl, Udo; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph

    2016-08-03

    The very low vapor pressure of ionic liquids is challenging to measure. At elevated temperatures the liquids might start to decompose, and at relatively low temperatures the vapor pressure becomes too low to be measured by conventional methods. In this work we developed a highly sensitive method for mass loss determination at temperatures starting from 350 K. This technique is based on an alternating current calorimeter equipped with a chip sensor that consists of a free-standing SiNx-membrane (thickness <1 μm) and a measuring area with lateral dimensions of the order of 1 mm. A small droplet (diameter ca. 600 μm) of an ionic liquid is vaporized isothermally from the chip sensor in a vacuum-chamber. The surface-to-volume-ratio of such a droplet is large and the relative mass loss due to evaporation is therefore easy to monitor by the changing heat capacity (J K(-1)) of the remaining liquid. The vapor pressure is determined from the measured mass loss rates using the Langmuir equation. The method was successfully tested for the determination of the vapor pressure and the vaporization enthalpy of an archetypical ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][NTf2]). The data set created in this way in an extremely broad temperature range from 358 K to 780 K has allowed the estimation of the boiling temperature of [EMIm][NTf2]. The value (1120 ± 50) K should be considered as the first reliable boiling point of the archetypical ionic liquid obtained from experimental vapor pressures measured in the most possible close proximity to the normal boiling temperature.

  2. Historic and projected changes in vapor pressure deficit suggest a continental-scale drying of the United States atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficklin, Darren L.; Novick, Kimberly A.

    2017-02-01

    Via air temperature increases and relative humidity changes, climate change will modify vapor pressure deficit (VPD), which is an important determinant of water vapor and CO2 exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. VPD is the difference between the water vapor the air can hold at saturation (es) and the actual amount of water vapor (ea). Here we assess changes in VPD, es, and ea in the United States (U.S.) for the recent past (1979-2013) and the future (2065-2099) using gridded, observed climate data and output from general circulation models. Historically, VPD has increased for all seasons, driven by increases in es and declines in ea. The spring, summer, and fall seasons exhibited the largest areal extent of significant increases in VPD, which was largely concentrated in the western and southern portions of the U.S. The changes in VPD stemmed from recent air temperature increases and relative humidity decreases. Projections indicate similar, amplified patterns into the future. For the summer, the general circulation model ensemble median showed a 51% projected increase (quartile range of 39 and 64%) in summer VPD for the U.S., reflecting temperature-driven increases in es but decreases or minimal changes in relative humidity that promotes negligible changes in ea. Using a simple model for plant hydraulic functioning, we also show that in the absence of stomatal acclimation, future changes in VPD can reduce stomatal conductance by 9-51%, which is a magnitude comparable to the expected decline in stomatal conductance from rising CO2.

  3. Design and performance of a trickling air biofilter for chlorobenzene and o-dichlorobenzene vapors.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y S; Bartha, R

    1994-01-01

    From contaminated industrial sludge, two stable multistrain microbial enrichments (consortia) that were capable of rapidly utilizing chlorobenzene and o-dichlorobenzene, respectively, were obtained. These consortia were characterized as to their species composition, tolerance range, and activity maxima in order to establish and maintain the required operational parameters during their use in biofilters for the removal of chlorobenzene contaminants from air. The consortia were immobilized on a porous perlite support packed into filter columns. Metered airstreams containing the contaminant vapors were partially humidified and passed through these columns. The vapor concentrations prior to and after biofiltration were measured by gas chromatography. Liquid was circulated concurrently with the air, and the device was operated in the trickling air biofilter mode. The experimental arrangement allowed the independent variation of liquid flow, airflow, and solvent vapor concentrations. Bench-scale trickling air biofilters removed monochlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, and their mixtures at rates of up to 300 g of solvent vapor h(-1) m(-3) filter volume. High liquid recirculation rates and automated pH control were critical for stable filtration performance. When the accumulating NaCl was periodically diluted, the trickling air biofilters continued to remove chlorobenzenes for several months with no loss of activity. The demonstrated high performance and stability of the described trickling air biofilters favor their use in industrial-scale air pollution control. PMID:8085815

  4. Influence of temperature gradients on partial pressures in a low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterlaken, T. G. M.; Leusink, G. J.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Radelaar, S.; Kuijlaars, K. J.; Kleijn, C. R.; van den Akker, H. E. A.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements and calculations of the influence of temperature gradients on the partial pressures of the gas species in a cold-wall chemical-vapor-deposition reactor are presented. The experiments were performed at low pressures (300-500 Pa total pressure) and gas mixtures consisting of hydrogen, nitrogen, and tetrafluoromethane. The partial pressures were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The Soret effect (or thermal diffusion) has a large influence on the partial pressures of heavy gases in the vicinity of the heated wafer. In some cases a decrease in partial pressure of 20% compared to the inlet partial pressures was observed. Numerical calculations were performed to predict the behavior of the gas mixture. For mixtures under investigation the gas temperatures as well as the changes in partial pressures due to the Soret effect were predicted correctly.

  5. Vapor pressure and freezing point osmolality measurements applied to a volatile screen.

    PubMed

    Draviam, E J; Custer, E M; Schoen, I

    1984-12-01

    This is a report of a rapid and precise screening procedure, developed for the determination of ethanol in serum using osmolality measurements. The osmolality of the patient is determined by freezing point method (freezing point osmometry) and dew point (water vapor pressure osmometry) method. The difference between freezing point osmolality and vapor pressure osmolality (delta osm) is due to the presence of volatiles in the serum, because the volatiles are not measured by vapor pressure osmometry. The amount of ethanol (mg/dL) in serum is estimated by multiplying delta osm by a factor of 4.2. As a comparison method, ethanol also is measured by a spectrophotometric alcohol dehydrogenase method. In addition, a significant difference between an osmometric alcohol assayed value and enzymatic spectrophotometric measurement indicates the presence of volatiles, other than ethanol. In addition to ethanol there is a linear relationship between osmolality and isopropanol or methanol when added in vitro to serum.

  6. Adipic and malonic acid aqueous solutions: surface tensions and saturation vapor pressures.

    PubMed

    Riipinen, Ilona; Koponen, Ismo K; Frank, Göran P; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Vanhanen, Joonas; Lihavainen, Heikki; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Bilde, Merete; Kulmala, Markku

    2007-12-20

    The surface tension of adipic aqueous solutions was measured as a function of temperature (T=278-313 K) and adipic acid mole fraction (X=0.000-0.003) using the Wilhelmy plate method. A parametrization fitted to these data is presented. The evaporation rates of binary water-malonic and water-adipic acid droplets were measured with a TDMA technique at different temperatures (T=293-300 K) and relative humidities (58-80%), and the saturation vapor pressures of subcooled liquid malonic and adipic acids were derived from the data using a binary evaporation model. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressures was obtained as least-squares fits to the derived vapor pressures: ln(Psat,l) (Pa)=220.2389-22634.96/T (K)-26.66767 ln T (K) for malonic acid and ln(Psat,l) (Pa)=140.6704-18230.97/T (K)-15.48011 ln T (K) for adipic acid.

  7. Quantitative structure-property relationships for prediction of boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point.

    PubMed

    Dearden, John C

    2003-08-01

    Boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point are important physicochemical properties in the modeling of the distribution and fate of chemicals in the environment. However, such data often are not available, and therefore must be estimated. Over the years, many attempts have been made to calculate boiling points, vapor pressures, and melting points by using quantitative structure-property relationships, and this review examines and discusses the work published in this area, and concentrates particularly on recent studies. A number of software programs are commercially available for the calculation of boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point, and these have been tested for their predictive ability with a test set of 100 organic chemicals.

  8. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  9. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems

    SciTech Connect

    Factorovich, Matías H.; Scherlis, Damián A.

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  10. Pressure-coupled vaporization and combustion responses of liquid-fuel droplets in high-pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Shuen, J. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic responses of liquid-fuel droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient pressure oscillations are examined. The analysis is based on the complete sets of conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates detailed treatments of finite-rate chemical kinetics and variable properties. With a full account of thermodynamic phase equilibrium at the droplet surface, the model enables a systematic examination of the effects of ambient flow conditions on the droplet behavior. The responses of hydrocarbon fuel droplets in both sub- and super-critical environments are investigated. Results indicate that the droplet gasification and burning mechanisms depend greatly on the ambient pressure. In particular, a rapid enlargement of the vaporization and combustion responses occurs when the droplet surface reaches its critical point, mainly due to the strong variations of latent heat of vaporization and thermophysical properties at the critical state.

  11. Vapor Pressures of Anesthetic Agents at Temperatures Below 0°C and a Novel Anesthetic Delivery Device.

    PubMed

    Schenning, Katie J; Casson, Henry; Click, Sarah V; Brambrink, Lucas; Chatkupt, Thomas T; Alkayed, Nabil J; Hutchens, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    At room temperature, the vapor pressures of desflurane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane are well above the clinically useful range. We hypothesized that therapeutic concentrations of these agents could be achieved at temperatures below 0°C, but the vapor pressure-temperature relationship is unknown below 0. Second, we hypothesized that this relationship could be exploited to deliver therapeutic-range concentrations of anesthetic vapor. We therefore set out to determine the low temperature-vapor pressure relationships of each anesthetic agent, thereby identifying the saturated vapor concentration of each agent at any temperature below 0°C. To test our hypothesis, we measured the saturated vapor concentration at 1 atm of pressure for temperatures between -60 and 0°C, thus developing an empiric relationship for each agent. There was consistency in repeated experiments for all 3 agents. To test the empiric data, we constructed a digitally controlled thermoelectric anesthetic vaporizer, characterized the device, and used it to deliver anesthetic vapor to laboratory mice. We report, for the first time, the temperature-vapor pressure relationship at temperatures below 0°C for desflurane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane as well as the TMAC of these agents: the temperature at which the vapor pressure is equal to the minimum alveolar concentration. We describe the construction and limited validation of an anesthetic vaporizer prototype on the basis of this principle. We conclude that clinically relevant concentrations of volatile anesthetics may be achieved at low temperatures.

  12. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapor on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P. P.; Nechev, P.

    2013-12-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapor as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapor to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx. 0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute- long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  13. VAPOR PRESSURE ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRITIUM SAMPLES.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhne, W.

    2012-12-03

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The magnitude of the vapor pressure isotope effect is characterized as functions of the amount of water distilled from the sample aliquot and the heat settings for the distillation process. The tritium concentration in the distillate is higher than the tritium concentration in the sample early in the distillation process, it then sharply decreases due to the vapor pressure isotope effect and becomes lower than the tritium concentration in the sample, until the high tritium concentration retained in the boiling flask is evaporated at the end of the process. At that time, the tritium concentration in the distillate again overestimates the sample tritium concentration. The vapor pressure isotope effect is more pronounced the slower the evaporation and distillation process is conducted; a lower heat setting during the evaporation of the sample results in a larger bias in the tritium measurement. The experimental setup used and the fact that the current study allowed for an investigation of the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process distinguish it from and extend previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.034 {+-} 0.033, 1.052 {+-} 0.025, and 1.066 {+-} 0.037, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples, this implies that

  14. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit.

  15. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-07

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H{sub 2}. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H{sub 2} under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H{sub 2}. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H{sub 2} molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H–H vibrational frequencies as well as H–H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H{sub 2} solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  16. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-07

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H2. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H2 under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H2. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H2 molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H-H vibrational frequencies as well as H-H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H2 solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  17. Spatiotemporal variability of tetrachloroethylene in residential indoor air due to vapor intrusion: a longitudinal, community-based study.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jill E; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2014-11-01

    The migration of volatile contaminants from groundwater and soil into indoor air is a potential health threat at thousands of contaminated sites across the country. This phenomenon, known as vapor intrusion, is characterized by spatial and temporal heterogeneity. This study examined short-term fluctuations in concentrations of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in the indoor air of residential homes due to vapor intrusion in a community in San Antonio, Texas, that sits atop an extensive, shallow plume of contaminated groundwater. Using a community-based design, we removed potential indoor sources of PCE and then collected twelve 3-day passive indoor air samples in each of the 20 homes. Results demonstrated a one-order-of-magnitude variability in concentration across both space and time among the study homes, although all measured concentrations were below risk-based screening levels. We found that within any given home, indoor concentrations increase with the magnitude of the barometric pressure drop (P=0.048) and humidity (P<0.001), while concentrations decrease as wind speed increases (P<0.001) and also during winter (P=0.001). In a second analysis to examine sources of spatial variability, we found that indoor air PCE concentrations between homes increase with groundwater concentration (P=0.030) and a slab-on-grade (as compared with a crawl space) foundation (P=0.028), whereas concentrations decrease in homes without air conditioners (P=0.015). This study offers insights into the drivers of temporal and spatial variability in vapor intrusion that can inform decisions regarding monitoring and exposure assessment at affected sites.

  18. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... body pressure. The device is used to prevent and treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a)...

  19. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor... section, the containment system must have a: (a) Tank pressure gauge at the point where cargo flow...

  20. Vapor pressure measurements by mass loss transpiration method with a thermogravimetric apparatus.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, R; Narasimhan, T S Lakshmi; Nalini, S

    2009-06-18

    Thermobalances are used for equilibrium vapor pressure measurements based on both effusion and transpiration methods. In the case of the transpiration method, however, despite the numerous advantages a thermogravimetric apparatus can offer, it is not as widely used as is the conventional apparatus. In this paper, the difference that can exist in the vapor phase compositions in an effusion cell and in a transpiration cell is shown first with two examples. Subsequently, how a commercial thermobalance was utilized to perform transpiration experiments that conform to the basic principle of the transpiration method and yield vapor pressures consistent with the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric method is described. The three systems investigated are CsI(s), TeO(2)(s), and Te(s), each known to vaporize congruently, but in different manner. A critical analysis was performed on the information available in the literature on transpiration measurements using thermogravimetric apparatuses, and the salient findings are discussed. Smaller plateau regions than with conventional transpiration apparatuses and the lack of evidence for perfect transpiration conditions in some transpiration thermogravimetric investigations are shown with a few examples. A recommendation is made for the use of the rate of mass loss versus flow rate plot to ascertain that the usual apparent vapor pressure versus flow rate plot corresponds to a meaningful transpiration experiment.

  1. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  3. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  4. Impact of Vapor Pressure Deficit on the Performance of Bemisia tabaci: Adult, Nymphal, and Egg Survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is a serious global pest with varying population dynamics among different ecosystems. An experiment was conducted to assess the impact of vapor pressure deficit (VPD) on the survival of adults, nymphs and eggs of B. tabaci. The insects were reared...

  5. Unusual effect of water vapor pressure on dehydration of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Aditya M; Vangala, Venu R; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-04-01

    Dibasic calcium phosphate occurs as an anhydrate (DCPA; CaHPO₄) and as a dihydrate (DCPD; CaHPO₄•2H₂O). Our objective was to investigate the unusual behavior of these phases. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate was dehydrated in a (i) differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) in different pan configurations; (ii) variable-temperature X-ray diffractometer (XRD) at atmospheric and under reduced pressure, and in sealed capillaries; and (iii) water vapor sorption analyzer at varying temperature and humidity conditions. Dehydration was complete by 210°C in an open DSC pan and under atmospheric pressure in the XRD. Unlike "conventional" hydrates, the dehydration of DCPD was facilitated in the presence of water vapor. Variable-temperature XRD in a sealed capillary and DSC in a hermetic pan with pinhole caused complete dehydration by 100°C and 140°C, respectively. Under reduced pressure, conversion to the anhydrate was incomplete even at 300°C. The increase in dehydration rate with increase in water vapor pressure has been explained by the Smith-Topley effect. Under "dry" conditions, a coating of poorly crystalline product is believed to form on the surface of particles and act as a barrier to further dehydration. However, in the presence of water vapor, recrystallization occurs, creating cracks and channels and facilitating continued dehydration.

  6. Soybean leaf expansion subjected to high and low atmospheric vapor pressure deficits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is considered an important environmental factor that might affect leaf expansion and TR in plants. Two slow-wilting soybean genotypes PI 416937 and PI 471938 along with commercial cultivar Hutcheson were subjected to low (1.2 – 1.6 kPa) and high VPD (2.8 – 3 kPa) enviro...

  7. Molar Mass and Second Virial Coefficient of Polyethylene Glycol by Vapor Pressure Osmometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Checkal, Caleb; Saksa, Brian; Baka, Nadia; Modi, Kalpit; Rivera, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students determine the number-average molar masses and second virial coefficients of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers ranging in molar mass from 200 to 1500 g mol[superscript -1] using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). Students assess VPO in relation to accurate molar mass calculations of PEG polymers. Additionally,…

  8. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.

