Science.gov

Sample records for air velocities ranging

  1. Flame Velocities over a Wide Composition Range for Pentane-air, Ethylene-air, and Propyne-air Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dorothy M; Wong, Edgar, L

    1951-01-01

    Fundamental flame velocities are reported for pentane air, ethylene-air, and propylene-air mixtures for the concentration range 60 to 130 percent of stoichiometric. A form of the Tanford and Pease equation, which includes a small constant velocity term independent of diffusion, will predict the observed changes in flame velocity.

  2. Ballistic Range Measurements of Stagnation-Point Heat Transfer in Air and in Carbon Dioxide at Velocities up to 18,000 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Layton; Bailey, Harry E.; Woodward, Henry T.

    1961-01-01

    A new technique for measuring heat-transfer rates on free-flight models in a ballistic range is described in this report. The accuracy of the heat-transfer rates measured in this way is shown to be comparable with the accuracy obtained in shock-tube measurements. The specific results of the present experiments consist of measurements of the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates experienced by a spherical-nosed model during flight through air and through carbon dioxide at velocities up to 18,000 feet per second. For flight through air these measured heat-transfer rates agree well with both the theoretically predicted rates and the rates measured in shock tubes. the heat-transfer rates agree well with the rates measured in a shock tube. Two methods of estimating the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates in carbon dioxide are compared with the experimental measurements. At each velocity the measured stagnation-point heat-transfer rate in carbon dioxide is about the same as the measured heat-transfer rate in air.

  3. Air velocity distribution in a commercial broiler house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing air velocity during tunnel ventilation in commercial broiler production facilities improves production efficiency, and many housing design specifications require a minimum air velocity. Air velocities are typically assessed with a hand-held velocity meter at random locations, rather than ...

  4. Significance of air humidity and air velocity for fungal spore release into the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Pasanen, P.; Jantunen, M. J.; Kalliokoski, P.

    Our previous field studies have shown that the presence of molds in buildings does not necessarily mean elevated airborne spore counts. Therefore, we investigated the release of fungal spores from cultures of Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium sp. and Cladosporium sp. at different air velocities and air humidities. Spores of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were released from conidiophores already at air velocity of 0.5 ms -1, whereas Cladosporium spores required at least a velocity of 1.0 ms -1. Airborne spore counts of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were usually higher in dry than moist air, being minimal at relative humidities (r.h.) above 70%, while the effect of r.h. on the release of Cladosporium sp. was ambivalent. The geometric mean diameter of released spores increased when the r.h. exceeded a certain level which depends on fungal genus. Thus, spores of all three fungi were hygroscopic but the hygroscopicity of various spores appeared at different r.h.-ranges. This study indicates that spore release is controlled by external factors and depends on fungal genus which can be one reason for considerable variation of airborne spore counts in buildings with mold problems.

  5. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  6. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  7. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  8. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  9. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  10. Relationship among shock-wave velocity, particle velocity, and adiabatic exponent for dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In H.; Hong, Sang H.; Jhung, Kyu S.; Oh, Ki-Hwan; Yoon, Yo K.

    1991-07-01

    Using the results of the detailed numerical calculations, it is shown that the relationship between the shock-wave velocity U sub s and the particle velocity U sub p for shock-compressed dry air can be represented accurately by the linear relation U sub s = a(P0) + b(P0)U sub p in a wide range of U sub p (U sub p = 2 to 9 ) km/s and initial pressure P0 = 10 to the -6th to 1 atm, where a and b are given by the cubic polynomials of log10P0. Based on the linear U sub s - U sub p relation, an analytic expression has been obtained for the adiabatic exponent gamma as a function of particle velocity.

  11. Fume hood performance: Face velocity variability inconsistent air volume systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volin, C.E.; Joao, R.V.; Gershey, E.L.; Reiman, J.S.; Party, E.

    1998-09-01

    A 3-year survey of 366 bench-type fume hoods in working laboratories in conventional, constant air volume settings showed that face velocities varied greatly from unit to unit and over time. Fume hoods with bypasses performed better than those without; however, even newly fabricated bypass hoods exhibited large variations. These variations were due to several factors; however, face velocities at 100 {+-} 10 ft/min at working sash heights in the range of 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) were attainable. The use of smoke showed poor containment, especially at face velocities below 85 ft/min (0.425 m/s) or above 130 ft/min (0.65 m/s) and when the hoods were obstructed by large items placed on the work surface. Auxiliary/supplemental air created unstable face velocities and poor smoke patterns. The analysis of 3 years of fume hood monitoring showed clearly the need for and importance of a maintenance program where the fume hood lower slots are cleaned and fans, ducts, dampers, and hoods are checked periodically.

  12. Measurement of vertical velocity using clear-air Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Green, J. L.; Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.; Clark, W. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A new clear air Doppler radar was constructed, called the Flatland radar, in very flat terrain near Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The radar wavelength is 6.02 m. The radar has been measuring vertical velocity every 153 s with a range resolution of 750 m almost continuously since March 2, 1987. The variance of vertical velocity at Flatland is usually quite small, comparable to the variance at radars located near rough terrain during periods of small background wind. The absence of orographic effects over very flat terrain suggests that clear air Doppler radars can be used to study vertical velocities due to other processes, including synoptic scale motions and propagating gravity waves. For example, near rough terrain the shape of frequency spectra changes drastically as the background wind increases. But at Flatland the shape at periods shorter than a few hours changes only slowly, consistent with the changes predicted by Doppler shifting of gravity wave spectra. Thus it appears that the short period fluctuations of vertical velocity at Flatland are alsmost entirely due to the propagating gravity waves.

  13. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  14. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    1999-01-01

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna.

  15. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  16. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  17. Simulation of air velocity in a vertical perforated air distributor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngu, T. N. W.; Chu, C. M.; Janaun, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Perforated pipes are utilized to divide a fluid flow into several smaller streams. Uniform flow distribution requirement is of great concern in engineering applications because it has significant influence on the performance of fluidic devices. For industrial applications, it is crucial to provide a uniform velocity distribution through orifices. In this research, flow distribution patterns of a closed-end multiple outlet pipe standing vertically for air delivery in the horizontal direction was simulated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a tool of research for enhancing and understanding design was used as the simulator and the drawing software SolidWorks was used for geometry setup. The main purpose of this work is to establish the influence of size of orifices, intervals between outlets, and the length of tube in order to attain uniformity of exit flows through a multi outlet perforated tube. However, due to the gravitational effect, the compactness of paddy increases gradually from top to bottom of dryer, uniform flow pattern was aimed for top orifices and larger flow for bottom orifices.

  18. Coherent Laser Instrument Would Measure Range and Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Cardell, Greg; San Martin, Alejandro; Spiers, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A proposed instrument would project a narrow laser beam that would be frequency-modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code for simultaneous measurement of range and velocity along the beam. The instrument performs these functions in a low mass, power, and volume package using a novel combination of established techniques. Originally intended as a low resource- footprint guidance sensor for descent and landing of small spacecraft onto Mars or small bodies (e.g., asteroids), the basic instrument concept also lends itself well to a similar application guiding aircraft (especially, small unmanned aircraft), and to such other applications as ranging of topographical features and measuring velocities of airborne light-scattering particles as wind indicators. Several key features of the instrument s design contribute to its favorable performance and resource-consumption characteristics. A laser beam is intrinsically much narrower (for the same exit aperture telescope or antenna) than a radar beam, eliminating the need to correct for the effect of sloping terrain over the beam width, as is the case with radar. Furthermore, the use of continuous-wave (CW), erbium-doped fiber lasers with excellent spectral purity (narrow line width) permits greater velocity resolution, while reducing the laser s power requirement compared to a more typical pulsed solid-state laser. The use of CW also takes proper advantage of the increased sensitivity of coherent detection, necessary in the first place for direct measurement of velocity using the Doppler effect. However, measuring range with a CW beam requires modulation to "tag" portions of it for time-of-flight determination; typically, the modulation consists of a PN code. A novel element of the instrument s design is the use of frequency modulation (FM) to accomplish both the PN-modulation and the Doppler-bias frequency shift necessary for signed velocity measurements. This permits the use of a single low-power waveguide electrooptic

  19. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  20. Minimum Detectable Air Velocity by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s. PMID:23966190

  1. Tracking far-range volcanogenic air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichu, Marie; Chiapello, Isabelle; Goloub, Phillipe; Péré, Jean-Christophe; Thieuleux, François; Blarel, Luc; Podvin, Thierry; Mortier, Augustin; Brogniez, Colette; Sohne, Nathalie; Theys, Nicolas; Van Roozendael, Michel; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Tanré, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The 2014-15 Holuhraun lava-flood eruption of Bárdarbunga volcano (Iceland) emitted prodigious amounts of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. This eruption triggered a long-distance episode of air pollution in September 2014, the first event of this magnitude recorded in the modern era. We gathered a wealth of complementary observations from satellite sensors (OMI, IASI), ground-based remote sensing (lidar, sunphotometry, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and ground-level air quality monitoring networks to characterize both the spatial distribution of volcanic SO2 and aerosols as well as the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. We take advantage of this exceptional panel of observations to quantitatively test our modeling ability to retrospectively simulate this event of far-range air pollution. Although the model captures the correct temporal dynamics, it fails to reproduce the intensity of the pollution. Paths worth exploring to get prepared to accurately forecast a future large-scale event of volcanogenic air pollution are discussed.

  2. Unimpeded air velocity profiles of air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that relies on tree structure information to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Unimpeded air jet velocities from an air assisted, five-port sprayer in an open field were measured at four height...

  3. Air velocity distributions from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer for tree applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that implements tree structure to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rat...

  4. Air velocity distributions from air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capability to control both liquid and air flow rates based on tree structures would be one of the advantages of future variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rate functions...

  5. Penetration of Liquid Jets into a High-velocity Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelko, Louis J

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented showing the penetration characteristics of liquid jets directed approximately perpendicular to a high-velocity air stream for jet-nozzle-throat diameters from 0.0135 to 0.0625 inch, air stream densities from 0.0805 to 0.1365 pound per cubic foot, liquid jet velocities from 168.1 to 229.0 feet per second and a liquid jet density of approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. The data were analyzed and a correlation was developed that permitted the determination of the penetration length of the liquid jet for any operation condition within the range of variables investigated.

  6. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m(3)/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s.

  7. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m3/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s. PMID:25810445

  8. Long-range air transmission of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bovallius, A; Bucht, B; Roffey, R; Anäs, P

    1978-06-01

    Bacterial spores from a sandstorm area north of the Black Sea were transmitted to Sweden by air, giving increased concentrations of viable bacterial spores at two air sampling stations in Sweden. PMID:677884

  9. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  10. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range. PMID:27607963

  11. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range.

  12. Methane flux across the air-water interface - Air velocity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Bartlett, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Methane loss to the atmosphere from flooded wetlands is influenced by the degree of supersaturation and wind stress at the water surface. Measurements in freshwater ponds in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Florida, demonstrated that for the combined variability of CH4 concentrations in surface water and air velocity over the water surface, CH4 flux varied from 0.01 to 1.22 g/sq m/day. The liquid exchange coefficient for a two-layer model of the gas-liquid interface was calculated as 1.7 cm/h for CH4 at air velocity of zero and as 1.1 + 1.2 v to the 1.96th power cm/h for air velocities from 1.4 to 3.5 m/s and water temperatures of 20 C.

  13. Egomotion estimation with optic flow and air velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Adam J; Miller, Mikel M; Quinn, Roger D; Willis, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    We develop a method that allows a flyer to estimate its own motion (egomotion), the wind velocity, ground slope, and flight height using only inputs from onboard optic flow and air velocity sensors. Our artificial algorithm demonstrates how it could be possible for flying insects to determine their absolute egomotion using their available sensors, namely their eyes and wind sensitive hairs and antennae. Although many behaviors can be performed by only knowing the direction of travel, behavioral experiments indicate that odor tracking insects are able to estimate the wind direction and control their absolute egomotion (i.e., groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have developed, which we call the opto-aeronautic algorithm, is tested in a variety of wind and ground slope conditions using a video recorded flight of a moth tracking a pheromone plume. Over all test cases that we examined, the algorithm achieved a mean absolute error in height of 7% or less. Furthermore, our algorithm is suitable for the navigation of aerial vehicles in environments where signals from the Global Positioning System are unavailable.

  14. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  15. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  16. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  17. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  18. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  19. A relation among geology, tectonics, and velocity structure, western to central Nevada Basin and Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the northwestern to central Nevada Basin and Range, there are correlations between velocity and specific geologic structures of the crust. Mapped range-bounding faults at the surface can be traced to appreciable (10km) depths based on velocity variations and are consistent with subsurface projections of the faults based on seismic reflection images. Correlations between velocity and the surface geology show that in the upper crust the pre-Cenozoic rocks are underlain by high-velocity rocks, whereas the Tertiary ranges are underlain by lower-velocity rocks to depths as great as 10 km. The regional seismicity pattern is consistent with this interpretation, as earthquakes are largely confined within or near the base of the low-velocity rocks. These low-velocity, highly fractured rocks are laterally distributed in discrete zones, suggesting that extension is not uniformly distributed but occurs in discrete, highly extended zones. -from Author

  20. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  1. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  2. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  3. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  4. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  5. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  6. Measurements of Flat-Flame Velocities of Diethyl Ether in Air

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Fiona; Metcalfe, Wayne K.; Dirrenberger, Patricia; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Curran, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents new adiabatic laminar burning velocities of diethyl ether in air, measured on a flat-flame burner using the heat flux method. The experimental pressure was 1 atm and temperatures of the fresh gas mixture ranged from 298 to 398 K. Flame velocities were recorded at equivalence ratios from 0.55 to 1.60, for which stabilization of the flame was possible. The maximum laminar burning velocity was found at an equivalence ratio of 1.10 or 1.15 at different temperatures. These results are compared with experimental and computational data reported in the literature. The data reported in this study deviate significantly from previous experimental results and are well-predicted by a previously reported chemical kinetic mechanism. PMID:23710107

  7. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect

  8. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  9. Effect of High Air Velocities on the Distribution and Penetration of a Fuel Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1931-01-01

    By means of the NACA Spray Photography Equipment high speed moving pictures were taken of the formation and development of fuel sprays from an automatic injection valve. The sprays were injected normal to and counter to air at velocities from 0 to 800 feet per second. The air was at atmosphere temperature and pressure. The results show that high air velocities are an effective means of mixing the fuel spray with the air during injection.

  10. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  13. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  18. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  19. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  20. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18–142 GPa range

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Feng Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18–142 GPa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  1. Measurement of vortex velocities over a wide range of vortex age, downstream distance and free stream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorke, J. B.; Moffett, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to obtain vortex velocity signatures over a wide parameter range encompassing the data conditions of several previous researchers while maintaining a common instrumentation and test facility. The generating wing panel was configured with both a revolved airfoil tip shape and a square tip shape and had a semispan aspect of 4.05/1.0 with a 121.9 cm span. Free stream velocity was varied from 6.1 m/sec to 76.2 m/sec and the vortex core velocities were measured at locations 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 chordlengths downstream of the wing trailing edge, yielding vortex ages up to 2.0 seconds. Wing pitch angles of 6, 8, 9 and 12 deg were investigated. Detailed surface pressure distributions and wing force measurements were obtained for each wing tip configuration. Correlation with vortex velocity data taken in previous experiments is good. During the rollup process, vortex core parameters appear to be dependent primarily on vortex age. Trending in the plateau and decay regions is more complex and the machanisms appear to be more unstable.

  2. Temperature and air velocity effects on ethanol emission from corn silage with the characteristics of an exposed silo face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D.; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank M.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from agricultural sources are believed to be an important contributor to tropospheric ozone in some locations. Recent research suggests that silage is a major source of VOCs emitted from agriculture, but only limited data exist on silage emissions. Ethanol is the most abundant VOC emitted from corn silage; therefore, ethanol was used as a representative compound to characterize the pattern of emission over time and to quantify the effect of air velocity and temperature on emission rate. Ethanol emission was measured from corn silage samples removed intact from a bunker silo. Emission rate was monitored over 12 h for a range in air velocity (0.05, 0.5, and 5 m s -1) and temperature (5, 20, and 35 °C) using a wind tunnel system. Ethanol flux ranged from 0.47 to 210 g m -2 h -1 and 12 h cumulative emission ranged from 8.5 to 260 g m -2. Ethanol flux was highly dependent on exposure time, declining rapidly over the first hour and then continuing to decline more slowly over the duration of the 12 h trials. The 12 h cumulative emission increased by a factor of three with a 30 °C increase in temperature and by a factor of nine with a 100-fold increase in air velocity. Effects of air velocity, temperature, and air-filled porosity were generally consistent with a conceptual model of VOC emission from silage. Exposure duration, temperature, and air velocity should be taken into consideration when measuring emission rates of VOCs from silage, so emission rate data obtained from studies that utilize low air flow methods are not likely representative of field conditions.

  3. Burning Velocity Measurements in Aluminum-Air Suspensions using Bunsen Type Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John; Goroshin, Samuel; Kolbe, Massimiliano

    2001-01-01

    Laminar burning velocity (sometimes also referred in literature as fundamental or normal flame propagation speed) is probably the most important combustion characteristic of the premixed combustible mixture. The majority of experimental data on burning velocities in gaseous mixtures was obtained with the help of the Bunsen conical flame. The Bunsen cone method was found to be sufficiently accurate for gaseous mixtures with burning velocities higher than 10-15 cm/s at normal pressure. Hans Cassel was the first to demonstrate that suspensions of micron-size solid fuel particles in a gaseous oxidizer can also form self-sustained Bunsen flames. He was able to stabilize Bunsen flames in a number of suspensions of different nonvolatile solid fuels (aluminum, carbon, and boron). Using the Bunsen cone method he estimated burning velocities in the premixed aluminum-air mixtures (particle size less than 10 microns) to be in the range of 30-40 cm/s. Cassel also found, that the burning velocity in dust clouds is a function of the burner diameter. In our recent work, we have used the Bunsen cone method to investigate dependence of burning velocity on dust concentration in fuel-rich aluminum dust clouds. Burning velocities in stoichiometric and fuel-rich aluminum dust suspensions with average particle sizes of about 5 microns were found to be in the range of 20-25 cm/s and largely independent on dust concentration. These results raise the question to what degree burning velocities derived from Bunsen flame specifically and other dust flame configurations in general, are indeed fundamental characteristics of the mixture and to what degree are they apparatus dependent. Dust flames in comparison to gas combustion, are thicker, may be influenced by radiation heat transfer in the flame front, respond differently to heat losses, and are fundamentally influenced by the particular flow configuration due to the particles inertia. Since characteristic spatial scales of dust flames are

  4. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s-1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  5. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s‑1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  6. Effect of Range and Angular Velocity of Passive Movement on Somatosensory Evoked Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    To clarify characteristics of each human somatosensory evoked field (SEF) component following passive movement (PM), PM1, PM2, and PM3, using high spatiotemporal resolution 306-channel magnetoencephalography and varying PM range and angular velocity. We recorded SEFs following PM under three conditions [normal range-normal velocity (NN), small range-normal velocity (SN), and small range-slow velocity (SS)] with changing movement range and angular velocity in 12 participants and calculated the amplitude, equivalent current dipole (ECD) location, and the ECD strength for each component. All components were observed in six participants, whereas only PM1 and PM3 in the other six. Clear response deflections at the ipsilateral hemisphere to PM side were observed in seven participants. PM1 amplitude was larger under NN and SN conditions, and mean ECD location for PM1 was at primary motor area. PM3 amplitude was larger under SN condition and mean ECD location for PM3 under SS condition was at primary somatosensory area. PM1 amplitude was dependent on the angular velocity of PM, suggesting that PM1 reflects afferent input from muscle spindle, whereas PM3 amplitude was dependent on the duration. The ECD for PM3 was located in the primary somatosensory cortex, suggesting that PM3 reflects cutaneous input. We confirmed the hypothesis for locally distinct generators and characteristics of each SEF component.

  7. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, Tim; O’Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV) is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets) still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS) technique (i) records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii) processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii) yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods. PMID:22346564

  8. The Effect of Solid Admixtures on the Velocity of Motion of a Free Dusty Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. P.

    1957-01-01

    In dusty air flows occurring in industrial practice in transport by air pressure of friable materials, in the drying, annealing, and so forth, of a pulverized solid mass in suspension, and in other processes, the concentration of solid particles usually has a magnitude of the order of 1 kg per 1 kg of air. At such a concentration, the ratio of the volume of the particles to the volume of the air is small (less than one-thousandth part). However, regardless of this, the presence of a solid admixture manifests itself in the rules for the velocity distribution of the air in a dusty air flow. As a result, the rules of velocity change are different for clean and for dusty air flows. The estimation of the influence of the admixture on the velocity of the motion of the flow presents a definitive interest. One of the attempts to estimate that influence on the axial velocity of a free axially symmetrical jet with admixtures was made by Abramovich. Abramovich assumed beforehand that the fine particles of the admixture in the jet are subject to the motion of the air (that is, that the velocity of the admixture is approximately equal to the local velocity of the air); he then took as the basis of his considerations, in solving the problem, the condition that the amount of motion of the two-phase jet must be constant.

  9. Velocity and pressure distribution behind bodies in an air current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1924-01-01

    The following experiments on the air flow behind bodies were made for the purpose of assisting in the explanation of the phenomena connected with air resistance. The first two series of experiments dealt with the phenomena behind a cylinder. The third series of experiments was carried out behind a streamlined strut.

  10. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  11. Methods of Measurement of High Air Velocities by the Hot-wire Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weske, John R.

    1943-01-01

    Investigations of strengths of hot wires at high velocities were conducted with platinum, nickel, and tungsten at approximately 200 Degrees Celcius hot-wire temperature. The results appear to disqualify platinum for velocities approaching the sonic range; whereas nickel withstands sound velocity, and tungsten may be used for supersonic velocities under standard atmospheric conditions. Hot wires must be supported by rigid prolongs at high velocities to avoid wire breakage. Resting current measurements for constant temperature show agreement with King's relation.

  12. High-precision measurement of satellite range and velocity using the EISCAT radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, J.; Nygrén, T.; Markkanen, M.; Voiculescu, M.; Aikio, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is a continuation of an earlier work by Nygrén et al. (2012), where the velocity of a hard target was determined from a set of echo pulses reflected by the target flying through the radar beam. Here the method is extended to include the determination of range at a high accuracy. The method is as follows. First, the flight time of the pulse from the transmitter to the target is determined at an accuracy essentially better than the accuracy given by the sampling interval. This method makes use of the fact that the receiver filtering creates slopes at the phase flips of the phase modulated echo pulse. A precise flight time is found by investigating the echo amplitude within this slope. A value of velocity is calculated from each echo pulse as explained in the earlier paper. Next, the ranges together with velocities from a single beam pass are combined to a measurement vector for a linear inversion problem. The solution of the inversion problem gives the time-dependent range and velocity from the time interval of satellite flight through the radar beam. The method is demonstrated using the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter) UHF radar and radio pulses reflected by a satellite. The achieved standard deviations of range are about 5-50 cm and those of velocity are about 3-25 mm s-1.

  13. 33 CFR 334.700 - Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and Development Command, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla... gunnery ranges, Air Proving Ground Center, Air Research and Development Command, Eglin Air Force Base,...

  14. Prototype air cleaning system for a firing range

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Mishima, J.; Bamberger, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report recommends air cleaning system components for the US Army Ballistics Research Laboratory's new large-caliber firing range, which is used for testing depleted uranium (DU) penetrators. The new air cleaning system has lower operating costs during the life of the system compared to that anticipated for the existing air cleaning system. The existing system consists of three banks of filters in series; the first two banks are prefilters and the last are high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The principal disadvantage of the existing filters is that they are not cleanable and reusable. Pacific Northwest Laboratory focused the search for alternate air cleaning equipment on devices that do not employ liquids as part of the particle collection mechanism. Collected dry particles were assumed preferable to a liquid waste stream. The dry particle collection devices identified included electrostatic precipitators; inertial separators using turning vanes or cyclones; and several devices employing a filter medium such as baghouses, cartridge houses, cleanable filters, and noncleanable filters similar to those in the existing system. The economics of practical air cleaning systems employing the dry particle collection devices were evaluated in 294 different combinations. 7 references, 21 figures, 78 tables.

  15. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  16. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  17. Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

    1988-09-10

    Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

  19. Long-range cortical connections give rise to a robust velocity map of V1.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional velocity model (2DVM) of the primary visual cortex (V1). The model's novel aspect is that it specifies a particular pattern of long-range cortical temporal connections, via the Connection Algorithm, and shows how the addition of these connections to well-known spatial properties of V1 transforms V1 into a velocity map. The map implies a number of organizational properties of V1: (1) the singularity of each orientation pinwheel contributes to the detection of slow-moving spots across the visual field; (2) the speed component of neuronal velocity selectivity decreases monotonically across each joint orientation contour line for parallel motion and increases monotonically for orthogonal motion; (3) the cells that are direction selective to slow-moving objects are situated in the periphery of V1; and (4) neurons in distinct pinwheels tend to be connected to neurons with similar tuning preferences in other pinwheels. The model accounts for various types of known illusionary perceptions of human vision: perceptual filling-in, illusionary orientation and visual crowding. The three distinguishing features of 2DVM are: (1) it unifies the functional properties of the conventional energy model of V1; (2) it directly relates the functional properties to the known structure of the upper layers of V1; and (3) it implies that the spatial selectivity features of V1 are side effects of its more important role as a velocity map of the visual field. PMID:26343820

  20. Quasiparticle weight and renormalized Fermi velocity of graphene with long-range Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ho-Kin; Leaw, Jia Ning; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Sengupta, P.; Assaad, F. F.; Adam, S.

    In this work, we study the effects of realistic Coulomb interactions in graphene using a projective quantum Monte Carlo simulation of electrons at half-filing on a honeycomb lattice. We compute the quasiparticle residue, the renormalized Fermi velocity and the antiferromagnetic order parameter as a function of both the long-range and short-range components of the Coulomb potential. We find that the Mott insulator transition is determined mostly by the short-range interaction and is consistent with the Gross-Neveu-Yukawa critical theory. Far from the critical point and in the semi-metallic regime, we find that the Fermi-velocity and quasiparticle residue are influenced by the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential, and for very small interaction strength are consistent with predictions of first order perturbation theory. For experimentally relevant and stronger values of the long-range interaction, our numerical data contradicts prediction from both perturbation theory and the renormalization group approaches. This work was supported by Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM mid-size Centre), Singapore Ministry of Education(Yale-NUS College R-607-265-01312 and MOE2014-T2-2-112), and DFG Grant No. AS120/9-1.

  1. Effect of compressibility on the rise velocity of an air bubble in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a theoretical model to analyze the effect of air compressibility on air bubble migration in porous media. The model is obtained by combining the Newton's second law of motion and the ideal gas law assuming that the air phase in the bubble behaves as an ideal gas. Numerical and analytical solutions are presented for various cases of interest. The model results compare favorably with both experimental data and analytical solutions reported in the literature obtained for an incompressible air bubble migration. The results show that travel velocity of a compressible air bubble in porous media strongly depends on the depth of air phase injection. A bubble released from greater depths travels with a slower velocity than a bubble with an equal volume injected at shallower depths. As an air bubble rises up, it expands with decreasing bubble pressure with depth. The volume of a bubble injected at a 1-m depth increases 10% as the bubble reaches the water table. However, bubble volume increases almost twofold when it reaches to the surface from a depth of 10 m. The vertical rise velocity of a compressible bubble approaches that of an incompressible one regardless of the injection depth and volume as it reaches the water table. The compressible bubble velocity does not exceed 18.8 cm/s regardless of the injection depth and bubble volume. The results demonstrate that the effect of air compressibility on the motion of a bubble cannot be neglected except when the air is injected at very shallow depths.

  2. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01

    A coherent lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation in which the positive and the negative optical sidebands can carry independent modulation waveforms. A fiber-optic 90° hybrid is used in the lidar receiver for coherent heterodyne detection and to recover the complex optical field. By loading a constant modulation frequency on the lower optical sideband and a wideband linear frequency chirp on the upper sideband, vector velocity and target distance can be measured independently. The wide modulation bandwidth of this lidar system also enabled unprecedented range resolution and the capability of measuring high velocity unambiguously. PMID:23187404

  3. Using eddy covariance to estimate air-sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of human aspiration in low-velocity air: orientation effects on mouth-breathing simulations.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Anderson, Kimberly R

    2013-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate particle aspiration efficiency in low-moving air typical of occupational settings (0.1-0.4 m s(-1)). Fluid flow surrounding an inhaling humanoid form and particle trajectories traveling into the mouth were simulated for seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 135° and 180°). Three continuous inhalation velocities (1.81, 4.33, and 12.11 m s(-1)), representing the mean inhalation velocity associated with sinusoidal at-rest, moderate, and heavy breathing (7.5, 20.8, and 50.3 l min(-1), respectively) were simulated. These simulations identified a decrease in aspiration efficiency below the inhalable particulate mass (IPM) criterion of 0.5 for large particles, with no aspiration of particles 100 µm and larger for at-rest breathing and no aspiration of particles 116 µm for moderate breathing, over all freestream velocities and orientations relative to the wind. For particles smaller than 100 µm, orientation-averaged aspiration efficiency exceeded the IPM criterion, with increased aspiration efficiency as freestream velocity decreased. Variability in aspiration efficiencies between velocities was low for small (<22 µm) particles, but increased with increasing particle size over the range of conditions studied. Orientation-averaged simulation estimates of aspiration efficiency agree with the linear form of the proposed linear low-velocity inhalable convention through 100 µm, based on laboratory studies using human mannequins.

  5. Environmental impacts of training activities at an air weapons range.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Within Canada, it has been recognized in the last decade that military training activities may have impacts on the environmental quality of training ranges. However, impacts of activities specific to Air Force Bases have not yet been intensely documented. A hydrogeological study was accomplished at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, Alberta, to evaluate the environmental impacts of using bombs, rockets, strafing, and open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) on the quality of soil, ground water, surface water, and lake sediments. Samples were analyzed for metals, anions, ammonium perchlorate (NH(4)ClO(4)), and energetic materials (EM). It was found that training activities did not result in measured values being exceeded on the basis of guidance values for surface water and lake sediments. Contamination by metals was mostly limited to soils, and some metals may be related to the use of bombs (Cd, Cu, Pb), strafe (Cu), and rockets (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, U, V, Zn). TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) was the main EM found in soils, while RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) was more common in ground water. Both are related to live bombing, while nitroglycerine (NG) is related to rocket use and was detected in soils only. Aluminum, nitrate, and ammonium perchlorate detected in ground water may be related to live bombing or rockets. OB/OD operations resulted in the presence of various EM in soils, and of perchlorate and nitrate in ground water. Contamination by metals and explosives in soils was localized around the targets and varied significantly in time; however, in ground water it was more constant and may persist for a period of several years after a target has been removed. PMID:18268292

  6. Environmental impacts of training activities at an air weapons range.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Within Canada, it has been recognized in the last decade that military training activities may have impacts on the environmental quality of training ranges. However, impacts of activities specific to Air Force Bases have not yet been intensely documented. A hydrogeological study was accomplished at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, Alberta, to evaluate the environmental impacts of using bombs, rockets, strafing, and open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) on the quality of soil, ground water, surface water, and lake sediments. Samples were analyzed for metals, anions, ammonium perchlorate (NH(4)ClO(4)), and energetic materials (EM). It was found that training activities did not result in measured values being exceeded on the basis of guidance values for surface water and lake sediments. Contamination by metals was mostly limited to soils, and some metals may be related to the use of bombs (Cd, Cu, Pb), strafe (Cu), and rockets (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, U, V, Zn). TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) was the main EM found in soils, while RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) was more common in ground water. Both are related to live bombing, while nitroglycerine (NG) is related to rocket use and was detected in soils only. Aluminum, nitrate, and ammonium perchlorate detected in ground water may be related to live bombing or rockets. OB/OD operations resulted in the presence of various EM in soils, and of perchlorate and nitrate in ground water. Contamination by metals and explosives in soils was localized around the targets and varied significantly in time; however, in ground water it was more constant and may persist for a period of several years after a target has been removed.

  7. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  8. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  9. The pulsed Doppler ultrasound flowmeter: experimental evaluation of velocity accuracy and range resolution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J M; McLeod, F D; Leroy, A F

    1977-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of blood flow patterns, particularly in the physiological state, is important to the successful study of several problems in biomedical research. The pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter offers promise of overcoming some of the difficulties present in other methods. This flowmeter can be either implantable or noninvasive. Although a number of papers describe important design criteria, the design or selection of a Doppler system for a given task remains a complex matter involving many compromises based on theoretical considerations and very limited data. Experimental data from well-defined flows are needed to help identify those areas in which ultrasonic flowmeters can be most useful. This paper defines and evaluates two important parameters for the pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter by comparing experimental results with those predicted theorectically. The first parameter is velocity accuracy; the second parameter is range resolution. Findings show that centerline flow velocities in circular tubes can be estimated to within a few percent of the correct value, and that a 1.5-mm range resolution can be realized with the system tested.

  10. Gas dispersion and immobile gas volume in solid and porous particle biofilter materials at low air flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2010-07-01

    Gas-phase dispersion in granular biofilter materials with a wide range of particle sizes was investigated using atmospheric air and nitrogen as tracer gases. Two types of materials were used: (1) light extended clay aggregates (LECA), consisting of highly porous particles, and (2) gravel, consisting of solid particles. LECA is a commercial material that is used for insulation, as a soil conditioner, and as a carrier material in biofilters for air cleaning. These two materials were selected to have approximately the same particle shape. Column gas transport experiments were conducted for both materials using different mean particle diameters, different particle size ranges, and different gas flow velocities. Measured breakthrough curves were modeled using the advection-dispersion equation modified for mass transfer between mobile and immobile gas phases. The results showed that gas dispersivity increased with increasing mean particle diameter for LECA but was independent of mean particle diameter for gravel. Gas dispersivity also increased with increasing particle size range for both media. Dispersivities in LECA were generally higher than for gravel. The mobile gas content in both materials increased with increasing gas flow velocity but it did not show any strong dependency on mean particle diameter or particle size range. The relative fraction of mobile gas compared with total porosity was highest for gravel and lowest for LECA likely because of its high internal porosity. PMID:20681430

  11. Gas dispersion and immobile gas volume in solid and porous particle biofilter materials at low air flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2010-07-01

    Gas-phase dispersion in granular biofilter materials with a wide range of particle sizes was investigated using atmospheric air and nitrogen as tracer gases. Two types of materials were used: (1) light extended clay aggregates (LECA), consisting of highly porous particles, and (2) gravel, consisting of solid particles. LECA is a commercial material that is used for insulation, as a soil conditioner, and as a carrier material in biofilters for air cleaning. These two materials were selected to have approximately the same particle shape. Column gas transport experiments were conducted for both materials using different mean particle diameters, different particle size ranges, and different gas flow velocities. Measured breakthrough curves were modeled using the advection-dispersion equation modified for mass transfer between mobile and immobile gas phases. The results showed that gas dispersivity increased with increasing mean particle diameter for LECA but was independent of mean particle diameter for gravel. Gas dispersivity also increased with increasing particle size range for both media. Dispersivities in LECA were generally higher than for gravel. The mobile gas content in both materials increased with increasing gas flow velocity but it did not show any strong dependency on mean particle diameter or particle size range. The relative fraction of mobile gas compared with total porosity was highest for gravel and lowest for LECA likely because of its high internal porosity.

  12. ADL ORVIS: an air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system.

    PubMed

    Trott, Wayne M; Castañeda, Jaime N; Cooper, Marcia A

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s(-1) fringe(-1), differences of 1-2 m s(-1) across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  13. ADL ORVIS: An air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s-1 fringe-1, differences of 1-2 m s-1 across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  14. Determination of station positions and velocities from laser ranging observations to Ajisai, Starlette and Stella satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, P.; Schillak, S.