    2008-05-01

    The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure poL (atm) and enthalpy of vaporization Δ Hvap (kJ mol-1) of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T). For each compound i, the method assumes log10poL,i (T)=∑kνk,ibk(T) where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk (T) is the contribution to log10poL,i (T) by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0 (T) with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary), aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary), peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C-C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk (T) is assumed to follow b(T)=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4ln T. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions po L,i=fi (T) are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict poL values is examined using a test set of 184 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273.15 to 393.15 K for some compounds. σFIT is defined as the average over all points of the absolute value of the difference between experimental and predicted values of log10poL,i (T). After consideration of σFIT for the test set, the initial basis set and test set compounds are combined, and the B coefficients re-optimized. For all compounds and temperatures, σFIT=0.34: on average, poL,i (T) values are predicted to within a factor of 2. Because d(log10 poL,i (T))d(1/T) is related to the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap,i, the fitted B provide

  9. SIMPOL.1: A simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.

    2007-08-01

    The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure pLo (atm) and enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap (kJ mol-1) of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T). For each compound i, the method assumes log10pL,io(T)=Σkνk,ibk(T) where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk(T) is the contribution to log10 pL,io(T) by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0(T) with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary), aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary), peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C-C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk(T) is assumed to follow b(T)=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4lnT. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions pL,io=fi(T) are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict pLo values is examined using a test set of 161 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273.15 to 393.15 K for some compounds. σFIT is defined as the average over all points of the absolute value of the difference between experimental and predicted values of log10pL,io(T). After consideration of σFIT for the test set, the initial basis set and test set compounds are combined, and the B coefficients re-optimized. For all compounds and temperatures, σFIT=0.34: on average, pL,io(T) values are predicted to within a factor of 2. Because d(log10pL,io(T))/d(1/T) is related to the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap,i, the fitted B provide predictions of

  10. Transient-pressure analysis in geothermal steam reservoirs with an immobile vaporizing liquid phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Atkinson, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-difference model for the radial horizontal flow of steam through a porous medium is used to evaluate transient-pressure behavior in the presence of an immobile vaporizing or condensing liquid phase. Graphs of pressure drawdown and buildup in terms of dimensionless pressure and time are obtained for a well discharging steam at a constant mass flow rate for a specified time. The assumptions are made that the steam is in local thermal equilibrium with the reservoir rocks, that temperature changes are due only to phase change, and that effects of vapor-pressure lowering are negligible. Computations show that when a vaporizing liquid phase is present the pressure drawdown exhibits behavior similar to that observed in noncondensable gas reservoirs, but delayed in time. A theoretical analysis allows for the computation of this delay and demonstrates that it is independent of flow geometry. The response that occurs upon pressure buildup is markedly different from that in a noncondensable gas system. This result may provide a diagnostic tool for establishing the existence of phase-change phenomena within a reservoir. ?? 1979.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR-TO-LEAF VAPOR PHASE TRANSFER FACTOR FOR DIOXINS AND FURANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of an experiment in which grass was grown in a greenhouse and outdoors, and in soils of different concentration levels of dioxins and furans, were used in a modeling exercise to derive an air-to-leaf vapor phase transfer factor. The purpose of the experiment was to under...

  12. THE BACTERICIDAL ACTION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL VAPOR ON MICROORGANISMS SUSPENDED IN AIR

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Theodore T.; Robertson, O. H.; Lemon, Henry M.

    1943-01-01

    A study of the conditions which affect the bactericidal action of propylene glycol vapor on air-suspended microorganisms has been carried out. The killing process was found to be more effective when both the total number of air-borne droplets and the number of organisms in the bacterial suspension are small. A temperature below 80°F. and an atmospheric relative humidity between 45 and 70 per cent were found to constitute the most favorable conditions for the lethal action of the vapor. Experiments were performed to test the bactericidal efficiency of propylene glycol vapor in both small and large enclosed spaces. These studies revealed that equally marked bactericidal action is obtained when propylene glycol is dispersed in an 800 cubic foot room as occurs in chambers of 2 cubic foot capacity. The susceptibility to vapor action of bacteria re-suspended in saliva was just as great as when broth was used as the suspending medium. Both partially and completely dehydrated bacteria also succumbed to the effects of the vapor. However, when unsterile dust collected from inhabited rooms was dispersed into the air, little reduction of the natural microbic population contained in this material was observed. Data are presented showing the minimum glycol concentration necessary for effective bactericidal action on various microorganisms. Pneumococci were killed by amounts of propylene glycol as low as 1 gm. in 20 million cc. of air. Concentrations of 1 to 5 million to 1 to 10 million were required to produce the same degree of killing of streptococci and staphylococci. The observations here reported add further support to the previously proposed conception of the mechanism of the lethal action of propylene glycol vapor, namely, that a bactericidal concentration of the glycol accumulates in the bacterial droplet as a result of contact with and absorption of glycol molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:19871337

  13. Thermodynamic properties and vapor pressures of polar fluids from a four-parameter corresponding-states method

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, W.V.; Johnson, J.K.; Rowley, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    A recently proposed extended Lee-Kesler corresponding-states method (ELK) for polar fluids which accurately predicts compressibility factors and departure functions is considered. Tables of polar deviation functions have been generated and values of the shape/size and polar parameters for 52 polar fluids have been calculated, allowing the method to be used for quick hand calculation in addition to the previous, more accurate, computer applications. Additionally, vapor pressures of 44 pure polar fluids were computed using the full version of the ELK and the equality of the Gibbs free energy criterion for phase equilibrium. An ELK vapor pressure correlation is proposed which is essentially numerically equivalent to, but computationally simpler than, the former method. Computed vapor pressures agree with experimental values as well or better than other vapor pressure equations designed exclusively for vapor pressure prediction of polar fluids.

  14. Non-contact measurement technique of the vapor pressure of liquid and high temperature solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, P.-F.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoda, S.

    2003-05-01

    Here is reported a new scheme to accurately determine the vapor pressure of undercooled, liquid, and high temperature solid materials. The method relies on an imaging technique that measures the time variation of the radius of an electrostatically levitated sample. This scheme, compared to other techniques, offers unique opportunity to explore not only the liquid above the melting point but also the undercooled states of highly reactive materials in a contamination free environment. This was exemplified in this paper with titanium. For the first time, we report the vapor pressure (V_p) of its liquid phase over a large temperature range, covering the undercooled region. Over the 1700 to 2050 K temperature range, it was measured as Log V_p(T) = 9.154 - 17978 T^{-1} (3%). Similarly, for high temperature solid titanium, the vapor pressure could be expressed as Log V_p(T) = 16.634 - 32960 T^{-1} (6%) over the 1770 to 1940 K temperature interval. From these data, the average latent heats of vaporization and sublimation were calculated respectively as 344.8 kJ/kg (8%) and 632.1 kJ/kg (6%) respectively.

  15. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors of vapor-liquid interface due to arrival of a pressure wave

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    In the vapor explosion, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role for triggering, propagation and enhancement of the explosion. Energy of the explosion is related to the magnitude of heat transfer rate from hot liquid to cold volatile one. This is related to an increasing rate of interface area and to an amount of transient heat flux between the liquids. In this study, the characteristics of transient heat transfer and behaviors of vapor film both on the platinum tube and on the hot melt tin drop, under same boundary conditions have been investigated. It is considered that there exists a fundamental mechanism of the explosion in the initial expansion process of the hot liquid drop immediately after arrival of pressure wave. The growth rate of the vapor film is much faster on the hot liquid than that on the solid surface. Two kinds of roughness were observed, one due to the Taylor instability, by rapid growth of the explosion bubble, and another, nucleation sites were observed at the vapor-liquid interface. Based on detailed observation of early stage interface behaviors after arrival of a pressure wave, the thermal fragmentation mechanism is proposed.

  16. Deviations from Ideal Sublimation Vapor Pressure Behavior in Mixtures of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds with Interacting Heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Jillian L; Suuberg, Eric M

    2010-08-01

    Despite the relatively small atomic fraction of a given heteroatom in a binary mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), the inclusion of heteroatomic substituted compounds can significantly impact mixture vapor pressure behavior over a wide range of temperatures. The vapor pressures of several binary PAC mixtures containing various heteroatoms show varying behavior, from practically ideal behavior following Raoult's law to significant deviations from ideality depending on the heteroatom(s) present in the mixture. Mixtures were synthesized using the quench-cool technique with equimolar amounts of two PAC, both containing heteroatoms such as aldehyde, carboxyl, nitrogen, and sulfur substituent groups. For some mixtures, deviation from ideality is inversely related to temperature, though in other cases we see deviations from ideality increasing with temperature, whereas some appear independent of temperature. Most commonly we see lower vapor pressures than predicted by Raoult's law, which indicates that the interacting heteroatoms prefer the solid mixture phase as opposed to the vapor phase. Although negative deviations predominate from Raoult's Law, the varying mixtures investigated show both higher and lower enthalpies and entropies of sublimation than predicted. In each mixture, a higher enthalpy of sublimation leads to higher entropy of sublimation than predicted, and vice versa.

  17. The vapor pressures of supercooled NHO3/H2O solutions. [in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure utilizing the Gibbs-Duhem relation is used to extrapolate vapor pressures of supercooled HNO3 mixtures to 190 K. Values of A and B from the equation logP = A - B/T are presented for solutions between 0.20 and 0.25 mole fraction HNO3. In the stratosphere, if sufficient HNO3 vapor is present because it has not come into equilibrium with the nitric acid trihydrate, supercooled nitric acid solutions could condense at temperatures up to 1.5 + or - 0.8 K above the ice point.

  18. Simulation Research of Vaporization and Pressure Variation in a Cryogenic Propellant Tank at the Launch Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Liang, Guo-zhu

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve depiction of pressure variation and investigate the interrelation among the physical processes in propellant tanks, a 2D axial symmetry Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) CFD model is established to simulate a large-sized liquid propellant tank when the rocket is preparing for launch with propellant loaded at the launch site. The numerical model is considered with propellant free convection, heat transfer between the tank and the external environment, thermal exchange between propellant and inner tank wall surfaces, gas compressibility, and phase change modeled under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. Vaporization rate of the vented LH2 tank and prediction of pressure change in the tank pressurized with GHe are obtained through simulation. We analysis the distributions of phase, temperature, and velocity vectors to reveal interactions among the propellant's own convection motion, heat transfer and phase change. The results show that the vaporization rate is mainly affected by heat leaks though the tank wall when the tank is vented, but it does not completely accord with the trend of the leakage because of convection motion and temperature nonuniformity of the liquid propellant in the tank. We also find that the main factors on pressure variation in the pressurized tank are the heat transfer on the tank wall surface bonding the ullage and propellant vaporization which has comparatively less influence.

  19. Phase State and Saturation Vapor Pressure of Submicron Particles of meso-Erythritol at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, Eva U; Tschiskale, Morten; Bilde, Merete

    2016-09-15

    meso-Erythritol is a sugar alcohol identified in atmospheric aerosol particles. In this work, evaporation of submicron-sized particles of meso-erythritol was studied in a TDMA system including a laminar flow tube under dry conditions at five temperatures (278-308 K) and ambient pressure. A complex behavior was observed and attributed to the formation of particles of three different phase states: (1) crystalline, (2) subcooled liquid or amorphous, and (3) mixed. With respect to saturation vapor pressure, the subcooled liquid and amorphous states are treated to be the same. The particle phase state was linked to initial particle size and flow tube temperature. Saturation vapor pressures of two phase states attributed to the crystalline and subcooled liquid state respectively are reported. Our results suggest a mass accommodation coefficient close to one for both states.

  20. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  1. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  2. Development of a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter for the determination of the water vapor pressure curve.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, S; Georgin, E; Hermier, Y; Sparasci, F; Himbert, M

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the knowledge of the water saturation curve is required to improve the accuracy of the calibrations in humidity. In order to achieve this objective, the LNE-CETIAT and the LNE-CNAM have jointly built a facility dedicated to the measurement of the saturation vapor pressure and temperature of pure water. The principle is based on a static measurement of the pressure and the temperature of pure water in a closed, temperature-controlled thermostat, conceived like a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter. A copper cell containing pure water is placed inside a temperature-controlled copper shield, which is mounted in a vacuum-tight stainless steel vessel immersed in a thermostated bath. The temperature of the cell is measured with capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers, calibrated with uncertainties below the millikelvin. The vapor pressure is measured by calibrated pressure sensors connected to the cell through a pressure tube whose temperature is monitored at several points. The pressure gauges are installed in a thermostatic apparatus ensuring high stability of the pressure measurement and avoiding any condensation in the tubes. Thanks to the employment of several technical solutions, the thermal contribution to the overall uncertainty budget is reduced, and the remaining major part is mainly due to pressure measurements. This paper presents a full description of this facility and the preliminary results obtained for its characterization.

  3. Measurements of blast waves from bursting frangible spheres pressurized with flash-evaporation vapor or liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparaza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Incident overpressure data from frangible spheres pressurized with a flash-evaporating fluid in liquid and vapor form were obtained in laboratory experiments. Glass spheres under higher than ambient internal pressure of Freon-12 were purposely burst to obtain time histories of overpressure. Nondimensional peak pressures, arrival and duration times, and impulses are presented, and whenever possible plotted and compared with compiled data for Pentolite high-explosive. The data are generally quite repeatable and show differences from blast data produced by condensed high-explosives.

  4. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  5. Noncontact Monitoring of Respiration by Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that a dynamic air-pressure sensor system allows respiratory status to be visually monitored for patients in minimally clothed condition. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using changes in air pressure. To utilize this device in the field, we must clarify the influence of clothing conditions on measurement. The present study evaluated use of the dynamic air-pressure sensor system as a respiratory monitor that can reliably detect change in breathing patterns irrespective of clothing. Twelve healthy volunteers reclined on a dental chair positioned horizontally with the sensor pad for measuring air-pressure signals corresponding to respiration placed on the seat back of the dental chair in the central lumbar region. Respiratory measurements were taken under 2 conditions: (a) thinly clothed (subject lying directly on the sensor pad); and (b) thickly clothed (subject lying on the sensor pad covered with a pressure-reducing sheet). Air-pressure signals were recorded and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration were calculated. This information was compared with expiratory tidal volume measured simultaneously by a respirometer connected to the subject via face mask. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was able to receive the signal corresponding to respiration regardless of clothing conditions. A strong correlation was identified between expiratory tidal volume and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration for all subjects under both clothing conditions (0.840-0.988 for the thinly clothed condition and 0.867-0.992 for the thickly clothed condition). These results show that the dynamic air-pressure sensor is useful for monitoring respiratory physiology irrespective of clothing.

  6. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  7. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

  8. Ultra-rapid flow-through polymerase chain reaction microfluidics using vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-09-15

    A novel flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microfluidic system using vapor pressure was developed that can achieve ultra-rapid, small-volume DNA amplification on a chip. The 40-cycle amplification can be completed in as little as 120 s, making this device the fastest PCR system in the world. The chip device is made of a pressure-sensitive polyolefin (PSP) film and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) substrate which was processed by cutting-work to fabricate the microchannel. The enclosed structure of the microchannel was fabricated solely by weighing the PSP film on the COP substrate, resulting in superior practical application. The vapor pressure in the denaturation zone of the destabilizing flow source was applied to the flow force, and ultra-rapid, efficient amplification was accomplished with a minimal amount of PCR reagents for detection. The flowing rhythm created by vapor pressure minimized the residual PCR products, leading to highly efficient amplification. For field test analysis, airborne dust was collected from a public place and tested for the presence of anthrax. The PCR chip had sufficient sensitivity for anthrax identification. The fastest time from aerosol sampling to detection was theoretically estimated as 8 min.

  9. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; ...

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  10. High-pressure homogenization lowers water vapor permeability of soybean protein isolate-beeswax films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Yue; Guo, Kuan; Zhao, Xiaoyan

    2012-03-07

    Soybean-protein isolate (SPI) has excellent film-forming capacity. However, the water vapor permeability of SPI film is high, which will cause the moisture lose of packaged products. The effect of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) on the water vapor permeability of SPI-beeswax films was evaluated. The HPH was effective at lowering the water vapor permeability of SPI-beeswax films to about 50% of the control. The HPH reduced the particle size of films and made their matrix more compact. The HPH improved the hydrophobicity of SPI-beeswax films. For the first time, we proved that the HPH improved the bound-beeswax content in SPI-beeswax films. The bound beeswax was effective at lowering the water vapor permeability of films rather than the free beeswax in the film matrix. In summary, the HPH lowered water vapor permeability of SPI-beeswax films by reducing their particle size and raising their hydrophobicity and bound-beeswax content.

  11. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell integral air accumular containment

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Basel, Richard A.

    2004-02-10

    A fuel cell generator apparatus contains at least one fuel cell subassembly module in a module housing, where the housing is surrounded by a pressure vessel such that there is an air accumulator space, where the apparatus is associated with an air compressor of a turbine/generator/air compressor system, where pressurized air from the compressor passes into the space and occupies the space and then flows to the fuel cells in the subassembly module, where the air accumulation space provides an accumulator to control any unreacted fuel gas that might flow from the module.