    2011-02-01

    The positions and velocities of the four Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) stations: Yarragadee (7090), Greenbelt (7105), Graz (7839) and Herstmonceux (7840) from 5-year (2001-2005) SLR data of low orbiting satellites (LEO): Ajisai, Starlette and Stella were determined. The orbits of these satellites were computed from the data provided by 20 SLR stations. All orbital computations were performed by means of NASA Goddard’s GEODYN-II program. The geocentric coordinates were transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West and Vertical components in reference to ITRF2005. The influence of the number of normal points per orbital arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on the quality of station coordinates was studied. To get standard deviation of the coordinates determination lower than 1 cm, the number of the normal points per site had to be greater than 50. The computed positions and velocities were compared to those derived from LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 data. Three parameters were used for this comparison: station coordinates stability, differences from ITRF2005 positions and velocities. The stability of coordinates of LEO satellites is significantly worse (17.8 mm) than those of LAGEOS (7.6 mm), the better results are for Ajisai (15.4 mm) than for Starlette/Stella (20.4 mm). The difference in positions between the computed values and ITRF2005 were little bit worse for Starlette/Stella (6.6 mm) than for LAGEOS (4.6 mm), the results for Ajisai were five times worse (29.7 mm) probably due to center of mass correction of this satellite. The station velocities with some exceptions were on the same level (≈1 mm/year) for all satellites. The results presented in this work show that results from Starlette/Stella are better than those from Ajisai for station coordinates determination. We can applied the data from LEO satellites, especially Starlette and Stella for determination of the SLR station coordinates but with two times lower accuracy than when using LAGEOS

  15. Optimization and investigation of the effect of velocity distribution of air curtains on the performance of food refrigerated display cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XueHong; Chang, ZhiJuan; Ma, QiuYang; Lu, YanLi; Yin, XueMei

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on improving the performance of the vertical open refrigerated display cabinets (VORDC) by optimizing the structure of deflector, which is affected by inlet velocity and velocity distribution of air curtains. The results show that the temperature of products located at the front and at the rear reduces as the increases of inlet velocity of air curtains. The increase of the inlet velocity of air curtains can strengthen the disturbance inside the VORDC, and also decrease the temperature of products inside the VORDC; the increase of the outer velocity of air curtain will exacerbate the disturbance outside the VORDC and decrease air curtain's performance. The present study can provide a theoretical foundation for the design of VORDC.

  16. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  17. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  18. An empirical model of human aspiration in low-velocity air using CFD investigations.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Anderson, Kimberly R

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed to investigate the aspiration efficiency of the human head in low velocities to examine whether the current inhaled particulate mass (IPM) sampling criterion matches the aspiration efficiency of an inhaling human in airflows common to worker exposures. Data from both mouth and nose inhalation, averaged to assess omnidirectional aspiration efficiencies, were compiled and used to generate a unifying model to relate particle size to aspiration efficiency of the human head. Multiple linear regression was used to generate an empirical model to estimate human aspiration efficiency and included particle size as well as breathing and freestream velocities as dependent variables. A new set of simulated mouth and nose breathing aspiration efficiencies was generated and used to test the fit of empirical models. Further, empirical relationships between test conditions and CFD estimates of aspiration were compared to experimental data from mannequin studies, including both calm-air and ultra-low velocity experiments. While a linear relationship between particle size and aspiration is reported in calm air studies, the CFD simulations identified a more reasonable fit using the square of particle aerodynamic diameter, which better addressed the shape of the efficiency curve's decline toward zero for large particles. The ultimate goal of this work was to develop an empirical model that incorporates real-world variations in critical factors associated with particle aspiration to inform low-velocity modifications to the inhalable particle sampling criterion.

  19. Airborne nanoparticle exposures while using constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain-isolated fume hoods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Jung Candace; Huang, Rong Fung; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Tsai et al. (Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods. J Nanopart Res 2009; 11: 147-61) found that the handling of dry nanoalumina and nanosilver inside laboratory fume hoods can cause a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the hood. Hood design affects the magnitude of release. With traditionally designed fume hoods, the airflow moves horizontally toward the hood cupboard; the turbulent airflow formed in the worker wake region interacts with the vortex in the constant-flow fume hood and this can cause nanoparticles to be carried out with the circulating airflow. Airborne particle concentrations were measured for three hood designs (constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain hoods) using manual handling of nanoalumina particles. The hood operator's airborne nanoparticle breathing zone exposure was measured over the size range from 5 nm to 20 mum. Experiments showed that the exposure magnitude for a constant-flow hood had high variability. The results for the constant-velocity hood varied by operating conditions, but were usually very low. The performance of the air-curtain hood, a new design with significantly different airflow pattern from traditional hoods, was consistent under all operating conditions and release was barely detected. Fog tests showed more intense turbulent airflow in traditional hoods and that the downward airflow from the double-layered sash to the suction slot of the air-curtain hood did not cause turbulence seen in other hoods. PMID:19933309

  20. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  1. The effect of air temperature, velocity and visual lean (VL) composition on the tempering times of frozen boneless beef blocks.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tim; James, Stephen J

    2006-08-01

    Beef blocks of two compositions, 100% and 50% visual lean (VL), in standard commercial packaging with nominal dimensions of 510×390×150mm were tempered from -18°C to -3°C using air at temperatures from 3°C to -3°C and velocities of 0.5 and 5ms(-1). These conditions were then modelled using a finite difference mathematical model and the accuracy of the model assessed by comparison with the experimental results. An extended range of conditions (including an intermediate air velocity of 2ms(-1) and an intermediate composition of 75% VL) was then modelled to produce data that can be used to design tempering processes. The results show that single stage air tempering of even single blocks within their cartons needs to be a long process. In air at 3°C and 5ms(-1), blocks of 50% VL rose to deep temperatures of -10°C and -3°C after 4.0 and 22.5h, respectively, while with 100% VL 4.6 and 27.3h were required. Under these conditions, the surface layers of the meat would have spent many hours in a thawed condition that would be detrimental to both drip and optimal processing. Using lower temperatures avoids thawing and at the same time produces an optimum temperature difference for subsequent processing. However, tempering times are substantially extended. For example, times to the above temperatures using air at -1°C and 5ms(-1) were 4.8 and 37.5h for 50% VL and 5.1 and 44.5h for 100% VL.

  2. Correlation of turbulent burning velocities of ethanol-air, measured in a fan-stirred bomb up to 1.2 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Mansour, M.S.

    2011-01-15

    The turbulent burning velocity is defined by the mass rate of burning and this also requires that the associated flame surface area should be defined. Previous measurements of the radial distribution of the mean reaction progress variable in turbulent explosion flames provide a basis for definitions of such surface areas for turbulent burning velocities. These inter-relationships. in general, are different from those for burner flames. Burning velocities are presented for a spherical flame surface, at which the mass of unburned gas inside it is equal to the mass of burned gas outside it. These can readily be transformed to burning velocities based on other surfaces. The measurements of the turbulent burning velocities presented are the mean from five different explosions, all under the same conditions. These cover a wide range of equivalence ratios, pressures and rms turbulent velocities for ethanol-air mixtures. Two techniques are employed, one based on measurements of high speed schlieren images, the other on pressure transducer measurements. There is good agreement between turbulent burning velocities measured by the two techniques. All the measurement are generalised in plots of burning velocity normalised by the effective unburned gas rms velocity as a function of the Karlovitz stretch factor for different strain rate Markstein numbers. For a given value of this stretch factor a decrease in Markstein number increases the normalised burning velocity. Comparisons are made with the findings of other workers. (author)

  3. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  4. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature. PMID:11538791

  5. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  6. Constraining depth range of S wave velocity decrease after large earthquakes near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunquan; Delorey, Andrew; Brenguier, Florent; Hadziioannou, Celine; Daub, Eric G.; Johnson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We use noise correlation and surface wave inversion to measure the S wave velocity changes at different depths near Parkfield, California, after the 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. We process continuous seismic recordings from 13 stations to obtain the noise cross-correlation functions and measure the Rayleigh wave phase velocity changes over six frequency bands. We then invert the Rayleigh wave phase velocity changes using a series of sensitivity kernels to obtain the S wave velocity changes at different depths. Our results indicate that the S wave velocity decreases caused by the San Simeon earthquake are relatively small (~0.02%) and access depths of at least 2.3 km. The S wave velocity decreases caused by the Parkfield earthquake are larger (~0.2%), and access depths of at least 1.2 km. Our observations can be best explained by material damage and healing resulting mainly from the dynamic stress perturbations of the two large earthquakes.

  7. Cytoplasmic dynein binding, run length, and velocity are guided by long-range electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Alper, Joshua; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are important molecular motors involved in many essential biological processes, including cargo transport along microtubules, mitosis, and in cilia. Dynein motility involves the coupling of microtubule binding and unbinding to a change in the configuration of the linker domain induced by ATP hydrolysis, which occur some 25 nm apart. This leaves the accuracy of dynein stepping relatively inaccurate and susceptible to thermal noise. Using multi-scale modeling with a computational focusing technique, we demonstrate that the microtubule forms an electrostatic funnel that guides the dynein’s microtubule binding domain (MTBD) as it finally docks to the precise, keyed binding location on the microtubule. Furthermore, we demonstrate that electrostatic component of the MTBD’s binding free energy is linearly correlated with the velocity and run length of dynein, and we use this linearity to predict the effect of mutating each glutamic and aspartic acid located in MTBD domain to alanine. Lastly, we show that the binding of dynein to the microtubule is associated with conformational changes involving several helices, and we localize flexible hinge points within the stalk helices. Taken all together, we demonstrate that long range electrostatic interactions bring a level of precision to an otherwise noisy dynein stepping process. PMID:27531742

  8. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  9. Effects of light intensity light quality and air velocity on temperature in plant reproductive organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Excess temperature increase in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmata could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions in closed plant growth facilities There is a possibility that the aberration was caused by an excess increase in temperatures of reproductive organs in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space The fundamental study was conducted to know the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by light intensity light quality and air velocity on the earth and to estimate the excess temperature increase in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities in space Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 10 r C The temperatures in flowers at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under the lights from red LEDs white LEDs blue LEDs fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps increased by 1 4 1 7 1 9 6 0 and 25 3 r C respectively for rice and by 2 8 3 4 4 1 7 8 and 43 4 r C respectively for strawberry The flower temperatures increased with increasing PPFD levels The temperatures in petals anthers and stigmas of strawberry at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under incandescent lamps increased by 32 7 29 0 and 26 6 r C respectively at 0 1 m s -1 air velocity and by 20 6 18 5 and 15 9 r C respectively at 0 8 m s -1 air velocity The temperatures of reproductive organs decreased with increasing

  10. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  11. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  12. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  13. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  14. A wide-frequency-range air-jet shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Robert W

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a simple air-jet shaker. Its force can be calibrated statically and appears to be constant with frequency. It is relatively easy to use, and it has essentially massless characteristics. This shaker is applied to define the unstable branch of a frequency-response curve obtained for a nonlinear spring with a single degree of freedom.

  15. An Idea of Staged and Large Velocity Differential Secondary Air for Waterwall Erosion Protection and Oxygen Complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Q.; Zhang, X. H.

    A successful design of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler should have the highest combustion efficiency, economic operation, and optimum availability. There is a coupled phenomenon of an oxygen lean zone existing in the CFB boiler furnace which depresses combustion efficiency and particle (group) falling down faster and faster when it falls along the waterwall, abrading the tube metal effectively. A new secondary air design for the oxygen lean zone and erosion protection is conceived by using staged and large velocity differential secondary air. For example, a part of concentrate supplied secondary air has been divided into two parts: a low velocity part and a high velocity part. The low velocity part is used for rigid gas layer to reduce the particle falling velocity, and the high velocity part is used for oxygen supply. It is believed that 40˜6Om/s projecting air velocity could send new oxygen to at least half furnace depth in a short projecting lift as shown in calculation. In another view point, operational superficial gas velocity has an obvious effect on waterwall metal erosion, with a lower operation velocity having lower erosion.

  16. Prediction of velocities for a range of streamflow conditions in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, L.A.; Stuckey, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    A regression equation that is used nationwide to predict traveltime in streams during periods of low and moderate flow was developed by H.E. Jobson in 1996. Because none of the data used in the development of the equation were from streams in Pennsylvania, velocities for low and moderate flows predicted by the equation were compared to velocities measured during time-of-travel studies on the Susquehanna, Delaware, and Lehigh Rivers. Although these comparisons showed good agreement, a similar comparison using velocities for higher flows indicated an overestimate by this regression equation. Because of the need for a method of computing traveltimes for periods of high flows, a new regression equation was developed using data from three sources: (1) time-of-travel studies conducted at low and moderate flow, (2) slopearea measurements of flood flows, and (3) velocities of the 100-year floodway as reported in various flood-insurance studies. The new regression equation can be used for predicting velocities associated with flows up to the 100-year flood for Pennsylvania streams. It has standard errors of estimate of 0.18 feet per second, 0.37 feet per second; and 0.31 feet per second, for time-of-travel studies in the Susquehanna, Delaware, and Lehigh Rivers, respectively. The standard error of estimate is 1.71 feet per second for velocities determined from the slope-area measurements and 1.22 feet per second for velocities determined from the flood-insurance studies.

  17. Active-passive bistatic surveillance for long range air defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wardrop, B.; Molyneux-Berry, M.R.B. )

    1992-06-01

    A hypothetical mobile support receiver capable of working within existing and future air defense networks as a means to maintain essential surveillance functions is considered. It is shown how multibeam receiver architecture supported by digital signal processing can substantially improve surveillance performance against chaff and jamming threats. A dual-mode support receiver concept is proposed which is based on the state-of-the-art phased-array technology, modular processing in industry standard hardware and existing networks. 20 refs.

  18. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  19. Long-range transport modeling of air pollution episodes.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, F A; Leyssius, H J

    1989-02-01

    The air quality network in the Netherlands is based on a regular grid with an interstation distance of 30 to 40 km. In or close to source areas, a higher station density is realized. Atmospheric transport models form an intrinsic part of the air quality monitoring system. The models are constructed in such a way that only routinely available meteorological input data are needed. The models are applied for interpretation and generalization of the measurements in terms of contributions of source categories. In scenario studies, the potential effect of abatement strategies is explored. The output of the models consists of concentration and deposition fields of NOx, NO2, SO2, sulfate, and nitrate on the scale of the Netherlands or on the scale of northwestern Europe. In the present version the models are not directly suitable to estimate exposures to acidic aerosols; however, in combination with limited aerosol measurements, the model predictions can be used to provide information on the spatial and temporal distribution of acidic aerosols as needed for exposure assessment.

  20. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  1. A methodology for long-range prediction of air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayati, M. B.; English, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A framework and methodology for long term projection of demand for aviation fuels is presented. The approach taken includes two basic components. The first was a new technique for establishing the socio-economic environment within which the future aviation industry is embedded. The concept utilized was a definition of an overall societal objective for the very long run future. Within a framework so defined, a set of scenarios by which the future will unfold are then written. These scenarios provide the determinants of the air transport industry operations and accordingly provide an assessment of future fuel requirements. The second part was the modeling of the industry in terms of an abstracted set of variables to represent the overall industry performance on a macro scale. The model was validated by testing the desired output variables from the model with historical data over the past decades.

  2. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Validation of a CFD model by using 3D sonic anemometers to analyse the air velocity generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-22

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values.

  4. Validation of a CFD Model by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611

  5. Strategic Long Range Planning for Universities. AIR Forum 1980 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael E.

    The use of strategic long-range planning at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) is discussed. A structure for strategic planning analysis that integrates existing techniques is presented, and examples of planning activities at CMU are included. The key concept in strategic planning is competitive advantage: if a university has a competitive…

  6. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  7. Determination of Optimal Velocity Ranges Based on the Shape Profiles of Two Passive Surface Water Flux Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, J. C.; Klammler, H.; Jawitz, J. W.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M.

    2004-12-01

    A method is presented for direct measurement of cumulative surface water flux (discharge) and solute flux using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Both the water velocity and the shape, or bluntness, of the device are important for determining the flow profile around a submerged body. Theoretically, the PSFM should provide the most precise cumulative flux measurements when the shape of the device is as blunt as possible without creating a separation region or a downstream wake. This study examined how the shape of the PSFM affects the accuracy of the cumulative flux data and determined the optimal velocity ranges under which each shape profile could be used. In this experiment, blunt (cylindrical) and streamlined (Joukowsky profile) shapes were tested. Both of these devices were examined under a range of velocities in a laboratory flume. Results showed that the blunt shape provided more accurate water and solute flux measurements at lower velocities, whereas the streamlined shape provided more accurate measurements at higher velocities. These findings indicate that the shape profile of the PSFM may be adjusted to provide the most accurate cumulative water and solute flux measurements when deployed in known flow regimes.

  8. Control of wind power stations with variable velocity in a large range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, B.; Ulen, E.

    1986-06-01

    Wind turbine control was performed by keeping the velocity ratio optimal up to a certain torque. At higher wind speed the turbine speed is allowed to augment at constant torque, to produce more power. When maximum speed is obtained, a blade regulation is inserted: adjustment to optimal speed is done by feedforward control. A torque (dependant on rotor speed) is imparted to the shaft by an electric control. The turbine then goes to the right speed.

  9. [Estimates of velocity of the travelling wave in the high-range cochlea of the dolphin].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2014-07-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound pulses of precisely defined spectrum band of 0.5 oct (from 11.2-16 to 90-128 kHz) were recorded in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus. At equal stimulus levels, ABR amplitude depended on the stimulus spectrum band: the higher the frequency, the higher the amplitude. ABR waveform little depended on the stimulus spectrum band, however ABR latency did depend: the higher the frequency, the shorter the latency. The latency difference between responses to the lowest-frequency (11.2-16 kHz) and the highest-frequency (90-129 kHz) stimuli was up to 0.3 ms. This latency difference was attributed to the time of the wave travelling along the basilar membrane. Therefore, the data were used to compute the travelling-wave velocity. The obtained estimates were: 38.2 oct/ms at the proximal (high-frequ- ency) end of the basilar membrane to 2.8 oct/ms at the distal (low-frequency) end. Comparison of the travelling-wave velocities in humans and dolphins shows that the travelling-wave velocity is linked to the characteristic frequency, not to the place in the cochlea.

  10. [Estimates of velocity of the travelling wave in the high-range cochlea of the dolphin].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2014-07-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound pulses of precisely defined spectrum band of 0.5 oct (from 11.2-16 to 90-128 kHz) were recorded in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus. At equal stimulus levels, ABR amplitude depended on the stimulus spectrum band: the higher the frequency, the higher the amplitude. ABR waveform little depended on the stimulus spectrum band, however ABR latency did depend: the higher the frequency, the shorter the latency. The latency difference between responses to the lowest-frequency (11.2-16 kHz) and the highest-frequency (90-129 kHz) stimuli was up to 0.3 ms. This latency difference was attributed to the time of the wave travelling along the basilar membrane. Therefore, the data were used to compute the travelling-wave velocity. The obtained estimates were: 38.2 oct/ms at the proximal (high-frequ- ency) end of the basilar membrane to 2.8 oct/ms at the distal (low-frequency) end. Comparison of the travelling-wave velocities in humans and dolphins shows that the travelling-wave velocity is linked to the characteristic frequency, not to the place in the cochlea. PMID:25669111

  11. Fragmentation of molecules sliding along surfaces in the speed range above thermal and below Bohr velocity.

    PubMed

    Jungclas, H; Wieghaus, A; Schmidt, L; Popova, A M; Komarov, V V

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical model and experimental time-of-flight mass spectrometric data for the fragmentation of molecules grazing along surfaces at velocities v = 10(5)-10(6) cm/s are presented. The effect of enhanced surface-induced dissociation at grazing incidence (GI-SID) is shown for hexadecylpyridine ions. The velocity dependence of the GI-SID fragmentation probability is studied in experiments with adduct ions of cyclodextrin derivatives. Surfaces used in the various collision experiments are aluminum oxide, gold, and a liquid film of perfluorinated polyether. In the theoretical model of the GI-SID effect we consider polyatomic molecules with substructures consisting of chains of identical biatomic dipoles. Because of the interaction with the periodic Coulomb field of the surface, collective vibrational excitations (excimols) are induced in these chains. Energy accumulation of several excimols and a subsequent energy transfer to a trap bond can induce its dissociation. An analytical expression for the velocity dependent GI-SID fragmentation probability is given, which is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Investigation of the Low Velocity Zone Beneath the Southern Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2003-12-01

    Following the work by Helmberger (1973), we use waveform recordings of P arrivals at distances from 6o to 20o to investigate the structure of the low velocity zone (LVZ) or asthenosphere. In contrast to the previous study, broadband data (TriNet and BDSN) is used at a much smaller station spacing providing higher along path and depth resolution. For this study, a well recorded earthquake in the central Gulf of California (Mw 6.3) produces transitions from PnL to P410 across all of California and western Nevada. The nature of these transitions indicates the thickness and gradients of the LVZ and the lithosphere. Initial findings show large variations of lithosphere and LVZ structure from east to west below California. By varying the lithosphere compressional velocity and depth of the LVZ in 1-D models, a database of synthetics waveforms is created to guide the development of realistic 2-D (along path) and 3-D (against azimuth) description of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. The character of the P arrivals changes dramatically near 9-11o with the emergence of a higher frequencies over-printing the longer-period PnL arrivals. Coastal California stations show these arrivals at the shortest distances, 9o indicating the lithosphere velocity and gradient below the LVZ are high. This is in opposition to those arrivals on the east which do not record the high frequency arrivals until 11o. As the distances reach 13o, a large amplitude, high frequency phase is present 10-15 seconds behind the initial P arrival. The emergence of the large secondary phase occurs at different distances across California with a pattern similar to before. At this distance, a change in the apparent velocity of the first arrival also occurs. Further in distance, the width of the initial P arrival and the energy following, or lack thereof, points to the shape of the underlying LVZ. Coastal stations and those in the central portion of California show larger amplitude arrivals following the initial P

  13. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  14. The stopping of heavy ions in the low-to-intermediate energy range: The apparent velocity threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Arista, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a non-linear study of the energy loss of heavy ions in solids, which is based on the transport cross section (TCS) and the extension of the Friedel sum rule (EFSR) for moving ions. We apply this approach to study the velocity dependence of the energy loss of heavy ions in the energy region below the stopping power maximum. With this formulation we are able to explain some striking effects in the energy loss of heavy ions which have been experimentally observed long time ago (Brown and Moak (1972) [14]), but have not been explained so far by the existing theoretical models: the deviations from the proportionality with ion velocity (predicted by alternative models in the low energy range), and the "apparent velocity threshold".

  15. Contrasting sound velocity and intermediate-range structural order between polymerized and depolymerized silicate glasses under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Kono, Yoshio; Wang, Yanbin; Park, Changyong; Yu, Tony; Jing, Zhicheng; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements of three silicate glasses (in jadeite, albite, and diopside compositions) show a sharp contrast in pressure-induced changes in structure and elasticity. With increasing pressure to around 6 GPa, polymerized glasses (jadeite and albite) display large shift in the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the structure factor, S(Q), to higher-Q values, indicating rapid shrinkage in the intermediate-range ordered (IRO) structure. Above 6 GPa, the shift of FSDP decelerates, suggesting that shrinkage in the IRO structure has been largely completed and the structure evolution is now dominated by the diminution of the interstitial volume in a more densely packed arrangement. Associated with this structural change, sound velocities increase with pressure above 6 GPa. In contrast, the depolymerized diopside glass exhibits smaller changes in the pressure dependence for both sound velocities and FSDP positions. Compared to the polymerized glasses, the velocities are faster and the positions of FSDP appear at higher-Q under the same experimental conditions. The results suggest that the depolymerized diopside glass has an initially denser IRO structure compared to that of the polymerized glasses, and there are no sufficient interstitial voids to shrink. The different behaviors between polymerized and depolymerized glasses are apparently related to the initial linkage of tetrahedra and the pressure-induced structural reactions. These results suggest that under compression up to 10 GPa, the degree of polymerization is a major factor affecting the IRO network structure and the sound velocity of silicate glasses.

  16. On the coefficients of small eddy and surface divergence models for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian; Fillingham, Joseph H.; Bootsma, Harvey A.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggested that under low to moderate wind conditions without bubble entraining wave breaking, the air-water gas transfer velocity k+ can be mechanistically parameterized by the near-surface turbulence, following the small eddy model (SEM). Field measurements have supported this model in a variety of environmental forcing systems. Alternatively, surface divergence model (SDM) has also been shown to predict the gas transfer velocity across the air-water interface in laboratory settings. However, the empirically determined model coefficients (α in SEM and c1 in SDM) scattered over a wide range. Here we present the first field measurement of the near-surface turbulence with a novel floating PIV system on Lake Michigan, which allows us to evaluate the SEM and SDM in situ in the natural environment. k+ was derived from the CO2 flux that was measured simultaneously with a floating gas chamber. Measured results indicate that α and c1 are not universal constants. Regression analysis showed that α˜log>(ɛ>) while the near-surface turbulence dissipation rate ɛ is approximately greater than 10-6 m2 s-3 according to data measured for this study as well as from other published results measured in similar environments or in laboratory settings. It also showed that α scales linearly with the turbulent Reynolds number. Similarly, coefficient c1 in the SDM was found to linearly scale with the Reynolds number. These findings suggest that larger eddies are also important parameters, and the dissipation rate in the SEM or the surface divergence β' in the SDM alone may not be adequate to determine k+ completely.

  17. Global positioning system data analysis: velocity ranges and a new definition of sprinting for field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Dan B; Gabbett, Tim J

    2012-03-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology has improved the speed, accuracy, and ease of time-motion analyses of field sport athletes. The large volume of numerical data generated by GPS technology is usually summarized by reporting the distance traveled and time spent in various locomotor categories (e.g., walking, jogging, and running). There are a variety of definitions used in the literature to represent these categories, which makes it nearly impossible to compare findings among studies. The purpose of this work was to propose standard definitions (velocity ranges) that were determined by an objective analysis of time-motion data. In addition, we discuss the limitations of the existing definition of a sprint and present a new definition of sprinting for field sport athletes. Twenty-five GPS data files collected from 5 different sports (men's and women's field hockey, men's and women's soccer, and Australian Rules Football) were analyzed to identify the average velocity distribution. A curve fitting process was then used to determine the optimal placement of 4 Gaussian curves representing the typical locomotor categories. Based on the findings of these analyses, we make recommendations about sport-specific velocity ranges to be used in future time-motion studies of field sport athletes. We also suggest that a sprint be defined as any movement that reaches or exceeds the sprint threshold velocity for at least 1 second and any movement with an acceleration that occurs within the highest 5% of accelerations found in the corresponding velocity range. From a practical perspective, these analyses provide conditioning coaches with information on the high-intensity sprinting demands of field sport athletes, while also providing a novel method of capturing maximal effort, short-duration sprints.

  18. Developing air quality goals and policies for long-range plans

    SciTech Connect

    Full, D.J.; Mitchell, D.

    1995-12-01

    Air Quality Guidelines for General Plans (Air Quality Guidelines) is a guidance document and resource for cities and counties to use to address air quality in their long-range planning efforts. It includes goals, policies, and programs that when adopted as part of a long-range plan will reduce vehicle trips and miles traveled and improve air quality. Although this is a voluntary program, the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (District) has strongly encouraged cities and counties in the San Joaquin Valley to use their land use and transportation planning authority to help achieve air quality goals by adopting the policies and programs suggested by the Air Quality Guidelines. Implementing the goals and policies will result in a win-win situation where cities, counties, and developers save money through more efficient land use and transportation systems and where the public benefits from a more livable community and better air quality. The purpose of the Air Quality Guidelines is threefold: (1) to provide local planning agencies with a comprehensive set of goals and policies that will improve air quality if adopted as part of a long-range plan; (2) to provide a guide to cities and counties for determining which goals and policies are appropriate in their particular community; and (3) to provide justification and rationale for the goals and policies that will convince decision-makers and the public that they are appropriate and necessary.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  20. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  1. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  2. Geographical limits to species-range shifts are suggested by climate velocity.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Michael T; Schoeman, David S; Richardson, Anthony J; Molinos, Jorge García; Hoffmann, Ary; Buckley, Lauren B; Moore, Pippa J; Brown, Christopher J; Bruno, John F; Duarte, Carlos M; Halpern, Benjamin S; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Kappel, Carrie V; Kiessling, Wolfgang; O'Connor, Mary I; Pandolfi, John M; Parmesan, Camille; Sydeman, William J; Ferrier, Simon; Williams, Kristen J; Poloczanska, Elvira S

    2014-03-27

    The reorganization of patterns of species diversity driven by anthropogenic climate change, and the consequences for humans, are not yet fully understood or appreciated. Nevertheless, changes in climate conditions are useful for predicting shifts in species distributions at global and local scales. Here we use the velocity of climate change to derive spatial trajectories for climatic niches from 1960 to 2009 (ref. 7) and from 2006 to 2100, and use the properties of these trajectories to infer changes in species distributions. Coastlines act as barriers and locally cooler areas act as attractors for trajectories, creating source and sink areas for local climatic conditions. Climate source areas indicate where locally novel conditions are not connected to areas where similar climates previously occurred, and are thereby inaccessible to climate migrants tracking isotherms: 16% of global surface area for 1960 to 2009, and 34% of ocean for the 'business as usual' climate scenario (representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5) representing continued use of fossil fuels without mitigation. Climate sink areas are where climate conditions locally disappear, potentially blocking the movement of climate migrants. Sink areas comprise 1.0% of ocean area and 3.6% of land and are prevalent on coasts and high ground. Using this approach to infer shifts in species distributions gives global and regional maps of the expected direction and rate of shifts of climate migrants, and suggests areas of potential loss of species richness.

  3. Base deformation of full metal-jacketed rifle bullets as a measure of impact velocity and range of fire.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lucien C

    2015-03-01

    Full metal-jacketed rifle bullets with lead cores and open bases can experience deformation of their cylindrical shapes as they yaw during the penetration of soft tissues. The amount of deformation depends upon the strength of the bullet and the velocity in soft tissue when they go into yaw. The yaw behavior of a bullet in soft tissue depends upon its design (length, ogive shape, ogive length, center of gravity, and pre-impact stability) as it penetrates soft tissue. The yaw characteristics of common spitzer-type military rifle bullets are relatively well known and quite reproducible when fired into suitable soft tissue simulants. This, in turn, results in a relationship between the amount of deformation of the bullet's shank and impact velocity with soft tissue. The specific relationship between impact velocity and bullet deformation must be worked out through empirical testing, but this relationship can be of critical importance in determining impact velocity, which, in turn, relates to range of fire.

  4. Base deformation of full metal-jacketed rifle bullets as a measure of impact velocity and range of fire.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lucien C

    2015-03-01

    Full metal-jacketed rifle bullets with lead cores and open bases can experience deformation of their cylindrical shapes as they yaw during the penetration of soft tissues. The amount of deformation depends upon the strength of the bullet and the velocity in soft tissue when they go into yaw. The yaw behavior of a bullet in soft tissue depends upon its design (length, ogive shape, ogive length, center of gravity, and pre-impact stability) as it penetrates soft tissue. The yaw characteristics of common spitzer-type military rifle bullets are relatively well known and quite reproducible when fired into suitable soft tissue simulants. This, in turn, results in a relationship between the amount of deformation of the bullet's shank and impact velocity with soft tissue. The specific relationship between impact velocity and bullet deformation must be worked out through empirical testing, but this relationship can be of critical importance in determining impact velocity, which, in turn, relates to range of fire. PMID:25594572

  5. Model of optical nonlinearity of air in the mid-IR wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A

    2014-09-30

    A model of optical nonlinearity of air (atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen) is developed. This model can be used to calculate numerically the propagation of radiation with a wavelength close to 10 μm. It takes into account the electronic Kerr effect, higher order nonlinearities, ionisation of a gas medium by electron impact, and pulse group-velocity dispersion. The applicability limits of the Drude approximation for calculating the impact-ionisation rate are also considered. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. Range and velocity independent classification of humans and animals using a profiling sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chari, Srikant; Smith, Forrest; Halford, Carl; Jacobs, Eddie; Brooks, Jason

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents object profile classification results using range and speed independent features from an infrared profiling sensor. The passive infrared profiling sensor was simulated using a LWIR camera. Field data collected near the US-Mexico border to yield profiles of humans and animals is reported. Range and speed independent features based on height and width of the objects were extracted from profiles. The profile features were then used to train and test three classification algorithms to classify objects as humans or animals. The performance of Naïve Bayesian (NB), K-Nearest Neighbors (K-NN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are compared based on their classification accuracy. Results indicate that for our data set all three algorithms achieve classification rates of over 98%. The field data is also used to validate our prior data collections from more controlled environments.

  7. Rich methane/air flames: Burning velocities, extinction limits, and flammability limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bui-Pham, M.N.; Miller, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A theoretical investigation has been conducted to establish a reliable chemical kinetic mechanism that can determine the extinction limit of opposed-flow, strained, rich premixed methane-air flames. In the process of developing this kinetic representation for rich methane-air flames, we found that the heat of formation of {sup 1}CH{sub 2}=102.5 kcal/mole, which is 1 kcal/mole higher than the currently available thermochemical data, gives the best agreement with experimental data on burning velocities for equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7. Employing this value for {Delta}H{sub f{sup 1}CH{sub 2}} in our calculations, the extinction stretch rate, K{sub ex}, was found to be K{sub ex}=2250 sec {sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.0, K{sub ex}=2000 sec{sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.1, and K{sub ex}=1400 sec{sup {minus}1} for {phi}=1.2. These results agree better with experiments than those using a lower heat of formation of singlet methylene. In comparison with previous calculations made by Kee et al., our predictions are basically the same except that our extinction stretch rate is slightly higher at {phi}=1.0 and that our location of the maximum extinction stretch rate is closer to that found in experiments. In addition, we establish the rich flammability limit using two different criteria to be approximately between {phi}=1.61 and {phi}=1.68, which agrees very well with an experimental value of {phi}=1.67.

  8. Velocities of southern Basin and Range xenoliths: insights on the nature of lower crustal reflectivity and composistion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Christensen, Nikolas I.; Wilshire, Howard G.

    1995-01-01

    To reconcile differences between the assessments of crustal composition in the southern Basin and Range province on the basis of seismic refraction and reflection data and lower-crustal xenoliths, we measured velocities of xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field in southern California. Lower-crustal samples studied included gabbro, microgabbro, and pyroxenite. We find that the mafic xenolith velocities are compatible with regional in situ measurements from seismic refraction studies, provided that a mixture of gabbro and pyroxenite is present in the lower crust. Supporting this model are observations that many of the lower-crustal xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field are composites of these rock types, with igneous contacts. Vertical incidence synthetic seismograms show that a gabbroic lower crust with occasional pyroxenite layering can produce a reflective lower crust that is similar in texture to that shown by seismic reflection data recorded nearby.

  9. Determining position, velocity and acceleration of free-ranging animals with a low-cost unmanned aerial system.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard J; Roskilly, Kyle; Buse, Chris; Evans, Hannah K; Hubel, Tatjana Y; Wilson, Alan M

    2016-09-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs), frequently referred to as 'drones', have become more common and affordable and are a promising tool for collecting data on free-ranging wild animals. We used a Phantom-2 UAS equipped with a gimbal-mounted camera to estimate position, velocity and acceleration of a subject on the ground moving through a grid of GPS surveyed ground control points (area ∼1200 m(2)). We validated the accuracy of the system against a dual frequency survey grade GPS system attached to the subject. When compared with GPS survey data, the estimations of position, velocity and acceleration had a root mean square error of 0.13 m, 0.11 m s(-1) and 2.31 m s(-2), respectively. The system can be used to collect locomotion and localisation data on multiple free-ranging animals simultaneously. It does not require specialist skills to operate, is easily transported to field locations, and is rapidly and easily deployed. It is therefore a useful addition to the range of methods available for field data collection on free-ranging animal locomotion.