  12. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  13. Water-vapor pressure in nests of the San Miguel Island Song Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Michael D.; Sogge, Mark K.; van Riper, Charles

    1990-01-01

    The water-vapor pressure (PN) in nests of the San Miguel Island race of Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia micronyx) averaged 16 torr, but varied considerable between nests and within individual nests during successive days of incubation. Large daily fluctuations occurred throughout the incubation period and did not parallel concurrent changes in ambien vapor pressure (P1). Daily rates of water loss from nest eggs (MH2O) averaged 28 mg day-1, but also varied considerable within and between nests and did not correlate with changes in P1. MH2O increased 6-33% after the third day of incubation. PN was significantly higher and MH2O significantly lower in nests located in sheltered gullies than in nests from a windswept slope. These data suggest that Song Sparrows do not regulate PN to achieve hatching success.

  14. On the critical temperature, normal boiling point, and vapor pressure of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, José N; Esperança, José M S S; Filipe, Eduardo

    2005-04-07

    One-stage, reduced-pressure distillations at moderate temperature of 1-decyl- and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bistriflilamide ([Ntf(2)](-)) ionic liquids (ILs) have been performed. These liquid-vapor equilibria can be understood in light of predictions for normal boiling points of ILs. The predictions are based on experimental surface tension and density data, which are used to estimate the critical points of several ILs and their corresponding normal boiling temperatures. In contrast to the situation found for relatively unstable ILs at high-temperature such as those containing [BF(4)](-) or [PF(6)](-) anions, [Ntf(2)](-)-based ILs constitute a promising class in which reliable, accurate vapor pressure measurements can in principle be performed. This property is paramount for assisting in the development and testing of accurate molecular models.

  15. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition of niobium coating on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaomu; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei; Liu, Jinling; Wang, Yiguang

    2009-07-01

    Nb coatings were prepared on a SiC substrate by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using NbCl 5. Thermodynamic calculations were performed to study the effect of temperature and partial pressure of NbCl 5 on the final products. The as-deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Nb coatings are oriented and grow in the preferred (2 0 0) plane and (2 1 1) plane, at 1173 K and 1223-1423 K, respectively. At 1123-1273 K, the deposition is controlled by the surface kinetic processes. The activation energy is found to be 133 kJ/mol. At 1273-1373 K, the deposition is controlled by the mass transport processes. The activation energy is found to be 46 kJ/mol. The growth mechanism of the chemical vapor deposited Nb is also discussed based on the morphologies and the deposition rates.

  16. Initial Measurement of the Vapor Pressures of Simple Refractory Materials: Cu and Fe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.; Johnson, Natasha; Martinez, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the past decade that high temperature processes played important roles in the Primitive Solar Nebula. Unfortunately, basic data, such as the vapor pressures of iron or SiO have not been measured over the appropriate temperature range (near T approximately equal to 2000K), but must be extrapolated from lower temperature measurements often made more than 50 years ago. The extrapolation of the available data to higher temperatures can be quite complex and can depend on other factors such as the oxygen fugacity or the presence of hydrogen gas. Moreover, modern technology has made possible more accurate measurements of such quantities over a wider temperature range. We recently acquired a commercial Thermo-Cahn Thermogravimetric system capable of vacuum operation to 1700 C and measurement of mass change with microgram accuracy in a 100g sample or smaller. In this paper, we will report our progress in learning to make vapor pressure measurements using this system.

  17. Some possible filler alloys with low vapor pressures for refractory-metal brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of eutectics and melting-point minima for binary combinations of metals having vapor pressures below 10 to the minus 10th power torr at 1500 degrees K and .00005 torr at 2000 degree K is presented. These compositions and others near them on their phase diagrams are potential special brazing fillers for refractory metals. Some possible problems and advantages for fusion bonds of such mixtures are indicated. Evaluations of brazing fillers containing refractory metals are reported.

  18. Characterization of the TIP4P-Ew water model: vapor pressure and boiling point.

    PubMed

    Horn, Hans W; Swope, William C; Pitera, Jed W

    2005-11-15

    The liquid-vapor-phase equilibrium properties of the previously developed TIP4P-Ew water model have been studied using thermodynamic integration free-energy simulation techniques in the temperature range of 274-400 K. We stress that free-energy results from simulations need to be corrected in order to be compared to the experiment. This is due to the fact that the thermodynamic end states accessible through simulations correspond to fictitious substances (classical rigid liquids and classical rigid ideal gases) while experiments operate on real substances (liquids and real gases, with quantum effects). After applying analytical corrections the vapor pressure curve obtained from simulated free-energy changes is in excellent agreement with the experimental vapor pressure curve. The boiling point of TIP4P-Ew water under ambient pressure is found to be at 370.3+/-1.9 K, about 7 K higher than the boiling point of TIP4P water (363.7+/-5.1 K; from simulations that employ finite range treatment of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones interactions). This is in contrast to the approximately +15 K by which the temperature of the density maximum and the melting temperature of TIP4P-Ew are shifted relative to TIP4P, indicating that the temperature range over which the liquid phase of TIP4P-Ew is stable is narrower than that of TIP4P and resembles more that of real water. The quality of the vapor pressure results highlights the success of TIP4P-Ew in describing the energetic and entropic aspects of intermolecular interactions in liquid water.

  19. New Micro-Method for Prediction of Vapor Pressure of Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    and HNS (20), caffeine (19, 21 both values used in linear regression), naphthalene (22), benzoic acid (23), adipic acid (24), anthraquinone (25...Naphthalene Mettler certified thermometric standard Caffeine Arthur R Thomas Co thermometric standard Acetanilide Arthur R Thomas Co thermometric...materials (energetic and non-energetic). The two data points in red are both for caffeine ; values for vapor pressures measured by two different groups differ

  20. Vapor Pressure Determination of VM Using the Denunder-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY –MASS SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUE ECBC-TR-1278 Amanda L. Jenkins ASK, INC. Hebron, MD 21830-1224 Eric J. Bruni LEIDOS, INC...2012 – Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vapor Pressure Determination of VM Using the Denuder–Liquid Chromatography –Mass Spectrometry Technique 5a...a novel, denuder-based liquid chromatography –mass spectrometry (LC–MS) approach designed specifically for low- volatility and thermally unstable

  1. Apparatus to measure the vapor pressure of slowly decomposing compounds from 1 Pa to 10(5) Pa.

    PubMed

    Berg, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    This article describes an apparatus and method for measuring vapor pressures in the range from 1 Pa to 10(5) Pa. Its three distinctive elements are : (1) the static pressure measurements were made with only a small temperature difference between the vapor and the condensed phase, (2) the sample was degassed in situ, and (3) the temperature range extended up to 200 °C. The apparatus was designed to measure metal-organic precursors, which often are toxic, pyrophoric, or unstable. Vapor pressures are presented for naphthalene, ferrocene, diethyl phthalate, and TEMAH (tetrakisethylmethylaminohafnium). Also presented are data for the temperature-dependent decomposition rate of TEMAH.

  2. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  3. Methods of Measuring Vapor Pressures of Lubricants With Their Additives Using TGA and/or Microbalances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Miller, Michael K.; Montoya, Alex F.

    1996-01-01

    The life of a space system may be critically dependent on the lubrication of some of its moving parts. The vapor pressure, the quantity of the available lubricant, the temperature and the exhaust venting conductance passage are important considerations in the selection and application of a lubricant. In addition, the oil additives employed to provide certain properties of low friction, surface tension, antioxidant and load bearing characteristics, are also very important and need to be known with regard to their amounts and vapor pressures. This paper reports on the measurements and analyses carried out to obtain those parameters for two often employed lubricants, the Apiezon(TM)-C and the Krytox(TM) AB. The measurements were made employing an electronic microbalance and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) modified to operate in a vacuum. The results have been compared to other data on these oils when available. The identification of the mass fractions of the additives in the oil and their vapor pressures as a function of the temperature were carried out. These may be used to estimate the lubricant life given its quantity and the system vent exhaust conductance. It was found that the Apiezon(TM)-C has three main components with different rates of evaporation while the Krytox(TM) did not indicate any measurable additive.

  4. Pressure drop in fully developed, duct flow of dispersed liquid-vapor mixture at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of steady, fully developed dispersed liquid-vapor flow in a straight duct at 0-g is simulated by flowing water containing n-butyl benzoate droplets. Water and benzoate are immiscible and have identical density at room temperature. The theoretical basis of the simulation is given. Experiments showed that, for a fixed combined flow rate of water and benzoate, the frictional pressure drop is unaffected by large changes in the volume fraction of benzoate drops and their size distribution. Measured power spectra of the static wall pressure fluctuations induced by the turbulent water-benzoate flow also revealed that their dynamics is essentially unaltered by the presence of the droplets. These experimental findings, together with the theoretical analysis, led to the conclusion that the pressure drop in fully developed, dispersed liquid-vapor flow in straight ducts of constant cross section at 0-g is identical to that due to liquid flowing alone at the same total volumetric flow rate of the liquid-vapor mixture and, therefore, can be readily determined.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure epitaxial growth technique of a multiple quantum well by mist chemical vapor deposition based on Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Dang, Giang T.; Nitta, Noriko

    2016-10-01

    A multiple quantum well α-Fe2O3/α-Ga2O3 with parallel and coherent formation of uniform and highly single-crystalline layers on a sapphire substrate has been fabricated by open-air atmospheric-pressure solution-processed mist chemical vapor deposition (Mist CVD). This report demonstrates that complicated structures with atomic-level control can be fabricated even in non-vacuum conditions by the Mist CVD. This can be achieved via the precise control of the precursor flow and ambient temperature combined with the formation of mist droplets of the special Leidenfrost state, which increased the atomic migration length by 108 times more than that of traditional vacuum techniques. This work could be a milestone in the transformation from vacuum to non-vacuum thin film deposition techniques towards a green and sustainable industry.

  6. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  7. In-Reactor Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 Under Low Water Vapor Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330° and 370°C). Data from these tests will be used to support fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex- reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  8. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 ºC). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  9. Thermal vapor bubble and pressure dynamics during infrared laser ablation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Sokolow, Adam; Pearlstein, Robert; Edwards, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Free-electron laser irradiation can superheat tissue water, driving thermal vapor bubbles confined by tissue matrix and leading to mechanical tissue failure (ablation). Acoustic transients propagating from an ablation cavity were recorded with a polarization quadrature, interferometric vibrometer. For 3.0 μm infrared irradiation, the shocklike transients with peak pressures in the megapascal range indicate amplification due to bubble collapse. In contrast, for 6.45 μm irradiation, elastic transients with peak pressures in the 0.1 MPa range indicate tissue failure during bubble growth.

  10. Fast membrane osmometer as alternative to freezing point and vapor pressure osmometry.

    PubMed

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Canavese, Giancarlo; Montevecchi, Franco Maria; Ferrari, Mauro

    2008-04-01

    Osmometry is an essential technique for solution analysis and the investigation of chemical and biological phenomena. Commercially available osmometers rely on the measurements of freezing point, vapor pressure, and osmotic pressure of solutions. Although vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) and freezing point osmometry (FPO) can perform rapid and inexpensive measurements, they are indirect techniques, which rely on thermodynamic assumptions, which limit their applicability. While membrane osmometry (MO) provides a potentially unlimited direct measurement of osmotic pressure and solution osmolality, the conventional technique is often time-consuming and difficult to operate. In the present work, a novel membrane osmometer is presented. The instrument significantly reduces the conventional MO measurement time and is not subject to the limitations of VPO and FPO. For this paper, the osmotic pressure of aqueous sucrose solutions was collected in a molality range 0-5.5, by way of demonstration of the new instrument. When compared with data found in the literature, the experimental data were generally in good agreement. However, differences among results from the three techniques were observed.

  11. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  12. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Status of the CNRS-LCSR program on high pressure droplet vaporization and burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender

    1993-01-01

    Depending on the surrounding flow and thermodynamic conditions, a single droplet may experience several gasification regimes, ranging from the envelope flame regime to pure vaporization. In practical situations, such as rocket propulsion or diesel combustion, the size distribution of droplets is, at best, bimodal, so that the possibility exists for the simultaneous presence of various regimes. For example, very small droplets are transported by the gas phase with zero relative velocity. This picture validates then the spherical symmetry hypothesis applied to the droplet and to the diffusion flame enveloping it. On the other hand, for larger droplets, a relative velocity exists due to drag forces. The most important influence of forced convection on droplet burning is the possibility to extinguish globally the envelope flame, or to establish a flame stabilized in the wake region. The burning rates of these regimes differ strongly. The characteristic time of droplet gasification is also influenced by the surrounding pressure and temperature. A parametric investigation of single droplet burning regimes is then helpful in providing the necessary physical ideas for sub-grid models used in spray combustion numerical prediction codes. The CNRS-LCSR experimental program on droplet vaporization and burning deals with these various regimes: stagnant and convective monocomponent droplet burning convective mono and bicomponent droplet vaporization; high temperature convective mono and biocomponent droplet vaporization; burning regimes of hydrazine and hydroxyl-ammonium-nitrate based monopropellant droplets and the vaporization regimes of liquid oxygen droplets. Studies on interacting droplets and on liquid aluminum droplets will start in the near future. The influence of high pressure is a common feature of all these studies. This paper summarizes the status of the CNRS-LCSR program on the effects of high pressure on monocomponent single droplet burning and vaporization, and

  14. Application of a 2D air flow model to soil vapor extraction and bioventing case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H.; Merz, P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is frequently the technology of choice to clean up hydrocarbon contamination in unsaturated soil. A two-dimensional air flow model provides a practical tool to evaluate pilot test data and estimate remediation rates for soil vapor extraction systems. The model predictions of soil vacuum versus distance are statistically compared to pilot test data for 65 SVE wells at 44 sites. For 17 of 21 sites where there was asphalt paving, the best agreement was obtained for boundary conditions with no barrier to air flow at the surface. The model predictions of air flow rates and stream lines around the well allow an estimate of the gasoline removal rates by both evaporation and bioremediation. The model can be used to quickly estimate the effective radius of influence, defined here as the maximum distance from the well where there is enough air flow to remove the contaminant present within the allowable time. The effective radius of influence is smaller than a radius of influence defined by soil vacuum only. For a case study, in situ bioremediation rates were estimated using the air flow model and compared to independent estimates based on changes in soil temperature. These estimate bioremediation rates for heavy fuel oil ranged from 2.5 to 11 mg oil degraded per kg soil per day, in agreement with values in the literature.

  15. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  16. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location. Demonstration of hot air vapor extraction for fuel hydrocarbon cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Hot air vapor extration (HAVE) is a fast track, innovative environmental cleanup technolgy that uses a combination of thermal, heap pile, and vapor extraction techniques to remove and destroy hydrocarbon contamination in soil. This technology is very effective in cleaning soils contaminated with gasoline, diesel, heavy oil, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).

  17. Thermochemical and Vapor Pressure Behavior of Anthracene and Brominated Anthracene Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-03-25

    The present work concerns the thermochemical and vapor pressure behavior of the anthracene (1) + 2-bromoanthracene (2) and anthracene (1) + 9-bromoanthracene (3) systems. Solid-liquid equilibrium temperature and differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate the existence of a minimum melting solid state near an equilibrium temperature of 477.65 K at x1 = 0.74 for the (1) + (2) system. Additionally, solid-vapor equilibrium studies for the (1) + (2) system show that the vapor pressure of the mixtures depends on composition, but does not follow ideal Raoult's law behaviour. The (1) + (3) system behaves differently from the (1) + (2) system. The (1) + (3) system has a solid solution like phase diagram. The system consists of two phases, an anthracene like phase and a 9-bromoanthracene like phase, while (1) + (2) mixtures only form a single phase. Moreover, experimental studies of the two systems suggest that the (1) + (2) system is in a thermodynamically lower energy state than the (1) + (3) system.

  18. Thermochemical and Vapor Pressure Behavior of Anthracene and Brominated Anthracene Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The present work concerns the thermochemical and vapor pressure behavior of the anthracene (1) + 2-bromoanthracene (2) and anthracene (1) + 9-bromoanthracene (3) systems. Solid-liquid equilibrium temperature and differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate the existence of a minimum melting solid state near an equilibrium temperature of 477.65 K at x1 = 0.74 for the (1) + (2) system. Additionally, solid-vapor equilibrium studies for the (1) + (2) system show that the vapor pressure of the mixtures depends on composition, but does not follow ideal Raoult’s law behaviour. The (1) + (3) system behaves differently from the (1) + (2) system. The (1) + (3) system has a solid solution like phase diagram. The system consists of two phases, an anthracene like phase and a 9-bromoanthracene like phase, while (1) + (2) mixtures only form a single phase. Moreover, experimental studies of the two systems suggest that the (1) + (2) system is in a thermodynamically lower energy state than the (1) + (3) system. PMID:24319314

  19. Laboratory performance of alternating pressure air mattresses component and sequelae.

    PubMed

    Bain, Duncan

    The performance of three different alternating pressure air mattresses with different geometries of air cell were compared (Nimbus 3, Heritage, Tamora Plus), using simple performance indices based on pressure mapping. The aim of this study was to examine the effect on performance of elevating the backrest and thigh section of the bed into sitting position. Ten healthy volunteers of various sizes were pressure-mapped over the full pressure cycle on three alternating pressure air mattresseses with differing cell geometries. This was then repeated with the beds profiled to a sitting position. Performance of the alternating pressure air mattresses in terms of their ability to redistribute pressure dynamically was assessed in the different positions. The different alternating pressure air mattresses performed similarly with the bed in the lying flat position, but smaller cells appeared to be more effective in the sitting position. A conclusion was made that cell geometry may have an effect on the ability of the mattress to achieve alternating behaviour in the sitting position.

  20. Disjoining pressure and capillarity in the constrained vapor bubble heat transfer system.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arya; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C

    2011-10-14

    Using the disjoining pressure concept in a seminal paper, Derjaguin, Nerpin and Churaev demonstrated that isothermal liquid flow in a very thin film on the walls of a capillary tube enhances the rate of evaporation of moisture by several times. The objective of this review is to present the evolution of the use of Churaev's seminal research in the development of the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) heat transfer system. In this non-isothermal "wickless heat pipe", liquid and vapor flow results from gradients in the intermolecular force field, which depend on the disjoining pressure, capillarity and temperature. A Kelvin-Clapeyron model allowed the use of the disjoining pressure to be expanded to describe non-isothermal heat, mass and momentum transport processes. The intermolecular force field described by the convenient disjoining pressure model is the boundary condition for "suction" and stability at the leading edge of the evaporating curved flow field. As demonstrated by the non-isothermal results, applications that depend on the characteristics of the evaporating meniscus are legion.

  1. Pressure intelligent control strategy of Waste heat recovery system of converter vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xugang; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jiayan; Qian, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The converter gas evaporative cooling system is mainly used for absorbing heat in the high temperature exhaust gas which produced by the oxygen blowing reaction. Vaporization cooling steam pressure control system of converter is a nonlinear, time-varying, lagging behind, close coupling of multivariable control object. This article based on the analysis of converter operation characteristics of evaporation cooling system, of vaporization in a production run of pipe pressure variation and disturbance factors.For the dynamic characteristics of the controlled objects,we have improved the conventional PID control scheme.In Oxygen blowing process, we make intelligent control by using fuzzy-PID cascade control method and adjusting the Lance,that it can realize the optimization of the boiler steam pressure control.By design simulation, results show that the design has a good control not only ensures drum steam pressure in the context of security, enabling efficient conversion of waste heat.And the converter of 1800 flue gas through pipes and cool and dust removal also can be cooled to about 800. Therefore the converter haze evaporative cooling system has achieved to the converter haze temperature decrease effect and enhanced to the coal gas returns-ratio.

  2. Air dilution, under calm, of spreading dense vapor from an instantaneous spill of volatile liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Fink, S.F. IV

    1998-07-01

    The objective is to estimate the time after release until dilution with air of a combustible vapor results in the local concentration being everywhere below the fuel-lean flammability limit. For an instantaneous release of sufficient liquid volume, the authors anticipate (and can justify a posteriori) that a balance of inertial and buoyant forces constitutes an excellent approximation to the conservation of momentum for the gravity-current dynamics of the spilled liquid and evolved vapor [until the (cylindrical-)radial spread results in liquid and vapor layers so thin that a viscous-buoyant balance is more appropriate]. Whereas virtually all previous analyses of wind-free dense-fluid dispersion take the initial condition to be a uniform-fluid spill in the configuration of a right-circular cylinder, and eventually a selfsimilar behavior, based parametrically only on the fixed spill-occupied volume and the effective gravitational acceleration, evolves, the authors adopt an initial spilled-fluid configuration in the form of a finite-radius mound, with the layer thickness monotonically decreasing with increasing radial distance and smoothly vanishing at finite radius. They find that no selfsimilar behavior evolves; furthermore, they find that at all times the thickness of the spilled-fluid layer would decrease monotonically with radius, from the axis of symmetry to the spilled-fluid-layer front. Also, whereas virtually all simple gas-cloud models are of box type, and take the contents to be spatially homogeneous, they investigate the spatial inhomogeneity of the vapor content of a cloud formed by evaporation, and show that distribution of the ambient-air-diluted vapor is well approximated as decreasing with increasing height as a Gaussian function, with peak concentration on the axis at all times.

  3. 58. AIR PRESSURIZATION TANK BEING LIFTED INTO PLACE ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. AIR PRESSURIZATION TANK BEING LIFTED INTO PLACE ON THE VAL BRIDGE STRUCTURE AT ISLIP CANYON, April 9, 1948. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 27. EXTENSION OF SURGE CHAMBER AND AIR PIPES TO PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. EXTENSION OF SURGE CHAMBER AND AIR PIPES TO PRESSURE LINE, HIGHLINE PUMPING PLANT. December 11, 1920 - Highline Canal & Pumping Station, South side of Salt River between Tempe, Phoenix & Mesa, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. Explosion pressures of hydrocarbon-air mixtures in closed vessels.

    PubMed

    Razus, Domnina; Movileanu, Codina; Brinzea, Venera; Oancea, D

    2006-07-31

    An experimental study on pressure evolution during closed vessel explosions of several gaseous fuel-air mixtures was performed, at various initial pressures within 0.3-1.2 bar and ambient initial temperature. Explosion pressures and explosion times are reported for methane-, n-pentane-, n-hexane-, propene-, butene-, butadiene-, cyclohexane- and benzene-air mixtures. The explosion pressures measured in a spherical vessel (Phi=10 cm) and in three cylindrical vessels with different diameter/height ratios are examined in comparison with the adiabatic explosion pressures, computed by assuming chemical equilibrium within the flame front. The influence of initial pressure, fuel concentration and heat losses during propagation (determined by the size and shape of the explosion vessel and by the position of the ignition source) on explosion pressures and explosion times are discussed for some of the examined systems.

  6. Water vapor isotopic composition of a stratospheric air intrusion: Measurements from the Chajnantor Plateau, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, Joseph; Samuels-Crow, Kimberly

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of water vapor isotopic composition in stratospheric air intrusions can be used to constrain the dilution of the intrusion as it mixes into the middle troposphere. The intrusion studied here occurred on 17 and 18 August 2012 with measurements obtained at an altitude of 5 km in the Chilean Andes at the Atacama Large Millimeter Array astronomical observatory on the Chajnantor Plateau. Surface ozone concentrations rose 16 ppb in 6 h and were associated with a potential vorticity intrusion on the 330 K isentropic surface. A simulated stratospheric ozone tracer reaching Chajnantor also supports the interpretation of a stratospheric intrusion. Beginning around 18:00 UTC on 17 August, the mixing ratio dropped from 3000 ppmv to 430 ppmv as the water vapor δD values dropped from -153‰ to -438‰ over 13 h while the δ18O values dropped from -20‰ to -63‰. The average mixing ratio, δD, and δ18O values during August 2012 were measured to be 1500 ppmv, -250‰, and -34‰, respectively. The minimum water vapor concentration during the intrusion was in the driest 5% of measurements made during that month, while the minimum δD and δ18O values were within the lowest 0.5% of measurements made during that month. Simple two-component models of mixing between stratospheric or upper tropospheric air with boundary layer air fail to reproduce observations, but a three-component mixing model, in which the stratospheric intrusion mixes with an upper tropospheric background air mass, as it mixes with boundary layer air on Chajnantor, matches the observations.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  8. Partial Pressures of In-Se from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3 and 61 atomic percent and 673 and 1418K has been measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gage measurements for compositions between 50 and 61 atomic percent but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Torsion-Knudsen cell measurements. The sequiselenide is found to sublime incongruently. Congruent vaporization occurs for the liquid above 1000 K between 50.08 and 56 at. percent Se. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000 and 1300K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 and -38 kJ per gram atomic weight for 50 and 56 percent Se at 1200 and 1300K.

  9. Remote catalyzation for growth of boron nitride nanotubes by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangjie; Li, Taotao; Ling, Lin; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Yancui; Lu, Huifen; Yao, Yagang

    2016-05-01

    Direct deposition of high purity and quality boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) on Si substrate were obtained using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We find Fe-Mg-O species may act as catalysts for growing BNNTs. This synthesis process conforms to vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. As-grown BNNTs also show a large optical energy band gap of 6.12 eV, approaching to hexagonal phase BN single crystals. Meanwhile, as-grown BNNTs exhibit an intense UV-emission band located at 345 nm and a weak deep band at 237 nm. Their optoelectronic properties make them have promising for future nanoscale deep-UV light emitting devices.

  10. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1982-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1984-06-01

    Under the auspices of US Department of Energy, this work supports the program to develop sorbents for the cleanup of gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion (PFBC) so that these cleaned hot gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. A laboratory-scale pressurized test unit was used to continue the alkali-vapor characterization of activated bauxite and Emathlite at a bed temperature of 850/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute in a simulated PFBC flue gas stream containing <10 ppMV NaCl vapor. Under the test conditions, preliminary results show a comparable NaCl-vapor capture capability for both activated bauxite and Emathlite. Emathlite was found to capture NaCl vapor essentially by chemical reactions with the vapor to form water-insoluble compounds, probably sodium aluminosilicates, whereas activated bauxite captures the vapor mainly by physical adsorption as sodium sulfate. The test unit was modified and tested to improve the control of NaCl vaporization in the unit required for the source of alkali vapor in the simulated flue gas. Experimental results are also presented on (1) water leachability of both metallic and nonmetallic ions present in activated bauxite when it is cyclically heat-treated in a simulated PFBC flue gas environment and then leached with distilled water, and (2) the effect of heat-treatment of Emathlite in the simulated PFBC flue gas on the changes of its physical and chemical properties.

  11. The Vapor Pressure of Environmentally Significant Organic Chemicals: A Review of Methods and Data at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Site, A.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental techniques and the prediction procedures for the determination or evaluation of the vapor pressure of environmentally relevant organic compounds are described; with 259 references examined. For each of them the characteristics of precision and accuracy are given, when available from the literature. The experimental methods are classified as {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect.{close_quotes} The first class includes all those which can measure directly the vapor pressure, while the second concerns those which need {open_quotes}known{close_quotes} vapor pressures of reference compounds for the calibration. Prediction methods are based on the application of the Clapeyron{endash}Clausius equation or on the quantitative structure-property relationships. Also correlation methods require a suitable calibration. The vapor pressures at ambient temperature for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, selected pesticides, and some reference compounds are tabulated together with the vapor pressure equations and the enthalpy values in the temperature range of measurement. A critical comparison, based on a statistical analysis of the data obtained with different methods and derived from 152 references, is also carried out. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society.}{ital Key words:} chlorinated biphenyls; chlorinated dioxins; critically reviewed data; critically reviewed methods; pesticides; polynuclear aromatics; vapor pressure. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  12. Underground storage systems for high-pressure air and gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, B. H.; Giovannetti, A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the safety and cost of underground high-pressure air and gas storage systems based on recent experience with a high-pressure air system installed at Moffett Field, California. The system described used threaded and coupled oil well casings installed vertically to a depth of 1200 ft. Maximum pressure was 3000 psi and capacity was 500,000 lb of air. A failure mode analysis is presented, and it is shown that underground storage offers advantages in avoiding catastrophic consequences from pressure vessel failure. Certain problems such as corrosion, fatigue, and electrolysis are discussed in terms of the economic life of such vessels. A cost analysis shows that where favorable drilling conditions exist, the cost of underground high-pressure storage is approximately one-quarter that of equivalent aboveground storage.

  13. Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  14. a Property of the Saturated Vapor Pressure:. Results from Equations of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Yi

    Experimentally, a maximum point in the curve of the saturated property ψ=(1-Tr)Pr versus the saturated temperature was postulated (High Temp.-High Press. 26 (1994) 427). Here, Tr is the saturated temperature reduced by the critical temperature and Pr is the saturated pressure reduced by the critical pressure. Later, this behavior was applied to assure the saturated vapor pressure critical amplitudes (Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 (2007) 141905). In this paper, we indicate that theory of equation of state (EOS) can predict this maximum point. The EOSs we study are the combinations of the hard sphere repulsions and some normally used attractions such as the Redlich-Kwong attraction. We find the EOSs with Redlich-Kwong attractive terms give out the results in the experimental range.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Graphene Using a Liquid Benzene Precursor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Lee, Jin Seok

    2015-11-01

    Graphene has attracted great attention owing to its unique structural and electrical properties. Among various synthetic approaches of the graphene, metal assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most reasonable and proper method to produce large-scale and low-defect graphene films. Until now, CVD from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth, but high growth temperature is required for such growth. A recent work by using liquid benzene precursor has shown that monolayer graphene could be obtained at 300 degrees C by low pressure, required for high vacuum equipment. Here, we report the first successful attempt of atmospheric pressure CVD graphene growth on Cu foil using liquid benzene as a precursor. We investigated the effect of hydrogen partial pressure, growth time, and precursor temperature on the domain size of as-grown graphene. Also, micro-Raman analysis confirmed that these reaction parameters influenced the number of layer and uniformity of the graphene.

  16. High-Pressure Solvent Vapor Annealing with a Benign Solvent To Rapidly Enhance the Performance of Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Buyoung; Kim, Kangmin; Eom, Yoomin; Kim, Woochul

    2015-06-24

    A high-pressure solvent vapor annealing (HPSVA) treatment is suggested as an annealing process to rapidly achieve high-performance organic photovoltaics (OPVs); this process can be compatible with roll-to-roll processing methods and uses a benign solvent: acetone. Solvent vapor annealing can produce an advantageous vertical distribution in the active layer; however, conventional solvent vapor annealing is also time-consuming. To shorten the annealing time, high-pressure solvent vapor is exposed on the active layer of OPVs. Acetone is a nonsolvent for poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), but it can dissolve small amounts of 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1,1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM). Acetone vapor molecules can penetrate into the active layer under high vapor pressure conditions to alter the morphology. HPSVA induces a PCBM-rich phase near the cathode and facilitates the transport of free charge carriers to the electrode. Although P3HT is not soluble in acetone, locally rearranged P3HT crystallites are generated. The performance of OPV films was enhanced after HPSVA; the film treated at 30 kPa for 10 s showed optimum performance. Additionally, this HPSVA method could be adapted for mass production because the temporary exposure of films to high-pressure acetone vapor in ambient conditions also improved performance.

  17. Pressure of air on coming to rest from various speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1927-01-01

    The text gives theoretical formulas from which is computed a table for the pressure of air on coming to rest from various speeds, such as those of aircraft and propeller blades. Pressure graphs are given for speeds from 1 cm. Sec. up to those of swift projectiles.

  18. Analysis of fuel vaporization, fuel/air mixing, and combustion in lean premixed/prevaporized combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, J.M.; Penko, P.F.; Cline, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    Requirements to reduce pollutant emissions from gas turbines used in aircraft propulsion and ground-based power generation have led to consideration of lean premixed/prevaporized (LPP) combustion concepts. This paper describes a series of the LPP combustor analyses performed with KIVA-II, a multi-dimensional CFD code for problems involving sprays, turbulence, and combustion. Modifications to KIVA-II`s boundary condition and chemistry treatments have been made to meet the needs of the present study. The study examines the relationships between fuel vaporization, fuel/air mixing, and combustion in a generic LPP combustor. Parameters considered include: mixer tube diameter, mixer tube length, mixer tube configuration (straight versus converging/diverging tubes), air inlet velocity, air inlet swirl angle, secondary air injection (dilution holes), fuel injection velocity, fuel injection angle, number of fuel injection ports, fuel spray cone angle, and fuel droplet size. Cases have been run with and without combustion to examine the variations in fuel/air mixing and potential for flashback due to the above parameters. The degree of fuel/air mixing is judged by comparing average, minimum, and maximum fuel/air ratios at the exit of the mixer tube, while flame stability is monitored by following the location of the flame front as the solution progresses from ignition to steady state.

  19. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. [Volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  20. Estimation of Fracture Toughness of Anisotropic Rocks by Semi-Circular Bend (SCB) Tests Under Water Vapor Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, M.; Obara, Y.; Kuruppu, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to investigate the influence of water vapor pressure in the surrounding environment on mode I fracture toughness ( K Ic) of rocks, semi-circular bend (SCB) tests under various water vapor pressures were conducted. Water vapor is one of the most effective agents which promote stress corrosion of rocks. The range of water vapor pressure used was 10-2 to 103 Pa, and two anisotropic rock types, African granodiorite and Korean granite, were used in this work. The measurement of elastic wave velocity and observation of thin sections of these rocks were performed to investigate the microstructures of the rocks. It was found that the distribution of inherent microcracks and grains have a preferred orientation. Two types of specimens in different orientations, namely Type-1 and Type-3, were prepared based on the anisotropy identified by the differences in the elastic wave velocity. K Ic of both rock types was dependent on the water vapor pressure in the surrounding environment and decreased with increasing water vapor pressure. It was found that the degree of the dependence is influenced by the orientation and density of inherent microcracks. The experimental results also showed that K Ic depended on the material anisotropy. A fracture process was discussed on the basis of the geometry of fractures within fractured specimens visualized by the X-ray computed tomography (CT) method. It was concluded that the dominant factor causing the anisotropy of K Ic is the distribution of grains rather than inherent microcracks in these rocks.