  10. Determining position, velocity and acceleration of free-ranging animals with a low-cost unmanned aerial system.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard J; Roskilly, Kyle; Buse, Chris; Evans, Hannah K; Hubel, Tatjana Y; Wilson, Alan M

    2016-09-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs), frequently referred to as 'drones', have become more common and affordable and are a promising tool for collecting data on free-ranging wild animals. We used a Phantom-2 UAS equipped with a gimbal-mounted camera to estimate position, velocity and acceleration of a subject on the ground moving through a grid of GPS surveyed ground control points (area ∼1200 m(2)). We validated the accuracy of the system against a dual frequency survey grade GPS system attached to the subject. When compared with GPS survey data, the estimations of position, velocity and acceleration had a root mean square error of 0.13 m, 0.11 m s(-1) and 2.31 m s(-2), respectively. The system can be used to collect locomotion and localisation data on multiple free-ranging animals simultaneously. It does not require specialist skills to operate, is easily transported to field locations, and is rapidly and easily deployed. It is therefore a useful addition to the range of methods available for field data collection on free-ranging animal locomotion. PMID:27353230

  11. Effect of the entrained air and initial droplet velocity on the release height parameter of a Gaussian spray drift model.

    PubMed

    Stainier, C; Destain, M F; Schiffers, B; Lebeau, F

    2006-01-01

    The increased concern about environmental effect of off-target deposits of pesticides use has resulted in the development of numerous spray drift models. Statistical models based on experimental field studies are used to estimate off-target deposits for different sprayers in various environmental conditions. Random-walk and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been used to predict the effect of operational parameters and were extensively validated in wind tunnel. A third group, Gaussian dispersion models have been used for several years for the environmental assessment of the pesticide spray drift, mainly for aerial application. When these models were used for the evaluation of boom sprayer spray drift, their predictions were found unreliable in the short range, were the initial release conditions of the droplets have a significant effect on the spray deposits. For longer ranges, the results were found consistent with the field measurements as the characteristics of the source have a reduced influence on the small droplets drift. Three major parameters must be taken into account in order to define realistic initial conditions of the droplets in a spray drift model: the spray pattern of the nozzle, the boom movements and the effect of entrained air and droplet velocities. To take theses parameters into account in a Gaussian model, the nozzle droplet size distribution measured with a PIV setup to divide the nozzle output into several size classes. The spray deposits of each diameter class was computed for each successive position of the nozzle combining the nozzle spray distribution with drift computed with a Gaussian tilting plume model. The summation of these footprints resulted in the global drift of the nozzle. For increasing droplet size, the release height used in the Gaussian model was decreased from nozzle height to ground level using an experimental law to take into account the effect of entrained air and droplet initial velocity. The experimental

  12. INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AIR VELOCITY, AND AMPLIFICATION ON THE EMISSION RATES OF FUNGAL SPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the impact of relative humidity (RH), air velocity, and surface growth on the emission rates of fungal spores from the surface of contaminated material. Although the results show a complex interaction of factors, we have determined, for this limited data set,...

  13. Determination of burst initiation location and tear propagation velocity during air burst testing of latex condoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1991-04-01

    The stress testing of latex condoms by an air burst procedure has been slow in gaining industry acceptance because questions have been raised regarding the influence of the test apparatus on the likelihood of breakage occurring where the condom is attached to the inflation device. It was desired to locate the areas at which the condoms tend to burst and thus corroborate or disprove these claims. Several factors associated with the bursting condom demanded the use of special instrumentation to detect arid study the burst initiation process. Microsecond duration electronic flashes were used for the initial stages of the investigation. Although the absolute point of initiation of a given burst could not be photographed, these high speed studies tend to indicate that the most likely place for high quality condoms to break is not where they are attached to the inflation device but at an intermediate area between the base and the tip of the condom. In addition, tear propagation characteristics and velocities were determined with a delayed-flash technique, a double-slit strip method and a rotating drum framing camera.

  14. Improving flow and spillage characteristics of range hoods by using an inclined air-curtain technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Nian, You-Cyun; Chen, Jia-Kun; Peng, Kuan-Lin

    2011-03-01

    The current study developed a new type of range hood, which was termed an 'inclined air-curtain range hood', in order to improve the flow and performance of the conventionally used wall-mounted range hood. The flow characteristics and oil mist spillages of air-curtain and conventional range hoods under the influences of both a mannequin presence and a simulated walk-by motion were experimentally examined. The study examined flow patterns by using a laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke-flow visualization technique and diagnosed spillages by using the tracer gas concentration test method. A mannequin presented in front of the conventional hood induced turbulent dispersion of oil mists toward the chest and nose of the mannequin owing to the complex interaction among the suction, wake, and wall effect, while the inclined air-curtain hood presented excellent hood performance by isolating the oil mists from the mannequin with an air curtain and therefore could reduce spillages out into the atmosphere and the mannequin's breathing zone. Both flow visualization and the tracer gas test indicated that the air-curtain hood had excellent 'robustness' over the conventional hood in resisting the influence of walk-by motion. The air-curtain technique could drastically improve the flow characteristics and performance of the range hood by consuming less energy.

  15. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malík, M. Primas, J.; Kopecký, V.; Svoboda, M.

    2014-01-15

    This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect). A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  16. Conduction Mechanisms in CVD-Grown Monolayer MoS2 Transistors: From Variable-Range Hopping to Velocity Saturation.

    PubMed

    He, G; Ghosh, K; Singisetti, U; Ramamoorthy, H; Somphonsane, R; Bohra, G; Matsunaga, M; Higuchi, A; Aoki, N; Najmaei, S; Gong, Y; Zhang, X; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Bird, J P

    2015-08-12

    We fabricate transistors from chemical vapor deposition-grown monolayer MoS2 crystals and demonstrate excellent current saturation at large drain voltages (Vd). The low-field characteristics of these devices indicate that the electron mobility is likely limited by scattering from charged impurities. The current-voltage characteristics exhibit variable range hopping at low Vd and evidence of velocity saturation at higher Vd. This work confirms the excellent potential of MoS2 as a possible channel-replacement material and highlights the role of multiple transport phenomena in governing its transistor action.

  17. Bacterial Chemotaxis Toward A NAPL Source Within A Pore-Scale Model Subject to A Range of Groundwater Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ford, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Organic solvents such as toluene are the most widely distributed pollutants in groundwater. Biodegradation of these industrial pollutants requires that microorganisms in the aqueous phase are brought in contact with sources of contamination, which may be dispersed as pore-size organic-phase droplets within the saturated soil matrix. Chemotaxis toward chemical pollutants provides a mechanism for bacteria to migrate to locations of high contamination, which may not normally be accessible to bacteria carried along by groundwater flow, and thus it may improve the efficiency of bioremediation. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic the dissolution of an organic-phase contaminant from a single pore into a larger macropore representing a preferred pathway for microorganisms that are carried along by groundwater flow. The glass windows of the µ-chip allowed image analysis of bacterial distributions within the vicinity of the organic contaminant. Concentrations of chemotactic bacteria P. putida F1 near the organic/aqueous interface were 25% greater than those of a nonchemotactic mutant in the vicinity of toluene for a fluid velocity of 0.5 m/d. For E. coli responding to phenol, the bacterial concentrations were 60% greater than the controls, also at a velocity of 0.5 m/d. Velocities in the macropore were varied over a range that is typical of groundwater velocities from 0.5 to 10 m/d. The accumulation of chemotactic bacteria near the NAPL (nonaqueous phase liquid) chemoattractant source decreased as the fluid velocity increased. At the higher velocities, accumulation of chemotactic bacteria was comparable to the non-chemotactic control experiments. Computer-based simulation using finite element analysis software (COMSOL) was also performed to understand the effects of various model parameters on bacterial chemotaxis to NAPL. There was good agreement between the simulations (generated using reasonable values of the model parameters) and the experimental data for P

  18. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  19. Validation of zero-order feedback strategies for medium range air-to-air interception in a horizontal plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.

    1982-01-01

    A zero order feedback solution of a variable speed interception game between two aircraft in the horizontal plane, obtained by using the method of forced singular perturbation (FSP), is compared with the exact open loop solution. The comparison indicates that for initial distances of separation larger than eight turning radii of the evader, the accuracy of the feedback approximation is better than one percent. The result validates the zero order FSP approximation for medium range air combat analysis.

  20. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  1. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  2. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  3. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  4. Investigations of the air flow velocity field structure above the wavy surface under severe wind conditions by particle image velosimetry technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary experiments devoted to measuring characteristics of the air flow above the waved water surface for the wide range of wind speeds were performed with the application of modified Particle Image Velosimetry (PIV) technique. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 °, cross section of air channel 0.4×0.4 m) for four different axial wind speeds: 8.7, 13.5, 19 and 24 m/s, corresponding to the equivalent 10-m wind speeds 15, 20, 30 40 m/s correspondingly. Intensive wave breaking with forming foam crest and droplets generations was occurred for two last wind conditions. The modified PIV-method based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by tiny particles and with highspeed video. Spherical 20 μm polyamide particles with density 1.02 g/sm3 and inertial time 7•10-3 s were used for seeding airflow with special injecting device. Green (532 nm) CW laser with 4 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz s and exposure time 10 ms Combination including iteration Canny method [1] for obtaining curvilinear surface from the images in the laser sheet view and contact measurements of surface elevation by wire wave gauge installed near the border of working area for the surface wave profile was used. Then velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved by averaging over obtained ensembles of wind velocity field realizations and over a wave period even for the cases of intensive wave breaking and droplets generation. To verify the PIV method additional measurements of mean velocity profiles over were carried out by the contact method using the Pitot tube. In the area of overlap, wind velocity profiles measured by

  5. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  6. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  7. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Measurements of the Air-flow Velocity in the Cylinder of an Airplane Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, Hermann

    1939-01-01

    The object of the present investigation is to determine the velocity in the BMW-VI cylinder of an externally driven single-cylinder test engine at high engine speeds using the hot-wire method of Ulsamer.

  9. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  10. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  11. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  12. Effect of temperature and air velocity on drying kinetics, antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, colour, texture and microstructure of apple (var. Granny Smith) slices.

    PubMed

    Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Ah-Hen, Kong; Chacana, Marcelo; Vergara, Judith; Martínez-Monzó, Javier; García-Segovia, Purificación; Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto; Di Scala, Karina

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of temperature and air velocity on the drying kinetics and quality attributes of apple (var. Granny Smith) slices during drying. Experiments were conducted at 40, 60 and 80°C, as well as at air velocities of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5ms(-1). Effective moisture diffusivity increased with temperature and air velocity, reaching a value of 15.30×10(-9)m(2)s(-1) at maximum temperature and air velocity under study. The rehydration ratio changed with varying both air velocity and temperature indicating tissue damage due to processing. The colour difference, ΔE, showed the best results at 80°C. The DPPH-radical scavenging activity at 40°C and 0.5ms(-1) showed the highest antioxidant activity, closest to that of the fresh sample. Although ΔE decreased with temperature, antioxidant activity barely varied and even increased at high air velocities, revealing an antioxidant capacity of the browning products. The total phenolics decreased with temperature, but at high air velocity retardation of thermal degradation was observed. Firmness was also determined and explained using glass transition concept and microstructure analysis. PMID:26434262

  13. The influence of topography on vertical velocity of air in relation to severe storms near the Southern Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Pessano, H.; Hierro, R.; Santos, J. R.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of 180 storms which took place between 2004 and 2011 over the province of Mendoza (Argentina) near to the Andes Range at southern mid-latitudes, we consider those registered in the northern and central crop areas (oases). The regions affected by these storms are currently protected by an operational hail mitigation project. Differences with previously reported storms detected in the southern oasis are highlighted. Mendoza is a semiarid region situated roughly between 32S and 37S at the east of the highest Andes top. It forms a natural laboratory where different sources of gravity waves, mainly mountain waves, occur. In this work, we analyze the effects of flow over topography generating mountain waves and favoring deep convection. The joint occurrence of storms with hail production and mountain waves is determined from mesoscale numerical simulations, radar and radiosounding data. In particular, two case studies that properly represent diverse structures observed in the region are considered in detail. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to each variable and profile to detect the main oscillation modes present. Simulated temperature profiles are validated and compared with radiosounding data. Each first radar echo, time and location are determined. The necessary energy to lift a parcel to its level of free convection is tested from the Convective Available Potential Energy and Convection Inhibition. This last parameter is compared against the mountain waves' vertical kinetic energy. The time evolution and vertical structure of vertical velocity and equivalent potential temperature suggest in both cases that the detected mountain wave amplitudes are able to provide the necessary energy to lift the air parcel and trigger convection. A simple conceptual scheme linking the dynamical factors taking place before and during storm development is proposed.

  14. Centerless circular array method: Inferring phase velocities of Rayleigh waves in broad wavelength ranges using microtremor records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ikuo; Tada, Taku; Shinozaki, Yuzo

    2006-09-01

    The centerless circular array (CCA) method, proposed by ourselves in an earlier work, is an algorithm of microtremor exploration which can be used to estimate phase velocities of Rayleigh waves by analyzing vertical component records of microtremors that are obtained with an array of three or five seismic sensors placed around a circumference. We have confirmed, through field tests, the applicability of our CCA method to arrays on the order of several to several hundred meters in radii and have revealed its remarkably high performance in long-wavelength ranges, the upper resolution limit extending as far as several 10 times the array radius. We have also invented a mathematical model that enables to evaluate signal-to-noise ratios in a given microtremor field. Scrutiny of field data has borne out our hypothesis that noise is the principal factor that biases the analysis results of the CCA method in long-wavelength ranges and that its longest resolvable wavelength is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio. Combined use of the CCA method and our new method of signal-to-noise ratio analysis provides a powerful methodological tool that allows one to extract maximal information from microtremor records obtained with a simple seismic array.

  15. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  16. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  17. Spatial Variability in Ozone and CO2 Flux during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almand-Hunter, B.; Piedrahita, R.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Walker, J. T.; Hannigan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality problems persist in the Northern Front-Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado despite efforts to reduce emissions, and summertime ozone concentrations frequently exceed the NAAQS. Atmospheric modeling in the NFRMA is challenging due to the complex topography of the area, as well as diversity of pollutant sources (urban NOx and VOCs, power plants, oil and gas, agricultural emissions, biogenic emissions, and wildfires). An improved understanding of the local atmospheric chemistry will enable researchers to advance atmospheric models, which will subsequently be used to develop and test more effective air quality management strategies. The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) investigates this problem through detailed examination of atmospheric chemistry in the NFRMA. Our project specifically explores the spatial variability in ozone (O3) concentration and dry deposition within the FRAPPE study area. One source of uncertainty in atmospheric models is O3 flux, which varies spatially due to local meteorology and variation in ambient concentration and deposition velocity. Model grid cells typically range in size from 10-100 km and 100-500 km, for regional and global models, respectively, and accurate representations of an entire grid cell cannot always be achieved. Large spatial variability within a model grid cell can lead to poor estimates of trace-gas flux and concentration. Our research addresses this issue by measuring spatial variability in O3 flux using low-cost dry-deposition flux chambers. We are measuring O3 and CO2 flux with 5 low-cost flux chambers and one eddy-covariance tower. The eddy-covariance tower is located at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. All 5 chambers are within a 8.3 x 6 km square, with one chamber collocated with the eddy-covariance tower, and the other 4 chambers at distances of 0.33, 1.14, 3.22, and 7.55 km from the tower. The largest distance between any two chambers is 8.5 km. All

  18. The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flocke, F. M.; Science Teams, F A D A

    2015-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ) was designed to quantify the factors controlling surface ozone in the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) and determine whether current and planned emission controls are sufficient to reduce ozone levels below standards. The experiment was conducted simultaneously with the 2014 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) intensive, and employed a coordinated set of ground-based, aircraft-based and satellite measurements. The NFRMA is subject to emissions from a wide variety of very diverse sources such as transportation, power generation, agriculture and livestock operations, oil and gas extraction activities, and natural emissions from vegetation. Inflow into the state can contain elevated ozone brought about from emissions originating from other Western states, Canada or Asia. Terrain-induced, complex mountain-valley circulation patterns, can, to some extent, recirculate polluted air and exacerbate high ozone events. This transport also contributes to high ozone, visibility degradation, and deposition of pollution into Rocky Mountain National Park and other pristine areas. Fifteen flights were performed between July 26 and August 17, 2014, on board the NCAR/NSF C-130 research aircraft, which was equipped with a comprehensive gas phase photochemistry and aerosol payload. The C-130 flights covered much of the State of Colorado. Numerous ground sites and mobile labs were taking measurements simultaneously, and the NASA P3, B-200, and Falcon aircraft flight operations were concentrated on the NFRMA itself. This presentation will summarize the FRAPPÉ activities and present first results with respect to emission characterization of the area and comparison with inventories, contributions of emission source types to ozone production and particle composition, transport and chemical evolution of air masses

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Nose-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberly R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  20. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a) The... meanderings of the shore to the point of beginning. (b) The regulations. (1) The fact that aerial...

  1. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a) The... meanderings of the shore to the point of beginning. (b) The regulations. (1) The fact that aerial...

  2. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a) The... meanderings of the shore to the point of beginning. (b) The regulations. (1) The fact that aerial...

  3. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a) The... meanderings of the shore to the point of beginning. (b) The regulations. (1) The fact that aerial...

  4. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a) The... meanderings of the shore to the point of beginning. (b) The regulations. (1) The fact that aerial...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  10. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  11. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  12. Origin of reverse-graded bedding in air-fall pumice, Coso Range, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Bacon, C.R.; Roquemore, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The origin of reverse grading in air-fall pyroclastic deposits has been ascribed to: (1) changing conditions at an erupting vent; (2) deposition in water; or (3) rolling of large clasts over smaller clasts on the surface of a steep slope. Structural features in a deposit of air-fall pumice lapilli in the Coso Range, California, indicate that reverse grading there formed by a fourth mechanism during flow of pumice. Reverse-graded beds in this deposit occur where pumice lapilli fell on slopes at or near the angle of repose and formed as parts of the blanket of accumulating pumice became unstable and flowed downslope. The process of size sorting during such flow is probably analogous to that which sorts sand grains in a reverse fashion during avalanching on the slip faces of sand dunes, attributed by Bagnold (1954a) to a grain-dispersive pressure acting on particles subjected to a shear stress. In view of the several ways in which air-fall pyroclastic debris may become reverse graded, caution is advised in interpretation of the origin of this structure both in modern and in ancient deposits. ?? 1979.

  13. Short-range optical air data measurements for aircraft control using rotational Raman backscatter.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2013-07-15

    A first laboratory prototype of a novel concept for a short-range optical air data system for aircraft control and safety was built. The measurement methodology was introduced in [Appl. Opt. 51, 148 (2012)] and is based on techniques known from lidar detecting elastic and Raman backscatter from air. A wide range of flight-critical parameters, such as air temperature, molecular number density and pressure can be measured as well as data on atmospheric particles and humidity can be collected. In this paper, the experimental measurement performance achieved with the first laboratory prototype using 532 nm laser radiation of a pulse energy of 118 mJ is presented. Systematic measurement errors and statistical measurement uncertainties are quantified separately. The typical systematic temperature, density and pressure measurement errors obtained from the mean of 1000 averaged signal pulses are small amounting to < 0.22 K, < 0.36% and < 0.31%, respectively, for measurements at air pressures varying from 200 hPa to 950 hPa but constant air temperature of 298.95 K. The systematic measurement errors at air temperatures varying from 238 K to 308 K but constant air pressure of 946 hPa are even smaller and < 0.05 K, < 0.07% and < 0.06%, respectively. A focus is put on the system performance at different virtual flight altitudes as a function of the laser pulse energy. The virtual flight altitudes are precisely generated with a custom-made atmospheric simulation chamber system. In this context, minimum laser pulse energies and pulse numbers are experimentally determined, which are required using the measurement system, in order to meet measurement error demands for temperature and pressure specified in aviation standards. The aviation error margins limit the allowable temperature errors to 1.5 K for all measurement altitudes and the pressure errors to 0.1% for 0 m and 0.5% for 13000 m. With regard to 100-pulse-averaged temperature measurements, the pulse energy using 532 nm

  14. Short-range optical air data measurements for aircraft control using rotational Raman backscatter.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2013-07-15

    A first laboratory prototype of a novel concept for a short-range optical air data system for aircraft control and safety was built. The measurement methodology was introduced in [Appl. Opt. 51, 148 (2012)] and is based on techniques known from lidar detecting elastic and Raman backscatter from air. A wide range of flight-critical parameters, such as air temperature, molecular number density and pressure can be measured as well as data on atmospheric particles and humidity can be collected. In this paper, the experimental measurement performance achieved with the first laboratory prototype using 532 nm laser radiation of a pulse energy of 118 mJ is presented. Systematic measurement errors and statistical measurement uncertainties are quantified separately. The typical systematic temperature, density and pressure measurement errors obtained from the mean of 1000 averaged signal pulses are small amounting to < 0.22 K, < 0.36% and < 0.31%, respectively, for measurements at air pressures varying from 200 hPa to 950 hPa but constant air temperature of 298.95 K. The systematic measurement errors at air temperatures varying from 238 K to 308 K but constant air pressure of 946 hPa are even smaller and < 0.05 K, < 0.07% and < 0.06%, respectively. A focus is put on the system performance at different virtual flight altitudes as a function of the laser pulse energy. The virtual flight altitudes are precisely generated with a custom-made atmospheric simulation chamber system. In this context, minimum laser pulse energies and pulse numbers are experimentally determined, which are required using the measurement system, in order to meet measurement error demands for temperature and pressure specified in aviation standards. The aviation error margins limit the allowable temperature errors to 1.5 K for all measurement altitudes and the pressure errors to 0.1% for 0 m and 0.5% for 13000 m. With regard to 100-pulse-averaged temperature measurements, the pulse energy using 532 nm

  15. CMOS Amperometric ADC With High Sensitivity, Dynamic Range and Power Efficiency for Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Boling, C Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Airborne pollutants are a leading cause of illness and mortality globally. Electrochemical gas sensors show great promise for personal air quality monitoring to address this worldwide health crisis. However, implementing miniaturized arrays of such sensors demands high performance instrumentation circuits that simultaneously meet challenging power, area, sensitivity, noise and dynamic range goals. This paper presents a new multi-channel CMOS amperometric ADC featuring pixel-level architecture for gas sensor arrays. The circuit combines digital modulation of input currents and an incremental Σ∆ ADC to achieve wide dynamic range and high sensitivity with very high power efficiency and compact size. Fabricated in 0.5 [Formula: see text] CMOS, the circuit was measured to have 164 dB cross-scale dynamic range, 100 fA sensitivity while consuming only 241 [Formula: see text] and 0.157 [Formula: see text] active area per channel. Electrochemical experiments with liquid and gas targets demonstrate the circuit's real-time response to a wide range of analyte concentrations. PMID:27352395

  16. AirSTAR Hardware and Software Design for Beyond Visual Range Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughter, Sean; Cox, David

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) is a facility developed to study the flight dynamics of vehicles in emergency conditions, in support of aviation safety research. The system was upgraded to have its operational range significantly expanded, going beyond the line of sight of a ground-based pilot. A redesign of the airborne flight hardware was undertaken, as well as significant changes to the software base, in order to provide appropriate autonomous behavior in response to a number of potential failures and hazards. Ground hardware and system monitors were also upgraded to include redundant communication links, including ADS-B based position displays and an independent flight termination system. The design included both custom and commercially available avionics, combined to allow flexibility in flight experiment design while still benefiting from tested configurations in reversionary flight modes. A similar hierarchy was employed in the software architecture, to allow research codes to be tested, with a fallback to more thoroughly validated flight controls. As a remotely piloted facility, ground systems were also developed to ensure the flight modes and system state were communicated to ground operations personnel in real-time. Presented in this paper is a general overview of the concept of operations for beyond visual range flight, and a detailed review of the airborne hardware and software design. This discussion is held in the context of the safety and procedural requirements that drove many of the design decisions for the AirSTAR UAS Beyond Visual Range capability.

  17. Influence of Wind Velocity Fluctuation on Air Temperature Difference between the Fan and Ground Levels and the Effect of Frost Protective Fan Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takuya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Miyama, Daisuke; Sumikawa, Osamu; Araki, Shinsuke

    We invested the influence of wind velocity fluctuation on air temperature difference between the fan (4.8 m) and ground levels (0.5 m) and the effect of frost protective fan operation in order to develop a new method to reduce electricity consumption due to frost protective fan operation. The results of the investigations are summarized as follows: (1) Air temperature difference between the fan (4.8 m) and ground levels (0.5 m) was decreased following an increase in wind velocity, and the difference was less than 1°C for a wind velocity more than 3.0 m/s at a height of 6.5 m. (2) When the wind velocity was more than 2-3 m/s, there was hardly any increase in the temperature of the leaves. In contrast, when the wind velocity was less than 2-3 m/s, an increase in the temperature of the leaves was observed. Based on these results, it is possible that when the wind velocity is greater than 2-3 m, it prevents thermal inversion. Therefore, there would be no warmer air for the frost protective fan to return to the tea plants and the air turbulence produced by the frost protective fan would not reach the plants under the windy condition.

  18. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores.

  19. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores. PMID:27109165

  20. The convention on long-range transboundary air pollution`s sulfur protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leaf, D.

    1995-12-31

    The US is a signatory to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe`s Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air pollution (LRTAP). The signatories to the LRTAP Convention include most European countries, as well as the US and Canada. Over the past decade two Sulfur Protocols have been negotiated under the auspices of LRTAP; both were based on acidification concerns. The first, signed in 1985, committed countries to a 30% decrease in sulfur emissions relative to a 1980 baseline. The second, signed in 1994, committed countries to a 50--80% reduction in sulfur emissions. The latest protocol was based on the effects-based concept of critical loads of sulfur for protecting ecosystems from the effects of acidification. The US did not sign either sulfur protocol, but has participated in discussions leading up to both. This paper will present a discussion of the LRTAP Convention, the two sulfur protocols, the NO{sub x} Protocol, the US-Canada relationship on acid rain, the critical loads concept, and US participation in the LRTAP process (including the relationship between the sulfur protocols and Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990). The focus will be on key scientific and policy issues.

  1. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-07-13

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms.

  2. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Zucca, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newberry volcano, a volcano in central regon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region beneath the eastern caldera may be an area of boiling water between the magma chamber and the ponded east flank material. -from Authors

  3. Effects of metabolic rate on thermal responses at different air velocities in -10 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T T; Gavhed, D; Holmér, I; Rintamäki, H

    2001-04-01

    The effects of exercise intensity on thermoregulatory responses in cold (-10 degrees C) in a 0.2 (still air, NoWi), 1.0 (Wi1), and 5.0 (Wi5) m x s(-1) wind were studied. Eight young and healthy men, preconditioned in thermoneutral (+20 degrees C) environment for 60 min, walked for 60 min on the treadmill at 2.8 km/h with different combinations of wind and exercise intensity. Exercise level was adjusted by changing the inclination of the treadmill between 0 degrees (lower exercise intensity, metabolic rate 124 W x m(-2), LE) and 6 degrees (higher exercise intensity, metabolic rate 195 W x m(-2), HE). Due to exercise increased heat production and circulatory adjustments, the rectal temperature (T(re)), mean skin temperature (Tsk) and mean body temperature (Tb) were significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1, and T(re) and Tb also in Wi5. Tsk and Tb were significantly decreased by 5.0 m x s(-1) wind in comparison to NoWi and Wi1. The higher exercise intensity was intense enough to diminish peripheral vasoconstriction and consequently the finger skin temperature was significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1. Mean heat flux from the skin was unaffected by the exercise intensity. At LE oxygen consumption (VO2) was significantly higher in Wi5 than NoWi and Wi1. Heart rate was unaffected by the wind speed. The results suggest that, with studied exercise intensities, produced without changes in walking speed, the metabolic rate is not so important that it should be taken into consideration in the calculation of wind chill index. PMID:11282319

  4. Effects of metabolic rate on thermal responses at different air velocities in -10 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T T; Gavhed, D; Holmér, I; Rintamäki, H

    2001-04-01

    The effects of exercise intensity on thermoregulatory responses in cold (-10 degrees C) in a 0.2 (still air, NoWi), 1.0 (Wi1), and 5.0 (Wi5) m x s(-1) wind were studied. Eight young and healthy men, preconditioned in thermoneutral (+20 degrees C) environment for 60 min, walked for 60 min on the treadmill at 2.8 km/h with different combinations of wind and exercise intensity. Exercise level was adjusted by changing the inclination of the treadmill between 0 degrees (lower exercise intensity, metabolic rate 124 W x m(-2), LE) and 6 degrees (higher exercise intensity, metabolic rate 195 W x m(-2), HE). Due to exercise increased heat production and circulatory adjustments, the rectal temperature (T(re)), mean skin temperature (Tsk) and mean body temperature (Tb) were significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1, and T(re) and Tb also in Wi5. Tsk and Tb were significantly decreased by 5.0 m x s(-1) wind in comparison to NoWi and Wi1. The higher exercise intensity was intense enough to diminish peripheral vasoconstriction and consequently the finger skin temperature was significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1. Mean heat flux from the skin was unaffected by the exercise intensity. At LE oxygen consumption (VO2) was significantly higher in Wi5 than NoWi and Wi1. Heart rate was unaffected by the wind speed. The results suggest that, with studied exercise intensities, produced without changes in walking speed, the metabolic rate is not so important that it should be taken into consideration in the calculation of wind chill index.

  5. Combined density gradient and velocity field measurements in transient flows by means of Differential Interferometry and Long-range \\varvec{μ}PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordel, S.; Nowak, T.; Skoda, R.; Hussong, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, Long-range Microparticle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and Differential Interferometry (DI) are combined in a novel manner to enable both velocity and depth-integrated density gradient field measurements using the same laser pulse for both recordings. In the present work, temperature-driven boundary layer flows could be successfully determined to an accuracy of δ T=0.17 K with a spatial resolution of 405 μm for interference and 101 μm for μPIV measurements. The DI measurements are refraction compensated, and both temperature and velocity fields are compared with results from numerical simulations.

  6. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nikoloch, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  7. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  8. Unmanned platform for long-range remote analysis of volatile compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Neves, Carlos A; Hotta, Guilherme M; Vidal, Denis T R; Barros, Marcelo F; Ayon, Arturo A; Garcia, Carlos D; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes a long-range remotely controlled CE system built on an all-terrain vehicle. A four-stroke engine and a set of 12-V batteries were used to provide power to a series of subsystems that include drivers, communication, computers, and a capillary electrophoresis module. This dedicated instrument allows air sampling using a polypropylene porous tube, coupled to a flow system that transports the sample to the inlet of a fused-silica capillary. A hybrid approach was used for the construction of the analytical subsystem combining a conventional fused-silica capillary (used for separation) and a laser machined microfluidic block, made of PMMA. A solid-state cooling approach was also integrated in the CE module to enable controlling the temperature and therefore increasing the useful range of the robot. Although ultimately intended for detection of chemical warfare agents, the proposed system was used to analyze a series of volatile organic acids. As such, the system allowed the separation and detection of formic, acetic, and propionic acids with signal-to-noise ratios of 414, 150, and 115, respectively, after sampling by only 30 s and performing an electrokinetic injection during 2.0 s at 1.0 kV.

  9. A miniaturized piezoelectric turbine with self-regulation for increased air speed range

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Hailing Yeatman, Eric M.

    2015-12-14

    This paper presents the design and demonstration of a piezoelectric turbine with self-regulation for increased air speed range. The turbine's transduction is achieved by magnetic “plucking” of a piezoelectric beam by the passing rotor. The increased speed range is achieved by the self-regulating mechanism which can dynamically adjust the magnetic coupling between the magnets on the turbine rotor and the piezoelectric beam using a micro-spring. The spring is controlled passively by the centrifugal force of the magnet on the rotor. This mechanism automatically changes the relative position of the magnets at different rotational speeds, making the coupling weak at low airflow speeds and strong at high speeds. Hence, the device can start up with a low airflow speed, and the output power can be ensured when the airflow speed is high. A theoretical model was established to analyse the turbine's performance, advantages, and to optimize its design parameters. A prototype was fabricated and tested in a wind tunnel. The start-up airflow speed was 2.34 m/s, showing a 30% improvement against a harvester without the mechanism.

  10. Unmanned platform for long-range remote analysis of volatile compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Neves, Carlos A; Hotta, Guilherme M; Vidal, Denis T R; Barros, Marcelo F; Ayon, Arturo A; Garcia, Carlos D; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes a long-range remotely controlled CE system built on an all-terrain vehicle. A four-stroke engine and a set of 12-V batteries were used to provide power to a series of subsystems that include drivers, communication, computers, and a capillary electrophoresis module. This dedicated instrument allows air sampling using a polypropylene porous tube, coupled to a flow system that transports the sample to the inlet of a fused-silica capillary. A hybrid approach was used for the construction of the analytical subsystem combining a conventional fused-silica capillary (used for separation) and a laser machined microfluidic block, made of PMMA. A solid-state cooling approach was also integrated in the CE module to enable controlling the temperature and therefore increasing the useful range of the robot. Although ultimately intended for detection of chemical warfare agents, the proposed system was used to analyze a series of volatile organic acids. As such, the system allowed the separation and detection of formic, acetic, and propionic acids with signal-to-noise ratios of 414, 150, and 115, respectively, after sampling by only 30 s and performing an electrokinetic injection during 2.0 s at 1.0 kV. PMID:22965708

  11. A miniaturized piezoelectric turbine with self-regulation for increased air speed range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hailing; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and demonstration of a piezoelectric turbine with self-regulation for increased air speed range. The turbine's transduction is achieved by magnetic "plucking" of a piezoelectric beam by the passing rotor. The increased speed range is achieved by the self-regulating mechanism which can dynamically adjust the magnetic coupling between the magnets on the turbine rotor and the piezoelectric beam using a micro-spring. The spring is controlled passively by the centrifugal force of the magnet on the rotor. This mechanism automatically changes the relative position of the magnets at different rotational speeds, making the coupling weak at low airflow speeds and strong at high speeds. Hence, the device can start up with a low airflow speed, and the output power can be ensured when the airflow speed is high. A theoretical model was established to analyse the turbine's performance, advantages, and to optimize its design parameters. A prototype was fabricated and tested in a wind tunnel. The start-up airflow speed was 2.34 m/s, showing a 30% improvement against a harvester without the mechanism.

  12. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms. PMID:26184215

  13. Comparison of the effects of stimulating groups of static gamma axons with different conduction velocity ranges on cat spindles.

    PubMed

    Emonet-Dénand, F; Laporte, Y; Petit, J

    2001-07-01

    In cat peroneus tertius muscles, static gamma axons were prepared in groups of three to four according to the conduction velocity of their axons (fast, intermediate, or slow). Effects of stimulating these groups (at 20, 30, and 50 Hz) on spindle ensemble discharges during sinusoidal stretch (peak-to-peak amplitude, 0.5 mm; frequency linearly increasing from 0.5 to 8 Hz in 10 s) were compared. Ensemble discharges were obtained by digital treatment of the discharges in afferent fibers from all the spindles in peroneus tertius as recorded from the muscle nerve. Stimulation of each group prevented ensemble discharges from falling to very low levels during shortening phases. However, this effect was clearly larger when the group of fast-conducting axons was stimulated. In view of the known effects of the activation of bag(2) and chain fibers (either separately or together) on single primary ending discharges during comparable sinusoidal stretches, this stronger effect supports the view that static gamma axons with faster conduction velocities are more likely to supply more bag(2) fibers than slower ones. Possibly the proportions of bag(2) and chain fibers activated during motor activity are determined by a recruitment of static gamma motoneurons related to their size.

  14. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John R.; Zucca, John J.

    1988-12-01

    We determine compressional wave velocity and attenuation structures for the upper crust beneath Medicine Lake volcano in northeast California using a high-resolution active source seismic tomography method. Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. This lineament is interpreted to be the result of an old crustal weakness now affecting the emplacement of magma, both on direct ascent from the lower crust and mantle and in migration from the shallow silicic chamber to summit vents. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newbeny volcano, a volcano in central Oregon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault, a normal fault mapped at the surface north of the volcano. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region

  15. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  16. Transient and steady-state velocity of domain walls for a complete range of drive fields. [in magnetic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Bartran, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for transient and steady-state 180 deg domain-wall motion in bulk magnetic material are obtained from the dynamic torque equations with a Gilbert damping term. The results for the Walker region in which the transient solution approaches the familiar Walker steady-state solution are presented in a slightly new form for completeness. An analytic solution corresponding to larger drive fields predicts an oscillatory motion with an average value of the velocity which decreases with drive field for reasonable values of the damping parameter. These results agree with those obtained by others from a computer solution of the torque equation and those obtained by others with the assumption of a very large anisotropy field.