  1. Teaching Science: Air Pressure "Eggs-periments."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how teachers can introduce students to various scientific concept concerning motion, air composition, and heat by conducting an experiment: A peeled, hard-boiled egg is sucked into a bottle neck slightly smaller than the egg, after the bottle has been filled and emptied of hot water. Also discusses how students' understanding of the…

  2. Influence of air velocity on the habit of ice crystal growth from the vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Hallett, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of air velocity on the growth behavior of ice crystals growing from water vapor was investigated at temperatures between 0 and -35 C and at supersaturation levels ranging from 2 to 40 percent, using a laboratory chamber in which it was possible to make these variations. It was found that crystal growth was most sensitive to changes in the air velocity at temperatures near -4 C and -15 C where, near water saturation, the introduction of only a 5 cm/s air velocity induced skeletal transitions (columns to needles near -4 C and plates to dendrites near -15 C). The experiments provide conditions which simulate growth of ice crystals in the atmosphere, where crystal growth takes place at or somewhat below water saturation.

  3. The control of purity and stoichiometry of compound semiconductors by high vapor pressure transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.; Ito, Kazufumi; Scroggs, Jeffery S.; Tran, Hien T.

    1995-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of a three year research program on high pressure vapor transport (HPVT) of compound semiconductors. Most of our work focused onto pnictides, in particular ZnGeP2, as a model system. Access to single crystals of well controlled composition of this material is desired for advancing the understanding and control of its point defect chemistry in the contest of remote, real-time sensing of trace impurities, e.g., greenhouse gases, in the atmosphere by ZnGeP2 optical parametric oscillators (OPO's).

  4. Solubility parameter and activity coefficient of HDEHP dimer in select organic diluents by vapor pressure osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zalupski, P.

    2013-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the non-ideal behavior of the chemical components utilized in solvent extraction contributes to the success of any large-scale spent nuclear fuel treatment. To address this, our current work uses vapor pressure osmometry to characterize the non-ideal behavior of the solvent extraction agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), a common extractant in proposed separation schemes. Solubility parameters were fit to data on HDEHP at four temperatures using models based on Scatchard Hildebrand regular solution theory with Flory Huggins entropic corrections. The results are comparable but not identical to the activity coefficients from prior slope analysis in the literature. (authors)

  5. Selective growth of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, R.; Dugrand, L.

    1991-01-01

    Complete selective epitaxy of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure was achieved by using TMG, AsH3, and AsCl3 as starting gases. Selectivity was observed at growth temperatures ranging from 650 to 750 °C. The blocking of polycrystal deposition on the mask, Si3N4, or W, is attributed to the adsorption of HCl on the mask, thus preventing the nucleation of GaAs. On the openings, the growth rate may be adjusted by controlling the TMG/AsCl3 ratio. When TMG/AsCl3<1, no growth occurs, but etching is observed.

  6. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. II. Microdosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    A low-pressure cloud chamber has been adapted to operate with pure water vapor. Photographs were obtained of tracks arising from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Distributions of lineal energy, radial distances around an ion track, and interdroplet distances were measured and compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. After allowing for diffusion and the limitations of the geometry of the system, the measured and calculated distributions were found to be in good agreement.

  7. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; Leonard, D. N.; Elsentriecy, H. H.; Unocic, K. A.; Anovitz, L. M.; Cakmak, E.; Keiser, J. R.; Song, G. L.; Davis, B.

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  8. A vapor-pressure study of the systems formed by polonium with palladium and iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Abakumou, A.S.; Khokhlou, A.D.; Malysheu, M.L.; Reznikova, N.F.

    1985-11-01

    Direct thermal vacuum synthesis shows that polonium vapor does not react with iridium when they are heated together to 1000/sup 0/C. Polonium vapor begins to be absorbed appreciably by palladium at 340-350/sup 0/C. The radiotensimetric method has been used in examining the thermal stabilities of polonium-palladium comounds, which has shown that there are three intermetallides PdPo, Pd/sub 2/Po, and Pd/sub 3/Po, which dissociate to release elemental polonium. The dissociation temperature increases as the polonium content of the compound decreases and is in the range 390-700/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence of the polonium vapor pressure in the dissociation is described by the following: PdPo log P /SUB Pa/ = (7.31 + or - 0.08) -- (4520 + or -40)/T, and at 460580/sup 0/C, ..delta..H = 86.3 + or - 0.7 kJ/mol; Pd/sub 2/Po log P /SUB Pa/ = (7.42 + or - 0.01) -- (6080 + or 10)/T at 725900/sup 0/C, ..delta..H = 116 + or - 0.2 kJ/mol; Pd/sub 3/Po log P /SUB Pa/ = (9.18 + or - 0.01) -- (8620 + or 1000/sup 0/C, ..delta..H = 164 + or - 1 kJ/mol. The properties of these compounds are compared with those of the corresponding tellurides and of the polonium-nickel and poloniumplatinum systems.

  9. Vapors and Droplets Mixture Deposition of Metallic Coatings by Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Bolot, R.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.; Montavon, G.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the very low pressure plasma-spraying (VLPPS) process has been intensely developed and implemented to manufacture thin, dense and finely structured ceramic coatings for various applications, such as Y2O3 for diffusion barriers, among other examples. This paper aims at presenting developments carried out on metallic coatings. Aluminum was chosen as a demonstrative material due to its "moderate" vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 38.23 KJ cm-3) compared to the one of copper (i.e., 55.33 KJ cm-3), cobalt (i.e., 75.03 KJ cm-3), or even tantalum (i.e., 87.18 KJ cm-3). The objective of this work is primarily to better understand the behavior of a solid precursor injected into the plasma jet leading to the formation of vapors and to better control the factors affecting the coating structure. Nearly dense aluminum coatings were successfully deposited by VLPPS at 100 Pa with an intermediate power plasma torch (i.e., Sulzer Metco F4 type gun with maximum power of 45 kW). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to study and analyze the vapor behavior into the plasma jet. Simplified CFD modeling allowed better understanding of some of the thermo-physical mechanisms. The effect of powder-size distribution, substrate temperature and spray distance were studied. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. Moreover, Vickers microhardness measurements were implemented.

  10. Generation of high pressure homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Naoki; Takashi, Ami; Yoshioka, Yoshio; Hanaoka, Ryoichi

    2013-02-01

    We succeeded in generating an atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge (APTD) in air by using a simple DBD device that consists of alumina barriers and plane electrodes. So far, we applied the APTD to an ozonizer and found that the ozone generation efficiency was higher by the APTD mode than by the conventional DBD mode in larger specific input energy region. It is well known that an operation under an optimized high gas pressure is advantageous for efficient ozone generation from air. In this paper, we investigated whether the Townsend discharge (TD) in dry air in high pressure up to 0.17 MPa can be generated or not. From the observation results of current waveforms and discharge photographs, we found that (1) the discharge currents flow continuously and have only one peak in every half cycle in all gas pressure and (2) filamentary discharges are not recognized between barriers in all gas pressure. These features completely agree with the features of the APTD we reported. Therefore, we concluded that our TD can be generated even in dry air in the pressure range of 0.1 and 0.17 MPa. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  11. The stability of Au-chloride complexes in water vapor at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, S. M.; Migdisov, A. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2001-12-01

    The solubility of gold in liquid-undersaturated HCl-bearing water vapor was investigated experimentally at temperatures of 300 to 360°C and pressures up to 144 bars. Results of these experiments show that the solubility of gold in the vapor phase is significant and increases with increasing fHCl and fH 2O . This behavior of gold is attributed to formation of hydrated gold-chloride gas species, interpreted to have a gold-chlorine ratio of 1:1 and a hydration number varying from 5 at 300°C to 3 at 360°C. These complexes are proposed to have formed through the following reaction: Ausolid+ m· HClgas+ n· H2Ogas= AuClm·( H2O) ngas+ m/2· H2gas which was determined to have log K values of -17.28 ± 0.36 at 300°C, -18.73 ± 0.66 at 340°C, and -18.74 ± 0.43 at 360°C. Gold solubility in the vapor was retrograde, i.e., it decreased with increasing temperature, possibly as a result of the inferred decrease in hydration number. Calculations based on our data indicate that at 300°C and fO 2-pH conditions, encountered in high sulfidation epithermal systems, the vapor phase can transport up to 6.6 ppb gold, which would be sufficient to form an economic deposit (e.g., Nansatsu, Japan; 36 tonnes) in ˜ 30,000 yr.

  12. Analysis of Fuel Vaporization, Fuel-Air Mixing, and Combustion in Integrated Mixer-Flame Holders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Cline, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Requirements to limit pollutant emissions from the gas turbine engines for the future High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) have led to consideration of various low-emission combustor concepts. One such concept is the Integrated Mixer-Flame Holder (IMFH). This report describes a series of IMFH analyses performed with KIVA-II, a multi-dimensional CFD code for problems involving sprays, turbulence, and combustion. To meet the needs of this study, KIVA-II's boundary condition and chemistry treatments are modified. The study itself examines the relationships between fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, and combustion. Parameters being considered include: mixer tube diameter, mixer tube length, mixer tube geometry (converging-diverging versus straight walls), air inlet velocity, air inlet swirl angle, secondary air injection (dilution holes), fuel injection velocity, fuel injection angle, number of fuel injection ports, fuel spray cone angle, and fuel droplet size. Cases are run with and without combustion to examine the variations in fuel-air mixing and potential for flashback due to the above parameters. The degree of fuel-air mixing is judged by comparing average, minimum, and maximum fuel/air ratios at the exit of the mixer tube, while flame stability is monitored by following the location of the flame front as the solution progresses from ignition to steady state. Results indicate that fuel-air mixing can be enhanced by a variety of means, the best being a combination of air inlet swirl and a converging-diverging mixer tube geometry. With the IMFH configuration utilized in the present study, flashback becomes more common as the mixer tube diameter is increased and is instigated by disturbances associated with the dilution hole flow.

  13. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  14. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and...

  18. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and...

  19. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  20. Biofiltration for removal of PCE and TCE vapors from contaminated air

    SciTech Connect

    Devinny, J.S.; Webster, T.S.; Torres, E.

    1995-12-31

    Bench scale biofilters (vapor phase bioreactors) treating a mixture of gases have removed perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene from the air. In a biofilter using carbon as the support medium, an initial period of adsorptive removal was followed by biological removal of 61% of the PCE and 48% of the TCE. In a compost biofilter, removals after the initial period were 40% for PCE and 49% for TCE. The reactors were dominantly aerobic. Because aerobic degradation of PCE has not been observed, it is believed that degradation occurred by reductive dechlorination in anaerobic zones within the particles of the support medium. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Vapor pressures, thermodynamic stability, and fluorescence properties of three 2,6-alkyl naphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Filipa L O M; Oliveira, Juliana A S A; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Monte, Manuel J S

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the experimental determination of relevant thermodynamic properties and the characterization of luminescence properties of the following polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): 2,6-diethylnaphthalene, 2,6-diisopropylnaphthalene and 2,6-di-tert-butylnaphthalene. The standard (p(o) = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of combustion, ΔcHm(o), of the three compounds were determined using static bomb combustion calorimetry. The vapor pressures of the crystalline phase of 2,6-diisopropylnaphthalene and 2,6-di-tert-butylnaphthalene were measured at different temperatures using the Knudsen effusion method and the vapor pressures of both liquid and crystalline phases of 2,6-diethylnaphthalene were measured by means of a static method. The temperatures and the molar enthalpies of fusion of the three compounds were determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The gas-phase molar heat capacities and absolute entropies of the three 2,6-dialkylnaphthalenes studied were determined computationally. The thermodynamic stability of the compounds in both the crystalline and gaseous phases was evaluated by the determination of the Gibbs energies of formation and compared with the ones reported in the literature for 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene. From fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, the optical properties of the compounds studied and of naphthalene were evaluated in solution and in the solid state.

  2. Fungicide volatilization measurements: inverse modeling, role of vapor pressure, and state of foliar residue.

    PubMed

    Bedos, Carole; Rousseau-Djabri, Marie-France; Loubet, Benjamin; Durand, Brigitte; Flura, Dominique; Briand, Olivier; Barriuso, Enrique

    2010-04-01

    Few data sets of pesticide volatilization from plants at the field scale are available. In this work, we report measurements of fenpropidin and chlorothalonil volatilization on a wheat field using the aerodynamic gradient (AG) method and an inverse dispersion modeling approach (using the FIDES model). Other data necessary to run volatilization models are also reported: measured application dose, crop interception, plant foliage residue, upwind concentrations, and meteorological conditions. The comparison of the AG and inverse modeling methods proved the latter to be reliable and hence suitable for estimating volatilization rates with minimized costs. Different diurnal/nocturnal volatilization patterns were observed: fenpropidin volatilization peaked on the application day and then decreased dramatically, while chlorothalonil volatilization remained fairly stable over a week-long period. Cumulated emissions after 31 h reached 3.5 g ha(-1) and 5 g ha(-1), respectively (0.8% and 0.6% of the theoretical application dose). A larger difference in volatilization rates was expected given differences in vapor pressure, and for fenpropidin, volatilization should have continued given that 80% of the initial amount remained on plant foliage for 6 days. We thus ask if vapor pressure alone can accurately estimate volatilization just after application and then question the state of foliar residue. We identified adsorption, formulation, and extraction techniques as relevant explanations.

  3. Density, vapor pressure, solubility, and viscosity for water + lithium bromide + lithium nitrate + 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.; Kim, J.S.; Lee, H.; Yu, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    Four physical properties (solubility, vapor pressure, density, and viscosity) of water + lithium bromide + lithium nitrate + 1,3-propanediol (LiBr/LiNO{sub 3} mole ratio = 4, (LiBr + LiNO{sub 3})/HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH mass ratio = 3.5) were measured. The system, a possible working fluid for an absorption heat pump, mainly consists of absorbent (LiBr + LiNO{sub 3} + HO(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}OH) and refrigerant (H{sub 2}O). Solubilities were measured by the visual polythermal method in the temperature range (285.55 to 346.65) K and in the absorbent concentration range (68.0 to 75.0) mass %. Vapor pressures were measured by the boiling point method in the temperature range (325.35 to 395.15) K and in the absorbent concentration range (46.0 to 69.6) mass %. Densities and viscosities were measured by a set of hydrometers and viscometers, respectively, in the temperature range (283.15 to 343.15) K and in the absorbent concentration range (24.3 to 70.3) mass %. The measured values were correlated.

  4. A gravimetric approach to providing SI traceability for concentration measurement results of mercury vapor at ambient air levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ent, Hugo; van Andel, Inge; Heemskerk, Maurice; van Otterloo, Peter; Bavius, Wijnand; Baldan, Annarita; Horvat, Milena; Brown, Richard J. C.; Quétel, Christophe R.

    2014-11-01

    Current measurement and calibration capabilities for mercury vapor in air are maintained at levels of 0.2-40 μg Hg m-3. In this work, a mercury vapor generator has been developed to establish metrological traceability to the international system of units (SI) for mercury vapor measurement results ≤15 ng Hg m-3, i.e. closer to realistic ambient air concentrations (1-2 ng Hg m-3) [1]. Innovations developed included a modified type of diffusion cell, a new measurement method to weigh the loss in (mercury) mass of these diffusion cells during use (ca. 6-8 μg mass difference between successive weighings), and a new housing for the diffusion cells to maximize flow characteristics and to minimize temperature variations and adsorption effects. The newly developed mercury vapor generator system was tested by using diffusion cells generating 0.8 and 16 ng Hg min-1. The results also show that the filter system, to produce mercury free air, is working properly. Furthermore, and most importantly, the system is producing a flow with a stable mercury vapor content. Some additional improvements are still required to allow the developed mercury vapor generator to produce SI traceable mercury vapor concentrations, based upon gravimetry, at much lower concentration levels and reduced measurement uncertainties than have been achieved previously. The challenges to be met are especially related to developing more robust diffusion cells and better mass measurement conditions. The developed mercury vapor generator will contribute to more reliable measurement results of mercury vapor at ambient and background air levels, and also to better safety standards and cost reductions in industrial processes, such as the liquefied natural gas field, where aluminum main cryogenic heat exchangers are used which are particularly prone to corrosion caused by mercury.