  17. Slowing down terahertz waves with tunable group velocities in a broad frequency range by surface magneto plasmons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2012-04-23

    This paper proposes one broadly tunable terahertz (THz) slow-light system in a semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor structure. Subject to an external magnetic field, the structure supports in total two surface magneto plasmons (SMPs) bands above and below the surface plasma frequency, respectively. Both the SMPs bands can be tuned by the external magnetic field. Numerical studies show that leveraging on the two tunable bands, the frequency and the group velocity of the slowed-down THz wave can be widely tuned from 0.3 THz to 10 THz and from 1 c to 10(-6) c, respectively, when the external magnetic field increases up to 6 Tesla. The proposed method based on the two SMPs bands can be widely used for many other plasmonic devices.

  18. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  19. Treatment of close-range, low-velocity gunshot fractures of tibia and femur diaphysis with consecutive compression-distraction technique: a report of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Ateşalp, A Sabri; Kömürcü, Mahmut; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Bek, Dogan; Oğuz, Erbil; Yanmiş, Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    Lower extremity injuries secondary to close-range, low-velocity gunshot wounds are frequently seen in both civilian and military populations. A close-range, low-velocity injury produces high energy and often results in comminuted and complicated fractures with significant morbidity. In this study, four femoral, four tibial, and three combined tibia and fibular comminuted diaphyseal fractures secondary to close-range, low-velocity gunshot wounds in 11 military personnel were treated with debridement followed by compression-distraction lengthening using a circular external fixator frame. Fracture union was obtained in all without significant major complications. Fracture consolidation occurred at a mean of 3.5 months. At follow-up of 46.8 months, there were no delayed unions, nonunions, or malunions. Minor complications included four pin-tract infections and knee flexion limitation in two femur fractures. Osteomyelitis and deep soft tissue infection were not observed. This technique provided an alternative to casting, open reduction internal fixation, or intermedullary fixation with an acceptable complication rate.

  20. Body composition analyses by air displacement plethysmography in adults ranging from normal weight to extremely obese

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Kazanna C.; Anthony, Steven J.; Thornton, John C.; Gallagher, Dympna; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare body composition parameters estimated by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in body mass index (BMI) classifications that include extremely obese (BMI≥40.0kg/m2), and to examine if differences between analyses were influenced by BMI. Design and Methods Fat free mass (FFM,kg), fat mass (FM,kg) and body fat (BF,%) were analyzed with both technologies. Results All outcome measures of ADP and DXA were highly correlated (r≥0.95,P<0.001 for FFM, FM and BF), but Bland-Altman analyses revealed significant bias (P<0.01 for all). ADP estimated greater FFM and lower FM and BF (P<0.01 for all). BMI explained 27% of the variance in differences between FFM measurements (P<0.001), and 37% and 33% of the variances in differences between FM and BF measurements, respectively (P<0.001 for both). Within normal weight and overweight classifications, ADP estimated greater FFM and lower FM and BF (P<0.001 for all), but the opposite occurred within the extremely obese classification; ADP estimated lower FFM and greater FM and BF (P<0.05 for all). Conclusions Body composition analyses by the two technologies were strongly congruent, but systematically different and influenced by BMI. Caution should be taken when utilizing ADP to estimate body composition parameters over a wide range of BMI classifications that include extremely obese. PMID:24170704

  1. In situ radiological surveying at the Double Tracks site, Nellis Air Force Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Riedhauser, S.R.; Tipton, W.J.

    1996-04-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the Double Tracks site on the Nellis Air Force Range just east of Goldfield, Nevada, during the periods of April 10-13 and June 5-9, 1995. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This site includes the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The main purpose of the first expedition was to assess several new techniques for characterizing sites with dispersed plutonium. The two purposes of the second expedition were to characterize the distribution of transuranic contamination (primarily plutonium) at the site by measuring the gamma rays from americium-241 and to assess the performance of the two new detector platforms. Both of the new platforms performed well, and the characterization of the americium-241 activity at the site was completed. Several plots compare these ground-based system measurements and the 1993 aerial data. The agreement is good considering the systems are characterized and calibrated through independent means. During the April expedition, several methods for measuring the depth distribution of americium-241 in the field were conducted as a way of quickly and reliably obtaining depth profiles without the need to wait for laboratory analysis. Two of the methods were not very effective, but the results of the third method appear very promising.

  2. A long-range air pollution transport model for eastern north america—I. Sulfur oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endlich, R. M.; Nitz, K. C.; Brodzinsky, R.; Bhumralkar, C. M.

    This paper describes a Lagrangian model for simulating long-range air pollution transport over eastern North America. One version (denoted ENAMAP-2S) uses emissions inventories and standard daily weather reports to compute the airborne concentrations of SO 2 and sulfate, and their deposition on the earth's surface. A separate version of the model (ENAMAP-2N) applies to oxides of nitrogen. These versions of the ENAMAP model include the influences of smoothed terrain on the winds, and divide the atmospheric boundary layer into three parts, allowing pollutant emissions to be divided among the layers. Vertical mixing is controlled by diffusion coefficients computed from wind shear, stability, and knowledge of the mixing depth. The transformation and wet and dry deposition rates are based on recently published values. The models have been used to compute monthly average values of concentrations and depositions for January and August 1977. Typical examples are shown. The sensitivity of the output fields of ENAMAP-2S to values selected for input parameters (e.g. transformation rate of SO 2 to sulfate and deposition rates) has been studied; and based on present information, optimum values of the parameters are given. The model results include geographical patterns of pollutant concentration and deposition, and interregional exchange tables that show how much of the pollution in a certain region was emitted locally and how much originated in other specified areas. The simulated monthly airborne concentrations of SO 2 and sulfate are generally within a factor of 2 of measured values.

  3. Study on measurement of the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes of a boiler with relationship between air velocity and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Shen, F.; Lin, W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Q.; Ke, J.; Quan, W.

    1999-07-01

    According to the theoretical relationship between air velocity and pressure drop in different solid-air mass flow in vertical pipes with the condition of upward air-solid flowing, the experimental research on measuring the coal powder concentration is directed against the pneumatic pipes of a boiler's combustion system in the energy industry. Through analyzing the experimental results, a mathematical model for measuring the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes is obtained. Then, the error analysis is done, and the method of on-line measurement and its function are provided.

  4. The role of loading rate, backwashing, water and air velocities in an up-flow nitrifying tertiary filter.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Canler, Jean-Pierre; Heduit, Alain; Sørensen, Kim Helleshøj; Lessard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The vertical distribution of nitrification performances in an up-flow biological aerated filter operated at tertiary nitrification stage is evaluated in this paper. Experimental data were collected from a semi-industrial pilot-plant under various operating conditions. The actual and the maximum nitrification rates were measured at different levels inside the up-flow biofilter. A nitrogen loading rate higher than 1.0 kg NH4-Nm(-3)_mediad(-1) is necessary to obtain nitrification activity over all the height of the biofilter. The increase in water and air velocities from 6 to 10 m h(-1) and 10 to 20 m h(-1) has increased the nitrification rate by 80% and 20% respectively. Backwashing decreases the maximum nitrification rate in the media by only 3-14%. The nitrification rate measured at a level of 0.5 m above the bottom of the filter is four times higher than the applied daily average volumetric nitrogen loading rate up to 1.5 kg NH4-N m(-3)_mediad(-1). Finally, it is shown that 58% of the available nitrification activity is mobilized in steady-state conditions while up to 100% is used under inflow-rate increase.

  5. Multichannel Ultrasonic Data Communications in Air Using Range-Dependent Modulation Schemes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-01-01

    There are several well-developed technologies of wireless communication such as radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR), but ultrasonic methods can be a good alternative in some situations. A multichannel airborne ultrasonic data communication system is described in this paper. ON-OFF keying (OOK) and binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation schemes were implemented successfully in the system by using a pair of commercially available capacitive ultrasonic transducers in a relatively low multipath indoor laboratory environment. Six channels were used from 50 to 110 kHz with a channel spacing of 12 kHz, allowing multiple 8-bit data packets to be transmitted simultaneously. The system data transfer rate achieved was up to 60 kb/s and ultrasonic wireless synchronization was implemented instead of using a hard-wired link. A model developed in the work could accurately predict ultrasonic signals through the air channels. Signal root mean square (rms) values and system bit error rates (BERs) were analyzed over different distances. Error-free decoding was achieved over ranges up to 5 m using a multichannel OOK modulation scheme. To obtain the highest data transfer rate and the longest error-free transmission distance, a range-dependent multichannel scheme with variable data rates, channel frequencies, and different modulation schemes, was also studied in the work. Within 2 m, error-free transmission was achieved using a five-channel OOK with a data rate of 63 kb/s. Between 2 and 5 m, six-channel OOK with 60 kb/s data transfer rate was error free. Beyond 5 m, the error-free transmission range could be extended up to 10 m using three-channel BPSK with a reduced data rate of 30 kb/s. The situation when two transducers were misaligned using three-channel OOK and BPSK schemes was also investigated in the work. It was concluded that error-free transmission could still be achieved with a lateral displacement of less than 7% and oblique angles of less than 7°, and three

  6. Optical Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air Over the Temperature Range 300-650 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), the speed of sound in room air (1 atm) is measured over the temperature range 300-650 K. Since the LITA apparatus maintains a fixed sound wavelength as temperature is varied, this temperature range simultaneously corresponds to a sound frequency range of 10-15 MHz. The data are compared to a published model and typically agree within 0.1%-0.4% at each of 21 temperatures.

  7. Stereomotion speed perception: contributions from both changing disparity and interocular velocity difference over a range of relative disparities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2004-01-01

    The role of two binocular cues to motion in depth-changing disparity (CD) and interocular velocity difference (IOVD)- was investigated by measuring stereomotion speed discrimination and static disparity discrimination performance (stereoacuity). Speed discrimination thresholds were assessed both for random dot stereograms (RDS), and for their temporally uncorrelated equivalents, dynamic random dot stereograms (DRDS), at relative disparity pedestals of -19, 0, and +19 arcmin. While RDS stimuli contain both CD and IOVD cues, DRDS stimuli carry only CD information. On average, thresholds were a factor of 1.7 higher for DRDS than for RDS stimuli with no clear effect of relative disparity pedestal. Results were similar for approaching and receding targets. Variations in stimulus duration had no significant effect on thresholds, and there was no observed correlation between stimulus displacement and perceived speed, confirming that subjects responded to stimulus speed in each condition. Stereoacuity was equally good for our RDS and DRDS stimuli, showing that the difference in stereomotion speed discrimination performance for these stimuli was not due to any difference in the precision of the disparity cue. In addition, when we altered stereomotion stimulus trajectory by independently manipulating the speeds and directions of its monocular half-images, perceived stereomotion speed remained accurate. This finding is inconsistent with response strategies based on properties of either monocular half-image motion, or any ad hoc combination of the monocular speeds. We conclude that although subjects are able to discriminate stereomotion speed reliably on the basis of CD information alone, IOVD provides a precise additional cue to stereomotion speed perception.

  8. Relationship Between Low-Velocity S-wave Anomalies, Asthenospheric Dynamics and Basaltic Volcanism in the Intraplate Setting of the Basin and Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, A. K.; Smith, E. I.; Conrad, C. P.; Lee, C.; Plank, T.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Pliocene to Recent intraplate mafic volcanic rocks of the Basin and Range Province mostly formed by asthenospheric melting, as determined from calculated melting temperatures ranging from 1249-1521 degrees C. Here asthenosphere is defined by mantle rheology and temperature and not by geochemistry. The duration of melting in a volcanic field may be related to the size and shape of pockets of low velocity asthenosphere moving under the areas of volcanism. Seismic S-wave velocity profiles constrained by ambient noise and earthquake tomography of the mantle (Yang et al., 2008) show low velocity pockets, which may correspond to higher temperatures and/or higher water contents. The lack of wider scale volcanism in the Basin and Range despite large scale anomalies indicates that the anomalies are not the only cause of melting. The observed smaller scale magmatism can be explained by circulatory flow driven by the small scale structure of the anomalies causing localized melting within the anomalies. By applying an asthenospheric shear flow velocity of 0 cm/yr at the base of the lithosphere and 5 cm/yr east at depth (Silver & Holt 2002, Conrad et al., 2007), the distance the mantle has moved since the time of volcanism can be calculated for basalts of known age. Past positions of low-velocity anomalies in the asthenosphere combined with depths and temperatures of melting calculated using the silica-liquid geobarometer (Lee et al., 2009) were used to determine if a low velocity anomaly existed under an area of volcanism at the depth of melting and time of eruption. The data constraints used for calculating depths and temperatures of melting are dry, MgO > 7.5 wt.%, SiO2 > 44 wt.%, and Fe as 90% Fe2+. Depths and temperatures of melting were calculated for San Francisco in AZ; Amboy, Pisgah, Death Valley, Coso, Big Pine, Cima, Long Valley, in CA; Crater Flat, Lunar Crater, Reveille in NV; and Black Rock, Hurricane, Snow Canyon, UT; and others all of which have known ages. Ages

  9. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  10. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  11. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  12. Parallel velocity diffusion and slowing-down rate from long-range collisions in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper derives an expression for the rate of collisional slowing of charges in a magnetized plasma for which r{sub c} < λ{sub D}, where r{sub c} is the mean thermal cyclotron radius and λ{sub D} is the Debye length. The rate depends on a new fundamental length scale d that separates collisions into two impact parameter ranges that yield different slowing rates: a Boltzmann rate due to isolated binary collisions for impact parameters ρ < d and a Fokker-Planck rate due to multiple small scatterings for ρ > d. Slowing due to Boltzmann collisions is also shown to depend on the sign of the Coulomb interaction: for repulsive interactions, the slowing is enhanced by “collisional caging,” while for attractive interactions the Boltzmann slowing rate is zero.

  13. Determination of positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station using satellite laser ranging observations to Lageos1 and Lageos2 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A.; Schillak, S.

    2012-04-01

    Riyadh Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) station (7832) has been established since 1995 and situated in the Arabian plate which is countering a north east motion. Laser ranging observations of about 20 global SLR stations to the LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 for 13-year (1996-2010) have been used to determine station positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station. The NASA Godard's GEODYN-II orbital software has been used to perform orbit determination of these two satellites. The computations were performed based on 114 monthly arcs of observations with total number of normal points of 33708 and 40168 for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 respectively. The geocentric coordinates were computed and then transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West, and Vertical components in the ITRF2008 reference frame. Effects of normal points for each arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on estimated station coordinates have been investigated. In order to achieve a lower standard deviation (less than 1 cm) of estimated coordinates, the number of the normal points per SLR station had to be greater than 50. The range biases were 7.5mm and 7.2 mm with long term biases stability 2.5 mm and 2.0 mm for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites, respectively. RMS of fit was calculated for all stations and found to be 17.2 mm for the whole period. Time series of positions and velocities have been computed for Riyadh SLR station with stability of ±10.1 mm, ±9.3 mm, and ±9.0 mm for X, Y, and Z coordinates, respectively. The estimated velocity is 29.1 mm/year, 31.6 mm/year, and 1.9 mm/year in North-South, East-West and vertical directions, respectively, with a 3D velocity 42.9 mm/year. 3D deviation from the ITRF2008 was equal 4.5 mm. To recover tectonic motion affecting the station, further analysis of velocity estimates has shown general agreement of Riyadh SLR station in comparison with recent GPS estimates for the Arabian plate motion.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. Power supply with air core transformer and seperated power supplies for high dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A power supply for a quadrupole mass spectrometer which operates using an RF signal. The RF signal is controllable via a feedback loop. The feedback loop is from the output, through a comparator, and compared to a digital signal. An air core transformer is used to minimize the weight. The air core transformer is driven via two out of phase sawtooth signals which drive opposite ends of the transformer.

  16. Investigation of the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot using simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Suntz, R.; Bockhorn, H.

    2015-05-01

    The response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (0-350 Hz) and the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot are investigated. The results obtained from these flames are of special interest for "rich-quenched-lean" (RQL) combustion concepts applied in modern gas turbines. In RQL combustion, the fuel is initially oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in a first stage followed by a fuel-lean combustion step in a second stage. To mimic soot formation and oxidation in RQL combustion, soot particle measurements in highly turbulent, non-premixed swirling natural gas/ethylene-confined flames at imposed air inlet velocity oscillations are performed using simultaneous 2-Colour-Time-Resolved-Laser-Induced Incandescence (simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII). The latter technique is combined with line-of-sight averaged OH*-chemiluminescence imaging, measurements of the velocity field by high-speed particle imaging velocimetry under reactive combustion conditions and measurements of the mean temperature field obtained by a thermocouple. A natural gas/ethylene mixture (Φ = 1.56, 42 % C2H4, 58 % natural gas, P th = 17.6 kW at atmospheric pressure) is used as a fuel, which is oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in the first combustion chamber.

  17. Reconstruction and rehabilitation of short-range, high-velocity gunshot injury to the lower face: a case report.

    PubMed

    Behnia, H; Motamedi, M H

    1997-08-01

    War injuries can range from the most minor to the devastating and life-threatening. Multidisciplinary care is required for successful management of survivors. In the acute phase, care may involve emergency surgeons, anaesthetists, neurosurgeons, ophthalmic surgeons, vascular surgeons and ENT specialists in addition to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Afterwards, definitive treatment of facial hard and soft tissue gunshot injuries depends ultimately on the abilities and skills of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon and his appreciation of such injuries. The timing and sequence of the surgical procedures used for reconstruction and rehabilitation of maxillofacial gunshot injuries are crucial to a successful outcome and aesthetic result. If incorrect, they may lead indefinitely to infection, graft rejection, wound dehiscence with consequent multiple revisional operations and complications which will prolong hospital stay, and increase treatment costs and morbidity in these patients. In this article, we describe the treatment protocol for reconstruction and rehabilitation of a typical case of devastating gunshot injury to the lower face and propose a staged sequence of surgical treatment based on an 8-year experience gained in treating war casualties during the Iraq-Iran war (1980-1988). PMID:9268901

  18. Regulation of stroke pattern and swim speed across a range of current velocities: diving by common eiders wintering in polynyas in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Heath, Joel P; Gilchrist, H Grant; Ydenberg, Ronald C

    2006-10-01

    Swim speed during diving has important energetic consequences. Not only do costs increase as drag rises non-linearly with increasing speed, but speed also affects travel time to foraging patches and therefore time and energy budgets over the entire dive cycle. However, diving behaviour has rarely been considered in relation to current velocity. Strong tidal currents around the Belcher Islands, Nunavut, Canada, produce polynyas, persistent areas of open water in the sea ice which are important habitats for wildlife wintering in Hudson Bay. Some populations of common eiders Somateria mollissima sedentaria remain in polynyas through the winter where they dive to forage on benthic invertebrates. Strong tidal currents keep polynyas from freezing, but current velocity can exceed 1.5 m s(-1) and could influence time and energy costs of diving and foraging. Polynyas therefore provide naturally occurring flume tanks allowing investigation of diving strategies of free ranging birds in relation to current velocity. We used a custom designed sub-sea ice camera to non-invasively investigate over 150 dives to a depth of 11.3 m by a population of approximately 100 common eiders at Ulutsatuq polynya during February and March of 2002 and 2003. Current speed during recorded dives ranged from 0 to 1 m s(-1). As currents increased, vertical descent speed of eiders decreased, while descent duration and the number of wing strokes and foot strokes during descent to the bottom increased. However, nearly simultaneous strokes of wings and feet, and swim speed relative to the moving water, were maintained within a narrow range (2.28+/-0.23 Hz; 1.25+/-0.14 m s(-1), respectively). This close regulation of swim speed over a range in current speed of 1.0 m s(-1) might correspond to efficient muscle contraction rates, and probably reduces work rates by avoiding rapidly increasing drag at greater speeds; however, it also increases travel time to benthic foraging patches. Despite regulation of

  19. Assessment of potential long-range transport of particulate air pollution using trajectory modeling and monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkiatkul, Prapat; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2007-07-01

    Quantification of the long-range transport (LRT) contribution to ambient air pollution levels at a location is a challenging task and is normally done with a high uncertainty. In the lack of accurate emission data over the large regional domain for dispersion modeling, this study attempts to use both trajectory analysis and monitoring data to assess the potential contribution of LRT to particulate air pollution (PM) in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). The 10-day backward trajectories of air masses arriving at BMR from January 2002 to December 2004 were determined using Hybrid Single-Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory model version 4 (HYSPLIT4) and were categorized by k-means clustering into 6 clusters. Subsequently, PM levels in the BMR associated with each air mass cluster during this period were analyzed. Clusters 1 and 6 were observed with the highest and 2nd highest average PM 10 and PM 2.5 levels in the BMR, respectively, which commonly have a longer air mass pathway over populated South East Asia (SEA). The third highest PM levels were associated with air masses from the east (clusters 2 and 5), which enter the BMR via the Gulf of Thailand without passing the SEA regions. The other two clusters (3 and 4) are characterized with a long pathway of air masses over the Indian Ocean and the lowest PM levels. High PM days, which are defined based on the spatial coverage of high PM levels in the BMR, were identified and analyzed for the possibility of long-range transport contribution of PM. The potential source contribution function (PSCF) and air mass trajectories show that on high PM day, the air masses commonly originated and passed over populated regions before arriving at the BMR, which suggests a possible LRT contribution. Considerations are made for surface ozone, SO 42-/SO 2 and average SO 2, PM 2.5/PM 10, and weekday-weekend traffic emission within each air mass trajectory cluster to reveal the possible LRT contribution.

  20. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean off..., U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zones—(1) For fighter aircraft. An area approximately 30 miles...″, longitude 80°43′00″; thence 270° to longitude 80°51′00″; and then northeasterly to the point of...

  1. An extended two-target differential game model for medium-range air combat game analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of an investigation of a two-target game, representing an air combat with boresight limited all-aspect guided missiles is summarized. The results, obtained by using a line of sight coordinate system, are compared to a similar recently published work. The comparison indicates that improved insight, gained by using line of sight coordinates, allows to discover important new features of the game solution.

  2. Effects of long range transboundary pollutants on air quality in Japan - numerical simulation of a yellow sand event

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Hiromasa; Kang, Seuk Jea

    1996-12-31

    Air quality in the East Asia may worsen drastically as a consequence of accelerated development of fossil fuel systems and highest economic and population growth rates of the world. The expansion of these energy systems combined with a major fuel shift to indigenous coal, will result in a significant acid deposition and photochemical oxidant pollution in this region. Frequently, during clean spring days large scale wind systems develop in order to transport pollutants from the East Asian mainland towards the Pacific Ocean. Therefore, in order to evaluate the air quality of the western Pacific Ocean and Japan, the effects of emissions of the adjacent continent must be taken into consideration. The present paper reports on a series of numerical simulations for clear spring time episodes using an Eulerian transport/chemistry/deposition model to obtain the concentration changes of air pollutants over this area. The simulation was done from 9:00 JST of 1 April to midnight of 3 April 1993. On this day a yellow sand event showing good evidence of long range transport from the continent toward the Western Pacific Ocean occurred. At first, the simulation results show a fair agreement with the observed values. Secondly, the numerical simulation showed the formation of a high air pollution belt in East Asia, connecting the eastern area of China, the southern area of Korea and the western area of Japan clearly. In the case of NO{sub x}, the formation of a air pollution belt is weak, but well displayed for sulfate, nitrate and the ozone. Specially, in the region covered by the air pollution belt (Western Pacific Ocean, Japan Sea and Western Japan) emissions are small, but the concentration of ozone, sulfate and nitrate are high. Ozone concentration in Japan, due to long range transport from the continent is already near the environmental standard value of 60 ppb. In this area tropospheric ozone and acid deposition were suggested to be a serious problem in the future.

  3. Long-term ambient air pollution and lung function impairment in Chinese children from a high air pollution range area: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Vivian, Elaina; Mohammed, Kahee A.; Jakhar, Shailja; Vaughn, Michael; Huang, Jin; Zelicoff, Alan; Xaverius, Pamela; Bai, Zhipeng; Lin, Shao; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Si-Quan; Qian, Zhengmin; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent and inconclusive associations between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung function in children from Europe and America, where air pollution levels were typically low. The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between air pollutants and lung function in children selected from heavily industrialized and polluted cities in northeastern China. During 2012, 6740 boys and girls aged 7-14 years were recruited in 24 districts of seven northeastern cities. Portable electronic spirometers were used to measure lung function. Four-year average concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were measured at monitoring stations in the 24 districts. Two-staged regression models were used in the data analysis, controlling for covariates. Overall, for all subjects, the increased odds of lung function impairment associated with exposure to air pollutants, ranged from 5% (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.10) for FVC < 85% predicted per 46.3 μg/m3 for O3 to 81% (aOR = 1.81; 95%CI = 1.44, 2.28) for FEV1 < 85% predicted per 30.6 μg/m3 for PM10. The linear regression models consistently showed a negative relationship between all air pollutants and lung function measures across subjects. There were significant interaction terms indicating gender differences for lung function impairment and pulmonary function from exposure to some pollutants (P < 0.10). In conclusion, long term exposure to high concentrations of ambient air pollution is associated with decreased pulmonary function and lung function impairment, and females appear to be more susceptible than males.

  4. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  5. Complete-velocity-range description of negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms on an alkali-metal-halide surface under grazing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Zhou, Wang; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Ma, Yulong; Wang, Guangyi; Wu, Yong; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple theoretical approach to consider negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms grazing on alkali-metal-halide crystal surfaces over the complete velocity range. The conversion process is viewed as a series of successive binary collisions between the projectile and the negatively charged sites on the surface along their trajectories due to localization of valence-band electrons at the anionic sites of the crystal. Conversion from F0 to F- via grazing scattering in LiF(100) and KI(100) is demonstrated with this model, which incorporates the key factors of image interaction and Mott-Littleton polarization interaction for electron capture. It also incorporates the decrease in the electron affinity due to Coulomb barrier tunneling of large-velocity negative ions to the vacuum level near surface anion sites. The pronounced differences in the efficiency of F- formation at LiF(100) and KI(100) surfaces are well explained by the proposed model. The relative efficiency and related saturation of the negative-ion formation for LiF and KI crystals compare well with experimental results.

  6. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  7. Air-coupled seismic waves at long range from Apollo launchings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, W. L.; Dalins, I.; Mccarty, V.; Ewing, M.; Kaschak , G.

    1971-01-01

    Microphones and seismographs were co-located in arrays on Skidaway Island, Georgia, for the launchings of Apollo 13 and 14, 374 km to the south. Simultaneous acoustic and seismic waves were recorded for both events at times appropriate to the arrival of the acoustic waves from the source. The acoustic signal is relatively broadband compared to the nearly monochromatic seismic signal; the seismic signal is much more continuous than the more pulse-like acoustic signal; ground loading from the pressure variations of the acoustic waves is shown to be too small to account for the seismic waves; and the measured phase velocities of both acoustic and seismic waves across the local instrument arrays differ by less than 6 per cent and possibly 3 per cent if experimental error is included. It is concluded that the seismic waves are generated by resonant coupling to the acoustic waves along some 10 km of path on Skidaway Island.

  8. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  9. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  10. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km. PMID:27475593

  11. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  12. Long-term carbide development in high-velocity oxygen fuel/high-velocity air fuel Cr3C2-NiCr coatings heat treated at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; Hyland, M.; James, B.

    2004-12-01

    During the deposition of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings, compositional degradation occurs, primarily through the dissolution of the carbide phase into the matrix. Exposure at an elevated temperature leads to transformations in the compositional distribution and microstructure. While these have been investigated in short-term trials, no systematic investigations of the long-term microstructural development have been presented for high-velocity sprayed coatings. In this work, high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) coatings were treated at 900 °C for up to 60 days. Rapid refinement of the supersaturated matrix phase occurred, with the degree of matrix phase alloying continuing to decrease over the following 20 to 40 days. Carbide nucleation in the HVAF coatings occurred preferentially on the retained carbide grains, while that in the HVOF coatings developed in the regions of greatest carbide dissolution. This difference resulted in a variation in carbide morphologies. Preferential horizontal growth was evident in both coatings over the first 20 to 30 days of exposure, beyond which spheroidization of the microstructure occurred. After 30 days, the carbide morphology of both coatings was comparable, tending toward an expansive structure of coalesced carbide grains. The development of the carbide phase played a significant role in the microhardness variation of these coatings with time.

  13. Long-term landscape development: a perspective from the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoulin, A.; Zarate, M.; Rabassa, J.

    2005-06-01

    Traditionally, the long-term landscape evolution of the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina has been related to the influence of the Andean orogeny. We describe the large-scale morphological units and associated weathering products in the Tandilia and Ventania ranges. Two main planation surfaces are encountered at varying altitudes in different sectors of these ranges. The lower surface is characterized by roots of kaolinized weathering profiles in the Tandil area and silicified conglomerates around Sierra de La Ventana. In an interpretative model linking the range morphogenesis to the tectonosedimentary evolution of the bordering Salado and Colorado Basins, we suggest that the main morphogenetic stages are related to the late Jurassic-early Cretaceous south Atlantic rifting and Miocene tectonic reactivation induced by the Andean orogeny. Thus, the uplifted surfaces appear much older than commonly believed: pre-Cretaceous and Paleogene. Although they contradict recent results of apatite fission-track studies along the South America and South Africa passive margins, the implied low denudation rates (˜4 m/My) can be explained by the limited Meso-Cenozoic uplift suffered by the southern Buenos Aires ranges. The discussion also shows the limits of the comparison that can be made with the South African planation surfaces.

  14. Detection of regional air pollution episodes utilizing satellite data in the visual range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowley, C. J.; Burke, H. K.; Barnes, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of satellite-observed haze patterns and ground-based aerosol measurements is carried out for July 20-23, 1978. During this period, a significant regional air pollution episode existed across the northeastern United States, accompanied by widespread haze, reduced surface visibility, and elevated sulfate levels measured by the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) network. The results show that the satellite-observed haze patterns correlate closely with the area of reported low surface visibility (less than 4 mi) and high sulfate levels. Quantitative information on total aerosol loading derived from the satellite-digitized data, using an atmospheric radiative transfer model, agrees well with the results obtained from the ground-based measurements.

  15. Late Paleozoic transpression in Buenos Aires and northeast Patagonia ranges, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossello, E. A.; Massabie, A. C.; López-Gamundí, O. R.; Cobbold, P. R.; Gapais, D.

    1997-12-01

    Paleozoic sediments are present in three regions in eastern central Argentina: (1) the Sierras Australes of Buenos Aires, (2) Sierras Septentrionales of Buenos Aires and (3) Northeast Patagonia. All of these deposits share a common deformational imprint imparted by late Paleozoic Gondwanan deformation. Exposures of these rocks are scattered, variably deformed, and isolated by younger sediments deposited in basins related to the Mesozoic through Tertiary opening of the South Atlantic such as the offshore Colorado Basin. The Sierras Australes of Buenos Aires outcrops are the best preserved. They are mostly located along the Sierras Australes foldbelt, with minor outliers distributed in the adjacent Claromec-basin. The Tunas Formation (early-early late? Permian) is the uppermost unit of the Pillahuincó Group (late Carboniferous-Permian) and is crucial to the understanding of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the region during the late Paleozoic. The underlying units of the Pillahuincó Group (Sauce Grande, Piedra Azul and Bonete Formations) exhibit a depositional and compositional history characterized by glaciomarine sedimentation and postglacial transgression. They are also characterized by rather uniform quartz-rich compositions indicative of a cratonic provenance from the La Plata craton to the NE. In contrast, the sandstone-rich Tunas Formation has low quartz contents, and abundant volcanic and metasedimentary fragments; paleocurrents are consistently from the SW. Glassrich tuffs are interbedded with sandstone in the upper half of the Tunas Formation. The age of the deformation in the Sierras Australes is Permian and early-middle Triassic. This is based on metamorphic events indicated by formation of illite at 282 ± 3 Ma, 273 ± 8 Ma, 265 ± 3 Ma, and 260 ± 3 Ma ( {K}/{Ar} illite) in the Silurian Curamalal Group. Evidence of syntectonic magmatism is provided by a radiometric date of 245 ± 12 Ma ( {K}/{Ar} hornblende) for the López Lecube Granite

  16. Aerosols in Polluted versus Nonpolluted Air Masses: Long-Range Transport and Effects on Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-12-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United State, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, New York, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types-background continental, polluted continental, and maritime-that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds to thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (ii) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur aerosols appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (iii) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (iv) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area, Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    ITLV

    1999-07-12

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 486, Double Tracks Radiological Safety (RADSAFE) Area (DTRSA) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 71-23-001-71DT, within CAU 486. Corrective Action Unit 486 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range 71 North, west of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR, located in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 140 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The DTRSA is located on the west side of the Cactus Range approximately 5 mi southwest of the Cactus Spring gate at the intersection of the Cactus Spring Road and the Double Tracks Control Point Road (Figure 1-2).

  18. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality and aerosol formation in the Colorado Front Range during FRAPPÉ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Kennedy T.; Dingle, Justin H.; Bahreini, Roya; Reddy, Patrick J.; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott C.; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Pusede, Sally E.; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Sachse, Glen W.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Walega, James; Weibring, Peter; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Pfister, Gabriele; Flocke, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We present airborne measurements made during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ) project to investigate the impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality in the greater Denver area. Data on trace gases, non-refractory submicron aerosol chemical constituents, and aerosol optical extinction (βext) at λ = 632 nm were evaluated in the presence and absence of the surface mesoscale circulation in three distinct study regions of the Front Range: In-Flow, Northern Front Range, and the Denver metropolitan area. Pronounced increases in mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in the Northern Front Range and the Denver metropolitan area were observed during the cyclone episodes (27-28 July) compared to the non-cyclonic days (26 July, 2-3 August). Organic aerosols dominated the mass concentrations on all evaluated days, with a 45 % increase in organics on cyclone days across all three regions, while the increase during the cyclone episode was up to ˜ 80 % over the Denver metropolitan area. In the most aged air masses (NOx / NOy < 0.5), background organic aerosols over the Denver metropolitan area increased by a factor of ˜ 2.5 due to transport from Northern Front Range. Furthermore, enhanced partitioning of nitric acid to the aerosol phase was observed during the cyclone episodes, mainly due to increased abundance of gas phase ammonia. During the non-cyclone events, βext displayed strong correlations (r = 0.71) with organic and nitrate in the Northern Front Range and only with organics (r = 0.70) in the Denver metropolitan area, while correlation of βext during the cyclone was strongest (r = 0.86) with nitrate over Denver. Mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values in the Denver metropolitan area were similar on cyclone and non-cyclone days despite the dominant influence of different aerosol species on βext. Our analysis showed that the meteorological patterns associated with the Denver Cyclone increased aerosol

  19. Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an indicator of long range transport of air pollutants over the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Han, J.; Lee, G.; Choi, H.

    2011-12-01

    Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN) was measured at Gosan ABC Superstation, Korea during 19 October ~ 6 November 2010. PAN and NO2 were separated onto a GC column and then quantified by luminol chemiluminescence at 425 nm every 2 minutes. PAN concentrations ranged from 0.2 ppbv to 2.4 ppbv with an average of 0.6 ppbv. The highest PAN concentrations were observed during the two haze events, when stagnant condition developed over the Yellow Sea. Particularly, PAN was surprisingly well correlated with PM10 for the whole experiment period (r = 0.88) (Fig. 1). The PM10 concentration was raised up to 216 μg/m3 during the second event. In addition, PAN concentrations were noticeably enhanced when air masses passed over the populated or industrialized areas in China or Korea and aged over the Sea, which were identified by backward air mass trajectories. In this study, PAN was suggested to be a good indicator of the long range transport of air pollutants.

  20. Validity of Using Tri-Axial Accelerometers to Measure Human Movement – Part II: Step Counts at a Wide Range of Gait Velocities

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Emma; Lugade, Vipul; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    A subject-specific step counting method with a high accuracy level at all walking speeds is needed to assess the functional level of impaired patients. The study aim was to validate step counts and cadence calculations from acceleration data by comparison to video data during dynamic activity. Custom-built activity monitors, each containing one tri-axial accelerometer, were placed on the ankles, thigh, and waist of 11 healthy adults. ICC values were greater than 0.98 for video inter-rater reliability of all step counts. The activity monitoring system (AMS) algorithm demonstrated a median (interquartile range; IQR) agreement of 92% (8%) with visual observations during walking/jogging trials at gait velocities ranging from 0.1 m/s to 4.8 m/s, while FitBits (ankle and waist), and a Nike Fuelband (wrist) demonstrated agreements of 92% (36%), 93% (22%), and 33% (35%), respectively. The algorithm results demonstrated high median (IQR) step detection sensitivity (95% (2%)), positive predictive value (PPV) (99% (1%)), and agreement (97% (3%)) during a laboratory-based simulated free-living protocol. The algorithm also showed high median (IQR) sensitivity, PPV, and agreement identifying walking steps (91% (5%), 98% (4%), and 96% (5%)), jogging steps (97% (6%), 100% (1%), and 95% (6%)), and less than 3% mean error in cadence calculations. PMID:24656871

  1. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part II: Step counts at a wide range of gait velocities.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Lugade, Vipul; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-06-01

    A subject-specific step counting method with a high accuracy level at all walking speeds is needed to assess the functional level of impaired patients. The study aim was to validate step counts and cadence calculations from acceleration data by comparison to video data during dynamic activity. Custom-built activity monitors, each containing one tri-axial accelerometer, were placed on the ankles, thigh, and waist of 11 healthy adults. ICC values were greater than 0.98 for video inter-rater reliability of all step counts. The activity monitoring system (AMS) algorithm demonstrated a median (interquartile range; IQR) agreement of 92% (8%) with visual observations during walking/jogging trials at gait velocities ranging from 0.1 to 4.8m/s, while FitBits (ankle and waist), and a Nike Fuelband (wrist) demonstrated agreements of 92% (36%), 93% (22%), and 33% (35%), respectively. The algorithm results demonstrated high median (IQR) step detection sensitivity (95% (2%)), positive predictive value (PPV) (99% (1%)), and agreement (97% (3%)) during a laboratory-based simulated free-living protocol. The algorithm also showed high median (IQR) sensitivity, PPV, and agreement identifying walking steps (91% (5%), 98% (4%), and 96% (5%)), jogging steps (97% (6%), 100% (1%), and 95% (6%)), and less than 3% mean error in cadence calculations.

  2. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part II: Step counts at a wide range of gait velocities.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Lugade, Vipul; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-06-01

    A subject-specific step counting method with a high accuracy level at all walking speeds is needed to assess the functional level of impaired patients. The study aim was to validate step counts and cadence calculations from acceleration data by comparison to video data during dynamic activity. Custom-built activity monitors, each containing one tri-axial accelerometer, were placed on the ankles, thigh, and waist of 11 healthy adults. ICC values were greater than 0.98 for video inter-rater reliability of all step counts. The activity monitoring system (AMS) algorithm demonstrated a median (interquartile range; IQR) agreement of 92% (8%) with visual observations during walking/jogging trials at gait velocities ranging from 0.1 to 4.8m/s, while FitBits (ankle and waist), and a Nike Fuelband (wrist) demonstrated agreements of 92% (36%), 93% (22%), and 33% (35%), respectively. The algorithm results demonstrated high median (IQR) step detection sensitivity (95% (2%)), positive predictive value (PPV) (99% (1%)), and agreement (97% (3%)) during a laboratory-based simulated free-living protocol. The algorithm also showed high median (IQR) sensitivity, PPV, and agreement identifying walking steps (91% (5%), 98% (4%), and 96% (5%)), jogging steps (97% (6%), 100% (1%), and 95% (6%)), and less than 3% mean error in cadence calculations. PMID:24656871

  3. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  4. Launch vehicle effluent measurements during the May 12, 1977, Titan 3 launch at Air Force Eastern Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Bendura, R. J.; Woods, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne effluent measurements and cloud physical behavior for the May 21, 1977, Titan 3 launch from the Air Force Eastern Test Range, Fla. are presented. The monitoring program included airborne effluent measurements in situ in the launch cloud, visible and infrared photography of cloud growth and physical behavior, and limited surface collection of rain samples. Airborne effluent measurements included concentrations of HCl, NO, NOx, and aerosols as a function of time in the exhaust cloud. For the first time in situ particulate mass concentration and aerosol number density were measured as a function of time and size in the size range of 0.05 to 25 micro meters diameter. Measurement results were similar to those of earlier launch monitorings. Maximum HCl and NOx concentrations ranged from 10 ppm and 500 ppb, respectively, several minutes after launch to about 1 ppm and 100 ppb at 45 minutes after launch.

  5. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  6. Oxidation characteristics of Beta-21S in air in the temperature range 600 to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terryl A.; Clark, Ronald K.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1992-01-01

    The metastable beta-Ti alloy Beta-21S, Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si (weight percent), has been proposed as a candidate for use in metal matrix composites in future hypersonic vehicles. The present study investigated the oxidation behavior of Beta-21S over the temperature range 600 C to 800 C. Oxidation weight gain was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis. Oxidized specimens were evaluated using x ray diffraction techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and electron microprobe analysis to identify oxidation products and evaluate oxidation damage to the alloy.

  7. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  8. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  9. Rotationally resolved water dimer spectra in atmospheric air and pure water vapour in the 188-258 GHz range.

    PubMed

    Serov, E A; Koshelev, M A; Odintsova, T A; Parshin, V V; Tretyakov, M Yu

    2014-12-21

    New experimental results regarding "warm" water dimer spectra under equilibrium conditions are presented. An almost equidistant series of six peaks corresponding to the merged individual lines of the bound dimer with consecutive rotational quantum numbers is studied in the 188-258 GHz frequency range in water vapour over a broad range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's atmosphere. The series is a continuation of the sequence detected earlier at lower frequencies at room temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra allowed investigating their evolution, when water vapour was diluted by atmospheric air with partial pressure from 0 up to 540 Torr. Analysis of the obtained spectra permitted determining the dimerization constant as well as the hydrogen bond dissociation energy and the dimer spectral parameters, including the average coefficient of collisional broadening of individual lines by water vapour and air. The manifestation of metastable states of the dimer in the observed spectra is assessed. The contribution of three possible pair states of water molecules to the second virial coefficient is evaluated over the broad range of temperatures. The work supports the significant role of the water dimer in atmospheric absorption and related processes.

  10. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  11. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  12. Study on the effect of the side secondary air velocity on the aerodynamic field in a tangentially fired furnace with HBC-SSA Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tong; Sun, Shaozeng; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    1999-12-01

    The present paper has compared a group of furnace aerodynamic fields at different velocities of side secondary air (SSA) in a test model of 420t/h utility boiler, applying Horizontal Bias Combustion Pulverized Coal Burner with Side Secondary Air (HBC-SSA Burner). Experimental results show that, when the ram pressure ratio of side secondary air (SSA) to primary air (PA) (ρ2sv 2s /2 /ρ1v 1 2 ) is between 1.0 2.4, the furnace aerodynamic field only varies slightly. The relative rotational diameters (φ/L) in the burner domain are moderate and the furnace is in good fullness. When ρ2sv 2s /2 /ρ1v 1 2 is beyond 4, φ/L is so large that the stream sweeps water-cooled wall and rotates strongly in the furnace. Therefore, slagging and high temperature corrosion of tube metal will be formed on the water-cooled wall in actual operation. This investigation provides the basis for the application of this new type burner. In addition, numerical simulations are conducted, and some defects in the numerical simulation are also pointed out and analyzed in this paper.

  13. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production from 24 to 27 weeks under simulated evaporatively cooled conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  14. Reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenni, A. J.; Benedict, K. B.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Zhou, Y.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Sive, B. C.; Zondlo, M. A.; Schichtel, B. A.; Vimont, J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) took place in July-August 2014. This collaborative study was aimed at characterizing those processes which control air quality along Colorado's Front Range. Although the study was largely focused on ozone, an additional goal of the study included characterizing contributions from Front Range sources and long-range transport to total reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO). Import of reactive nitrogen into ROMO and other pristine, high elevation areas has the potential to negatively impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We present measurements of reactive nitrogen species measured within ROMO during FRAPPÉ, and compare these data to measurements made in the surrounding areas. At our monitoring site in ROMO, co-located with IMPROVE and CASTNet monitoring, measurements of NO, NO2, NOx, NOy, NH3, and total reactive nitrogen (TNx) were made at high time resolution. Additional measurements of NH3, HNO3 and PM2.5 ions were made at hourly resolution using a MARGA and also at 24-hour time resolution using URG denuder-filter pack sampling. Precipitation samples also were collected to quantify wet deposition of ammonium, nitrate, and organic nitrogen. Finally, measurements of organic gases were made using online gas chromatography and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. Preliminary results for ammonia show both a diel pattern, with concentrations increasing each morning, and a strong dependence on wind direction, implicating the importance of transport. Higher concentrations of NOx and NOy also were observed in the daytime, but in general these patterns differed from that of ammonia. Several upslope events were observed during the measurement period during which NOx, NH3, 2-propylnitrate, 2-butylnitrate, ethane, butane, and pentane were observed to increase in concentration along with ozone.

  15. Measurement of Off-Body Velocity, Pressure, and Temperature in an Unseeded Supersonic Air Vortex by Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical method is used to make time-averaged (30 sec) off-body measurements in a supersonic airflow. Seeding of tracer particles is not required. One spatial component of velocity, static pressure, and static temperature are measured with stimulated Raman scattering. The three flow parameters are determined simultaneously from a common sample volume (0.3 by 0.3 by 15 mm) using concurrent measurements of the forward and backward scattered line shapes of a N2 vibrational Raman transition. The capability of this technique is illustrated with laboratory and large-scale wind tunnel testing that demonstrate 5-10% measurement uncertainties. Because the spatial resolution of the present work was improved to 1.5 cm (compared to 20 cm in previous work), it was possible to demonstrate a modest one-dimensional profiling of cross-flow velocity, pressure, and translational temperature through the low-density core of a stream-wise vortex (delta-wing model at Mach 2.8 in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel).

  16. Firn air-content of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, from seismic velocities, borehole surveys and firn modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Brisbourne, Alex; Booth, Adam; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Bevan, Suzanne; Luckman, Adrian; Hubbard, Bryn; Gourmelen, Noel; Palmer, Steve; Holland, Paul; Ashmore, David; Shepherd, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The rising surface temperature of Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves is strongly implicated in ice shelf disintegration, by exacerbating the compaction of firn layers. Firn compaction is expected to warm the ice column and, given sufficiently wet and compacted layers, to allow meltwater to penetrate into surface crevasses and thus enhance hydrofracture potential. Integrating seismic refraction surveys with borehole neutron and firn core density logging, we reveal vertical and horizontal changes in firn properties across Larsen C Ice Shelf. Patterns of firn air-content derived from seismic surveys are broadly similar to those estimated previously from airborne radar and satellite data. Specifically, these estimates show greater firn compaction in the north and landward inlets compared to the south, although spatial gradients in seismic-derived air-contents are less pronounced than those previously inferred. Firn thickness is less than 10 m in the extreme northwest of Larsen C, in Cabinet Inlet, yet exceeds 40 m in the southeast, suggesting that the inlet is a focus of firn compaction; indeed, buried layers of massive refrozen ice were observed in 200 MHz GPR data in Cabinet and Whirlwind Inlets during a field campaign in the 2014-15 austral summer. Depth profiles of firn density provide a reasonable fit with those derived from closely-located firn cores and neutron probe data. Our model of firn structure is driven by RACMO and includes a 'bucket'-type hydrological implementation, and simulates the depth-density profiles in the inlets well. Discrepancies between measured and modelled depth-density profiles become progressively greater towards the ice-shelf front. RACMO incorrectly simulates the particular leeward (sea-ice-influenced) microclimate of the shallow boundary layer, leading to excess melt and/or lack of snowfall. The spatial sampling density of our seismic observations will be augmented following a further field campaign in the 2016-17 austral summer

  17. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill...

  18. Age of the Dawson Arkose, southwestern Air Force Academy, Colorado, and implications for the uplift history of the Front Range

    SciTech Connect

    Kluth, C.F.; Nelson, S.N. )

    1988-01-01

    An angular unconformity within the synorogenic Dawson Arkose (Late Cretaceous-Eocene) is preserved and exposed in areas south of Denver, Colorado, along the eastern side of the Front Range uplift. In the southwestern part of the Air Force Academy, the basal Dawson is concordant with the underlying Laramie and Fox Hills formations and dips 72-84{degree} eastward. Above an intraformational angular unconformity, younger units of the Dawson dip 24{degree}-46{degree} eastward. Smaller angular unconformities (10{degree}{plus minus}), and beds with gradually decreasing dip occur higher in the Dawson section. Rocks above the largest unconformity contain a rich palynomorph assemblage of Late Maestrichtain age. These data indicate that approximately 30{degree}-40{degree}, and possibly as much as approximately 70{degree}, of tilting of the underlying rocks occurred during the Late Maestrichtian (66-70 Ma). It is also possible that approximately 30{degree}-40{degree} of the tilting of the Late Cretaceous rocks occurred between latest Maestrichtian and Eocene (approximately 45 Ma). These results suggest that the transition from a tectonically quiet marine environment to a non-marine, tectonically active condition took place rapidly, probably within a few million years. When combined with published data, the authors study indicates that the Front Range has different tectonic histories on its eastern and its western side, and that the deformation is diachronous along the strike of the eastern side of the Front Range.

  19. Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  20. Impact of Emissions and Long-Range Transport on Multi-Decadal Aerosol Trends: Implications for Air Quality and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2012-01-01

    We present a global model analysis of the impact of long-range transport and anthropogenic emissions on the aerosol trends in the major pollution regions in the northern hemisphere and in the Arctic in the past three decades. We will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to analyze the multi-spatial and temporal scale data, including observations from Terra, Aqua, and CALIPSO satellites and from the long-term surface monitoring stations. We will analyze the source attribution (SA) and source-receptor (SR) relationships in North America, Europe, East Asia, South Asia, and the Arctic at the surface and free troposphere and establish the quantitative linkages between emissions from different source regions. We will discuss the implications for regional air quality and climate change.

  1. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  2. 33 CFR 334.540 - Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.540 Section 334.540... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.540 Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass...

  3. 33 CFR 334.540 - Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.540 Section 334.540... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.540 Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass...

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    IT Las Vegas

    1998-10-15

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 486, the Double Tracks Radiological Safety (RADSAFE) Area (DTRSA) which is located on the Nellis Air Force Range 71North (N), west of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range Complex, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 486 is comprised of CAS 71-23-001-71DT consisting of two areas of concern referred to as the vehicle decontamination area and the animal burial pit. The DTRSA is located on the west side of the Cactus Range approximately 8 km (5 mi) southwest of the Cactus Spring gate at the intersection of the Cactus Spring Road and the Double Tracks Control Point Road (Figure 1-2). The DTRSA was used during May 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, personnel, and animals from the Double Tracks test. The DTRSA is one of three areas identified as a potential location for the disposal of radioactively contaminated

  5. Experimental techniques and measurements for code validation beyond the current testable regime i.e., at impact velocities over the range of 7 to 16 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a hyperveloci launcher which is capable of launching 0.5 mm to 1.0 mm thick by 6 mm to 19 mm diameter plates to velocities of 16 km/s. The hypervelocity launcher has been used to extend th shocked material properties data base at pressures an temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory. In this paper, recent results of one-dimensional an two-dimensional impact experiments at impact velocities over 10 km/s are presented. An example of an one-dimension experiment consists of measurements of shock loading an release in titanium at {approximately}2.3 Mbar resulting from symmetric impact at impact velocities of 10 km/s. Another example include the technique developed to probe the kinetics of shock-induced vaporization of a thin zinc plate shocked 5.5 Mbar resulting from an initial tantalum impact at over 10 km/s. The velocity interferometer, VISAR, is being used to estimate the time-resolved particle velocity history at a sample/lithium-fluoride window interface in the above experiments. The hypervelocity launcher has also been used to perform two-dimensional experiments. In particular, the propagation characteristics of debris clouds resulting from impact of a flier plate on a thin bumper shield. Aluminum flier plates were used to impact aluminum bumper shields at impact velocities of 5 to 11 km/s. In this instance, radiographic and framing photography have been used to record the debris cloud motion.

  6. Turbulent burning velocities of premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames in intense isotropic turbulence with consideration of radiation losses

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, S.S.; Yang, S.I.; Lin, W.J.; Su, R.C.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents turbulent burning velocities, S{sub T}, of several premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames at the same laminar burning velocity S{sub L}=0.1 m/s for two equivalence ratios f=0.7 and 1.4 near flammability limits with consideration of radiation heat losses from small (N{sub 2} diluted) to large (CO{sub 2} diluted). Experiments are carried out in a cruciform burner, in which the long vertical vessel is used to provide a downward propagating premixed flame and the large horizontal vessel equipped with a pair of counterrotating fans and perforated plates can be used to generate an intense isotropic turbulence in the central region between the two perforated plates. Turbulent flame speeds are measured by four different arrangements of pairs of ion-probe sensors at different positions from the top to the bottom of the central region in the burner. It is found that the effect of gas velocity on S{sub T} measured in the central region can be neglected. Simultaneous measurements using the pressure transducer and ion-probe sensors show that the pressure rise due to turbulent burning has little influence on S{sub T}. These measurements prove the accuracy of the S{sub T} data. At f=0.7, the percentage of [(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub CO{sub 2}}-(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}}]/(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}} decreases gradually from -4 to -17% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} increase from 4 to 46, while at f=1.4 such decrease is much more abrupt from -19 to -53% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} only increase from 4 to 18. The larger the radiation losses, the smaller the values of S{sub T}. This decreasing effect is augmented by increasing u{sup '}/S{sub L} and is particularly pronounced for rich CH{sub 4} flames. When u{sup '}/S{sub L}=18, lean CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames have much higher, 3.6 and/or 1.8 times higher, values of S{sub T}/S{sub L} than rich CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames, respectively. It is found that

  7. Walk-through survey report: HVLV (high velocity low volume) control technology for aircraft bonded wing and radome maintenance at Air Force Logistics Command, McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center, McClellan Air Force Base, California, on June 13, 1983, to evaluate the use of High Velocity Low Volume (HVLV) technology in the aircraft-maintenance industry. The HVLV system consisted of 65 ceiling drops in the bonded honeycomb shop where grinding and sanding operations created glass fiber and resin dusts. Preemployment and periodic physical examinations were required. Workers were required to wear disposable coveralls, and disposable dust masks were available. Workers walked through decontamination air jet showers before leaving the area to change clothes. Environmental monitoring revealed no significant dust exposures when the HVLV system was in use. Performance of the exhaust system on the eight-inch-diameter nose cone sanding operation was good, but the three-inch-diameter tools were too large and the shrouds too cumbersome for use on many hand-finishing tasks. The author concludes that the HVLV system is partially successful but requires additional shroud design. Further development of small tool shrouds is recommended.

  8. Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingle, Justin H.; Vu, Kennedy; Bahreini, Roya; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; Flocke, Frank; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Reeves, Mike; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoff; Walega, James; Weibring, Petter; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Summertime aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range and Denver metropolitan area as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) campaign during July-August 2014. An Aerodyne cavity attenuated phase shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex) was deployed to measure βext (at average relative humidity of 20 ± 7 %) of submicron aerosols at λ = 632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret βext behavior in various categories of air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios relative to CO (Δβext / ΔCO) were higher in aged urban air masses compared to fresh air masses by ˜ 50 %. The resulting increase in Δβext / ΔCO for highly aged air masses was accompanied by formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In addition, the impacts of aerosol composition on βext in air masses under the influence of urban, natural oil and gas operations (O&G), and agriculture and livestock operations were evaluated. Estimated non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values for different air mass types ranged from 1.51 to 2.27 m2 g-1, with the minimum and maximum values observed in urban and agriculture-influenced air masses, respectively. The mass distribution for organic, nitrate, and sulfate aerosols presented distinct profiles in different air mass types. During 11-12 August, regional influence of a biomass burning event was observed, increasing the background βext and estimated MEE values in the Front Range.

  9. Determination of the origin of groundwater nitrate at an air weapons range using the dual isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Savard, Martine M; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-06-01

    Nitrate is one of the most common contaminants in shallow groundwater, and many sources may contribute to the nitrate load within an aquifer. Groundwater nitrate plumes have been detected at several ammunition production sites. However, the presence of multiple potential sources and the lack of existing isotopic data concerning explosive degradation-induced nitrate constitute a limitation when it comes to linking both types of contaminants. On military training ranges, high nitrate concentrations in groundwater were reported for the first time as part of the hydrogeological characterization of the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR), Alberta, Canada. Explosives degradation is thought to be the main source of nitrate contamination at CLAWR, as no other major source is present. Isotopic analyses of N and O in nitrate were performed on groundwater samples from the unconfined and confined aquifers; the dual isotopic analysis approach was used in order to increase the chances of identifying the source of nitrate. The isotopic ratios for the groundwater samples with low nitrate concentration suggested a natural origin with a strong contribution of anthropogenic atmospheric NOx. For the samples with nitrate concentration above the expected background level the isotopic ratios did not correspond to any source documented in the literature. Dissolved RDX samples were degraded in the laboratory and results showed that all reproduced degradation processes released nitrate with a strong fractionation. Laboratory isotopic values for RDX-derived NO(3)(-) produced a trend of high delta(18)O-low delta(15)N to low delta(18)O-high delta(15)N, and groundwater samples with nitrate concentrations above the expected background level appeared along this trend. Our results thus point toward a characteristic field of isotopic ratios for nitrate being derived from the degradation of RDX.

  10. New particle formation under the influence of the long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Indra; Kim, Seyoung; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio; Takami, Akinori; Yoshino, Ayako; Irei, Satoshi; Park, Kihong; Takamura, Tamio; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2016-09-01

    Field observations to investigate the correlation between New Particle Formation (NPF) and the long-range transport of air pollutants in the East Asia region were carried out on a rural Island of Japan in the East-China Sea (Fukue Island, 32.8°N, 128.7°E) over three periods (February 23 to March 7, 2013; November 7 to 20, 2013; and November 2 to 24, 2014). Frequent NPF events were identified (16 events in 50 days), typically in association with sudden increases in particle number concentrations and the successive growth of particles to mobility diameters of several tens of nanometers. The NPF events were classified into two types (A and B) according to the initially detected particle sizes (onset diameters). Type-A consisted of strong NPF events with onset diameters as small as 5 nm. Type-B consisted of NPF events whose onset (<10 nm) was not clearly identifiable. The correlations of SO2 concentrations, solar radiation, PM2.5 concentrations, and chemical composition were analyzed based on the types of NPF events.

  11. New particle formation under the influence of the long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Indra; Kim, Seyoung; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio; Takami, Akinori; Yoshino, Ayako; Irei, Satoshi; Park, Kihong; Takamura, Tamio; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2016-09-01

    Field observations to investigate the correlation between New Particle Formation (NPF) and the long-range transport of air pollutants in the East Asia region were carried out on a rural Island of Japan in the East-China Sea (Fukue Island, 32.8°N, 128.7°E) over three periods (February 23 to March 7, 2013; November 7 to 20, 2013; and November 2 to 24, 2014). Frequent NPF events were identified (16 events in 50 days), typically in association with sudden increases in particle number concentrations and the successive growth of particles to mobility diameters of several tens of nanometers. The NPF events were classified into two types (A and B) according to the initially detected particle sizes (onset diameters). Type-A consisted of strong NPF events with onset diameters as small as 5 nm. Type-B consisted of NPF events whose onset (<10 nm) was not clearly identifiable. The correlations of SO2 concentrations, solar radiation, PM2.5 concentrations, and chemical composition were analyzed based on the types of NPF events.

  12. Long range transport and air quality impacts of SO2 emissions from Holuhraun (Bárdarbunga, Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Anja; Witham, Claire; Leadbetter, Susan; Theys, Nicholas; Hort, Matthew; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Stevenson, John; Shepherd, Janet; Sinnott, Richard; Kenny, Patrick; Barsotti, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Gas emissions from the Holuhraun eruption site in Iceland resulted in increases in observed ground level concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the UK and Ireland during two occasions in September 2014. We present data from the Irish and UK monitoring networks along with satellite imagery which describes the temporal and spatial evolution of these pollution episodes. During both events increases in concentration were significant compared to ambient levels. The peaks were short lived, 6-12 hours, and below the World Health Organisation's 10-minute air quality standard for SO2 of 500 µg/m3, but these events show that gas from relatively low altitude volcanic emissions in Iceland can pose a hazard to north west Europe. The two pollution events serve as excellent case studies and observations from the events provide us with a unique dataset for the verification of atmospheric dispersion models. We use the atmospheric dispersion model NAME to simulate the long-range transport, removal and chemical conversion of the volcanic SO2 during September 2014. We evaluate a range of model simulations, using varying model input and physical parameters, against ground based measurements and satellite retrievals of SO2. Simulations demonstrate that the long-range ground concentrations are strongly dependent on the emission flux and the height of emission at source. This relationship is well known from similar studies of other pollution events. However this work also demonstrates a dependence on the model's vertical turbulence parameterisation and the height of the boundary layer determined from the input Numerical Weather Prediction meteorological data. For the pollution events in September 2014, we find that using a mass flux of 40 kilotons per day of SO2 gives best agreement with vertical column retrievals of SO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument, which is in good agreement with initial estimates made by the Icelandic Meteorological Office. "This work is distributed under

  13. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  14. Concerning the flow about ring-shaped cowlings Part IX : the influence of oblique oncoming flow on the incremental velocities and air forces at the front part of circular cowls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchemann, Dietrich; Weber, Johanna

    1952-01-01

    The dependence of the maximum incremental velocities and air forces on a circular cowling on the mass flow and the angle of attack of the oblique flow is determined with the aid of pressure-distribution measurements. The particular cowling tested had been partially investigated in NACA TM 1327.

  15. Flow mechanism for the long-range transport of air pollutants by the sea breeze causing inland nighttime high oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, H.; Mitsumoto, S.; Kurita, H.

    1988-02-01

    Flow mechanism causing nightttime smog was investigated by analyzing 1) continuous records of meteorological data and concentration of oxidants (Ox) for 15 days and 2) aircraft data along the transportation route of a polluted air mass.

  16. Representing the Effects of Long-Range Transport and Lateral Boundary Conditions in Regional Air Pollution Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was applied to a domain covering the northern hemisphere; meteorological information was derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model run on identical grid and projection configuration, while the emissio...

  17. Air-water gas exchange of chlorinated pesticides in four lakes spanning a 1,205 meter elevation range in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Andrew C; Kimpe, Lynda E; Blais, Jules M

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in air and water were measured from four lakes that transect the Canadian Rocky Mountains. These data were used in combination with wind velocity and temperature-adjusted Henry's law constants to estimate the direction and magnitude of chemical exchange across the air-water interface of these lakes. Bow Lake (1,975 m above sea level [masl]) was studied during the summers of 1998 through 2000; Donald (770 masl) was studied during the summer of 1999; Dixon Dam Lake (946 masl) and Kananaskis Lake (1,667 masl) were studied during the summer of 2000. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dieldrin volatilized from Bow Lake in spring and summer of 1998 to 2000 at a rate of 0.92 +/-1.1 and 0.55+/-0.37 ng m(-2) d(-1), respectively. The alpha-endosulfan deposited to Bow Lake at a rate of 3.4+/-2.2 ng m(-2) d(-1). Direction of gas exchange for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH) changed from net deposition in 1998 to net volatilization in 1999, partly because of a surge in y-HCH concentrations in the water at Bow Lake in 1999. Average gamma-HCH concentrations in air declined steadily over the three-year period, from 0.021 ng m(-3) in 1998, to 0.0023 ng m(-3) in 2000, and to volatilization in 1999 and 2000. Neither the concentrations of organochlorine compounds (OCs) in air and water, nor the direction and rate of air-water gas exchange correlate with temperature or elevation. In general, losses of pesticides by outflow were greater than the amount exchanged across the air-water interface in these lakes. PMID:15683168

  18. Effect of gas-transfer velocity parameterization choice on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The oceanic sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important part of the global carbon budget. Understanding uncertainties in the calculation of this net flux into the ocean is crucial for climate research. One of the sources of the uncertainty within this calculation is the parameterization chosen for the CO2 gas-transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software toolbox, called the FluxEngine (Shutler et al., 2016), to estimate the monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes for the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean, including the European Arctic, and for the global ocean using several published quadratic and cubic wind speed parameterizations of the gas-transfer velocity. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic Ocean. This region is a large oceanic sink of CO2, and it is also a region characterized by strong winds, especially in winter but with good in situ data coverage. We show that the uncertainty in the parameterization is smaller in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic than in the global ocean. It is as little as 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, in comparison to 9 % for the global ocean when restricted to parameterizations with quadratic wind dependence. This uncertainty becomes 46, 44, and 65 %, respectively, when all parameterizations are considered. We suggest that this smaller uncertainty (5 and 4 %) is caused by a combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic (> 7 ms-1) and lack of any seasonal changes in the direction of the flux direction within most of the region. We also compare the impact of using two different in situ pCO2 data sets (Takahashi et al. (2009) and Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 and v2.0, for the flux calculation. The annual fluxes using the two data sets differ by 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal fluxes in the Arctic computed from the two data sets disagree with each

  19. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  20. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  1. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  2. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  3. Ground-water hydrology and water quality of the southern high plains aquifer, Melrose Air Force Range, Cannon Air Force Base, Curry and Roosevelt Counties, New Mexico, 2002-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.; Gebhardt, Fredrick E.; Falk, Sarah E.

    2004-01-01

    In cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized the ground-water hydrology and water quality at Melrose Air Force Range in east-central New Mexico. The purpose of the study was to provide baseline data to Cannon Air Force Base resource managers to make informed decisions concerning actions that may affect the ground-water system. Five periods of water-level measurements and four periods of water-quality sample collection were completed at Melrose Air Force Range during 2002 and 2003. The water-level measurements and water-quality samples were collected from a 29-well monitoring network that included wells in the Impact Area and leased lands of Melrose Air Force Range managed by Cannon Air Force Base personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a broad overview of ground-water flow and ground-water quality in the Southern High Plains aquifer in the Ogallala Formation at Melrose Air Force Range. Results of the ground-water characterization of the Southern High Plains aquifer indicated a local flow system in the unconfined aquifer flowing northeastward from a topographic high, the Mesa (located in the southwestern part of the Range), toward a regional flow system in the unconfined aquifer that flows southeastward through the Portales Valley. Ground water was less than 55 years old across the Range; ground water was younger (less than 25 years) near the Mesa and ephemeral channels and older (25 years to 55 years) in the Portales Valley. Results of water-quality analysis indicated three areas of different water types: near the Mesa and ephemeral channels, in the Impact Area of the Range, and in the Portales Valley. Within the Southern High Plains aquifer, a sodium/chloride-dominated ground water was found in the center of the Impact Area of the Range with water-quality characteristics similar to ground water from the underlying Chinle Formation. This sodium/chloride-dominated ground water of the unconfined aquifer in the Impact

  4. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  5. Quantification of the effects of generation volume, surface recombination velocity, and diffusion length on the electron-beam-induced current and its derivative Determination of diffusion lengths in the low micron and submicron ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Von Roos, O.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic and quantitative analysis is carried out to investigate the effects of the shape (point, cube, Gaussian) and size of the generation volume, the surface recombination velocity, and the diffusion length on the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) and its derivative (DEIC). Thick homogeneously doped samples exhibiting diffusion lengths in the low micron and submicron range are considered. The results are presented in computed EBIC curves as a function of scanning distance and of the ratio true diffusion length/effective diffusion length. Shown using these curves are: (1) a simple and yet rigorous method for the determination of the true diffusion length, taking into consideration all of the factors cited above, (2) a method for the rapid determination of the surface recombination velocity, (3) the condition under which the source shape becomes insignificant, and (4) a new value for the lower limit of the diffusion length which can be determined by the EBOC technique.

  6. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  7. Interpolation Correlations for Fluid Properties of Humid Air in the Temperature Range 100 °C to 200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melling, Adrian; Noppenberger, Stefan; Still, Martin; Venzke, Holger

    1997-07-01

    This paper provides simple analytical correlations for selected thermodynamic and fluid transport properties for the mixture dry air and water vapor. These correlations are derived from theory as well as from numerical fitting procedures and give expressions for density ϱ, viscosity μ, thermal conductivity k, specific heat cp, and Prandtl number Pr at a working pressure of p=1 bar and for a temperature range from 100 °C to 200 °C. The main purpose is to present a comparatively simple set of equations, as the correlations do not reflect in every case the underlying physical background. Since experimental data are scarce for the properties under investigation, it was in some cases necessary to extrapolate the available correlations to temperatures or water vapor contents where no experimental data could be found. The derived equations are compared with the pure component values for dry air and water vapor and, as far as possible, also for air-water vapor mixtures.

  8. Air and silica core Bragg fibers for radiation delivery in the wavelength range 0.6-1.5 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Milan; Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Matějec, Vlastimil

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents fundamental characteristics of laboratory designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air and silica cores at wavelengths of 632, 975, 1064 and 1550 nm. Fibers with the 26- μ m-silica core and 5- or 73- μ m-air cores in diameters and claddings of 3 pairs of Bragg layers were prepared from one preform. The overall transmittance, attenuation coefficients, coupling losses, bending losses, and damage-intensity thresholds were determined using four continuous-wave laser sources with the maximum output power of 300 mW and a pulsed 9 ns laser with the maximum output energy up to 1 mJ. The lowest attenuation coefficient of about 70 dB/km was determined at 1064 nm with the 73- μ m-air-core Bragg fiber. All fibers have been found to exhibit negligible bending losses down to the bending diameters of 5 cm. In comparison with the conventional gradient optical fiber, all the prepared Bragg fibers have approximately six times higher damage intensity threshold of about 30 GWcm-2 and therefore they are very suitable for high power laser radiation delivery.

  9. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion.

  10. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters are essential in assessing the flight performance of aerospace vehicles. The effects of the Earth's atmosphere on aerospace vehicles influence various aspects of the vehicle during ascent ranging from its flight trajectory to the structural dynamics and aerodynamic heatmg on the vehicle. Atmospheric databases charactenzing the wind and thermodynamic environments, known as Range Reference Atmospheres (RRA), have been developed at space launch ranges by a governmental interagency working group for use by aerospace vehicle programs. The National Aeronantics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle Program (SSP), which launches from Kennedy Space Center, utilizes atmosphenc statistics derived from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere (CCAFS RRA) database to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehlcle during ascent.

  11. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  12. Colorado air quality impacted by long-range-transported aerosol: a set of case studies during the 2015 Pacific Northwest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie M.; Neiman, Paul J.; Coleman, Timothy; Senff, Christoph J.; Kirgis, Guillaume; Alvarez, Raul J.; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Biomass burning plumes containing aerosols from forest fires can be transported long distances, which can ultimately impact climate and air quality in regions far from the source. Interestingly, these fires can inject aerosols other than smoke into the atmosphere, which very few studies have evidenced. Here, we demonstrate a set of case studies of long-range transport of mineral dust aerosols in addition to smoke from numerous fires (including predominantly forest fires and a few grass/shrub fires) in the Pacific Northwest to Colorado, US. These aerosols were detected in Boulder, Colorado, along the Front Range using beta-ray attenuation and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and corroborated with satellite-borne lidar observations of smoke and dust. Further, we examined the transport pathways of these aerosols using air mass trajectory analysis and regional- and synoptic-scale meteorological dynamics. Three separate events with poor air quality and increased mass concentrations of metals from biomass burning (S and K) and minerals (Al, Si, Ca, Fe, and Ti) occurred due to the introduction of smoke and dust from regional- and synoptic-scale winds. Cleaner time periods with good air quality and lesser concentrations of biomass burning and mineral metals between the haze events were due to the advection of smoke and dust away from the region. Dust and smoke present in biomass burning haze can have diverse impacts on visibility, health, cloud formation, and surface radiation. Thus, it is important to understand how aerosol populations can be influenced by long-range-transported aerosols, particularly those emitted from large source contributors such as wildfires.