  5. Alkali-metal-vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed-combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1981-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1983-03-01

    This work supports the program to develop sorbents for the cleanup of gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion (PFBC) so that the cleaned hot gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. A simulated PFBC flue gas containing NaCl vapor was used to characterize activated bauxite and diatomaceous earth at a bed temperature of 905/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute. The NaCl vapor was found to be captured by activated bauxite essentially as sodium sulfate, with a small fraction captured as sodium chloride. In contrast, diatomaceous earth captured NaCl vapor by a combined result of (1) a chemical reaction that converts the vapor into condensed sodium sulfate and (2) chemical reactions that transform the captured sodium into water-insoluble silicate compounds. In NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency studies, a 12.7-cm-long activated bauxite bed was tested for 12 h in a gas stream containing 4 to 8 ppmV NaCl-vapor concentration, and >99.8% NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency was achieved. This efficiency compared with 99.1 and 95.3% obtained by a diatomaceous earth bed of the same length tested for 8 h in gas streams containing 28 and 2 ppmV NaCl-vapor concentration, respectively. The addition of HCl to the simulated flue gas had an insignificant effect on the NaCl-vapor sorption behavior and efficiency of activated bauxite. Experimental results are also presented on (1) the water leachability of the sodium captured on activated bauxite, (2) the partial conversion to sodium sulfate of the NaCl sample used as the vapor source for the sorption tests, and (3) the changes in the chemical and physical properties of both sorbents as a result of exposure to the simulated flue gas.

  6. The Vapor Pressure of Environmentally Significant Organic Chemicals: A Review of Methods and Data at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Site, Alessandro

    1997-01-01

    The experimental techniques and the prediction procedures for the determination or evaluation of the vapor pressure of environmentally relevant organic compounds are described; with 259 references examined. For each of them the characteristics of precision and accuracy are given, when available from the literature. The experimental methods are classified as "direct" and "indirect." The first class includes all those which can measure directly the vapor pressure, while the second concerns those which need "known" vapor pressures of reference compounds for the calibration. Prediction methods are based on the application of the Clapeyron-Clausius equation or on the quantitative structure-property relationships. Also correlation methods require a suitable calibration. The vapor pressures at ambient temperature for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, selected pesticides, and some reference compounds are tabulated together with the vapor pressure equations and the enthalpy values in the temperature range of measurement. A critical comparison, based on a statistical analysis of the data obtained with different methods and derived from 152 references, is also carried out.

  7. A unified equation for calculating methane vapor pressures in the CH4-H2O system with measured Raman shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Song, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A unified equation has been derived by using all available data for calculating methane vapor pressures with measured Raman shifts of C-H symmetric stretching band (??1) in the vapor phase of sample fluids near room temperature. This equation eliminates discrepancies among the existing data sets and can be applied at any Raman laboratory. Raman shifts of C-H symmetric stretching band of methane in the vapor phase of CH4-H2O mixtures prepared in a high-pressure optical cell were also measured at temperatures between room temperature and 200 ??C, and pressures up to 37 MPa. The results show that the CH4 ??1 band position shifts to higher wavenumber as temperature increases. We also demonstrated that this Raman band shift is a simple function of methane vapor density, and, therefore, when combined with equation of state of methane, methane vapor pressures in the sample fluids at elevated temperatures can be calculated from measured Raman peak positions. This method can be applied to determine the pressure of CH4-bearing systems, such as methane-rich fluid inclusions from sedimentary basins or experimental fluids in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell or other types of optical cell. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaporation rates and vapor pressures of individual aerosol species formed in the atmospheric oxidation of alpha- and beta-pinene.

    PubMed

    Bilde, M; Pandis, S N

    2001-08-15

    The semivolatile oxidation products (trans-norpinic acid, pinic acid, cis-pinonic acid, etc.) of the biogenic monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, etc.) contribute to the atmospheric burden of particulate matter. Using the tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) technique evaporation rates of glutaric acid, trans-norpinic acid, and pinic acid particles were measured in a laminar flow reactor. The vapor pressure of glutaric acid was found to be log(p0 glutaric/Pa) = - 3,510 K/T + 8.647 over the temperature range 290-300 K in good agreement with the values previously reported by Tao and McMurry (1989). The measured vapor pressure of trans-norpinic acid over the temperature range 290-312 K is log(p0 norpinic/Pa) = - 2,196.9 K/T + 3.522, and the vapor pressure of pinic acid is log(p0 pinic/ Pa) = - 5,691.7 K/T + 14.73 over the temperature range 290-323 K. The uncertainty on the reported vapor pressures is estimated to be approximately +/- 50%. The vapor pressure of cis-pinonic acid is estimated to be of the order of 7 x 10(-5) Pa at 296 K.

  9. Temperature and pressure influence on explosion pressures of closed vessel propane-air deflagrations.

    PubMed

    Razus, Domnina; Brinzea, Venera; Mitu, Maria; Oancea, Dumitru

    2010-02-15

    An experimental study on pressure evolution during closed vessel explosions of propane-air mixtures was performed, for systems with various initial concentrations and pressures ([C(3)H(8)]=2.50-6.20 vol.%, p(0)=0.3-1.2 bar). The explosion pressures and explosion times were measured in a spherical vessel (Phi=10 cm), at various initial temperatures (T(0)=298-423 K) and in a cylindrical vessel (Phi=10 cm; h=15 cm), at ambient initial temperature. The experimental values of explosion pressures are examined against literature values and compared to adiabatic explosion pressures, computed by assuming chemical equilibrium within the flame front. The influence of initial pressure, initial temperature and fuel concentration on explosion pressures and explosion times are discussed. At constant temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio, the explosion pressures are linear functions of total initial pressure, as reported for other fuel-air mixtures. At constant initial pressure and composition, both the measured and calculated (adiabatic) explosion pressures are linear functions of reciprocal value of initial temperature. Such correlations are extremely useful for predicting the explosion pressures of flammable mixtures at elevated temperatures and/or pressures, when direct measurements are not available.

  10. A vapor generator for transonic flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Hess, Robert W.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A vapor generator was developed for use in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). Propylene glycol was used as the vapor material. The vapor generator system was evaluated in a laboratory setting and then used in the TDT as part of a laser light sheet flow visualization system. The vapor generator provided satisfactory seeding of the air flow with visible condensate particles, smoke, for tests ranging from low subsonic through transonic speeds for tunnel total pressures from atmospheric pressure down to less than 0.1 atmospheric pressure.

  11. US residential building air exchange rates: new perspectives to improve decision making at vapor intrusion sites.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Shirazi, Elham; Colliver, Donald G; Pennell, Kelly G

    2017-02-22

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is well-known to be difficult to characterize because indoor air (IA) concentrations exhibit considerable temporal and spatial variability in homes throughout impacted communities. To overcome this and other limitations, most VI science has focused on subsurface processes; however there is a need to understand the role of aboveground processes, especially building operation, in the context of VI exposure risks. This tutorial review focuses on building air exchange rates (AERs) and provides a review of literature related building AERs to inform decision making at VI sites. Commonly referenced AER values used by VI regulators and practitioners do not account for the variability in AER values that have been published in indoor air quality studies. The information presented herein highlights that seasonal differences, short-term weather conditions, home age and air conditioning status, which are well known to influence AERs, are also likely to influence IA concentrations at VI sites. Results of a 3D VI model in combination with relevant AER values reveal that IA concentrations can vary more than one order of magnitude due to air conditioning status and one order of magnitude due to house age. Collectively, the data presented strongly support the need to consider AERs when making decisions at VI sites.

  12. Concomitant adsorption and desorption of organic vapor in dry and humid air streams using microwave and direct electrothermal swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Emamipour, Hamidreza; Rood, Mark J; Hay, K James; Kim, Byung J; Thurston, Deborah

    2008-12-15

    Industrial gas streams can contain highly variable organic vapor concentrations that need to be processed before they are emitted to the atmosphere. Fluctuations in organic vapor concentrations make it more difficult to operate a biofilter when compared to a constant vapor concentration. Hence, there is a need to stabilize the concentration of rapidly fluctuating gas streams for optimum operation of biofilters. This paper describes new concomitant adsorption desorption (CAD) systems used with variable organic vapor concentration gas streams to provide the same gas stream, but at a user-selected constant vapor concentration that can then be more readily processed by a secondary air pollution control device such as a biofilter. The systems adsorb organic vapor from gas streams and simultaneously heat the adsorbent using microwave or direct electrothermal energy to desorb the organic vapor at a user-selected set-point concentration. Both systems depicted a high degree of concentration stabilization with a mean relative deviation between set-point and stabilized concentration of 0.3-0.4%. The direct electrothermal CAD system was also evaluated to treat a humid gas stream (relative humidity = 85%) that contained a variable organic vapor concentration. The high humidity did not interfere with CAD operation as water vapor did not adsorb but penetrated through the adsorbent These results are important because they demonstrate the ability of CAD to effectively dampen concentration fluctuation in gas streams.

  13. Fuel Cells Utilizing Oxygen From Air at Low Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan; Boyer, Chris; Greenwald, Charles

    2006-01-01

    A fuel cell stack has been developed to supply power for a high-altitude aircraft with a minimum of air handling. The fuel cell is capable of utilizing oxygen from ambient air at low pressure with no need for compression. For such an application, it is advantageous to take oxygen from the air (in contradistinction to carrying a supply of oxygen onboard), but it is a challenging problem to design a fuel-cell stack of reasonable weight that can generate sufficient power while operating at reduced pressures. The present fuel-cell design is a response to this challenge. The design features a novel bipolar plate structure in combination with a gas-diffusion structure based on a conductive metal core and a carbon gas-diffusion matrix. This combination makes it possible for the flow fields in the stack to have a large open fraction (ratio between open volume and total volume) to permit large volumes of air to flow through with exceptionally low backpressure. Operations at reduced pressure require a corresponding increase in the volume of air that must be handled to deliver the same number of moles of oxygen to the anodes. Moreover, the increase in the open fraction, relative to that of a comparable prior fuel-cell design, reduces the mass of the stack. The fuel cell has been demonstrated to operate at a power density as high as 105 W/cm2 at an air pressure as low as 2 psia (absolute pressure 14 kPa), which is the atmospheric pressure at an altitude of about 50,000 ft ( 15.2 km). The improvements in the design of this fuel cell could be incorporated into designs of other fuel cells to make them lighter in weight and effective at altitudes higher than those of prior designs. Potential commercial applications for these improvements include most applications now under consideration for fuel cells.

  14. Inverse association between air pressure and rheumatoid arthritis synovitis.

    PubMed

    Terao, Chikashi; Hashimoto, Motomu; Furu, Moritoshi; Nakabo, Shuichiro; Ohmura, Koichiro; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Ito, Hiromu; Fujii, Takao; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a bone destructive autoimmune disease. Many patients with RA recognize fluctuations of their joint synovitis according to changes of air pressure, but the correlations between them have never been addressed in large-scale association studies. To address this point we recruited large-scale assessments of RA activity in a Japanese population, and performed an association analysis. Here, a total of 23,064 assessments of RA activity from 2,131 patients were obtained from the KURAMA (Kyoto University Rheumatoid Arthritis Management Alliance) database. Detailed correlations between air pressure and joint swelling or tenderness were analyzed separately for each of the 326 patients with more than 20 assessments to regulate intra-patient correlations. Association studies were also performed for seven consecutive days to identify the strongest correlations. Standardized multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate independent influences from other meteorological factors. As a result, components of composite measures for RA disease activity revealed suggestive negative associations with air pressure. The 326 patients displayed significant negative mean correlations between air pressure and swellings or the sum of swellings and tenderness (p = 0.00068 and 0.00011, respectively). Among the seven consecutive days, the most significant mean negative correlations were observed for air pressure three days before evaluations of RA synovitis (p = 1.7 × 10(-7), 0.00027, and 8.3 × 10(-8), for swellings, tenderness and the sum of them, respectively). Standardized multiple linear regression analysis revealed these associations were independent from humidity and temperature. Our findings suggest that air pressure is inversely associated with synovitis in patients with RA.

  15. Inverse Association between Air Pressure and Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Furu, Moritoshi; Nakabo, Shuichiro; Ohmura, Koichiro; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Ito, Hiromu; Fujii, Takao; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a bone destructive autoimmune disease. Many patients with RA recognize fluctuations of their joint synovitis according to changes of air pressure, but the correlations between them have never been addressed in large-scale association studies. To address this point we recruited large-scale assessments of RA activity in a Japanese population, and performed an association analysis. Here, a total of 23,064 assessments of RA activity from 2,131 patients were obtained from the KURAMA (Kyoto University Rheumatoid Arthritis Management Alliance) database. Detailed correlations between air pressure and joint swelling or tenderness were analyzed separately for each of the 326 patients with more than 20 assessments to regulate intra-patient correlations. Association studies were also performed for seven consecutive days to identify the strongest correlations. Standardized multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate independent influences from other meteorological factors. As a result, components of composite measures for RA disease activity revealed suggestive negative associations with air pressure. The 326 patients displayed significant negative mean correlations between air pressure and swellings or the sum of swellings and tenderness (p = 0.00068 and 0.00011, respectively). Among the seven consecutive days, the most significant mean negative correlations were observed for air pressure three days before evaluations of RA synovitis (p = 1.7×10−7, 0.00027, and 8.3×10−8, for swellings, tenderness and the sum of them, respectively). Standardized multiple linear regression analysis revealed these associations were independent from humidity and temperature. Our findings suggest that air pressure is inversely associated with synovitis in patients with RA. PMID:24454853

  16. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Akyildiz, Halil I.; Mousa, Moataz Bellah M.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2015-01-28

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-O{sub x} product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  17. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; ...

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage ofmore » 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.« less

  18. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage of 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.

  19. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Vapor Pressure Thermometry System Near LN2 Subcooler

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwazaki, Andrew; /Fermilab

    1996-07-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is in the process of upgrading its detectors. Among these upgrades is the need for more transfer lines containing both liquid nitrogen and helium gas. These two fluids are used to provide the necessary operating cryogenic temperatures for the various detectors, such as the Visible Light Photon Counter (VLPC) and the solenoid inside the detector's calorimeter. With additional piping, it is important to monitor the temperatures to assure that the detectors can operate correctly. This can be done two ways. The first method is to use a Resistance Temperature Device, called a RTD, which is made using either a carbon resistor or a platinum resistor and measures the temperature based on resistance. The second method is to use a vapor-pressure thermometry system. This design will focus on the second method. A nitrogen Vapor Pressure Thermometer (VPT) system is designed to determine the temperature of the liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) supply line, after exiting the LN{sub 2} subcooler, inside the D-Zero Assembly Hall. The operating temperature range is designed from 77 to 300 Kelvin with an initial charge pressure of 100 psia. A cylindrical bulb with a 0.1875-inch diameter and 0.625-inch length allows for minimum cold and warm 1/4-inch O.D. SS 304L tubing lengths, 12-inch and 18-inch respectively, and maintains a liquid level of 50% inside the bulb during cold operation. The amount of nitrogen needed to fill the cylindrical bulb approximately half full is 0.149 grams. In order to conform to the conventional cold volume and warm volume VPT systems, we need to enlarge the existing 1/2-inch x 2-inch SCH. 10 LN{sub 2} supply line over a one foot section to 1-inch x 3-inch SCH. 10 piping.

  20. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  1. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures.

  2. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  3. Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

  4. Guard Flow-enhanced Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Molecular Materials in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shaurjo

    Rapid advances in the research and development of organic electronics have re-sulted in many exciting discoveries and applications, including OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs. Devices based on small molecular organic materials often call for sharp interfaces and highly pure materials for improved device performance. Solvent-free deposition and additive patterning of the active layers without the use of vacuum is preferred, calling for specialized processing approaches. Guard flow-enhanced organic vapor jet printing (GF-OVJP), enables addi-tive, rapid, mask-free, solvent-free printing of molecular organic semiconductors in ambient atmosphere by evaporating organic source material into an inert carrier gas jet and collimating and impinging it onto a substrate where the organic molecules condense. A surrounding annular "guard flow" hydrodynamically focuses the primary jet carrying the hot organic vapor and shields it from contact with the ambient oxygen and moisture, enabling device-quality deposits. Deposition in air entails non-trivial effects at the boundary between ambient surroundings and the gas jet carrying the semiconductor vapor that influence the morphology and properties of the resulting electronic devices. This thesis demonstrates the deposition of active layers of OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs by GF-OVJP in air. Process-structure-property relationships are elucidated, using a combination of film deposition and structural characterization (e.g. AFM, XRD, SEM, spectroscopies), device fabrication and testing, as well as compressible fluid flow, heat and mass transport modeling, thus laying the groundwork for rigorous, quantitative design of film deposition apparatus and small molecular organic semiconductor processing.

  5. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ER-200830) Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using...Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques W912HQ-08-C...volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at sites with potential human health risks. These risks were attributable to subsurface vapor intrusion to indoor air by

  6. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  7. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  8. Microwave-swing adsorption to capture and recover vapors from air streams with activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Rood, Mark; Botich, Leon

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption with regeneration is a desirable means to control the emissions of organic vapors such as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air streams as it allows for capture, recovery, and reuse of those VOCs/HAPS. Integration of activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorbent with microwave regeneration provides promise as a new adsorption/ regeneration technology. This research investigates the feasibility of using microwaves to regenerate ACFC as part of a process for capture and recovery of organic vapors from gas streams. A bench-scale fixed-bed microwave-swing adsorption (MSA) system was built and tested for adsorption of water vapor, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) from an airstream and then recovery of those vapors with microwave regeneration. The electromagnetic heating behavior of dry and vapor-saturated ACFC was also characterized. The MSA system successfully adsorbed organic vapors from the airstreams, allowed for rapid regeneration of the ACFC cartridge, and recovered the water and organic vapors as liquids.