  13. The magnitude and spatial range of current-use urban PCB and PBDE emissions estimated using a coupled multimedia and air transport model.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Susan A; Diamond, Miriam L; Daggupaty, Sreerama M

    2014-01-21

    SO-MUM, a coupled atmospheric transport and multimedia urban model, was used to estimate spatially resolved (5 × 5 km(2)) air emissions and chemical fate based on measured air concentrations and chemical mass inventories within Toronto, Canada. Approximately 95% and 70% of Σ5PCBs (CB-28, -52, -101, -153, and -180) and Σ5PBDEs (BDE-28, -47, -100, -154, and -183) emissions of 17 (2-36) and 18 (3-42) kg y(-1), respectively, undergo atmospheric transport from the city, which is partly over Lake Ontario. The urban air plume was found to reach about 50 km for PCBs and PBDEs, in the direction of prevailing winds which is almost twice the distance of the wind-independent plume. The distance traveled by the plume is a function of prevailing wind velocity, the geographic distribution of the chemical inventory, and gas-particle partitioning. Soil wash-off of historically accumulated Σ5PCBs to surface water contributed ∼ 0.4 kg y(-1) (of mainly higher congeners) to near-shore Lake Ontario compared with volatilization of ∼ 6 kg y(-1) of mainly lighter congeners. Atmospheric emissions from primary sources followed by deposition to surface films and subsequent wash-off to surface water contributed ∼ 1 kg y(-1) and was the main route of Σ5PBDE loadings to near-shore Lake Ontario which acts as a net PBDE sink. Secondary emissions of PCBs and PBDEs from at least a ∼ 900,000 km(2) rural land area would be needed to produce the equivalent primary emissions as Toronto (∼ 640 km(2)). These results provide clear support for reducing inventories of these POPs.

  14. Analysis of long-range transport of particulate matters in connection with air circulation over Central and Eastern part of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Necula, Cristian; Georgescu, Florinela

    The aim of this paper is to establish a practical methodology for examining the long-range transport of particulate matters (PM), named TSP. The daily concentration values of TSP from years 2001 and 2002, for three sites, Baia Mare (RO), Vienna (AU), Aosta (IT), were analyzed. In order to connect the main air circulation types with the aerosol concentrations at the selected sites, the catalogues of Circulation and Weather type Classification (COST733) were used. Spectral analysis was made using spectrum software based on Lomb-Scargle periodograms, and multiresolution analysis (MRA) technique based on Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform (MODWT) with Fejer-Korovkin in 22 points wavelet filter (waveslim package). Spectral analysis shows a dominant one-year periodicity for all the time series with a variance around 22% for each time series. In addition, several winters TSP pollution episodes from each city were analyzed using a back trajectory model (HYSPLIT4), in order to compare with the resulted air circulation types. Two important concluding remarks emerge: (i) the Eastern part of Europe shows a dominant easterly air circulation and central Europe is characterized by south-west air circulations, which drive the maxima of pollutant concentrations; (ii) the choice of the domain for analysis of the circulation types is very important.

  15. Ballistics examination of air rifle.

    PubMed

    Bogiel, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the velocity, energy, maximum range and distance at which pellets fired from an air rifle of kinetic energy below 17 J can pose a threat to unprotected human skin. Doppler radar equipment and exterior ballistics software were used in this examination. PMID:25184422

  16. Extensive air showers generated by protons, nuclei, gamma-quanta and neutrinos at energy range 1 - 100 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Arsov, T. P.; Borisov, S. S.; Musin, F. I.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Mirzafatikhov, R. M.; Kasparov, G. M.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Platonov, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Basic science: nuclear physics, physics of elementary particles and connected with them astrophysics and cosmology, has studied the structure of matter on micro and macro scales. Gamma-astronomy and neutrino-astronomy, are unique experimental possibilities to search for high-energy cosmic ray sources (1012 - 1014 eV). Evidence has already been obtained of metagalactic sources exceeding by 106 - 1012 times the power of gamma-quanta galactic sources. This data puts into doubt the assumption about the galactic origin of the observed very high energy cosmic radiation. The energy spectrum of the majority of known gamma-sources with energy 1012 - 1014 eV is harder than the proton and cosmic ray nuclei spectrum. The problem of observing extensive air showers generated by neutrinos is connected with the extremely small effective cross-section of inelastic collisions of neutrinos with nuclei. However, two facts allow a search for showers generated by neutrinos. The hadron cascade with primary energy of more than 1012 eV leaves the ground to atmosphere from depth of ~ 300 g/cm2 without essential loss of total energy in the hadron cascade. The Cherenkov radiation in the atmosphere from such hadron cascades will be observed at distances from the telescope of 7.5 km over an area more than 7 . 105 m2. This partially compensates for the small cross-section of inelastic neutrino collisions. RFBR, FNP, GNTP

  17. Launch vehicle effluent measurements during the August 20, 1977, Titan 3 launch at Air Force Eastern Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. C.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne effluent measurements within the launch cloud and visible and infrared measurements of cloud physical behavior are discussed. Airborne effluent measurements include concentrations of HCl, Cl2, NO, NOX, and particulates as a function of time during each sampling pass through the exhaust cloud. The particle size distribution was measured for each pass through the cloud. Mass concentration as a function of particle diameter was measured over the size range of 0.05- to 25 micron diameter, and particle number density was measured as a function of diameter over a size range of 0.5 to 7.5 micron. Effluent concentrations in the cloud ranged from about 30 ppm several minutes after launch to about 1 to 2 ppm at 100 minutes. Maximum Cl2 concentrations were about 40 to 55 ppb and by 20 minutes were less than 1.0 ppb. A tabulated listing of the airborne data is given in the appendix. Usable cloud imaging data were limited to the first 16 minutes after launch.

  18. Current challenges in modelling far-range air pollution induced by the 2014-2015 Bárðarbunga fissure eruption (Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichu, Marie; Chiapello, Isabelle; Brogniez, Colette; Péré, Jean-Christophe; Thieuleux, Francois; Torres, Benjamin; Blarel, Luc; Mortier, Augustin; Podvin, Thierry; Goloub, Philippe; Söhne, Nathalie; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Hendrick, François; Theys, Nicolas; Van Roozendael, Michel; Tanré, Didier

    2016-08-01

    The 2014-2015 Holuhraun lava-flood eruption of Bárðarbunga volcano (Iceland) emitted prodigious amounts of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere. This eruption caused a large-scale episode of air pollution throughout Western Europe in September 2014, the first event of this magnitude recorded in the modern era. We gathered chemistry-transport simulations and a wealth of complementary observations from satellite sensors (OMI, IASI), ground-based remote sensing (lidar, sunphotometry, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and ground-level air quality monitoring networks to characterize both the spatial-temporal distributions of volcanic SO2 and sulfate aerosols as well as the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. Time variations of dynamical and microphysical properties of sulfate aerosols in the aged low-tropospheric volcanic cloud, including loading, vertical distribution, size distribution and single scattering albedo, are provided. Retrospective chemistry-transport simulations at low horizontal resolution (25 km × 25 km) capture the correct temporal dynamics of this far-range air pollution event but fail to reproduce the correct magnitude of SO2 concentration at ground-level. Simulations at higher spatial resolution, relying on two nested domains with finest resolution of 7.3 km × 7.3 km, improve substantially the far-range vertical distribution of the volcanic cloud and subsequently the description of ground-level SO2 concentrations. However, remaining discrepancies between model and observations are shown to result from an inaccurate representation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. Comparison with lidar observations points out a systematic under-estimation of the PBL height by the model, whichever the PBL parameterization scheme. Such a shortcoming impedes the capture of the overlying Bárðarbunga cloud into the PBL at the right time and in sufficient quantities. This study therefore demonstrates the key role played by the PBL

  19. Velocity and mass flux distribution measurements of spherical glass beads in air flow in a 90-deg vertical-to-horizontal bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliafas, Yannis

    The fluid mechanics of a mixture of gas and glass beads in a 90-deg bend was studied, and the resulting mean streamwise and radial velocities and the associated Reynolds stresses are reported. Higher negative slip velocities were observed for 100-micron beads than for 50-micron beads. At angular displacements of 0 deg the radial velocity was directed toward the inner wall for both sizes of beads. Most of the bead-wall collisions occurred between the 30- and 60-deg stations. Bead-wall interaction was the controlling factor influencing the behavior of the beads. The inner wall was generally erosion-free, and no erosion was observed on the side walls, which were made of glass. A 2.5-m-long deposition-free area was observed for both bead sizes used. The results are significant for coal gasification technology.

  20. Aerosol Optical Extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) 2014 Summertime Field Campaign, Colorado U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingle, J. H.; Vu, K. K. T.; Bahreini, R.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Cohen, R. C.; Ebben, C. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Montzka, D. D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range Denver Metropolitan Area as part of the summertime air quality airborne field campaign to characterize the influence of sources, photochemical processing, and transport of pollution on local air quality. An Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex) was deployed to measure dry βext at λ=632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret the βext under various categories of aged air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios of Δβext/ΔCO were evaluated under 3 differently aged air mass categories (fresh, intermediately aged, and aged) to investigate impacts of photochemistry on βext. Δβext/ΔCO was significantly increased in heavily aged air masses compared to fresh air masses (0.17 Mm-1/ppbv and 0.094 Mm-1/ppbv respectively). The resulting increase in Δβext/ΔCO under heavily aged air masses was represented by secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation. Aerosol composition and sources from urban, natural oil and gas wells (OG), and agriculture and livestock operations were also evaluated for their impacts on βext. Linear regression fits to βext vs. organic aerosol mass showed higher correlation coefficients under the urban and OG plumes (r=0.55 and r=0.71 respectively) and weakest under agricultural and livestock plumes (r=0.28). The correlation between βext and nitrate aerosol mass however was best under the agriculture and livestock plumes (r=0.81), followed by OG plumes (r=0.74), suggesting co-location of aerosol nitrate precursor sources with OG emissions. Finally, non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE) was analyzed. MEE was observed to be 1.37 g/m2 and 1.30 g/m2 in OG and urban+OG plumes, respectively.

  1. Assessment of concentrations of trace elements in ground water and soil at the Small-Arms Firing Range, Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from four shallow water-table aquifer observation wells beneath the Small-Arms Firing Range study area at Shaw Air Force Base. Water-chemistry analyses indicated that total lead concentrations in shallow ground water beneath the study area do not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level established for lead in drinking water (0.05 milligrams per liter). All other trace element total concentrations in ground water beneath the study area were at or below the detection limit of the analytical methodology.

  2. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Paxton K; Parsons, Michael S; Unz, Ronald J; Waggoner, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m(3)/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  3. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Unz, Ronald J.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m3/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  4. Launch vehicle effluent measurements during the September 5, 1977, Titan 3 launch at Air Force eastern test range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Bendura, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne effluent measurements and cloud physical behavior data are presented. The monitoring program included airborne effluent measurements in situ in the launch cloud, visible and infrared photography of cloud growth and physical behavior, and limited surface collection of rain samples. Effluent measurements included concentrations of HCl, Cl2, NO, nitric oxide, and particles as a function of time in the exhaust cloud. In situ particle mass concentration and number density were measured as a function of time and size in the range of 0.05 micron m to 30 micron m diameter. Measurement results were similar to those of previous launch monitorings. Maximum HCl and nitric oxide concentrations of Cl2 were maximum about 2 minutes after launch and by 10 to 15 minutes had decayed to less than 10 ppb (detection limit). Particle measurements showed most of the particles present to be below about 3-micron m diameter. Postlaunch analyses of collected particle samples showed significant amounts of Al (some cases Cl) from about 3-micron m to 0.04-micron m diameter.

  5. Regional differences in major carbon emissions observed during FRAPPE (Front Range Air Pollution Photochemical Experiment) and WINTER (Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stell, M. H.; Campos, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sampling of coal powered power plant emission plumes during two NCAR airborne field campaigns using the NSF NCAR C-130, FRAPPE (Front Range Air Pollution Photochemical Experiment) and WINTER (Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity) revealed different plume composition in different areas of the continental United States. The FRAPPE campaign sampled along the Colorado Front Range and the WINTER campaign, based out of Virginia sampled along the East Coast. Analysis of the relative production of the three major carbon species, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane from power plant plumes sampled in both these campaigns will be compared to the emissions reported to the EPA by the power plants. Regional differences will be highlighted. Spatial distribution of the pollution plume will also be presented, looking at factors such as topographic barriers, and meteorological phenomena such as subsidence and wind advection. This analysis will take into account experimental condition differences such as the summer versus winter sampling and night/day.

  6. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected

  7. Questions Students Ask: About Terminal Velocity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Earl R.; Nelson, Jim

    1984-01-01

    If a ball were given an initial velocity in excess of its terminal velocity, would the upward force of air resistance (a function of velocity) be greater than the downward force of gravity and thus push the ball back upwards? An answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  8. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan; Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle utilizes atmospheric thermodynamic properties to evaluate structural dynamics and vehicle flight performance impacts by the atmosphere during ascent. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric thermodynamic properties at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) used in Space. Shuttle Vehicle assessments are contained in the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) Database. Database contains tabulations for monthly and annual means (mu), standard deviations (sigma) and skewness of wind and thermodynamic variables. Wind, Thermodynamic, Humidity and Hydrostatic parameters 1 km resolution interval from 0-30 km 2 km resolution interval 30-70 km Multiple revisions of the CCAFS RRA database have been developed since initial RRA published in 1963. 1971, 1983, 2006 Space Shuttle program utilized 1983 version for use in deriving "hot" and "cold" atmospheres, atmospheric density dispersions for use in vehicle certification analyses and selection of atmospheric thermodynamic profiles for use in vehicle ascent design and certification analyses. During STS-114 launch preparations in July 2005 atmospheric density observations between 50-80 kft exceeded density limits used for aerodynamic ascent heating constraints in vehicle certification analyses. Mission specific analyses were conducted and concluded that the density bias resulted in small changes to heating rates and integrated heat loading on the vehicle. In 2001, the Air Force Combat Climatology Center began developing an updated RRA for CCAFS.

  9. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model summarizing the wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 kin. Launches of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle from Kennedy Space Center utilize CCAFS RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the CCAFS RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, a validation study on the 2006 version was conducted as well as a comparison analysis of the 2006 version to the existing CCAFS RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  10. Removal of formaldehyde by a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in dry air in the 20 °C to 300 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin-Simiand, N.; Pasquiers, S.; Magne, L.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the gas mixture temperature, from 20 °C up to 300 °C, on the removal of formaldehyde, diluted at low concentration (less than 800 ppm) in dry air at atmospheric pressure, by a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro gas chromatography. Efficient removal of CH2O is obtained and it is found that the characteristic energy, less than 200 J l-1, is a decreasing function of the temperature over the whole range of concentration values under consideration. Byproducts issued from the removal are identified and quantified (CO, CO2, HCOOH, HNO3). Experimental results are analysed using a zero-dimensional simplified DBD-reactor model in order to gain insights on the chemical processes involved. It is shown that the dissociation of the molecule competes with oxidation reactions at low temperature, whereas at high temperature oxidation processes dominate.

  11. Comparison of the NIST and BIPM Air-Kerma Standards for Measurements in the Low-Energy X-Ray Range

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D. T.; Lamperti, P.; O’Brien, M.

    1999-01-01

    A direct comparison was made between the air-kerma standards used for the measurement of low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The comparison was carried out at the BIPM using the BIPM reference beam qualities in the range from 10 kV to 100 kV. The results show the standards to be in agreement to around 0.5 % at reference beam qualities up to 50 kV and at 100 kV. The result at the 80 kV beam quality is less favorable, with agreement at the 1 % level.

  12. Penetration of Air Jets Issuing from Circular, Square, and Elliptical Orifices Directed Perpendicularly to an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, Robert S.; Callaghan, Edmund E.; Bowden, Dean T.

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the penetration of air jets d.irected perpendicularlY to an air stream. Jets Issuing from circular, square, and. elliptical orifices were investigated. and. the jet penetration at a position downstream of the orifice was determined- as a function of jet density, jet velocity, air-stream d.enaity, air-stream velocity, effective jet diameter, and. orifice flow coeffIcient. The jet penetrations were determined for nearly constant values of air-stream density at three tunnel-air velocities arid for a large range of Jet velocities and. densities. The results were correlated in terms of dimensionless parameters and the penetrations of the various shapes were compared. Greater penetration was obtained. with the square orifices and the elliptical orifices having an axis ratio of 4:1 at low tunnel-air velocities and low jet pressures than for the other orifices investigated. The square orifices gave the best penetrations at the higher values of tunnel-air velocity and jet total pressure.

  13. Ice core evidence of rapid air temperature increases since 1960 in alpine areas of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Susong, D.D.; Schuster, P.F.; Cecil, L.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Michel, R.L.; Kendall, C.

    2002-01-01

    Site-specific transfer functions relating delta oxygen 18 (??18O) values in snow to the average air temperature (TA) during storms on Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) were used in conjunction with ??18O records from UFG ice cores to reconstruct long-term trends in air temperature from alpine areas in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Transfer functions were determined by using data collected from four seasonal snowpacks (1989-1990, 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000). The timing and amount of each storm was determined from an automated snowpack telemetry (SNOTEL) site, 22 km northeast of UFG, and ???1060 m in elevation below UFG. Statistically significant and positive correlations between ??18O values in the snow and TA were consistently found in three of the four seasonal snowpacks. The snowpack with the poor correlation was deposited in 1997-1998 during the 1997-1998 El Nin??o Southern Oscillation (ENSO). An ultrasonic snow-depth sensor installed on UFG provided valuable insights into site-specific storms and postdepositional processes that occur on UFG. The timing of storms recorded at the UFG and Cold Springs SNOTEL sites were similar; however, selected storms did not correlate. Snow from storms occurring after mid-October and followed by high winds was most susceptible to redeposition of snow. This removal of lower temperature snowfall could potentially bias the ??18O values preserved in ice core records to environmental conditions reflecting higher air temperatures and lower wind speeds. Transfer functions derived from seasonal snow cover on UFG were used to reconstruct TA values from ??18O values determined from two ice cores collected from UFG. Reconstructed air temperatures from the ice core data indicate an increase in TA of ???3.5??C from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s in the alpine areas of northwestern Wyoming. Reconstructed TA from the ice core records between the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA), mid-1800s, and the early 1990s indicate a TA increase of

  14. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  15. An overview of the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS): Impact of stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport on surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M. Y.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S. P.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-05-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was conducted in the late spring and early summer of 2013 to assess the seasonal contribution of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport to surface ozone in Clark County, Nevada and determine if these processes directly contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. Secondary goals included the characterization of local ozone production, regional transport from the Los Angeles Basin, and impacts from wildfires. The LVOS measurement campaign took place at a former U.S. Air Force radar station ∼45 km northwest of Las Vegas on Angel Peak (∼2.7 km above mean sea level, asl) in the Spring Mountains. The study consisted of two extended periods (May 19-June 4 and June 22-28, 2013) with near daily 5-min averaged lidar measurements of ozone and backscatter profiles from the surface to ∼2.5 km above ground level (∼5.2 km asl), and continuous in situ measurements (May 20-June 28) of O3, CO, (1-min) and meteorological parameters (5-min) at the surface. These activities were guided by forecasts and analyses from the FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTticle) dispersion model and the Real Time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS), and the NOAA Geophysical Research Laboratory (NOAA GFDL) AM3 chemistry-climate model. In this paper, we describe the LVOS measurements and present an overview of the results. The combined measurements and model analyses show that STT directly contributed to each of the three O3 exceedances that occurred in Clark County during LVOS, with contributions to 8-h surface concentrations in excess of 30 ppbv on each of these days. The analyses show that long-range transport from Asia made smaller contributions (<10 ppbv) to surface O3 during two of those exceedances. The contribution of regional wildfires to surface O3 during the three LVOS exceedance events was found to be negligible, but wildfires were found to be a major factor during exceedance events

  16. The Contribution of Trans-Pacific Submicron Aerosols and Local Particle Nucleation Bursts to California's Air Quality as Seen from the Pacific Coast Mountain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, E. C. C.; Christensen, J. N.; Post, A.; Faloona, I. C.

    2015-12-01

    The long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols to the Western US has received considerable attention due to the growing disparity between North American and Asian air quality. Using MODIS and space-borne LIDAR measurements some have argued that the transcontinental transport of dust from Asia, Africa, and Europe outweighs that of locally produced combustion aerosols (Yu et al. 2012). This study seeks to compare the aerosol composition, number, and size distribution of locally derived submicron aerosols (including particle nucleation events) vs. long-range transported aerosols observed at a remote mountain site near the Pacific Coast. Toward this aim, rotating drum impactor (RDI) and scanning mobility particle size (SMPS) measurements of size-segregated elemental compositions and size spectra were collected from February to November of 2012 at Chews Ridge (elevation 1450 m) in Monterey County, California. This mountaintop site experiences two main wind modes. The main mode is ohshore-directed winds from the southwest, which are most likely to bring trans-Pacific aerosols to the site; and offshore-directed, northeasterly winds that bring continental aerosols to the site from the interior of California. Elemental ratios (normalized to Al), matrix factorization, and a k-cluster analysis of these data suggest distinct crustal, combustion, and marine sources with considerable seasonal as well as short-term variability. HYSPLIT model back trajectories support the hypothesized sources of these submicron aerosols. Locally, SMPS data reveal consistent nucleation bursts and subsequent growth in the 20-60 nm range during the afternoons. A distinct but weaker diel cycle was observed in the 70 - 100 nm range, corresponding to the smallest RDI impactor stage. Finally, the Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb) of aerosol samples from selected dates will be measured by MC-ICPMS to further identify aerosol origins (e.g. Ewing et al. 2010).

  17. Summary and analysis of approaches linking visual range, PM2.5 concentrations, and air quality health impact indices for wildfires.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lahm, Peter W; Fitch, Mark J; Broughton, Mike

    2013-09-01

    Several U.S. state and tribal agencies and other countries have implemented a methodology developed in the arid intermountain western U.S. where short-term (1- to 3-hr) particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) concentrations are estimated from an observed visual range (VR) measurement. This PM2.5 concentration estimate is then linked to a public health warning scale to inform the public about potential health impacts from smoke from wildfire. This methodology is often used where monitoring data do not exist (such as many rural areas). This work summarizes the various approaches, highlights the potential for wildfire smoke impact messaging conflicts at state and international borders, and highlights the need to define consistent short-term health impact category breakpoint categories. Is air quality "unhealthy" when 1- to 3-hr PM2.5 is > or = 139 microg/m3 as specified in the Wildfire Smoke, A Guide for Public Health Officials? Or is air quality unhealthy when 1- to 3-hr PM2.5 is > or = 88.6 microg/m3 as specified in the Montana categorizations? This work then examines the relationship between visual range and PM2.5 concentrations using data from the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program and the IMPROVE extinction coefficient (beta ext) equation to simulate an atmosphere dominated by smoke for sites in the arid intermountain western U.S. and great plains. This was accomplished by rearranging the beta ext equation to solve for organic mass as a function of VR. The results show that PM2.5 and VR are related by PM2.5 = 622 * VR(-0.98) with a correlation of 0.99 and that at low VR values (<10 km) a small change in VR results in a large change in PM2.5 concentrations. The results also show that relative humidity and the presence of hygroscopic pollutants from sources other than fire can change the VR/PM2.5 relationships, especially at PM2.5 concentrations less than approximately 90 microg/m3.

  18. Climatology of tropospheric vertical velocity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Vertical velocity power spectra obtained from Poker Flat, Alaska; Platteville, Colorado; Rhone Delta, France; and Ponape, East Caroline Islands using 50-MHz clear-air radars with vertical beams are given. The spectra were obtained by analyzing the quietest periods from the one-minute-resolution time series for each site. The lengths of available vertical records ranged from as long as 6 months at Poker Flat to about 1 month at Platteville. The quiet-time vertical velocity spectra are shown. Spectral period ranging from 2 minutes to 4 hours is shown on the abscissa and power spectral density is given on the ordinate. The Brunt-Vaisala (B-V) periods (determined from nearby sounding balloons) are indicated. All spectra (except the one from Platteville) exhibit a peak at periods slightly longer than the B-V period, are flat at longer periods, and fall rapidly at periods less than the B-V period. This behavior is expected for a spectrum of internal waves and is very similar to what is observed in the ocean (Eriksen, 1978). The spectral amplitudes vary by only a factor of 2 or 3 about the mean, and show that under quiet conditions vertical velocity spectra from the troposphere are very similar at widely different locations.

  19. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations.The tool includes climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  20. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  1. Minimization of temperature ranges between the top and bottom of an air flow controlling device through hybrid control in a plant factory.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung-Mi; Kwon, Sook-Youn; Lim, Jae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the production timing, productivity, and product quality of plant factories, it is necessary to keep the growth environment uniform. A vertical multistage type of plant factory involves different levels of growing trays, which results in the problem of difference in temperature among vertically different locations. To address it, it is necessary to install air flow devices such as air flow fan and cooling/heating device at the proper locations in order to facilitate air circulation in the facility as well as develop a controlling technology for efficient operation. Accordingly, this study compares the temperature and air distribution within the space of a vertical multistage closed-type plant factory by controlling cooling/heating devices and air flow fans harmoniously by means of the specially designed testbed. The experiment results indicate that in the hybrid control of cooling and heating devices and air flow fans, the difference in temperature decreased by as much as 78.9% compared to that when only cooling and heating devices were operated; the air distribution was improved by as much as 63.4%.

  2. Influence of the inlet velocity profiles on the prediction of velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Shah M.E.; Deev, A.V.; Subaschandar, N.; Rasul, M.G.; Khan, M.M.K.

    2009-01-15

    The influence of the velocity profile at the inlet boundary on the simulation of air velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator is presented in this study. Measurements and simulations were performed in a duct and an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). A four-hole cobra probe was used for the measurement of velocity distribution. The flow simulation was performed by using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Numerical calculations for the air flow were carried out by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the realizable k-{epsilon} turbulence model equations. Simulations were performed with two different velocity profiles at the inlet boundary - one with a uniform (ideal) velocity profile and the other with a non-uniform (real) velocity profile to demonstrate the effect of velocity inlet boundary condition on the flow simulation results inside an ESP. The real velocity profile was obtained from the velocity measured at different points of the inlet boundary whereas the ideal velocity profile was obtained by calculating the mean value of the measured data. Simulation with the real velocity profile at the inlet boundary was found to predict better the velocity distribution inside the ESP suggesting that an experimentally measured velocity profile could be used as velocity inlet boundary condition for an accurate numerical simulation of the ESP. (author)

  3. Geothermal potential of Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Arizona, and the western portion of Luke-Williams gunnery range. Progress report, 1984-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, S.C.; Katzenstein, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    This report details the geothermal resource exploration program at the U. S. Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Arizona, and vicinity, as requested by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL), Port Hueneme, California.

  4. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  5. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  6. Velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaem-Maghami, E.; Johari, H.

    2010-11-01

    The velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs was measured using the particle image velocimetry technique and was compared with the steady jet flow field. Puffs were generated by injecting air through a 5 mm diameter nozzle into a flow chamber with a weak coflow. Isolated puffs with a Reynolds number of 5000 were examined in the range of 40-75 diameters downstream of the nozzle. The injection time was varied in order to assess the effects of injection volume and equivalent stroke ratio on the puff structure. The results from phase-locked measurements indicate that as the injection volume increased, puffs elongated in the axial direction and became similar to starting jets in the range considered. The largest scaled fluctuating velocities and turbulent shear stress within the puffs were twice the steady jet values. Inspection of the vorticity field revealed the presence of vorticity throughout the puff volume. Entrainment takes place on the portion of the puff closest to the nozzle and the entrainment rate is greater for the puffs with the smaller injection volume. This is consistent with the observations of rapid mixing and combustion of puffs in previous studies.

  7. Laboratory host range testing of Lilioceris sp. near impressa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) – a potential biological control agent of air potato, Dioscorea bulbifera (Dioscoreaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air potato, Dioscorea bulbifera, is an invasive, herbaceous, climbing vine, which dominates invaded native vegetation in Florida. The fortuitous discovery of Lilioceris sp. near impressa defoliating D. bulbifera vines and feeding on the bulbils (aerial tubers) in the Katmandu Valley of Nepal initiat...

  8. Threshold velocity for environmentally-assisted cracking in low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.; Kandra, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is generally believed to be activated by dissolution of MnS inclusions at the crack tip in high temperature LWR environments. EAC is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs in high temperature LWR environments. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggested that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. A range of about twenty in critical crack tip velocities was invoked by Combrade, et al., to describe data available at that time. This range was attributed to exposure of additional sulfides above and below the crack plane. However, direct measurements of exposed sulfide densities on cracked specimens were performed herein and the results rule out significant additional sulfide exposure as a plausible explanation. Alternatively, it is proposed herein that localized EAC starting at large sulfide clusters reduces the calculated threshold velocity from the value predicted for a uniform distribution of sulfides. Calculations are compared with experimental results where the threshold velocity has been measured, and the predicted wide range of threshold values for steels of similar sulfur content but varying sulfide morphology is observed. The threshold velocity decreases with the increasing maximum sulfide particle size, qualitatively consistent with the theory. The calculation provides a basis for a conservative minimum velocity threshold tied directly to the steel sulfur level, in cases where no details of sulfide distribution are known.

  9. NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, air velocity, and inlet size. This technique uses the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and velocity. The study shows that high sidewall supply air jets achieve uniform mixing in a room, which is essential for providing acceptable comfort levels. The study also provides information required to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes.

  10. Long-range transport, air quality and climate impacts of volcanic sulfur from the 2014-2015 eruption at Holuhraun (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Theys, N.; Carboni, E.; Witham, C. S.; Thordarson, T.; Stevenson, J. A.; Gettelman, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The 2014-2015 effusive Holuhraun flood lava eruption produced about 1.5 km3 of lava, making it the largest eruption in Iceland in more than 200 years. Over the course of the eruption, daily sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from Holuhraun exceeded daily SO2 emissions from all anthropogenic sources in Europe in 2010 by at least a factor of 3. We present surface air quality observations from across Northern Europe together with satellite remote-sensing data and model simulations of volcanic SO2. These datasets highlight that despite Holuhraun emitting SO2 into the lowermost troposphere, volcanic SO2 was transported over long distances and detected by air quality monitoring stations up to 2750 km away from the source. We will also discuss how and to what degree this eruption and other continuously degassing volcanoes emitting SO2 into the troposphere can affect the brightness of low-level clouds and regional climate.

  11. Evaluation of conversion coefficients relating air-kerma to H*(10) using primary and transmitted x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology energy range.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; Mariano, L; Tomal, A; Costa, P R

    2016-03-01

    According to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the relationship between effective dose and incident air-kerma is complex and depends on the attenuation of x-rays in the body. Therefore, it is not practical to use this quantity for shielding design purposes. This correlation is adopted in practical situations by using conversion coefficients calculated using validated mathematical models by the ICRU. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is a quantity adopted by the IAEA for monitoring external exposure. Dose constraint levels are established in terms of H*(10), while the radiation levels in radiometric surveys are calculated by means of the measurements of air-kerma with ion chambers. The resulting measurements are converted into ambient dose equivalents by conversion factors. In the present work, an experimental study of the relationship between the air-kerma and the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent was conducted using different experimental scenarios. This study was done by measuring the primary x-ray spectra and x-ray spectra transmitted through materials used in dedicated chest radiographic facilities, using a CdTe detector. The air-kerma to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients were calculated from these measured spectra. The resulting values of the quantity ambient dose equivalent using these conversion coefficients are more realistic than those available in the literature, because they consider the real energy distribution of primary and transmitted x-ray beams. The maximum difference between the obtained conversion coefficients and the constant value recommended in national and international radiation protection standards is 53.4%. The conclusion based on these results is that a constant coefficient may not be adequate for deriving the ambient dose equivalent. PMID:26835613

  12. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  13. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  14. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  15. Demonstration of zinc/air fuel battery to enhance the range and mission of fleet electric vehicles: Preliminary results in the refueling of a multicell module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Fleming, D.; Keene, L.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.; Koopman, R.

    1994-08-01

    We report progress in an effort to develop and demonstrate a refuelable zinc/air battery for fleet electric vehicle applications. A refuelable module consisting of twelve bipolar cells with internal flow system has been refueled at rates of nearly 4 cells per minute, indicating a refueling time of 10 minutes for a 15 kW, 55 kWh battery. The module is refueled by entrainment of 0.5-mm particles in rapidly flowing electrolyte, which delivers the particles into hoppers above each cell in a parallel-flow hydraulic circuit. The concept of user-recovery is presented as an alternative to centralized service infrastructure during market entry.

  16. Demonstration of zinc/air fuel battery to enhance the range and mission of fleet electric vehicles: Preliminary results in the refueling of a multicell module

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Keene, L.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.; Koopman, R.

    1994-08-08

    We report progress in an effort to develop and demonstrate a refuelable zinc/air battery for fleet electric vehicle applications. A refuelable module consisting of twelve bipolar cells with internal flow system has been refueled at rates of nearly 4 cells per minute refueling time of 10 minutes for a 15 kW, 55 kWh battery. The module is refueled by entrainment of 0.5-mm particles in rapidly flowing electrolyte, which delivers the particles into hoppers above each cell in a parallel-flow hydraulic circuit. The concept of user-recovery is presented as an alternative to centralized service infrastructure during market entry.

  17. The isolated head model of the plasma bullet/streamer propagation: electric field-velocity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sretenović, Goran B.; Krstić, Ivan B.; Kovačević, Vesna V.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2014-09-01

    A model of the isolated streamer head based on Meek's criterion of the avalanche to streamer transition is applied for description of the plasma bullet propagation in a helium/air admixture. According to the model previously proposed by Kulikovsky for streamers in air, along with the knowledge of one of three parameters: electric field, ionization integral or the width of the space charge layer, the other two parameters could be determined. Furthermore, using the streamer current or radius, it is possible to determine the electric field-streamer velocity functional dependence. Obtained results showed satisfactory agreement with both the results of the fluid model from the literature and the experimental results of plasma jet studies. Finally, for the sake of comparison, streamer velocity dependence on the electric field strength range of 10-250 kV cm-1 is determined for helium, argon and air.

  18. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  19. Range of fire determination from the pseudostippling of skin by shotshell buffer material.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lucien C

    2013-03-01

    The plastic buffer material in certain American shotgun shells emerges from the muzzle with the same velocity as the pellets that it was intended to protect from deformation during the very high accelerative forces associated with the discharge process. These small plastic particles spread out quickly over distance in a predictable, reproducible, and uniform manner as they lose velocity because of air resistance. If these plastic particles strike skin with sufficient velocity and energy, they will produce stipple marks whose distribution and density can be used to establish range of fire. This can be of critical importance in the reconstruction of a shooting involving this type of ammunition.

  20. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  1. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  2. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers

  3. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  4. Impacts of long-range transports of PM10 on air quality in Gwangju, South Korea using satellite and in-situ measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R.; Han, K.; Song, C.; Kang, Y.; Jung, W.; Ahan, S.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the impact of long-range transported particular matter on the city of Gwangju which is one of metropolitan cities in the South Korea and is located in the southwestern part of the Korean peninsula, the PM10 concentrations measured at six measurement sites in Gwangju area were used. A decadal trend (2002-2011) of PM10 was analyzed and then the monthly and daily variations of PM10 for the years of 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011 were investigated. The events of long-range transport were selected from peaks of daily PM10 and were evaluated through 72-hours backward trajectory analysis using NOAA HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, the events were evaluated using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)-retrieved AI (Aerosol Index), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Then the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport was filtered and the monthly variations calculated from the filtered daily PM10 and the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport were compared. For the year of 2002, up to ~50% of the PM10 concentration was influenced by Asian dust in March and April, respectively. In contrast, for the year of 2003, the impact of LRT on the PM10 concentrations were relatively small in the Gwangju areas. The monthly variations and annual mean values for 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011, calculated from the filtered daily PM10, were similar and therefore, the annual variations of PM10 in Gwangju could be mainly affected by the long-range transport.

  5. Sensitivity tests of two-dimensional model predictions of corridor effects. [concentration of spacecraft produced air pollutants into narrow latitude ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Whitten, R. C.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Future aerospace-vehicle systems, such as supersonic transport fleets, the Space Shuttle (SS), and the Heavy-Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) system will inject substantial amounts of pollutants into the stratosphere. It is, therefore, pertinent to ask whether the operation of these systems will lead to deleterious effects in the atmosphere. The current investigation is concerned with the development of criteria to assess the likelihood of a detectable corridor effect being caused by the long-term deposition of pollutants at a single latitude. The sources are assumed to operate continuously and at a uniform rate for periods of many years. It is found that transport by meridional winds and by eddy processes acts to diminish the corridor effect by advecting the pollutants out of the region of injection and by mixing them with the ambient air. Attention is given to the altitude for which a detectable corridor effect can be expected for the hypothetical launching of 400 HLLV's per year for 10 years.

  6. Velocity distributions for 2D inelastic granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, Dylan J.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Moon, Sung Joon; Rericha, Erin; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2002-11-01

    A previous study of a vertically vibrated 2D granular gas found a time-averaged horizontal velocity distribution function of the form P(v) exp(-C|v|^3/2) for the entire velocity range(F. Rouyer and N. Menon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 3676 (2000).. We examine the dependence of the velocity distribution function on phase in the cycle, height above the plate and air pressure in the container. We use 1.6 mm stainless steel balls confined to a vertical plane by a container 32σ tall, 48σ wide, and 1.15σ thick, where σ is the particle diameter. The container oscillates with peak acceleration 20g and frequency 50 Hz. We observe that a shock forms at collision of the plate with the layer and propagates through the layer, heating the grains. The shock rapidly decays over a distance of approximately 8σ above the plate; above this height the granular temperature and density are essentially independent of phase in the cycle. In this steady-state region, we compare the observed functional form of the velocity distribution to molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Gas Gun Modification for Achieving Ultra-Low Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellamy, Paul; Bartkowski, Peter T.; Boteler, J. Michael

    1997-07-01

    In this paper we describe a simple yet versatile device for modifying a single stage gas gun, to achieve ultra-low velocities. The device employs a throttling concept to control the applied force behind the projectile. For ultra-low velocity operation, the wrap-around breach is replaced by a throttle plate. In lieu of the O-rings normally used to make a seal around the projectile during launch, a flared tail section is bolted onto the projectile. The flare helps to minimize blow-by and provides a good vacuum seal between the projectile and rubber gasket on the throttle plate. A retaining bolt, which has been tapered in the center, passes through an aperture disc mounted in the rear of the throttle plate, to hold the projectile in place. The target chamber and launch tube in front of the projectile are evacuated and the projectile is launched by shearing the retaining bolt at the taper. The air flow is throttled as it flows through the aperture plate, dropping the dynamic pressure in the gun tube, yielding ultra-low projectile velocities. A set of aperture plates have been manufactured with apertures ranging from 25 mm to 75 mm diameter. Desired projectile velocity is attained by choosing the appropriate diameter aperture plate as predicted from flow equations. Due to the non-linear nature of the flow equations, a finite element calculation is used to march the velocity solution in time. Velocities as low as 15.3 m/s have been demonstrated using this technique.

  8. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  9. Aircraft observations of East-Asian cyclone induced uplift and long-range transport of polluted boundary layer air to the lowermost stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Hans; Arnold, Frank; Aufmhoff, Heinrich; Baumann, Robert; Priola, Lisa; Roiger, Anke; Sailer, Tomas; Wirth, Martin; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    We report on the airborne detection of a large-scale stratified pollution layer in the lowermost stratosphere which contained increased concentrations of sulfur dioxide, reactive nitrogen, water vapour and sulfate aerosols. The measurements were performed over Central Europe with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer and a high spectral resolution Lidar on board the new German research aircraft HALO. Transport model simulations indicate the East-Asian planetary boundary layer (PBL) as the source region of this layer. The PBL air was uplifted by an East Asian warm conveyor belt (WCB) and thereafter experienced mostly horizontal transport and dispersion covering significant part of the northern hemisphere. The pollution layer extent up to 2 km above the thermal tropopause and appears to be trapped in the upper part of the tropopause inversion layer (TIL). Accompanying chemistry and aerosol model simulations indicate efficient SO2 conversion to sulfuric acid during the horizontal transport in the TIL, accelerated by increased OH resulting from the increased water vapour. Low temperature and increased water vapour led to efficient binary H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The uplifted anthropogenic nitrogen oxides experienced OH and particle mediated conversion to HNO3. The layer of sulfate particles formed in the upper part of the TIL was observed in the Lidar backscatter signal. Since mid-latitude East Asia is a region with very large SO2 emissions and a very high frequency of WCBs, SO2 uplift into the lowermost stratosphere from this region may occur frequently, eventually leading very often to corresponding pollution layers in the northern-hemisphere TIL.

  10. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the results of the ANU's (Applied Meteorology Unit) Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds. The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The Keith Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A 7 year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. In all climatologies, the average and peak wind speeds were highly variable in time. This indicated that the development of a peak wind forecasting tool would be difficult. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. The climatologies and PDFs provide tools with which to make peak wind forecasts that are critical to safe operations.

  11. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  12. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  13. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  14. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  15. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  16. Range Ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After 200 years, livestock grazing remains California’s most extensive land use. Contemporary rangelands are managed for multiple outcomes, including livestock production, biodiversity conservation, fuels management, and soil, water, and air quality protection. The requirements of grazing management...

  17. High velocity gas in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamphuis, J.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Sancisi, R.

    1990-01-01

    Two nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies, M 101 and NGC 6946, observed in the HI with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) as part of a program to search for high velocity gas in other galaxies, are used to illustrate the range of properties of high velocity gas in other galaxies found thusfar.

  18. Evaluation of glass fiber Hepa filters as a function of media velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, S.L.; Parsons, M.S.; Hogancamp, K.U.; Waggoner, C.A.

    2007-07-01

    Section FC of the ASME AG-1 Code addresses glass fiber HEPA filters and restricts the media velocity to a maximum of 5 ft./min. Advances in filter media technology allow glass fiber HEPA filters to function at significantly higher velocities and still achieve HEPA performance. Ultrafine particles (< 100 nm) are removed by a diffusive capture mechanism. The removal efficiency of these particles is reduced at higher media velocities due to shorter residence times within the media matrix. Therefore, it is unlikely that higher media velocities for HEPA filters will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of particles in the smaller size classes. Additional questions remain regarding particle loading and filter lifetimes at higher media velocities. In order to address these issues, nuclear grade AG-1 HEPA filters obtained from two manufacturers have been evaluated at media velocities ranging from 4 to 8.8 ft./min. KCl was utilized as aerosol challenge material and data regarding filter lifetimes, loading characteristics, changes in filtering efficiency and the most penetrating particle size are presented. Results of this testing will be provided to the ASME AG-1 FC Committee for consideration in future versions of the HEPA standard and will be useful for the development of air filtration systems in a nuclear environment. (authors)

  19. Spectral emissivity modeling of steel 201 during the growth of oxidation film over the temperature range from 800 to 1100 K in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Zou, Fenghui; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Zunlue; Sun, Jinfeng; Wang, Baokui

    2014-11-01

    This study explores the spectral emissivity modeling of steel 201 during the growth of oxidation film over the temperature range from 800 to 1100 K at 1.5 μm. The radiance coming from the specimen is received by an InGaAs photodiode detector. The specimen temperature is obtained by averaging the two platinum-rhodium thermocouples, which are tightly welded in the front surface of specimen near the measuring area viewed by the detector. The variation of spectral emissivity with the temperature is studied at a given heating time. The variation of spectral emissivity with the heating time is evaluated at a definite temperature. The strong oscillations of spectral emissivity are observed and discussed in detail, which originate from the interference effect between the radiation stemming from the oxidization film on the specimen surface and the radiation coming from the specimen surface. The measurement uncertainties of spectral emissivity contributed only by the surface oxidization are about 3.2-14.1%. At a given heating time, the variation of spectral emissivity with the temperature abides well by a simple analytic functional form. And at a definite temperature, the variation of spectral emissivity with the heating time can also be well reproduced by fitting except for the periodical oscillations.

  20. Holographic photography of high velocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyes, W. A.; Mc Cabe, B. J.; Ward, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    Fourier transform hologram camera increases the velocity range for holography by a factor of 10 to 1000. Two different optical systems, using a triangular arrangement of beam splitters and a mirror to illuminate the object from two directions, are investigated.

  1. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  2. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  3. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  4. The All-Particle Spectrum of Primary Cosmic Rays in the Wide Energy Range from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} eV Observed with the Tibet-III Air-Shower Array

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Ding, L. K.; Feng, Zhaoyang; He, H. H.; Hu, H. B.; Chen, D.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, X. H.; Guo, H. W.; Hu, Haibing; Fan, C.; Feng, C. F.; He, M.; Feng, Z. Y.; Gao, X. Y.; Geng, Q. X.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.

    2008-05-10

    We present an updated all-particle energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays in a wide range from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} eV using 5.5 x 10{sup 7} events collected from 2000 November through 2004 October by the Tibet-III air-shower array located 4300 m above sea level (an atmospheric depth of 606 g cm{sup -2}). The size spectrum exhibits a sharp knee at a corresponding primary energy around 4 PeV. This work uses increased statistics and new simulation calculations for the analysis. We discuss our extensive Monte Carlo calculations and the model dependencies involved in the final result, assuming interaction models QGSJET01c and SIBYLL2.1, and heavy dominant (HD) and proton dominant (PD) primary composition models. Pure proton and pure iron primary models are also examined as extreme cases. A detector simulation was also performed to improve our accuracy in determining the size of the air showers and the energy of the primary particle. We confirmed that the all-particle energy spectra obtained under various plausible model parameters are not significantly different from each other, which was the expected result given the characteristics of the experiment at high altitude, where the air showers of the primary energy around the knee reach near-maximum development, with their features dominated by electromagnetic components, leading to a weak dependence on the interaction model or the primary mass. This is the highest statistical and the best systematics-controlled measurement covering the widest energy range around the knee energy region.

  5. Cooling Characteristics of a Pratt and Whitney R-2800 Engine Installed in an NACA Short-nose High-inlet-velocity Cowling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, Blake W.; McLellan, Charles H.

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was made of the cooling characteristics of a P and W R-2800 engine with NACA short-nose high inlet-velocity cowling. The internal aerodynamics of the cowling were studied for ranges of propeller-advance ratio and inlet-velocity ratio obtained by deflection of cowling flaps. Tests included variations of engine power, fuel/air ratio and cooling-air pressure drop. Engine cooling data are presented in the form of cooling correlation curves, and an example for calculation of cooling requirements in flight is included.

  6. Analysis of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans using a 3D sonic anemometer.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans.

  7. Analysis of the Air Flow Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans Using a 3D Sonic Anemometer

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans. PMID:22969363

  8. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  9. Detailed Comparison of Blast Effects in Air and Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; Molitoris, J D; Garza, R G; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J D; Lauderbach, L M; Vincent, E R; Wong, B M

    2007-07-26

    Although blast mitigation is most often achieved with solid shielding, ambient gas pressure can also affect the coupling of shock waves to solid targets. In this work the role of air as an energy transfer medium was examined experimentally by subjecting identical large-area rectangular witness plates to short-range blast effects in air and vacuum ({approx}50 mtorr) at 25 C. The expanding reactant front of 3 kg C4 charges was observed by fast camera to be cylindrically symmetric in both air and vacuum. The horizontal component of the reactant cloud velocity (perpendicular to the witness plates) was constant in both cases, with values of 3.0 and 5.9 km/s for air and vacuum, respectively. As a result of the blast, witness plates were plastically deformed into a shallow dish geometry, with local maxima 30 and 20 mm deep for air and vacuum, respectively. The average plate deflection from the air blast was 11 mm, {approx}10% deeper than the average vacuum plate deflection. Shock pressure estimates were made with a simple impedance-matching model, and indicate peak values in the 30-50 MPa range are consistent with the reactant cloud density and velocity. However, more detailed analysis is necessary to definitely establish the mechanisms by which air couples shock energy to the plates.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  15. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  16. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  17. Deposition velocity of caesium-137 on vertical building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roed, Jørn

    Deposition of fall-out particles of caesium-137 on vertical building surfaces has been measured. The deposition is combined with the corresponding concentration in air of fall-out particles to give the deposition velocity.

  18. Sex-specific difference of the association between ambient air pollution and the prevalence of obesity in Chinese adults from a high pollution range area: 33 Communities Chinese Health Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Qian, Zhengmin; Vaughn, Michael; Boutwell, Brian; Ward, Patrick; Lu, Tao; Lin, Shao; Zhao, Yang; Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Qing; Qin, Xiao-Di; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Wen; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Experimental data suggests that exposure to airborne fine particulate matter is associated with obesity. There is little supporting epidemiologic evidence of this, however. To evaluate the effects of ambient air pollution on the prevalence of obesity among adults living in a primarily industrial province of northeast China, 24,845 Chinese adults between the ages of 18 and 74 were randomly recruited from 33 communities in 11 districts of three northeastern Chinese cities during 2009. The participants' weight and height were measured. Three-year (2006-2008) average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were calculated from monitoring stations in each of the 11 districts. Two-level logistic regressions models were used to examine the effects of pollutants exposure. Overall, 35.3% (8764) were overweight and 5.8% (1435) were obese. After adjusting for confounding factors, significant associations between concentrations of air pollutants and prevalence of obesity were found. When the analysis was stratified by sex, the associations were significant only in women. Among women, an increased prevalence of obesity was associated with an interquartile range increase in PM10 (19 μg/m3; odds ratio [ORs] = 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.06-1.32), NO2 (9 μg/m3; ORs = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.09-1.41), and O3 (22 μg/m3; ORs = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.01-1.30). Associations were stronger among older participants. In conclusion, this study reveals a positive association between the long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and increased prevalence of obesity, and that these associations were more apparent in women than in men.

  19. Measurement of velocities in gas-liquid two-phase flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Kirouac, G.J.

    1992-09-01

    Measurements of bubble and liquid velocities in two-phase flow have been made using a new forward/backward scattering Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) technique. This work was performed in a 6.4 by 11.1 mm vertical duct using known air/water mixtures. A standard LDV fiber optic probe was used to measure the bubble velocity, using direct backscattered light. A novel retro-reflector and lens assembly permitted the same probe to measure the liquid velocity with direct forward-scattered light. The bubble velocity was confirmed by independent measurements with a high-speed video system. The liquid velocity was confirmed by demonstrating the dominance of the liquid seed data rate in the forward-scatter measurement. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the technique for a wide range of flow conditions, from bubbles as small as 0.75-mm-diam to slugs as large as 10-mm wide by 30-mm long. In the slug regime, the LDV technique performed velocity measurements for both phases, for void fractions up to 50%, which was the upper limit of our experimental investigation.

  20. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  1. Multilogarithmic velocity renormalization in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anand; Kopietz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of long-range Coulomb interactions on the quasiparticle velocity in graphene. Using a nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach with partial bosonization in the forward scattering channel and momentum transfer cutoff scheme, we calculate the quasiparticle velocity, v (k ) , and the quasiparticle residue, Z , with frequency-dependent polarization. One of our most striking results is that v (k ) ∝ln[Ck(α ) /k ] where the momentum- and interaction-dependent cutoff scale Ck(α ) vanishes logarithmically for k →0 . Here k is measured with respect to one of the charge neutrality (Dirac) points and α =2.2 is the strength of dimensionless bare interaction. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the so-obtained multilogarithmic singularity is reconcilable with the perturbative expansion of v (k ) in powers of the bare interaction.

  2. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  3. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  4. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  5. Near wake velocity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Porterio, J.L.F.; Page, R.H.; Przirembel, C.E.G.

    1984-02-01

    The development of the wake velocity profile behind a cylindrical blunt based body aligned with a subsonic uniform stream was experimentally investigated as a function of the momentum thickness of the approaching boundary layer and the transfer of mass into the recirculating region. Tests were conducted at M = 0.11 in an interference-free wind tunnel utilizing an upstream support system. Results indicate that the width of the wake increases with the thickness of the boundary layer while the velocity at the centerline decreases. Near wake mass transfer was found to alter centerline velocities while the width of the wake was not significantly altered. Wake centerline velocity development as a function of boundary layer thickness is presented for distances up to three diameters from the base.

  6. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  7. Velocity profile development for a poultry facility acid scrubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the air velocity profile for 12 experimental configurations (ECs) of an acid scrubber was carried out using an equal area traverse method with a vane axial anemometer. Four velocity profile plots were created for each configuration to determine the four optimal ECs. ECs were selecte...

  8. Long-range transport of the April 2001 dust clouds over the subtropical East Asia and the North Pacific and its impacts on ground-level air pollution: A Lagrangian simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2007-05-01

    One of the most remarkable Asian dust storms occurred in April 2001, during the periods of the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia and the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific (TRACE-P) field experiments. Our high-resolution Lagrangian simulations and the detailed comparisons with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)-Aerosol Index (AI) data, the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS)-5 derived dust distribution, and the ground-level ambient air particulate matter measurements over Taiwan in the subtropical East Asia reveal several features which were not reported before. We found that (1) the trans-Pacific long-range transport was dominated by the dust emissions from the natural source over the Gobi desert and the anthropogenic source over east China before 6-7 April, while the southward long-range transport to the subtropical East Asia were mainly contributed by the dust emissions from natural source over the Taklamakan and the Gobi, and the anthropogenic source over east China after 6-7 April; (2) the southward long-range transport implies that the anthropogenic pollution is ahead of the cold front (where the precipitation washes out the particulate matter), while the dust is behind the cold front. (3) The dust emissions from the Gobi during 7-9 April, anthropogenic emissions from east China during 9-10 April, and dust emissions from the Taklamakan during 1-4 April appear to have the most significant impacts on the ground-level particulate matter concentrations over Taiwan. The simulated particle emitted from desert regions before 6-7 April mainly confined to the Gobi and the Taklamakan regions until 6 April when they became highly mobile for the long-range transport by the large-scale cyclonic activity and its associated cold air outbreak. The southward transport characteristics simulated here are consistent with the aerosol characterization observed at Taiwan during this period. Our simulations reveal that the rapid trans

  9. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  10. The range scheduling aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbfinger, Eliezer M.; Smith, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Space Command schedules telemetry, tracking and control activities across the Air Force Satellite Control network. The Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is a rapid prototype combining a user-friendly, portable, graphical interface with a sophisticated object-oriented database. The RSA has been a rapid prototyping effort whose purpose is to elucidate and define suitable technology for enhancing the performance of the range schedulers. Designing a system to assist schedulers in their task and using their current techniques as well as enhancements enabled by an electronic environment, has created a continuously developing model that will serve as a standard for future range scheduling systems. The RSA system is easy to use, easily ported between platforms, fast, and provides a set of tools for the scheduler that substantially increases his productivity.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations for deriving the precision in GPR velocity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. A.; Booth, A.; Murray, T.

    2010-12-01

    Models of ground penetrating radar (GPR) propagation velocity are often used to quantify physical subsurface properties (e.g., layer thickness, porosity, water content). A common approach is to conduct semblance analysis on common midpoint (CMP) gathers, in which successive pairs of stacking velocity and travel-time are input to Dix’s Equation, to obtain a velocity estimate, termed interval stacking velocity. However, the precision in interval stacking velocity is seldom reported since it is cumbersome to obtain an analytic expression for precision particularly since Dix’s Equation has four independently resolved degrees of freedom. We present Monte Carlo simulations as a means of expressing interval stacking velocities, and its derivative quantities, as a probability density functions (PDFs). These are built using Gaussian distributions of pseudo-random samples from within the 50% contour around successive coherence responses; precision is summarised using the median and inter-quartile range of each PDF. To verify this method’s accuracy, we simulate CMP data in which travel-times are computed for reflections from two horizontal horizons at depths of 5 and 10 m, with isotropic interval velocity of 0.1 m/ns, for source-receiver offsets from 0 to 30 m. The Monte Carlo simulation produces 107 manifestations of interval stacking velocity and layer thickness, and yields estimates of 0.1±0.003 m/ns and 4.99±0.16 m, respectively. The simulation is repeated for real CMP data, acquired with 50 MHz antennas, for establishing the precision in interval stacking velocity and speculative estimates (in the absence of extensive borehole logs) of layer thickness and fractional porosity (via the complex refractive index method, CRIM). The site comprises Quaternary sediment, in which the water table is observed at ~2 m depth, overlying Cambrian basement at 10-15 m depth. The resolution of stacking velocity in semblance analysis decreases with depth, as reflected in PDFs of

  12. Gas cooking range

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, R.K.; Narang, K.

    1984-02-14

    An energy-efficient gas cooking range features an oven section with improved heat circulation and air preheat, a compact oven/broiler burner, a smoke-free drip pan, an efficient piloted ignition, flame-containing rangetop burner rings, and a small, portable oven that can be supported on the burner rings. Panels spaced away from the oven walls and circulation fans provide very effective air flow within the oven. A gas shutoff valve automatically controls the discharge of heated gases from the oven so that they are discharged only when combustion is occurring.

  13. Detailed Comparison of Blast Effects in Air and Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringe, J. W.; Molitoris, J. D.; Garza, R. G.; Andreski, H. G.; Batteux, J. D.; Lauderbach, L. M.; Vincent, E. R.; Wong, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    The role of air as an energy transfer medium was examined experimentally by subjecting identical large-area rectangular witness plates to short-range blast effects in air and vacuum (˜50 mtorr) at 25 °C. The expanding reactant front of 3 kg C4 charges was observed by fast camera to be cylindrically symmetric in both air and vacuum. The horizontal component of the reactant cloud velocity (perpendicular to the witness plates) was constant in both cases, with values of 3.0 and 5.9 km/s for air and vacuum, respectively. As a result of the blast, witness plates were plastically deformed into a shallow dish geometry, with local maxima 30 and 20 mm deep for air and vacuum, respectively. The average plate deflection from the air blast was 11 mm, ˜10% deeper than the average vacuum plate deflection. Shock pressure estimates were made with a simple impedance-matching model, and indicate peak values in the 30-50 MPa range are consistent with the reactant cloud density and velocity. However, more detailed analysis is necessary to better understand the time-dependent coupling of shock energy that plastically deforms the plates.

  14. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  15. Range Safety Flight Elevation Limit Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzi, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    inputs of vehicle characteristics (e.g., thrust and aerodynamic data), nor does it require reams of turn data after the traditional fashion of the Air Force ranges. The program requires a nominal trajectory table (time, altitude, range, velocity, and flight elevation) and makes heavy use of it to initialize and model a failure turn.

  16. Aerodynamic effect of combustor inlet-air pressure on fuel jet atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Mean drop diameters were measured with a recently developed scanning radiometer in a study of the atomization of liquid jets injected cross stream in high velocity and high pressure airflows. At constant inlet air pressure, reciprocal mean drop diameter, was correlated with airflow mass velocity. Over a combustor inlet-air pressure range of 1 to 21 atmospheres, the ratio of orifice to mean drop diameter, D(O)/D(M), was correlated with the product of Weber and Reynolds number, WeRe, and with the molecular scale momentum transfer ratio of gravitational to inertial forces.

  17. Aerodynamic effect of combustor inlet-air pressure on fuel jet atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Mean drop diameters were measured with a recently developed scanning radiometer in a study of the atomization of liquid jets injected cross stream in high velocity and high pressure airflows. At constant inlet air pressure, reciprocal mean drop diameter was correlated with airflow mass velocity. Over a combustor inlet-air pressure range of 1 to 21 atmospheres, the ratio of orifice to mean drop diameter, D(O)/D(M), was correlated with the product of Weber and Reynolds number, WeRe, and with the molecular scale momentum transfer ratio of gravitational to inertial forces. Previously announced in STAR as N84-22910

  18. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.

    PubMed

    Locke, Shannon M; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-06-13

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static "snapshot" model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation.

  19. Measurement of gas temperature and convection velocity profiles in a dc atmospheric glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Stepaniuk, Vadim P.; Ioppolo, Tindaro; Oetuegen, M. Volkan; Sheverev, Valery A.

    2007-12-15

    Gas temperature and convective velocity distributions are presented for an unconfined glow discharge in air at atmospheric pressure, with electric currents ranging between 30 and 92 mA. The vertically oriented discharge was formed between a pin anode (top) and an extended cathode. The temperature and velocity profiles were measured using laser-induced Rayleigh scattering and laser Doppler anemometry techniques, respectively. The temperature field exhibited a conical shape with the radius of hot temperature zone increasing toward the anode. A maximum temperature of 2470 K was observed on the discharge axis with the discharge current of 92 mA. Air velocity measurements around the discharge demonstrated that the shape and magnitude of the temperature field are strongly affected by natural convection. Estimates indicate that convective losses may account for more than 50% of the power input into the positive column of the discharge. The measured temperature fields and convective velocity profiles provide a set of data that is important for the evaluation of dc atmospheric glow discharges in various applications such as sound manipulation and acoustic noise mitigation.

  20. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J. )

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide. 6 refs.

  1. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J.

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide.

  2. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  3. A new instrumentation for particle velocity and velocity related measurements under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weijia

    This dissertation investigates the capability of a new instrument for small particle velocity measurement and velocity related signal analysis in an underwater environment. This research started from the laser beam quality test, which was performed in air. It was conducted mainly by means of an optical fiber sensor combined with a computer controlled stepping motor as well as two other methods, edge detection and needle-tip scattering. The stepping motor offers a constant velocity to the fiber sensor, so that the beam separation can be accurately measured by using the constant velocity value and the transit time determined by the cross correlation function of two digital signals. Meanwhile, information of the beam intensity profile, the parallelism of the two beams and the in-air beam widths can also be obtained in the test. By using the calibrated beam separation of the ribbon pair in the beam quality test, particle velocity measurements are carried out based on the relation between velocity, displacement and time in a 500-liter open water tank. The time delay for a particle crossing over the two ribbons in sequence is obtained by computing the cross correlation of the two signals. In fact, the time delay is actually a statistical mean value of many particles that cross over the ribbons in a short time. So is the measured velocity. The third part of this research is the practical study on pulse shape analysis based on the data sets of the velocity measurement. Several computer programs are developed to explore the pulse height distribution in a data set, to study the pulse degeneration, the relationship between the pulse width and the velocity, and the in-water beam width information. Some important reference materials are displayed in the appendices such as the fundamentals of the cross correlation and auto correlation, three main MATLAB programs developed for this research, the theoretical analysis of particle diffraction.

  4. Velocity distributions in a hydrocyclone separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. J.; Flack, R. D.

    The internal three-dimensional flow field in a hydrocyclone was studied using laser velocimetry. Seven axial planes were investigated for three different inlet flow rates and three independent and different rejects rates. Results at each measurement plane showed that the measured tangential velocity profile behaves like a forced vortex at the region near the air core, and like a free vortex in the outer portion of the flow. The peak nondimensional tangential velocity decreases as the distance from the inlet region increases, however, the peak dimensional tangential velocity increases as the distance from the inlet region increases. The nondimensional peak tangential velocities are approximately equal for all of the flow rates. The magnitude of the tangential velocity increased in the inner forced vortex region as the rejects rate was increased. Backflows exist in the axial velocity profile near the inlet region, but these reversed flows disappear in the exit region. The dimensional vorticity is proportional to inlet flow rate and decreases with increasing rejects flow rates.

  5. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  6. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  7. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  8. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  9. Advanced PDV velocity extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Daniel; Ao, Tommy; Furnish, Michael

    2015-06-01

    While PDV has become a standard diagnostic, reliable velocity extraction remains challenging. Measurements with multiple real/apparent velocities are intrinsically difficult to analyze, and overlapping frequency components invalidate standard extraction methods. This presentation describes an advanced analysis technique where overlapping frequency components are resolved in the complex Fourier spectrum. Practical matters--multiple region of interest selection, component intersection, and shock transitions--will also be discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  14. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  15. Velocity measurements in inhomogeneous combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    Measurements of velocity have been made in single-phase and two-phase combustion systems using laser anemometers. Argon ion lasers, Bragg cells for frequency shifting, forward and backscatter collection, signal processing, and computer analysis are used for velocity measurement. The set of vertical and horizontal fringes allows two orthogonal velocity components to be measured simultaneously and instantaneously. Radiation line filters are installed in the photomultiplier detectors to remove influence of flame radiation on velocity measurements. Instantaneous measurements of three orthogonal velocity components ({mu}, {nu}, w) are made over time periods sufficiently long for statistically valid time averaging. Conditional sampling is used on velocity-time traces to separate periodic fluctuations of flow field structure (form intermittency) from microscale fluctuations intrinsic to fluid mechanic turbulence. For two-phase flow systems with liquid fuel injection, the phase Doppler particle analyzer measures the size and velocity of single drops simultaneously. The technique is based upon the measurement of the interference fringe patterns produced by spherical drops passing through the intersection of two laser beams. Three detectors, separated at fixed spacing, are used to receive Doppler signals and to determine the phase shift due to different path lengths of the laser beam. Detailed measurements have been made in burning and nonburning air-assisted atomizer sprays revealing the detailed structural changes in the sprays as a result of drop collision and coalescence, evaporation, dispersion, and acceleration. Comparisons of mean drop sizes, number densities, and velocities under burning and nonburning conditions show the extent that the spray and flow fields are modified by combustion.

  16. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  17. Correlative velocity fluctuations over a gravel river bed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Velocity fluctuations in a steep, coarse-bedded river were measured in flow depths ranging from 0.8 to 2.2 m, with mean velocities at middepth from 1.1 to 3.1 m s−1. Analyses of synchronous velocity records for two and three points in the vertical showed a broad range of high coherence for wave periods from 10 to 100 s, centering around 10–30 s. Streamwise correlations over distances of 9 and 14 m showed convection velocities near mean velocity for the same wave periods. The range of coherent wave periods was a small multiple of predicted “boil” periods. Correlative fluctuations in synchronous velocity records in the vertical direction suggested the blending of short pulses into longer wave periods. The highest spectral densities were measured beyond the range of coherent wave periods and were probably induced by migration of low-relief bed forms.

  18. Striatal firing rate reflects head movement velocity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Barter, Joseph W; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Yin, Henry H

    2014-11-01

    Although the basal ganglia have long been implicated in the initiation of actions, their contribution to movement remains a matter of dispute. Using wireless multi-electrode recording and motion tracking, we examined the relationship between single-unit activity in the sensorimotor striatum and movement kinematics. We recorded single-unit activity from medium spiny projection neurons and fast-spiking interneurons while monitoring the movements of mice using motion tracking. In Experiment 1, we trained mice to generate movements reliably by water-depriving them and giving them periodic cued sucrose rewards. We found high correlations between single-unit activity and movement velocity in particular directions. This correlation was found in both putative medium spiny projection neurons and fast-spiking interneurons. In Experiment 2, to rule out the possibility that the observed correlations were due to reward expectancy, we repeated the same procedure but added trials in which sucrose delivery was replaced by an aversive air puff stimulus. The air puff generated avoidance movements that were clearly different from movements on rewarded trials, but the same neurons that showed velocity correlation on reward trials exhibited a similar correlation on air puff trials. These experiments show for the first time that the firing rate of striatal neurons reflects movement velocity for different types of movements, whether to seek rewards or to avoid harm. PMID:25209171

  19. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  20. The erosion-corrosion performance of SA213-T22 steel in low velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Nava, J. G.; Martínez-Villafañe, A.; Almeraya-Calderón, F. M.; Stott, F. H.; González-Rodríguez, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    The erosion-corrosion (E-C) behavior of SA213-T22 steel has been studied in a laboratory fluidized-bed (FB) facility in the temperature range from 100 to 600 °C. Tests were carried out on pin specimens in air using alumina particles of 560 µm average size at impact velocities from 1.5 to 4.5 m/s. The trends of wear with temperature showed small weight gains at velocities up to 1.5 m/s. Erodent deposition was a dominant process at temperatures below about 300 °C and velocities below about 2 m/s. At higher velocities, a peak wastage temperature was observed at about 350 °C. The wastage/temperature curves observed in both cases suggested four temperature regions. In each region, a different E-C regime operates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed various wastage mechanisms, i.e., (a) oxide chipping, (b) development of a compact and adherent oxide scale, (c) oxide and metal removal, and (d) fracture and spalling within the oxide layer and at the scale/metal interface. In the present study, the latter mechanism was responsible for the high wastage rates observed at temperatures above about 450 °C and impact velocities above 3.5 m/s.

  1. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  2. Effect of Diffuser Design, Diffuser-exit Velocity Profile and Fuel Distribution on Altitude Performance of Several Afterburner Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E William; Schultz, Frederick W; Usow, Karl H

    1953-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel to improve the altitude performance and operational characteristics of an afterburner primarily by modifying the diffuser-exit velocity profile by changes in diffuser design and by changing the fuel distribution and the flame holder. Twenty configurations, consisting of combinations of six diffuser geometries, six flame-holder types, and twelve fuel systems, were investigated. Data were obtained over a range of afterburner fuel-air ratios at diffuser-inlet total pressures from 2750 to 620 pounds per square foot. Changes in fuel distribution affected the fuel-air ratio at which peak combustion efficiency occurred as well as the efficiency level. Screeching combustion, which was most prevalent at low altitudes and medium-to-high fuel-air ratios, imposed a restriction on the operable range of a number of configurations.

  3. Bodies Falling with Air Resistance: Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Two models are presented. The first assumes that air resistance is proportional to the velocity of the falling body. The second assumes that air resistance is proportional to the square of the velocity. A program written in BASIC that simulates the second model is presented. (MP)

  4. Long-range water plan Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio phase 1: Hydraulic and water quality requirements analyses. Final report, September 1993-April 1994, FLD33 ERR CHK FLD04

    SciTech Connect

    VanAtten, J.L.; Forbes, R.E.

    1994-04-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act and associated regulations developed by USEPA and state and local agencies have expanded the standards and requirements on water suppliers to assure that a safe, high quality, and continuous supply of drinking (potable) water is provided to all consumers by all providers. Currently, Wright-Patterson AFB (Base) uses groundwater sources on the Base to supply all potable water to Areas A, B, and C. The base has individual treatment facilities located at each Area, which include air strippers, polyphosphate addition, chlorination, carbon dioxide addition, softening, and fluoride addition. The Base has initiated an aggressive and comprehensive program to fully evaluate available water supply and treatment alternatives to comply with all Federal and State regulations and to assure that a safe and reliable supply of potable water is available for all base activities. The purpose of this Long-Range Water Plan is to define and evaluate alternatives for providing the public water systems on the Base with water that will meet future demands as well as environmental regulations. These alternatives include treatment systems upgrades, maintenance/repair of existing treatment components, or a completely new water supply. The recommended alternatives are to be based on hydrogeologic and water quality data, an assessment of the existing water supply and treatment systems, and off-Base sources of water.

  5. An airborne amplitude-modulated 1.57 μm differential laser absorption spectrometer: simultaneous measurement of partial column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2 and target range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaizawa, D.; Kawakami, S.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the partial column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2 (XCO2) and target range were demonstrated using airborne amplitude-modulated 1.57 μm differential laser absorption spectrometer (LAS). The LAS system is useful for discriminating between ground and cloud return signals and has a demonstrated ability to suppress the impact of integrated aerosol signals on atmospheric CO2 measurements. A high correlation coefficient (R) of 0.987 between XCO2 observed by LAS and XCO2 calculated from in situ measurements was obtained. The averaged difference in XCO2 obtained from LAS and validation data was within 1.5 ppm for all spiral measurements. An interesting vertical profile was observed for both XCO2LAS and XCO2val, in which lower altitude CO2 decreases compared to higher altitude CO2 attributed to the photosynthesis over grassland in the summer. In the case of an urban area where there are boundary-layer enhanced CO2 and aerosol in the winter, the difference of XCO2LAS to XCO2val is a negative bias of 1.5 ppm, and XCO2LAS is in agreement with XCO2val within the measurement precision of 2.4 ppm (1 SD).