  9. Vegetation stress from increased vapor pressure deficit implicated in recent decline in U.S. evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Guido, D.; Rigden, Angela

    2016-04-01

    We detect and attribute long-term changes in evapotranspiration (ET) over the contiguous United States from 1961 to 2013 using an approach we refer to as the ETRHEQ method (Evapotranspiration from Relative Humidity at Equilibrium). The ETRHEQ method primarily uses meteorological data collected at common weather stations. Daily ET is inferred by choosing the surface conductance to water vapor transport that minimizes the vertical variance of the calculated relative humidity profile averaged over the day. The key advantage of the ETRHEQ method is that it does not require knowledge of the surface state (soil moisture, stomatal conductance, leaf are index, etc.) or site-specific calibration. We estimate daily ET at 229 weather stations for 53 years. Across the U.S., we find a decrease in summertime (JJAS) ET of 0.21 cm/yr/yr from 1961-2013 with recent (1998-2013) declines in summertime ET of 1.08 cm/yr/yr. We decompose the ET trends into the dominant environmental drivers. Our results suggest that the recent decline in ET is due to increased vegetation stress induced by increases in vapor pressure deficit. We will present out results in context of other commonly used, regional ET data products.

  10. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV).

  11. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen; Chen, Mingming; Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei; Chen, Anqi; Zhu, Hai; Tang, Zikang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future.

  12. Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit reflect tissue-specific differences in hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Ocheltree, T W; Nippert, J B; Prasad, P V V

    2014-01-01

    The vapor pressure deficit (D) of the atmosphere can negatively affect plant growth as plants reduce stomatal conductance to water vapor (g(wv)) in response to increasing D, limiting the ability of plants to assimilate carbon. The sensitivity of g(wv) to changes in D varies among species and has been correlated with the hydraulic conductance of leaves (K(leaf) ), but the hydraulic conductance of other tissues has also been implicated in plant responses to changing D. Among the 19 grass species, we found that K(leaf) was correlated with the hydraulic conductance of large longitudinal veins (K(lv), r(2) = 0.81), but was not related to K(root) (r(2) = 0.01). Stomatal sensitivity to D was correlated with K(leaf) relative to total leaf area (r(2) = 0.50), and did not differ between C3 and C4 species. Transpiration (E) increased in response to D, but 8 of the 19 plants showed a decline in E at high D, indicative of an 'apparent feedforward' response. For these individuals, E began to decline at lower values of D in plants with low K(root) (r(2) = 0.72). These results show the significance of both leaf and root hydraulic conductance as drivers of plant responses to evaporative demand.

  13. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. I. Macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    Techniques have been developed to operate a low-pressure cloud chamber with pure water vapor. Photographs have been obtained of the tracks arising in this medium from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Track lengths of the electrons were similar to those found previously in tissue-equivalent gas. W values of 35.6 +/- 0.4 and 32.6 +/- 0.6 eV per ion pair for carbon and aluminum X rays also compare closely with those in tissue-equivalent gas, but are somewhat higher than the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. Differential w values were obtained: for alpha particles of energy 5.3 MeV the value was 33.0 +/- 3.0 eV per ion pair; for protons of energy 390, 230, and 85 keV the values were 30.6 +/- 1.9, 31.9 +/- 2.0, and 33.6 +/- 3.4 eV per ion pair. The energy losses of protons in water vapor were measured in a second (dummy) chamber used for energy calibration. Results support Janni's values of stopping power for protons in the energy range 40-480 keV.

  14. Linking Turgor with ABA Biosynthesis: Implications for Stomatal Responses to Vapor Pressure Deficit across Land Plants.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) constitute the predominant form of daytime gas-exchange regulation in plants. Stomatal closure in response to increased VPD is driven by the rapid up-regulation of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and ABA levels in angiosperms; however, very little is known about the physiological trigger for this increase in ABA biosynthesis at increased VPD Using a novel method of modifying leaf cell turgor by the application of external pressures, we test whether changes in turgor pressure can trigger increases in foliar ABA levels over 20 min, a period of time most relevant to the stomatal response to VPD We found in angiosperm species that the biosynthesis of ABA was triggered by reductions in leaf turgor, and in two species tested, that a higher sensitivity of ABA synthesis to leaf turgor corresponded with a higher stomatal sensitivity to VPD In contrast, representative species from nonflowering plant lineages did not show a rapid turgor-triggered increase in foliar ABA levels, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating passive stomatal responses to changes in VPD in these lineages. Our method provides a new tool for characterizing the response of stomata to water availability.

  15. 3D simulation of tungsten low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, E.; Lorenz, J.

    1995-10-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3D) simulation of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in arbitrary geometries using a segment-based topography discretization with triangles combined with the calculation of particle fluxes to the wafer surface. The simulation program is applied to tungsten LPCVD using the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6) by silane (SiH 4). We found that an approach in which the redistribution of the SiH 4 molecules is simulated and a constant reaction probability after collision of a SiH 4 molecule with the surface is assumed allows the simulation of this process with a reaction probability which is consistent with thermodynamic calculations. A comparison between a simulated 3D profile and experimental data from tungsten LPCVD in a contact hole shows very good agreement between experiment and simulation.

  16. Effect of Vapor Pressure Scheme on Multiday Evolution of SOA in an Explicit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tyndall, G. S.; Valorso, R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent modeling of the evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) has led to the critically important prediction that SOA mass continues to increase for several days after emission of primary pollutants. This growth of organic aerosol in dispersing plumes originating from urban point sources has direct implications for regional aerosol radiative forcing. We investigate the robustness of predicted SOA mass growth downwind of Mexico City in the model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), by assessing its sensitivity to the choice of vapor pressure prediction scheme. We also explore the implications for multi-day SOA mass growth of glassification / solidification of SOA constituents during aging. Finally we use output from the MOZART-4 chemical transport model to evaluate our results in the regional and global context.

  17. Generalization of vapor pressure lowering effects in an existing geothermal simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1993-06-01

    Thermodynamic properties of pore water are shown to be different from those of bulk water because of interfacial forces between the aqueous and solid phases. This {open_quotes}vapor-pressure lowering{close_quotes} (VPL) effect is described through Kelvin`s equation, which relates VPL to properties of the liquid phase. An algorithm that accounts for VPL had previously been implented in the geothermal simulator TETRAD. This algorithm applies to a narrow range of reservoir properties, and in some cases leads in inconsistencies. This report presents a generalization of the VPL algorithm which removes many of its limitations. The governing equations for the generalization are presented, assumptions and limitations of the method are discussed, and the modifications are validated.

  18. Si delta-doped field-effect transistors by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, N.; Carter, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Hendriks, H.; Zheng, X. L.; Kim, M. H.

    1991-07-01

    Si delta-doped GaAs field-effect transistors (FETs) are demonstrated by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and characterized by Hall-effect, capacitance-voltage (C-V), and Shubnikov de-Haas measurements. The Si delta doping was accomplished by interrupting the growth and flowing silane with controlled timing under an arsenic overpressure. Devices with 0.5 μm gate length (Ns=2.2×1012 cm-2) were fabricated with a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 140 mS/mm and a current gain cutoff frequency of 17 GHz. The transconductance as a function of gate voltage showed a plateau region through a range of 1.5 V further supporting spatial confinement of the electrons.

  19. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  20. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  1. Identification of reaction products in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gaczi, P.J.; Reynolds, G.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The gaseous species produced by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum silicide in a cold wall reactor were identified by mass spectroscopy. Lowering the ionizing electron energy made possible the unambiguous assignment of the mass spectra to individual species and also permitted useful quantitative estimates to be made. Thermodynamic calculations using the computer program SOLGASMIX were carried out on the M-Si-H-F (M = Mo, W) quaternary system. Both experiment and calculation indicate that the fluorosilanes were the major gaseous reaction by-products, with SiHF{sub 3} being the most abundant for the experimental conditions investigated here. The changes in the process with substrate temperature were also investigated and are discussed with reference to both thermodynamic and kinetic effects.

  2. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.; Hemawan, Kadek W.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been successfully synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ and Hα were observed in emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealmore » that, depending on the on growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.« less

  3. Fabrication of Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells by Controlled Low-Pressure Vapor Annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbo; Cooper, Jason K; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Giannini, Cinzia; Liu, Yi; Toma, Francesca M; Sharp, Ian D

    2015-02-05

    A new method for achieving high efficiency planar CH3NH3I3-xClx perovskite photovoltaics, based on a low pressure, reduced temperature vapor annealing is demonstrated. Heterojunction devices based on this hybrid halide perovskite exhibit a top PCE of 16.8%, reduced J-V hysteresis, and highly repeatable performance without need for a mesoporous or nanocrystalline metal oxide layer. Our findings demonstrate that large hysteresis is not an inherent feature of planar heterojunctions, and that efficient charge extraction can be achieved with uniform halide perovskite materials with desired composition. X-ray diffraction, valence band spectroscopy, and transient absorption measurements of these thin films reveal that structural modifications induced by chlorine clearly dominate over chemical and electronic doping effects, without affecting the Fermi level or photocarrier lifetime in the material.

  4. The Vapor Pressure of Palladium at Temperatures up to 1973K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, K. G.; Feguson, F. T.; Nuth, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding high-temperature processes is imperative for modeling the formation of the solar system. It is unfortunate that since the 1950 s little has been done in the area of thermodynamics to continue gaining information on metals such as iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), palladium (Pd) and many others. Although the vapor pressures of these metals can be extrapolated to higher temperatures, the data is often limited to temperature ranges too low to be applicable to processes that occur during the formation of the solar system (T approx. 2000K). Experimental techniques inhibited the data in the past by restricting the testing of metals to temperatures below their melting point. Today, higher temperature testing is possible by using a Thermo- Cahn Thermogravimetric system that is able to reach temperatures up to 1973K in vacuo and measure a 10 gram change in a sample with mass of up to 100 grams.

  5. The Action of Pressure-Radiation Forces on Pulsating Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Oguz, N.; Prosperetti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The action of pressure-radiation (or Bjerknes) forces on gas bubbles is well understood. This paper studies the analogous phenomenon for vapor bubbles, about which much less is known. A possible practical application is the removal of boiling bubbles from the neighborhood of a heated surface in the case of a downward facing surface or in the absence of gravity. For this reason, the case of a bubble near a plane rigid surface is considered in detail. It is shown that, when the acoustic wave fronts are parallel to the surface, the bubble remains trapped due to secondary Bjerknes force caused by an "image bubble." When the wave fronts are perpendicular to the surface, on the other hand, the bubble can be made to slide laterally.

  6. A search for chemical laser action in low pressure metal vapor flames. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwillenberg, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Optical emissions were studied from low pressure (approximately 1 torr) dilute diffusion flames of Ca and Mg vapor with O2, N2O and mixtures of CCl4 and O2. The Ca flames with O2 and N2O revealed high vibrational excitation of the product CaO molecule (up to v=30). The flames with CCl4 revealed extreme nonequilibrium metal atom electronic excitation, up to the metal atom ionization limit (6.1 eV for Ca, 7.6 eV for Mg). The metal atom excited electronic state populations did not follow a Boltzmann distribution, but the excitation rates ('pumping rate') were found to obey an Arrhenius-type expression, with the electronic excitation energy playing the role of activation energy and a temperature of about 5000 K for triplet excited states and 2500 K for singlets (vs. approximately 500 K translational temperature).

  7. Partial Pressures for Several In-Se Compositions from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3-60.99 at.% Se and 673-1418 K was measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gauge measurements for compositions between 50-61 at.%, but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Knudsen-torsion cell measurements. It is found that 60.99 at.% Se lies outside the sesquiselenide homogeneity range and 59.98 at.% Se lies inside and is the congruently melting composition. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000-1300 K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 to -38 kJ per g atomic weight for 50 and 56% Se at 1200 and 1300 K.

  8. The Jar Magic--Instructional Activities for Teaching Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Bing-Hong; Chen, Chyong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of impressive activities designed for teaching the concept of air pressure to junior high school students. Water, glasses, balloons, plastic bottles, and suction cups are some of the items commonly used in these experiments. For example, if we take a glass of water, cover it with a piece of cardboard, and invert the glass,…

  9. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880.5550 Section 880.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital...

  10. Experimental Air Pressure Tank Systems for Process Control Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Christopher E.; Holland, Charles E.; Gatzke, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    In process control education, particularly in the field of chemical engineering, there is an inherent need for industrially relevant hands-on apparatuses that enable one to bridge the gap between the theoretical content of coursework and real-world applications. At the University of South Carolina, two experimental air-pressure tank systems have…

  11. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  12. Vapor Pressure Isotope Effects in Halogenated Organic Compounds and Alcohols Dissolved in Water.

    PubMed

    Horst, Axel; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2016-12-20

    Volatilization causes changes in the isotopic composition of organic compounds as a result of different vapor pressures of molecules containing heavy and light isotopes. Both normal and inverse vapor pressure isotope effects (VPIE) have been observed, depending on molecular interactions in the liquid phase and the investigated element. Previous studies have focused mostly on pure compound volatilization or on compounds dissolved in organic liquids. Environmentally relevant scenarios, such as isotope fractionation during volatilization of organics from open water surfaces, have largely been neglected. In the current study, open-system volatilization experiments (focusing thereby on kinetic/-nonequilibrium effects) were carried out at ambient temperatures for trichloromethane, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, trichlorotrifluoroethane, methanol, and ethanol dissolved in water and, if not previously reported in the literature for these compounds, for volatilization from pure liquids. Stable carbon isotopic signatures were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that volatilization of the four halogenated compounds from water does not cause a measurable change in the carbon isotopic composition, whereas for pure-phase evaporation, significant inverse isotope effects are consistently observed (+0.3 ‰< ε < + 1.7 ‰). In contrast, methanol and ethanol showed normal isotope effects for evaporation of pure organic liquids (-3.9 ‰ and -1.9 ‰) and for volatilization of compounds dissolved in water (-4.4 ‰ and -2.9 ‰), respectively. This absence of measurable carbon isotope fractionation considerably facilitates the application of isotopic techniques for extraction of field samples and preconcentration of organohalogens-known to be important pollutants in groundwater and in the atmosphere.

  13. A Method for Determining Hygroscopic Growth Factor for Organic Aerosols From Vapor Pressure Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Tabazadeh, A.; Golden, D. M.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2008-12-01

    Currently, the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) is one of the most commonly used instruments to study the hygroscopic behavior of aerosols. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to humid conditions to that at dry conditions, is typically used to quantify particle water uptake. We present a new formulation to express the HGF of an aerosol particle as a function of water activity (aW) in the aqueous phase. Our approach is based on the fact that water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. We have assembled a vapor pressure apparatus to measure aW of aqueous solutions as a function of solution concentration and temperature. For the pertinent solutions, we report coefficients resulting from a least square fitting of the water activity data as a function of molality for temperatures from 0 to 30°C. We compared the results obtained using our measured water activities in the HGF formulation with previous studies published, where TDMA is used to directly measure the HGF, for solutes commonly found in atmospheric aerosols. Our results indicate agreement with TDMA studies for common inorganic salts and water-miscible organic particles that are known to deliquesce into aqueous drops at high relative humidity (RH). However, we find a difference for organic particles that show no deliquescence behavior at low RH. For example, one TDMA study measured a HGF of 1.18 for 100 nm phthalic acid particles at 90% RH (aW= 0.9) and 30°C. Our data showed that even an aqueous solution saturated in phthalic acid did not lower the vapor pressure of pure water at 30°C. We propose that the adsorption of a negligible mass of water by a porous particle can lead to an apparent growth in particle size by changing the particle morphology.

  14. Improved fireman's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. A.; Morris, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prototype high pressure glass filament-wound, aluminum-lined pressurant vessels suitable for use in a fireman's compressed air breathing system were designed, fabricated, and acceptance tested in order to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such high performance, lightweight units. The 4000 psi tanks have a 60 standard cubic foot (SCF) air capacity, and have a 6.5 inch diamter, 19 inch length, 415 inch volume, weigh 13 pounds when empty, and contain 33 percent more air than the current 45 SCF (2250 psi) steel units. The current steel 60 SCF (3000 psi) tanks weigh approximately twice as much as the prototype when empty, and are 2 inches, or 10 percent shorter. The prototype units also have non-rusting aluminum interiors, which removes the hazard of corrosion, the need for internal coatings, and the possibility of rust particles clogging the breathing system.