  6. Latitudinal Variation of Solar Wind Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Janardhan, P.

    1995-04-01

    Single station solar wind velocity measurements using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) in India (operating at 327 MHz) are reported for the period August 1992 to August 1993. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations on a large number of compact radio sources covering a latitudinal range of ±80° were used to derive solar wind velocities using the method of fitting a power law model to the observed IPS spectra. The data shows a velocity versus heliographic latitude pattern which is similar to that reported by Rickett and Coles (1991) for the 1981 1982 period. However, the average of the measured equatorial velocities are higher, being about 470 km s-1 compared to their value of 400 km s-1. The distribution of electron density variations (ΔN e ) between 50R⊙ and 90R⊙ was also determined and it was found that ΔN e was about 30% less at the poles as compared to the equator.

  7. Simulating photospheric Doppler velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for constructing artificial data that realistically simulate photospheric velocity fields. The velocity fields include rotation, differential rotation, meridional circulation, giant cell convection, supergranulation, convective limb shift, p-mode oscillations, and observer motion. Data constructed by this method can be used for testing algorithms designed to extract and analyze these velocity fields in real Doppler velocity data.

  8. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    potential implications for many other LIF measurement techniques. Our results indicated the need to modify the commercially available laser cavity in order to accommodate the constraints imposed by typical SCRAMJET combustion characteristics as well as to increase the instrument's velocity dynamic range to span an intra-image range in excess of 2 km/s. The various technical efforts were brought together in a series of experiments demonstrating the applicability of the technique in a high pressure, high temperature H2-air combustion system. The resultant images were compared with 2-D flow simulations in order to determine the accuracy of the instrument. Mean velocity imaging in flows with an axis of symmetry was demonstrated with an accuracy of +/- 50 m/s out of an intra-image dynamic range of 1600 m/s, including reversed flow. A more complex configuration amenable to single-shot imaging in flows without an axis of symmetry was also demonstrated. Limitations imposed by available equipment resulted in an accuracy of about +/- 200 m/s out of 1750 m/s in these demonstrations. Minor modifications to the present configuration were suggested to improve this performance. Each technical task is described in detail, along with significance of the results for the overall imaging velocimeter configuration. This report should allow the user community to integrate this new measurement capability in their existing instrumentation platforms.

  9. Doppler radar velocity measurements for wound ballistics experiments.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, P J; Svender, J

    1994-01-01

    Bullet velocity is a basic parameter in wound ballistics studies. It is usually measured electronically by means of a variety of solid or photoelectric barriers connected to equipment measuring the time elapsing between impulses, enabling the velocity to be calculated. With the advent of Doppler radar velocity measurement of large calibre artillery shells, the use of this equipment for wound ballistics experiments was investigated. Anaesthetized pigs were shot at a range of 9-10 metres and the velocities measured by Doppler radar and photocells were compared. A very good correspondence between the measured entry and exit velocities in low and medium velocity bullets was found, i.e. an average deviation of less than 1% (range 0-2%) between the two types of equipment. In high velocity bullets measurement of entry velocities was just as good, but in both methods measurement of the exit velocity was complicated by the cluttering of signals by fragments of tissue released from the exit wound and the deflection of the bullet, Doppler radar offers important benefits - simple set up, minimal risk of damage of equipment by stray bullets and very good accuracy - and may replace photocells and similar equipment in studies involving low and medium velocity bullets. Measurement of the exit velocity of high velocity bullets is unsatisfactory in both methods, and it is necessary to improve the Doppler radar method in order to measure that as well.

  10. Investigation on wind energy-compressed air power system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guang-Zheng; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Wu, Gen-Mao

    2004-03-01

    Wind energy is a pollution free and renewable resource widely distributed over China. Aimed at protecting the environment and enlarging application of wind energy, a new approach to application of wind energy by using compressed air power to some extent instead of electricity put forward. This includes: explaining the working principles and characteristics of the wind energy-compressed air power system; discussing the compatibility of wind energy and compressor capacity; presenting the theoretical model and computational simulation of the system. The obtained compressor capacity vs wind power relationship in certain wind velocity range can be helpful in the designing of the wind power-compressed air system. Results of investigations on the application of high-pressure compressed air for pressure reduction led to conclusion that pressure reduction with expander is better than the throttle regulator in energy saving.

  11. Crosshole shear-wave seismic monitoring of an in situ air stripping waste remediation process

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.

    1992-02-01

    Crosshole shear-wave seismic surveys have been used to monitor the distribution of injected air in the subsurface during an in situ air stripping waste remediation project at the Savannah River site in South Carolina. To remove the contaminant, in this case TCE's from a leaking sewer line, two horizontal wells were drilled at depths of 20 m and 52 m. Air was pumped into the lower well and a vacuum was applied to the upper well to extract the injected air. As the air passed through the subsurface, TCE's were dissolved into the gas and brought out the extraction well. Monitoring of the air injection by crosshole shear wave seismics is feasible due to the changes in soil saturation during injection resulting in a corresponding change in seismic velocities. Using a downhole shear-wave source and clamped downhole receiver, two sets of shear-wave data were taken. The first data were taken before the start of air injection, and the second taken during. The difference in travel times between the two data sets were tomographically inverted to obtain velocity differences. Velocity changes ranging up to 3% were mapped corresponding to saturation changes up to 24%. The distribution of these changes shows a desaturation around the position of the injection well with a plume extending in the direction of the extraction well. Layers with higher clay content show distinctively less change in saturation than the regions with higher sand content.

  12. Crosshole shear-wave seismic monitoring of an in situ air stripping waste remediation process

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.

    1992-02-01

    Crosshole shear-wave seismic surveys have been used to monitor the distribution of injected air in the subsurface during an in situ air stripping waste remediation project at the Savannah River site in South Carolina. To remove the contaminant, in this case TCE`s from a leaking sewer line, two horizontal wells were drilled at depths of 20 m and 52 m. Air was pumped into the lower well and a vacuum was applied to the upper well to extract the injected air. As the air passed through the subsurface, TCE`s were dissolved into the gas and brought out the extraction well. Monitoring of the air injection by crosshole shear wave seismics is feasible due to the changes in soil saturation during injection resulting in a corresponding change in seismic velocities. Using a downhole shear-wave source and clamped downhole receiver, two sets of shear-wave data were taken. The first data were taken before the start of air injection, and the second taken during. The difference in travel times between the two data sets were tomographically inverted to obtain velocity differences. Velocity changes ranging up to 3% were mapped corresponding to saturation changes up to 24%. The distribution of these changes shows a desaturation around the position of the injection well with a plume extending in the direction of the extraction well. Layers with higher clay content show distinctively less change in saturation than the regions with higher sand content.

  13. Long-range transport of air pollutants originating in China: A possible major cause of multi-day high-PM10 episodes during cold season in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hye-Ryun; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Jinwon; Chen, Deliang; Lee, Seungmin; Choi, Yong-Sang; Chang, Lim-Seok; Song, Chang-Keun

    2015-05-01

    Massive air pollutants originating in China and their trans-boundary transports are an international concern in East Asia. Despite its importance, details in the trans-boundary transport of air pollutants over East Asia and its impact on regional air quality remain to be clarified. This study presents an evidence which strong support that aerosols emitting in China play a major role in the occurrence of multi-day (≥4 days) severe air pollution episodes in cold seasons (October through March) for 2001-2013 in Seoul, Korea, where the concentration of PM10 (particulates with diameters ≤ 10 μm) exceeds 100 μg m-3. Observations show that these multi-day severe air pollution episodes occur when a strong high-pressure system resides over the eastern China-Korea region. In such weather conditions, air pollutants emitted in eastern China/southwestern Manchuria are trapped within the atmospheric boundary layer, and gradually spread into neighboring countries by weak lower tropospheric westerlies. Understanding of trans-boundary transports of air pollutants will advance the predictability of local air quality, and will encourage the development of international measures to improve air quality.

  14. Evolution of planetesimal velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Glen R.; Wetherill, George W.

    1987-01-01

    A self-consistent set of equations for the velocity evolution of a general planetesimal population is presented. The equations are given in a form convenient for calculations of the early stages of planetary accumulation when it is necessary to model the planetesimal swarm by methods of gas dynamics, rather than follow the orbital evolution of individual bodies. Steady state velocities of a simple planetesimal population consisting of two different sizes of bodies are calculated. Dynamical friction is found to be an important mechanism for transferring kinetic energy from the larger planetesimals to the smaller ones. When the small planetesimals are relatively abundant, gas drag and inelastic collisions among the smaller bodies are of comparable importance for dissipating energy from the population.

  15. Kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity climatologies from a chemistry climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinke Hoppe, Charlotte; Ploeger, Felix; Konopka, Paul; Müller, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The representation of vertical velocity in chemistry climate models is a key element for the representation of the large-scale Brewer-Dobson circulation in the stratosphere. Here, we diagnose and compare the kinematic and diabatic vertical velocities in the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The calculation of kinematic vertical velocity is based on the continuity equation, whereas diabatic vertical velocity is computed using diabatic heating rates. Annual and monthly zonal mean climatologies of vertical velocity from a 10-year simulation are provided for both kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity representations. In general, both vertical velocity patterns show the main features of the stratospheric circulation, namely, upwelling at low latitudes and downwelling at high latitudes. The main difference in the vertical velocity pattern is a more uniform structure for diabatic and a noisier structure for kinematic vertical velocity. Diabatic vertical velocities show higher absolute values both in the upwelling branch in the inner tropics and in the downwelling regions in the polar vortices. Further, there is a latitudinal shift of the tropical upwelling branch in boreal summer between the two vertical velocity representations with the tropical upwelling region in the diabatic representation shifted southward compared to the kinematic case. Furthermore, we present mean age of air climatologies from two transport schemes in EMAC using these different vertical velocities and analyze the impact of residual circulation and mixing processes on the age of air. The age of air distributions show a hemispheric difference pattern in the stratosphere with younger air in the Southern Hemisphere and older air in the Northern Hemisphere using the transport scheme with diabatic vertical velocities. Further, the age of air climatology from the transport scheme using diabatic vertical velocities shows a younger mean age of air in the

  16. Evolution of planetesimal velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, G. R.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1988-06-01

    A self-consistent set of equations for the velocity evolution of a general planetesimal population is presented. Dynamical friction is found to be an important mechanism for transferring kinetic energy from the larger planetesimals to the smaller ones, providing an energy source for the small planetesimals that is comparable to that provided by the viscous stirring process. When small planetesimals are relatively abundant, gas drag and inelastic collisions among the smaller bodies are of comparable importance for dissipating energy from the population.

  17. [Study on determination of plume velocity by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-hua; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Dou, Ke; Lin, Yi-hui

    2008-10-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure various trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source can obtain the continuous column density distribution of air pollutants (such as SO2 and NO2) by scanning the plume emitted from sources on a mobile platform, then with the plume velocity information the total emission value can be ultimately estimated. In practice it is hard to calculate the total emission because there is no efficient way to accurately get the plume velocity which is the most important parameter. Usually the wind speed near ground is used as the actual plume speed, which constitutes the greatest source of uncertainty in the passive DOAS measurements for the total emission calculation. A passive DOAS method for the determination of plume velocity of pollution source was studied in the present paper. Two passive DOAS systems were placed under the plume along the plume transmission direction to observed the scattered sunlight at one fixed sepasation angle, and then the plume velocity was derived from the time delay resulting from the plume moving a certain distance, and also the plume height needed in the plume velocity calculation was measured by the same two passive DOAS systems. Measurement of the plume emitted from a certain power plant was carried out by the two passive DOAS systems and the plume velocities of 3.6 and 5.4 m x s(-1) at two separate moments were derived. The comparison with the wind speed measured at the same time by the single theodolite wind observation method indicates that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to determine the plume velocity by monitoring the total emission from sources.

  18. [Study on determination of plume velocity by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-hua; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Dou, Ke; Lin, Yi-hui

    2008-10-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure various trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source can obtain the continuous column density distribution of air pollutants (such as SO2 and NO2) by scanning the plume emitted from sources on a mobile platform, then with the plume velocity information the total emission value can be ultimately estimated. In practice it is hard to calculate the total emission because there is no efficient way to accurately get the plume velocity which is the most important parameter. Usually the wind speed near ground is used as the actual plume speed, which constitutes the greatest source of uncertainty in the passive DOAS measurements for the total emission calculation. A passive DOAS method for the determination of plume velocity of pollution source was studied in the present paper. Two passive DOAS systems were placed under the plume along the plume transmission direction to observed the scattered sunlight at one fixed sepasation angle, and then the plume velocity was derived from the time delay resulting from the plume moving a certain distance, and also the plume height needed in the plume velocity calculation was measured by the same two passive DOAS systems. Measurement of the plume emitted from a certain power plant was carried out by the two passive DOAS systems and the plume velocities of 3.6 and 5.4 m x s(-1) at two separate moments were derived. The comparison with the wind speed measured at the same time by the single theodolite wind observation method indicates that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to determine the plume velocity by monitoring the total emission from sources. PMID:19123375

  19. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  20. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  1. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena. PMID:27581602

  2. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  3. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. )

    1991-06-01

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  4. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  5. Air stripping industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, B.; Shearouse, D.

    1994-09-01

    Industrial wastewater can be quickly, efficiently and economically treated using air strippers. Air stripping removes a range of volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from water. And the performance of various types and sizes of tray-type air stripper for treating contaminated water now is highly predictable because of laboratory studies. Air stripping can be a fast, efficient and economical approach to treating industrial wastewater. However, since every industrial wastewater stream is unique, each must be evaluated to determine its constituents, its potentially adverse effects on treatability, and any pretreatment steps necessary to ensure desired results. The general principles of air stripping are simple. In an air stripper, the surfaces area of a film of contaminated water is maximized while air is directed across it. Contaminants at the air/water interface volatilize and are discharged to the atmosphere or to an off-gas treatment system.

  6. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  7. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications. PMID:26849582

  8. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  9. Halo velocity bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Kehagias, Alex; Riotto, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    It has been recently shown that any halo velocity bias present in the initial conditions does not decay to unity, in agreement with predictions from peak theory. However, this is at odds with the standard formalism based on the coupled-fluids approximation for the coevolution of dark matter and halos. Starting from conservation laws in phase space, we discuss why the fluid momentum conservation equation for the biased tracers needs to be modified in accordance with the change advocated in Baldauf et al. Our findings indicate that a correct description of the halo properties should properly take into account peak constraints when starting from the Vlasov-Boltzmann equation.

  10. High velocity acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, R.

    1992-09-01

    Different types of aerodynamically generated noise of practical interest are examined using a novel, physically based, approach. A simple source model for turbulence noise is proposed. The prediction for turbulent mixing layer noise, produced by this model based on a simple monopole-type source mechanism, is that the radiated sound power varies as the eighth power of the relative velocity. The model is too simple to allow calculations to be carried further to the extent of determining the radiated sound power level, so that an empirical factor must still be considered, as in the case of Lighthill's formula.

  11. Effects of particle size and velocity on burial depth of airborne particles in glass fiber filters

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    Air sampling for particulate radioactive material involves collecting airborne particles on a filter and then determining the amount of radioactivity collected per unit volume of air drawn through the filter. The amount of radioactivity collected is frequently determined by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the particles collected on the filter. Counting losses caused by the particle becoming buried in the filter matrix may cause concentrations of airborne particulate radioactive materials to be underestimated by as much as 50%. Furthermore, the dose calculation for inhaled radionuclides will also be affected. The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which particle size and sampling velocity influence burial depth in glass-fiber filters. Aerosols of high-fired /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ were collected at various sampling velocities on glass-fiber filters. The fraction of alpha counts lost due to burial was determined as the ratio of activity detected by direct alpha count to the quantity determined by photon spectrometry. The results show that burial of airborne particles collected on glass-fiber filters appears to be a weak function of sampling velocity and particle size. Counting losses ranged from 0 to 25%. A correction that assumes losses of 10 to 15% would ensure that the concentration of airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides would not be underestimated when glass-fiber filters are used. 32 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  12. Relationships between energetic, stroke determinants, and velocity in butterfly.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, T M; Keskinen, K L; Fernandes, R; Colaço, P; Carmo, C; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the bioenergetical and the biomechanical variables (stroke parameters), through a range of swimming velocities, in butterfly stroke. Three male and one female butterflier of international level were submitted to an incremental set of 200-m butterfly swims. The starting velocity was 1.18 m . s (-1) for the males and 1.03 m . s (-1) for the female swimmer. Thereafter, the velocity was increased by 0.05 m . s (-1) after each swim until exhaustion. Cardio-pulmonary and gas exchange parameters were measured breath by breath for each swim to analyze oxygen consumption and other energetic parameters by portable metabolic cart (K4b (2), Cosmed, Rome, Italy). A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to measure pulmonary ventilation and to collect breathing air samples. Blood samples from the ear lobe were collected before and after each swim to analyze blood lactate concentration (YSI 1500 L, Yellow Springs, US). Total energy expenditure (E (tot)), energetic cost (EC), stroke frequency (SF), stroke length (SL), mean swimming velocity (V), and stroke index (SI) were calculated for each lap and average for each 200-m stage. Correlation coefficients between E (tot) and V, EC, and SF, as well as between EC and SI were statistically significant. For the relation between EC and SL, only one regression equation presented a correlation coefficient with statistical significance. Relations between SF and V, as well as between SI and V were significant in all of the swimmers. Only two individual regression equations presented statistically significant correlation coefficient values for the relation established between V and the SL. As a conclusion, the present sample of swims demonstrated large inter individual variations concerning the relationships between bioenergetic and biomechanical variables in butterfly stroke. Practitioners should be encouraged to analyze the

  13. Characterization of impact damage resistance of CF/PEEK and CF/toughened epoxy laminates under low and high velocity impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hideo; Adachi, Tadaharu; Tateishi, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    In order to use composite materials in aeronautical turbo engines, their resistance to impact damage must be understood. In this work the subperforation flat-wise impact resistance of three kinds of high resistance material systems were evaluated under low and high velocity impact tests. Tested systems were AS4/PEEK (APC-2/AS4, ICI-Fiberite), AS4/PEEK+IL, which consists of APC-2 prepreg and PEEK film inserted between layers as an interleave, and toughened epoxy system T800/{number_sign}3900 (Toray). To investigate the effects of stacking sequence on resistance, three lay-ups -- (0/+30/0/{minus}30)s, (0/+60/0/{minus}60)s, and (0/+45/90/{minus}45)s -- were tested. A drop weight system was used for the low velocity tests, where the velocity ranged from 1.5 to 3.1 m/s. An air gun system was used for the high velocity tests, where the velocity range was between 50 and 100 m/s. The relation between damage area (DA) and impact energy (IE) was linear, and the ratio of the DA/IE quantified the impact resistance of each specimen. The value of DA/IE for the high velocity tests was larger than the value for low velocity tests. To estimate the lay-up effect, a stacking parameter {beta}, which indicates the difference of the inplane stiffness between the adjacent laminae, was proposed. A proportional relation between the DA/IE and the {beta} was obtained. The value of (DA/IE)/{beta}, which was independent of stacking sequence, indicated the impact resistance of the tested material systems for both velocity levels. The ratio of (DA/IE)/{beta} for the high velocity to the value for the low velocity changed with material systems.

  14. Auditory Risk of Air Rifles

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, James E.; Meinke, Deanna K.; Flamme, Gregory A.; Finan, Donald S.; Stewart, Michael; Tasko, Stephen; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize the impulse noise exposure and auditory risk for air rifle users for both youth and adults. Design Acoustic characteristics were examined and the auditory risk estimates were evaluated using contemporary damage-risk criteria for unprotected adult listeners and the 120-dB peak limit and LAeq75 exposure limit suggested by the World Health Organization (1999) for children. Study sample Impulses were generated by 9 pellet air rifles and 1 BB air rifle. Results None of the air rifles generated peak levels that exceeded the 140 dB peak limit for adults and 8 (80%) exceeded the 120 dB peak SPL limit for youth. In general, for both adults and youth there is minimal auditory risk when shooting less than 100 unprotected shots with pellet air rifles. Air rifles with suppressors were less hazardous than those without suppressors and the pellet air rifles with higher velocities were generally more hazardous than those with lower velocities. Conclusion To minimize auditory risk, youth should utilize air rifles with an integrated suppressor and lower velocity ratings. Air rifle shooters are advised to wear hearing protection whenever engaging in shooting activities in order to gain self-efficacy and model appropriate hearing health behaviors necessary for recreational firearm use. PMID:26840923

  15. Air Sparging Decision Tool

    1996-06-10

    The Air Sparging Decision Tool is a computer decision aid to help environmental managers and field practitioners in evaluating the applicability of air sparging to a wide range of sites and for refining the operation of air sparging systems. The program provides tools for the practitioner to develop the conceptual design for an air sparging system suitable for the identified site. The Tool provides a model of the decision making process, not a detailed designmore » of air sparging systems. The Tool will quickly and cost effectively assist the practitioner in screening for applicability of the technology at a proposed site.« less

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  17. Finger velocities in the lifting Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiraj, Subrata K.; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2003-10-01

    Velocities of viscous fingers growing in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell are studied. The plates are separated by a pneumatic cylinder arrangement exerting a constant force. It is observed that with air invading a non-Newtonian oil-paint, finger velocities show an anomalous behaviour, with a rapid growth towards the end of the process. The correlation coefficient between neighbouring fingers shows the dominant modes selected as the pattern develops.

  18. Constraints on Shear Velocity in the Cratonic Upper Mantle From Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Dalton, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the prevailing notion of Precambrian continental lithosphere as a thick boundary layer (200-300 km), defined by a depleted composition and a steady-state conductively cooled temperature structure, has been challenged by several lines of seismological evidence. One, profiles of shear velocity with depth beneath cratons exhibit lower wave speed at shallow depths and higher wave speed at greater depths than can be explained by temperature alone. These profiles are also characterized by positive or flat velocity gradients with depth and anomalously high attenuation in the uppermost mantle, both of which are difficult to reconcile with the low temperatures and large thermal gradient expected with a thermal boundary layer. Two, body-wave receiver-function studies have detected a mid-lithospheric discontinuity that requires a large and abrupt velocity decrease with depth in cratonic regions that cannot be achieved by thermal gradients alone. Here, we used forward-modeling to identify the suite of shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves that primarily traversed cratons in North America, South America, Africa, and Australia. We considered two approaches; with the first, depth profiles of shear velocity were predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the crust and upper mantle. With the second approach, depth profiles of shear velocity were randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity was calculated from the Earth models and compared to the observed values. We show that it is very difficult to match the observations with an Earth model containing a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle; instead, the best-fit models contain a flat or positive velocity gradient with depth. We explore the implications of this result for the thermal and

  19. Influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters of spring-piston air guns.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    In firearm examiners' and forensic specialists' casework as well as in air gun proof testing, reliable measurement of the weapon's muzzle velocity is indispensable. While there are standardized and generally accepted procedures for testing the performance of air guns, the method of seating the diabolo pellets deeper into the breech of break barrel spring-piston air guns has not found its way into standardized test procedures. The influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters was investigated using ten different break barrel spring-piston air guns. Test shots were performed with the diabolo pellets seated 2 mm deeper into the breech using a pellet seater. The results were then compared to reference shots with conventionally loaded diabolo pellets. Projectile velocity was measured with a high-precision redundant ballistic speed measurement system. In eight out of ten weapons, the muzzle energy increased significantly when the pellet seater was used. The average increase in kinetic energy was 31 % (range 9-96 %). To conclude, seating the pellet even slightly deeper into the breech of spring-piston air guns might significantly alter the muzzle energy. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this effect is taken into account when accurate and reliable measurements of air gun muzzle velocity are necessary. PMID:27448569

  20. Influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters of spring-piston air guns.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    In firearm examiners' and forensic specialists' casework as well as in air gun proof testing, reliable measurement of the weapon's muzzle velocity is indispensable. While there are standardized and generally accepted procedures for testing the performance of air guns, the method of seating the diabolo pellets deeper into the breech of break barrel spring-piston air guns has not found its way into standardized test procedures. The influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters was investigated using ten different break barrel spring-piston air guns. Test shots were performed with the diabolo pellets seated 2 mm deeper into the breech using a pellet seater. The results were then compared to reference shots with conventionally loaded diabolo pellets. Projectile velocity was measured with a high-precision redundant ballistic speed measurement system. In eight out of ten weapons, the muzzle energy increased significantly when the pellet seater was used. The average increase in kinetic energy was 31 % (range 9-96 %). To conclude, seating the pellet even slightly deeper into the breech of spring-piston air guns might significantly alter the muzzle energy. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this effect is taken into account when accurate and reliable measurements of air gun muzzle velocity are necessary.

  1. The velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen - Evidence for high velocities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1993-01-01

    The Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory was used to obtain high-velocity and spatial resolution 2D spectra of H-alpha 6563-A emission in Comets Austin and Levy. The presence of the components expected from water dissociation and collisional thermalization in the inner coma is confirmed by the hydrogen velocity distribution. In Comet Austin, the potential high-velocity hydrogen includes velocities of up to about 40 km/s and is spatially symmetric with respect to the nucleus. In Comet Levy, the high-velocity hydrogen reaches velocities of up to 50 km/s and is situated exclusively on the sunward side of the nucleus. The two distinct signatures of high-velocity hydrogen imply two distinct sources.

  2. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... impractical, air flow of 2 mph or less will be allowed at 0 mph vehicle speed. (3) The fan air flow velocity vector perpendicular to the axial flow velocity vector shall be less than 10 percent of the mean velocity measured at fan speeds corresponding to vehicle speeds of 20 and 40 mph. (4)(i) Fan axial air flow...

  3. Velocity Distribution in the Boundary Layer of a Submerged Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M

    1930-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of the velocity distribution of the air in the velocity of a plate placed parallel to the air flow. The measurements took place in a small wind tunnel where the diameter of the entrance cone is 30 cm and the length of the free jet between the entrance and exit cones is about 2.5 m. The measurements were made in the free jet where the static pressure was constant, which was essential for the method of measurement used.

  4. Magnetic induction system for two-stage gun projectile velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R L; Konrad, C H

    1984-05-01

    A magnetic induction technique for measuring projectile velocities has been implemented on Sandia's two-stage light gas gun. The system has been designed to allow for projectile velocity measurements to an accuracy of approx. 0.2 percent. The velocity system has been successfully tested in a velocity range of 3.5 km/s to 6.5 km/s.

  5. Biogas Laminar Burning Velocity and Flammability Characteristics in Spark Ignited Premix Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Wardana, I. N. G.; Lawes, M.; Hughes, K. J.; Wahyudi, Slamet; Hamidi, Nurkholis; Hayakawa, Akihiro

    2013-04-01

    Spherically expanding flames propagating at constant pressure were employed to determine the laminar burning velocity and flammability characteristics of biogas-air mixtures in premixed combustion to uncover the fundamental flame propagation characteristics of a new alternative and renewable fuel. The results are compared with those from a methane-air flame. Biogas is a sustainable and renewable fuel that is produced in digestion facilities. The composition of biogas discussed in this paper consists of 66.4% methane, 30.6% carbon dioxide and 3% nitrogen. Burning velocity was measured at various equivalence ratios (phi) using a photographic technique in a high pressure fan-stirred bomb, the initial condition being at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The flame for methane-air mixtures propagates from phi=0.6 till phi=1.3. The flame at phi >= 1.4 does not propagate because the combustion reaction is quenched by the larger mass of fuel. At phi<=0.5, it does not propagate as well since the heat of reaction is insufficient to burn the mixtures. The flame for biogas-air mixtures propagates in a narrower range, that is from phi=0.6 to phi=1.2. Different from the methane flame, the biogas flame does not propagate at phi>=1.3 because the heat absorbed by inhibitors strengthens the quenching effect by the larger mass of fuel. As in the methane flame, the biogas flame at phi<=0.5 does not propagate. This shows that the effect of inhibitors in extremely lean mixtures is small. Compared to a methane-air mixture, the flammability characteristic (flammable region) of biogas becomes narrower in the presence of inhibitors (carbon dioxide and nitrogen) and the presence of inhibitors causes a reduction in the laminar burning velocity. The inhibitor gases work more effectively at rich mixtures because the rich biogas-air mixtures have a higher fraction of carbon dioxide and nitrogen components compared to the lean biogas-air mixtures.

  6. Density - Velocity Relationships in Explosive Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Positively buoyant volcanic plumes rise until the bulk density of the plume is equal to the density of the ambient atmosphere. As ambient air mixes with the plume, it lowers the plume bulk density; thus, the plume is diluted enough to reach neutral density in a naturally stratified atmospheric environment. We produced scaled plumes in analogue laboratory experiments by injecting a saline solution with a tracer dye into distilled water, using a high-pressure injection system. We recorded each eruption with a CASIO HD digital camera and used ImageJ's FeatureJ Edge toolbox to identify individual eddies. We used an optical flow software based off the ImageJ toolbox FlowJ to determine the velocities along the edge of each eddy. Eddy densities were calculated by mapping the dye concentration to the RGB digital color value. We overlaid the eddy velocities over the densities in order to track the behavioral relationship between the two variables with regard to plume motion. As an eddy's bulk density decreases, the vertical velocity decreases; this is a result of decreased mass, and therefore momentum, in the eddy. Furthermore as the density rate of change increases, the eddy deceleration increases. Eddies are most dense at their top and least dense at their bottom. The less dense sections of the eddies have lower vertical velocities than the sections of the eddies with the higher densities, relating to the expanding radial size of an eddy as it rises and the preferential ingestion of ambient air at the base of eddies. Thus the mixing rate in volcanic plumes fluctuates not only as a function of height as described by the classic 1D entrainment hypothesis, but also as a function of position in an eddy itself.

  7. Semiconductor structures for repeated velocity overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Capasso, F.; Thornber, K. K.

    1982-12-01

    The conditions required for obtaining repeated velocity overshoot in semiconductors are discussed. Two classes of structures that provide these conditions are considered. The structures are seen as holding promise for achieving average drift velocities well in excess of the maximum steady-state velocity over distances ranging from submicron to tens of microns. In structures of the first class, the stairstep in potential is achieved by using a graded bandgap that is similar to the avalanche photodetector described by Williams et al. (1982), where the composition is graded from GaAs to Al(0.2)Ga(0.8)As. The second class of structures uses alternating planar doped charge sheets, as described by Malik et al. (1980).

  8. Marine taxa track local climate velocities.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Malin L; Worm, Boris; Fogarty, Michael J; Sarmiento, Jorge L; Levin, Simon A

    2013-09-13

    Organisms are expected to adapt or move in response to climate change, but observed distribution shifts span a wide range of directions and rates. Explanations often emphasize biological distinctions among species, but general mechanisms have been elusive. We tested an alternative hypothesis: that differences in climate velocity-the rate and direction that climate shifts across the landscape-can explain observed species shifts. We compiled a database of coastal surveys around North America from 1968 to 2011, sampling 128 million individuals across 360 marine taxa. Climate velocity explained the magnitude and direction of shifts in latitude and depth much more effectively than did species characteristics. Our results demonstrate that marine species shift at different rates and directions because they closely track the complex mosaic of local climate velocities.

  9. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  10. Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schery, Stephen D., Wasiolek, Piotr; Rodgers, John

    1999-06-01

    Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

  11. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    DOEpatents

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  12. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  13. High velocity formability and factors affecting it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehra, Mala Seth

    High velocity forming methods successfully address problems faced in conventional forming techniques. They can be effectively used for forming metals with low formability like aluminum alloys and high strength steel. They can be instrumental is manufacturing of lighter vehicles with higher fuel efficiency. Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is an HVF method that is gaining wide acceptance due to its advantages and scope for commercialization. A number of experimental studies were carried out with EMF with the main goal of exploring fundamentals about material formability at high velocities, which can be used to establish practical design guidelines and to make models of high velocity formability. Thus the main factors that influence high velocity formability-inertia/size effects; changes in constitutive behavior; impact; and dynamic failure modes, were studied mainly with experiments. The role of changes in constitutive behavior in improving formability was studied from existing studies and new theoretical studies involving High velocity Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) and through solving an inverse problem of ring expansion. Tube free-expansion experiments were carried out to demonstrate enhanced metal formability even in the absence of die impact. To further establish the significance of inertia, electromagnetic ring free-expansion experiments with rings of different aspect ratios were carried out. A higher aspect ratio sample had better formability in terms of uniform and total elongation and also had fewer necks than a low aspect ratio (more slender) ring at the same velocity. The results clearly demonstrated the influence of sample aspect ratio (dimensions) and hence inertia on high velocity formability. Die impact experiments were carried out with tubes and rings to show the beneficial influence of die arrest of a moving sample. It was revealed that die impact in an appropriate range of velocities can significantly suppress failure and reduce the number of tears and

  14. Velocity dependence of serpentinite friction promotes aseismic slip on faults

    SciTech Connect

    Reinen, L.A.; Weeks, J.D.; Tullis, T.E. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Serpentinite is common on many crustal faults and it has been suggested that the presence of serpentine on these faults may promote aseismic slip. Consequently, the authors have experimentally measured the frictional constitutive response of both antigorite and lizardite polymorphs of serpentine to step changes in velocity. This was done at room temperature in rotary direct shear; normal stress was 25 MPa, and velocities ranged from 32 mm/yr to 3.2 [times] 10[sup 5] mm/yr. The frictional behavior of both serpentine polymorphs indicates that the presence of either one on a fault would result in aseismic creep in the shallow crust at typical plate motion rates. In contrast to other rock types, such as granite, both serpentinites display velocity-strengthening behavior at slow sliding velocities: below some transitional velocity, the frictional resistance increases with velocity, thus promoting stable aseismic slip. At faster velocities, however, frictional strength has a negative dependence on velocity (velocity weakening), which provides the potential for unstable sliding, leading to earthquakes. The coefficient of friction of the antigorite serpentinite is similar to that of other silicates, while that of the lizardite is much lower. The low frictional strength of lizardite may help explain some geologic observations that serpentine appears quite mobile during deformation in the crust. However, it is the velocity-strengthening behavior observed in both serpentinites at low sliding velocities, and not the frictional strength, that will promote aseismic slip on serpentine-bearing faults at typical rates of plate motion.

  15. Oxygen intake in track and treadmill running with observations on the effect of air resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, L. G. C. E.

    1970-01-01

    1. The relation of V̇O2 and speed was measured on seven athletes running on a cinder track and an all-weather track. The results were compared with similar observations on four athletes running on a treadmill. 2. In treadmill running the relation was linear and the zero intercept coincided with resting V̇O2. 3. In track running the relation was curvilinear, but was adequately represented by a linear regression over a range of speeds extending from 8·0 km/hr (2·2 m/sec) to 21·5 km/hr (6·0 m/sec). The slope of this line was substantially steeper than the regression line slope for treadmill running. 4. The influence of air resistance in running was estimated from measurements of V̇O2 on a subject running on a treadmill at constant speed against wind of varying velocity. 5. The extra O2 intake (ΔV̇O2) associated with wind increased as the square of wind velocity. If wind velocity and running velocity are equal, as in running on a track in calm air, ΔV̇O2 will increase as the cube of velocity. 6. It was estimated that the energy cost of overcoming air resistance in track running is about 8% of total energy cost at 21·5 km/hr (5000 m races) and 16% for sprinting 100 m in 10·0 sec. ImagesFig. 4 PMID:5532903

  16. Oxygen intake in track and treadmill running with observations on the effect of air resistance.

    PubMed

    Pugh, L G

    1970-05-01

    1. The relation of V(O2) and speed was measured on seven athletes running on a cinder track and an all-weather track. The results were compared with similar observations on four athletes running on a treadmill.2. In treadmill running the relation was linear and the zero intercept coincided with resting V(O2).3. In track running the relation was curvilinear, but was adequately represented by a linear regression over a range of speeds extending from 8.0 km/hr (2.2 m/sec) to 21.5 km/hr (6.0 m/sec). The slope of this line was substantially steeper than the regression line slope for treadmill running.4. The influence of air resistance in running was estimated from measurements of V(O2) on a subject running on a treadmill at constant speed against wind of varying velocity.5. The extra O(2) intake (DeltaV(O2)) associated with wind increased as the square of wind velocity. If wind velocity and running velocity are equal, as in running on a track in calm air, DeltaV(O2) will increase as the cube of velocity.6. It was estimated that the energy cost of overcoming air resistance in track running is about 8% of total energy cost at 21.5 km/hr (5000 m races) and 16% for sprinting 100 m in 10.0 sec.

  17. Next Generation Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development is evaluating and developing a rang...

  18. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  19. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  20. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.