  15. Gas chromatographic vapor pressure determination of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene and α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartonen, Kari; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vilja, Vesa-Pekka; Tiala, Heidi; Knuuti, Sinivuokko; Lai, Ching Kwan; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-12-01

    Vapor pressures (subcooled liquid, pliquid) of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene (β-caryophyllene aldehyde 0.18 ± 0.03 Pa and β-nocaryophyllene aldehyde 0.17 ± 0.03 Pa), and α-pinene (pinonaldehyde 16.8 ± 0.20 Pa, cis-pinic acid 0.12 ± 0.06 Pa, and cis-pinonic acid 0.99 ± 0.19 Pa) at 298 K were obtained by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The effects of stationary phase polarity and column film thickness on the vapor pressure values were investigated. Increase in stationary phase polarity provided smaller values, while increase in film thickness gave slightly higher values. Values for vapor pressure were at least two orders of magnitude lower when obtained by a method utilizing vaporization enthalpy (determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) than by retention index method. Finally, the results were compared with values calculated by group contribution theory. For the β-caryophyllene oxidation products, the values measured by gas chromatography were slightly lower than those obtained by theoretical calculations. The opposite trend was observed for the α-pinene oxidation products. The methods based on gas chromatography are concluded to be highly useful for the determination of vapor pressures of semi-volatile compounds. Except for the most polar pinic and pinonic acids, differences between vapor pressure values obtained by GC-FID and GC-MS were small. Since GC-MS provides structural information simultaneously, the use of GC-MS is recommended.

  16. Flame structures in the pressurized methane-air combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Tomonaga, Furuhata, Tomohiko; Arai, Norio

    1998-07-01

    This study has been carried out in order to investigate the applicability of a pressurized and fuel-rich burner at a first stage combustor for a newly proposed chemical gas turbine system. The flammability limits, exhaust gas composition and the NO{sub x} emission characteristics under the pressurized conditions of 1.1--4.1 MPa have been investigated in a model combustor. This paper focuses on the influence of pressure and F/A equivalence ratio on flame structures of pressurized combustion with methane and air to obtain detailed data for designing of fuel-rich combustor for gas turbine application. The flame under fuel-rich condition and pressure of 1 MPa showed underventilated structure like other atmospheric fuel-rich flames while the flame under pressure over 1.5 MPa had shapes as fuel-lean flame. The flame becomes longer as the pressure was increased under the fuel-lean conditions, which under fuel-rich condition the influence of pressure on flame length was smaller in comparison with the flame under fuel-lean conditions. These results give an opportunity for developing smaller combustor under fuel-rich and pressurized condition compared to fuel-lean one. Numerical simulation has been done for defining the temperature profile in the model combustor using the k-{var{underscore}epsilon} turbulence model and three-step reaction model. The comparison between theoretical results and experimental data showed fair agreements.

  17. Modeling the chemical kinetics of high-pressure glow discharges in mixtures of helium with real air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalder, K. R.; Vidmar, R. J.; Nersisyan, G.; Graham, W. G.

    2006-05-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated in both pure helium and helium-air mixtures have been studied using a plasma chemistry code originally developed for simulations of electron-beam-produced air plasmas. Comparisons are made with experimental data obtained from high-pressure glow discharges in helium-air mixtures developed by applying sinusoidal voltage wave forms between two parallel planar metallic electrodes covered by glass plates, with frequencies ranging from 10 to 50 kHz and electric field strengths up to 5 kV/cm. The code simulates the plasma chemistry following periodic pulsations of ionization in prescribed E/N environments. Many of the rate constants depend on gas temperature, electron temperature, and E/N. In helium plasmas with small amounts (~850 ppm) of air added, rapid conversion of atomic helium ions to molecular helium ions dominate the positive ion kinetics and these species are strongly modulated while the radical species are not. The charged and neutral species concentrations at atmospheric pressure with air impurity levels up to 10 000 ppm are predicted. The negative ion densities are very small but increase as the air impurity level is raised, which indicates that in helium-based systems operated in open air the concentration of negative ions would be significant. If water vapor at typical humidity levels is present as one of the impurities, hydrated cluster ions eventually comprise a significant fraction of the charged species.

  18. 40 CFR 1066.615 - NOX intake-air humidity correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vapor pressure at the ambient dry bulb temperature. RH = relative humidity of ambient air M air = molar mass of air. p atmos = atmospheric pressure. ER28AP14.106 Where: x NOXdexh = measured dilute...

  19. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  20. Air and gas pockets in sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    In The Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to large centralised WWTPs by means of an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the past decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. For that reason, in practice their state of functioning is often not known. Failure of operation is only noticed when the capacity of the system proves to be insufficient to fulfil the minimum design capacity demand. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. Many causes may account for the reduction of the system's nominal capacity like an increased wall roughness, scaling or occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. The occurrence of free gas may be caused by degassing of dissolved (bio) gas or by air entrained at the pumps' inlet or at air valves. A research study is started that will focus on three main issues: The description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation and dynamic hydraulic behaviour, A method to diagnose gas problems, and To overcome future problems by either applying remedial measures or improving the design of wastewater pressure systems. For this study, two experimental facilities are constructed, a small circuit for the study of multi-phase flow and a second, larger one for the research into diagnostic methods. This paper describes the preliminary results of the experiments in the multi-phase circuit.

  1. Water Vapor and Temperature Measurements within the GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) was established in 2008 in recognition of the importance of reference-quality observations of atmospheric column properties, in particular temperature and water vapor, from the surface into the stratosphere to enhance the monitoring and understanding of climate variability and change. The GRUAN Task Team on Radiosondes provides guidelines for GRUAN on how to obtain the best possible reference quality data from radiosoundings. "Reference quality" here means that a data product (1) is traceable to an accepted standard (generally to the SI unit), (2) provides a comprehensive, vertically resolved uncertainty analysis, (3) is properly documented (e.g. in peer-reviewed publications) and is validated (e.g. through intercomparisons). In the presentation, an overview is given on the developments within the GRUAN community to establish reference quality observations using radiosondes. In particular, a review is made on the most recent radiosonde intercomparison at Yangjiang, China in 2010 by the World Meteorological Organization, focusing on the temperature and water vapor measurements and lessons for GRUAN.

  2. Heat treatment's effects on hydroxyapatite powders in water vapor and air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, A.; Baştan, F. E.; Erdoǧan, G.; Üstel, F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is the main chemical constituent of bone tissue (~70%) as well as HA which is a calcium phosphate based ceramic material forms inorganic tissue of bone and tooth as hard tissues is used in production of prosthesis for synthetic bone, fractured and broken bone restoration, coating of metallic biomaterials and dental applications because of its bio compatibility. It is known that Hydroxyapatite decomposes with high heat energy after heat treatment. Therefore hydroxyapatite powders that heated in water vapor will less decomposed phases and lower amorphous phase content than in air atmosphere. In this study high purity hydroxyapatite powders were heat treated with open atmosphere furnace and water vapor atmosphere with 900, 1000, 1200 °C. Morphology of same powder size used in this process by SEM analyzed. Chemical structures of synthesized coatings have been examined by XRD. The determination of particle size and morphological structure of has been characterized by Particle Sizer, and SEM analysis, respectively. Weight change of sample was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) during heating and cooling.

  3. Optimized air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction to remediate groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, M.; Linck, J.; Manz, C.; Petrofske, T.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) has obvious benefits for groundwater contamination consisting of volatile organic compounds, particularly benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTEX). Although AS/SVE is easily employed given suitable site conditions, optimized AS/SVE system operation and monitoring (O/M) are often overlooked once treatment is initiated. Site O/M typically is conducted with on-site field staff, or as an alternative, by remotely connecting to the site via modem and programmable logic controller (PLC). Two AS/SVE sites located in Wisconsin have used either traditional on-site O/M or the remote modem/PLC option to evaluate and optimize system operation. System on-time efficiency using remote telemetry was improved compared to traditional O/M and system operations.

  4. Determination of vapor-liquid equilibrium data in microfluidic segmented flows at elevated pressures using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Luther, Sebastian K; Stehle, Simon; Weihs, Kristian; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas

    2015-08-18

    A fast, noninvasive, and efficient analytical measurement strategy for the characterization of vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) is presented, which is based on phase (state of matter) selective Raman spectroscopy in multiphase flows inside microcapillay systems (MCS). Isothermal VLE data were measured in binary and ternary mixtures composed of acetone, water, carbon dioxide or nitrogen at elevated pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 333 K. For validation, the obtained data were compared with literature data and reference measurements in a high-pressure variable volume cell. Additionally, the mixtures were investigated at temperatures and pressures where no data is available in literature to extend the high-pressure VLE database.

  5. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iron Pyrite Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nicholas; Cheng, Ming; Perkins, Craig L.; Limpinsel, Moritz; Hemminger, John C.; Law, Matt

    2012-10-23

    Iron pyrite (cubic FeS{sub 2}) is a promising candidate absorber material for earth-abundant thin-film solar cells. In this report, single-phase, large-grain, and uniform polycrystalline pyrite thin films are fabricated on glass and molybdenum-coated glass substrates by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) using the reaction of iron(III) acetylacetonate and tert-butyl disulfide in argon at 300 C, followed by sulfur annealing at 500--550 C to convert marcasite impurities to pyrite. The pyrite-marcasite phase composition depends strongly on the concentration of sodium in the growth substrate and the sulfur partial pressure during annealing. Phase and elemental composition of the films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The in-plane electrical properties are surprisingly insensitive to phase and elemental impurities, with all films showing p-type, thermally activated transport with a small activation energy ({approx}30 meV), a room- temperature resistivity of {approx}1 {Omega} cm, and low mobility. These ubiquitous electrical properties may result from robust surface effects. These CVD pyrite thin films are well suited to fundamental electrical studies and the fabrication of pyrite photovoltaic device stacks.

  6. Photosynthesis Decrease and Stomatal Control of Gas Exchange in Abies alba Mill. in Response to Vapor Pressure Difference

    PubMed Central

    Guehl, Jean-Marc; Aussenac, Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    The responses of steady state CO2 assimilation rate (A), transpiration rate (E), and stomatal conductance (gs) to changes in leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (ΔW) were examined on different dates in shoots from Abies alba trees growing outside. In Ecouves, a provenance representative of wet oceanic conditions in Northern France, both A and gs decreased when ΔW was increased from 4.6 to 14.5 Pa KPa−1. In Nebias, which represented the dry end of the natural range of A. alba in southern France, A and gs decreased only after reaching peak levels at 9.0 and 7.0 Pa KPa−1, respectively. The representation of the data in assimilation rate (A) versus intercellular CO2 partial pressure (Ci) graphs allowed us to determine how stomata and mesophyll photosynthesis interacted when ΔW was increased. Changes in A were primarily due to alterations in mesophyll photosynthesis. At high ΔW, and especially in Ecouves when soil water deficit prevailed, A declined, while Ci remained approximately constant, which may be interpreted as an adjustment of gs to changes in mesophyll photosynthesis. Such a stomatal control of gas exchange appeared as an alternative to the classical feedforward interpretation of E versus ΔW responses with a peak rate of E. The gas exchange response to ΔW was also characterized by considerable deviations from the optimization theory of IR Cowan and GD Farquhar (1977 Symp Soc Exp Biol 31: 471-505). PMID:16665243

  7. Determination of saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of semi-volatile aerosols: the integrated volume mentod

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the integrated volume method for estimating saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of a whole aerosol distribution. We measure the change of total volume of an aerosol distribution between a reference state and several heated states, with the heating...

  8. An Integrated Approach to Introducing Biofuels, Flash Point, and Vapor Pressure Concepts into an Introductory College Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adam R.; Britton, Stephanie L.; Cadwell, Katie D.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Students explore the fundamental chemical concepts of vapor pressure and flash point in a real-world technical context, while gaining insight into the contemporary societal issue of biofuels. Lab activities were developed using a closed-cup instrument to measure the flash point of various biodiesel samples. Pre- and post-tests revealed that the…

  9. 46 CFR 39.20-13 - High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High and low vapor pressure protection for tankships-T/ALL. 39.20-13 Section 39.20-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS... inerted tankship, or the lowest vacuum relief valve setting in the cargo tank venting system for a...

  10. Vapor pressure and evaporation rate of certain heat-resistant compounds in a vacuum at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolgar, A.S.; Verkhoglyadova, T.S.; Samsonov, G.V.

    1985-02-01

    The vapor pressure and evaporation rate of borides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome and of strontium and carbides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome, molybdenum silicide and nitrides of titanium, niobium, and tantalum in a vacuum were studied. It is concluded that all subject compounds evaporate by molecular structures except AlB sub 12' which dissociates, losing the aluminum.

  11. Vapor pressure and evaporation rate of certain heat-resistant compounds in a vacuum at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolgar, A. S.; Verkhoglyadova, T. S.; Samsonov, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure and evaporation rate of borides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome; and of strontium and carbides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome, molybdenum silicide; and nitrides of titanium, niobium, and tantalum in a vacuum were studied. It is concluded that all subject compounds evaporate by molecular structures except AlB sub 12' which dissociates, losing the aluminum.

  12. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  13. Temperature influences the ability of tall fescue to control transpiration in response to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water availability for turfgrass systems is often limited, and likely to become more so in the future. These experiments examined the ability of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) to control transpiration with increasing vapor pressure deficit and whether control was influenced by temperature...

  14. Deposition and adsorption of the air pollutant HNO 3 vapor to soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Pamela E.; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej

    Deposition of nitric acid (HNO 3) vapor to soils has been evaluated in three experimental settings: (1) continuously stirred tank reactors with the pollutant added to clean air, (2) open-top chambers at high ambient levels of pollution with and without filtration reducing particulate nitrate levels, (3) two field sites with high or low pollution loads in the coastal sage plant community of southern California. The results from experiment (1) indicated that the amount of extractable NO 3- from isolated sand, silt and clay fractions increased with atmospheric concentration and duration of exposure. After 32 days, the highest absorption of HNO 3 was determined for clay, followed by silt and sand. While the sand and silt fractions showed a tendency to saturate, the clay samples did not after 32 days of exposure under highly polluted conditions. Absorption of HNO 3 occurred mainly in the top 1 mm layer of the soil samples and the presence of water increased HNO 3 absorption by about 2-fold. Experiment (2) indicated that the presence of coarse particulate NO 3- could effectively block absorption sites of soils for HNO 3 vapor. Experiment (3) showed that soil samples collected from open sites had about 2.5 more extractable NO 3- as compared to samples collected from beneath shrub canopies. The difference in NO 3- occurred only in the upper 1-2 cm as no significant differences in NO 3- concentrations were found in the 2-5 cm soil layers. Extractable NO 3- from surface soils collected from a low-pollution site ranged between 1 and 8 μg NO 3-N g -1, compared to a maximum of 42 μg NO 3-N g -1 for soils collected from a highly polluted site. Highly significant relationship between HNO 3 vapor doses and its accumulation in the upper layers of soils indicates that carefully prepared soil samples (especially clay fraction) may be useful as passive samplers for evaluation of ambient concentrations of HNO 3 vapor.

  15. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  16. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Trends for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena F.

    2010-01-01

    Mainly due to their global nature, satellite observations can provide a very useful basis for GCM validations. In particular, satellite sounders such as AIRS provide 3-D spatial information (most useful for GCMs), so the question arises: can we use AIRS datasets for climate variability assessments? We show that the recent (September 2002 February 2010) CERES-observed negative trend in OLR of approx.-0.1 W/sq m/yr averaged over the globe is found in the AIRS OLR data as well. Most importantly, even minute details (down to 1 x 1 degree GCM-scale resolution) of spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS-retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over this time period are essentially the same. The correspondence can be seen even in the very large spatial variations of these trends with local values ranging from -2.6 W/sq m/yr to +3.0 W/sq m/yr in the tropics, for example. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate, and indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of other AIRS derived products as well. These products show that global and regional anomalies and trends of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over the last 7+ years are strongly influenced by EI-Nino-La Nina cycles . We have created climate parameter anomaly datasets using AIRS retrievals which can be compared directly with coupled GCM climate variability assessments. Moreover, interrelationships of these anomalies and trends should also be similar between the observed and GCM-generated datasets, and, in cases of discrepancies, GCM parameterizations could be improved based on the relationships observed in the data. First, we assess spatial "trends" of variability of climatic parameter anomalies [since anomalies relative to the seasonal cycle are good proxies of

  17. Thermodynamic study of air-cycle and mercury-vapor-cycle systems for refrigerating cooling air for turbines or other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, Alfred J; Freche, John C; Esgar, Jack B

    1956-01-01

    An analysis of air refrigeration systems indicated that air cycles are generally less satisfactory than simple heat exchangers unless high component efficiencies and high values of heat-exchanger effectiveness can be obtained. A system employing a mercury-vapor cycle appears to be feasible for refrigerating air that must enter the system at temperature levels of approximately 1500 degrees R, and this cycle is more efficient than the air cycle. Weight of the systems was not considered. The analysis of the systems is presented in a generalized dimensionless form.

  18. A correlation to predict the heat flux on the air-side of a vapor chamber with overturn-U flattened tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimuang, Wasan; Limkaisang, Viroj

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a conventional vapor chamber (CVC) and a loop vapor chamber (LVC) are compared. The vapor chambers consisted of a stainless steel box with different covers. The results indicated that the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of LVC is higher than CVC. An empirical correlation was developed to predict the convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of the LVC.

  19. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  20. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...